WorldWideScience

Sample records for neural associative retriever

  1. Neural activations associated with feedback and retrieval success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Andersson, Micael; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2017-11-01

    There is substantial behavioral evidence for a phenomenon commonly called "the testing effect", i.e. superior memory performance after repeated testing compared to re-study of to-be-learned materials. However, considerably less is known about the underlying neuro-cognitive processes that are involved in the initial testing phase, and thus underlies the actual testing effect. Here, we investigated functional brain activity related to test-enhanced learning with feedback. Subjects learned foreign vocabulary across three consecutive tests with correct-answer feedback. Functional brain-activity responses were analyzed in relation to retrieval and feedback events, respectively. Results revealed up-regulated activity in fronto-striatal regions during the first successful retrieval, followed by a marked reduction in activity as a function of improved learning. Whereas feedback improved behavioral performance across consecutive tests, feedback had a negligable role after the first successful retrieval for functional brain-activity modulations. It is suggested that the beneficial effects of test-enhanced learning is regulated by feedback-induced updating of memory representations, mediated via the striatum, that might underlie the stabilization of memory commonly seen in behavioral studies of the testing effect.

  2. CONVERTING RETRIEVED SPOKEN DOCUMENTS INTO TEXT USING AN AUTO ASSOCIATIVE NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. SANGEETHA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper frames a novel methodology for spoken document information retrieval to the spontaneous speech corpora and converting the retrieved document into the corresponding language text. The proposed work involves the three major areas namely spoken keyword detection, spoken document retrieval and automatic speech recognition. The keyword spotting is concerned with the exploit of the distribution capturing capability of the Auto Associative Neural Network (AANN for spoken keyword detection. It involves sliding a frame-based keyword template along the audio documents and by means of confidence score acquired from the normalized squared error of AANN to search for a match. This work benevolences a new spoken keyword spotting algorithm. Based on the match the spoken documents are retrieved and clustered together. In speech recognition step, the retrieved documents are converted into the corresponding language text using the AANN classifier. The experiments are conducted using the Dravidian language database and the results recommend that the proposed method is promising for retrieving the relevant documents of a spoken query as a key and transform it into the corresponding language.

  3. Neural correlates of relational memory: Successful encoding and retrieval of semantic and perceptual associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, S.E.; Daselaar, S.M.; Cabeza, R.

    2005-01-01

    Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified brain regions involved in successful relational memory (RM) during encoding and retrieval for semantic and perceptual associations or in general, independent of phase and content. Participants were scanned while encoding and

  4. Neural correlates of relational memory: successful encoding and retrieval of semantic and perceptual associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prince, S.E.; Daselaar, S.M.; Cabeza, R.

    2005-01-01

    Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified brain regions involved in successful relational memory (RM) during encoding and retrieval for semantic and perceptual associations or in general, independent of phase and content. Participants were scanned while encoding and

  5. Neural Network Model of memory retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eRecanatesi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human memory can store large amount of information. Nevertheless, recalling is often achallenging task. In a classical free recall paradigm, where participants are asked to repeat abriefly presented list of words, people make mistakes for lists as short as 5 words. We present amodel for memory retrieval based on a Hopfield neural network where transition between itemsare determined by similarities in their long-term memory representations. Meanfield analysis ofthe model reveals stable states of the network corresponding (1 to single memory representationsand (2 intersection between memory representations. We show that oscillating feedback inhibitionin the presence of noise induces transitions between these states triggering the retrieval ofdifferent memories. The network dynamics qualitatively predicts the distribution of time intervalsrequired to recall new memory items observed in experiments. It shows that items having largernumber of neurons in their representation are statistically easier to recall and reveals possiblebottlenecks in our ability of retrieving memories. Overall, we propose a neural network model ofinformation retrieval broadly compatible with experimental observations and is consistent with ourrecent graphical model (Romani et al., 2013.

  6. Neural markers of inhibition in human memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimber, Maria; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz; Bergström, Zara; Markopoulos, Gerasimos; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2008-12-10

    Retrieving particular information from memory facilitates the later retrieval of that information, but also impairs the later retrieval of related, interfering information. It has been theorized that this retrieval-induced forgetting reflects inhibition of interfering memory representations. We used event-related fMRI to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of this impaired retrieval, at the time the impairment is observed. Neural activity differences between impaired and facilitated information occurred in left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC, BA 45 and 47), precuneus (BA 7), and right inferior parietal lobule (IPL, BA 40). Activity in left anterior VLPFC (BA 47) and left posterior temporal cortex (BA 22), regions implicated in the controlled retrieval of weak semantic memory representations, predicted the degree of retrieval-induced forgetting. In contrast, activity in precuneus and right IPL predicted the degree of retrieval-induced facilitation. Our findings demonstrate that impairment of interfering memories and facilitation of practiced memories involve distinct neural processes, and suggest that the impairment reflects inhibition that weakens interfering memory representations.

  7. Issues in the use of neural networks in information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Iatan, Iuliana F

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the ability of neural networks (NNs) to be excellent pattern matchers and their importance in information retrieval (IR), which is based on index term matching. The book defines a new NN-based method for learning image similarity and describes how to use fuzzy Gaussian neural networks to predict personality. It introduces the fuzzy Clifford Gaussian network, and two concurrent neural models: (1) concurrent fuzzy nonlinear perceptron modules, and (2) concurrent fuzzy Gaussian neural network modules. Furthermore, it explains the design of a new model of fuzzy nonlinear perceptron based on alpha level sets and describes a recurrent fuzzy neural network model with a learning algorithm based on the improved particle swarm optimization method.

  8. Comparison of the neural correlates of retrieval success in tests of cued recall and recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kayoko; Vilberg, Kaia L; Rugg, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    The neural correlates of successful retrieval on tests of word stem recall and recognition memory were compared. In the recall test, subjects viewed word stems, half of which were associated with studied items and half with unstudied items, and for each stem attempted to recall a corresponding study word. In the recognition test, old/new judgments were made on old and new words. The neural correlates of successful retrieval were identified by contrasting activity elicited by correctly endorsed test items. Old > new effects common to the two tasks were found in medial and lateral parietal and right entorhinal cortex. Common new > old effects were identified in medial and left frontal cortex, and left anterior intra-parietal sulcus. Greater old > new effects were evident for cued recall in inferior parietal regions abutting those demonstrating common effects, whereas larger new > old effects were found for recall in left frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate. New > old effects were also found for the recall task in right lateral anterior prefrontal cortex, where they were accompanied by old > new effects during recognition. It is concluded that successful recall and recognition are associated with enhanced activity in a common set of recollection-sensitive parietal regions, and that the greater activation in these regions during recall reflects the greater dependence of that task on recollection. Larger new > old effects during recall are interpreted as reflections of the greater opportunity for iterative retrieval attempts when retrieval cues are partial rather than copy cues. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Comparison of the neural correlates of retrieval success in tests of cued recall and recognition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kayoko; Vilberg, Kaia L.; Rugg, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The neural correlates of successful retrieval on tests of word stem recall and recognition memory were compared. In the recall test, subjects viewed word stems, half of which were associated with studied items and half with unstudied items, and for each stem attempted to recall a corresponding study word. In the recognition test, old/new judgments were made on old and new words. The neural correlates of successful retrieval were identified by contrasting activity elicited by correctly endorsed test items. Old > new effects common to the two tasks were found in medial and lateral parietal, and right entorhinal cortex. Common new > old effects were identified in medial and left frontal cortex, and left anterior intra-parietal sulcus. Greater old > new effects were evident for cued recall in inferior parietal regions abutting those demonstrating common effects, whereas larger new > old effects were found for recall in left frontal cortex and the anterior cingulate. New > old effects were also found for the recall task in right lateral anterior prefrontal cortex, where they were accompanied by old > new effects during recognition. It is concluded that successful recall and recognition are associated with enhanced activity in a common set of recollection-sensitive parietal regions, and that the greater activation in these regions during recall reflects the greater dependence of that task on recollection. Larger new > old effects during recall are interpreted as reflections of the greater opportunity for iterative retrieval attempts when retrieval cues are partial rather than copy cues. PMID:21455941

  10. Neural mechanism of lmplicit and explicit memory retrieval: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Park, Tae Jin; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Hyung Joong; Eun, Sung Jong; Chung, Tae Woong [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To identify, using functional MR imaging, distinct cerebral centers and to evaluate the neural mechanism associated with implicit and explicit retrieval of words during conceptual processing. Seven healthy volunteers aged 21-25 (mean, 22) years underwent BOLD-based fMR imaging using a 1.5T signa horizon echospeed MR system. To activate the cerebral cortices, a series of tasks was performed as follows: the encoding of two-syllable words, and implicit and explicit retrieval of previously learned words during conceptual processing. The activation paradigm consisted of a cycle of alternating periods of 30 seconds of stimulation and 30 seconds of rest. Stimulation was accomplished by encoding eight two-syllable words and the retrieval of previously presented words, while the control condition was a white screen with a small fixed cross. During the tasks we acquired ten slices (6 mm slice thickness, 1 mm gap) parallel to the AC-PC line, and the resulting functional activation maps were reconstructed using a statistical parametric mapping program (SPM99). A comparison of activation ratios (percentages), based on the number of volunteers, showed that activation of Rhs-35, PoCiG-23 and ICiG-26{center_dot}30 was associated with explicit retrieval only; other brain areas were activated during the performance of both implicit and explicit retrieval tasks. Activation ratios were higher for explicit tasks than for implicit; in the cingulate gyrus and temporal lobe they were 30% and 10% greater, respectively. During explicit retrieval, a distinct brain activation index (percentage) was seen in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobe and cingulate gyrus, and PrCeG-4, Pr/ PoCeG-43 in the frontal lobe. During implicit retrieval, on the other hand, activity was greater in the frontal lobe, including the areas of SCA-25, SFG/MFG-10, IFG-44{center_dot}45, OrbG-11{center_dot}47, SFG-6{center_dot}8 and MFG-9{center_dot}46. Overall, activation was lateralized mainly in the left

  11. Semantic association ranking schemes for information retrieval ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the Information Retrieval (IR) techniques are based on representing the documents using the traditional vector space and probabilistic language model i.e., bag-of- words model. In this paper, associations among words in the documents are assessed and it is expressed in Term Association Graph model to represent ...

  12. Framing memories: How the retrieval query format shapes the neural bases of remembering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Ana; Frade, Sofia; Alves, Mara

    2016-08-01

    The way memory questions are framed influences the information that is searched, retrieved, and monitored during remembering. This fMRI study aimed at clarifying how the format of the retrieval query shapes the neural basis of source recollection. During encoding, participants made semantic (pleasantness) or perceptual (number of letters) judgments about words. Subsequently, in a source memory test, the retrieval query was manipulated such that for half of the items from each encoding task, the retrieval query emphasized the semantic source (i.e., semantic query format: "Is this word from the pleasantness task?"), whereas for the other half the retrieval query emphasized the alternate, perceptual source (i.e., perceptual query format: "Is this word from the letter task?"). The results showed that the semantic query format was associated with higher source recognition than the perceptual query format. This behavioral advantage was accompanied by increased activation in several regions associated to controlled semantic elaboration and monitoring of internally-generated features about the past event. In particular, for items semantically encoded, the semantic query, relative to the perceptual query, induced activation in medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampal, parahippocampal and middle temporal cortex. Conversely, for items perceptually encoded, the semantic query recruited the lateral PFC and occipital-fusiform areas. Interestingly, the semantic format also influenced the processing of new items, eliciting greater L lateral and medial PFC activation. In contrast, the perceptual query format (versus the semantic format) only prompted greater activation in R orbitofrontal cortex and the R inferior parietal lobe, for items encoded in a perceptual manner and for new items, respectively. The results highlight the role of the retrieval query format in source remembering, showing that the retrieval query that emphasizes the semantic source promotes the use of semantic

  13. Prior perceptual processing enhances the effect of emotional arousal on the neural correlates of memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Ilana T Z; Ritchey, Maureen; LaBar, Kevin S; Cabeza, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    A fundamental idea in memory research is that items are more likely to be remembered if encoded with a semantic, rather than perceptual, processing strategy. Interestingly, this effect has been shown to reverse for emotionally arousing materials, such that perceptual processing enhances memory for emotional information or events. The current fMRI study investigated the neural mechanisms of this effect by testing how neural activations during emotional memory retrieval are influenced by the prior encoding strategy. Participants incidentally encoded emotional and neutral pictures under instructions to attend to either semantic or perceptual properties of each picture. Recognition memory was tested 2 days later. fMRI analyses yielded three main findings. First, right amygdalar activity associated with emotional memory strength was enhanced by prior perceptual processing. Second, prior perceptual processing of emotional pictures produced a stronger effect on recollection- than familiarity-related activations in the right amygdala and left hippocampus. Finally, prior perceptual processing enhanced amygdalar connectivity with regions strongly associated with retrieval success, including hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, visual cortex, and ventral parietal cortex. Taken together, the results specify how encoding orientations yield alterations in brain systems that retrieve emotional memories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Content-based retrieval using MPEG-7 visual descriptor and hippocampal neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ho; Joung, Lyang-Jae; Kang, Dae-Seong

    2005-12-01

    As development of digital technology, many kinds of multimedia data are used variously and requirements for effective use by user are increasing. In order to transfer information fast and precisely what user wants, effective retrieval method is required. As existing multimedia data are impossible to apply the MPEG-1, MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 technologies which are aimed at compression, store and transmission. So MPEG-7 is introduced as a new technology for effective management and retrieval for multimedia data. In this paper, we extract content-based features using color descriptor among the MPEG-7 standardization visual descriptor, and reduce feature data applying PCA(Principal Components Analysis) technique. We remodel the cerebral cortex and hippocampal neural networks as a principle of a human's brain and it can label the features of the image-data which are inputted according to the order of hippocampal neuron structure to reaction-pattern according to the adjustment of a good impression in Dentate gyrus region and remove the noise through the auto-associate- memory step in the CA3 region. In the CA1 region receiving the information of the CA3, it can make long-term or short-term memory learned by neuron. Hippocampal neural network makes neuron of the neural network separate and combine dynamically, expand the neuron attaching additional information using the synapse and add new features according to the situation by user's demand. When user is querying, it compares feature value stored in long-term memory first and it learns feature vector fast and construct optimized feature. So the speed of index and retrieval is fast. Also, it uses MPEG-7 standard visual descriptors as content-based feature value, it improves retrieval efficiency.

  15. Toward Content Based Image Retrieval with Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Judah E S; Plassard, Andrew J; Fabbri, Daniel; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-19

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers the potential to identify similar case histories, understand rare disorders, and eventually, improve patient care. Recent advances in database capacity, algorithm efficiency, and deep Convolutional Neural Networks (dCNN), a machine learning technique, have enabled great CBIR success for general photographic images. Here, we investigate applying the leading ImageNet CBIR technique to clinically acquired medical images captured by the Vanderbilt Medical Center. Briefly, we (1) constructed a dCNN with four hidden layers, reducing dimensionality of an input scaled to 128×128 to an output encoded layer of 4×384, (2) trained the network using back-propagation 1 million random magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, (3) labeled an independent set of 2100 images, and (4) evaluated classifiers on the projection of the labeled images into manifold space. Quantitative results were disappointing (averaging a true positive rate of only 20%); however, the data suggest that improvements would be possible with more evenly distributed sampling across labels and potential re-grouping of label structures. This prelimainry effort at automated classification of medical images with ImageNet is promising, but shows that more work is needed beyond direct adaptation of existing techniques.

  16. Image retrieval method based on metric learning for convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieyuan; Qian, Ying; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Biao

    2017-09-01

    At present, the research of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) focuses on learning effective feature for the representations of origin images and similarity measures. The retrieval accuracy and efficiency are crucial to a CBIR. With the rise of deep learning, convolutional network is applied in the domain of image retrieval and achieved remarkable results, but the image visual feature extraction of convolutional neural network exist high dimension problems, this problem makes the image retrieval and speed ineffective. This paper uses the metric learning for the image visual features extracted from the convolutional neural network, decreased the feature redundancy, improved the retrieval performance. The work in this paper is also a necessary part for further implementation of feature hashing to the approximate-nearest-neighbor (ANN) retrieval method.

  17. Neural correlates of durable memories across the adult lifespan: brain activity at encoding and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Piñeiro, Didac; Sneve, Markus H; Storsve, Andreas B; Roe, James M; Walhovd, Kristine B; Fjell, Anders M

    2017-12-01

    Age-related effects on brain activity during encoding and retrieval of episodic memories are well documented. However, research typically tests memory only once, shortly after encoding. Retaining information over extended periods is critical, and there are reasons to expect age-related effects on the neural correlates of durable memories. Here, we tested whether age was associated with the activity elicited by durable memories. One hundred forty-three participants (22-78 years) underwent an episodic memory experiment where item-context relationships were encoded and tested twice. Participants were scanned during encoding and the first test. Memories retained after 90 minutes but later forgotten were classified as transient, whereas memories retained after 5 weeks were classified as durable. Durable memories were associated with greater encoding activity in inferior lateral parietal and posteromedial regions and greater retrieval activity in frontal and insular regions. Older adults exhibited lower posteromedial activity during encoding and higher frontal activity during retrieval, possibly reflecting greater involvement of control processes. This demonstrates that long-lasting memories are supported by specific patterns of cortical activity that are related to age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-related changes in neural oscillations supporting context memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Jonathan; James, Taylor; Arndt, Jason; Duarte, Audrey

    2017-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that directing attention toward single item-context associations during encoding improves young and older adults' context memory performance and reduces demands on executive functions during retrieval. In everyday situations, there are many event features competing for our attention, and our ability to successfully recover those details may depend on our ability to ignore others. Failures of selective attention may contribute to older adults' context memory impairments. In the current electroencephalogram (EEG) study, we assessed the effects of age on processes supporting successful context memory retrieval of selectively attended features as indexed by neural oscillations. During encoding, young and older adults were directed to attend to a picture of an object and its relationship to one of two concurrently presented contextual details: a color or scene. At retrieval, we tested their memory for the object, its attended and unattended context features, and their confidence for both the attended and unattended features. Both groups showed greater memory for attended than unattended contextual features. However, older adults showed evidence of hyper-binding between attended and unattended context features while the young adults did not. EEG results in the theta band suggest that young and older adults recollect similar amounts of information but brain-behavior correlations suggest that this information was supportive of contextual memory performance, particularly for young adults. By contrast, sustained beta desynchronization, indicative of sensory reactivation and episodic reconstruction, was correlated with contextual memory performance for older adults only. We conclude that older adults' inhibition deficits during encoding reduced the selectivity of their contextual memories, which led to reliance on executive functions like episodic reconstruction to support successful memory retrieval. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Combined neural network/Phillips-Tikhonov approach to aerosol retrievals over land from the NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Noia, Antonio; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Wu, Lianghai; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Cairns, Brian; Yorks, John E.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, an algorithm for the retrieval of aerosol and land surface properties from airborne spectropolarimetric measurements - combining neural networks and an iterative scheme based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization - is described. The algorithm - which is an extension of a scheme previously designed for ground-based retrievals - is applied to measurements from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. A neural network, trained on a large data set of synthetic measurements, is applied to perform aerosol retrievals from real RSP data, and the neural network retrievals are subsequently used as a first guess for the Phillips-Tikhonov retrieval. The resulting algorithm appears capable of accurately retrieving aerosol optical thickness, fine-mode effective radius and aerosol layer height from RSP data. Among the advantages of using a neural network as initial guess for an iterative algorithm are a decrease in processing time and an increase in the number of converging retrievals.

  20. SiNC: Saliency-injected neural codes for representation and efficient retrieval of medical radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamil; Sajjad, Muhammad; Mehmood, Irfan; Baik, Sung Wook

    2017-01-01

    Medical image collections contain a wealth of information which can assist radiologists and medical experts in diagnosis and disease detection for making well-informed decisions. However, this objective can only be realized if efficient access is provided to semantically relevant cases from the ever-growing medical image repositories. In this paper, we present an efficient method for representing medical images by incorporating visual saliency and deep features obtained from a fine-tuned convolutional neural network (CNN) pre-trained on natural images. Saliency detector is employed to automatically identify regions of interest like tumors, fractures, and calcified spots in images prior to feature extraction. Neuronal activation features termed as neural codes from different CNN layers are comprehensively studied to identify most appropriate features for representing radiographs. This study revealed that neural codes from the last fully connected layer of the fine-tuned CNN are found to be the most suitable for representing medical images. The neural codes extracted from the entire image and salient part of the image are fused to obtain the saliency-injected neural codes (SiNC) descriptor which is used for indexing and retrieval. Finally, locality sensitive hashing techniques are applied on the SiNC descriptor to acquire short binary codes for allowing efficient retrieval in large scale image collections. Comprehensive experimental evaluations on the radiology images dataset reveal that the proposed framework achieves high retrieval accuracy and efficiency for scalable image retrieval applications and compares favorably with existing approaches.

  1. SiNC: Saliency-injected neural codes for representation and efficient retrieval of medical radiographs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Ahmad

    Full Text Available Medical image collections contain a wealth of information which can assist radiologists and medical experts in diagnosis and disease detection for making well-informed decisions. However, this objective can only be realized if efficient access is provided to semantically relevant cases from the ever-growing medical image repositories. In this paper, we present an efficient method for representing medical images by incorporating visual saliency and deep features obtained from a fine-tuned convolutional neural network (CNN pre-trained on natural images. Saliency detector is employed to automatically identify regions of interest like tumors, fractures, and calcified spots in images prior to feature extraction. Neuronal activation features termed as neural codes from different CNN layers are comprehensively studied to identify most appropriate features for representing radiographs. This study revealed that neural codes from the last fully connected layer of the fine-tuned CNN are found to be the most suitable for representing medical images. The neural codes extracted from the entire image and salient part of the image are fused to obtain the saliency-injected neural codes (SiNC descriptor which is used for indexing and retrieval. Finally, locality sensitive hashing techniques are applied on the SiNC descriptor to acquire short binary codes for allowing efficient retrieval in large scale image collections. Comprehensive experimental evaluations on the radiology images dataset reveal that the proposed framework achieves high retrieval accuracy and efficiency for scalable image retrieval applications and compares favorably with existing approaches.

  2. Strategy over operation: neural activation in subtraction and multiplication during fact retrieval and procedural strategy use in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polspoel, Brecht; Peters, Lien; Vandermosten, Maaike; De Smedt, Bert

    2017-09-01

    Arithmetic development is characterized by strategy shifts between procedural strategy use and fact retrieval. This study is the first to explicitly investigate children's neural activation associated with the use of these different strategies. Participants were 26 typically developing 4th graders (9- to 10-year-olds), who, in a behavioral session, were asked to verbally report on a trial-by-trial basis how they had solved 100 subtraction and multiplication items. These items were subsequently presented during functional magnetic resonance imaging. An event-related design allowed us to analyze the brain responses during retrieval and procedural trials, based on the children's verbal reports. During procedural strategy use, and more specifically for the decomposition of operands strategy, activation increases were observed in the inferior and superior parietal lobes (intraparietal sulci), inferior to superior frontal gyri, bilateral areas in the occipital lobe, and insular cortex. For retrieval, in comparison to procedural strategy use, we observed increased activity in the bilateral angular and supramarginal gyri, left middle to inferior temporal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, and superior medial frontal gyrus. No neural differences were found between the two operations under study. These results are the first in children to provide direct evidence for alternate neural activation when different arithmetic strategies are used and further unravel that previously found effects of operation on brain activity reflect differences in arithmetic strategy use. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4657-4670, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Research on image retrieval using deep convolutional neural network combining L1 regularization and PRelu activation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    QingJie, Wei; WenBin, Wang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the image retrieval using deep convolutional neural network combined with regularization and PRelu activation function is studied, and improves image retrieval accuracy. Deep convolutional neural network can not only simulate the process of human brain to receive and transmit information, but also contains a convolution operation, which is very suitable for processing images. Using deep convolutional neural network is better than direct extraction of image visual features for image retrieval. However, the structure of deep convolutional neural network is complex, and it is easy to over-fitting and reduces the accuracy of image retrieval. In this paper, we combine L1 regularization and PRelu activation function to construct a deep convolutional neural network to prevent over-fitting of the network and improve the accuracy of image retrieval

  4. Utilizing Neural Networks in the Retrieval of Jovian Constituent Profiles Using Data from the Juno MWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, Amadeo; Steffes, Paul G.

    2017-10-01

    The Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR) has six channels ranging from 1.36-50 cm and has the ability to peer deep into the Jovian atmosphere. A minimization algorithm utilizing surrogate models has been developed and implemented to perform retrievals for Jovian constituent profiles using Juno MWR data. An artifical neural network algorithm is used as the surrogate for the Juno Atmospheric Microwave Radiative Transfer (JAMRT) model in this minimization. The neural network is trained by simulating emissions at the six wavelengths computed using JAMRT. By exploiting the speed of this surrogate model, retrievals for Jovian constituents profiles, such as ammonia and water vapor, can be rapidly and accurately performed. Retrieved abundance profiles for the first six perijoves during which the Juno MWR was operational will be presented.This work was supported by NASA Contract NNM06AA75C from the Marshall Space Flight Center supporting the Juno Mission Science team, under Subcontract 699054X from the Southwest Research Institute.

  5. Combined Ozone Retrieval From METOP Sensors Using META-Training Of Deep Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Martin; Sehnke, Frank; Kaifel, Anton

    2013-12-01

    The newest installment of our well-proven Neural Net- work Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) combines the METOP sensors GOME-2 and IASI with cloud information from AVHRR. Through the use of advanced meta- learning techniques like automatic feature selection and automatic architecture search applied to a set of deep neural networks, having at least two or three hidden layers, we have been able to avoid many technical issues normally encountered during the construction of such a joint retrieval system. This has been made possible by harnessing the processing power of modern consumer graphics cards with high performance graphic processors (GPU), which decreases training times by about two orders of magnitude. The system was trained on data from 2009 and 2010, including target ozone profiles from ozone sondes, ACE- FTS and MLS-AURA. To make maximum use of tropospheric information in the spectra, the data were partitioned into several sets of different cloud fraction ranges with the GOME-2 FOV, on which specialized retrieval networks are being trained. For the final ozone retrieval processing the different specialized networks are combined. The resulting retrieval system is very stable and does not show any systematic dependence on solar zenith angle, scan angle or sensor degradation. We present several sensitivity studies with regard to cloud fraction and target sensor type, as well as the performance in several latitude bands and with respect to independent validation stations. A visual cross-comparison against high-resolution ozone profiles from the KNMI EUMETSAT Ozone SAF product has also been performed and shows some distinctive features which we will briefly discuss. Overall, we demonstrate that a complex retrieval system can now be constructed with a minimum of ma- chine learning knowledge, using automated algorithms for many design decisions previously requiring expert knowledge. Provided sufficient training data and computation power of GPUs is available, the

  6. Multimode Retrieval of Mammography Based on Association Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LV Ya-na

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mammogram case has images of low level features and semantic features. In order to achieve efficient retrieval of breast imaging cases,and enhance the certainty of computer aided diagnosis,a multi-mode retrieval method based on association rules is proposed in this paper. First of all,feature selection algorithm based on the association rules can be used to select the low level features associated with image semantic features,to achieve the dimension reduction. The associative rules which between the selected features and the semantic features can be excavated by using the Apriori algorithm .And then,the associative classifier engine will be used to build the associative classification model depend on the associative rules to capture the visual semantic features. Finally,take obtained semantic from the association classification as input semantic,combining with the low level features of image,to implement the mammogram case multi-mode retrieval. We conducted experiments comparing by precision and recall rate and relevance ranking average value and so nn as the results show,multi一mode retrieval method proposed by this paper and provide visual semantic features of can effectively improve the performance of breast imaging case retrieval image by its low-level features. Multi-mode retrieval reduced the semantic gap between image low level features and visual semantic features,improved the accuracy of image retrieval and provided more meaningful decision support for doctors.

  7. Neural networks supporting autobiographical memory retrieval in post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Peggy L.; Kragel, Philip A.; Rubin, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects the functional recruitment and connectivity between neural regions during autobiographical memory (AM) retrieval that overlap with default and control networks. Whether such univariate changes relate to potential differences in the contribution of large-scale neural networks supporting cognition in PTSD is unknown. In the current functional MRI (fMRI) study we employ independent component analysis to examine the influence the engagement of neural networks during the recall of personal memories in PTSD (15 participants) compared to non-trauma exposed, healthy controls (14 participants). We found that the PTSD group recruited similar neural networks when compared to controls during AM recall, including default network subsystems and control networks, but there were group differences in the spatial and temporal characteristics of these networks. First, there were spatial differences in the contribution of the anterior and posterior midline across the networks, and with the amygdala in particular for the medial temporal subsystem of the default network. Second, there were temporal differences in the relationship of the medial prefrontal subsystem of the default network, with less temporal coupling of this network during AM retrieval in PTSD relative to controls. These findings suggest that spatial and temporal characteristics of the default and control networks potentially differ in PTSD versus healthy controls, and contribute to altered recall of personal memory. PMID:23483523

  8. Volcanic ash detection and retrievals using MODIS data by means of neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Picchiani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic ash clouds detection and retrieval represent a key issue for aviation safety due to the harming effects on aircraft. A lesson learned from the recent Eyjafjallajokull eruption is the need to obtain accurate and reliable retrievals on a real time basis.

    In this work we have developed a fast and accurate Neural Network (NN approach to detect and retrieve volcanic ash cloud properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data in the Thermal InfraRed (TIR spectral range. Some measurements collected during the 2001, 2002 and 2006 Mt. Etna volcano eruptions have been considered as test cases.

    The ash detection and retrievals obtained from the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD algorithm are used as training for the NN procedure that consists in two separate steps: ash detection and ash mass retrieval. The ash detection is reduced to a classification problem by identifying two classes: "ashy" and "non-ashy" pixels in the MODIS images. Then the ash mass is estimated by means of the NN, replicating the BTD-based model performances. A segmentation procedure has also been tested to remove the false ash pixels detection induced by the presence of high meteorological clouds. The segmentation procedure shows a clear advantage in terms of classification accuracy: the main drawback is the loss of information on ash clouds distal part.

    The results obtained are very encouraging; indeed the ash detection accuracy is greater than 90%, while a mean RMSE equal to 0.365 t km−2 has been obtained for the ash mass retrieval. Moreover, the NN quickness in results delivering makes the procedure extremely attractive in all the cases when the rapid response time of the system is a mandatory requirement.

  9. Neural network temperature and moisture retrieval algorithm validation for AIRS/AMSU and CrIS/ATMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Blackwell, William J.

    2016-02-01

    We present comprehensive validation results for the recently introduced neural network technique for retrieving vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and water vapor from spaceborne microwave and hyperspectral infrared sounding instruments. This technique is currently in operational use as the first guess for the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Science Team Version 6 retrieval algorithm. The validation incorporates a variety of data sources, independent from the algorithm training set, as ground truth, including global numerical weather analyses generated by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, synoptic radiosonde measurements, and radiosondes dedicated for validation. The results demonstrate significant performance improvements over the previous AIRS/advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU) operational sounding retrievals in both retrieval error and also show comparable vertical resolution. We also present initial neural network retrieval results using measurements from the Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) currently flying on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite.

  10. Intelligent control of robotic arm/hand systems for the NASA EVA retriever using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclauchlan, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Adaptive/general learning algorithms using varying neural network models are considered for the intelligent control of robotic arm plus dextrous hand/manipulator systems. Results are summarized and discussed for the use of the Barto/Sutton/Anderson neuronlike, unsupervised learning controller as applied to the stabilization of an inverted pendulum on a cart system. Recommendations are made for the application of the controller and a kinematic analysis for trajectory planning to simple object retrieval (chase/approach and capture/grasp) scenarios in two dimensions.

  11. Memory trace stabilization leads to large-scale changes in the retrieval network: a functional MRI study on associative memory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takashima, A.; Nieuwenhuis, I.L.C.; Rijpkema, M.; Petersson, K.M.; Jensen, O.; Fernandez, G.

    2007-01-01

    Spaced learning with time to consolidate leads to more stabile memory traces. However, little is known about the neural correlates of trace stabilization, especially in humans. The present fMRI study contrasted retrieval activity of two well-learned sets of face-location associations, one learned in

  12. Cirrus cloud retrieval with MSG/SEVIRI using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Johan; Bugliaro, Luca; Sehnke, Frank; Schröder, Leon

    2017-09-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in climate as they tend to warm the Earth-atmosphere system. Nevertheless their physical properties remain one of the largest sources of uncertainty in atmospheric research. To better understand the physical processes of cirrus clouds and their climate impact, enhanced satellite observations are necessary. In this paper we present a new algorithm, CiPS (Cirrus Properties from SEVIRI), that detects cirrus clouds and retrieves the corresponding cloud top height, ice optical thickness and ice water path using the SEVIRI imager aboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation satellites. CiPS utilises a set of artificial neural networks trained with SEVIRI thermal observations, CALIOP backscatter products, the ECMWF surface temperature and auxiliary data. CiPS detects 71 and 95 % of all cirrus clouds with an optical thickness of 0.1 and 1.0, respectively, that are retrieved by CALIOP. Among the cirrus-free pixels, CiPS classifies 96 % correctly. With respect to CALIOP, the cloud top height retrieved by CiPS has a mean absolute percentage error of 10 % or less for cirrus clouds with a top height greater than 8 km. For the ice optical thickness, CiPS has a mean absolute percentage error of 50 % or less for cirrus clouds with an optical thickness between 0.35 and 1.8 and of 100 % or less for cirrus clouds with an optical thickness down to 0.07 with respect to the optical thickness retrieved by CALIOP. The ice water path retrieved by CiPS shows a similar performance, with mean absolute percentage errors of 100 % or less for cirrus clouds with an ice water path down to 1.7 g m-2. Since the training reference data from CALIOP only include ice water path and optical thickness for comparably thin clouds, CiPS also retrieves an opacity flag, which tells us whether a retrieved cirrus is likely to be too thick for CiPS to accurately derive the ice water path and optical thickness. By retrieving CALIOP-like cirrus properties with the large

  13. Learned Interval Time Facilitates Associate Memory Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Vincent; Kochs, Sarah; Smulders, Fren; De Weerd, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The extent to which time is represented in memory remains underinvestigated. We designed a time paired associate task (TPAT) in which participants implicitly learned cue-time-target associations between cue-target pairs and specific cue-target intervals. During subsequent memory testing, participants showed increased accuracy of identifying…

  14. Chinese Herbal Medicine Image Recognition and Retrieval by Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Qian, Huinan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine image recognition and retrieval have great potential of practical applications. Several previous studies have focused on the recognition with hand-crafted image features, but there are two limitations in them. Firstly, most of these hand-crafted features are low-level image representation, which is easily affected by noise and background. Secondly, the medicine images are very clean without any backgrounds, which makes it difficult to use in practical applications. Therefore, designing high-level image representation for recognition and retrieval in real world medicine images is facing a great challenge. Inspired by the recent progress of deep learning in computer vision, we realize that deep learning methods may provide robust medicine image representation. In this paper, we propose to use the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for Chinese herbal medicine image recognition and retrieval. For the recognition problem, we use the softmax loss to optimize the recognition network; then for the retrieval problem, we fine-tune the recognition network by adding a triplet loss to search for the most similar medicine images. To evaluate our method, we construct a public database of herbal medicine images with cluttered backgrounds, which has in total 5523 images with 95 popular Chinese medicine categories. Experimental results show that our method can achieve the average recognition precision of 71% and the average retrieval precision of 53% over all the 95 medicine categories, which are quite promising given the fact that the real world images have multiple pieces of occluded herbal and cluttered backgrounds. Besides, our proposed method achieves the state-of-the-art performance by improving previous studies with a large margin.

  15. Chinese Herbal Medicine Image Recognition and Retrieval by Convolutional Neural Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Sun

    Full Text Available Chinese herbal medicine image recognition and retrieval have great potential of practical applications. Several previous studies have focused on the recognition with hand-crafted image features, but there are two limitations in them. Firstly, most of these hand-crafted features are low-level image representation, which is easily affected by noise and background. Secondly, the medicine images are very clean without any backgrounds, which makes it difficult to use in practical applications. Therefore, designing high-level image representation for recognition and retrieval in real world medicine images is facing a great challenge. Inspired by the recent progress of deep learning in computer vision, we realize that deep learning methods may provide robust medicine image representation. In this paper, we propose to use the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN for Chinese herbal medicine image recognition and retrieval. For the recognition problem, we use the softmax loss to optimize the recognition network; then for the retrieval problem, we fine-tune the recognition network by adding a triplet loss to search for the most similar medicine images. To evaluate our method, we construct a public database of herbal medicine images with cluttered backgrounds, which has in total 5523 images with 95 popular Chinese medicine categories. Experimental results show that our method can achieve the average recognition precision of 71% and the average retrieval precision of 53% over all the 95 medicine categories, which are quite promising given the fact that the real world images have multiple pieces of occluded herbal and cluttered backgrounds. Besides, our proposed method achieves the state-of-the-art performance by improving previous studies with a large margin.

  16. Version 2 of the IASI NH3 neural network retrieval algorithm: near-real-time and reanalysed datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Martin; Whitburn, Simon; Clarisse, Lieven; Clerbaux, Cathy; Hurtmans, Daniel; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2017-12-01

    Recently, Whitburn et al.(2016) presented a neural-network-based algorithm for retrieving atmospheric ammonia (NH3) columns from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) satellite observations. In the past year, several improvements have been introduced, and the resulting new baseline version, Artificial Neural Network for IASI (ANNI)-NH3-v2.1, is documented here. One of the main changes to the algorithm is that separate neural networks were trained for land and sea observations, resulting in a better training performance for both groups. By reducing and transforming the input parameter space, performance is now also better for observations associated with favourable sounding conditions (i.e. enhanced thermal contrasts). Other changes relate to the introduction of a bias correction over land and sea and the treatment of the satellite zenith angle. In addition to these algorithmic changes, new recommendations for post-filtering the data and for averaging data in time or space are formulated. We also introduce a second dataset (ANNI-NH3-v2.1R-I) which relies on ERA-Interim ECMWF meteorological input data, along with surface temperature retrieved from a dedicated network, rather than the operationally provided Eumetsat IASI Level 2 (L2) data used for the standard near-real-time version. The need for such a dataset emerged after a series of sharp discontinuities were identified in the NH3 time series, which could be traced back to incremental changes in the IASI L2 algorithms for temperature and clouds. The reanalysed dataset is coherent in time and can therefore be used to study trends. Furthermore, both datasets agree reasonably well in the mean on recent data, after the date when the IASI meteorological L2 version 6 became operational (30 September 2014).

  17. Beyond Associations: Strategic Components in Memory Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Lynne M.

    There are two dominant approaches to understanding human memory, one in the tradition of Ebbinghaus, the other in the tradition of Bartlett. The former approach views learning as the formation of associations, while the latter views memory as the process of reconstruction of fragments based on prior knowledge. These positions are often considered…

  18. Semantic association ranking schemes for information retrieval ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... relevance, multimedia, information, video, image, answer, text}. Doc 9. {google, search, engine, personalization, information, text, multimedia}. Figure 8. Term association graph on real data with 50 nodes. Table 6. User search interest value table. Session ID. Software. Algorithms. Healthcare. Sports. Movies. Music. S1.

  19. Geometry-invariant texture retrieval using a dual-output pulse-coupled neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Ma, Yide; Wang, Zhaobin; Yu, Wenrui

    2012-01-01

    This letter proposes a novel dual-output pulse coupled neural network model (DPCNN). The new model is applied to obtain a more stable texture description in the face of the geometric transformation. Time series, which are computed from output binary images of DPCNN, are employed as translation-, rotation-, scale-, and distortion-invariant texture features. In the experiments, DPCNN has been well tested by using Brodatz's album and the VisTex database. Several existing models are compared with the proposed DPCNN model. The experimental results, based on different testing data sets for images with different translations, orientations, scales, and affine transformations, show that our proposed model outperforms existing models in geometry-invariant texture retrieval. Furthermore, the robustness of DPCNN to noisy data is examined in the experiments.

  20. Artificial neural networks as quantum associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kathleen; Schrock, Jonathan; Imam, Neena; Humble, Travis

    We present results related to the recall accuracy and capacity of Hopfield networks implemented on commercially available quantum annealers. The use of Hopfield networks and artificial neural networks as content-addressable memories offer robust storage and retrieval of classical information, however, implementation of these models using currently available quantum annealers faces several challenges: the limits of precision when setting synaptic weights, the effects of spurious spin-glass states and minor embedding of densely connected graphs into fixed-connectivity hardware. We consider neural networks which are less than fully-connected, and also consider neural networks which contain multiple sparsely connected clusters. We discuss the effect of weak edge dilution on the accuracy of memory recall, and discuss how the multiple clique structure affects the storage capacity. Our work focuses on storage of patterns which can be embedded into physical hardware containing n States Department of Defense and used resources of the Computational Research and Development Programs as Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725 with the U. S. Department of Energy.

  1. The application of artificial neural networks for discrete wavelength retrievals of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J.; Singh Anand, J.; Leigh, R.; Chang, M.; Monks, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Despite emission reductions in Europe, air quality continues to be a major health and policy issue. Significant areas of uncertainty persist in relating emissions, atmospheric composition and human exposure within the urban atmosphere. Furthermore, air quality continues to worsen in some highly populated parts of the world. The current air quality monitoring framework is based upon bottom-up emission estimates coupled with sparse in situ monitoring. Research at the University of Leicester in the UK is being conducted to investigate the feasibility of using a technique of discrete wavelength sunlight spectroscopy to derive concentrations of the pollutant nitrogen dioxide from a satellite platform. This technique has the potential to enable very light and compact instrumentation and may subsequently provide abundant air quality data of significant value to users and policy makers. A back propagation multi-layered perceptron artificial neural network (ANN) has been developed to retrieve atmospheric slant columns of nitrogen dioxide from simulated measurements. The ANN approach enables retrievals to be performed much faster than other retrieval methods once the network has been appropriately trained, which is a particularly useful feature in instances where a large quantity of retrievals is required in near real time. To generate the required training data for the ANN to understand the necessary relationships a radiative transfer model SCIATRAN was run to provide millions of spectral intensities and slant column concentrations. To enable the radiative transfer simulations to realistically portray urban air quality the SCIATRAN model was fed atmospheric profile and aerosol data from modelled air quality forecasts over London to enable assimilation of the atmospheric composition of a typical urban environment. The training data produced by SCIATRAN was configured to span a range of solar azimuth and zenith angles to provide results which are applicable to all low earth

  2. Cirrus cloud retrieval from MSG/SEVIRI during day and night using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Johan; Bugliaro, Luca

    2017-04-01

    By covering a large part of the Earth, cirrus clouds play an important role in climate as they reflect incoming solar radiation and absorb outgoing thermal radiation. Nevertheless, the cirrus clouds remain one of the largest uncertainties in atmospheric research and the understanding of the physical processes that govern their life cycle is still poorly understood, as is their representation in climate models. To monitor and better understand the properties and physical processes of cirrus clouds, it's essential that those tenuous clouds can be observed from geostationary spaceborne imagers like SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager), that possess a high temporal resolution together with a large field of view and play an important role besides in-situ observations for the investigation of cirrus cloud processes. CiPS (Cirrus Properties from Seviri) is a new algorithm targeting thin cirrus clouds. CiPS is an artificial neural network trained with coincident SEVIRI and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) observations in order to retrieve a cirrus cloud mask along with the cloud top height (CTH), ice optical thickness (IOT) and ice water path (IWP) from SEVIRI. By utilizing only the thermal/IR channels of SEVIRI, CiPS can be used during day and night making it a powerful tool for the cirrus life cycle analysis. Despite the great challenge of detecting thin cirrus clouds and retrieving their properties from a geostationary imager using only the thermal/IR wavelengths, CiPS performs well. Among the cirrus clouds detected by CALIOP, CiPS detects 70 and 95 % of the clouds with an optical thickness of 0.1 and 1.0 respectively. Among the cirrus free pixels, CiPS classify 96 % correctly. For the CTH retrieval, CiPS has a mean absolute percentage error of 10 % or less with respect to CALIOP for cirrus clouds with a CTH greater than 8 km. For the IOT retrieval, CiPS has a mean absolute percentage error of 100 % or less with respect to

  3. Learning Low Dimensional Convolutional Neural Networks for High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixun Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning powerful feature representations for image retrieval has always been a challenging task in the field of remote sensing. Traditional methods focus on extracting low-level hand-crafted features which are not only time-consuming but also tend to achieve unsatisfactory performance due to the complexity of remote sensing images. In this paper, we investigate how to extract deep feature representations based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs for high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval (HRRSIR. To this end, several effective schemes are proposed to generate powerful feature representations for HRRSIR. In the first scheme, a CNN pre-trained on a different problem is treated as a feature extractor since there are no sufficiently-sized remote sensing datasets to train a CNN from scratch. In the second scheme, we investigate learning features that are specific to our problem by first fine-tuning the pre-trained CNN on a remote sensing dataset and then proposing a novel CNN architecture based on convolutional layers and a three-layer perceptron. The novel CNN has fewer parameters than the pre-trained and fine-tuned CNNs and can learn low dimensional features from limited labelled images. The schemes are evaluated on several challenging, publicly available datasets. The results indicate that the proposed schemes, particularly the novel CNN, achieve state-of-the-art performance.

  4. Learning Low Dimensional Convolutional Neural Networks for High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weixun; Newsam, Shawn; Li, Congmin; Shao, Zhenfeng

    2017-05-01

    Learning powerful feature representations for image retrieval has always been a challenging task in the field of remote sensing. Traditional methods focus on extracting low-level hand-crafted features which are not only time-consuming but also tend to achieve unsatisfactory performance due to the content complexity of remote sensing images. In this paper, we investigate how to extract deep feature representations based on convolutional neural networks (CNN) for high-resolution remote sensing image retrieval (HRRSIR). To this end, two effective schemes are proposed to generate powerful feature representations for HRRSIR. In the first scheme, the deep features are extracted from the fully-connected and convolutional layers of the pre-trained CNN models, respectively; in the second scheme, we propose a novel CNN architecture based on conventional convolution layers and a three-layer perceptron. The novel CNN model is then trained on a large remote sensing dataset to learn low dimensional features. The two schemes are evaluated on several public and challenging datasets, and the results indicate that the proposed schemes and in particular the novel CNN are able to achieve state-of-the-art performance.

  5. Methylphenidate during early consolidation affects long-term associative memory retrieval depending on baseline catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Isabella C; van Buuren, Mariët; Bovy, Leonore; Morris, Richard G; Fernández, Guillén

    2017-02-01

    Synaptic memory consolidation is thought to rely on catecholaminergic signaling. Eventually, it is followed by systems consolidation, which embeds memories in a neocortical network. Although this sequence was demonstrated in rodents, it is unclear how catecholamines affect memory consolidation in humans. Here, we tested the effects of catecholaminergic modulation on synaptic and subsequent systems consolidation. We expected enhanced memory performance and increased neocortical engagement during delayed retrieval. Additionally, we tested if this effect was modulated by individual differences in a cognitive proxy measure of baseline catecholamine synthesis capacity. Fifty-three healthy males underwent a between-subjects, double-blind, placebo-controlled procedure across 2 days. On day 1, subjects studied and retrieved object-location associations and received 20 mg of methylphenidate or placebo. Drug intake was timed so that methylphenidate was expected to affect early consolidation but not encoding or retrieval. Memory was tested again while subjects were scanned three days later. Methylphenidate did not facilitate memory performance, and there was no significant group difference in activation during delayed retrieval. However, memory representations differed between groups depending on baseline catecholamines. The placebo group showed increased activation in occipito-temporal regions but decreased connectivity with the hippocampus, associated with lower baseline catecholamine synthesis capacity. The methylphenidate group showed stronger activation in the postcentral gyrus, associated with higher baseline catecholamine synthesis capacity. Altogether, methylphenidate during early consolidation did not foster long-term memory performance, but it affected retrieval-related neural processes depending on individual levels of baseline catecholamines.

  6. Neural network retrievals of phytoplankton absorption and Karenia brevis harmful algal blooms in the West Florida Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sam; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Lovko, Vincent

    2017-05-01

    Preliminary results of previous work had shown a Neural Network (NN) technique developed by us as effective in detecting Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms (KB HABs) plaguing West Florida Shelf (WFS) from VIIRS satellite observations. We extend comparisons of NN retrievals against a data set of near simultaneous in-situ measurements in the WFS spanning the 2012-2016 period for which there was available VIIRS data. Specifically we looked for match ups where the overlap time windows between satellite observations and in-situ measurements were 15 minutes and 100 minutes. We then compare the accuracy of the NN retrievals against the in-situ measurements, with the accuracies achieved with similar of retrievals using OC3, GIOP, QAA and RGCI algorithms. The NN technique exhibited the best retrieval accuracy statistics. The retrievals for all the algorithms very clearly showed the impact of temporal variations of the KB HABS on retrieval accuracies. Thus, retrievals using a 15 minutes overlap window between satellite observations and in-situ measurements yielded much higher accuracies than those with the 100 minutes overlap window. Temporal variabilities were also studied, using consecutive overlapping VIIRS images. These variabilities, as well as the patchiness of KB blooms were also confirmed by a set of in-situ measurements near Sarasota, FL.

  7. Neural Networks Retrieving Boolean Patterns in a Sea of Gaussian Ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Longo, Chiara; Tantari, Daniele

    2017-09-01

    Restricted Boltzmann machines are key tools in machine learning and are described by the energy function of bipartite spin-glasses. From a statistical mechanical perspective, they share the same Gibbs measure of Hopfield networks for associative memory. In this equivalence, weights in the former play as patterns in the latter. As Boltzmann machines usually require real weights to be trained with gradient-descent-like methods, while Hopfield networks typically store binary patterns to be able to retrieve, the investigation of a mixed Hebbian network, equipped with both real (e.g., Gaussian) and discrete (e.g., Boolean) patterns naturally arises. We prove that, in the challenging regime of a high storage of real patterns, where retrieval is forbidden, an additional load of Boolean patterns can still be retrieved, as long as the ratio between the overall load and the network size does not exceed a critical threshold, that turns out to be the same of the standard Amit-Gutfreund-Sompolinsky theory. Assuming replica symmetry, we study the case of a low load of Boolean patterns combining the stochastic stability and Hamilton-Jacobi interpolating techniques. The result can be extended to the high load by a non rigorous but standard replica computation argument.

  8. Toward content-based image retrieval with deep convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklan, Judah E. S.; Plassard, Andrew J.; Fabbri, Daniel; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) offers the potential to identify similar case histories, understand rare disorders, and eventually, improve patient care. Recent advances in database capacity, algorithm efficiency, and deep Convolutional Neural Networks (dCNN), a machine learning technique, have enabled great CBIR success for general photographic images. Here, we investigate applying the leading ImageNet CBIR technique to clinically acquired medical images captured by the Vanderbilt Medical Center. Briefly, we (1) constructed a dCNN with four hidden layers, reducing dimensionality of an input scaled to 128x128 to an output encoded layer of 4x384, (2) trained the network using back-propagation 1 million random magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, (3) labeled an independent set of 2100 images, and (4) evaluated classifiers on the projection of the labeled images into manifold space. Quantitative results were disappointing (averaging a true positive rate of only 20%); however, the data suggest that improvements would be possible with more evenly distributed sampling across labels and potential re-grouping of label structures. This preliminary effort at automated classification of medical images with ImageNet is promising, but shows that more work is needed beyond direct adaptation of existing techniques.

  9. Effect of synapse dilution on the memory retrieval in structured attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, N.

    1993-08-01

    We investigate a simple model of structured attractor neural network (ANN). In this network a module codes for the category of the stored information, while another group of neurons codes for the remaining information. The probability distribution of stabilities of the patterns and the prototypes of the categories are calculated, for two different synaptic structures. The stability of the prototypes is shown to increase when the fraction of neurons coding for the category goes down. Then the effect of synapse destruction on the retrieval is studied in two opposite situations : first analytically in sparsely connected networks, then numerically in completely connected ones. In both cases the behaviour of the structured network and that of the usual homogeneous networks are compared. When lesions increase, two transitions are shown to appear in the behaviour of the structured network when one of the patterns is presented to the network. After the first transition the network recognizes the category of the pattern but not the individual pattern. After the second transition the network recognizes nothing. These effects are similar to syndromes caused by lesions in the central visual system, namely prosopagnosia and agnosia. In both types of networks (structured or homogeneous) the stability of the prototype is greater than the stability of individual patterns, however the first transition, for completely connected networks, occurs only when the network is structured.

  10. A multi-scale hybrid neural network retrieval model for dust storm detection, a study in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Sing; Xiao, Fei; Nichol, Janet; Fung, Jimmy; Kim, Jhoon; Campbell, James; Chan, P. W.

    2015-05-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on human health and significant impact on weather, air quality, hydrological cycle, and ecosystem. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the large uncertainties in global climate modeling, due to its significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. Observations of dust storms in humid tropical south China (e.g. Hong Kong), are challenging due to high industrial pollution from the nearby Pearl River Delta region. This study develops a method for dust storm detection by combining ground station observations (PM10 concentration, AERONET data), geostationary satellite images (MTSAT), and numerical weather and climatic forecasting products (WRF/Chem). The method is based on a hybrid neural network (NN) retrieval model for two scales: (i) a NN model for near real-time detection of dust storms at broader regional scale; (ii) a NN model for detailed dust storm mapping for Hong Kong and Taiwan. A feed-forward multilayer perceptron (MLP) NN, trained using back propagation (BP) algorithm, was developed and validated by the k-fold cross validation approach. The accuracy of the near real-time detection MLP-BP network is 96.6%, and the accuracies for the detailed MLP-BP neural network for Hong Kong and Taiwan is 74.8%. This newly automated multi-scale hybrid method can be used to give advance near real-time mapping of dust storms for environmental authorities and the public. It is also beneficial for identifying spatial locations of adverse air quality conditions, and estimates of low visibility associated with dust events for port and airport authorities.

  11. Imagery and retrieval of auditory and visual information: Neural correlates of successful and unsuccessful performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, W.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Rubin, D.C.; Daselaar, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Remembering past events - or episodic retrieval - consists of several components. There is evidence that mental imagery plays an important role in retrieval and that the brain regions supporting imagery overlap with those supporting retrieval. An open issue is to what extent these regions support

  12. Neural Correlates of Verbal Episodic Memory and Lexical Retrieval in Logopenic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaing T. Win

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA is commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. But lvPPA patients display different cognitive and anatomical profile from the common clinical AD patients, whose verbal episodic memory is primarily affected. Reports of verbal episodic memory difficulty in lvPPA are inconsistent, and we hypothesized that their lexical retrieval impairment contributes to verbal episodic memory performance and is associated with left middle temporal gyrus atrophy.Methods: We evaluated patients with lvPPA (n = 12 displaying prominent word-finding and repetition difficulties, and a demographically-matched cohort of clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 26, and healthy seniors (n = 16. We assessed lexical retrieval with confrontation naming and verbal episodic memory with delayed free recall. Whole-brain regressions related naming and delayed free recall to gray matter atrophy. Medial temporal lobe (MTL subfields were examined using high in-plane resolution imaging.Results: lvPPA patients had naming and delayed free recall impairments, but intact recognition memory. In lvPPA, delayed free recall was related to naming; both were associated with left middle temporal gyrus atrophy but not MTL atrophy. Despite cerebrospinal fluid evidence consistent with AD pathology, examination of MTL subfields revealed no atrophy in lvPPA. While AD patients displayed impaired delayed free recall, this deficit did not correlate with naming. Regression analyses related delayed free recall deficits in clinical AD patients to MTL subfield atrophy, and naming to left middle temporal gyrus atrophy.Conclusion: Unlike amnestic AD patients, MTL subfields were not affected in lvPPA patients. Verbal episodic memory deficit observed in lvPPA was unlikely to be due to a hippocampal-mediated mechanism but appeared to be due to poor lexical retrieval. Relative sparing of MTL volume and intact recognition memory are

  13. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  14. Learning and retrieval behavior in recurrent neural networks with pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusaki, Beatriz E. P.; Agnes, Everton J.; Erichsen, Rubem; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-08-01

    The plastic character of brain synapses is considered to be one of the foundations for the formation of memories. There are numerous kinds of such phenomenon currently described in the literature, but their role in the development of information pathways in neural networks with recurrent architectures is still not completely clear. In this paper we study the role of an activity-based process, called pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic scaling, in the organization of networks that yield precise-timed spiking patterns. It encodes spatio-temporal information in the synaptic weights as it associates a learned input with a specific response. We introduce a correlation measure to evaluate the precision of the spiking patterns and explore the effects of different inhibitory interactions and learning parameters. We find that large learning periods are important in order to improve the network learning capacity and discuss this ability in the presence of distinct inhibitory currents.

  15. Neural associative memory with optimal Bayesian learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Neural associative memories are perceptron-like single-layer networks with fast synaptic learning typically storing discrete associations between pairs of neural activity patterns. Previous work optimized the memory capacity for various models of synaptic learning: linear Hopfield-type rules, the Willshaw model employing binary synapses, or the BCPNN rule of Lansner and Ekeberg, for example. Here I show that all of these previous models are limit cases of a general optimal model where synaptic learning is determined by probabilistic Bayesian considerations. Asymptotically, for large networks and very sparse neuron activity, the Bayesian model becomes identical to an inhibitory implementation of the Willshaw and BCPNN-type models. For less sparse patterns, the Bayesian model becomes identical to Hopfield-type networks employing the covariance rule. For intermediate sparseness or finite networks, the optimal Bayesian learning rule differs from the previous models and can significantly improve memory performance. I also provide a unified analytical framework to determine memory capacity at a given output noise level that links approaches based on mutual information, Hamming distance, and signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Satellite Retrievals of Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms in the West Florida Shelf Using Neural Networks and Comparisons with Other Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-habashi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the application of a Neural Network (NN previously developed by us, to the detection and tracking, of Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms (KB HABs that plague the coasts of the West Florida Shelf (WFS using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS satellite observations. Previous approaches for the detection of KB HABs in the WFS primarily used observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua (MODIS-A satellite. They depended on the remote sensing reflectance signal at the 678 nm chlorophyll fluorescence band (Rrs678 needed for both the normalized fluorescence height (nFLH and Red Band Difference algorithms (RBD currently used. VIIRS which has replaced MODIS-A, unfortunately does not have a 678 nm fluorescence channel so we customized the NN approach to retrieve phytoplankton absorption at 443 nm (aph443 using only Rrs measurements from existing VIIRS channels at 486, 551 and 671 nm. The aph443 values in these retrieved VIIRS images, can in turn be correlated to chlorophyll-a concentrations [Chla] and KB cell counts. To retrieve KB values, the VIIRS NN retrieved aph443 images are filtered by applying limiting constraints, defined by (i low backscatter at Rrs 551 nm and (ii a minimum aph443 value known to be associated with KB HABs in the WFS. The resulting filtered residual images, are then used to delineate and quantify the existing KB HABs. Comparisons with KB HABs satellite retrievals obtained using other techniques, including nFLH, as well as with in situ measurements reported over a four year period, confirm the viability of the NN technique, when combined with the filtering constraints devised, for effective detection of KB HABs.

  17. Spatial-area selective retrieval of multiple object-place associations in a hierarchical cognitive map formed by theta phase coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2009-06-01

    The human cognitive map is known to be hierarchically organized consisting of a set of perceptually clustered landmarks. Patient studies have demonstrated that these cognitive maps are maintained by the hippocampus, while the neural dynamics are still poorly understood. The authors have shown that the neural dynamic "theta phase precession" observed in the rodent hippocampus may be capable of forming hierarchical cognitive maps in humans. In the model, a visual input sequence consisting of object and scene features in the central and peripheral visual fields, respectively, results in the formation of a hierarchical cognitive map for object-place associations. Surprisingly, it is possible for such a complex memory structure to be formed in a few seconds. In this paper, we evaluate the memory retrieval of object-place associations in the hierarchical network formed by theta phase precession. The results show that multiple object-place associations can be retrieved with the initial cue of a scene input. Importantly, according to the wide-to-narrow unidirectional connections among scene units, the spatial area for object-place retrieval can be controlled by the spatial area of the initial cue input. These results indicate that the hierarchical cognitive maps have computational advantages on a spatial-area selective retrieval of multiple object-place associations. Theta phase precession dynamics is suggested as a fundamental neural mechanism of the human cognitive map.

  18. Neu-IR: The SIGIR 2016 Workshop on Neural Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craswell, N.; Croft, W.B.; Guo, J.; Mitra, B.; de Rijke, M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks have yielded significant performance improvements on speech recognition and computer vision tasks, as well as led to exciting breakthroughs in novel application areas such as automatic voice translation, image captioning, and conversational agents. Despite

  19. Neural Network (NN) retrievals of Stratocumulus cloud properties using multi-angle polarimetric observations during ORACLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Redemann, J.; Cairns, B.; Alexandrov, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    The ORACLES (ObseRvations of Aerosols above CLouds and their intEractionS) campaign is taking place in the South-East Atlantic during the Austral Spring for three consecutive years from 2016-2018. The study area encompasses one of the Earth's three semi-permanent subtropical Stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks, and experiences very large aerosol optical depths, mainly biomass burning, originating from Africa. Over time, cloud optical depth (COD), lifetime and cloud microphysics (number concentration, effective radii Reff and precipitation) are expected to be influenced by indirect aerosol effects. These changes play a key role in the energetic balance of the region, and are part of the core investigation objectives of the ORACLES campaign, which acquires measurements of clean and polluted scenes of above cloud aerosols (ACA). Simultaneous retrievals of aerosol and cloud optical properties are being developed (e.g. MODIS, OMI), but still challenging, especially for passive, single viewing angle instruments. By comparison, multiangle polarimetric instruments like RSP (Research Scanning Polarimeter) show promise for detection and quantification of ACA, however, there are no operational retrieval algorithms available yet. Here we describe a new algorithm to retrieve cloud and aerosol optical properties from observations by RSP flown on the ER-2 and P-3 during the 2016 ORACLES campaign. The algorithm is based on training a NN, and is intended to retrieve aerosol and cloud properties simultaneously. However, the first step was to establish the retrieval scheme for low level Sc cloud optical properties. The NN training was based on simulated RSP total and polarized radiances for a range of COD, Reff, and effective variances, spanning 7 wavelength bands and 152 viewing zenith angles. Random and correlated noise were added to the simulations to achieve a more realistic representation of the signals. Before introducing the input variables to the network, the signals are projected

  20. Associative conceptual space-based information retrieval systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); J.H. van den Berg (Jan)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn this `Information Era' with the availability of large collections of books, articles, journals, CD-ROMs, video films and so on, there exists an increasing need for intelligent information retrieval systems that enable users to find the information desired easily. Many attempts have

  1. Generic information can retrieve known biological associations: implications for biomedical knowledge discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman H H B M van Haagen

    Full Text Available MOTIVATION: Weighted semantic networks built from text-mined literature can be used to retrieve known protein-protein or gene-disease associations, and have been shown to anticipate associations years before they are explicitly stated in the literature. Our text-mining system recognizes over 640,000 biomedical concepts: some are specific (i.e., names of genes or proteins others generic (e.g., 'Homo sapiens'. Generic concepts may play important roles in automated information retrieval, extraction, and inference but may also result in concept overload and confound retrieval and reasoning with low-relevance or even spurious links. Here, we attempted to optimize the retrieval performance for protein-protein interactions (PPI by filtering generic concepts (node filtering or links to generic concepts (edge filtering from a weighted semantic network. First, we defined metrics based on network properties that quantify the specificity of concepts. Then using these metrics, we systematically filtered generic information from the network while monitoring retrieval performance of known protein-protein interactions. We also systematically filtered specific information from the network (inverse filtering, and assessed the retrieval performance of networks composed of generic information alone. RESULTS: Filtering generic or specific information induced a two-phase response in retrieval performance: initially the effects of filtering were minimal but beyond a critical threshold network performance suddenly drops. Contrary to expectations, networks composed exclusively of generic information demonstrated retrieval performance comparable to unfiltered networks that also contain specific concepts. Furthermore, an analysis using individual generic concepts demonstrated that they can effectively support the retrieval of known protein-protein interactions. For instance the concept "binding" is indicative for PPI retrieval and the concept "mutation abnormality" is

  2. Distractibility during Retrieval of Long-Term Memory: Domain-General Interference, Neural Networks and Increased Susceptibility in Normal Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Edward Wais

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The mere presence of irrelevant external stimuli results in interference with the fidelity of details retrieved from long-term memory (LTM. Recent studies suggest that distractibility during LTM retrieval occurs when the focus of resource-limited, top-down mechanisms that guide the selection of relevant mnemonic details is disrupted by representations of external distractors. We review findings from four studies that reveal distractibility during episodic retrieval. The approach cued participants to recall previously studied visual details when their eyes were closed, or were open and irrelevant visual information was present. The results showed a negative impact of the distractors on the fidelity of details retrieved from LTM. An fMRI experiment using the same paradigm replicated the behavioral results and found that diminished episodic memory was associated with the disruption of functional connectivity in whole-brain networks. Specifically, network connectivity supported recollection of details based on visual imagery when eyes were closed, but connectivity declined in the presence of visual distractors. Another experiment using auditory distractors found equivalent effects for auditory and visual distraction during cued recall, suggesting that the negative impact of distractibility is a domain-general phenomenon in LTM. Comparisons between older and younger adults revealed an aging-related increase in the negative impact of distractibility on retrieval of LTM. Finally, a new study that compared categorization abilities between younger and older adults suggests a cause underlying age-related decline of visual details in LTM. The sum of our findings suggests that cognitive control resources, although limited, have the capability to resolve interference from distractors during tasks of moderate effort, but these resources are overwhelmed when additional processes associated with episodic retrieval, or categorization of complex prototypes, are

  3. Polarimetric weather radar retrieval of raindrop size distribution by means of a regularized artificial neural network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulpiani, G.; Marzano, F.S.; Chandrasekar, V.; Berne, A.D.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2006-01-01

    The raindrop size distribution (RSD) is a critical factor in estimating rain intensity using advanced dual-polarized weather radars. A new neural-network algorithm to estimate the RSD from S-band dual-polarized radar measurements is presented. The corresponding rain rates are then computed assuming

  4. Entropy Associated with Information Storage and Its Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Mohamed Alhasan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We provide an entropy analysis for light storage and light retrieval. In this analysis, entropy extraction and reduction in a typical light storage experiment are identified. The spatiotemporal behavior of entropy is presented for D1 transition in cold sodium atoms. The governing equations are the reduced Maxwell field equations and the Liouville–von Neumann equation for the density matrix of the dressed atom.

  5. Robust hippocampal responsivity during retrieval of consolidated associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Shoai; Chen, Lillian; Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F

    2015-05-01

    A contentious point in memory research is whether or not the hippocampus plays a time-limited role in the consolidation of declarative memories. A widely held view is that declarative memories are initially encoded in the hippocampus, then transferred to the neocortex for long-term storage. Alternate views argue instead that the hippocampus continues to play a role in remote memory recall. These competing theories are largely based on human amnesic and animal lesion/inactivation studies. However, in vivo electrophysiological evidence supporting these views is scarce. Given that other studies examining the role of the hippocampus in remote memory retrieval using lesion and imaging techniques in human and animal models have provided mixed results, it would be particularly useful to gain insight at the in vivo electrophysiological level. Here we report hippocampal single-neuron and theta activity recorded longitudinally during acquisition and remote retrieval of trace eyeblink conditioning. Results from conditioned rabbits were compared to those obtained from yoked pseudo-conditioned control rabbits. Results reveal continued learning-specific hippocampal activity one month after initial acquisition of the task. Our findings yield insight into the normal physiological responses of the hippocampus during memory processes and provide compelling in vivo electrophysiological evidence that the hippocampus is involved in both acquisition and retrieval of consolidated memories. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Digital associative memory neural network with optical learning capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Minoru; Ohtsubo, Junji

    1994-12-01

    A digital associative memory neural network system with optical learning and recalling capabilities is proposed by using liquid crystal television spatial light modulators and an Optic RAM detector. In spite of the drawback of the limited memory capacity compared with optical analogue associative memory neural network, the proposed optical digital neural network has the advantage of all optical learning and recalling capabilities, thus an all optics network system is easily realized. Some experimental results of the learning and the recalling for character recognitions are presented. This new optical architecture offers compactness of the system and the fast learning and recalling properties. Based on the results, the practical system for the implementation of a faster optical digital associative memory neural network system with ferro-electric liquid crystal SLMs is also proposed.

  7. Distorted Character Recognition Via An Associative Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Richard A.; Szu, Harold H.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, it is intended to provide some preliminary results of a character recognition scheme which has foundations in on-going neural network architecture modeling, and secondly, to apply some of the neural network results in a real application area where thirty years of effort has had little effect on providing the machine an ability to recognize distorted objects within the same object class. It is the author's belief that the time is ripe to start applying in ernest the results of over twenty years of effort in neural modeling to some of the more difficult problems which seem so hard to solve by conventional means. The character recognition scheme proposed utilizes a preprocessing stage which performs a 2-dimensional Walsh transform of an input cartesian image field, then sequency filters this spectrum into three feature bands. Various features are then extracted and organized into three sets of feature vectors. These vector patterns that are stored and recalled associatively. Two possible associative neural memory models are proposed for further investigation. The first being an outer-product linear matrix associative memory with a threshold function controlling the strength of the output pattern (similar to Kohonen's crosscorrelation approach [1]). The second approach is based upon a modified version of Grossberg's neural architecture [2] which provides better self-organizing properties due to its adaptive nature. Preliminary results of the sequency filtering and feature extraction preprocessing stage and discussion about the use of the proposed neural architectures is included.

  8. Increased resting-state perfusion after repeated encoding is related to later retrieval of declarative associative memories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Groen

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological studies in animals have shown coordinated reactivation of neuronal ensembles during a restricted time period of behavioral inactivity that immediately followed active encoding. In the present study we directly investigated off-line processing of associative memory formation in the human brain. Subjects' regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF as a surrogate marker of neural activity during rest was measured by MR-based perfusion imaging in a sample of 14 healthy male subjects prior to (Pre2 and after (Post extensive learning of 24 face-name associations within a selective reminding task (SR. Results demonstrated significant Post-Pre2 rCBF increases in hippocampal and temporal lobe regions, while in a control comparison of two perfusion scans with no learning task in-between (Pre2-Pre1 no differences in rCBF emerged. Post perfusion scanning was followed by a surprise cued associative recall task from which two types of correctly retrieved names were obtained: older names already correctly retrieved at least once during one of the SR blocks, and recent names acquired during the last SR block immediately prior to the Post scan. In the anterior hippocampus individual perfusion increases were correlated with both correct retrievals of older and recent names. By contrast, older but not recently learned names showed a significant correlation with perfusion increases in the left lateral temporal cortex known to be associated with long-term memory. Recent, but not older names were correlated with dopaminergic midbrain structures reported to contribute to the persistence of memory traces for novel information. Although the direct investigation of off-line memory processing did not permit concomitant experimental control, neither intentional rehearsal, nor substantial variations in subjects' states of alertness appear to contribute to present results. We suggest that the observed rCBF increases might reflect processes that possibly

  9. Association of dietary copper and zinc levels with hepatic copper and zinc concentration in Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, H; Hooijer-Nouwens, B D; Biourge, V C; Leegwater, P A J; Watson, A L; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Rothuizen, J

    2012-01-01

    Copper-associated hepatitis is an inherited disease in the Labrador Retriever. Apart from genetic factors, dietary intake of copper and zinc are suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis. To investigate whether dietary copper and zinc levels of commercially available dry diets are associated with hepatic copper and zinc concentrations in Labrador Retrievers. Fifty-five Labrador Retrievers that were fed a single brand and type of commercial dry food for at least 1 year. Of these, 44 dogs were family members of Labrador Retrievers with copper-associated hepatitis. Liver biopsies, blood samples, and diet samples were obtained. Liver specimens were scored histologically and copper and zinc concentrations were quantified. Dietary concentrations of copper and zinc were measured. The association between dietary intake of copper and zinc and hepatic copper and zinc concentrations was investigated by linear regression analysis. High dietary copper and low dietary zinc levels were significantly associated with high hepatic copper levels. No association between dietary intake and hepatic zinc was present. Dietary copper and zinc at current levels in commercially available dry dog food can influence hepatic copper and can be a risk factor for the development of copper-associated hepatitis in Labrador Retrievers with a genetic susceptibility to copper. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Psychosocial stress impairs working memory at high loads: an association with cortisol levels and memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, N Y L; Everaerd, W T A M; Elzinga, B M; van Well, S; Bermond, B

    2006-09-01

    Stress and cortisol are known to impair memory retrieval of well-consolidated declarative material. The effects of cortisol on memory retrieval may in particular be due to glucocorticoid (GC) receptors in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Therefore, effects of stress and cortisol should be observable on both hippocampal-dependent declarative memory retrieval and PFC-dependent working memory (WM). In the present study, it was tested whether psychosocial stress would impair both WM and memory retrieval in 20 young healthy men. In addition, the association between cortisol levels and cognitive performance was assessed. It was found that stress impaired WM at high loads, but not at low loads in a Sternberg paradigm. High cortisol levels at the time of testing were associated with slow WM performance at high loads, and with impaired recall of moderately emotional, but not of highly emotional paragraphs. Furthermore, performance at high WM loads was associated with memory retrieval. These data extend previous results of pharmacological studies in finding WM impairments after acute stress at high workloads and cortisol-related retrieval impairments.

  11. On the VHF source retrieval errors associated with Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    A common method for retrieving the lightning Very High Frequency (VHF) radio source (x, y, z, t) emission is to minimize a (reduced) chi-squared function that indicates how well the model arrival times associated with the model source represent the arrival time measurements at each Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) site. The Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is usually employed to find the minimum of the chi-squared function, and the model source producing this minimum is considered to be the optimal source solution. Because the chi-squared mathematical surface is nonlinear, it is important to feed the LM algorithm an accurate initial guess (xo, yo, zo, to) in parameter space to avoid parameter searches that terminate at a relative minima of the chi-squared surface. Source initialization is commonly performed using a linear retrieval algorithm first introduced in Koshak and Solakiewicz (1996), and further applied in Koshak et al. (2004). Monte Carlo simulations and theoretical inferences both show that source retrieval errors (particularly source altitude errors) increase with horizontal source range. In the present study, the effect of modifying certain elements of the retrieval (i. e., the LMA site locations, the number of sites employed, and the retrieval algorithm characteristics) are examined to assess and quantify associated improvements in retrieval results.

  12. Topography and dynamics of associative long-term memory retrieval in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Patrick; Knoth, Kathrin; Burke, Michael; Ranganath, Charan; Bien, Siegfried; Rösler, Frank

    2007-03-01

    The present study investigated the neurophysiological processes underlying associative long-term memory retrieval of objects and spatial positions by means of a modified fan paradigm with cued recall and two neuroimaging methods (electroencephalogram [EEG] and functional magnetic resonance imaging). In an acquisition phase, either one stimulus or two stimuli became associated with a noun. During retrieval, probe stimuli comprising noun pairs were presented, and participants had to recall the respective associations and decided whether the nouns are linked to each other via a commonly associated stimulus. With this design, the quality and quantity of recalled associations was systematically varied, whereas the triggering stimuli and response requirements were held constant in all experimental conditions. Recall time proved to be directly related to the number of associations fanning out from a retrieval cue. Correspondingly, the hemodynamic response (blood oxygen level-dependent [BOLD] signal) and the amplitude of slow negative EEG potentials increased monotonically with the number of associations in both left anterior and bilateral posterior cortical areas. These effects were consistently observed with content-specific topographies for the two distinct materials. Furthermore, the multimethod approach revealed a close temporal link between response times and event-related slow potential changes on the one side and a close topographical and amplitude correspondence between slow potentials and BOLD signal changes on the other. The integrated results suggest that the neuronal dynamics of associative memory retrieval are equivalent for different types of associations, but that the structural basis is clearly content-specific.

  13. Copper-associated chronic hepatitis in the Labrador retriever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483839X

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes copper-associated chronic hepatitis as a new disease in the Labrador. A study of 143 dogs that were prospectively assessed for clinical parameters, laboratory results, and liver copper concentrations, as well as histologic signs of inflammation revealed that more than two

  14. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated with Neural Tube Defects (I): Full Aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-01-01

    Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) carry a risk of chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with other structural abnormalities, and family history of chromosome aberrations. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with NTDs in embryos, fetuses, and newborn patients, and a comprehensive review of numerical chromosomal abnormalities associated with NTDs, such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploi...

  15. Psychotherapy Process Variables Associated with the Retrieval of Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Alisa; Enns, Carolyn Zerbe; Friedlander, Myrna L.

    1997-01-01

    Investigated how the therapeutic process is associated with the retrieval of sexual abuse memories. A qualitative analysis of 11 adult women who identified themselves as victims of childhood sexual abuse resulted in the identification of 180 codes representing the participants' perspectives of therapy. Noteworthy codes were arranged into four…

  16. Association of dietary copper and zinc levels with hepatic copper and zinc concentration in Labrador Retrievers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fieten, H.; Hooijer-Nouwens, B.D.; Biourge, V.; Leegwater, P.A.J.; Watson, A.L.; van den Ingh, T.S.G.A.M.; Rothuizen, J.

    2012-01-01

    J Vet Intern Med. 2012 Nov;26(6):1274-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1939-1676.2012.01001.x. Epub 2012 Sep 24. Association of dietary copper and zinc levels with hepatic copper and zinc concentration in labrador retrievers. Fieten H, Hooijer-Nouwens BD, Biourge VC, Leegwater PA, Watson AL, van den Ingh TS,

  17. Stress impairs retrieval of extinguished and unextinguished associations in a predictive learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher-Dang, Tanja C; Uengoer, Metin; Wolf, Oliver T

    2013-09-01

    Recovery effects which can frequently be observed after a seemingly successful extinction procedure indicate that extinction does not lead to an erasure of the memory trace. Investigating factors which modulate the retrieval of extinction memory is highly relevant for basic science and clinical applications alike. This study investigated the effect of stress on the retrieval of extinguished and unextinguished stimulus-outcome associations in a predictive learning task. In this task, participants had to imagine being the doctor of a patient who sometimes suffers from stomach trouble after meals in his favorite restaurants. They were presented with different food stimuli while having to predict the occurrence or non-occurrence of stomach trouble. As extinction memory is modulated by context, we manipulated contextual cues so that initial acquisition of critical associations occurred in context (restaurant frame) A on day one, whereas associations were reversed in context B (extinction, day two). On the third day, participants were either stressed (exposed to the socially evaluated cold pressor task (SECPT); n=21) or subjected to a control condition (n=21) shortly before extinction memory retrieval was tested (in contexts A and B). Salivary cortisol and blood pressure measures as well as subjective ratings indicated that stress induction was successful. When retrieval of extinguished associations was tested on day three, participants' predictions reflected a renewal effect, as indicated by stronger recovery of responding in the acquisition context compared to the extinction context. Compared to controls, stressed participants showed impaired retrieval of extinguished and unextinguished associations. Contextual cues abolished the stress-induced memory impairment for unextinguished but not for extinguished associations. These findings might help to explain why stress leads to the reoccurrence of symptoms in affective disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Histopathologic Analysis of Retrieved Thrombi Associated With Successful Reperfusion After Acute Stroke Thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Mikito; Funatsu, Naoko; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Satow, Tetsu; Takahashi, Jun C; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-12-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of occlusive thrombi retrieved from cerebral arteries using endovascular therapy is possible. We investigated the relationship between successful reperfusion after thrombectomy and histopathologic characteristics of retrieved thrombi. Among consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with endovascular therapy at our institute from December 2010 to July 2015, we retrospectively reviewed those with acute major arterial occlusion from which retrieved thrombi were evaluated histopathologically. Obtained thrombi were assessed for the existence of atheromatous gruel, organization, and the ratios of erythrocyte and fibrin/platelet components. Successful reperfusion was defined as the modified Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia grade of 2b to 3. Of 83 patients studied, 58 (70%) underwent successful reperfusion. Atheromatous gruel was less frequently identified (3% versus 20%; P=0.024), and the proportion of erythrocyte components was higher (57±23% versus 47±24%; P=0.042) in thrombi retrieved from the reperfused than the unreperfused group. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, atheromatous gruel was inversely related (odds ratio, 0.062; 95% confidence interval, 0.002-0.864), and >64% erythrocyte components (cutoff obtained from receiver operating characteristic curve) were positively related (odds ratio, 4.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.185-19.363) to successful reperfusion. Successful reperfusion could be associated with the histopathology of occlusive thrombi, including the existence of atheromatous gruel and proportion of erythrocyte components. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02251665. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Neural ensemble dynamics underlying a long-term associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Benjamin F.; Gründemann, Jan; Kitch, Lacey J.; Lecoq, Jerome A.; Parker, Jones G.; Marshall, Jesse D.; Larkin, Margaret C.; Jercog, Pablo E.; Grenier, Francois; Li, Jin Zhong; Lüthi, Andreas; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    The brain’s ability to associate different stimuli is vital to long-term memory, but how neural ensembles encode associative memories is unknown. Here we studied how cell ensembles in the basal and lateral amygdala (BLA) encode associations between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli (CS, US). Using a miniature fluorescence microscope, we tracked BLA ensemble neural Ca2+ dynamics during fear learning and extinction over six days in behaving mice. Fear conditioning induced both up- and down-regulation of individual cells’ CS-evoked responses. This bi-directional plasticity mainly occurred after conditioning and reshaped the CS ensemble neural representation to gain similarity to the US-representation. During extinction training with repetitive CS presentations, the CS-representation became more distinctive without reverting to its original form. Throughout, the strength of the ensemble-encoded CS-US association predicted each mouse’s level of behavioral conditioning. These findings support a supervised learning model in which activation of the US-representation guides the transformation of the CS-representation. PMID:28329757

  20. Accelerated DNA Methylation Age: Associations with PTSD and Neural Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Erika J.; Logue, Mark W.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Sadeh, Naomi; Schichman, Steven A.; Stone, Annjanette; Salat, David H.; Milberg, William; McGlinchey, Regina; Miller, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may accelerate cellular aging and lead to premature morbidity and neurocognitive decline. Methods This study evaluated associations between PTSD and DNA methylation (DNAm) age using recently developed algorithms of cellular age by Horvath (2013) and Hannum et al. (2013). These estimates reflect accelerated aging when they exceed chronological age. We also examined if accelerated cellular age manifested in degraded neural integrity, indexed via diffusion tensor imaging. Results Among 281 male and female veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, DNAm age was strongly related to chronological age (rs ~.88). Lifetime PTSD severity was associated with Hannum DNAm age estimates residualized for chronological age (β = .13, p= .032). Advanced DNAm age was associated with reduced integrity in the genu of the corpus callosum (β = −.17, p= .009) and indirectly linked to poorer working memory performance via this region (indirect β = − .05, p= .029). Horvath DNAm age estimates were not associated with PTSD or neural integrity. Conclusions Results provide novel support for PTSD-related accelerated aging in DNAm and extend the evidence base of known DNAm age correlates to the domains of neural integrity and cognition. PMID:26447678

  1. Bayesian neural networks for detecting epistasis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Andrew L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Doyle, Jon

    2014-11-21

    Discovering causal genetic variants from large genetic association studies poses many difficult challenges. Assessing which genetic markers are involved in determining trait status is a computationally demanding task, especially in the presence of gene-gene interactions. A non-parametric Bayesian approach in the form of a Bayesian neural network is proposed for use in analyzing genetic association studies. Demonstrations on synthetic and real data reveal they are able to efficiently and accurately determine which variants are involved in determining case-control status. By using graphics processing units (GPUs) the time needed to build these models is decreased by several orders of magnitude. In comparison with commonly used approaches for detecting interactions, Bayesian neural networks perform very well across a broad spectrum of possible genetic relationships. The proposed framework is shown to be a powerful method for detecting causal SNPs while being computationally efficient enough to handle large datasets.

  2. An exploratory study on the aerosol height retrieval from OMI measurements of the 477 nm O2 - O2 spectral band using a neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimot, Julien; Pepijn Veefkind, J.; Vlemmix, Tim; de Haan, Johan F.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Proestakis, Emmanouil; Marinou, Eleni; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study on the aerosol layer height (ALH) retrieval from the OMI 477 nm O2 - O2 spectral band. We have developed algorithms based on the multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN) approach and applied them to 3-year (2005-2007) OMI cloud-free scenes over north-east Asia, collocated with MODIS Aqua aerosol product. In addition to the importance of aerosol altitude for climate and air quality objectives, our long-term motivation is to evaluate the possibility of retrieving ALH for potential future improvements of trace gas retrievals (e.g. NO2, HCHO, SO2) from UV-visible air quality satellite measurements over scenes including high aerosol concentrations. This study presents a first step of this long-term objective and evaluates, from a statistic point of view, an ensemble of OMI ALH retrievals over a long time period of 3 years covering a large industrialized continental region. This ALH retrieval relies on the analysis of the O2 - O2 slant column density (SCD) and requires an accurate knowledge of the aerosol optical thickness, τ. Using MODIS Aqua τ(550 nm) as a prior information, absolute seasonal differences between the LIdar climatology of vertical Aerosol Structure for space-based lidar simulation (LIVAS) and average OMI ALH, over scenes with MODIS τ(550 nm) ≥ 1. 0, are in the range of 260-800 m (assuming single scattering albedo ω0 = 0. 95) and 180-310 m (assuming ω0 = 0. 9). OMI ALH retrievals depend on the assumed aerosol single scattering albedo (sensitivity up to 660 m) and the chosen surface albedo (variation less than 200 m between OMLER and MODIS black-sky albedo). Scenes with τ ≤ 0. 5 are expected to show too large biases due to the little impact of particles on the O2 - O2 SCD changes. In addition, NN algorithms also enable aerosol optical thickness retrieval by exploring the OMI reflectance in the continuum. Comparisons with collocated MODIS Aqua show agreements between -0. 02 ± 0. 45 and -0. 18 ± 0

  3. Learning and retrieving holistic and componential visual-verbal associations in reading and object naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Connor; Taylor, J S H; Davis, Matthew H

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the neural processes that underlie learning to read can provide a scientific foundation for literacy education but studying these processes in real-world contexts remains challenging. We present behavioural data from adult participants learning to read artificial words and name artificial objects over two days. Learning profiles and generalisation confirmed that componential learning of visual-verbal associations distinguishes reading from object naming. Functional MRI data collected on the second day allowed us to identify the neural systems that support componential reading as distinct from systems supporting holistic visual-verbal associations in object naming. Results showed increased activation in posterior ventral occipitotemporal (vOT), parietal, and frontal cortices when reading an artificial orthography compared to naming artificial objects, and the reverse profile in anterior vOT regions. However, activation differences between trained and untrained words were absent, suggesting a lack of cortical representations for whole words. Despite this, hippocampal responses provided some evidence for overnight consolidation of both words and objects learned on day 1. The comparison between neural activity for artificial words and objects showed extensive overlap with systems differentially engaged for real object naming and English word/pseudoword reading in the same participants. These findings therefore provide evidence that artificial learning paradigms offer an alternative method for studying the neural systems supporting language and literacy. Implications for literacy acquisition are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Music Retrieval Based on the Relation between Color Association and Lyrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamur, Tetsuaki; Utsumi, Akira; Sakamoto, Maki

    Various methods for music retrieval have been proposed. Recently, many researchers are tackling developing methods based on the relationship between music and feelings. In our previous psychological study, we found that there was a significant correlation between colors evoked from songs and colors evoked only from lyrics, and showed that the music retrieval system using lyrics could be developed. In this paper, we focus on the relationship among music, lyrics and colors, and propose a music retrieval method using colors as queries and analyzing lyrics. This method estimates colors evoked from songs by analyzing lyrics of the songs. On the first step of our method, words associated with colors are extracted from lyrics. We assumed two types of methods to extract words associated with colors. In the one of two methods, the words are extracted based on the result of a psychological experiment. In the other method, in addition to the words extracted based on the result of the psychological experiment, the words from corpora for the Latent Semantic Analysis are extracted. On the second step, colors evoked from the extracted words are compounded, and the compounded colors are regarded as those evoked from the song. On the last step, colors as queries are compared with colors estimated from lyrics, and the list of songs is presented based on similarities. We evaluated the two methods described above and found that the method based on the psychological experiment and corpora performed better than the method only based on the psychological experiment. As a result, we showed that the method using colors as queries and analyzing lyrics is effective for music retrieval.

  5. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated with Neural Tube Defects (I: Full Aneuploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs carry a risk of chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with other structural abnormalities, and family history of chromosome aberrations. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with NTDs in embryos, fetuses, and newborn patients, and a comprehensive review of numerical chromosomal abnormalities associated with NTDs, such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 9, trisomy 2, trisomy 21, trisomy 7, trisomy 8, trisomy 14, trisomy 15, trisomy 16, trisomy 5 mosaicism, trisomy 11 mosaicism, trisomy 20 mosaicism, monosomy X, and tetraploidy. NTDs may be associated with aneuploidy. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the possibility of chromosomal abnormalities and prompt a thorough cytogenetic investigation and genetic counseling.

  6. Tropospheric ozone column retrieval at northern mid-latitudes from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument by means of a neural network algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sellitto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring tropospheric ozone from space is of critical importance in order to gain more thorough knowledge on phenomena affecting air quality and the greenhouse effect. Deriving information on tropospheric ozone from UV/VIS nadir satellite spectrometers is difficult owing to the weak sensitivity of the measured radiance spectra to variations of ozone in the troposphere. Here we propose an alternative method of analysis to retrieve tropospheric ozone columns from Ozone Monitoring Instrument radiances by means of a neural network algorithm. An extended set of ozone sonde measurements at northern mid-latitudes for the years 2004–2008 has been considered as the training and test data set. The design of the algorithm is extensively discussed. Our retrievals are compared to both tropospheric ozone residuals and optimal estimation retrievals over a similar independent test data set. Results show that our algorithm has comparable accuracy with respect to both correlative methods and its performance is slightly better over a subset containing only European ozone sonde stations. Possible sources of errors are analyzed. Finally, the capabilities of our algorithm to derive information on boundary layer ozone are studied and the results critically discussed.

  7. Coupling a Neural Network-Based forward Model and a Bayesian Inversion Approach to Retrieve Wind Field from Spaceborne Polarimetric Radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Marzano, Frank S

    2008-12-03

    A simulation study to assess the potentiality of sea surface wind vector estimation based on the approximation of the forward model through Neural Networks and on the Bayesian theory of parameter estimation is presented. A polarimetric microwave radiometer has been considered and its observations have been simulated by means of the two scale model. To perform the simulations, the atmospheric and surface parameters have been derived from ECMWF analysis fields. To retrieve wind speed, Minimum Variance (MV) and Maximum Posterior Probability (MAP) criteria have been used while, for wind direction, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) criterion has been exploited. To minimize the cost function of MAP and ML, conventional Gradient Descent method, as well as Simulated Annealing optimization technique, have been employed. Results have shown that the standard deviation of the wind speed retrieval error is approximately 1.1 m/s for the best estimator. As for the wind direction, the standard deviation of the estimation error is less than 13° for wind speeds larger than 6 m/s. For lower wind velocities, the wind direction signal is too weak to ensure reliable retrievals. A method to deal with the non-uniqueness of the wind direction solution has been also developed. A test on a case study has yielded encouraging results.

  8. Neurons in the barrel cortex turn into processing whisker and odor signals: a cellular mechanism for the storage and retrieval of associative signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dangui eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Associative learning and memory are essential to logical thinking and cognition. How the neurons are recruited as associative memory cells to encode multiple input signals for their associated storage and distinguishable retrieval remains unclear. We studied this issue in the barrel cortex by in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, electrophysiology and neural tracing in our mouse model that the simultaneous whisker and olfaction stimulations led to odorant-induced whisker motion. After this cross-modal reflex arose, the barrel and piriform cortices connected. More than 40% of barrel cortical neurons became to encode odor signal alongside whisker signal. Some of these neurons expressed distinct activity patterns in response to acquired odor signal and innate whisker signal, and others encoded similar pattern in response to these signals. In the meantime, certain barrel cortical astrocytes encoded odorant and whisker signals. After associative learning, the neurons and astrocytes in the sensory cortices are able to store the newly learnt signal (cross-modal memory besides the innate signal (native-modal memory. Such associative memory cells distinguish the differences of these signals by programming different codes and signify the historical associations of these signals by similar codes in information retrievals.

  9. Evolution of the C2RCC Neural Network for Sentinel 2 and 3 for the Retrieval of Ocean Colour Products in Normal and Extreme Optically Complex Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Carsten; Doerffer, Roland; Peters, Marco; Kerstin, Stelzer; Embacher, Sabine; Ruescas, Ana

    2016-08-01

    Retrieval of water constituents, or its optical properties, requires inversion of the water leaving reflectance spectrum, measured at top of atmosphere by ocean colour satellites. The Case 2 Regional processor, originally developed by Doerffer and Schiller [6], uses a large database of radiative transfer simulations inverted by neural networks as basic technology. Through the CoastColour project major improvements were introduced. It has been amended by a set of additional neural networks performing specific tasks and special neural networks have been trained to cover extreme ranges of scattering and absorption. The processor has been renamed into C2RCC (Case 2 Regional CoastColour) and is applicable to all past and current ocean colour sensors as well as Sentinel 2. It has been validated in various studies and is available through ESA's Sentinel toolbox SNAP. It is also used in the Sentinel 3 OLCI ground segment processor of ESA for the generation of the Case 2 water products, as well as in the processor for the upcoming MERIS 4th reprocessing.

  10. Altered Source Memory Retrieval is Associated with Pathological Doubt in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christy A.; Hale, Lisa R.; Hamilton, Nancy; Powell, Joshua N.; Martin, Laura E.; Savage, Cary R.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often complain of doubt related to memory. As neuropsychological research has demonstrated that individuals with OCD tend to focus on details and miss the larger context, the construct of source (contextual) memory may be particularly relevant to memory complaints in OCD. Memory for object versus contextual information relies on partially distinct regions within the prefrontal cortex, parietal and medial temporal lobe, and may be differentially impacted by OCD. In the present study we sought to test the hypothesis that individuals with OCD exhibit impaired source memory retrieval using a novel memory paradigm-The Memory for Rooms Test (MFRT)- a four-room memory task in which participants walk through four rooms and attempt to encode and remember objects. Demographically matched individuals with OCD and healthy controls studied objects in the context of four rooms, and then completed a memory retrieval test while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). While no differences were observed in source memory accuracy, individuals with OCD exhibited greater task related activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls during correct source memory retrieval. During correct object recognition, individuals with OCD failed to recruit the dorsolateral prefrontal(DLPFC)/premotor, left mPFC, and right parietal regions to the same extent as healthy controls. Our results suggest abnormal recruitment of frontal-parietal and PCC regions during source verses object memory retrieval in OCD. Within the OCD group, activation in the PCC and the premotor/DLPFC was associated with greater pathological doubt. This finding is consistent with the observation that OCD patients often experience extreme doubt, even when memory performance is intact. PMID:26315458

  11. Altered source memory retrieval is associated with pathological doubt in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christy A; Hale, Lisa R; Hamilton, Nancy; Powell, Joshua N; Martin, Laura E; Savage, Cary R

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often complain of doubt related to memory. As neuropsychological research has demonstrated that individuals with OCD tend to focus on details and miss the larger context, the construct of source (contextual) memory may be particularly relevant to memory complaints in OCD. Memory for object versus contextual information relies on partially distinct regions within the prefrontal cortex, parietal and medial temporal lobe, and may be differentially impacted by OCD. In the present study, we sought to test the hypothesis that individuals with OCD exhibit impaired source memory retrieval using a novel memory paradigm - The Memory for Rooms Test (MFRT) - a four-room memory task in which participants walk through four rooms and attempt to encode and remember objects. Demographically matched individuals with OCD and healthy controls studied objects in the context of four rooms, and then completed a memory retrieval test while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). While no differences were observed in source memory accuracy, individuals with OCD exhibited greater task related activation in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) relative to healthy controls during correct source memory retrieval. During correct object recognition, individuals with OCD failed to recruit the dorsolateral prefrontal(DLPFC)/premotor, left mPFC, and right parietal regions to the same extent as healthy controls. Our results suggest abnormal recruitment of frontal-parietal and PCC regions during source verses object memory retrieval in OCD. Within the OCD group, activation in the PCC and the premotor/DLPFC was associated with greater pathological doubt. This finding is consistent with the observation that OCD patients often experience extreme doubt, even when memory performance is intact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Item and source memory for emotional associates is mediated by different retrieval processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Dolcos, Florin; Wendt, Julia; Wirkner, Janine; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2017-12-12

    Recent event-related potential (ERP) data showed that neutral objects encoded in emotional background pictures were better remembered than objects encoded in neutral contexts, when recognition memory was tested one week later. In the present study, we investigated whether this long-term memory advantage for items is also associated with correct memory for contextual source details. Furthermore, we were interested in the possibly dissociable contribution of familiarity and recollection processes (using a Remember/Know procedure). The results revealed that item memory performance was mainly driven by the subjective experience of familiarity, irrespective of whether the objects were previously encoded in emotional or neutral contexts. Correct source memory for the associated background picture, however, was driven by recollection and enhanced when the content was emotional. In ERPs, correctly recognized old objects evoked frontal ERP Old/New effects (300-500ms), irrespective of context category. As in our previous study (Ventura-Bort et al., 2016b), retrieval for objects from emotional contexts was associated with larger parietal Old/New differences (600-800ms), indicating stronger involvement of recollection. Thus, the results suggest a stronger contribution of recollection-based retrieval to item and contextual background source memory for neutral information associated with an emotional event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neural oscillations and information flow associated with synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao

    2011-10-25

    As a rhythmic neural activity, neural oscillation exists all over the nervous system, in structures as diverse as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, subcortical nuclei and sense organs. This review firstly presents some evidence that synchronous neural oscillations in theta and gamma bands reveal much about the origin and nature of cognitive processes such as learning and memory. And then it introduces the novel analyzing algorithms of neural oscillations, which is a directionality index of neural information flow (NIF) as a measure of synaptic plasticity. An example of application used such an analyzing algorithms of neural oscillations has been provided.

  14. Disgust proneness and associated neural substrates in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Tristan J; Di Iorio, Christina R; Olatunji, Bunmi O; Benningfield, Margaret M; Blackford, Jennifer U; Dietrich, Mary S; Bhatia, Monisha; Theiss, Justin D; Salomon, Ronald M; Niswender, Kevin; Cowan, Ronald L

    2016-03-01

    Defects in experiencing disgust may contribute to obesity by allowing for the overconsumption of food. However, the relationship of disgust proneness and its associated neural locus has yet to be explored in the context of obesity. Thirty-three participants (17 obese, 16 lean) completed the Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale-Revised and a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm where images from 4 categories (food, contaminates, contaminated food or fixation) were randomly presented. Independent two-sample t-tests revealed significantly lower levels of Disgust Sensitivity for the obese group (mean score = 14.7) compared with the lean group (mean score = 17.6, P = 0.026). The obese group had less activation in the right insula than the lean group when viewing contaminated food images. Multiple regression with interaction analysis revealed one left insula region where the association of Disgust Sensitivity scores with activation differed by group when viewing contaminated food images. These interaction effects were driven by the negative correlation of Disgust Sensitivity scores with beta values extracted from the left insula in the obese group (r = -0.59) compared with a positive correlation in the lean group (r = 0.65). Given these body mass index-dependent differences in Disgust Sensitivity and neural responsiveness to disgusting food images, it is likely that altered Disgust Sensitivity may contribute to obesity. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Neural network based feed-forward high density associative memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, T.; Moopenn, A.; Lamb, J. L.; Ramesham, R.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel thin film approach to neural-network-based high-density associative memory is described. The information is stored locally in a memory matrix of passive, nonvolatile, binary connection elements with a potential to achieve a storage density of 10 to the 9th bits/sq cm. Microswitches based on memory switching in thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon, and alternatively in manganese oxide, have been used as programmable read-only memory elements. Low-energy switching has been ascertained in both these materials. Fabrication and testing of memory matrix is described. High-speed associative recall approaching 10 to the 7th bits/sec and high storage capacity in such a connection matrix memory system is also described.

  16. Neural network implementations of data association algorithms for sensor fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald E.; Pittard, Clarence L.; Martin, Worthy N.

    1989-01-01

    The paper is concerned with locating a time varying set of entities in a fixed field when the entities are sensed at discrete time instances. At a given time instant a collection of bivariate Gaussian sensor reports is produced, and these reports estimate the location of a subset of the entities present in the field. A database of reports is maintained, which ideally should contain one report for each entity sensed. Whenever a collection of sensor reports is received, the database must be updated to reflect the new information. This updating requires association processing between the database reports and the new sensor reports to determine which pairs of sensor and database reports correspond to the same entity. Algorithms for performing this association processing are presented. Neural network implementation of the algorithms, along with simulation results comparing the approaches are provided.

  17. Factors associated with reduced radiation exposure, cost, and technical difficulty of inferior vena cava filter placement and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Matthew; Charles, Hearns W; Pflager, Daniel; Deipolyi, Amy R

    2017-01-01

    We sought to delineate factors of inferior vena cava filter placement associated with increased radiation and cost and difficult subsequent retrieval. In total, 299 procedures from August 2013 to December 2014, 252 in a fluoroscopy suite (FS) and 47 in the operating room (OR), were reviewed for radiation exposure, fluoroscopy time, filter type, and angulation. The number of retrieval devices and fluoroscopy time needed for retrieval were assessed. Multiple linear regression assessed the impact of filter type, procedure location, and patient and procedural variables on radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and filter angulation. Logistic regression assessed the impact of filter angulation, type, and filtration duration on retrieval difficulty. Access site and filter type had no impact on radiation exposure. However, placement in the OR, compared to the FS, entailed more radiation (156.3 vs 71.4 mGy; P = 0.001), fluoroscopy time (6.1 vs 2.8 min; P 1 retrieval device (P 30 min fluoroscopy time (P = 0.02). Cost savings for placement in the FS vs OR were estimated at $444.50 per case. In conclusion, increased radiation and cost were associated with placement in the OR. Filter angulation independently predicted difficult filter retrieval; angulation was determined by filter type. Performing filter placement in the FS using specific filters may reduce radiation and cost while enabling future retrieval.

  18. Molecular substrates for retrieval and reconsolidation of cocaine-associated contextual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Courtney A; Marshall, John F

    2005-09-15

    Relapse into drug taking among addicts often depends on learned associations between drug-paired cues and the rewarding effects of these drugs, such as cocaine (COC). Memory for drug-paired cues resists extinction and contributes to the high rate of relapse; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not understood. We show that COC-conditioned place preference (CPP) activates ERK, CREB, Elk-1, and Fos in the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC) but not shell. Intra-AcbC infusions of U0126, an inhibitor of the ERK kinase MEK, prevent both the activation of ERK, CREB, Elk-1, and Fos and retrieval of COC-CPP. When tested again 24 hr or 14 days after intra-AcbC infusions of U0126 or another MEK inhibitor, PD98059, CPP retrieval and concomitant protein activation were significantly attenuated. Together, these findings indicate the necessity of the AcbC ERK signaling pathway for drug-paired contextual cue memories and suggest that these strong memories can become susceptible to disruption by therapeutic agents.

  19. A Deletion in the Canine POMC Gene Is Associated with Weight and Appetite in Obesity-Prone Labrador Retriever Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffan, Eleanor; Dennis, Rowena J; O'Donovan, Conor J; Becker, Julia M; Scott, Robert A; Smith, Stephen P; Withers, David J; Wood, Claire J; Conci, Elena; Clements, Dylan N; Summers, Kim M; German, Alexander J; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Arendt, Maja L; Iyemere, Valentine P; Withers, Elaine; Söder, Josefin; Wernersson, Sara; Andersson, Göran; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Yeo, Giles S H; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2016-05-10

    Sequencing of candidate genes for obesity in Labrador retriever dogs identified a 14 bp deletion in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) with an allele frequency of 12%. The deletion disrupts the β-MSH and β-endorphin coding sequences and is associated with body weight (per allele effect of 0.33 SD), adiposity, and greater food motivation. Among other dog breeds, the deletion was only found in the closely related flat-coat retriever (FCR), where it is similarly associated with body weight and food motivation. The mutation is significantly more common in Labrador retrievers selected to become assistance dogs than pets. In conclusion, the deletion in POMC is a significant modifier of weight and appetite in Labrador retrievers and FCRs and may influence other behavioral traits. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chaotic neural network for learnable associative memory recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charles C.; Szu, Harold H.

    2003-04-01

    We show that the Fuzzy Membership Function (FMF) is learnable with underlying chaotic neural networks for the open set probability. A sigmoid N-shaped function is used to generate chaotic signals. We postulate that such a chaotic set of innumerable realization forms a FMF exemplified by fuzzy feature maps of eyes, nose, etc., for the invariant face classification. The CNN with FMF plays an important role for fast pattern recognition capability in examples of both habituation and novelty detections. In order to reduce the computation complexity, the nearest-neighborhood weight connection is proposed. In addition, a novel timing-sequence weight-learning algorithm is introduced to increase the capacity and recall of the associative memory. For simplicity, a piece-wise-linear (PWL) N-shaped function was designed and implemented and fabricated in a CMOS chip.

  1. Neural signalling of food healthiness associated with emotion processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe eHerwig

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to differentiate healthy from unhealthy foods is important in order to promote good health. Food, however, may have an emotional connotation, which could be inversely related to healthiness. The neurobiological background of differentiating healthy and unhealthy food and its relations to emotion processing are not yet well understood. We addressed the neural activations, particularly considering the single subject level, when one evaluates a food item to be of a higher, compared to a lower grade of healthiness with a particular view on emotion processing brain regionsThirty-seven healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while evaluating the healthiness of food presented as photographs with a subsequent rating on a visual analogue scale. We compared individual evaluations of high and low healthiness of food items and also considered gender differences.We found increased activation when food was evaluated to be healthy in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precuneus in whole brain analyses. In ROI analyses, perceived and rated higher healthiness was associated with lower amygdala activity and higher ventral striatal and orbitofrontal cortex activity. Females exerted a higher activation in midbrain areas when rating food items as being healthy.Our results underline the close relationship between food and emotion processing, which makes sense considering evolutionary aspects. Actively evaluating and deciding whether food is healthy is accompanied by neural signalling associated with reward and self-relevance, which could promote salutary nutrition behaviour. The involved brain regions may be amenable to mechanisms of emotion regulation in the context of psychotherapeutic regulation of food intake.

  2. Stochastic simulation experiment to assess radar rainfall retrieval uncertainties associated with attenuation and its correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uijlenhoet

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available As rainfall constitutes the main source of water for the terrestrial hydrological processes, accurate and reliable measurement and prediction of its spatial and temporal distribution over a wide range of scales is an important goal for hydrology. We investigate the potential of ground-based weather radar to provide such measurements through a theoretical analysis of some of the associated observation uncertainties. A stochastic model of range profiles of raindrop size distributions is employed in a Monte Carlo simulation experiment to investigate the rainfall retrieval uncertainties associated with weather radars operating at X-, C-, and S-band. We focus in particular on the errors and uncertainties associated with rain-induced signal attenuation and its correction for incoherent, non-polarimetric, single-frequency, operational weather radars. The performance of two attenuation correction schemes, the (forward Hitschfeld-Bordan algorithm and the (backward Marzoug-Amayenc algorithm, is analyzed for both moderate (assuming a 50 km path length and intense Mediterranean rainfall (for a 30 km path. A comparison shows that the backward correction algorithm is more stable and accurate than the forward algorithm (with a bias in the order of a few percent for the former, compared to tens of percent for the latter, provided reliable estimates of the total path-integrated attenuation are available. Moreover, the bias and root mean square error associated with each algorithm are quantified as a function of path-averaged rain rate and distance from the radar in order to provide a plausible order of magnitude for the uncertainty in radar-retrieved rain rates for hydrological applications.

  3. Evaluation of risk factors for degenerative joint disease associated with hip dysplasia in German Shepherd Dogs, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, and Rottweilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G K; Mayhew, P D; Kapatkin, A S; McKelvie, P J; Shofer, F S; Gregor, T P

    2001-12-15

    To determine whether age, breed, sex, weight, or distraction index (DI) was associated with the risk that dogs of 4 common breeds (German Shepherd Dog, Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever, Rottweiler) would have radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated with hip dysplasia. Cross-sectional prevalence study. 15,742 dogs. Hips of dogs were evaluated radiographically by use of the ventrodorsal hip-extended view, the compression v ew, and the distraction view. The ventrodorsal hip-extended view was examined to determine whether dogs had DJD. For each breed, a multiple logistic regression model incorporating age, sex, weight, and DI was created. For each breed, disease-susceptibility curves were produced, using all dogs, regardless of age, and dogs grouped on the basis of age. Weight and DI were significant risk factors for DJD in all breeds. For German Shepherd Dogs, the risk of having DJD was 4.95 times the risk for dogs of the other 3 breeds combined. In all breeds, the probability of having DJD increased with age. Results indicated that the probability of having hip DJD increased with hip joint laxity as measured by use of DI. This association was breed-specific, indicating that breed-specific information on disease susceptibility should be incorporated when making breeding decisions and when deciding on possible surgical treatment of hip dysplasia.

  4. Two loci on chromosome 5 are associated with serum IgE levels in Labrador retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Owczarek-Lipska

    Full Text Available Crosslinking of immunoglobulin E antibodies (IgE bound at the surface of mast cells and subsequent mediator release is considered the most important trigger for allergic reactions. Therefore, the genetic control of IgE levels is studied in the context of allergic diseases, such as asthma, atopic rhinitis, or atopic dermatitis (AD. We performed genome-wide association studies in 161 Labrador Retrievers with regard to total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE levels. We identified a genome-wide significant association on CFA 5 with the antigen-specific IgE responsiveness to Acarus siro. We detected a second genome-wide significant association with respect to the antigen-specific IgE responsiveness to Tyrophagus putrescentiae at a different locus on chromosome 5. A. siro and T. putrescentiae both belong to the family Acaridae and represent so-called storage or forage mites. These forage mites are discussed as major allergen sources in canine AD. No obvious candidate gene for the regulation of IgE levels is located under the two association signals. Therefore our studies offer a chance of identifying a novel mechanism controlling the host's IgE response.

  5. Aerosol height retrieval from satellite visible measurements: application to OMI 477 nm O2-O2 spectral band, based on Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimot, Julien; Veefkind, Pepijn; Vlemmix, Tim; Levelt, Pieternel

    2017-04-01

    The ability to monitor air quality and climate from UltraViolet-Visible (UV-Vis) satellite spectral measurements relies on accurate trace gas (e.g. NO2, SO2, HCHO, O3) columns combined with aerosol properties and vertical distribution. In the absence of clouds, the most important error source on the observations of trace gases in the troposphere are aerosols, since their scattering and absorbing properties modify the average light path followed by the detected photons. Large impacts due to their vertical distribution uncertainties remain when retrieving vertical column densities of trace gases from UV-Vis air quality space-borne sensors [Krotkov et al., 2008; Boersma et al., 2011; Barkley et al., 2012; Hewson et al., 2015; Castellanos et al., 2015; Chimot et al., 2016a]. Aerosols and trace gases share, over urban and industrialized areas, similar anthropogenic sources, and their concentrations, as shown by the satellite observations, often present significant correlations [Veefkind et al., 2011]. We have recently developed a Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network (NN) algorithm to retrieve Aerosol Layer Height (ALH) from the OMI 477 nm O2-O2 absorption band [Chimot et al., 2016b]. This algorithm represents aerosols in the troposphere as a single scattering layer defined by its mean altitude and homogeneous optical properties. This algorithm enables the link between the OMI O2-O2 slant column density derived from the 477 nm spectral measurements and the aerosol layer altitude. A prior information about the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) is needed to distinguish the effects due to the amount of fine particles and their altitude. Therefore, the ALH retrieval strongly benefits from a synergy between OMI 477 nm O2-O2 spectral measurements and MODIS AOT product. Aerosol layer heights are currently retrieved with an uncertainty in the range of 260-800 m for scenes with AOT larger than 1. Improvement of these retrievals can be expected by improving assumptions on the

  6. Training-Associated Emotional Arousal Shapes Endocannabinoid Modulation of Spatial Memory Retrieval in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Maria; De Castro, Valentina; Gray, J Megan; Palmery, Maura; Trezza, Viviana; Roozendaal, Benno; Hill, Matthew N; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2015-10-14

    Variations in environmental aversiveness influence emotional memory processes in rats. We have previously shown that cannabinoid effects on memory are dependent on the stress level at the time of training as well as on the aversiveness of the environmental context. Here, we investigated whether the hippocampal endocannabinoid system modulates memory retrieval depending on the training-associated arousal level. Male adult Sprague Dawley rats were trained on a water maze spatial task at two different water temperatures (19°C and 25°C) to elicit either higher or lower stress levels, respectively. Rats trained under the higher stress condition had better memory and higher corticosterone concentrations than rats trained at the lower stress condition. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 (10-30 ng/side), the 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) hydrolysis inhibitor JZL184 (0.1-1 μg/side), and the anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis inhibitor URB597 (10-30 ng/side) were administered bilaterally into the hippocampus 60 min before probe-trial retention testing. WIN55212-2 or JZL184, but not URB597, impaired probe-trial performances only of rats trained at the higher stressful condition. Furthermore, rats trained under higher stress levels displayed an increase in hippocampal 2-AG, but not AEA, levels at the time of retention testing and a decreased affinity of the main 2-AG-degrading enzyme for its substrate. The present findings indicate that the endocannabinoid 2-AG in the hippocampus plays a key role in the selective regulation of spatial memory retrieval of stressful experience, shedding light on the neurobiological mechanisms involved in the impact of stress effects on memory processing. Endogenous cannabinoids play a central role in the modulation of memory for emotional events. Here we demonstrate that the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the hippocampus, a brain region crucially involved in the regulation of memory processes, selectively modulates spatial

  7. What factors are associated with the integration of evidence retrieval technology into routine general practice settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrabi, Farah; Westbrook, Johanna I; Coiera, Enrico W

    2007-10-01

    Information retrieval systems have the potential to improve patient care but little is known about the variables which influence clinicians' uptake and use of systems in routine work. To determine which factors influenced use of an online evidence retrieval system. Computer logs and pre- and post-system survey analysis of a 4-week clinical trial of the Quick Clinical online evidence system involving 227 general practitioners across Australia. Online evidence use was not linked to general practice training or clinical experience but female clinicians conducted more searches than their male counterparts (mean use=14.38 searches, S.D.=11.68 versus mean use=8.50 searches, S.D.=9.99; t=2.67, d.f.=157, P=0.008). Practice characteristics such as hours worked, type and geographic location of clinic were not associated with search activity. Information seeking was also not related to participants' perceived information needs, computer skills, training nor Internet connection speed. Clinicians who reported direct improvements in patient care as a result of system use had significantly higher rates of system use than other users (mean use=12.55 searches, S.D.=13.18 versus mean use=8.15 searches, S.D.=9.18; t=2.322, d.f.=154 P=0.022). Comparison of participants' views pre- and post- the trial, showed that post-trial clinicians expressed more positive views about searching for information during a consultation (chi(2)=27.40, d.f.=4, PPost-trial clinicians positively changed their views about having time to search for information and pursued more questions during clinic hours.

  8. Psychosocial stress impairs working memory at high loads: An association with cortisol levels and memory retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, N.Y.L.; Everaerd, W.T.A.M.; Elzinga, B.M.; van Well, S.; Bermond, B.

    2006-01-01

    Stress and cortisol are known to impair memory retrieval of well-consolidated declarative material. The effects of cortisol on memory retrieval may in particular be due to glucocorticoid (GC) receptors in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Therefore, effects of stress and cortisol should

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies shared risk loci common to two malignancies in golden retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Tonomura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6% and hemangiosarcoma (20%. We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers.

  10. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Shared Risk Loci Common to Two Malignancies in Golden Retrievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonomura, Noriko; Elvers, Ingegerd; Thomas, Rachael; Megquier, Kate; Turner-Maier, Jason; Howald, Cedric; Sarver, Aaron L.; Swofford, Ross; Frantz, Aric M.; Ito, Daisuke; Mauceli, Evan; Arendt, Maja; Noh, Hyun Ji; Koltookian, Michele; Biagi, Tara; Fryc, Sarah; Williams, Christina; Avery, Anne C.; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Barber, Lisa; Burgess, Kristine; Lander, Eric S.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Azuma, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6%) and hemangiosarcoma (20%). We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers. PMID:25642983

  11. Nondirective meditation activates default mode network and areas associated with memory retrieval and emotional processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eXu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nondirective meditation techniques are practiced with a relaxed focus of attention that permits spontaneously occurring thoughts, images, sensations, memories and emotions to emerge and pass freely, without any expectation that mind wandering should abate. These techniques are thought to facilitate mental processing of emotional experiences, thereby contributing to wellness and stress management. The present study assessed brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging in 14 experienced practitioners of Acem meditation in two experimental conditions. In the first, nondirective meditation was compared to rest. Significantly increased activity was detected in areas associated with attention, mind wandering, retrieval of episodic memories and emotional processing. In the second condition, participants carried out concentrative practicing of the same meditation technique, actively trying to avoid mind wandering. The contrast nondirective meditation > concentrative practicing was characterized by higher activity in the right medial temporal lobe (parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala. In conclusion, the present results support the notion that nondirective meditation, which permits mind wandering, involves more extensive activation of brain areas associated with episodic memories and emotional processing, than during concentrative practicing or regular rest.

  12. Neural network model for atmospheric attenuation retrieval between 20 and 50 GHz by means of dual-frequency microwave radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Laurent; Mallet, CéCile; Gole, Peter

    2003-10-01

    The propagation of signals through the atmosphere plays a major role in the quality of communications between ground terminals and satellites. Its characteristics have to be known accurately for appropriate communications equipment to be selected. In the band of frequencies used by operators in the future generation of satellites (beyond 20 GHz), the quality of transmission is especially affected by the attenuation of received signals because of rain, and by other less significant but much more frequent effects due to atmospheric gases, and nonprecipitating water. These phenomena have a direct impact on the availability ratio of a link between a ground terminal and a satellite. Our main goal in this study is to measure the atmospheric attenuation, using dual-frequency ground-based radiometers measuring the sky radiation at different pointing directions, so as to perform a statistical study. A new algorithm, based on a neural approach, is thus developed for estimating atmospheric attenuation, in various meteorological conditions, for several elevation angles and for frequencies between 20 and 50 GHz, from dual-frequency radiometric measurements. A validation of the obtained algorithm is performed on Olympus experimental data for the 20 and 30 GHz channels. At the end of this paper some applications are then presented to underline the usefulness of this new algorithm. The applicability of the algorithm to satellite beacon calibration in Ka or Q band with accuracy of 0.1 dB is shown. Preliminary joint statistics between attenuation at various pointing directions obtained at 40 GHz show what improvement can be expected from satellite diversity in the case of satellite constellations.

  13. Spaced Retrieval Enhances Memory for a Name-Face-Occupation Association in Older Adults with Probable Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E.; Walvoord, Ashley A. G.; Hawley, Karri S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors trained 4 older adults with probable Alzheimer's disease to recall a name-face-occupation association using the spaced retrieval technique. Six training sessions were administered over a 2-week period. On each trial, participants selected a target photograph and stated the target name and occupation at increasingly longer retention…

  14. Brain Activation during Associative Short-Term Memory Maintenance is Not Predictive for Subsequent Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko eBergmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Performance on working memory (WM tasks may partially be supported by long-term memory (LTM processing. Hence, brain activation recently being implicated in WM may actually have been driven by (incidental LTM formation. We examined which brain regions actually support successful WM processing, rather than being confounded by LTM processes, during the maintenance and probe phase of a WM task. We administered a four-pair (faces and houses associative delayed-match-to-sample (WM task using event-related fMRI and a subsequent associative recognition LTM task, using the same stimuli. This enabled us to analyze subsequent memory effects for both the WM and the LTM test by contrasting correctly recognized pairs with incorrect pairs for either task. Critically, with respect to the subsequent WM effect, we computed this analysis exclusively for trials that were forgotten in the subsequent LTM recognition task. Hence, brain activity associated with successful WM processing was less likely to be confounded by incidental LTM formation. The subsequent LTM effect, in contrast, was analyzed exclusively for pairs that previously had been correctly recognized in the WM task, disclosing brain regions involved in successful LTM formation after successful WM processing. Results for the subsequent WM effect showed no significantly activated brain areas for WM maintenance, possibly due to an insensitivity of fMRI to mechanisms underlying active WM maintenance. In contrast, a correct decision at WM probe was linked to activation in the retrieval success network (anterior and posterior midline brain structures. The subsequent LTM analyses revealed greater activation in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex in the early phase of the maintenance stage. No supra-threshold activation was found during the WM probe. Together, we obtained clearer insights in which brain regions support successful WM and LTM without the potential confound of the

  15. The relational luring effect: Retrieval of relational information during associative recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Vencislav; Hristova, Penka; Anders, Royce

    2017-05-01

    Here we argue that semantic relations (e.g., works in: nurse-hospital) have abstract independent representations in long-term memory (LTM) and that the same representation is accessed by all exemplars of a specific relation. We present evidence from 2 associative recognition experiments that uncovered a novel relational luring effect (RLE) in recognition memory. Participants studied word pairs, and then discriminated between intact (old) pairs and recombined lures. In the first experiment participants responded more slowly to lures that were relationally similar (table-cloth) to studied pairs (floor-carpet), in contrast to relationally dissimilar lures (pipe-water). Experiment 2 extended the RLE by showing a continuous effect of relational lure strength on recognition times (RTs), false alarms, and hits. It used a continuous pair recognition task, where each recombined lure or target could be preceded by 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 different exemplars of the same relation. RTs and false alarms increased linearly with the number of different previously seen relationally similar pairs. Moreover, more typical exemplars of a given relation lead to a stronger RLE. Finally, hits for intact pairs also rose with the number of previously studied different relational instances. These results suggest that semantic relations exist as independent representations in LTM and that during associative recognition these representations can be a spurious source of familiarity. We discuss the implications of the RLE for current models of semantic and episodic memory, unitization in associative recognition, analogical reasoning and retrieval, as well as constructive memory research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Brain activation during associative short-term memory maintenance is not predictive for subsequent retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Heiko C; Daselaar, Sander M; Beul, Sarah F; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Kessels, Roy P C

    2015-01-01

    Performance on working memory (WM) tasks may partially be supported by long-term memory (LTM) processing. Hence, brain activation recently being implicated in WM may actually have been driven by (incidental) LTM formation. We examined which brain regions actually support successful WM processing, rather than being confounded by LTM processes, during the maintenance and probe phase of a WM task. We administered a four-pair (faces and houses) associative delayed-match-to-sample (WM) task using event-related functional MRI (fMRI) and a subsequent associative recognition LTM task, using the same stimuli. This enabled us to analyze subsequent memory effects for both the WM and the LTM test by contrasting correctly recognized pairs with incorrect pairs for either task. Critically, with respect to the subsequent WM effect, we computed this analysis exclusively for trials that were forgotten in the subsequent LTM recognition task. Hence, brain activity associated with successful WM processing was less likely to be confounded by incidental LTM formation. The subsequent LTM effect, in contrast, was analyzed exclusively for pairs that previously had been correctly recognized in the WM task, disclosing brain regions involved in successful LTM formation after successful WM processing. Results for the subsequent WM effect showed no significantly activated brain areas for WM maintenance, possibly due to an insensitivity of fMRI to mechanisms underlying active WM maintenance. In contrast, a correct decision at WM probe was linked to activation in the "retrieval success network" (anterior and posterior midline brain structures). The subsequent LTM analyses revealed greater activation in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex in the early phase of the maintenance stage. No supra-threshold activation was found during the WM probe. Together, we obtained clearer insights in which brain regions support successful WM and LTM without the potential confound of

  17. MR findings of spondylolisthesis: assessment of associated spinal and neural foraminal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Kang, Heung Sik; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    To assess the spinal canal and neural foraminal stenosis associated with spondylolisthesis on MR imaging. We retrospectively analysed MR findings of 63 cases of spondylolisthesis(degenerative type: 23 cases, isthmic type: 40 cases) regarding the type and grade of spondylolisthesis, presence or absence of associated spinal canal stenosis, and the severity of associated neural foraminal stenosis. Central canal stenosis were more frequent in degenerative type(91%) than isthmic type(33%), and more frequent in grade II spondylolisthesis of degenerative type(100%) and isthmic type(89%) than in grade I spondylolisthesis of degenerative type(45%) and isthmic type(20%). There was positive correlation between the severity of neural foraminal stenosis and the grade of spondylolisthesis, whereas there was no significant difference between degenerative and isthmic types. Degenerative spondylolisthesis were frequently associated with central canal stenosis more than isthmic type. When the grade of spondylolisthesis was higher, it was more frequently associated with central canal stenosis and severe neural foraminal stenosis.

  18. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  19. The dorsal prefrontal and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices exert complementary network signatures during encoding and retrieval in associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Eric A; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive control includes processes that facilitate execution of effortful cognitive tasks, including associative memory. Regions implicated in cognitive control during associative memory include the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Here we investigated the relative degrees of network-related interactions originating in the dPFC and dACC during oscillating phases of associative memory: encoding and cued retrieval. Volunteers completed an established object-location associative memory paradigm during fMRI. Psychophysiological interactions modeled modulatory network interactions from the dPFC and dACC during memory encoding and retrieval. Results were evaluated in second level analyses of variance with seed region and memory process as factors. Each seed exerted differentiable modulatory effects during encoding and retrieval. The dACC exhibited greater modulation (than the dPFC) on the fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus during encoding, while the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the fusiform, hippocampus, dPFC and basal ganglia. During retrieval, the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, superior parietal lobule, and dPFC. The most notable finding was a seed by process interaction indicating that the dACC and the dPFC exerted complementary modulatory control on the hippocampus during each of the associative memory processes. These results provide evidence for differentiable, yet complementary, control-related modulation by the dACC and dPFC, while establishing the primacy of dPFC in exerting network control during both associative memory phases. Our approach and findings are relevant for understanding basic processes in human memory and psychiatric disorders that impact associative memory-related networks. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Cross-sectional study to investigate the association between vitamin D status and cutaneous mast cell tumours in Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshlag, Joseph J; Rassnick, Kenneth M; Malone, Erin K; Struble, Angela M; Vachhani, Priyanka; Trump, Donald L; Tian, Lili

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that low serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of a variety of human tumours. Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCT) occur more frequently in dogs than in any other species. Canine MCT express the vitamin D receptor, and vitamin D derivatives have in vitro and in vivo anti-tumour activity. We sought to examine the association between vitamin D serum level and MCT in Labrador retrievers, a dog breed predisposed to MCT development. To examine this association, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) concentrations were examined in eighty-seven Labrador retrievers, including thirty-three with MCT and fifty-four unaffected controls. The relationship between cases and controls and 25(OH)D3 level, age and body condition score were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Potential differences in vitamin D oral intake, calculated on the basis of a dietary questionnaire, were also evaluated between groups. Mean 25(OH)D3 concentration (104 (SD 30) nmol/l) in dogs with MCT was significantly lower than that of unaffected dogs (120 (SD 35) nmol/l; P = 0.027). The mean calculated vitamin D intake per kg body weight in Labrador retrievers with MCT was not statistically different from that of unaffected Labrador retrievers (0.38 (SD 0.25) and 0.31 (SD 0.22) μg/kg body weight, respectively; P = 0.13). These findings suggest that low levels of 25(OH)D3 might be a risk factor for MCT in Labrador retrievers. Prospective cohort studies are warranted.

  1. Microtubule-associated protein 1b is required for shaping the neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Olmo, Valerie N; Sanchez, Stephanie P; McFarland, Rebecca J; Vital, Eudorah; Werner, Jonathan M; Hong, Elim; Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Molodstov, Aleksey; Brewster, Rachel M

    2016-01-18

    Shaping of the neural tube, the precursor of the brain and spinal cord, involves narrowing and elongation of the neural tissue, concomitantly with other morphogenetic changes that contribue to this process. In zebrafish, medial displacement of neural cells (neural convergence or NC), which drives the infolding and narrowing of the neural ectoderm, is mediated by polarized migration and cell elongation towards the dorsal midline. Failure to undergo proper NC results in severe neural tube defects, yet the molecular underpinnings of this process remain poorly understood. We investigated here the role of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton in mediating NC in zebrafish embryos using the MT destabilizing and hyperstabilizing drugs nocodazole and paclitaxel respectively. We found that MTs undergo major changes in organization and stability during neurulation and are required for the timely completion of NC by promoting cell elongation and polarity. We next examined the role of Microtubule-associated protein 1B (Map1b), previously shown to promote MT dynamicity in axons. map1b is expressed earlier than previously reported, in the developing neural tube and underlying mesoderm. Loss of Map1b function using morpholinos (MOs) or δMap1b (encoding a truncated Map1b protein product) resulted in delayed NC and duplication of the neural tube, a defect associated with impaired NC. We observed a loss of stable MTs in these embryos that is likely to contribute to the NC defect. Lastly, we found that Map1b mediates cell elongation in a cell autonomous manner and polarized protrusive activity, two cell behaviors that underlie NC and are MT-dependent. Together, these data highlight the importance of MTs in the early morphogenetic movements that shape the neural tube and reveal a novel role for the MT regulator Map1b in mediating cell elongation and polarized cell movement in neural progenitor cells.

  2. An fMRI comparison of neural activity associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu eSikka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies of semantic memory in non-musical domains involving recognition of items from long-term memory have shown an age-related shift from the medial temporal lobe structures to the frontal lobe. However, the effects of aging on musical semantic memory remain unexamined. We compared activation associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults. Recognition follows successful retrieval from the musical lexicon that comprises a lifetime of learned musical phrases. We used the sparse-sampling technique in fMRI to determine the neural correlates of melody recognition by comparing activation when listening to familiar versus unfamiliar melodies, and to identify age differences. Recognition-related cortical activation was detected in the right superior temporal, bilateral inferior and superior frontal, left middle orbitofrontal, bilateral precentral, and left supramarginal gyri. Region-of-interest analysis showed greater activation for younger adults in the left superior temporal gyrus and for older adults in the left superior frontal, left angular, and bilateral superior parietal regions. Our study provides powerful evidence for these musical memory networks due to a large sample (N = 40 that includes older adults. This study is the first to investigate the neural basis of melody recognition in older adults and to compare the findings to younger adults.

  3. Retrieval cues that trigger reconsolidation of associative fear memory are not necessarily an exact replica of the original learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke eSoeter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Disrupting the process of memory reconsolidation may point to a novel therapeutic strategy for the permanent reduction of fear in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. However both in animal and human studies the retrieval cue typically involves a re-exposure to the original fear-conditioned stimulus. A relevant question is whether abstract cues not directly associated with the threat event also trigger reconsolidation, given that anxiety disorders often result from vicarious or unobtrusive learning for which no explicit memory exists. Insofar as the fear memory involves a flexible representation of the original learning experience, we hypothesized that the process of memory reconsolidation may also be triggered by abstract cues. We addressed this hypothesis by using a differential human fear-conditioning procedure in two distinct fear-learning groups. We predicted that if fear learning involves discrimination on basis of perceptual cues within one semantic category (i.e., the perceptual-learning group, n = 15, the subsequent ambiguity of the abstract retrieval cue would not trigger memory reconsolidation. In contrast, if fear learning involves discriminating between two semantic categories (i.e., categorical-learning group, n = 15, an abstract retrieval cue would unequivocally reactivate the fear memory and might subsequently trigger memory reconsolidation. Here we show that memory reconsolidation may indeed be triggered by another cue than the one that was present during the original learning occasion, but this effect depends on the learning history. Evidence for fear memory reconsolidation was inferred from the fear-erasing effect of one pill of propranolol (40 mg systemically administered upon exposure to the abstract retrieval cue. Our finding that reconsolidation of a specific fear association does not require exposure to the original retrieval cue supports the feasibility of reconsolidation-based interventions for emotional disorders.

  4. Impaired retrieval processes evident during visual working memory in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Lynn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prominent working memory (WM deficits have been observed in people with schizophrenia (PSZ across multiple sensory modalities, including the visuospatial realm. Electrophysiological abnormalities noted during early visual processing as well as later cognitive functions in PSZ may underlie deficiencies in WM ability, though the mechanisms linking behavior to neural responses are not well understood. WM dysfunction has also been observed in biological relatives of PSZ (REL and therefore may be a manifestation of genetic liability for the disorder. We administered a delayed response visuospatial WM task to 23 PSZ, 30 of their REL, and 37 healthy controls (CTRL to better understand the contributions of neural abnormalities to WM performance deficits associated with schizophrenia. PSZ performed more poorly on the WM task and failed to effectively process distractor stimuli as well as CTRL and REL. N1 electrophysiological responses to probes during retrieval differentiated the type and locations of stimuli presented during encoding in CTRL. Retrieval N1 responses in PSZ, however, failed to do so, while retrieval responses in REL showed more pronounced differentiation of stimulus features during encoding. Furthermore, neural responses during retrieval predicted behavioral performance in PSZ and REL, but not CTRL. These results suggest that retrieval processes are particularly important to efficient visuospatial WM function in PSZ and REL, and support further investigation of WM retrieval as a potential target for improving overall WM function through clinical intervention.

  5. Longitudinal associations among family environment, neural cognitive control, and social competence among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungmeen Kim-Spoon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During adolescence, prefrontal cortex regions, important in cognitive control, undergo maturation to adapt to changing environmental demands. Ways through which social-ecological factors contribute to adolescent neural cognitive control have not been thoroughly examined. We hypothesize that household chaos is a context that may modulate the associations among parental control, adolescent neural cognitive control, and developmental changes in social competence. The sample involved 167 adolescents (ages 13–14 at Time 1, 53% male. Parental control and household chaos were measured using adolescents’ questionnaire data, and cognitive control was assessed via behavioral performance and brain imaging at Time 1. Adolescent social competence was reported by adolescents at Time 1 and at Time 2 (one year later. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that higher parental control predicted better neural cognitive control only among adolescents living in low-chaos households. The association between poor neural cognitive control at Time 1 and social competence at Time 2 (after controlling for social competence at Time 1 was significant only among adolescents living in high-chaos households. Household chaos may undermine the positive association of parental control with adolescent neural cognitive control and exacerbate the detrimental association of poor neural cognitive control with disrupted social competence development.

  6. Lesser Neural Pattern Similarity across Repeated Tests Is Associated with Better Long-Term Memory Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson Wirebring, Linnea; Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Eriksson, Johan; Andersson, Micael; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2015-07-01

    Encoding and retrieval processes enhance long-term memory performance. The efficiency of encoding processes has recently been linked to representational consistency: the reactivation of a representation that gets more specific each time an item is further studied. Here we examined the complementary hypothesis of whether the efficiency of retrieval processes also is linked to representational consistency. Alternatively, recurrent retrieval might foster representational variability--the altering or adding of underlying memory representations. Human participants studied 60 Swahili-Swedish word pairs before being scanned with fMRI the same day and 1 week later. On Day 1, participants were tested three times on each word pair, and on Day 7 each pair was tested once. A BOLD signal change in right superior parietal cortex was associated with subsequent memory on Day 1 and with successful long-term retention on Day 7. A representational similarity analysis in this parietal region revealed that beneficial recurrent retrieval was associated with representational variability, such that the pattern similarity on Day 1 was lower for retrieved words subsequently remembered compared with those subsequently forgotten. This was mirrored by a monotonically decreased BOLD signal change in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on Day 1 as a function of repeated successful retrieval for words subsequently remembered, but not for words subsequently forgotten. This reduction in prefrontal response could reflect reduced demands on cognitive control. Collectively, the results offer novel insights into why memory retention benefits from repeated retrieval, and they suggest fundamental differences between repeated study and repeated testing. Repeated testing is known to produce superior long-term retention of the to-be-learned material compared with repeated encoding and other learning techniques, much because it fosters repeated memory retrieval. This study demonstrates that repeated memory

  7. Confirmation that a deletion in the POMC gene is associated with body weight of Labrador Retriever dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowska, M; Krzeminska, P; Graczyk, M; Switonski, M

    2017-06-01

    A 14-bp deletion present in the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene of Labrador and Flat Coat Retrievers (FCR), but absent in POMC of other breeds, disrupts the β-MSH and β-endorphin coding sequences. This deletion was recently reported as strongly associated with increased body weight and obesity. We searched for this mutation in a cohort of 272 dogs, representing four breeds with a known predisposition to obesity (Labrador and Golden Retrievers, Beagle, and Cocker Spaniel) and, as expected, we found it only in Labradors. Further, we confirmed the association between the deletion variant and body weight of Labradors but not with a 5-point body condition score (BCS). We suspect that the deletion variant in our cohort may act as a recessive allele, unlike the previous study, which suggested its additive effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wnt/Yes-Associated Protein Interactions During Neural Tissue Patterning of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejoy, Julie; Song, Liqing; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2017-08-31

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have special ability to self-assemble into neural spheroids or mini-brain-like structures. During the self-assembly process, Wnt signaling plays an important role in regional patterning and establishing positional identity of hiPSC-derived neural progenitors. Recently, the role of Wnt signaling in regulating Yes-associated protein (YAP) expression (nuclear or cytoplasmic), the pivotal regulator during organ growth and tissue generation, has attracted increasing interests. However, the interactions between Wnt and YAP expression for neural lineage commitment of hiPSCs remain poorly explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of Wnt signaling and YAP expression on the cellular population in three-dimensional (3D) neural spheroids derived from hiPSCs. In this study, Wnt signaling was activated using CHIR99021 for 3D neural spheroids derived from human iPSK3 cells through embryoid body formation. Our results indicate that Wnt activation induces nuclear localization of YAP and upregulates the expression of HOXB4, the marker for hindbrain/spinal cord. By contrast, the cells exhibit more rostral forebrain neural identity (expression of TBR1) without Wnt activation. Cytochalasin D was then used to induce cytoplasmic YAP and the results showed the decreased HOXB4 expression. In addition, the incorporation of microparticles in the neural spheroids was investigated for the perturbation of neural patterning. This study may indicate the bidirectional interactions of Wnt signaling and YAP expression during neural tissue patterning, which have the significance in neurological disease modeling, drug screening, and neural tissue regeneration.

  9. Neural correlates of generation and inhibition of verbal association patterns in mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin; Cojan, Yann; Sterpenich, Virginie; Dayer, Alexandre; Bertschy, Gilles; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Thought disorders such as rumination or flight of ideas are frequent in patients with mood disorders, and not systematically linked to mood state. These symptoms point to anomalies in cognitive processes mediating the generation and control of thoughts; for example, associative thinking and inhibition. However, their neural substrates are not known. METHOD: To obtain an ecological measure of neural processes underlying the generation and suppression of spontaneous thoughts, we des...

  10. Acquired proximal renal tubular dysfunction in 9 Labrador Retrievers with copper-associated hepatitis (2006-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, D K; Smedley, R C; Schall, W D; Kruger, J M

    2013-01-01

    Copper-associated hepatitis (CAH) has been well described in Labrador Retrievers. However, the association of CAH with proximal renal tubular dysfunction in this breed has not been characterized. To report clinical features, hepatic and renal histopathologic findings, tissue copper concentrations, and outcome of Labradors with CAH and proximal renal tubular disease. Nine Labrador Retrievers with renal glucosuria and biopsy-confirmed CAH. Clinical, clinicopathologic, and light microscopic findings were retrospectively reviewed. Rhodanine staining or atomic emission spectroscopy was performed on all hepatic samples and available renal tissue (4 dogs) to assess copper concentrations. Eight dogs had a history of polyuria and polydipsia, and all dogs had increased serum bilirubin concentrations. Five dogs had hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Three dogs with acidemia had paradoxical alkalinuria. All renal specimens had increased copper concentrations. Renal tubular vacuolization, degeneration, and regeneration were observed on light microscopy. Four dogs died within 10 days of diagnosis. One dog survived 2 months; 4 dogs survived more than 1 year. In long-term survivors, including 2 that did not undergo immediate copper chelation, resolution of renal tubular dysfunction occurred within weeks to months. Labrador Retrievers with CAH can develop clinical and laboratory evidence of renal tubular dysfunction in association with increased renal copper concentrations. Given the rarity of renal tubular disorders, detection of renal glucosuria and increased ALT activity in a Labrador Retriever is suggestive of CAH. Although renal tubular dysfunction may indicate advanced disease, successful long-term outcome is possible with a variety of therapies. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Neural associations of the early retinotopic cortex with the lateral occipital complex during visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong Zhang

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that the early retinotopic cortex (ERC, i.e., V1/V2/V3 is highly associated with the lateral occipital complex (LOC during visual perception. However, it remains largely unclear how to evaluate their associations in quantitative way. The present study tried to apply a multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA to quantify the neural activity in ERC and its association with that of the LOC when participants saw visual images. To this end, we assessed whether low-level visual features (Gabor features could predict the neural activity in the ERC and LOC according to a voxel-based encoding model (VBEM, and then quantified the association of the neural activity between these regions by using an analogical VBEM. We found that the Gabor features remarkably predicted the activity of the ERC (e.g., the predicted accuracy was 52.5% for a participant instead of that of the LOC (4.2%. Moreover, the MVPA approach can also be used to establish corresponding relationships between the activity patterns in the LOC and those in the ERC (64.2%. In particular, we found that the integration of the Gabor features and LOC visual information could dramatically improve the 'prediction' of ERC activity (88.3%. Overall, the present study provides new evidences for the possibility of quantifying the association of the neural activity between the regions of ERC and LOC. This approach will help to provide further insights into the neural substrates of the visual processing.

  12. Remote Sensing Techniques Applying Neural Networks for Effective Retrieval of Harmful Algal Blooms in the West Florida Shelf from VIIRS Satellite Observations, without the need for a Fluorescence Channel, and their comparisons with other Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-habashi, A.; Ahmed, S.; Lovko, V. J.

    2016-02-01

    Remote sensing approaches using neural networks (NN), are described that make use of the Ocean Color Remote Sensing Reflectances (OC Rrs) available from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) satellite bands at 486, 551 and 671nm to detect and retrieve Karenia brevis (KB) Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) that plague West Florida Shelf (WFS) coasts impacting the environment and tourism. This approach is necessitated because VIIRS, unfortunately, unlike the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), does not have a 678 nm chlorophyll-a fluorescence channel that is normally effectively used with the normalized fluorescence height (nFLH) algorithm for detecting KB HABs in the WFS. We describe here the application of neural networks (NNs) previously reported by us for Chesapeake Bay chlorophyll retrievals, for the retrieval of phytoplankton absorption at 443 nm (aph443) in VIIRS images of the WFS using the existing VIIRS 486, 551 and 671nm bands. These NN retrieved aph443 values, are then converted to equivalent [Chla] values using known empirical relationships between them for the WFS. Now waters compatible with KB HABS in the WFS are known to be characterized by a minimum permissible [Chla] and a maximum permissible particulate backscatter bbp at 551nm (and therefore a maximum permissible VIIRS Rrs 551 nm). These two limiting criteria are then used to create exclusion masks which are then consecutively applied as filters to retrieved VIIRS Rrs551nm images and then to VIIRS [Chla] images (obtained from equivalent NN retrieved aph443 images). The residual [Chla] image after application of the filters then shows values compatible with KB HABS in the WFS having satisfied both maximum Rrs551nm and minimum [Chla] criteria. The residual images of KB compatible [Chla] values are then used to identify, delineate and quantify the existing KB HABS. Comparisons with in-situ measurements and other techniques, including nFLH with MODIS, are presented, and confirm

  13. Neural Pattern Similarity in the Left IFG and Fusiform Is Associated with Novel Word Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed that greater neural pattern similarity across repetitions is associated with better subsequent memory. In this study, we used an artificial language training paradigm and representational similarity analysis to examine whether neural pattern similarity across repetitions before training was associated with post-training behavioral performance. Twenty-four native Chinese speakers were trained to learn a logographic artificial language for 12 days and behavioral performance was recorded using the word naming and picture naming tasks. Participants were scanned while performing a passive viewing task before training, after 4-day training and after 12-day training. Results showed that pattern similarity in the left pars opercularis (PO and fusiform gyrus (FG before training was negatively associated with reaction time (RT in both word naming and picture naming tasks after training. These results suggest that neural pattern similarity is an effective neurofunctional predictor of novel word learning in addition to word memory.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Golden Retrievers Identifies Germ-Line Risk Factors Predisposing to Mast Cell Tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja L Arendt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canine mast cell tumours (CMCT are one of the most common skin tumours in dogs with a major impact on canine health. Certain breeds have a higher risk of developing mast cell tumours, suggesting that underlying predisposing germ-line genetic factors play a role in the development of this disease. The genetic risk factors are largely unknown, although somatic mutations in the oncogene C-KIT have been detected in a proportion of CMCT, making CMCT a comparative model for mastocytosis in humans where C-KIT mutations are frequent. We have performed a genome wide association study in golden retrievers from two continents and identified separate regions in the genome associated with risk of CMCT in the two populations. Sequence capture of associated regions and subsequent fine mapping in a larger cohort of dogs identified a SNP associated with development of CMCT in the GNAI2 gene (p = 2.2x10-16, introducing an alternative splice form of this gene resulting in a truncated protein. In addition, disease associated haplotypes harbouring the hyaluronidase genes HYAL1, HYAL2 and HYAL3 on cfa20 and HYAL4, SPAM1 and HYALP1 on cfa14 were identified as separate risk factors in European and US golden retrievers, respectively, suggesting that turnover of hyaluronan plays an important role in the development of CMCT.

  15. Neural activity associated with metaphor comprehension: spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, María; Carretié, Luis; Hinojosa, José A; Tapia, Manuel; Mercado, Francisco; López-Martín, Sara; Albert, Jacobo

    2005-01-03

    Though neuropsychological data indicate that the right hemisphere (RH) plays a major role in metaphor processing, other studies suggest that, at least during some phases of this processing, a RH advantage may not exist. The present study explores, through a temporally agile neural signal--the event-related potentials (ERPs)--, and through source-localization algorithms applied to ERP recordings, whether the crucial phase of metaphor comprehension presents or not a RH advantage. Participants (n=24) were submitted to a S1-S2 experimental paradigm. S1 consisted of visually presented metaphoric sentences (e.g., "Green lung of the city"), followed by S2, which consisted of words that could (i.e., "Park") or could not (i.e., "Semaphore") be defined by S1. ERPs elicited by S2 were analyzed using temporal principal component analysis (tPCA) and source-localization algorithms. These analyses revealed that metaphorically related S2 words showed significantly higher N400 amplitudes than non-related S2 words. Source-localization algorithms showed differential activity between the two S2 conditions in the right middle/superior temporal areas. These results support the existence of an important RH contribution to (at least) one phase of metaphor processing and, furthermore, implicate the temporal cortex with respect to that contribution.

  16. Multimedia Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, Henk; de Vries, A.P.; de Vries, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L.; Unknown, [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    Retrieval of multimedia data is different from retrieval of structured data. A key problem in multimedia databases is search, and the proposed solutions to the problem of multimedia information retrieval span a rather wide spectrum of topics outside the traditional database area, ranging from

  17. Assessing Optimal Neural Network Architecture for Identifying Disease-associated Multi-marker Genotypes using a Permutation Test, and Application to Calpain 10 Polymorphisms Associated with Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    North B.V; Curtis D; Cassell P.G; Hitman G.A; Sham P.C

    2003-01-01

    .... An artificial neural network allows investigation of association between disease phenotype and tightly linked markers without requiring haplotype phase and without modelling any evolutionary history...

  18. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List

  19. [Complete lower urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to anorrectal and neural malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirao, M J; Zambudio, G; Nortes, L; Jiménez, J I Ruiz

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of complete urinary tract duplication with true diphallia associated to intestinal and neural anomalies. Complete penile duplication with hypospadias and bifidum scrotum were showed. Moreover, he had got anorrectal disease (anterior anus) and neural tube defects (myelomeningocele). Radiological and functional studies were performed and complete duplication lower urinary tract with coordinate miction were found. Combined surgical approach were used: perineal to remove lateralized and hypospadic penile and abdominal for cystoplasty. We report a case due to the extremely low prevalence. Only 15 cases have been described in the literature.

  20. Global Exponential Stability Criteria for Bidirectional Associative Memory Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thipcha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global exponential stability for bidirectional associative memory neural networks with time-varying delays is studied. In our study, the lower and upper bounds of the activation functions are allowed to be either positive, negative, or zero. By constructing new and improved Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and introducing free-weighting matrices, a new and improved delay-dependent exponential stability for BAM neural networks with time-varying delays is derived in the form of linear matrix inequality (LMI. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate that the derived condition is less conservative than some existing results given in the literature.

  1. Association between MTHFD1 G1958A polymorphism and neural tube defects susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Jiang

    Full Text Available The methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD1 gene, as one of the key genes involved in the folate pathway, has been reported to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects (NTDs. However, the results of published studies are contradictory and inconclusive. Thus, this meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effect of the common polymorphism in the MTHFD1 gene, the G1958A (R653Q, dbSNP ID: rs2236225 variant, on the risk of NTDs in all eligible studies.Relevant literature published before January 3, 2014 was retrieved from the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases. Pooled crude odds ratios (ORs and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to evaluate the association between the MTHFD1 G1958A polymorphism and NTDs risk.We performed a meta-analysis of nine studies with a total of 4,302 NTDs patients and 4,238 healthy controls. Our results demonstrated a significant correlation between the MTHFD1 G1958A polymorphism and NTDs in an overall meta-analysis. For family-based studies, the study subjects were classified as NTD cases, mothers with NTDs offspring, and fathers with NTDs offspring. We found no association between any of the fathers' genotypes and NTDs, whereas there was a clear excess of the 1958A allele in the mothers of children with NTDs compared with controls individuals.In summary, our meta-analysis strongly suggests that the MTHFD1 G1958A polymorphism might be associated with maternal risk for NTDs in Caucasian populations. However, the evidence of this association should be interpreted with caution due to the selective nature of publication of genetic association studies.

  2. Retrieving Full Object Information from Partial Object Information using Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackin, B. J.; Palanisamy, P. K.; Yatagai, T.

    2011-10-01

    Storage and retrieval of object information from hologram using partial object as input is reported. This method uses holographic associative memory principles combined with digital image processing techniques. The inclusion of digital image processing helps in eliminating the iterations which are otherwise mandatory when using neural network principles for object information retrieval. The implementation method is explained and simulation results are presented. The reconstructed images agree well with the object chosen.

  3. Neural and behavioral associations of manipulated determination facial expressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, Tom F.; Hortensius, R.; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    Past research associated relative left frontal cortical activity with positive affect and approach motivation, or the urge to move toward a stimulus. Less work has examined relative left frontal activity and positive emotions ranging from low to high approach motivation, to test whether positive

  4. Comparison of artificial neural network analysis with other multimarker methods for detecting genetic association

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis David

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Debate remains as to the optimal method for utilising genotype data obtained from multiple markers in case-control association studies. I and colleagues have previously described a method of association analysis using artificial neural networks (ANNs), whose performance compared favourably to single-marker methods. Here, the perfomance of ANN analysis is compared with other multi-marker methods, comprising different haplotype-based analyses and locus-based analyses. Result...

  5. Acupuncture stimulation on GB34 activates neural responses associated with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sujung; Lim, Sabina; Choe, Il-Hwan; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Chung, Kyung-Cheon; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder that is caused by neural defects in the substantia nigra. Numerous studies have reported that acupuncture treatment on GB34 (Yanglingquan) leads to significant improvements in patients with PD and in PD animal models. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have shown that patients with PD, compared to healthy participants, have lower neural responses in extensive brain regions including the putamen, thalamus, and the supplementary motor area. This study investigated the reported association between acupuncture point GB34 and PD. Using fMRI, neural responses of 12 patients with PD and 12 healthy participants were examined before and after acupuncture stimulation. Acupuncture stimulation increased neural responses in regions including the substantia nigra, caudate, thalamus, and putamen, which are impaired caused by PD. Areas associated with PD were activated by the acupuncture stimulation on GB34. This shows that acupuncture treatment on GB34 may be effective in improving the symptoms of PD. Although more randomized controlled trials on the topic will be needed, this study shows that acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of symptoms involving PD. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Quantifying Wildfire Emissions and associated Aerosol Species using Assimilation of Satellite Carbon Monoxide Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David; Barre, Jerome; Worden, Helen; Gaubert, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Intense and costly wildfires tend are predicted to increase in frequency under a warming climate. For example, the recent August 2015 Washington State fires were the largest in the state's history. Also in September and October 2015 very intense fires over Indonesia produced some of the highest concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) ever seen from satellite. Such larges fires impact not only the local environment but also affect air quality far downwind through the long-range transport of pollutants. Global to continental scale coverage showing the evolution of CO resulting from fire emission is available from satellite observations. Carbon monoxide is the only atmospheric trace gas for which satellite multispectral retrievals have demonstrated reliable independent profile information close to the surface and also higher in the free troposphere. The unique CO profile product from Terra/MOPITT clearly distinguishes near-surface CO from the free troposphere CO. Also previous studies have suggested strong correlations between primary emissions of fire organic and black carbon aerosols and CO. We will present results from the Ensemble Adjustement Kalman Filter (DART) system that has been developed to assimilate MOPITT CO in the global-scale chemistry-climate model CAM-Chem. The ensemble technique allows inference on various fire model state variables such as CO emissions, and also aerosol species resulting from fires such as organic and black carbon. The benefit of MOPITT CO profile assimilation for estimating the CO emissions from the Washington and Indonesian fire cases will be discussed, along with the ability of the ensemble approach to infer information on the black and organic carbon aerosol distribution. This study builds on capability to quantitatively integrate satellite observations and models developed in recent years through projects funded by the NASA ACMAP Program.

  7. Neural oscillations associated with the primacy and recency effects of verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, Massoud; Ince, Nuri F; Kuskowski, Michael; Leuthold, Arthur; Tewfik, Ahmed H; Nelson, Katie; McClannahan, Kate; Fletcher, Charles R; Tadipatri, Vijay Aditya

    2010-04-12

    For sequential information, the first (primacy) and last (recency) items are better remembered than items in the middle of the sequence. The cognitive operations and neural correlates for the primacy and recency effects are unclear. In this paper, we investigate brain oscillations associated with these effects. MEG recordings were obtained on 19 subjects performing a modified Sternberg paradigm. Correlation analyses were performed between brain oscillatory activity and primacy and recency indices. Oscillatory activity during information maintenance, not encoding, was correlated with the primacy and recency effects. The primacy effect was associated with occipital post-desynchrony, and temporal post-synchrony. The recency effect was associated with parietal and temporal desynchrony. Differences were also observed according to the maintenance strategy. These data indicate that the primacy and recency effects are related to different neural, and likely cognitive, operations that are dependant on the strategy for information maintenance. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Associations among exercise duration, lameness severity, and hip joint range of motion in Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Laura M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate factors associated with lameness severity and hip joint range of motion in dogs with hip dysplasia and to assess the association between hip joint range of motion and degree of lameness. Prospective case series. 60 client-owned Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia. Owners completed a questionnaire regarding their dogs' daily exercise duration and type (i.e., low impact vs high impact) and lifestyle. Range of motion of affected hip joints was measured with a transparent plastic goniometer. The presence of subluxation or luxation of hip joints as a consequence of hip dysplasia and the size of the largest osteophytes or enthesophytes of hip joints on ventrodorsal radiographic images of the pelvis were recorded. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with lameness, loss of hip joint flexion, and loss of hip joint extension and to identify factors associated with the presence of large osteophytes. Exercise was associated with a decrease in the severity of lameness in dogs with hip dysplasia. The strength of this inverse relationship increased with longer exercise duration. Lameness was more severe in dogs with hip joint luxation than in dogs without luxation. Hip joint extension was 1° lower for each year of age, and osteophyte or enthesophyte size was 1 mm larger with each 3-year increase in age. Longer daily exercise duration was associated with lower lameness scores in dogs with hip dysplasia. Dogs with hip joint luxation secondary to hip dysplasia had higher lameness scores than did dogs without hip joint luxation.

  9. Activation of right parietal cortex during memory retrieval of nonlinguistic auditory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermann, Ellen C; Loui, Psyche; Shimamura, Arthur P

    2009-09-01

    In neuroimaging studies, the left ventral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is particularly active during memory retrieval. However, most studies have used verbal or verbalizable stimuli. We investigated neural activations associated with the retrieval of short, agrammatical music stimuli (Blackwood, 2004), which have been largely associated with right hemisphere processing. At study, participants listened to music stimuli and rated them on pleasantness. At test, participants made old/new recognition judgments with high/low confidence ratings. Right, but not left, ventral PPC activity was observed during the retrieval of these music stimuli. Thus, rather than indicating a special status of left PPC in retrieval, both right and left ventral PPC participate in memory retrieval, depending on the type of information that is to be remembered.

  10. Finite-Time Stability for Fractional-Order Bidirectional Associative Memory Neural Networks with Time Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang-Jin; Li, Pei-Luan; Pang, Yi-Cheng

    2017-02-01

    This paper is concerned with fractional-order bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with time delays. Applying Laplace transform, the generalized Gronwall inequality and estimates of Mittag-Leffler functions, some sufficient conditions which ensure the finite-time stability of fractional-order bidirectional associative memory neural networks with time delays are obtained. Two examples with their simulations are given to illustrate the theoretical findings. Our results are new and complement previously known results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos.~61673008, 11261010, 11101126, Project of High-Level Innovative Talents of Guizhou Province ([2016]5651), Natural Science and Technology Foundation of Guizhou Province (J[2015]2025 and J[2015]2026), 125 Special Major Science and Technology of Department of Education of Guizhou Province ([2012]011) and Natural Science Foundation of the Education Department of Guizhou Province (KY[2015]482)

  11. Functional neural changes associated with acquired amusia across different stages of recovery after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J.; Särkämö, Teppo; Ripolles, Pablo; Leo, Vera; Saunavaara, Jani; Parkkola, Riitta; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Soinila, Seppo

    2017-01-01

    Brain damage causing acquired amusia disrupts the functional music processing system, creating a unique opportunity to investigate the critical neural architectures of musical processing in the brain. In this longitudinal fMRI study of stroke patients (N = 41) with a 6-month follow-up, we used natural vocal music (sung with lyrics) and instrumental music stimuli to uncover brain activation and functional network connectivity changes associated with acquired amusia and its recovery. In the acu...

  12. Associations between maternal negative affect and adolescent's neural response to peer evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Z. Tan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Parenting is often implicated as a potential source of individual differences in youths’ emotional information processing. The present study examined whether parental affect is related to an important aspect of adolescent emotional development, response to peer evaluation. Specifically, we examined relations between maternal negative affect, observed during parent–adolescent discussion of an adolescent-nominated concern with which s/he wants parental support, and adolescent neural responses to peer evaluation in 40 emotionally healthy and depressed adolescents. We focused on a network of ventral brain regions involved in affective processing of social information: the amygdala, anterior insula, nucleus accumbens, and subgenual anterior cingulate, as well as the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. Maternal negative affect was not associated with adolescent neural response to peer rejection. However, longer durations of maternal negative affect were associated with decreased responsivity to peer acceptance in the amygdala, left anterior insula, subgenual anterior cingulate, and left nucleus accumbens. These findings provide some of the first evidence that maternal negative affect is associated with adolescents’ neural processing of social rewards. Findings also suggest that maternal negative affect could contribute to alterations in affective processing, specifically, dampening the saliency and/or reward of peer interactions during adolescence.

  13. Lack of association between folate-receptor autoantibodies and neural-tube defects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Molloy, Anne M

    2009-07-09

    BACKGROUND: A previous report described the presence of autoantibodies against folate receptors in 75% of serum samples from women with a history of pregnancy complicated by a neural-tube defect, as compared with 10% of controls. We sought to confirm this finding in an Irish population, which traditionally has had a high prevalence of neural-tube defects. METHODS: We performed two studies. Study 1 consisted of analysis of stored frozen blood samples collected from 1993 through 1994 from 103 mothers with a history of pregnancy complicated by a neural-tube defect (case mothers), 103 mothers with a history of pregnancy but no complication by a neural-tube defect (matched with regard to number of pregnancies and sampling dates), 58 women who had never been pregnant, and 36 men. Study 2, conducted to confirm that the storage of samples did not influence the folate-receptor autoantibodies, included fresh samples from 37 case mothers, 22 control mothers, 10 women who had never been pregnant, and 9 men. All samples were assayed for blocking and binding autoantibodies against folate receptors. RESULTS: In Study 1, blocking autoantibodies were found in 17% of case mothers, as compared with 13% of control mothers (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70 to 3.39), and binding autoantibodies in 29%, as compared with 32%, respectively (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.50). Study 2 showed similar results, indicating that sample degradation was unlikely. CONCLUSIONS: The presence and titer of maternal folate-receptor autoantibodies were not significantly associated with a neural-tube defect-affected pregnancy in this Irish population.

  14. Nutritional managment of inherited copper-associated hepatitis in the Labrador retriever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fieten, Hille; Biourge, Vincent; Watson, AL; Leegwater, Peter; van den Ingh, T.S.G.A.M.; Rothuizen, J

    Canine hereditary copper-associated hepatitis is characterized by gradual hepatic copper accumulation eventually leading to liver cirrhosis. Therapy is aimed at creating a negative copper balance with metal chelators, of which d-penicillamine is the most commonly used. d-penicillamine often causes

  15. Data for behavioral results and brain regions showing a time effect during pair-association retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Jimura

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current data article provides behavioral and neuroimaging data for the research article "Relatedness-dependent rapid development of brain activity in anterior temporal cortex during pair-association retrieval” (Jimura et al., 2016 [1]. Behavioral performance is provided in a table. Fig. 2 of the article is based on this table. Brain regions showing time effect are provided in a table. A statistical activation map for the time effect is shown in Fig. 3C of the article.

  16. Neural markers of neuropathic pain associated with maladaptive plasticity in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal-Faria, Paula; Yalcin, Nilufer; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    Given the potential use of neural markers for the development of novel treatments in spinal cord pain, we aimed to characterize the most effective neural markers of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). A systematic PubMed review was conducted, compiling studies that were published prior to April, 2014 that examined neural markers associated with neuropathic pain after SCI using electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques. We identified 6 studies: Four using electroencephalogram (EEG); 1 using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET (positron emission tomography); and 1 using MR spectroscopy. The EEG recordings suggested a reduction in alpha EEG peak frequency activity in the frontal regions of SCI patients with neuropathic pain. The MRI scans showed volume loss, primarily in the gray matter of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and by FDG-PET, hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex was observed in SCI patients with neuropathic pain compared with healthy subjects. In the MR spectroscopy findings, the presence of pain was associated with changes in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. When analyzed together, the results of these studies seem to point out to a common marker of pain in SCI characterized by decreased cortical activity in frontal areas and possibly increased subcortical activity. These results may contribute to planning further mechanistic studies as to better understand the mechanisms by which neuropathic pain is modulated in patients with SCI as well as clinical studies investigating best responders of treatment. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Distinct neural activity associated with focused-attention meditation and loving-kindness meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tatia M C; Leung, Mei-Kei; Hou, Wai-Kai; Tang, Joey C Y; Yin, Jing; So, Kwok-Fai; Lee, Chack-Fan; Chan, Chetwyn C H

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the dissociable neural effects of ānāpānasati (focused-attention meditation, FAM) and mettā (loving-kindness meditation, LKM) on BOLD signals during cognitive (continuous performance test, CPT) and affective (emotion-processing task, EPT, in which participants viewed affective pictures) processing. Twenty-two male Chinese expert meditators (11 FAM experts, 11 LKM experts) and 22 male Chinese novice meditators (11 FAM novices, 11 LKM novices) had their brain activity monitored by a 3T MRI scanner while performing the cognitive and affective tasks in both meditation and baseline states. We examined the interaction between state (meditation vs. baseline) and expertise (expert vs. novice) separately during LKM and FAM, using a conjunction approach to reveal common regions sensitive to the expert meditative state. Additionally, exclusive masking techniques revealed distinct interactions between state and group during LKM and FAM. Specifically, we demonstrated that the practice of FAM was associated with expertise-related behavioral improvements and neural activation differences in attention task performance. However, the effect of state LKM meditation did not carry over to attention task performance. On the other hand, both FAM and LKM practice appeared to affect the neural responses to affective pictures. For viewing sad faces, the regions activated for FAM practitioners were consistent with attention-related processing; whereas responses of LKM experts to sad pictures were more in line with differentiating emotional contagion from compassion/emotional regulation processes. Our findings provide the first report of distinct neural activity associated with forms of meditation during sustained attention and emotion processing.

  18. Distinct Neural Activity Associated with Focused-Attention Meditation and Loving-Kindness Meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tatia M. C.; Leung, Mei-Kei; Hou, Wai-Kai; Tang, Joey C. Y.; Yin, Jing; So, Kwok-Fai; Lee, Chack-Fan; Chan, Chetwyn C. H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the dissociable neural effects of ānāpānasati (focused-attention meditation, FAM) and mettā (loving-kindness meditation, LKM) on BOLD signals during cognitive (continuous performance test, CPT) and affective (emotion-processing task, EPT, in which participants viewed affective pictures) processing. Twenty-two male Chinese expert meditators (11 FAM experts, 11 LKM experts) and 22 male Chinese novice meditators (11 FAM novices, 11 LKM novices) had their brain activity monitored by a 3T MRI scanner while performing the cognitive and affective tasks in both meditation and baseline states. We examined the interaction between state (meditation vs. baseline) and expertise (expert vs. novice) separately during LKM and FAM, using a conjunction approach to reveal common regions sensitive to the expert meditative state. Additionally, exclusive masking techniques revealed distinct interactions between state and group during LKM and FAM. Specifically, we demonstrated that the practice of FAM was associated with expertise-related behavioral improvements and neural activation differences in attention task performance. However, the effect of state LKM meditation did not carry over to attention task performance. On the other hand, both FAM and LKM practice appeared to affect the neural responses to affective pictures. For viewing sad faces, the regions activated for FAM practitioners were consistent with attention-related processing; whereas responses of LKM experts to sad pictures were more in line with differentiating emotional contagion from compassion/emotional regulation processes. Our findings provide the first report of distinct neural activity associated with forms of meditation during sustained attention and emotion processing. PMID:22905090

  19. Distinct neural activity associated with focused-attention meditation and loving-kindness meditation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatia M C Lee

    Full Text Available This study examined the dissociable neural effects of ānāpānasati (focused-attention meditation, FAM and mettā (loving-kindness meditation, LKM on BOLD signals during cognitive (continuous performance test, CPT and affective (emotion-processing task, EPT, in which participants viewed affective pictures processing. Twenty-two male Chinese expert meditators (11 FAM experts, 11 LKM experts and 22 male Chinese novice meditators (11 FAM novices, 11 LKM novices had their brain activity monitored by a 3T MRI scanner while performing the cognitive and affective tasks in both meditation and baseline states. We examined the interaction between state (meditation vs. baseline and expertise (expert vs. novice separately during LKM and FAM, using a conjunction approach to reveal common regions sensitive to the expert meditative state. Additionally, exclusive masking techniques revealed distinct interactions between state and group during LKM and FAM. Specifically, we demonstrated that the practice of FAM was associated with expertise-related behavioral improvements and neural activation differences in attention task performance. However, the effect of state LKM meditation did not carry over to attention task performance. On the other hand, both FAM and LKM practice appeared to affect the neural responses to affective pictures. For viewing sad faces, the regions activated for FAM practitioners were consistent with attention-related processing; whereas responses of LKM experts to sad pictures were more in line with differentiating emotional contagion from compassion/emotional regulation processes. Our findings provide the first report of distinct neural activity associated with forms of meditation during sustained attention and emotion processing.

  20. Identifying temporal and causal contributions of neural processes underlying the Implicit Association Test (IAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Edward Forbes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Implicit Association Test (IAT is a popular behavioral measure that assesses the associative strength between outgroup members and stereotypical and counterstereotypical traits. Less is known, however, about the degree to which the IAT reflects automatic processing. Two studies examined automatic processing contributions to a gender-IAT using a data driven, social neuroscience approach. Performance on congruent (e.g., categorizing male names with synonyms of strength and incongruent (e.g., categorizing female names with synonyms of strength IAT blocks were separately analyzed using EEG (event-related potentials, or ERPs, and coherence; Study 1 and lesion (Study 2 methodologies. Compared to incongruent blocks, performance on congruent IAT blocks was associated with more positive ERPs that manifested in frontal and occipital regions at automatic processing speeds, occipital regions at more controlled processing speeds and was compromised by volume loss in the anterior temporal lobe, insula and medial PFC. Performance on incongruent blocks was associated with volume loss in supplementary motor areas, cingulate gyrus and a region in medial PFC similar to that found for congruent blocks. Greater coherence was found between frontal and occipital regions to the extent individuals exhibited more bias. This suggests there are separable neural contributions to congruent and incongruent blocks of the IAT but there is also a surprising amount of overlap. Given the temporal and regional neural distinctions, these results provide converging evidence that stereotypic associative strength assessed by the IAT indexes automatic processing to a degree.

  1. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated With Neural Tube Defects (VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, including maternal fumonisin consumption, periconceptional zinc deficiency, parental occupational exposure and residential proximity to pesticides, lower socioeconomic status, fetal alcohol syndrome, mutations in the VANGL1 gene, human athymic Nude/SCID fetus, and single nucleotide polymorphism in the NOS3 gene. NTDs associated with these syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal diagnosis of NTDs should alert doctors to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  2. Separating neural activity associated with emotion and implied motion: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, Tiffany A; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Smith, Stephen D

    2017-02-01

    Previous research provides evidence for an emo-motoric neural network allowing emotion to modulate activity in regions of the nervous system related to movement. However, recent research suggests that these results may be due to the movement depicted in the stimuli. The purpose of the current study was to differentiate the unique neural activity of emotion and implied motion using functional MRI. Thirteen healthy participants viewed 4 sets of images: (a) negative stimuli implying movement, (b) negative stimuli not implying movement, (c) neutral stimuli implying movement, and (d) neutral stimuli not implying movement. A main effect for implied motion was found, primarily in regions associated with multimodal integration (bilateral insula and cingulate), and visual areas that process motion (bilateral middle temporal gyrus). A main effect for emotion was found primarily in occipital and parietal regions, indicating that emotion enhances visual perception. Surprisingly, emotion also activated the left precentral gyrus, a motor region. These results demonstrate that emotion elicits activity above and beyond that evoked by the perception of implied movement, but that the neural representations of these characteristics overlap. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Gene regulatory networks in neural cell fate acquisition from genome-wide chromatin association of Geminin and Zic1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Savita; Yellajoshyula, Dhananjay; Zhang, Bo; Teets, Bryan; Rockweiler, Nicole; Kroll, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    Neural cell fate acquisition is mediated by transcription factors expressed in nascent neuroectoderm, including Geminin and members of the Zic transcription factor family. However, regulatory networks through which this occurs are not well defined. Here, we identified Geminin-associated chromatin locations in embryonic stem cells and Geminin- and Zic1-associated locations during neural fate acquisition at a genome-wide level. We determined how Geminin deficiency affected histone acetylation at gene promoters during this process. We integrated these data to demonstrate that Geminin associates with and promotes histone acetylation at neurodevelopmental genes, while Geminin and Zic1 bind a shared gene subset. Geminin- and Zic1-associated genes exhibit embryonic nervous system-enriched expression and encode other regulators of neural development. Both Geminin and Zic1-associated peaks are enriched for Zic1 consensus binding motifs, while Zic1-bound peaks are also enriched for Sox3 motifs, suggesting co-regulatory potential. Accordingly, we found that Geminin and Zic1 could cooperatively activate the expression of several shared targets encoding transcription factors that control neurogenesis, neural plate patterning, and neuronal differentiation. We used these data to construct gene regulatory networks underlying neural fate acquisition. Establishment of this molecular program in nascent neuroectoderm directly links early neural cell fate acquisition with regulatory control of later neurodevelopment. PMID:27881878

  4. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Neural Tube Defects (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs maybe associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as Currarino syndrome, sacral defect with anterior meningocele, Jarcho-Levin syndrome (spondylo-costal dysostosis, lateral meningocele syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, and hyperthermia. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors may be different from those of non-syndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  5. Increasing body condition score is positively associated interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Lauren; Mann, Sabine; Levine, Corri B; Cummings, Bethany P; Wakshlag, Joseph J

    2015-10-15

    The accumulation of excess body fat is a growing problem in dogs as well as people. Contrary to prior understanding of adipose tissue, fat is now considered to be an active endocrine organ that promotes a chronic low-grade inflammatory state often characterized by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These have been implicated in several obesity-related disorders such as insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, and neoplasia. The purpose of this study was to characterize fasting plasma cytokine concentrations in ninety-two healthy client-owned Labrador retriever dogs of various ages and body condition scores. The dogs were grouped according to body condition score (BCS) into three categories, lean, overweight and obese. The following cytokines and chemokines were evaluated; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1). Our results indicated that fasting plasma IL-6 and MCP-1 concentrations are associated with increasing BCS. This data suggest that certain markers of inflammation increase with increasing body condition score, and that dogs, similar to humans, may be fostering a chronic inflammatory state due to obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The new Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR algorithm for the cross-track scanning ATMS radiometer: description and verification study over Europe and Africa using GPM and TRMM spaceborne radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sanò

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to describe the development and evaluate the performance of a completely new version of the Passive microwave Neural network Precipitation Retrieval (PNPR v2, an algorithm based on a neural network approach, designed to retrieve the instantaneous surface precipitation rate using the cross-track Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS radiometer measurements. This algorithm, developed within the EUMETSAT H-SAF program, represents an evolution of the previous version (PNPR v1, developed for AMSU/MHS radiometers (and used and distributed operationally within H-SAF, with improvements aimed at exploiting the new precipitation-sensing capabilities of ATMS with respect to AMSU/MHS. In the design of the neural network the new ATMS channels compared to AMSU/MHS, and their combinations, including the brightness temperature differences in the water vapor absorption band, around 183 GHz, are considered. The algorithm is based on a single neural network, for all types of surface background, trained using a large database based on 94 cloud-resolving model simulations over the European and the African areas. The performance of PNPR v2 has been evaluated through an intercomparison of the instantaneous precipitation estimates with co-located estimates from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (TRMM-PR and from the GPM Core Observatory Ku-band Precipitation Radar (GPM-KuPR. In the comparison with TRMM-PR, over the African area the statistical analysis was carried out for a 2-year (2013–2014 dataset of coincident observations over a regular grid at 0.5°  ×  0.5° resolution. The results have shown a good agreement between PNPR v2 and TRMM-PR for the different surface types. The correlation coefficient (CC was equal to 0.69 over ocean and 0.71 over vegetated land (lower values were obtained over arid land and coast, and the root mean squared error (RMSE was equal to 1.30 mm h−1 over ocean and 1.11 mm h−1 over

  7. Fetal DNA hypermethylation in tight junction pathway is associated with neural tube defects: A genome-wide DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Lin, Shanshan; Zhang, Ji; Tian, Tian; Jin, Lei; Ren, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a spectrum of severe congenital malformations of fusion failure of the neural tube during early embryogenesis. Evidence on aberrant DNA methylation in NTD development remains scarce, especially when exposure to environmental pollutant is taken into consideration. DNA methylation profiling was quantified using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 array in neural tissues from 10 NTD cases and 8 non-malformed controls (stage 1). Subsequent validation was performed using a Sequenom MassARRAY system in neural tissues from 20 NTD cases and 20 non-malformed controls (stage 2). Correlation analysis of differentially methylated CpG sites in fetal neural tissues and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations in fetal neural tissues and maternal serum was conducted. Differentially methylated CpG sites of neural tissues were further validated in fetal mice with NTDs induced by benzo(a)pyrene given to pregnant mice. Differentially hypermethylated CpG sites in neural tissues from 17 genes and 6 pathways were identified in stage 1. Subsequently, differentially hypermethylated CpG sites in neural tissues from 6 genes (BDKRB2, CTNNA1, CYFIP2, MMP7, MYH2, and TIAM2) were confirmed in stage 2. Correlation analysis showed that methylated CpG sites in CTNNA1 and MYH2 from NTD cases were positively correlated to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon level in fetal neural tissues and maternal serum. The correlation was confirmed in NTD-affected fetal mice that were exposed to benzo(a)pyrene in utero. In conclusion, hypermethylation of the CTNNA1 and MYH2 genes in tight junction pathway is associated with the risk for NTDs, and the DNA methylation aberration may be caused by exposure to benzo(a)pyrene.

  8. Learning to Associate Auditory and Visual Stimuli: Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Nicholas; Stevenson, Ryan; Wallace, Mark T.; Wenger, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to effectively combine sensory inputs across modalities is vital for acquiring a unified percept of events. For example, watching a hammer hit a nail while simultaneously identifying the sound as originating from the event requires the ability to identify spatio-temporal congruencies and statistical regularities. In this study, we applied a reaction time (RT) and hazard function measure known as capacity (e.g., Townsend and Ashby, 1978) to quantify the extent to which observers learn paired associations between simple auditory and visual patterns in a model theoretic manner. As expected, results showed that learning was associated with an increase in accuracy, but more significantly, an increase in capacity. The aim of this study was to associate capacity measures of multisensory learning, with neural based measures, namely mean Global Field Power (GFP). We observed a co-variation between an increase in capacity, and a decrease in GFP amplitude as learning occurred. This suggests that capacity constitutes a reliable behavioral index of efficient energy expenditure in the neural domain. PMID:24276220

  9. Water equivalent of snow retrieved from data of passive microwave scanning with the use of artificial neural networks over the Russian Federation territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Volchek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using of the Chang model for calculation of the snow water equivalent on the basis of measurements of the Earth thermo-microwave radiation by means of scanning polarimeters (SMMR, SSM/I, AMSR-E from board of orbital satellites does not allow obtaining the accuracy needed hydrological purposes. Low accuracy of the calculations is caused by both simplified character of the mathematical model, and due to significant influence of the surface characteristics (relief, vegetation and complex structure of snow thickness upon the microwave radiation propagation. This work was aimed at finding a way to increase accuracy of calculations of the snow water equivalent on the Russian Federation territory with its different climate conditions by means of application the neural network approach for processing of results of the passive microwave scanning of the Earth surface. Feed-forward multi-layer artificial neural network was trained by back-propagation algorithm using SSM/I data and results of snow water equivalent in situ measurements obtained at 117 meteorological stations during the period from January 1st, 1988 till December 31st, 1988. Validation was performed using data from the same sources collected during 7 years (1992–1998. Results of performed numerical experiments and obtained values of rootmean-square error (σ = 24.9 мм; r = 0.39±0,01 allow coming to conclusion that the best estimation of water equivalent of a snow cover is provided by artificial neural network using as the input data a set of the SSM/I channels 19.35, 37.0, 85.5 GHz of horizontal and vertical polarizations with meteorological data differentiated by types of the snow survey route.It is shown that low correlation coefficients (< 0.5 as compared with similar studies on small areas is not caused by the chosen mathematical model and its realization but it is due to a strong diversity of climatic conditions and low density of meteorological stations on the land areas

  10. Differential neural activity during search of specific and general autobiographical memories elicited by musical cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2011-07-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies that have examined autobiographical memory specificity have utilized retrieval cues associated with prior searches of the event, potentially changing the retrieval processes being investigated. In the current study, musical cues were used to naturally elicit memories from multiple levels of specificity (i.e., lifetime period, general event, and event-specific). Sixteen young adults participated in a neuroimaging study in which they retrieved autobiographical memories associated with musical cues. These musical cues led to the retrieval of highly emotional memories that had low levels of prior retrieval. Retrieval of all autobiographical memory levels was associated with activity in regions in the autobiographical memory network, specifically the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and right medial temporal lobe. Owing to the use of music, memories from varying levels of specificity were retrieved, allowing for comparison of event memory and abstract personal knowledge, as well as comparison of specific and general event memory. Dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal regions were engaged during event retrieval relative to personal knowledge retrieval, and retrieval of specific event memories was associated with increased activity in the bilateral medial temporal lobe and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex relative to retrieval of general event memories. These results suggest that the initial search processes for memories of different specificity levels preferentially engage different components of the autobiographical memory network. The potential underlying causes of these neural differences are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  12. A neural network-based method for merging ocean color and Argo data to extend surface bio-optical properties to depth: Retrieval of the particulate backscattering coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzède, R.; Claustre, H.; Uitz, J.; Jamet, C.; Dall'Olmo, G.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Gentili, B.; Poteau, A.; Schmechtig, C.

    2016-04-01

    The present study proposes a novel method that merges satellite ocean color bio-optical products with Argo temperature-salinity profiles to infer the vertical distribution of the particulate backscattering coefficient (bbp). This neural network-based method (SOCA-BBP for Satellite Ocean-Color merged with Argo data to infer the vertical distribution of the Particulate Backscattering coefficient) uses three main input components: (1) satellite-based surface estimates of bbp and chlorophyll a concentration matched up in space and time with (2) depth-resolved physical properties derived from temperature-salinity profiles measured by Argo profiling floats and (3) the day of the year of the considered satellite-Argo matchup. The neural network is trained and validated using a database including 4725 simultaneous profiles of temperature-salinity and bio-optical properties collected by Bio-Argo floats, with concomitant satellite-derived products. The Bio-Argo profiles are representative of the global open-ocean in terms of oceanographic conditions, making the proposed method applicable to most open-ocean environments. SOCA-BBP is validated using 20% of the entire database (global error of 21%). We present additional validation results based on two other independent data sets acquired (1) by four Bio-Argo floats deployed in major oceanic basins, not represented in the database used to train the method; and (2) during an AMT (Atlantic Meridional Transect) field cruise in 2009. These validation tests based on two fully independent data sets indicate the robustness of the predicted vertical distribution of bbp. To illustrate the potential of the method, we merged monthly climatological Argo profiles with ocean color products to produce a depth-resolved climatology of bbp for the global ocean.

  13. A Novel Chaotic Neural Network Using Memristive Synapse with Applications in Associative Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaotic Neural Network, also denoted by the acronym CNN, has rich dynamical behaviors that can be harnessed in promising engineering applications. However, due to its complex synapse learning rules and network structure, it is difficult to update its synaptic weights quickly and implement its large scale physical circuit. This paper addresses an implementation scheme of a novel CNN with memristive neural synapses that may provide a feasible solution for further development of CNN. Memristor, widely known as the fourth fundamental circuit element, was theoretically predicted by Chua in 1971 and has been developed in 2008 by the researchers in Hewlett-Packard Laboratory. Memristor based hybrid nanoscale CMOS technology is expected to revolutionize the digital and neuromorphic computation. The proposed memristive CNN has four significant features: (1 nanoscale memristors can simplify the synaptic circuit greatly and enable the synaptic weights update easily; (2 it can separate stored patterns from superimposed input; (3 it can deal with one-to-many associative memory; (4 it can deal with many-to-many associative memory. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Urošević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development.

  15. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Snežana; Luciana, Monica; Jensen, Jonathan B; Youngstrom, Eric A; Thomas, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD) and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age) associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus), suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development.

  16. Is increased modularity associated with increased fretting and corrosion damage in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty devices?: a retrieval study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Genymphas B; Hanzlik, Josa A; MacDonald, Daniel W; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Rimnac, Clare M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2013-09-01

    This retrieval study documents taper damage at modular interfaces in retrieved MOM THA systems and investigates if increased modularity is associated with increased fretting and corrosion. One hundred thirty-four (134) heads and 60 stems (41 modular necks) of 8 different bearing designs (5 manufacturers) were analyzed. Damage at the shell-liner interface of 18 modular CoCr acetabular liners and the corresponding 11 acetabular shells was also evaluated. The results of this study support the hypothesis that fretting and corrosion damage occurs at a variety of modular component interfaces in contemporary MOM THAs. We also found that modularity of the femoral stem was associated with increased damage at the head. An analysis of component and patient variables revealed that dissimilar alloy pairing, larger head sizes, increased medio-lateral offsets and longer neck moment arms were all associated with increased taper damage at the modular interfaces. © 2013.

  17. pth moment exponential stability of stochastic memristor-based bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Chen, Yuanlong; Liu, Meichun

    2018-02-01

    Stochastic memristor-based bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with time delays play an increasingly important role in the design and implementation of neural network systems. Under the framework of Filippov solutions, the issues of the pth moment exponential stability of stochastic memristor-based BAM neural networks are investigated. By using the stochastic stability theory, Itô's differential formula and Young inequality, the criteria are derived. Meanwhile, with Lyapunov approach and Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, we derive some sufficient conditions for the mean square exponential stability of the above systems. The obtained results improve and extend previous works on memristor-based or usual neural networks dynamical systems. Four numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural correlates of subjective CS/UCS association in appetitive conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia León, Isabell; Kruse, Onno; Stalder, Tobias; Stark, Rudolf; Klucken, Tim

    2018-01-03

    Explicit knowledge of conditioned stimulus (CS)/unconditioned stimulus (UCS) associations is proposed as important factor in classical conditioning. However, while previous studies have focused on its roles in fear conditioning, it has been neglected in the context of appetitive conditioning. The present functional magnetic resonance study aimed to investigate neural activation and functional connectivity linked to subjective CS/UCS association in appetitive conditioning. In total, 85 subjects participated in an appetitive acquisition procedure in which a neutral stimulus (CS+) was paired with a monetary reward, while another neutral stimulus (CS-) was never paired with the reward. Directly afterwards, subjective CS/UCS association was assessed by measuring the extent to which the CS+ was thought to be associated with the UCS compared to the CS-. Close relationships were established between subjective CS/UCS association and activations in the primary visual cortex (V1) during the early phase of conditioning and in the striatum during the late conditioning phase. In addition, we observed inverse relationships between subjective CS/UCS association and both V1/ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and striatal/vmPFC connectivity. The results suggest the involvement of decoupling vmPFC connectivity in reward learning in general and the roles of attentional processes in the formation of the subjective CS/UCS association during the early phase and reward prediction during the late phase of appetitive conditioning. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nonequilibrium landscape theory of neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Liang; Wang, Xidi; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The brain map project aims to map out the neuron connections of the human brain. Even with all of the wirings mapped out, the global and physical understandings of the function and behavior are still challenging. Hopfield quantified the learning and memory process of symmetrically connected neural networks globally through equilibrium energy. The energy basins of attractions represent memories, and the memory retrieval dynamics is determined by the energy gradient. However, the realistic neural networks are asymmetrically connected, and oscillations cannot emerge from symmetric neural networks. Here, we developed a nonequilibrium landscape–flux theory for realistic asymmetrically connected neural networks. We uncovered the underlying potential landscape and the associated Lyapunov function for quantifying the global stability and function. We found the dynamics and oscillations in human brains responsible for cognitive processes and physiological rhythm regulations are determined not only by the landscape gradient but also by the flux. We found that the flux is closely related to the degrees of the asymmetric connections in neural networks and is the origin of the neural oscillations. The neural oscillation landscape shows a closed-ring attractor topology. The landscape gradient attracts the network down to the ring. The flux is responsible for coherent oscillations on the ring. We suggest the flux may provide the driving force for associations among memories. We applied our theory to rapid-eye movement sleep cycle. We identified the key regulation factors for function through global sensitivity analysis of landscape topography against wirings, which are in good agreements with experiments. PMID:24145451

  20. AIRS retrieved CO{sub 2} and its association with climatic parameters over India during 2004–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. Ravi; Revadekar, J.V.; Tiwari, Yogesh K., E-mail: yktiwari@gmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) retrieved mid-tropospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO{sub 2}) have been used to study the variability and its association with the climatic parameters over India during 2004 to 2011. The study also aims in understanding transport of CO{sub 2} from surface to mid-troposphere over India. The annual cycle of mid-tropospheric CO{sub 2} shows gradual increase in concentration from January till the month of May at the rate ∼ 0.6 ppm/month. It decreases continuously in summer monsoon (JJAS) at the same rate during which strong westerlies persists over the region. A slight increase is seen during winter monsoon (DJF). Being a greenhouse gas, annual cycle of CO{sub 2} show good resemblance with annual cycle of surface air temperature with correlation coefficient (CC) of + 0.8. Annual cycle of vertical velocity indicate inverse pattern compared to annual cycle of CO{sub 2}. High values of mid-tropospheric CO{sub 2} correspond to upward wind, while low values of mid-tropospheric CO{sub 2} correspond to downward wind. In addition to vertical motion, zonal winds are also contributing towards the transport of CO{sub 2} from surface to mid-troposphere. Vegetation as it absorbs CO{sub 2} at surface level, show inverse annual cycle to that of annual cycle of CO{sub 2} (CC-0.64). Seasonal variation of rainfall-CO{sub 2} shows similarities with seasonal variation of NDVI-CO{sub 2}. However, the use of long period data sets for CO{sub 2} at the surface and at the mid-troposphere will be an advantage to confirm these results. - Highlights: • Association of AIRS CO{sub 2} with climate parameters over India • CO{sub 2} show positive correlation with surface temperature • Vertical/horizontal winds contribute towards CO{sub 2} transport • Vegetation and monsoonal rainfall show inverse relationship with CO{sub 2}.

  1. Co-speech gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Hasson, Uri; Skipper, Jeremy I; Small, Steven L

    2009-11-01

    Everyday communication is accompanied by visual information from several sources, including co-speech gestures, which provide semantic information listeners use to help disambiguate the speaker's message. Using fMRI, we examined how gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information. The BOLD response was recorded while participants listened to stories under three audiovisual conditions and one auditory-only (speech alone) condition. In the first audiovisual condition, the storyteller produced gestures that naturally accompany speech. In the second, the storyteller made semantically unrelated hand movements. In the third, the storyteller kept her hands still. In addition to inferior parietal and posterior superior and middle temporal regions, bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus and left anterior inferior frontal gyrus responded more strongly to speech when it was further accompanied by gesture, regardless of the semantic relation to speech. However, the right inferior frontal gyrus was sensitive to the semantic import of the hand movements, demonstrating more activity when hand movements were semantically unrelated to the accompanying speech. These findings show that perceiving hand movements during speech modulates the distributed pattern of neural activation involved in both biological motion perception and discourse comprehension, suggesting listeners attempt to find meaning, not only in the words speakers produce, but also in the hand movements that accompany speech.

  2. Estimating the geoeffectiveness of halo CMEs from associated solar and IP parameters using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Uwamahoro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the geoeffectiveness of solar events is of significant importance for space weather modelling and prediction. This paper describes the development of a neural network-based model for estimating the probability occurrence of geomagnetic storms following halo coronal mass ejection (CME and related interplanetary (IP events. This model incorporates both solar and IP variable inputs that characterize geoeffective halo CMEs. Solar inputs include numeric values of the halo CME angular width (AW, the CME speed (Vcme, and the comprehensive flare index (cfi, which represents the flaring activity associated with halo CMEs. IP parameters used as inputs are the numeric peak values of the solar wind speed (Vsw and the southward Z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF or Bs. IP inputs were considered within a 5-day time window after a halo CME eruption. The neural network (NN model training and testing data sets were constructed based on 1202 halo CMEs (both full and partial halo and their properties observed between 1997 and 2006. The performance of the developed NN model was tested using a validation data set (not part of the training data set covering the years 2000 and 2005. Under the condition of halo CME occurrence, this model could capture 100% of the subsequent intense geomagnetic storms (Dst ≤ −100 nT. For moderate storms (−100 < Dst ≤ −50, the model is successful up to 75%. This model's estimate of the storm occurrence rate from halo CMEs is estimated at a probability of 86%.

  3. Chronic Childhood Peer Rejection is Associated with Heightened Neural Responses to Social Exclusion During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Geert-Jan; van Lier, Pol A C; Crone, Eveline A; Güroğlu, Berna

    2016-01-01

    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study examined subjective and neural responses to social exclusion in adolescents (age 12-15) who either had a stable accepted (n = 27; 14 males) or a chronic rejected (n = 19; 12 males) status among peers from age 6 to 12. Both groups of adolescents reported similar increases in distress after being excluded in a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball), but adolescents with a history of chronic peer rejection showed higher activity in brain regions previously linked to the detection of, and the distress caused by, social exclusion. Specifically, compared with stably accepted adolescents, chronically rejected adolescents displayed: 1) higher activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) during social exclusion and 2) higher activity in the dACC and anterior prefrontal cortex when they were incidentally excluded in a social interaction in which they were overall included. These findings demonstrate that chronic childhood peer rejection is associated with heightened neural responses to social exclusion during adolescence, which has implications for understanding the processes through which peer rejection may lead to adverse effects on mental health over time.

  4. Retrieval cues that trigger reconsolidation of associative fear memory are not necessarily an exact replica of the original learning experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeter, M.; Kindt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Disrupting the process of memory reconsolidation may point to a novel therapeutic strategy for the permanent reduction of fear in patients suffering from anxiety disorders. However both in animal and human studies the retrieval cue typically involves a re-exposure to the original fear-conditioned

  5. Retrieval of spinach crop parameters by microwave remote sensing with back propagation artificial neural networks: A comparison of different transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Pandey, A.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, V. P.; Mishra, R. K.; Singh, D.

    2012-08-01

    Back propagation artificial natural network (BPANN) is a well known and widely used machine learning methodology in the field of remote sensing. In this paper an attempt is made to retrieve the spinach crop parameters like biomass, leaf area index, average plant height and soil moisture content by using the X-band scattering coefficients with BPANN at different growth stages of this crop. The maturity age of this crop was found to be 45 days from the date of sowing. After 45 days from the date of sowing, this crop was cut at a certain height for production. Then, it is a point of interest to investigate the microwave response of variation in production. Significant variations in all the crop parameters were observed after cutting the crop and consequently made the problem more critical. Our work confirms the utility of BPANN in handling such a non-linear data set. The BPANN is essentially a network of simple processing nodes arranged into different layers as input, hidden and the output. The input layer propagates components of a particular input vector after weighting these with synaptic weights to each node in the hidden layer. At each node, these weighted input vector components are added. Each hidden layer computes output corresponding to these weighted sum through a non-linear/linear function (e.g. LOGSIG, TANSIG and PURLIN). These functions are known as transfer functions. Thus, each of the hidden layer nodes compute output values, which become inputs to the nodes of the output layer. At nodes of output layer also a weighted sum of outputs of previous layer (hidden layer) are obtained and processed through a transfer function. Thus, the output layer nodes compute the network output for the particular input vector. In this paper, output nodes use linear transfer function. Different transfer functions e.g. TANSIG, LOGSIG and PURELIN were used and the performance of the ANN was optimized by changing the number of neurons in the hidden layers. The present

  6. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated with Neural Tube Defects (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as omphalocele, OEIS (omphalocele-exstrophy-imperforate anus-spinal defects complex, pentalogy of Cantrell, amniotic band sequence, limb-body wall complex, Meckel syndrome, Joubert syndrome, skeletal dysplasia, diabetic embryopathy, and single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes of glucose metabolism. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multi facto rial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert the clinician to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal and fetal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling. [Taiwan J Obstet Cynecol 2008;47(2:131-140

  7. Syndromes, Disorders and Maternal Risk Factors Associated With Neural Tube Defects (VII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs may be associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of the syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, including DK phocomelia syndrome (von Voss-Cherstvoy syndrome, Siegel-Bartlet syndrome, fetal warfarin syndrome, craniotelencephalic dysplasia, Czeizel-Losonci syndrome, maternal cocaine abuse, Weissenbacher-Zweymüller syndrome, parietal foramina (cranium bifidum, Apert syndrome, craniomicromelic syndrome, XX-agonadism with multiple dysraphic lesions including omphalocele and NTDs, Fryns microphthalmia syndrome, Gershoni-Baruch syndrome, PHAVER syndrome, periconceptional vitamin B6 deficiency, and autosomal dominant Dandy-Walker malformation with occipital cephalocele. NTDs associated with these syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors may be different from those of nonsyndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal diagnosis of NTDs should alert doctors to the syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  8. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Foreign Body Retrieval Foreign body retrieval is the removal of ... foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves the removal of ...

  9. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Foreign Body Retrieval Foreign body retrieval is the removal of ... foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves the removal of ...

  10. Recognizing partially occluded objects by a bidirectional associative memory neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Nirwan; Liu, Xianjun

    1993-07-01

    We develop a bidirectional associative memory (BAM)-based neural network to achieve high- speed partial shape recognition. To recognize objects that are partially occluded, we represent each object by a set of landmarks. The landmarks of an object are points of interest relative to the object that have important shape attributes. To achieve recognition, feature values (landmark values) of each model object are trained and stored in the network. Each memory cell is trained to store landmark values of a model object for all possible positions. Given a scene that may consist of several objects, landmarks in the scene are first extracted, and their corresponding landmark values are computed. Scene landmark values are entered to each trained memory cell. The memory cell is shown to be able to recall the position of the model object in the scene. A heuristic measure is then computed to validate the recognition.

  11. AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF BROADCAST AUDIO SIGNALS USING AUTO ASSOCIATIVE NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dhanalakshmi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe automatic segmentation methods for audio broadcast data. Today, digital audio applications are part of our everyday lives. Since there are more and more digital audio databases in place these days, the importance of effective management for audio databases have become prominent. Broadcast audio data is recorded from the Television which comprises of various categories of audio signals. Efficient algorithms for segmenting the audio broadcast data into predefined categories are proposed. Audio features namely Linear prediction coefficients (LPC, Linear prediction cepstral coefficients, and Mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC are extracted to characterize the audio data. Auto Associative Neural Networks are used to segment the audio data into predefined categories using the extracted features. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithms can produce satisfactory results.

  12. Co-Operative Coevolutionary Neural Networks for Mining Functional Association Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Merrick, Kathryn E; Abbass, Hussein A

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel form of association rules (ARs) that do not require discretization of continuous variables or the use of intervals in either sides of the rule. This rule form captures nonlinear relationships among variables, and provides an alternative pattern representation for mining essential relations hidden in a given data set. We refer to the new rule form as a functional AR (FAR). A new neural network-based, co-operative, coevolutionary algorithm is presented for FAR mining. The algorithm is applied to both synthetic and real-world data sets, and its performance is analyzed. The experimental results show that the proposed mining algorithm is able to discover valid and essential underlying relations in the data. Comparison experiments are also carried out with the two state-of-the-art AR mining algorithms that can handle continuous variables to demonstrate the competitive performance of the proposed method.

  13. Integrin-associated protein promotes neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Fujimura

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs proliferate and differentiate depending on their intrinsic properties and local environment. During the development of the mammalian nervous system, NSPCs generate neurons and glia sequentially. However, little is known about the mechanism that determines the timing of switch from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. In this study, we established a culture system in which the neurogenic potential of NSPCs is decreased in a time-dependent manner, so that short-term-cultured NSPCs differentiate into more neurons compared with long-term-cultured NSPCs. We found that short-term-cultured NSPCs express high levels of integrin-associated protein form 2 (IAP2; so-called CD47 mRNA using differential display analysis. Moreover, IAP2 overexpression in NSPCs induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which IAP2 induces neuronal differentiation of NSPCs.

  14. Informing others is associated with behavioral and neural signatures of value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Diana I; Zaki, Jamil; Mitchell, Jason P

    2015-12-01

    One of the many proclivities of our species is the drive to share information with others. What drives this unusual proclivity for propagating knowledge? Here, we test a common prediction made by recent theories in this domain: that individuals value opportunities to inform others. Two sets of studies supported this hypothesis. Behaviorally, individuals gave up money to inform others, even in "minimalistic" settings under which informing neither improved participants' reputation nor provided material benefits to information recipients. Neurally, opportunities to inform others engaged brain regions associated with motivation and reward, including the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that people place intrinsic value on sharing information with others. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Use of an artificial neural network to detect association between a disease and multiple marker genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, D; North, B V; Sham, P C

    2001-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are very common throughout the genome and hence are potentially valuable for mapping disease susceptibility loci by detecting association between SNP markers and disease. However as SNPs are biallelic they may have relatively little power in association studies compared with the information that would be obtainable if marker haplotypes were available and could be used efficiently. Modelling the evolutionary events leading to linkage disequilibrium is very complex and many methods that seek to use information from multiple markers simultaneously need to make simplifying assumptions and may only be applicable when marker haplotypes, rather than genotypes, are available for analysis. We explore the properties of a simple application of a standard artificial neural network to this problem. The pattern-recognition properties of the network are used in the hope that marker haplotypes implicit in the genotypes will differ between cases and controls in a way which will lead to the network being able to classify the subjects correctly, according to their marker genotype. This method makes no assumptions at all regarding population history or the marker map, and can be applied to genotypes, as would be available from a simple case-control sample, without any need to determine haplotypes. Through application to data simulated under a very wide range of assumptions we show that such an analysis produces a useful augmentation in power above that which would be achieved by testing each marker individually, in particular when more than one mutation has occurred in a disease gene at different points in evolution. The application of neural networks to such problems shows considerable promise and further work could usefully be directed towards optimising the design and implementation of such networks.

  16. Information retrieval in cultural heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, M.; Kamps, J.; de Keijzer, V.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the opportunities and challenges of applying modern information retrieval techniques to the cultural heritage domain. Although the field of information retrieval is closely associated with computer science, it originally emerged from library science — also one of the main

  17. How Does a Child Solve 7 + 8? Decoding Brain Activity Patterns Associated with Counting and Retrieval Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soohyun; Ryali, Srikanth; Geary, David C.; Menon, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive development and learning are characterized by diminished reliance on effortful procedures and increased use of memory-based problem solving. Here we identify the neural correlates of this strategy shift in 7-9-year-old children at an important developmental period for arithmetic skill acquisition. Univariate and multivariate approaches…

  18. Cross-Modal Decoding of Neural Patterns Associated with Working Memory: Evidence for Attention-Based Accounts of Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Cowan, Nelson; Péters, Frédéric; Van Calster, Laurens; Phillips, Christophe; Schrouff, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest common neural substrates involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM), interpreted as reflecting shared attention-based, short-term retention mechanisms. We used a machine-learning approach to determine more directly the extent to which common neural patterns characterize retention in verbal WM and visual WM. Verbal WM was assessed via a standard delayed probe recognition task for letter sequences of variable length. Visual WM was assessed via a visual array WM task involving the maintenance of variable amounts of visual information in the focus of attention. We trained a classifier to distinguish neural activation patterns associated with high- and low-visual WM load and tested the ability of this classifier to predict verbal WM load (high-low) from their associated neural activation patterns, and vice versa. We observed significant between-task prediction of load effects during WM maintenance, in posterior parietal and superior frontal regions of the dorsal attention network; in contrast, between-task prediction in sensory processing cortices was restricted to the encoding stage. Furthermore, between-task prediction of load effects was strongest in those participants presenting the highest capacity for the visual WM task. This study provides novel evidence for common, attention-based neural patterns supporting verbal and visual WM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Cross-Modal Decoding of Neural Patterns Associated with Working Memory: Evidence for Attention-Based Accounts of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Cowan, Nelson; Péters, Frédéric; Van Calster, Laurens; Phillips, Christophe; Schrouff, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest common neural substrates involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM), interpreted as reflecting shared attention-based, short-term retention mechanisms. We used a machine-learning approach to determine more directly the extent to which common neural patterns characterize retention in verbal WM and visual WM. Verbal WM was assessed via a standard delayed probe recognition task for letter sequences of variable length. Visual WM was assessed via a visual array WM task involving the maintenance of variable amounts of visual information in the focus of attention. We trained a classifier to distinguish neural activation patterns associated with high- and low-visual WM load and tested the ability of this classifier to predict verbal WM load (high–low) from their associated neural activation patterns, and vice versa. We observed significant between-task prediction of load effects during WM maintenance, in posterior parietal and superior frontal regions of the dorsal attention network; in contrast, between-task prediction in sensory processing cortices was restricted to the encoding stage. Furthermore, between-task prediction of load effects was strongest in those participants presenting the highest capacity for the visual WM task. This study provides novel evidence for common, attention-based neural patterns supporting verbal and visual WM. PMID:25146374

  20. Blunted feelings: alexithymia is associated with a diminished neural response to speech prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerlich-Dobre, Katharina Sophia; Witteman, Jurriaan; Schiller, Niels O; van Heuven, Vincent J P; Aleman, André; Martens, Sander

    2014-08-01

    How we perceive emotional signals from our environment depends on our personality. Alexithymia, a personality trait characterized by difficulties in emotion regulation has been linked to aberrant brain activity for visual emotional processing. Whether alexithymia also affects the brain's perception of emotional speech prosody is currently unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the impact of alexithymia on hemodynamic activity of three a priori regions of the prosody network: the superior temporal gyrus (STG), the inferior frontal gyrus and the amygdala. Twenty-two subjects performed an explicit task (emotional prosody categorization) and an implicit task (metrical stress evaluation) on the same prosodic stimuli. Irrespective of task, alexithymia was associated with a blunted response of the right STG and the bilateral amygdalae to angry, surprised and neutral prosody. Individuals with difficulty describing feelings deactivated the left STG and the bilateral amygdalae to a lesser extent in response to angry compared with neutral prosody, suggesting that they perceived angry prosody as relatively more salient than neutral prosody. In conclusion, alexithymia may be associated with a generally blunted neural response to speech prosody. Such restricted prosodic processing may contribute to problems in social communication associated with this personality trait. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Motor and mental training in older people: Transfer, interference, and associated functional neural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraxbekk, C J; Hagkvist, Filip; Lindner, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Learning new motor skills may become more difficult with advanced age. In the present study, we randomized 56 older individuals, including 30 women (mean age 70.6 years), to 6 weeks of motor training, mental (motor imagery) training, or a combination of motor and mental training of a finger tapping sequence. Performance improvements and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used to investigate performance gains and associated underlying neural processes. Motor-only training and a combination of motor and mental training improved performance in the trained task more than mental-only training. The fMRI data showed that motor training was associated with a representation in the premotor cortex and mental training with a representation in the secondary visual cortex. Combining motor and mental training resulted in both premotor and visual cortex representations. During fMRI scanning, reduced performance was observed in the combined motor and mental training group, possibly indicating interference between the two training methods. We concluded that motor and motor imagery training in older individuals is associated with different functional brain responses. Furthermore, adding mental training to motor training did not result in additional performance gains compared to motor-only training and combining training methods may result in interference between representations, reducing performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coordinated neural, behavioral, and phenomenological changes in perceptual plasticity through overtraining of synesthetic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Nicolas; Schwartzman, David J; Bor, Daniel; Seth, Anil K

    2018-01-31

    Synesthesia is associated with additional perceptual experiences, which are automatically and consistently triggered by specific inducing stimuli. Synesthesia is also accompanied by more general sensory and cortical changes, including enhanced modality-specific cortical excitability. Extensive cognitive training has been shown to generate synesthesia-like phenomenology but whether these experiences are accompanied by neurophysiological changes characteristic of synesthesia remains unknown. Addressing this question provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the neural basis of perceptual plasticity relevant to conscious experiences. Here we investigate whether extensive training of letter-color associations leads not only to synesthetic experiences, but also to changes in cortical excitability. We confirm that overtraining synesthetic associations results in synesthetic phenomenology. Stroop tasks further reveal synesthesia-like performance following training. Electroencephalography and transcranial magnetic stimulation show, respectively, enhanced visual evoked potentials (in response to untrained patterns) and lower phosphene thresholds, demonstrating specific cortical changes. An active (using letter-symbol training) and a passive control confirmed these results were due to letter-color training and not simply to repeated testing. Summarizing, we demonstrate specific cortical changes, following training-induced acquisition of synesthetic phenomenology that are characteristic of genuine synesthesia. Collectively, our data reveal dramatic plasticity in human visual perception, expressed through a coordinated set of behavioral, neurophysiological, and phenomenological changes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Are concentrations of alkaline earth elements in maternal hair associated with risk of neural tube defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenjiang; Wang, Bin; Huo, Wenhua; Liu, Yingying; Zhu, Yibing; Xie, Jing; Li, Zhiwen; Ren, Aiguo

    2017-12-31

    The relationship between maternal intake of alkaline earth elements (AEEs) during the period of neural tube closure and the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) is still unclear. We propose that AEE deficiency during the early period of pregnancy is associated with an elevated risk of NTDs in the offspring. In this study, we recruited 191 women with NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 261 women who delivered healthy infants (controls). The concentrations of four AEEs (Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba) in maternal hair sections that grew during early pregnancy were analyzed. Information on the dietary habits of the mothers was also collected by questionnaire. Higher concentrations of the four AEEs in hair had protective effects against the risk of total NTDs, with odds ratios with 95% confidence interval (comparing groups separated by each median level) of 0.44 (0.28-0.68) for Mg, 0.56 (0.36-0.87) for Ca, 0.45 (0.28-0.70) for Sr, and 0.41 (0.26-0.65) for Ba. Significant negative dose-response trends were identified for the relationships between the four AEE concentrations in maternal hair and the risks of anencephaly and spina bifida, but not for encephalocele. The frequencies of maternal consumption of fresh green vegetables, fresh fruit, and meat or fish were positively correlated with the concentrations of AEEs in hair. We concluded that the maternal intake of AEEs may play an important role in preventing NTD formation in offspring, and that this intake is related to maternal dietary habits of consuming fresh green vegetables, fresh fruit, and fish or meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Untargeted metabolite profiling of murine embryos to reveal metabolic perturbations associated with neural tube closure defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansler, Alex; Chen, Qiuying; Gray, Jason D; Ross, M Elizabeth; Finnell, Richard H; Gross, Steven S

    2014-08-01

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs) are among the most common congenital malformation in human, typically presenting in liveborns as spina bifida. At least 240 gene mutations in mouse are known to increase the risk of NTD. There is a growing appreciation that environmental factors significantly contribute to NTD expression, and that NTDs likely arise from complex gene-environment interactions. Because maternal folic acid supplementation reduces human NTD risk in some populations by 60 to 70%, it is likely that NTD predisposition is often associated with a defect in folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism. A comprehensive, untargeted metabolic survey of NTD-associated changes in embryo metabolism would provide a valuable test of this assumption. We sought to establish a metabolic profiling platform that is capable of broadly assessing metabolic aberrations associated with NTD-promoting gene mutations in early-stage mouse embryos. A liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolite profiling platform was used to broadly identify significant differences in small molecule levels (50-1000 Da) in NTD-affected embryonic day (E) 9.5 mouse embryos (Lrp6(-) (/) (-) ) versus unaffected (Lrp6(+/+) ) control embryos. Results provide proof-of-principal feasibility for the broad survey of the metabolome of individual E9.5 mouse embryos and identification of metabolic changes associated with NTDs and gene mutations. Levels of 30 different metabolites were altered in association with Lrp6 gene deletion. Some metabolites link to folate-dependent one-carbon transfer reactions, as anticipated, while others await structure elucidation and pathway integration. Whole-embryo metabolomics offers the potential to identify metabolic changes in genetically determined NTD-prone embryos. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-04-10

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

  6. Neural correlates of retaliatory and prosocial reactions to social exclusion: Associations with chronic peer rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A; van Lier, Pol A C; Güroğlu, Berna

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a distressing experience and can lead to both retaliatory and prosocial reactions toward the sources of exclusion. The way people react to social exclusion has been hypothesized to be shaped through chronic exposure to peer rejection. This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study examined associations between chronic peer rejection and retaliatory (i.e. punishing) and prosocial (i.e. forgiving) reactions to social exclusion and the neural processes underlying them. Chronically rejected (n=19) and stably highly accepted adolescents (n=27) distributed money between themselves and unknown others who previously included or excluded them in a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball). Decreasing the excluders' monetary profits (i.e., punishment) was associated with increased activity in the ventral striatum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and parietal cortex in both groups. Compared to stably highly accepted adolescents, chronically rejected adolescents exhibited higher activity in the dorsal striatum and lateral prefrontal cortex - brain regions implicated in cognitive control - when they refrained from punishment and shared their money equally with (i.e. forgave) the excluders. These results provide insights into processes that might underlie the maintenance of peer rejection across development, such as difficulties controlling the urge to retaliate after exclusion. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential diagnosis of dumbbell lesions associated with spinal neural foraminal widening: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivrak, Ali Sami [Selcuk University, Meram Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, 42080 Konya (Turkey)], E-mail: alisamikivrak@hotmail.com; Koc, Osman; Emlik, Dilek; Kiresi, Demet; Odev, Kemal [Selcuk University, Meram Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, 42080 Konya (Turkey); Kalkan, Erdal [Selcuk University, Meram Medical Faculty, Department of Neurosurgery, Konya (Turkey)

    2009-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reliably demonstrate typical features of schwannomas or neurofibromas in the vast majority of dumbbell lesions responsible for neural foraminal widening. However, a large variety of unusual lesions which are causes of neural foraminal widening can also be encountered in the spinal neural foramen. Radiologic findings can be helpful in differential diagnosis of lesions of spinal neural foramen including neoplastic lesions such as benign/malign peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs), solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP), chondroid chordoma, superior sulcus tumor, metastasis and non-neoplastic lesions such as infectious process (tuberculosis, hydatid cyst), aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), synovial cyst, traumatic pseudomeningocele, arachnoid cyst, vertebral artery tortuosity. In this article, we discuss CT and MRI findings of dumbbell lesions which are causes of neural foraminal widening.

  8. Comparison of artificial neural network analysis with other multimarker methods for detecting genetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David

    2007-07-18

    Debate remains as to the optimal method for utilising genotype data obtained from multiple markers in case-control association studies. I and colleagues have previously described a method of association analysis using artificial neural networks (ANNs), whose performance compared favourably to single-marker methods. Here, the performance of ANN analysis is compared with other multi-marker methods, comprising different haplotype-based analyses and locus-based analyses. Of several methods studied and applied to simulated SNP datasets, heterogeneity testing of estimated haplotype frequencies using asymptotic p values rather than permutation testing had the lowest power of the methods studied and ANN analysis had the highest power. The difference in power to detect association between these two methods was statistically significant (p = 0.001) but other comparisons between methods were not significant. The raw t statistic obtained from ANN analysis correlated highly with the empirical statistical significance obtained from permutation testing of the ANN results and with the p value obtained from the heterogeneity test. Although ANN analysis was more powerful than the standard haplotype-based test it is unlikely to be taken up widely. The permutation testing necessary to obtain a valid p value makes it slow to perform and it is not underpinned by a theoretical model relating marker genotypes to disease phenotype. Nevertheless, the superior performance of this method does imply that the widely-used haplotype-based methods for detecting association with multiple markers are not optimal and efforts could be made to improve upon them. The fact that the t statistic obtained from ANN analysis is highly correlated with the statistical significance does suggest a possibility to use ANN analysis in situations where large numbers of markers have been genotyped, since the t value could be used as a proxy for the p value in preliminary analyses.

  9. Comparison of artificial neural network analysis with other multimarker methods for detecting genetic association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis David

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debate remains as to the optimal method for utilising genotype data obtained from multiple markers in case-control association studies. I and colleagues have previously described a method of association analysis using artificial neural networks (ANNs, whose performance compared favourably to single-marker methods. Here, the perfomance of ANN analysis is compared with other multi-marker methods, comprising different haplotype-based analyses and locus-based analyses. Results Of several methods studied and applied to simulated SNP datasets, heterogeneity testing of estimated haplotype frequencies using asymptotic p values rather than permutation testing had the lowest power of the methods studied and ANN analysis had the highest power. The difference in power to detect association between these two methods was statistically significant (p = 0.001 but other comparisons between methods were not significant. The raw t statistic obtained from ANN analysis correlated highly with the empirical statistical significance obtained from permutation testing of the ANN results and with the p value obtained from the heterogeneity test. Conclusion Although ANN analysis was more powerful than the standard haplotype-based test it is unlikely to be taken up widely. The permutation testing necessary to obtain a valid p value makes it slow to perform and it is not underpinned by a theoretical model relating marker genotypes to disease phenotype. Nevertheless, the superior performance of this method does imply that the widely-used haplotype-based methods for detecting association with multiple markers are not optimal and efforts could be made to improve upon them. The fact that the t statistic obtained from ANN analysis is highly correlated with the statistical significance does suggest a possibility to use ANN analysis in situations where large numbers of markers have been genotyped, since the t value could be used as a proxy for the p value in

  10. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Detre, John A.; Martha J Farah; Rao, Hengyi

    2011-01-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of...

  11. Comparison of complication rates associated with permanent and retrievable inferior vena cava filters: a review of the MAUDE database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Jessica M; Lewandowski, Robert J; Vogelzang, Robert L; Ryu, Robert K

    2014-08-01

    To compare the safety of permanent and retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters by reviewing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The MAUDE database was reviewed from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012. Product class search criteria were "filter, intravascular, cardiovascular." Type of device used and specific adverse events (AEs) were recorded. For the period January 2009-December 2012, 1,606 reported AEs involving 1,057 IVC filters were identified in the MAUDE database . Of reported AEs, 1,394 (86.8%) involved retrievable inferior vena cava filters (rIVCFs), and 212 (13.2%) involved permanent inferior vena cava filters (pIVCFs) (P < .0001). Reported AEs included fracture, migration, limb embolization, tilt, IVC penetration, venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism, IVC thrombus, and malfunctions during placement. Each specific AE was reported with significantly higher frequency in rIVCFs compared with pIVCFs. The most common reported complication with rIVCFs was fracture, whereas the most commonly reported complications with pIVCFs were placement malfunctions. For rIVCFs, the most commonly reported AE varied depending on filter brand. The MAUDE database reveals that complications occur with significantly higher frequency with rIVCFs compared with pIVCFs. This finding suggests that the self-reported complication rate with rIVCFs is significantly higher than the self-reported complication rate with pIVCFs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Renewal effects in interference between outcomes as measured by a cued response reaction time task: further evidence for associative retrieval models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Pedro L; González-Martín, Estrella; Varona-Moya, Sergio; López, Francisco J

    2013-10-01

    Two experiments demonstrated renewal effects in interference between outcomes in human participants. Experiment 1 revealed a XYX renewal effect, whereas Experiment 2 showed a XYZ renewal effect. The results from both experiments conformed to Bouton's (1993) theory of interference and recovery from interference, and contradicted the predictions derived from alternative accounts. Unlike previous demonstration of renewal effects, a cued response reaction time (RT) task was used, able to detect the effects of fast retrieval processes based on associative activation and that allowed little impact of inferential reasoning.

  13. Proliferation and recapitulation of developmental patterning associated with regulative regeneration of the spinal cord neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasi, Gabor; Søviknes, Anne Mette; Sigurjonsson, Olafur; Glover, Joel C

    2012-05-01

    Developmental patterning during regulative regeneration of the chicken embryo spinal neural tube was characterized by assessing proliferation and the expression of transcription factors specific to neural progenitor and postmitotic neuron populations. One to several segments of the thoracolumbar neural tube were selectively excised unilaterally to initiate regeneration. The capacity for regeneration depended on the stage when ablation was performed and the extent of tissue removed. 20% of surviving embryos exhibited complete regulative regeneration, wherein the missing hemi-neural tube was reconstituted to normal size and morphology. Fate-mapping of proliferative adjacent tissue indicated contributions from the opposite side of the neural tube and potentially from the ipsilateral neural tube rostral and caudal to the lesion. Application of the thymidine analog EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) demonstrated a moderate increase in cell proliferation in lesioned relative to control embryos, and quantitative PCR demonstrated a parallel moderate increase in transcription of proliferation-related genes. Mathematical calculation showed that such modest increases are sufficient to account for the amount of regenerated tissue. Within the regenerated neural tube the expression pattern of progenitor-specific transcription factors was recapitulated in the separate advancing ventral and dorsal fronts of regeneration, with no evidence of abnormal mixing of progenitor subpopulations, indicating that graded patterning mechanisms do not require continuity of neural tube tissue along the dorsoventral axis and do not involve a sorting out of committed progenitors. Upon completion of the regeneration process, the pattern of neuron-specific transcription factor expression was essentially normal. Modest deficits in the numbers of transcription factor-defined neuron types were evident in the regenerated tissue, increasing particularly in dorsal neuron types with later lesions. These

  14. Adding insult to injury: neural sensitivity to social exclusion is associated with internalizing symptoms in chronically peer-victimized girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Karen D; Miernicki, Michelle E; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Davis, Megan M; Telzer, Eva H

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence documenting activation of the social pain network in response to social rejection and its link to temporary distress, far less is known regarding its role in pervasive emotional difficulties. Moreover, research has not considered the intersection between neural activation to experimentally induced social exclusion and naturally occurring social adversity. This study examined an integrated social pain model of internalizing symptoms, which posits that (i) neural sensitivity in the social pain network is associated with internalizing symptoms, (ii) this linkage is more robust in youth with than without a history of social adversity, and (iii) heightened avoidance motivation serves as one pathway linking neural sensitivity and internalizing symptoms. During a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan, 47 adolescent girls (M age = 15.46 years, SD = .35) with well-characterized histories of peer victimization were exposed to social exclusion. Whole-brain analyses revealed that activation to exclusion in the social pain network was associated with internalizing symptoms. As anticipated, this linkage was stronger in chronically victimized than non-victimized girls and was partially accounted for by avoidance motivation. This research indicates the importance of integrating neural, social and psychological systems of development in efforts to elucidate risk for internalizing symptoms among adolescent girls. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Neural adaptations associated with interlimb transfer in a ballistic wrist flexion task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L Ruddy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1 to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left limb. These were: mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; no visual feedback of either limb; and visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realised through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS.

  16. Neural Adaptations Associated with Interlimb Transfer in a Ballistic Wrist Flexion Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Rudolf, Anne K.; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J.; Carson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE) arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right) limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left) limb. These were: (1) mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; (2) no visual feedback of either limb; and (3) visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realized through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS. PMID:27199722

  17. Neural compensation in adulthood following very preterm birth demonstrated during a visual paired associates learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Philip J; Froudist Walsh, Sean; Nam, Kie-Woo; Giampietro, Vincent; Karolis, Vyacheslav; Murray, Robin M; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Kalpakidou, Anastasia; Nosarti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Very preterm birth (VPT; brain insult; however, adaptive neuroplastic processes may subsequently occur in the developing preterm brain which ameliorate, to an extent, the potential sequelae of altered neurophysiology. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare neuronal activation in 24 VPT individuals and 22 controls (CT) in young adulthood during a learning task consisting of the encoding and subsequent recognition of repeated visual paired associates. Structural MRI data were also collected and analysed in order to explore possible structure-function associations. Whilst the two groups did not differ in their learning ability, as demonstrated by their capacity to recognize previously-seen and previously-unseen visual pairs, between-group differences in linear patterns of Blood Oxygenation Level Dependant (BOLD) activity were observed across the four repeated blocks of the task for both the encoding and recognition conditions, suggesting that the way learning takes place differs between the two groups. During encoding, significant between-group differences in patterns of BOLD activity were seen in clusters centred on the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate gyrus, the midbrain/substantia nigra, medial temporal (including parahippocampal) gyrus and inferior and superior frontal gyri. During the recognition condition, significant between-group differences in patterns of BOLD activity were seen in clusters centred on the claustrum and the posterior cerebellum. Structural analysis revealed smaller grey matter volume in right middle temporal gyrus in VPT individuals compared to controls, however volume in this region was not significantly associated with functional activation. These results demonstrate that although cognitive task performance between VPT individuals and controls may be comparable on certain measures, differences in BOLD signal may also be evident, some of which could represent compensatory neural processes following VPT

  18. Light evokes melanopsin-dependent vocalization and neural activation associated with aversive experience in neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Delwig

    Full Text Available Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs are the only functional photoreceptive cells in the eye of newborn mice. Through postnatal day 9, in the absence of functional rods and cones, these ipRGCs mediate a robust avoidance behavior to a light source, termed negative phototaxis. To determine whether this behavior is associated with an aversive experience in neonatal mice, we characterized light-induced vocalizations and patterns of neuronal activation in regions of the brain involved in the processing of aversive and painful stimuli. Light evoked distinct melanopsin-dependent ultrasonic vocalizations identical to those emitted under stressful conditions, such as isolation from the litter. In contrast, light did not evoke the broad-spectrum calls elicited by acute mechanical pain. Using markers of neuronal activation, we found that light induced the immediate-early gene product Fos in the posterior thalamus, a brain region associated with the enhancement of responses to mechanical stimulation of the dura by light, and thought to be the basis for migrainous photophobia. Additionally, light induced the phosphorylation of extracellular-related kinase (pERK in neurons of the central amygdala, an intracellular signal associated with the processing of the aversive aspects of pain. However, light did not activate Fos expression in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis, the primary receptive field for painful stimulation to the head. We conclude that these light-evoked vocalizations and the distinct pattern of brain activation in neonatal mice are consistent with a melanopsin-dependent neural pathway involved in processing light as an aversive but not acutely painful stimulus.

  19. Epileptic Seizure Prediction by a System of Particle Filter Associated with a Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derong; Pang, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhuo

    2009-12-01

    None of the current epileptic seizure prediction methods can widely be accepted, due to their poor consistency in performance. In this work, we have developed a novel approach to analyze intracranial EEG data. The energy of the frequency band of 4-12 Hz is obtained by wavelet transform. A dynamic model is introduced to describe the process and a hidden variable is included. The hidden variable can be considered as indicator of seizure activities. The method of particle filter associated with a neural network is used to calculate the hidden variable. Six patients' intracranial EEG data are used to test our algorithm including 39 hours of ictal EEG with 22 seizures and 70 hours of normal EEG recordings. The minimum least square error algorithm is applied to determine optimal parameters in the model adaptively. The results show that our algorithm can successfully predict 15 out of 16 seizures and the average prediction time is 38.5 minutes before seizure onset. The sensitivity is about 93.75% and the specificity (false prediction rate) is approximately 0.09 FP/h. A random predictor is used to calculate the sensitivity under significance level of 5%. Compared to the random predictor, our method achieved much better performance.

  20. Adaptive Predistortions Based on Neural Networks Associated with Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Satellite Down Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roviras Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents adaptive predistortion techniques based on a feed-forward neural network (NN to linearize power amplifiers such as those used in satellite communications. Indeed, it presents the suitable NN structures which give the best performances for three satellite down links. The first link is a stationary memoryless travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA, the second one is a nonstationary memoryless TWT amplifier while the third is an amplifier with memory modeled by a memoryless amplifier followed by a linear filter. Equally important, it puts forward the studies concerning the application of different NN training algorithms in order to determine the most prefermant for adaptive predistortions. This comparison examined through computer simulation for 64 carriers and 16-QAM OFDM system, with a Saleh's TWT amplifier, is based on some quality measure (mean square error, the required training time to reach a particular quality level, and computation complexity. The chosen adaptive predistortions (NN structures associated with an adaptive algorithm have a low complexity, fast convergence, and best performance.

  1. Adaptive Predistortions Based on Neural Networks Associated with Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Satellite Down Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Roviras

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents adaptive predistortion techniques based on a feed-forward neural network (NN to linearize power amplifiers such as those used in satellite communications. Indeed, it presents the suitable NN structures which give the best performances for three satellite down links. The first link is a stationary memoryless travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA, the second one is a nonstationary memoryless TWT amplifier while the third is an amplifier with memory modeled by a memoryless amplifier followed by a linear filter. Equally important, it puts forward the studies concerning the application of different NN training algorithms in order to determine the most prefermant for adaptive predistortions. This comparison examined through computer simulation for 64 carriers and 16-QAM OFDM system, with a Saleh's TWT amplifier, is based on some quality measure (mean square error, the required training time to reach a particular quality level, and computation complexity. The chosen adaptive predistortions (NN structures associated with an adaptive algorithm have a low complexity, fast convergence, and best performance.

  2. Epileptic Seizure Prediction by a System of Particle Filter Associated with a Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available None of the current epileptic seizure prediction methods can widely be accepted, due to their poor consistency in performance. In this work, we have developed a novel approach to analyze intracranial EEG data. The energy of the frequency band of 4–12 Hz is obtained by wavelet transform. A dynamic model is introduced to describe the process and a hidden variable is included. The hidden variable can be considered as indicator of seizure activities. The method of particle filter associated with a neural network is used to calculate the hidden variable. Six patients' intracranial EEG data are used to test our algorithm including 39 hours of ictal EEG with 22 seizures and 70 hours of normal EEG recordings. The minimum least square error algorithm is applied to determine optimal parameters in the model adaptively. The results show that our algorithm can successfully predict 15 out of 16 seizures and the average prediction time is 38.5 minutes before seizure onset. The sensitivity is about 93.75% and the specificity (false prediction rate is approximately 0.09 FP/h. A random predictor is used to calculate the sensitivity under significance level of 5%. Compared to the random predictor, our method achieved much better performance.

  3. Neural Sensitivity to Smoking Stimuli Is Associated With Cigarette Craving in Adolescent Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Kathy T; Galván, Adriana

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents initiate cigarette smoking at disproportionately high rates, despite widespread knowledge of its health-compromising and long-term consequences. Psychosocial factors clearly play a role in adolescent smoking initiation, but the role of the developing adolescent brain in this behavior remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to determine whether greater neural sensitivity to smoking cues in adolescents compared to adults underlies increased proclivity toward smoking behavior and craving. We addressed this question in a sample of adolescent (n = 39) and adult (n = 39) smokers and nonsmokers by assessing craving in response to smoking videos that featured late adolescents/young adults while participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Ventral striatal activation mediated the relationship between video-induced craving and subsequent desires to smoke following the scan in adolescent smokers only. We also found that functional coupling between striatal and cortical regions was associated with increased craving in adolescent smokers. These novel results demonstrate that adolescent smokers may be more neurobiologically responsive to smoking stimuli than adults, perhaps because of ongoing ontogenetic changes in adolescents that normatively occur in frontostriatal circuitry. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves the ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used to ...

  5. Neural compensation in adulthood following very preterm birth demonstrated during a visual paired associates learning task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Brittain

    2014-01-01

    was not significantly associated with functional activation. These results demonstrate that although cognitive task performance between VPT individuals and controls may be comparable on certain measures, differences in BOLD signal may also be evident, some of which could represent compensatory neural processes following VPT-related brain insult.

  6. Enhanced neural responsiveness to reward associated with obesity in the absence of food-related stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Nils; Redlich, Ronny; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Haupenthal, Cordula; Heindel, Walter; Kugel, Harald; Arolt, Volker; Dannlowski, Udo

    2015-06-01

    Obesity has been characterized by alterations in brain structure and function associated with emotion processing and regulation. Particularly, aberrations in food-related reward processing have been frequently demonstrated in obese subjects. However, it remains unclear whether reward-associated functional aberrations in obesity are specific for food-related stimuli or represent a general deficit in reward processing, extending to other stimulus domains. Given the crucial role of rewarding effects in the development of obesity and the ongoing discussion on overlapping neurobiological traits of obesity and psychiatric disorders such as depression and substance-related disorders, this study aimed to investigate the possibility of altered reward processing in obese subjects to occur in the absence of food-related stimuli during a monetary reward condition. Twenty-nine healthy obese subjects (body mass index >30) and 29 healthy, age-, and sex-matched control subjects of normal weight underwent functional MRI during a frequently used card guessing paradigm. A Group × Condition (win vs. loss) ANOVA was conducted to investigate differences between obese and normal-weight subjects. We found significant Group × Condition interaction effects in brain areas involved in emotion regulation and reward processing including the insula, the striatum, and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). This interaction was predominantly driven by a significant increase in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in obese individuals while experiencing reward. Enhanced neural activation in obesity during reward processing seems to be apparent even in the absence of food-related stimuli and, thus, might point to generalized dysfunctions in reward-related brain circuits in obese individuals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Skill in Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2008-01-01

    Retrieval Skill quantifies the ability of one retrieval from a sounder to be more accurate than the best forecast relative to another with the same of another sounder. This is summarized using a Retrieval Anomaly Skill Score (RASS) which is the cor (retrieved-background, truth-background) * sqrt(f), Where f is defined as the ratio of accepted to the possible retrievals. Charts show various features and comparisons of RASS to other methods of retrieval.

  8. Maternal hCG concentrations in early IVF pregnancies: associations with number of cells in the Day 2 embryo and oocytes retrieved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanbo, T G; Eskild, A

    2015-12-01

    Do number of cells in the transferred cleavage stage embryo and number of oocytes retrieved for IVF influence maternal hCG concentrations in early pregnancies? Compared with transfer of a 2-cell embryo, transfer of a 4-cell embryo results in higher hCG concentrations on Day 12 after transfer, and more than 20 oocytes retrieved were associated with low hCG concentrations. Maternal hCG concentration in very early pregnancy varies considerably among women, but is likely to be an indicator of time since implantation of the embryo into the endometrium, in addition to number and function of trophoblast cells. We followed 1047 pregnancies after IVF/ICSI from oocyte retrieval until Day 12 after embryo transfer. Women were recruited in Norway during the years 2005-2013. Successful pregnancies after transfer of one single embryo that had been cultured for 2 days were included. Maternal hCG was quantified on Day 12 after embryo transfer by chemiluminescence immunoassay, which measures intact hCG and the free β-hCG chain. Information on a successful pregnancy, defined as birth after >16 weeks, was obtained by linkage to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Transfer of a 4-cell embryo resulted in higher maternal hCG concentrations compared with transfer of a 2-cell embryo (134.8 versus 87.8 IU/l, P 20) was associated with low hCG concentrations (P hCG concentrations in early pregnancy. Although embryo transfer was performed at the same time after fertilization, we do not know the exact time of implantation. A further limitation to our study is that the number of pregnancies after transfer of a 2-cell embryo was small (27 cases). Number of cells in the transferred embryo and number of oocytes retrieved may influence the conditions and timing for embryo implantation in different ways and thereby influence maternal hCG concentrations. Such knowledge may be important for interpretation of hCG concentrations in early pregnancy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  9. The Use of an Open Field Model to Assess Sound-Induced Fear and Anxiety Associated Behaviors in Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Margaret E; Case, Beth C; Foster, Melanie L; Lazarowski, Lucia; Fish, Richard E; Landsberg, Gary; DePuy, Venita; Dorman, David C; Sherman, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the playing of thunderstorm recordings during an open-field task elicits fearful or anxious responses in adult beagles. The goal of our study was to apply this open field test to assess sound-induced behaviors in Labrador retrievers drawn from a pool of candidate improvised explosive devices (IED)-detection dogs. Being robust to fear-inducing sounds and recovering quickly is a critical requirement of these military working dogs. This study presented male and female dogs, with 3 minutes of either ambient noise (Days 1, 3 and 5), recorded thunderstorm (Day 2), or gunfire (Day 4) sounds in an open field arena. Behavioral and physiological responses were assessed and compared to control (ambient noise) periods. An observer blinded to sound treatment analyzed video records of the 9-minute daily test sessions. Additional assessments included measurement of distance traveled (activity), heart rate, body temperature, and salivary cortisol concentrations. Overall, there was a decline in distance traveled and heart rate within each day and over the five-day test period, suggesting that dogs habituated to the open field arena. Behavioral postures and expressions were assessed using a standardized rubric to score behaviors linked to canine fear and anxiety. These fear/anxiety scores were used to evaluate changes in behaviors following exposure to a sound stressor. Compared to control periods, there was an overall increase in fear/anxiety scores during thunderstorm and gunfire sound stimuli treatment periods. Fear/anxiety scores were correlated with distance traveled, and heart rate. Fear/anxiety scores in response to thunderstorm and gunfire were correlated. Dogs showed higher fear/anxiety scores during periods after the sound stimuli compared to control periods. In general, candidate IED-detection Labrador retrievers responded to sound stimuli and recovered quickly, although dogs stratified in their response to sound stimuli. Some dogs were

  10. Association of contextual cues with morphine reward increases neural and synaptic plasticity in the ventral hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvandi, Mina Sadighi; Bourmpoula, Maria; Homberg, Judith R; Fathollahi, Yaghoub

    2017-11-01

    Drug addiction is associated with aberrant memory and permanent functional changes in neural circuits. It is known that exposure to drugs like morphine is associated with positive emotional states and reward-related memory. However, the underlying mechanisms in terms of neural plasticity in the ventral hippocampus, a region involved in associative memory and emotional behaviors, are not fully understood. Therefore, we measured adult neurogenesis, dendritic spine density and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB mRNA expression as parameters for synaptic plasticity in the ventral hippocampus. Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to the CPP (conditioned place preference) paradigm and received 10 mg/kg morphine. Half of the rats were used to evaluate neurogenesis by immunohistochemical markers Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX). The other half was used for Golgi staining to measure spine density and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess BDNF/TrkB expression levels. We found that morphine-treated rats exhibited more place conditioning as compared with saline-treated rats and animals that were exposed to the CPP without any injections. Locomotor activity did not change significantly. Morphine-induced CPP significantly increased the number of Ki67 and DCX-labeled cells in the ventral dentate gyrus. Additionally, we found increased dendritic spine density in both CA1 and dentate gyrus and an enhancement of BDNF/TrkB mRNA levels in the whole ventral hippocampus. Ki67, DCX and spine density were significantly correlated with CPP scores. In conclusion, we show that morphine-induced reward-related memory is associated with neural and synaptic plasticity changes in the ventral hippocampus. Such neural changes could underlie context-induced drug relapse. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Detection of copy number variants reveals association of cilia genes with neural tube defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. METHODS: The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV. Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05. Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24-5.87. Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05, corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27-8.01. Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis.

  12. Neural networks for modeling gene-gene interactions in association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bammann Karin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim is to investigate the ability of neural networks to model different two-locus disease models. We conduct a simulation study to compare neural networks with two standard methods, namely logistic regression models and multifactor dimensionality reduction. One hundred data sets are generated for each of six two-locus disease models, which are considered in a low and in a high risk scenario. Two models represent independence, one is a multiplicative model, and three models are epistatic. For each data set, six neural networks (with up to five hidden neurons and five logistic regression models (the null model, three main effect models, and the full model with two different codings for the genotype information are fitted. Additionally, the multifactor dimensionality reduction approach is applied. Results The results show that neural networks are more successful in modeling the structure of the underlying disease model than logistic regression models in most of the investigated situations. In our simulation study, neither logistic regression nor multifactor dimensionality reduction are able to correctly identify biological interaction. Conclusions Neural networks are a promising tool to handle complex data situations. However, further research is necessary concerning the interpretation of their parameters.

  13. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  14. Adapting a Diagnostic Problem-Solving Model to Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syu, Inien; Lang, S. D.

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a competition-based connectionist model for diagnostic problem-solving is adapted to information retrieval. Topics include probabilistic causal networks; Bayesian networks; the neural network model; empirical studies of test collections that evaluated retrieval performance; precision results; and the use of a thesaurus to provide…

  15. Stress-altered synaptic plasticity and DAMP signaling in the hippocampus-PFC axis; elucidating the significance of IGF-1/IGF-1R/CaMKIIα expression in neural changes associated with a prolonged exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundele, Olalekan M; Ebenezer, Philip J; Lee, Charles C; Francis, Joseph

    2017-06-14

    Traumatic stress patients showed significant improvement in behavior after a prolonged exposure to an unrelated stimulus. This treatment method attempts to promote extinction of the fear memory associated with the initial traumatic experience. However, the subsequent prolonged exposure to such stimulus creates an additional layer of neural stress. Although the mechanism remains unclear, prolonged exposure therapy (PET) likely involves changes in synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter function and inflammation; especially in parts of the brain concerned with the formation and retrieval of fear memory (Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex: PFC). Since certain synaptic proteins are also involved in danger-associated molecular pattern signaling (DAMP), we identified the significance of IGF-1/IGF-1R/CaMKIIα expression as a potential link between the concurrent progression of synaptic and inflammatory changes in stress. Thus, a comparison between IGF-1/IGF-1R/CaMKIIα, synaptic and DAMP proteins in stress and PET may highlight the significance of PET on synaptic morphology and neuronal inflammatory response. In behaviorally characterized Sprague-Dawley rats, there was a significant decline in neural IGF-1 (pDAMP proteins, Microglia activation, and its implication on synaptic plasticity during stress and PET. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    from text, image to object. An empirical study, based on 17 newspaper archives, demonstrates user group requirements including archivists (creators), journalists (immediate users), and newspaper readers (end-users). A word association test is completed and the terms are used to build a user interface...

  17. Validation of artificial neural network models for predicting biochemical markers associated with male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickram, A S; Kamini, A Rao; Das, Raja; Pathy, M Ramesh; Parameswari, R; Archana, K; Sridharan, T B

    2016-08-01

    Seminal fluid is the secretion from many glands comprised of several organic and inorganic compounds including free amino acids, proteins, fructose, glucosidase, zinc, and other scavenging elements like Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), and Na(+). Therefore, in the view of development of novel approaches and proper diagnosis to male infertility, overall understanding of the biochemical and molecular composition and its role in regulation of sperm quality is highly desirable. Perhaps this can be achieved through artificial intelligence. This study was aimed to elucidate and predict various biochemical markers present in human seminal plasma with three different neural network models. A total of 177 semen samples were collected for this research (both fertile and infertile samples) and immediately processed to prepare a semen analysis report, based on the protocol of the World Health Organization (WHO [2010]). The semen samples were then categorized into oligoasthenospermia (n=35), asthenospermia (n=35), azoospermia (n=22), normospermia (n=34), oligospermia (n=34), and control (n=17). The major biochemical parameters like total protein content, fructose, glucosidase, and zinc content were elucidated by standard protocols. All the biochemical markers were predicted by using three different artificial neural network (ANN) models with semen parameters as inputs. Of the three models, the back propagation neural network model (BPNN) yielded the best results with mean absolute error 0.025, -0.080, 0.166, and -0.057 for protein, fructose, glucosidase, and zinc, respectively. This suggests that BPNN can be used to predict biochemical parameters for the proper diagnosis of male infertility in assisted reproductive technology (ART) centres. AAS: absorption spectroscopy; AI: artificial intelligence; ANN: artificial neural networks; ART: assisted reproductive technology; BPNN: back propagation neural network model; DT: decision tress; MLP: multilayer perceptron; PESA: percutaneous

  18. The associations between serum adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, insulin, and serum long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in Labrador Retrievers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streeter RM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Renee M Streeter,1 Angela M Struble,1 Sabine Mann,2 Daryl V Nydam,2 John E Bauer,3 Marta G Castelhano,1 Rory J Todhunter,1 Bethany P Cummings,4 Joseph J Wakshlag11Department of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 4Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USAAbstract: Obesity has been associated with an increased inflammatory response and insulin resistance due to adipose tissue–derived adipokines and increases in C-reactive protein (CRP. Dogs appear to be similar to other species with the exception of adiponectin, which might not be affected by obesity status. Serum long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations have been positively and negatively associated with serum adipokines. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between leptin, CRP, adiponectin, and insulin to body condition score (BCS and to the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in serum lipoproteins, including alpha-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosapentanenoic acid (DPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA as a reflection of dietary omega-3 status in the Labrador Retriever. Seventy-seven Labrador Retrievers were evaluated for BCS, percent fasting serum lipoprotein fatty acid concentrations, as well as serum leptin, adiponectin, insulin, and CRP. A multivariable general linear regression model was constructed to examine the association between the dependent variables leptin, CRP, adiponectin, and insulin and the predictor variables of BCS, age, and sex, as well as concentrations of alpha-linolenic acid, EPA, DHA, and DPA. Adiponectin concentration was positively associated with age (P<0.0008, EPA (P=0.027 and negatively associated with DHA (P=0.008. Leptin concentration was positively associated with an increased DHA (P=0.009, BCS (P

  19. Mutations in the Motile Cilia Gene DNAAF1 Are Associated with Neural Tube Defects in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Chunyue; Jiang, Qian; Li, Huili; Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Bao, Yihua; Zhang, Ting

    2016-10-13

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe malformations of the central nervous system caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. Among genes involved in NTD, cilia-related genes have been well defined and found to be essential for the completion of neural tube closure (NTC). We have carried out next-generation sequencing on target genes in 373 NTDs and 222 healthy controls, and discovered eight disease-specific rare mutations in cilia-related gene DNAAF1 DNAAF1 plays a central role in cytoplasmic preassembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes, and is expressed in some key tissues involved in neural system development, such as neural tube, floor plate, embryonic node, and brain ependyma epithelial cells in zebrafish and mouse. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and functions of mutations in DNAAF1 in transfected cells to analyze the potential correlation of these mutants to NTDs in humans. One rare frameshift mutation (p.Gln341Argfs*10) resulted in significantly diminished DNAAF1 protein expression, compared to the wild type. Another mutation, p.Lys231Gln, disrupted cytoplasmic preassembly of the dynein-arm complexes in cellular assay. Furthermore, results from NanoString assay on mRNA from NTD samples indicated that DNAAF1 mutants altered the expression level of NTC-related genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the rare mutations in DNAAF1 may contribute to the susceptibility for NTDs in humans. Copyright © 2016 Miao et al.

  20. Mutations in the Motile Cilia Gene DNAAF1 Are Associated with Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyue Miao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are severe malformations of the central nervous system caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. Among genes involved in NTD, cilia-related genes have been well defined and found to be essential for the completion of neural tube closure (NTC. We have carried out next-generation sequencing on target genes in 373 NTDs and 222 healthy controls, and discovered eight disease-specific rare mutations in cilia-related gene DNAAF1. DNAAF1 plays a central role in cytoplasmic preassembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes, and is expressed in some key tissues involved in neural system development, such as neural tube, floor plate, embryonic node, and brain ependyma epithelial cells in zebrafish and mouse. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and functions of mutations in DNAAF1 in transfected cells to analyze the potential correlation of these mutants to NTDs in humans. One rare frameshift mutation (p.Gln341Argfs*10 resulted in significantly diminished DNAAF1 protein expression, compared to the wild type. Another mutation, p.Lys231Gln, disrupted cytoplasmic preassembly of the dynein-arm complexes in cellular assay. Furthermore, results from NanoString assay on mRNA from NTD samples indicated that DNAAF1 mutants altered the expression level of NTC-related genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the rare mutations in DNAAF1 may contribute to the susceptibility for NTDs in humans.

  1. Diminished behavioral and neural sensitivity to sound modulation is associated with moderate developmental hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merri J Rosen

    Full Text Available The acoustic rearing environment can alter central auditory coding properties, yet altered neural coding is seldom linked with specific deficits to adult perceptual skills. To test whether developmental hearing loss resulted in comparable changes to perception and sensory coding, we examined behavioral and neural detection thresholds for sinusoidally amplitude modulated (sAM stimuli. Behavioral sAM detection thresholds for slow (5 Hz modulations were significantly worse for animals reared with bilateral conductive hearing loss (CHL, as compared to controls. This difference could not be attributed to hearing thresholds, proficiency at the task, or proxies for attention. Detection thresholds across the groups did not differ for fast (100 Hz modulations, a result paralleling that seen in humans. Neural responses to sAM stimuli were recorded in single auditory cortex neurons from separate groups of awake animals. Neurometric analyses indicated equivalent thresholds for the most sensitive neurons, but a significantly poorer detection threshold for slow modulations across the population of CHL neurons as compared to controls. The magnitude of the neural deficit matched that of the behavioral differences, suggesting that a reduction of sensory information can account for limitations to perceptual skills.

  2. Healthy Adolescents' Neural Response to Reward: Associations with Puberty, Positive Affect, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Erika E.; Ryan, Neal D.; Phillips, Mary L.; Manuck, Stephen B.; Worthman, Carol M.; Moyles, Donna L.; Tarr, Jill A.; Sciarrillo, Samantha R.; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Changes in reward-related behavior are an important component of normal adolescent affective development. Understanding the neural underpinnings of these normative changes creates a foundation for investigating adolescence as a period of vulnerability to affective disorders, substance use disorders, and health problems. Studies of…

  3. Chronic childhood peer rejection is associated with heightened neural responses to social exclusion during adolescence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Will, G.J.; Van, Lier P.A.; Crone, E.A.; Guroglu, B.

    2016-01-01

    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study examined subjective and neural responses to social exclusion in adolescents (age 12-15) who either had a stable accepted (n = 27; 14 males) or a chronic rejected (n = 19; 12 males) status among peers from age 6 to 12. Both groups of adolescents

  4. Associations among Pubertal Development, Empathic Ability, and Neural Responses While Witnessing Peer Rejection in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masten, Carrie L.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.; Pfeifer, Jennifer H.; Colich, Natalie L.; Dapretto, Mirella

    2013-01-01

    Links among concurrent and longitudinal changes in pubertal development and empathic ability from ages 10 to 13 and neural responses while witnessing peer rejection at age 13 were examined in 16 participants. More advanced pubertal development at age 13, and greater longitudinal increases in pubertal development, related to increased activity in…

  5. Enhanced storage capacity with errors in scale-free Hopfield neural networks: An analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Park, Jinha; Kahng, Byungnam

    2017-01-01

    The Hopfield model is a pioneering neural network model with associative memory retrieval. The analytical solution of the model in mean field limit revealed that memories can be retrieved without any error up to a finite storage capacity of O(N), where N is the system size. Beyond the threshold, they are completely lost. Since the introduction of the Hopfield model, the theory of neural networks has been further developed toward realistic neural networks using analog neurons, spiking neurons, etc. Nevertheless, those advances are based on fully connected networks, which are inconsistent with recent experimental discovery that the number of connections of each neuron seems to be heterogeneous, following a heavy-tailed distribution. Motivated by this observation, we consider the Hopfield model on scale-free networks and obtain a different pattern of associative memory retrieval from that obtained on the fully connected network: the storage capacity becomes tremendously enhanced but with some error in the memory retrieval, which appears as the heterogeneity of the connections is increased. Moreover, the error rates are also obtained on several real neural networks and are indeed similar to that on scale-free model networks.

  6. Time in the eye of the beholder: Gaze position reveals spatial-temporal associations during encoding and memory retrieval of future and past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martarelli, Corinna S; Mast, Fred W; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Time is grounded in various ways, and previous studies point to a "mental time line" with past associated with the left, and future with the right side. In this study, we investigated whether spontaneous eye movements on a blank screen would follow a mental timeline during encoding, free recall, and recognition of past and future items. In all three stages of processing, gaze position was more rightward during future items compared to past items. Moreover, horizontal gaze position during encoding predicted horizontal gaze position during free recall and recognition. We conclude that mental time line and the stored gaze position during encoding assist memory retrieval of past versus future items. Our findings highlight the spatial nature of temporal representations.

  7. Neural changes associated to procedural learning and automatization process in Developmental Coordination Disorder and/or Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotteau, Maëlle; Péran, Patrice; Vayssière, Nathalie; Tallet, Jessica; Albaret, Jean-Michel; Chaix, Yves

    2017-03-01

    Recent theories hypothesize that procedural learning may support the frequent overlap between neurodevelopmental disorders. The neural circuitry supporting procedural learning includes, among others, cortico-cerebellar and cortico-striatal loops. Alteration of these loops may account for the frequent comorbidity between Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and Developmental Dyslexia (DD). The aim of our study was to investigate cerebral changes due to the learning and automatization of a sequence learning task in children with DD, or DCD, or both disorders. fMRI on 48 children (aged 8-12) with DD, DCD or DD + DCD was used to explore their brain activity during procedural tasks, performed either after two weeks of training or in the early stage of learning. Firstly, our results indicate that all children were able to perform the task with the same level of automaticity, but recruit different brain processes to achieve the same performance. Secondly, our fMRI results do not appear to confirm Nicolson and Fawcett's model. The neural correlates recruited for procedural learning by the DD and the comorbid groups are very close, while the DCD group presents distinct characteristics. This provide a promising direction on the neural mechanisms associated with procedural learning in neurodevelopmental disorders and for understanding comorbidity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Dissociating Retrieval Success from Incidental Encoding Activity during Emotional Memory Retrieval, in the Medial Temporal Lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Taylor Shafer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The memory-enhancing effect of emotion, during encoding and retrieval, has been linked to the engagement of emotion- and memory-related medial temporal lobe (MTL regions (amygdala-AMY; hippocampus-HC; parahippocampus-PHC. However, recognition tasks used to investigate the neural correlates of retrieval make it difficult to distinguish MTL engagement linked to retrieval success (RS from that linked to incidental encoding success (ES during retrieval. This issue has been investigated for retrieval of non-emotional memories, but not for emotional memory retrieval. To address this, we used event-related functional MRI with an emotional distraction and two episodic memory tasks (one testing memory for distracter items and the other testing memory for new/lure items presented in the first memory task. This paradigm allowed for dissociation of MTL activity linked to RS from that linked to RS and incidental ES during retrieval. There were two novel findings regarding the neural correlates of emotional memory retrieval. First, greater emotional RS was identified bilaterally in AMY, HC and PHC. However, AMY was most impacted when accounting for ES activity, as only RS activity in left AMY was dissociated from ES activity during retrieval, whereas portions of HC and PHC showing greater emotional RS were largely uninvolved in ES. Second, an earlier and more anteriorly spread response (left AMY and bilateral HC, PHC was linked to greater emotional RS, whereas a later and more posteriorly localized response (right posterior PHC was linked to greater neutral RS. These findings shed light on MTL mechanisms subserving the memory-enhancing effect of emotion at retrieval.

  9. Neural correlates of the formation and retention of cocaine-induced stimulus-reward associations

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Koen; Jarraya, Bechir; Arsenault, John; Rosen, Bruce; Wald, Lawrence,; Mandeville, Joseph; Marota, John; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cocaine can elicit drug-seeking behavior for drug-predicting stimuli, even after a single stimulus-cocaine pairing. While orbitofrontal cortex is thought to be important during encoding and maintenance of stimulus-reward value, we still lack a comprehensive model of the neural circuitry underlying this cognitive process. Methods: We studied the conditioned effects of cocaine using monkey fMRI and classical conditioning by pairing a visual shape (conditioning stimulus, CS+) wit...

  10. Artificial neural network associated to UV/Vis spectroscopy for monitoring bioreactions in biopharmaceutical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Maria Beatriz; Leme, Jaci; Caricati, Celso Pereira; Tonso, Aldo; Fernández Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo; Rocha, José Celso

    2015-06-01

    Currently, mammalian cells are the most utilized hosts for biopharmaceutical production. The culture media for these cell lines include commonly in their composition a pH indicator. Spectroscopic techniques are used for biopharmaceutical process monitoring, among them, UV-Vis spectroscopy has found scarce applications. This work aimed to define artificial neural networks architecture and fit its parameters to predict some nutrients and metabolites, as well as viable cell concentration based on UV-Vis spectral data of mammalian cell bioprocess using phenol red in culture medium. The BHK-21 cell line was used as a mammalian cell model. Off-line spectra of supernatant samples taken from batches performed at different dissolved oxygen concentrations in two bioreactor configurations and with two pH control strategies were used to define two artificial neural networks. According to absolute errors, glutamine (0.13 ± 0.14 mM), glutamate (0.02 ± 0.02 mM), glucose (1.11 ± 1.70 mM), lactate (0.84 ± 0.68 mM) and viable cell concentrations (1.89 10(5) ± 1.90 10(5) cell/mL) were suitably predicted. The prediction error averages for monitored variables were lower than those previously reported using different spectroscopic techniques in combination with partial least squares or artificial neural network. The present work allows for UV-VIS sensor development, and decreases cost related to nutrients and metabolite quantifications.

  11. MR imaging quantitative analysis of fetal Chiari II malformations and associated open neural tube defects: balanced SSFP versus half-Fourier RARE and interobserver reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele, Travis A; Lee, Stacy L; Twickler, Diane M

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate bSSFP (balanced steady state free precession) and half-Fourier RARE (rapid acceleration with relaxation enhancement) MRI sequences in their ability to demonstrate fetal anatomic landmarks, quantify the degree of cerebellar herniation in Chiari II malformations and level and length of the associated open neural tube defects, as well as evaluate interobserver reliability of these measurements. Two independent observers retrospectively reviewed MRIs of 37 fetuses with Chiari II malformations and associated open neural tube defects (mean gestational age: 27 weeks 2 days). Comparison of bSSFP and RARE included: (i) Ability to confidently identify anatomic landmarks of the posterior fossa and spine; (ii) Measurements of the foramen magnum, cerebellar tonsillar herniation length, intervertebral disc space level of tonsillar herniation, open neural tube defect length, and disc space start and end level of the open neural tube defect; (iii) Observed conspicuity of anatomic landmarks. There was no significant difference in assessment of cerebellar tonsillar herniation or open neural tube defect level between bSSFP and RARE for either observer. Intervertebral discs were more conspicuous on bSSFP while cerebellar tonsils were more conspicuous on RARE (P neural tube defect length (r = 0.97, 0.96). Despite improved conspicuity of the intervertebral discs with bSSFP and cerebellar tonsils with RARE, there is no significant difference in measurement of hindbrain herniation or open neural tube defect level; interobserver reliability is excellent for both sequences. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Differentiation defect in neural crest-derived smooth muscle cells in patients with aortopathy associated with bicuspid aortic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Jiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV are at a higher risk of developing thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA than patients with trileaflet aortic valves (TAV. The aneurysms associated with BAV most commonly involve the ascending aorta and spare the descending aorta. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs in the ascending and descending aorta arise from neural crest (NC and paraxial mesoderm (PM, respectively. We hypothesized defective differentiation of the neural crest stem cells (NCSCs-derived SMCs but not paraxial mesoderm cells (PMCs-derived SMCs contributes to the aortopathy associated with BAV. When induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from BAV/TAA patients were differentiated into NCSC-derived SMCs, these cells demonstrated significantly decreased expression of marker of SMC differentiation (MYH11 and impaired contraction compared to normal control. In contrast, the PMC-derived SMCs were similar to control cells in these aspects. The NCSC-SMCs from the BAV/TAA also showed decreased TGF-β signaling based on phosphorylation of SMAD2, and increased mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTOR pathway using rapamycin rescued the aberrant differentiation. Our data demonstrates that decreased differentiation and contraction of patient's NCSC-derived SMCs may contribute to that aortopathy associated with BAV.

  13. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of foreign body detection and removal? What is Foreign Body Retrieval? Foreign body retrieval involves ... and damage to surrounding tissues. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign ...

  14. Cocaine self-administration abolishes associative neural encoding in the nucleus accumbens necessary for higher-order learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddoris, Michael P; Carelli, Regina M

    2014-01-15

    Cocaine use is often associated with diminished cognitive function, persisting even after abstinence from the drug. Likely targets for these changes are the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which are critical for mediating the rewarding aspects of drugs of abuse as well as supporting associative learning. To understand this deficit, we recorded neural activity in the NAc of rats with a history of cocaine self-administration or control subjects while they learned Pavlovian first- and second-order associations. Rats were trained for 2 weeks to self-administer intravenous cocaine or water. Later, rats learned a first-order Pavlovian discrimination where a conditioned stimulus (CS)+ predicted food, and a control (CS-) did not. Rats then learned a second-order association where, absent any food reinforcement, a novel cued (SOC+) predicted the CS+ and another (SOC-) predicted the CS-. Electrophysiological recordings were taken during performance of these tasks in the NAc core and shell. Both control subjects and cocaine-experienced rats learned the first-order association, but only control subjects learned the second-order association. Neural recordings indicated that core and shell neurons encoded task-relevant information that correlated with behavioral performance, whereas this type of encoding was abolished in cocaine-experienced rats. The NAc core and shell perform complementary roles in supporting normal associative learning, functions that are impaired after cocaine experience. This impoverished encoding of motivational behavior, even after abstinence from the drug, might provide a key mechanism to understand why addiction remains a chronically relapsing disorder despite repeated attempts at sobriety. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    1999-08-27

    Phase I retrieval of post-1970 TRU wastes from burial ground 218-W-4C can be done in a safe, efficient, and cost-effective manner. Initiating TRU retrieval by retrieving uncovered drums from Trenches 1, 20, and 29, will allow retrieval to begin under the current SWBG safety authorization basis. The retrieval of buried drums from Trenches 1, 4, 20, and 29, which will require excavation, will commence once the uncovered drum are retrieved. This phased approach allows safety analysis for drum venting and drum module excavation to be completed and approved before the excavation proceeds. In addition, the lessons learned and the operational experience gained from the retrieval of uncovered drums can be applied to the more complicated retrieval of the buried drums. Precedents that have been set at SRS and LANL to perform retrieval without a trench cover, in the open air, should be followed. Open-air retrieval will result in significant cost savings over the original plans for Phase I retrieval (Project W-113). Based on LANL and SRS experience, open-air retrieval will have no adverse impacts to the environment or to the health and safety of workers or the public. Assaying the waste in the SWBG using a mobile assay system, will result in additional cost savings. It is expected that up to 50% of the suspect-TRU wastes will assay as LLW, allowing those waste to remain disposed of in the SWBG. Further processing, with its associated costs, will only occur to the portion of the waste that is verified to be TRU. Retrieval should be done, to the extent possible, under the current SWBG safety authorization basis as a normal part of SWBG operations. The use of existing personnel and existing procedures should be optimized. By working retrieval campaigns, typically during the slow months, it is easier to coordinate the availability of necessary operations personnel, and it is easier to coordinate the availability of a mobile assay vendor.

  16. Natural Language Object Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Ronghang; Xu, Huazhe; Rohrbach, Marcus; Feng, Jiashi; Saenko, Kate; Darrell, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the task of natural language object retrieval, to localize a target object within a given image based on a natural language query of the object. Natural language object retrieval differs from text-based image retrieval task as it involves spatial information about objects within the scene and global scene context. To address this issue, we propose a novel Spatial Context Recurrent ConvNet (SCRC) model as scoring function on candidate boxes for object retrieval, integ...

  17. Neural and sympathetic activity associated with exploration in decision-making: Further evidence for involvement of insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eOhira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that sympathetic activity was associated with exploration in decision-making indexed by entropy, which is a concept in information theory and indexes randomness of choices or the degree of deviation from sticking to recent experiences of gains and losses, and that activation of the anterior insula mediated this association. The current study aims to replicate and to expand these findings in a situation where contingency between options and outcomes is manipulated. Sixteen participants performed a stochastic decision-making task in which we manipulated a condition with low uncertainty of gain/loss (contingent-reward condition and a condition with high uncertainty of gain/loss (random-reward condition. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET, and cardiovascular parameters and catecholamine in the peripheral blood were measured, during the task. In the contingent-reward condition, norepinephrine as an index of sympathetic activity was positively correlated with entropy indicating exploration in decision-making. Norepinephrine was negatively correlated with neural activity in the right posterior insula, rostral anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsal pons, suggesting neural bases for detecting changes of bodily states. Furthermore, right anterior insular activity was negatively correlated with entropy, suggesting influences on exploration in decision-making. By contrast, in the random-reward condition, entropy correlated with activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices but not with sympathetic activity. These findings suggest that influences of sympathetic activity on exploration in decision-making and its underlying neural mechanisms might be dependent on the degree of uncertainty of situations.

  18. Chronic Childhood Peer Rejection is Associated with Heightened Neural Responses to Social Exclusion During Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Will, G.J.; Van, Lier P.A.; Crone, E.A.; Guroglu, B.

    2015-01-01

    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study examined subjective and neural responses to social exclusion in adolescents (age 12?15) who either had a stable accepted (n?=?27; 14 males) or a chronic rejected (n?=?19; 12 males) status among peers from age 6 to 12. Both groups of adolescents reported similar increases in distress after being excluded in a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball), but adolescents with a history of chronic peer rejection showed higher activity in brain reg...

  19. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  20. Dynamic neural network reorganization associated with second language vocabulary acquisition: a multimodal imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Chihiro; Tanaka, Kanji; Nariai, Tadashi; Honda, Manabu; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2013-08-21

    It remains unsettled whether human language relies exclusively on innately privileged brain structure in the left hemisphere or is more flexibly shaped through experiences, which induce neuroplastic changes in potentially relevant neural circuits. Here we show that learning of second language (L2) vocabulary and its cessation can induce bidirectional changes in the mirror-reverse of the traditional language areas. A cross-sectional study identified that gray matter volume in the inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFGop) and connectivity of the IFGop with the caudate nucleus and the superior temporal gyrus/supramarginal (STG/SMG), predominantly in the right hemisphere, were positively correlated with L2 vocabulary competence. We then implemented a cohort study involving 16 weeks of L2 training in university students. Brain structure before training did not predict the later gain in L2 ability. However, training intervention did increase IFGop volume and reorganization of white matter including the IFGop-caudate and IFGop-STG/SMG pathways in the right hemisphere. These "positive" plastic changes were correlated with the gain in L2 ability in the trained group but were not observed in the control group. We propose that the right hemispheric network can be reorganized into language-related areas through use-dependent plasticity in young adults, reflecting a repertoire of flexible reorganization of the neural substrates responding to linguistic experiences.

  1. Investigating the association between parity and the maternal neural response to infant cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Angela N; Rutherford, Helena J V; Landi, Nicole; Potenza, Marc N; Mayes, Linda C

    2018-01-08

    Understanding the maternal neural response to infant affective cues has important implications for parent-child relationships. The current study employed event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine patterns in mothers' responses to infant affective cues, and evaluated the influence of maternal experience, defined by parity (i.e., the number of children a mother has) on ERP responses. Eighty-three mothers, three months postpartum, viewed photographs of displays of infant emotional faces (sad or happy) and listened to infant cries of different distress levels and a control tone. Maternal neural response was modulated by the emotional content of the auditory stimulus, as indexed by the N100 amplitude and latency. However, response to infant faces was not modulated by the emotional content of the stimuli as indexed by the N170. Neither N100 nor N170 were affected by parity. Maternal engagement with auditory stimuli, as indexed by the P300, was modulated by the emotional content of the cry and was affected by parity. A similar parity effect was observed for the P300 response to infant faces. Results suggest that parity may play an important role at later stages of maternal infant cue perception.

  2. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Marrs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD, caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection.

  3. Response retrieval and motor planning during typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet, Svetlana; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alario, F-Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Recent work in language production research suggests complex relationships between linguistic and motor processes. Typing is an interesting candidate for investigating further this issue. First, typing presumably relies on the same distributed left-lateralized brain network as handwriting and speech production. Second, typing has its own set of highly specific motor constraints, such as internal keystroke representations that hold information about both letter identity and spatial characteristics of the key to strike. The present study aims to further develop research on typed production, by targeting the dynamics between linguistic and motor neural networks. Specifically, we used a typed picture-naming task to examine the interplay between response retrieval and motor planning. To track processes associated with both linguistic processing and keystroke representation, we manipulated, respectively, the semantic context in which the target appeared and the side of the first keystrokes of the word. We recorded high-density electroencephalography (EEG) continuously from the presentation of a picture, to the typing of its name, and computed both event-related potentials (ERP) and beta-band power analyses. Non-parametric data-driven analysis revealed a clear pattern of response preparation over both hemispheres close to response time, in both the ERP and beta-band power modulations. This was preceded by a left-lateralized power decrease in the beta-band, presumably representing memory retrieval, and an early contrast in ERP, between left and right keystrokes' preparation. We discuss these results in terms of a dynamic access approach for internal keystroke representations, and argue for an integrative rather than separatist view of linguistic and motor processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased skin conductance responses and neural activity during fear conditioning are associated with a repressive coping style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKlucken

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of individual differences in coping styles in response to fear conditioning is an important issue for a better understanding of the etiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. It has been assumed that an avoidant (repressive coping style is characterized by increased emotion regulation efforts in context of fearful stimuli as compared to a more vigilant coping style. However, no study so far has investigated the neural correlates of fear conditioning of repressors and sensitizers.In the present fMRI study, 76 participants were classified as repressors or as sensitizers and were exposed to a fear conditioning paradigm, in which the CS+ predicted electrical stimulation, while another neutral stimulus (CS- did not. In addition, skin conductance responses (SCRs were measured continuously.As the main findings, we found increased neural activations in repressors as compared to sensitizers in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex during fear conditioning. In addition, elevated activity to the CS+ in amygdala, insula, occipital, and orbitofrontal cortex as well as conditioned SCRs were found in repressors.The present results demonstrate increased neural activations in structures linked to emotion down-regulation mechanisms like the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which may reflect the increased coping effort in repressors. At the same time, repressors showed increased activations in arousal and evaluation-associated structures like the amygdala, the occipital cortex, and the orbitofrontal cortex, which is also mirrored in increased SCRs. The present results support recent assumptions about a two-process model of repression postulating a fast vigilant response to fearful stimuli, but also a second emotion down-regulating process.

  5. Modeling the behavioral substrates of associate learning and memory - Adaptive neural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chuen-Chien

    1991-01-01

    Three adaptive single-neuron models based on neural analogies of behavior modification episodes are proposed, which attempt to bridge the gap between psychology and neurophysiology. The proposed models capture the predictive nature of Pavlovian conditioning, which is essential to the theory of adaptive/learning systems. The models learn to anticipate the occurrence of a conditioned response before the presence of a reinforcing stimulus when training is complete. Furthermore, each model can find the most nonredundant and earliest predictor of reinforcement. The behavior of the models accounts for several aspects of basic animal learning phenomena in Pavlovian conditioning beyond previous related models. Computer simulations show how well the models fit empirical data from various animal learning paradigms.

  6. Neural correlates of adolescents' viewing of parents' and peers' emotions: Associations with risk-taking behavior and risky peer affiliations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Social reorientation from parents to same-age peers is normative in adolescence, but the neural correlates of youths' socioemotional processing of parents and peers have not been explored. In the current study, 22 adolescents (average age 16.98) underwent neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) while viewing and rating emotions shown in brief video clips featuring themselves, their parents, or an unfamiliar peer. Viewing self vs. other and parents vs. the peer activated regions in the medial prefrontal cortex, replicating prior findings that this area responds to self-relevant stimuli, including familiar and not just similar others. Viewing the peer compared with parents elicited activation in posterior 'mentalizing' structures, the precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus and right temporoparietal junction, as well as the ventral striatum and bilateral amygdala and hippocampus. Relative activations in the PCC and precuneus to the peer vs. the parent were related both to reported risk-taking behavior and to affiliations with more risk-taking peers. The results suggest neural correlates of the adolescent social reorientation toward peers and away from parents that may be associated with adolescents' real-life risk-taking behaviors and social relationships.

  7. Associating a product with a luxury brand label modulates neural reward processing and favors choices in materialistic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrin, Catherine; Ceravolo, Leonardo; Chanal, Julien; Brosch, Tobias; Sander, David

    2017-11-23

    The present study investigated the extent to which luxury vs. non-luxury brand labels (i.e., extrinsic cues) randomly assigned to items and preferences for these items impact choice, and how this impact may be moderated by materialistic tendencies (i.e., individual characteristics). The main objective was to investigate the neural correlates of abovementioned effects using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Behavioural results showed that the more materialistic people are, the more they choose and like items labelled with luxury brands. Neuroimaging results revealed the implication of a neural network including the dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex that was modulated by the brand label and also by the participants' preference. Most importantly, items with randomly assigned luxurious brand labels were preferentially chosen by participants and triggered enhanced signal in the caudate nucleus. This effect increased linearly with materialistic tendencies. Our results highlight the impact of brand-item association, although random in our study, and materialism on preference, relying on subparts of the brain valuation system for the integration of extrinsic cues, preferences and individual characteristics.

  8. Hetero-association for pattern translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Lu, Thomas T.; Yang, Xiangyang

    1991-09-01

    A hetero-association neural network using an interpattern association algorithm is presented. By using simple logical rules, hetero-association memory can be constructed based on the association between the input-output reference patterns. For optical implementation, a compact size liquid crystal television neural network is used. Translations between the English letters and the Chinese characters as well as Arabic and Chinese numerics are demonstrated. The authors have shown that the hetero-association model can perform more effectively in comparison to the Hopfield model in retrieving large numbers of similar patterns.

  9. Executive Semantic Processing Is Underpinned by a Large-scale Neural Network: Revealing the Contribution of Left Prefrontal, Posterior Temporal, and Parietal Cortex to Controlled Retrieval and Selection Using TMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Carin; Kirk, Marie; O'Sullivan, Jamie; Ralph, Matthew A. Lambon; Jefferies, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    To understand the meanings of words and objects, we need to have knowledge about these items themselves plus executive mechanisms that compute and manipulate semantic information in a task-appropriate way. The neural basis for semantic control remains controversial. Neuroimaging studies have focused on the role of the left inferior frontal gyrus…

  10. Failing to learn from negative prediction errors: Obesity is associated with alterations in a fundamental neural learning mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathar, David; Neumann, Jane; Villringer, Arno; Horstmann, Annette

    2017-10-01

    Prediction errors (PEs) encode the difference between expected and actual action outcomes in the brain via dopaminergic modulation. Integration of these learning signals ensures efficient behavioral adaptation. Obesity has recently been linked to altered dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuits, thus implying impairments in cognitive domains that rely on its integrity. 28 obese and 30 lean human participants performed an implicit stimulus-response learning paradigm inside an fMRI scanner. Computational modeling and psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis was utilized for assessing PE-related learning and associated functional connectivity. We show that human obesity is associated with insufficient incorporation of negative PEs into behavioral adaptation even in a non-food context, suggesting differences in a fundamental neural learning mechanism. Obese subjects were less efficient in using negative PEs to improve implicit learning performance, despite proper coding of PEs in striatum. We further observed lower functional coupling between ventral striatum and supplementary motor area in obese subjects subsequent to negative PEs. Importantly, strength of functional coupling predicted task performance and negative PE utilization. These findings show that obesity is linked to insufficient behavioral adaptation specifically in response to negative PEs, and to associated alterations in function and connectivity within the fronto-striatal system. Recognition of neural differences as a central characteristic of obesity hopefully paves the way to rethink established intervention strategies: Differential behavioral sensitivity to negative and positive PEs should be considered when designing intervention programs. Measures relying on penalization of unwanted behavior may prove less effective in obese subjects than alternative approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. From hippocampus to whole-brain: The role of integrative processing in episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Benjamin R; Stanley, Matthew L; Dennis, Nancy A; Woldorff, Marty G; Cabeza, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Multivariate functional connectivity analyses of neuroimaging data have revealed the importance of complex, distributed interactions between disparate yet interdependent brain regions. Recent work has shown that topological properties of functional brain networks are associated with individual and group differences in cognitive performance, including in episodic memory. After constructing functional whole-brain networks derived from an event-related fMRI study of memory retrieval, we examined differences in functional brain network architecture between forgotten and remembered words. This study yielded three main findings. First, graph theory analyses showed that successfully remembering compared to forgetting was associated with significant changes in the connectivity profile of the left hippocampus and a corresponding increase in efficient communication with the rest of the brain. Second, bivariate functional connectivity analyses indicated stronger interactions between the left hippocampus and a retrieval assembly for remembered versus forgotten items. This assembly included the left precuneus, left caudate, bilateral supramarginal gyrus, and the bilateral dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus. Integrative properties of the retrieval assembly were greater for remembered than forgotten items. Third, whole-brain modularity analyses revealed that successful memory retrieval was marginally significantly associated with a less segregated modular architecture in the network. The magnitude of the decreases in modularity between remembered and forgotten conditions was related to memory performance. These findings indicate that increases in integrative properties at the nodal, retrieval assembly, and whole-brain topological levels facilitate memory retrieval, while also underscoring the potential of multivariate brain connectivity approaches for providing valuable new insights into the neural bases of memory processes. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2242-2259, 2017. © 2017 Wiley

  12. Private information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Xun; Bertino, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with Private Information Retrieval (PIR), a technique allowing a user to retrieve an element from a server in possession of a database without revealing to the server which element is retrieved. PIR has been widely applied to protect the privacy of the user in querying a service provider on the Internet. For example, by PIR, one can query a location-based service provider about the nearest car park without revealing his location to the server.The first PIR approach was introduced by Chor, Goldreich, Kushilevitz and Sudan in 1995 in a multi-server setting, where the user retriev

  13. The spatial decision-supporting system combination of RBR & CBR based on artificial neural network and association rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yangge; Bian, Fuling

    2007-06-01

    The technology of artificial intelligence should be imported on the basis of the geographic information system to bring up the spatial decision-supporting system (SDSS). The paper discusses the structure of SDSS, after comparing the characteristics of RBR and CBR, the paper brings up the frame of a spatial decisional system that combines RBR and CBR, which has combined the advantages of them both. And the paper discusses the CBR in agriculture spatial decisions, the application of ANN (Artificial Neural Network) in CBR, and enriching the inference rule base based on association rules, etc. And the paper tests and verifies the design of this system with the examples of the evaluation of the crops' adaptability.

  14. Neural evidence for an association between social proficiency and sensitivity to social reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossen, Anna; Groppe, Sarah E; Winkler, Lina; Kohls, Gregor; Herrington, John; Schultz, Robert T; Gründer, Gerhard; Spreckelmeyer, Katja N

    2014-05-01

    Data from developmental psychology suggests a link between the growth of socio-emotional competences and the infant's sensitivity to the salience of social stimuli. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for this relationship in healthy adults. Thirty-five participants were recruited based on their score above the 85th or below the 15th percentile of the empathy quotient questionnaire (EQ, Baron-Cohen and Wheelwright, 2004). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to compare neural responses to cues of social and non-social (monetary) reward. When compared to the high-EQ group, the low-EQ group showed reduced activity of the brain s reward system, specifically the right nucleus accumbens, in response to cues predictive of social reward (videos showing gestures of approval)-but increased activation in this area for monetary incentives. Our data provide evidence for a link between self-reported deficits in social proficiency and reduced sensitivity to the motivational salience of positive social stimuli.

  15. Neural mechanisms of reward processing associated with depression-related personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Akina; Holroyd, Clay B

    2017-07-01

    Although impaired reward processing in depression has been well-documented, the exact nature of that deficit remains poorly understood. To investigate the link between depression and the neural mechanisms of reward processing, we examined individual differences in personality. We recorded the electroencephalogram from healthy college students engaged in a probabilistic reinforcement learning task. Participants also completed several personality questionnaires that assessed traits related to reward sensitivity, motivation, and depression. We examined whether behavioral measures of reward learning and event-related potential components related to outcome processing and reward anticipation-namely, the cue and feedback-related reward positivity (RewP) and the stimulus preceding negativity (SPN)-would link these personality traits to depression. Participants who scored high in reward sensitivity produced a relatively larger feedback-RewP. By contrast, participants who scored high in depression learned the contingencies for infrequently rewarded cue-response combinations relatively poorly, exhibited a larger SPN, and produced a smaller feedback-RewP, especially to outcomes following cue-response combinations that were frequently rewarded. These results point to a primary deficit in reward valuation in individuals who score high in depression, with secondary consequences that impact reward learning and anticipation. Despite recent evidence arguing for an anticipatory deficit in depression, impaired reward valuation as a primary deficit should be further examined in clinical samples. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural connectivity moderates the association between sleep and impulsivity in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Tashjian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is characterized by chronic insufficient sleep and extensive brain development, but the relation between adolescent sleep and brain function remains unclear. We report the first functional magnetic resonance imaging study to investigate functional connectivity as a moderator between sleep and impulsivity, a problematic behavior during this developmental period. Naturalistic differences in sleep have not yet been explored as treatable contributors to adolescent impulsivity. Although public and scientific attention focuses on sleep duration, we report individual differences in sleep quality, not duration, in fifty-five adolescents (ages 14–18 yielded significant differences in functional connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and default mode network. Poor sleep quality was related to greater affect-related impulsivity among adolescents with low, but not high, connectivity, suggesting neural functioning relates to individual differences linking sleep quality and impulsivity. Response inhibition and cognitive impulsivity were not related to sleep quality, suggesting that sleep has a greater impact on affect-related impulsivity. Exploring environmental contributors of poor sleep quality, we demonstrated pillow comfort was uniquely related to sleep quality over age, sex, and income, a promising advance ripe for intervention.

  17. Assessing optimal neural network architecture for identifying disease-associated multi-marker genotypes using a permutation test, and application to calpain 10 polymorphisms associated with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, B V; Curtis, D; Cassell, P G; Hitman, G A; Sham, P C

    2003-07-01

    Biallelic markers, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), provide greater information for localising disease loci when treated as multilocus haplotypes, but often haplotypes are not immediately available from multilocus genotypes in case-control studies. An artificial neural network allows investigation of association between disease phenotype and tightly linked markers without requiring haplotype phase and without modelling any evolutionary history for the disease-related haplotypes. The network assesses whether marker haplotypes differ between cases and controls to the extent that classification of disease status based on multi-marker genotypes is achievable. The network is "trained" to "recognise" affection status based on supplied marker genotypes, and then for each multi-marker genotype it produces outputs which aim to approximate the associated affection status. Next, the genotypes are permuted relative to affection status to produce many random datasets and the process of training and recording of outputs is repeated. The extent to which the ability to predict affection for the real dataset exceeds that for the random datasets measures the statistical significance of the association between multi-marker genotype and affection. This permutation test performs well with simulated case-control datasets, particularly when major gene effects are present. We have explored the effects of systematically varying different network parameters in order to identify their optimal values. We have applied the permutation test to 4 SNPs of the calpain 10 (CAPN10) gene typed in a case-control sample of subjects with type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and controls. We show that the neural network produces more highly significant evidence for association than do single marker tests corrected for the number of markers genotyped. The use of a permutation test could potentially allow conditional analyses which could incorporate known risk factors alongside marker

  18. Folic acid usage and associated factors in the prevention of neural tube defects among pregnant women in Ethiopia: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessie, Meselech Ambaw; Zeleke, Ejigu Gebeye; Workie, Shimelash Bitew; Berihun, Ayanaw Worku

    2017-09-21

    Neural tube defects are among the most common birth defects, contributing to miscarriage, infant mortality, severe congenital abnormalities and serious disabilities. It is burdensome to patients, caregivers, healthcare systems and society. It could be reduced if women consume a folic acid supplement before and during the early weeks of pregnancy. This study assesses folic acid usage and associated factors for the prevention of neural tube defects among pregnant women in Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted on 417 systematically sampled, consented pregnant women that visited Adama hospital medical college for antenatal care during August to November 2014. Pretested interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic, obstetric characteristics and folic acid usage of women. About 48.4% of women took a folic acid supplement at different period of pregnancy; but, only 1.92% of women took the supplement at a protective period against neural tube defects. Age, the early timing of antenatal registration, was a preconception consulted, previous unsuccessful pregnancies and level of folic acid awareness were significantly associated with folic acid usage for prevention of neural tube defects. Folic acid usage during the protective period against neural tube defects among women in Ethiopia is very low, so healthcare plan to improve intake of folic acid is required.

  19. Neural activity in the macaque putamen associated with saccades and behavioral outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Phillips

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that the basal ganglia nuclei form segregated, parallel loops with neocortical areas. The prevalent view is that the putamen is part of the motor loop, which receives inputs from sensorimotor areas, whereas the caudate, which receives inputs from frontal cortical eye fields and projects via the substantia nigra pars reticulata to the superior colliculus, belongs to the oculomotor loop. Tracer studies in monkeys and functional neuroimaging studies in human subjects, however, also suggest a potential role for the putamen in oculomotor control. To investigate the role of the putamen in saccadic eye movements, we recorded single neuron activity in the caudal putamen of two rhesus monkeys while they alternated between short blocks of pro- and anti-saccades. In each trial, the instruction cue was provided after the onset of the peripheral stimulus, thus the monkeys could either generate an immediate response to the stimulus based on the internal representation of the rule from the previous trial, or alternatively, could await the visual rule-instruction cue to guide their saccadic response. We found that a subset of putamen neurons showed saccade-related activity, that the preparatory mode (internally- versus externally-cued influenced the expression of task-selectivity in roughly one third of the task-modulated neurons, and further that a large proportion of neurons encoded the outcome of the saccade. These results suggest that the caudal putamen may be part of the neural network for goal-directed saccades, wherein the monitoring of saccadic eye movements, context and performance feedback may be processed together to ensure optimal behavioural performance and outcomes are achieved during ongoing behaviour.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Gene-Behavior Associations in an Artificial Neural Network Model of Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Forrester, Neil A.; Ronald, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    In the multidisciplinary field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, statistical associations between levels of description play an increasingly important role. One example of such associations is the observation of correlations between relatively common gene variants and individual differences in behavior. It is perhaps surprising that such…

  1. Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

    2012-07-05

    Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

  2. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Detre, John A; Farah, Martha J; Rao, Hengyi

    2011-04-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of mood as a function of weather conditions. The model results were used to calculate the mood-relevant weather index which served as the covariate in the regression analysis of the resting CBF (N = 42) measured by ASL perfusion fMRI under various weather conditions. The resting CBF activities in the left insula-prefrontal cortex and left superior parietal lobe were negatively correlated (corrected pweather index, indicating that better mood-relevant weather conditions were associated with lower CBF in these regions within the brain's emotional network. The present study represents a first step toward the investigation of the effect of natural environment on baseline human brain function, and suggests the feasibility of ASL perfusion fMRI for such study.

  3. Neural network modelling and dynamical system theory: are they relevant to study the governing dynamics of association football players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt-Mazumder, Aviroop; Button, Chris; Robins, Anthony; Bartlett, Roger

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have explored the organization of player movements in team sports using a range of statistical tools. However, the factors that best explain the performance of association football teams remain elusive. Arguably, this is due to the high-dimensional behavioural outputs that illustrate the complex, evolving configurations typical of team games. According to dynamical system analysts, movement patterns in team sports exhibit nonlinear self-organizing features. Nonlinear processing tools (i.e. Artificial Neural Networks; ANNs) are becoming increasingly popular to investigate the coordination of participants in sports competitions. ANNs are well suited to describing high-dimensional data sets with nonlinear attributes, however, limited information concerning the processes required to apply ANNs exists. This review investigates the relative value of various ANN learning approaches used in sports performance analysis of team sports focusing on potential applications for association football. Sixty-two research sources were summarized and reviewed from electronic literature search engines such as SPORTDiscus, Google Scholar, IEEE Xplore, Scirus, ScienceDirect and Elsevier. Typical ANN learning algorithms can be adapted to perform pattern recognition and pattern classification. Particularly, dimensionality reduction by a Kohonen feature map (KFM) can compress chaotic high-dimensional datasets into low-dimensional relevant information. Such information would be useful for developing effective training drills that should enhance self-organizing coordination among players. We conclude that ANN-based qualitative analysis is a promising approach to understand the dynamical attributes of association football players.

  4. Neural correlates of verbal creativity: Differences in resting-state functional connectivity associated with expertise in creative writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eLotze

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural characteristics of verbal creativity as assessed by word generation tasks have been recently identified, but differences in resting-state functional connectivity (rFC between experts and non-experts in creative writing have not been reported yet. Previous electroencephalography (EEG coherence measures during rest demonstrated a decreased cooperation between brain areas in association with creative thinking ability. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare 20 experts in creative writing and 23 age-matched non-experts with respect to rFC strengths within a brain network previously found to be associated with creative writing. Decreased rFC for experts was found between areas 44 of both hemispheres. Increased rFC for experts was observed between right hemispheric caudate and intraparietal sulcus. Correlation analysis of verbal creativity indices with rFC values in the expert group revealed predominantly negative associations, particularly of rFC between left area 44 and left temporal pole. Overall, our data support previous findings on reduced connectivity between interhemispheric areas and increased right-hemispheric connectivity during rest in highly verbally creative individuals.

  5. Neural correlates of verbal creativity: differences in resting-state functional connectivity associated with expertise in creative writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotze, Martin; Erhard, Katharina; Neumann, Nicola; Eickhoff, Simon B; Langner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Neural characteristics of verbal creativity as assessed by word generation tasks have been recently identified, but differences in resting-state functional connectivity (rFC) between experts and non-experts in creative writing have not been reported yet. Previous electroencephalography (EEG) coherence measures during rest demonstrated a decreased cooperation between brain areas in association with creative thinking ability. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare 20 experts in creative writing and 23 age-matched non-experts with respect to rFC strengths within a brain network previously found to be associated with creative writing. Decreased rFC for experts was found between areas 44 of both hemispheres. Increased rFC for experts was observed between right hemispheric caudate and intraparietal sulcus. Correlation analysis of verbal creativity indices (VCIs) with rFC values in the expert group revealed predominantly negative associations, particularly of rFC between left area 44 and left temporal pole. Overall, our data support previous findings of reduced connectivity between interhemispheric areas and increased right-hemispheric connectivity during rest in highly verbally creative individuals.

  6. Enhanced selective gene delivery to neural stem cells in vivo by an adeno-associated viral variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Melissa A; Vazin, Tandis; Schaffer, David V

    2015-05-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are defined by their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into mature neuronal and glial cell types. NSCs are the subject of intense investigation, owing to their crucial roles in neural development and adult brain function and because they present potential targets for gene and cell replacement therapies following injury or disease. Approaches to specifically genetically perturb or modulate NSC function would be valuable for either motivation. Unfortunately, most gene delivery vectors are incapable of efficient or specific gene delivery to NSCs in vivo. Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) present a number of advantages and have proven increasingly successful in clinical trials. However, natural AAV variants are inefficient in transducing NSCs. We previously engineered a novel AAV variant (AAV r3.45) capable of efficient transduction of adult NSCs in vitro. Here, to build upon the initial promise of this variant, we investigated its in vitro and in vivo infectivity. AAV r3.45 was more selective for NSCs than mature neurons in a human embryonic stem cell-derived culture containing a mixture of cell types, including NSCs and neurons. It was capable of more efficient and selective transduction of rat and mouse NSCs in vivo than natural AAV serotypes following intracranial vector administration. Delivery of constitutively active β-catenin yielded insights into mechanisms by which this key regulator modulates NSC function, indicating that this engineered AAV variant can be harnessed for preferential modulation of adult NSCs in the hippocampus. The capacity to rapidly genetically modify these cells might greatly accelerate in vivo investigations of adult neurogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Dance type and flight parameters are associated with different mushroom body neural activities in worker honeybee brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketoshi Kiya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Honeybee foragers can transmit the information concerning the location of food sources to their nestmates using dance communication. We previously used a novel immediate early gene, termed kakusei, to demonstrate that the neural activity of a specific mushroom body (MB neuron subtype is preferentially enhanced in the forager brain. The sensory information related to this MB neuron activity, however, remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we used kakusei to analyze the relationship between MB neuron activity and types of foraging behavior. The number of kakusei-positive MB neurons was higher in the round dancers that had flown a short distance than in the waggle dancers that had flown a long distance. Furthermore, the amount of kakusei transcript in the MBs inversely related to the waggle-phase duration of the waggle dance, which correlates with the flight distance. Using a narrow tunnel whose inside was vertically or axially lined, we manipulated the pattern of visual input, which is received by the foragers during flight, and analysed kakusei expression. The amount of kakusei transcript in the MBs was related to the foraging frequency but not to the tunnel pattern. In contrast, the number of kakusei-positive MB neurons was affected by the tunnel patterns, but not related to foraging frequency. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the MB neuron activity depends on the foraging frequency, whereas the number of active MB neurons is related to the pattern of visual input received during foraging flight. Our results suggest that the foraging frequency and visual experience during foraging are associated with different MB neural activities.

  8. Borna disease virus P protein affects neural transmission through interactions with gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guiqing; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Chengliang; Wang, Shiqun; Yan, Xiaohong; Lu, Lili; Li, Wei; Hu, Jing; Wei, Wei; Mu, Yongxin; Chen, Yanni; Feng, Yong; Gong, Rui; Wu, Kailang; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhang, Xiaolian; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Jianguo

    2008-12-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is one of the infectious agents that causes diseases of the central nervous system in a wide range of vertebrate species and, perhaps, in humans. The phosphoprotein (P) of BDV, an essential cofactor of virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, is required for virus replication. In this study, we identified the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) with functions in neurobiology as one of the viral P protein-interacting cellular factors by using an approach of phage display-based protein-protein interaction analysis. Direct binding between GABARAP and P protein was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, protein pull-down, and mammalian two-hybrid analyses. GABARAP originally was identified as a linker between the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) and the microtubule to regulate receptor trafficking and plays important roles in the regulation of the inhibitory neural transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We showed that GABARAP colocalizes with P protein in the cells infected with BDV or transfected with the P gene, which resulted in shifting the localization of GABARAP from the cytosol to the nucleus. We further demonstrated that P protein blocks the trafficking of GABAR, a principal GABA-gated ion channel that plays important roles in neural transmission, to the surface of cells infected with BDV or transfected with the P gene. We proposed that during BDV infection, P protein binds to GABARAP, shifts the distribution of GABARAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, and disrupts the trafficking of GABARs to the cell membranes, which may result in the inhibition of GABA-induced currents and in the enhancement of hyperactivity and anxiety.

  9. Neural responses associated with cue-reactivity in frequent cannabis users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousijn, J.; Goudriaan, A.E.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D.J.; Wiers, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-reactivity reflects enhanced motivational processing underlying continued substance use and relapse in substance use disorders. Substance use disorders are associated with greater cue-reactivity in orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, ventral tegmental area and amygdala.

  10. Stimulant Treatment Trajectories Are Associated With Neural Reward Processing in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweren, Lizanne J. S.; Groenman, Annabeth; von Rhein, Daniel; Weeda, Wouter; Faraone, Stephen F.; Luman, Marjolein; van Ewijk, Hanneke; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The past decades have seen a surge in stimulant prescriptions for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Stimulants acutely alleviate symptoms and cognitive deficits associated with ADHD by modulating striatal dopamine neurotransmission and induce therapeutic

  11. Stimulant Treatment Trajectories Are Associated With Neural Reward Processing in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweren, L.J.; Groenman, A.; Rhein, D.T. von; Weeda, W.; Faraone, S.F.; Luman, M.; Ewijk, H. van; Heslenfeld, D.J.; Franke, B.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hoekstra, P.J.; Hartman, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The past decades have seen a surge in stimulant prescriptions for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Stimulants acutely alleviate symptoms and cognitive deficits associated with ADHD by modulating striatal dopamine neurotransmission and induce therapeutic

  12. A comparison of a novel neural spell checker and standard spell checking algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Hodge, V.J.; Austin, Jim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple and flexible spell checker using efficient associative matching in the AURA modular neural system. Our approach aims to provide a pre-processor for an information retrieval (IR) system allowing the user's query to be checked against a lexicon and any spelling errors corrected, to prevent wasted searching. IR searching is computationally intensive so much so that if we can prevent futile searches we can minimise computational cost. We evaluate our approach ag...

  13. Inhibitory Control of Memory Retrieval and Motor Processing Associated with the Right Lateral Prefrontal Cortex: Evidence from Deficits in Individuals with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depue, B. E.; Burgess, G. C.; Willcutt, E. G.; Ruzic, L.; Banich, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of inhibitory control have focused on inhibition of motor responses. Individuals with ADHD consistently show reductions in inhibitory control and exhibit reduced activity of rLPFC activity compared to controls when performing such tasks. Recently these same brain regions have been implicated in the inhibition of memory retrieval. The…

  14. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  15. Neural Correlates of Biased Responses: The Negative Method Effect in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Is Associated with Right Amygdala Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Kong, Feng; Huang, Lijie; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Self-esteem is a widely studied construct in psychology that is typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). However, a series of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that a simple and widely used unidimensional factor model does not provide an adequate explanation of RSES responses due to method effects. To identify the neural correlates of the method effect, we sought to determine whether and how method effects were associated with the RSES and investigate the neural basis of these effects. Two hundred and eighty Chinese college students (130 males; mean age = 22.64 years) completed the RSES and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Behaviorally, method effects were linked to both positively and negatively worded items in the RSES. Neurally, the right amygdala volume negatively correlated with the negative method factor, while the hippocampal volume positively correlated with the general self-esteem factor in the RSES. The neural dissociation between the general self-esteem factor and negative method factor suggests that there are different neural mechanisms underlying them. The amygdala is involved in modulating negative affectivity; therefore, the current study sheds light on the nature of method effects that are related to self-report with a mix of positively and negatively worded items. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Spiking modular neural networks: A neural network modeling approach for hydrological processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamban Parasuraman; Amin Elshorbagy; Sean K. Carey

    2006-01-01

    .... In this study, a novel neural network model called the spiking modular neural networks (SMNNs) is proposed. An SMNN consists of an input layer, a spiking layer, and an associator neural network layer...

  17. Neural correlates of side-specific odour memory in mushroom body output neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strube-Bloss, Martin F; Nawrot, Martin P; Menzel, Randolf

    2016-12-14

    Humans and other mammals as well as honeybees learn a unilateral association between an olfactory stimulus presented to one side and a reward. In all of them, the learned association can be behaviourally retrieved via contralateral stimulation, suggesting inter-hemispheric communication. However, the underlying neuronal circuits are largely unknown and neural correlates of across-brain-side plasticity have yet not been demonstrated. We report neural plasticity that reflects lateral integration after side-specific odour reward conditioning. Mushroom body output neurons that did not respond initially to contralateral olfactory stimulation developed a unique and stable representation of the rewarded compound stimulus (side and odour) predicting its value during memory retention. The encoding of the reward-associated compound stimulus is delayed by about 40 ms compared with unrewarded neural activity, indicating an increased computation time for the read-out after lateral integration. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Retrieval options study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

  19. Neural Correlates of Moral Sensitivity and Moral Judgment Associated with Brain Circuitries of Selfhood: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemin

    2017-01-01

    The present study meta-analyzed 45 experiments with 959 subjects and 463 activation foci reported in 43 published articles that investigated the neural mechanism of moral functions by comparing neural activity between the moral task conditions and non-moral task conditions with the Activation Likelihood Estimation method. The present study…

  20. Shifting visual perspective during retrieval shapes autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Jacques, Peggy L; Szpunar, Karl K; Schacter, Daniel L

    2017-03-01

    The dynamic and flexible nature of memories is evident in our ability to adopt multiple visual perspectives. Although autobiographical memories are typically encoded from the visual perspective of our own eyes they can be retrieved from the perspective of an observer looking at our self. Here, we examined the neural mechanisms of shifting visual perspective during long-term memory retrieval and its influence on online and subsequent memories using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants generated specific autobiographical memories from the last five years and rated their visual perspective. In a separate fMRI session, they were asked to retrieve the memories across three repetitions while maintaining the same visual perspective as their initial rating or by shifting to an alternative perspective. Visual perspective shifting during autobiographical memory retrieval was supported by a linear decrease in neural recruitment across repetitions in the posterior parietal cortices. Additional analyses revealed that the precuneus, in particular, contributed to both online and subsequent changes in the phenomenology of memories. Our findings show that flexibly shifting egocentric perspective during autobiographical memory retrieval is supported by the precuneus, and suggest that this manipulation of mental imagery during retrieval has consequences for how memories are retrieved and later remembered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Meta-analysis of the association of maternal smoking and passive smoking during pregnancy with neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xin; Sun, Yanxin; Duan, Wenhou; Jia, Chongqi

    2018-01-01

    It is unclear whether the incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) is greater with maternal smoking or with passive smoking during pregnancy. To compare the effects of smoking and passive smoking during pregnancy on the risk of NTDs. English and Chinese databases were searched for relevant papers published before March 2017, using search terms including "smoking" and "NTD." Case-control and cohort studies on the aforementioned association were included. Two authors independently extracted the original data. Meta-analyses were performed to assess the risks associated with smoking and passive smoking, followed by a comparison of the two pooled effect estimates. The I 2 statistic was used to examine between-study heterogeneity. The final analysis included 23 articles representing 33 studies. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the risk of NTDs was 1.052 (0.907-1.220) with smoking and 1.898 (1.557-2.313) with passive smoking. Comparison of these ORs indicated that the risk of NTDs was higher with passive smoking than with smoking (OR 1.804, 95% CI 1.409-2.309). Compared with smoking, exposure to passive smoking during pregnancy carries a higher risk of having infants with NTDs. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  2. Repeated anodal transcranial direct current stimulation induces neural plasticity-associated gene expression in the rat cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sun; Koo, Ho; Han, Sang Who; Paulus, Walter; Nitsche, Michael A; Kim, Yun-Hee; Yoon, Jin A; Shin, Yong-Il

    2017-01-01

    Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (A-tDCS) induces a long-lasting increase in cortical excitability that can increase gene transcription in the brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of genes related to activity-dependent neuronal plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus of young Sprague-Dawley rats following A-tDCS. We applied A-tDCS over the right sensorimotor cortex epicranially with a circular electrode (3 mm diameter) at 250 μA for 20 min per day for 7 consecutive days. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), synapsin I, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), and c-Fos were analyzed using SYBR Green quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found that 7 days of unilateral A-tDCS resulted in significant increases in transcription of all plasticity-related genes tested in the ipsilateral cortex. Daily A-tDCS also resulted in a significant increase in c-Fos mRNA in the ipsilateral hippocampus. These results indicate that altered expression of plasticity-associated genes in the cortex and hippocampus is a molecular substrate of A-tDCS-induced neural plasticity.

  3. Housing- and exercise-related risk factors associated with the development of hip dysplasia as determined by radiographic evaluation in a prospective cohort of Newfoundlands, Labrador Retrievers, Leonbergers, and Irish Wolfhounds in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krontveit, Randi I; Nødtvedt, Ane; Sævik, Bente K; Ropstad, Erik; Trangerud, Cathrine

    2012-06-01

    To identify housing- and exercise-related risk factors associated with the development of hip dysplasia (HD) as determined by radiographic evaluation in Newfoundlands, Labrador Retrievers, Leonbergers, and Irish Wolfhounds in Norway. 501 client-owned dogs from 103 litters. Dogs were assessed from birth until official radiographic screening for HD at 12 (Labrador Retriever [n = 133] and Irish Wolfhound [63]) or 18 (Newfoundland [125] and Leonberger [180]) months of age. Information regarding housing and exercise conditions during the preweaning and postweaning periods was obtained with questionnaires. Multivariable random effects logistic regression models were used to identify housing- and exercise-related risk factors associated with the development of radiographically detectable HD. Puppies walking on stairs from birth to 3 months of age had an increased risk of developing HD. Factors associated with a decreased risk of developing HD included off-leash exercise from birth to 3 months of age, birth during the spring and summer, and birth on a farm. Significant clustering of dogs with HD was detected within litters. Results indicated that puppies ≤ 3 months old should not be allowed access to stairs, but should be allowed outdoor exercise on soft ground in moderately rough terrain to decrease the risk for developing radiographically detectable HD. These findings could be used as practical recommendations for the prevention of HD in Newfoundlands, Labrador Retrievers, Leonbergers, and Irish Wolfhounds.

  4. Dissipation of ‘dark energy’ by cortex in knowledge retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J.; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli.

  5. Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Discusses topological aspects of theoretical information retrieval, including retrieval topology; similarity topology; pseudo-metric topology; document spaces as topological spaces; Boolean information retrieval as a subsystem of any topological system; and proofs of theorems. (LRW)

  6. Neural adaptations associated with interlimb transfer in a ballistic wrist flexion task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Rudolf, Anne K.; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J.; Carson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite

  7. Neural tube defects and associated anomalies in a fetal and perinatal autopsy series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ljudmilla A G; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Broholm, Helle

    2006-01-01

    morphological anomalies, and organ weights. Organ weights were evaluated according to new fetal autopsy standards and grouped as low, normal or high. Ninety-seven NTD cases were found (4.9%): Spina bifida (38 cases), cephalocele (17 cases) and anencephaly (42 cases). 63% of NTD cases had associated morphologic...

  8. Neural circuitry at age 6 months associated with later repetitive behavior and sensory responsiveness in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J; Swanson, Meghan R; Elison, Jed T; Gerig, Guido; Pruett, John R; Styner, Martin A; Vachet, Clement; Botteron, Kelly N; Dager, Stephen R; Estes, Annette M; Hazlett, Heather C; Schultz, Robert T; Shen, Mark D; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Piven, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors are defining features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Under revised diagnostic criteria for ASD, this behavioral domain now includes atypical responses to sensory stimuli. To date, little is known about the neural circuitry underlying these features of ASD early in life. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 217 infants at high familial risk for ASD. Forty-four of these infants were diagnosed with ASD at age 2. Targeted cortical, cerebellar, and striatal white matter pathways were defined and measured at ages 6, 12, and 24 months. Dependent variables included the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised and the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire. Among children diagnosed with ASD, repetitive behaviors and sensory response patterns were strongly correlated, even when accounting for developmental level or social impairment. Longitudinal analyses indicated that the genu and cerebellar pathways were significantly associated with both repetitive behaviors and sensory responsiveness but not social deficits. At age 6 months, fractional anisotropy in the genu significantly predicted repetitive behaviors and sensory responsiveness at age 2. Cerebellar pathways significantly predicted later sensory responsiveness. Exploratory analyses suggested a possible disordinal interaction based on diagnostic status for the association between fractional anisotropy and repetitive behavior. Our findings suggest that restricted and repetitive behaviors contributing to a diagnosis of ASD at age 2 years are associated with structural properties of callosal and cerebellar white matter pathways measured during infancy and toddlerhood. We further identified that repetitive behaviors and unusual sensory response patterns co-occur and share common brain-behavior relationships. These results were strikingly specific given the absence of association between targeted pathways and social deficits.

  9. Impact of a Common Genetic Variation Associated With Putamen Volume on Neural Mechanisms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivières, Sylvane

    2017-05-01

    In a recent genomewide association study of subcortical brain volumes, a common genetic variation at rs945270 was identified as having the strongest effect on putamen volume, a brain measurement linked to familial risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To determine whether rs945270 might be a genetic determinant of ADHD, its effects on ADHD-related symptoms and neural mechanisms of ADHD, such as response inhibition and reward sensitivity, were explored. A large population sample of 1,834 14-year-old adolescents was used to test the effects of rs945270 on ADHD symptoms assessed through the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and region-of-interest analyses of putamen activation by functional magnetic resonance imaging using the stop signal and monetary incentive delay tasks, assessing response inhibition and reward sensitivity, respectively. There was a significant link between rs945270 and ADHD symptom scores, with the C allele associated with lower symptom scores, most notably hyperactivity. In addition, there were sex-specific effects of this variant on the brain. In boys, the C allele was associated with lower putamen activity during successful response inhibition, a brain response that was not associated with ADHD symptoms. In girls, putamen activation during reward anticipation increased with the number of C alleles, most significantly in the right putamen. Remarkably, right putamen activation during reward anticipation tended to negatively correlate with ADHD symptoms. These results indicate that rs945270 might contribute to the genetic risk of ADHD partly through its effects on hyperactivity and reward processing in girls. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  10. ATHENA: Identifying interactions between different levels of genomic data associated with cancer clinical outcomes using grammatical evolution neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dokyoon; Li, Ruowang; Dudek, Scott M; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2013-12-20

    Gene expression profiles have been broadly used in cancer research as a diagnostic or prognostic signature for the clinical outcome prediction such as stage, grade, metastatic status, recurrence, and patient survival, as well as to potentially improve patient management. However, emerging evidence shows that gene expression-based prediction varies between independent data sets. One possible explanation of this effect is that previous studies were focused on identifying genes with large main effects associated with clinical outcomes. Thus, non-linear interactions without large individual main effects would be missed. The other possible explanation is that gene expression as a single level of genomic data is insufficient to explain the clinical outcomes of interest since cancer can be dysregulated by multiple alterations through genome, epigenome, transcriptome, and proteome levels. In order to overcome the variability of diagnostic or prognostic predictors from gene expression alone and to increase its predictive power, we need to integrate multi-levels of genomic data and identify interactions between them associated with clinical outcomes. Here, we proposed an integrative framework for identifying interactions within/between multi-levels of genomic data associated with cancer clinical outcomes using the Grammatical Evolution Neural Networks (GENN). In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed framework, ovarian cancer data from TCGA was used as a pilot task. We found not only interactions within a single genomic level but also interactions between multi-levels of genomic data associated with survival in ovarian cancer. Notably, the integration model from different levels of genomic data achieved 72.89% balanced accuracy and outperformed the top models with any single level of genomic data. Understanding the underlying tumorigenesis and progression in ovarian cancer through the global view of interactions within/between different levels of genomic data is

  11. Verbal memory retrieval engages visual cortex in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z; Zhang, J X; Yang, Z; Dong, G; Wu, J; Chan, A S; Weng, X

    2010-06-16

    As one major line of research on brain plasticity, many imaging studies have been conducted to identify the functional and structural reorganization associated with musical expertise. Based on previous behavioral research, the present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the neural correlates of superior verbal memory performance in musicians. Participants with and without musical training performed a verbal memory task to first encode a list of words auditorily delivered and then silently recall as many words as possible. They performed in separate blocks a control task involving pure tone pitch judgment. Post-scan recognition test showed better memory performance in musicians than non-musicians. During memory retrieval, the musicians showed significantly greater activations in bilateral though left-lateralized visual cortex relative to the pitch judgment baseline. In comparison, no such visual cortical activations were found in the non-musicians. No group differences were observed during the encoding stage. The results echo a previous report of visual cortical activation during verbal memory retrieval in the absence of any visual sensory stimulation in the blind population, who are also known to possess superior verbal memory. It is suggested that the visual cortex can be recruited to serve as extra memory resources and contributes to the superior verbal memory in special situations. While in the blind population, such cross-modal functional reorganization may be induced by sensory deprivation; in the musicians it may be induced by the long-term and demanding nature of musical training to use as much available neural resources as possible. 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes and Neural Mechanisms Associated with Non-right Handedness in Children Born Very Preterm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Leona; Scratch, Shannon E; Burnett, Alice C; Thompson, Deanne K; Lee, Katherine J; Doyle, Lex W; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Inder, Terrie E; Anderson, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Non-right handedness (NRH) is reportedly more common in very preterm (VPT; children compared with term-born peers, but it is unclear whether neonatal brain injury or altered brain morphology and microstructure underpins NRH in this population. Given that NRH has been inconsistently reported to be associated with cognitive and motor difficulties, this study aimed to examine associations between handedness and neurodevelopmental outcomes in VPT 7-year-olds. Furthermore, the relationship between neonatal brain injury and integrity of motor tracts (corpus callosum and corticospinal tract) with handedness at age 7 years in VPT children was explored. One hundred seventy-five VPT and 69 term-born children completed neuropsychological and motor assessments and a measure of handedness at 7 years' corrected age. At term-equivalent age, brain injury on MRI was assessed and diffusion tensor measures were obtained for the corpus callosum and posterior limb of the internal capsule. There was little evidence of stronger NRH in the VPT group compared with term controls (regression coefficient [b] -1.95, 95% confidence interval [-5.67, 1.77]). Poorer academic and working memory outcomes were associated with stronger NRH in the VPT group. While there was little evidence that neonatal unilateral brain injury was associated with stronger NRH, increased area and fractional anisotropy of the corpus callosum splenium were predictive of stronger NRH in the VPT group. VPT birth may alter the relationship between handedness and academic outcomes, and neonatal corpus callosum integrity predicts hand preference in VPT children at school age. (JINS, 2015, 21, 610-621).

  13. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used to remove one or more foreign objects that have been ingested ... a foreign body or witness a child ingest one or suspect the presence of a soft tissue ...

  14. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissues. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  15. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... Anesthesia Safety X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Videos related to Foreign Body Retrieval ...

  16. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used to remove ... the digestive system. top of page How should I prepare? If you ingest a foreign body or ...

  17. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Foreign body retrieval is used to remove ... the foreign body. top of page What does the equipment look like? A variety of x-ray ...

  18. The Knowledge Retrieval Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    knowledge accessed from the corporate memory. We suggest thatmultinational companies (MNCs) solve knowledge retrieval problems by implementingvirtual communities of practice - intranet-based collaborative forums. Codification andpersonalization strategies have previously been emphasized as an either...

  19. Disostose espôndilo-costal associada a defeitos de fechamento do tubo neural Spondylocostal dysostosis associated with neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Salientar a relação dos defeitos de fechamento do tubo neural com a disostose espôndilo-costal (DEC por meio da descrição de três pacientes. DESCRIÇÃO DOS CASOS: Paciente 1: menina branca, 22 meses, nascida com mielomeningocele lombar. Na avaliação, apresentava hipotonia, baixa estatura, dolicocefalia, fendas palpebrais oblíquas para cima, pregas epicânticas e tronco curto com tórax assimétrico. A avaliação radiográfica revelou hemivértebras múltiplas, vértebras em borboleta e fusão e ausência de algumas costelas. Paciente 2: menina branca, 22 meses, com moderado atraso do desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, baixa estatura, olhos profundos, pregas epicânticas, pescoço e tronco curtos com assimetria do tórax, abdome protruso, hemangioma plano na altura da transição lombossacra e fosseta sacral profunda no dorso. A avaliação radiográfica identificou hemivértebras, fusão incompleta de vértebras e vértebras em borboleta, malformações de costelas e espinha bífida oculta em L5/S1. Paciente 3: menina branca, 9 dias de vida, com fendas palpebrais oblíquas para cima, ponte nasal alargada, orelhas baixo implantadas e rotadas posteriormente, tronco curto, tórax assimétrico e meningocele tóraco-lombar. A avaliação radiográfica evidenciou hemivértebras, malformação e ausência de algumas costelas e agenesia diafragmática à esquerda. A tomografia computadorizada de encéfalo mostrou estenose de aqueduto. COMENTÁRIOS: Vários defeitos de fechamento do tubo neural, de espinha bífida oculta a grandes mielomeningoceles, são observados em pacientes com DEC, indicando que tais pacientes devem ser cuidadosamente avaliados quanto à possível presença desses defeitos.OBJECTIVE: To highlight the relationship between neural tube defects and spondylocostal dysostosis (SCD through the description of three patients. CASES DESCRIPTION: Patient 1: white girl, 22 months old, born with a lumbar meningomyelocele. At

  20. Dissipation of 'dark energy' by cortex in knowledge retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capolupo, Antonio; Freeman, Walter J; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    We have devised a thermodynamic model of cortical neurodynamics expressed at the classical level by neural networks and at the quantum level by dissipative quantum field theory. Our model is based on features in the spatial images of cortical activity newly revealed by high-density electrode arrays. We have incorporated the mechanism and necessity for so-called dark energy in knowledge retrieval. We have extended the model first using the Carnot cycle to define our measures for energy, entropy and temperature, and then using the Rankine cycle to incorporate criticality and phase transitions. We describe the dynamics of two interactive fields of neural activity that express knowledge, one at high and the other at low energy density, and the two operators that create and annihilate the fields. We postulate that the extremely high density of energy sequestered briefly in cortical activity patterns can account for the vividness, richness of associations, and emotional intensity of memories recalled by stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuroadaptive changes associated with smoking: structural and functional neural changes in nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Soelch, Chantal

    2013-02-15

    Tobacco smoking is the most frequent form of substance abuse. We provide a review of the neuroadaptive changes evidenced in human smokers with regard to the current neurobiological models of addiction. Addiction is thought to result from an interplay between positive and negative reinforcement. Positive reinforcing effects of the drugs are mediated by striatal dopamine release, while negative reinforcement involves the relief of withdrawal symptoms and neurobiological stress systems. In addition, drug-related stimuli are attributed with excessive motivational value and are thought to exert a control on the behavior. This mechanism plays a central role in drug maintenance and relapse. Further neuroadaptive changes associated with chronic use of the drug consist of reduced responses to natural rewards and in the activation of an antireward system, related to neurobiological stress systems. Reduced inhibitory cognitive control is believed to support the development and the maintenance of addiction. The findings observed in human nicotine dependence are generally in line with these models. The current state of the research indicates specific neuroadaptive changes associated with nicotine addiction that need to be further elucidated with regard to their role in the treatment of nicotine dependence.

  2. The neural network associated with lexical-semantic knowledge about social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piretti, Luca; Carnaghi, Andrea; Campanella, Fabio; Ambron, Elisabetta; Skrap, Miran; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2015-09-01

    A person can be appraised as an individual or as a member of a social group. In the present study we tested whether the knowledge about social groups is represented independently of the living and non-living things. Patients with frontal and temporal lobe tumors involving either the left or the right hemisphere performed three tasks--picture naming, word-to-picture matching and picture sorting--tapping the lexical semantic knowledge of living things, non-living things and social groups. Both behavioral and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analyses suggested that social groups might be represented differently from other categories. VLSM analysis carried out on naming errors revealed that left-lateralized lesions in the inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala, insula and basal ganglia were associated with the lexical-semantic processing of social groups. These findings indicate that the social group representation may rely on areas associated with affective processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuroadaptive Changes Associated with Smoking: Structural and Functional Neural Changes in Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Martin-Soelch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is the most frequent form of substance abuse. We provide a review of the neuroadaptive changes evidenced in human smokers with regard to the current neurobiological models of addiction. Addiction is thought to result from an interplay between positive and negative reinforcement. Positive reinforcing effects of the drugs are mediated by striatal dopamine release, while negative reinforcement involves the relief of withdrawal symptoms and neurobiological stress systems. In addition, drug-related stimuli are attributed with excessive motivational value and are thought to exert a control on the behavior. This mechanism plays a central role in drug maintenance and relapse. Further neuroadaptive changes associated with chronic use of the drug consist of reduced responses to natural rewards and in the activation of an antireward system, related to neurobiological stress systems. Reduced inhibitory cognitive control is believed to support the development and the maintenance of addiction. The findings observed in human nicotine dependence are generally in line with these models. The current state of the research indicates specific neuroadaptive changes associated with nicotine addiction that need to be further elucidated with regard to their role in the treatment of nicotine dependence.

  4. Retrieval of humidity and temperature profiles over the oceans from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles of atmosphere from INSAT 3D-observed radiances has been accomplished. As the first step, a fast forward radiative transfer model using an Artificial neural network has been developed and it was proven to be highly effective, giving a correlationcoefficient of 0.97.

  5. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenga, Anthony P; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A; Abel, Mark F

    2016-08-01

    Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. All patients aged ≤13 years (n = 75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003-2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiographs and MRI were analyzed retrospectively for bone and neural pathology. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare groups for categorical dependent variables. Independent t tests were used for continuous dependent variables. Significance was set at p deformity patients (n = 41) had associated spinal cord anomalies on MRI. Complex bony abnormalities had a higher incidence of cord anomalies than simple abnormalities (67, 37 %; p = 0.011). Mixed deformities of segmentation and formation had a higher incidence of cord anomalies (73 %) than failures of formation (50 %) or segmentation (45 %) alone (p = 0.065). Deformities in the sacrococcygeal area had the highest rate of spinal cord anomalies (13 of 15 patients, 87 %). In 35 cases (47 %), MRI revealed additional bony anomalies that were not seen on the radiographs. As the number of bony malformations increased, we found a higher incidence of cord anomalies. Clinicians should have increased suspicion of spinal cord pathology in the presence of mixed failures of segmentation and formation.

  6. Linear association between social anxiety symptoms and neural activations to angry faces: from subclinical to clinical levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Arnaud; Gierski, Fabien; Lemogne, Cédric; Tran, Eric; Raucher-Chéné, Delphine; Béra-Potelle, Céline; Portefaix, Christophe; Kaladjian, Arthur; Pierot, Laurent; Besche-Richard, Chrystel; Limosin, Frédéric

    2014-06-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD), which is characterized by the fear of being rejected and negatively evaluated, involves altered brain activation during the processing of negative emotions in a social context. Although associated temperament traits, such as shyness or behavioral inhibition, have been studied, there is still insufficient knowledge to support the dimensional approach, which assumes a continuum from subclinical to clinical levels of social anxiety symptoms. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural bases of individual differences in social anxiety. Our sample included participants with both healthy/subclinical as well as clinical levels of social anxiety. Forty-six participants with a wide range of social anxiety levels performed a gender decision task with emotional facial expressions during fMRI scanning. Activation in the left anterior insula and right lateral prefrontal cortex in response to angry faces was positively correlated with the level of social anxiety in a regression analysis. The results substantiate, with a dimensional approach, those obtained in previous studies that involved SAD patients or healthy and subclinical participants. It may help to refine further therapeutic strategies based on markers of social anxiety. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Glyoxal retrieval from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chan Miller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for the retrieval of glyoxal from backscattered solar radiation, and apply it to spectra measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. The algorithm is based on direct spectrum fitting, and adopts a two-step fitting routine to account for liquid water absorption. Previous studies have shown that glyoxal retrieval algorithms are highly sensitive to the position of the spectral fit window. This dependence was systematically tested on real and simulated OMI spectra. We find that a combination of errors resulting from uncertainties in reference cross sections and spectral features associated with the Ring effect are consistent with the fit-window dependence observed in real spectra. This implies an optimal fitting window of 435–461 nm, consistent with previous satellite glyoxal retrievals. The results from the retrieval of simulated spectra also support previous findings that have suggested that glyoxal is sensitive to NO2 cross-section temperature. The retrieval window limits of the liquid water retrieval are also tested. A retrieval window 385–470 nm reduces interference with strong spectral features associated with sand. We show that cross-track dependent offsets (stripes present in OMI can be corrected using offsets derived from retrieved slant columns over the Sahara, and apply the correction to OMI data. Average glyoxal columns are on average lower than those of previous studies likely owing to the choice of reference sector for offset correction. OMI VCDs (vertical column densitiesare lower compared to other satellites over the tropics and Asia during the monsoon season, suggesting that the new retrieval is less sensitive to water vapour abundance. Consequently we do not see significant glyoxal enhancements over tropical oceans. OMI-derived glyoxal-to-formaldehyde ratios over biogenic and anthropogenic source regions are consistent with surface observations.

  8. Association of Neural and Emotional Impacts of Reward Prediction Errors With Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutoussis, Michael; Smittenaar, Peter; Zeidman, Peter; Taylor, Tanja; Hrynkiewicz, Louise; Lam, Jordan; Skandali, Nikolina; Siegel, Jenifer Z.; Ousdal, Olga T.; Prabhu, Gita; Dayan, Peter; Fonagy, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with deficits in representing reward prediction errors (RPEs), which are the difference between experienced and predicted reward. Reward prediction errors underlie learning of values in reinforcement learning models, are represented by phasic dopamine release, and are known to affect momentary mood. Objective To combine functional neuroimaging, computational modeling, and smartphone-based large-scale data collection to test, in the absence of learning-related concerns, the hypothesis that depression attenuates the impact of RPEs. Design, Setting, and Participants Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were collected on 32 individuals with moderate MDD and 20 control participants who performed a probabilistic reward task. A risky decision task with repeated happiness ratings as a measure of momentary mood was also tested in the laboratory in 74 participants and with a smartphone-based platform in 1833 participants. The study was conducted from November 20, 2012, to February 17, 2015. Main Outcomes and Measures Blood oxygen level–dependent activity was measured in ventral striatum, a dopamine target area known to represent RPEs. Momentary mood was measured during risky decision making. Results Of the 52 fMRI participants (mean [SD] age, 34.0 [9.1] years), 30 (58%) were women and 32 had MDD. Of the 74 participants in the laboratory risky decision task (mean age, 34.2 [10.3] years), 44 (59%) were women and 54 had MDD. Of the smartphone group, 543 (30%) had a depression history and 1290 (70%) had no depression history; 918 (50%) were women, and 593 (32%) were younger than 30 years. Contrary to previous results in reinforcement learning tasks, individuals with moderate depression showed intact RPE signals in ventral striatum (z = 3.16; P = .002) that did not differ significantly from controls (z = 0.91; P = .36). Symptom severity correlated with baseline mood parameters in laboratory (

  9. Variation in the oxytocin receptor gene is associated with behavioral and neural correlates of empathic accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Ruff; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Haren, Tina

    2014-01-01

    The neuromodulators oxytocin and serotonin have been implicated in regulating affective processes underlying empathy. Understanding this dependency, however, has been limited by a lack of objective metrics for measuring empathic performance. Here we employ a novel psychophysical method for measur......The neuromodulators oxytocin and serotonin have been implicated in regulating affective processes underlying empathy. Understanding this dependency, however, has been limited by a lack of objective metrics for measuring empathic performance. Here we employ a novel psychophysical method...... performing an irrelevant attention-demanding task. We investigated the effect of variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) on the psychophysical and neurometric variability associated with empathic performance. The OXTR rs2268498 and rs53576 polymorphisms...

  10. Associations between proprioceptive neural pathway structural connectivity and balance in people with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett W Fling

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobility and balance impairments are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS, affecting nearly half of patients at presentation and resulting in decreased activity and participation, falls, injuries, and reduced quality of life. A growing body of work suggests that balance impairments in people with mild MS are primarily the result of deficits in proprioception, the ability to determine body position in space in the absence of vision. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of balance disturbances in MS is needed to develop evidence-based rehabilitation approaches. The purpose of the current study was to 1 map the cortical proprioceptive pathway in-vivo using diffusion weighted imaging and 2 assess associations between proprioceptive pathway white matter microstructural integrity and performance on clinical and behavioral balance tasks. We hypothesized that people with MS (PwMS would have reduced integrity of cerebral proprioceptive pathways, and that reduced white matter microstructure within these tracts would be strongly related to proprioceptive-based balance deficits. We found poorer balance control on proprioceptive-based tasks and reduced white matter microstructural integrity of the cortical proprioceptive tracts in PwMS compared with age-matched healthy controls. Microstructural integrity of this pathway in the right hemisphere was also strongly associated with proprioceptive-based balance control in PwMS and controls. Conversely, while white matter integrity of the right hemisphere’s proprioceptive pathway was significantly correlated with overall balance performance in healthy controls, there was no such relationship in PwMS. These results augment existing literature suggesting that balance control in PwMS may become more dependent upon 1 cerebellar-regulated proprioceptive control, 2 the vestibular system, and/or 3 the visual system.

  11. Neural effects of the CSMD1 genome-wide associated schizophrenia risk variant rs10503253.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rose, Emma J

    2013-09-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs10503253 within the CUB and Sushi multiple domains-1 (CSMD1) gene on 8p23.2 has been identified as genome-wide significant for schizophrenia (SZ). This gene is of unknown function but has been implicated in multiple neurodevelopmental disorders that impact upon cognition, leading us to hypothesize that an effect on brain structure and function underlying cognitive processes may be part of the mechanism by which CMSD1 increases illness risk. To test this hypothesis, we investigated this CSMD1 variant in vivo in healthy participants in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study comprised of both fMRI of spatial working memory (N = 50) and a voxel-based morphometry investigation of grey and white matter (WM) volume (N = 150). Analyses of these data indicated that the risk "A" allele was associated with comparatively reduced cortical activations in BA18, that is, middle occipital gyrus and cuneus; posterior brain regions that support maintenance processes during performance of a spatial working memory task. Conversely, there was an absence of significant structural differences in brain volume (i.e., grey or WM). In accordance with previous evidence, these data suggest that CSMD1 may mediate brain function related to cognitive processes (i.e., executive function); with the relatively deleterious effects of the identified "A" risk allele on brain activity possibly constituting part of the mechanism by which CSMD1 increases schizophrenia risk.

  12. Rumination in major depressive disorder is associated with impaired neural activation during conflict monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Alderman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD often ruminate about past experiences, especially those with negative content. These repetitive thoughts may interfere with cognitive processes related to attention and conflict monitoring. However, the temporal nature of these processes as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs has not been well described. We examined behavioral and ERP indices of conflict monitoring during a modified flanker task and the allocation of attention during an attentional blink (AB task in 33 individuals with MDD and 36 healthy controls, and whether their behavioral performance and ERPs varied with level of rumination. N2 amplitude elicited by the flanker task was significantly reduced in participants with MDD compared to healthy controls. Level of self-reported rumination was also correlated with N2 amplitude. In contrast, P3 amplitude during the AB task was not significantly different between groups, nor was it correlated with rumination. No significant differences were found in behavioral task performance measures between groups or by rumination levels. These findings suggest that rumination in MDD is associated with select deficits in cognitive control, particularly related to conflict monitoring.

  13. Dysfunctional neural networks associated with impaired social interactions in early psychosis: an ICA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Monica; Catalucci, Alessia; Pino, Maria Chiara; Giusti, Laura; Nigri, Anna; Pollice, Rocco; Roncone, Rita; Casacchia, Massimo; Gallucci, Massimo

    2013-09-01

    The "default mode", or baseline of brain function is a topic of great interest in schizophrenia research. Recent neuroimaging studies report that the symptoms of chronic schizophrenia subjects are associated with temporal frequency alterations as well as with the disruption of local spatial patterns in the default mode network (DMN). Previous studies both on chronic and medicated subjects with psychosis suffered from limitations; on this basis, it was hypothesized that the default mode network showed abnormal activation and connectivity in young and neuroleptic-naïve patients with first-episode psychosis. This study investigated emotional responses to pleasant and unpleasant/disgusting visual stimuli by a resting-state analysis of fMRI-data from 12 untreated first-episode psychosis patients with prevalently negative symptomatology versus 12 healthy subjects. We chose this experimental task to explore the functional link between default mode network and hedonic processing which has been proposed as a marker of cerebral dysfunction in psychotic disorder and implicated in its pathophysiology. Independent Component Analysis (ICA) was used to identify the default mode component. Both healthy and first-episode subjects showed significant spatial differences in the default mode network. In first-episode subjects, medial frontal hypoactivity and cerebellar hyperactivity were correlated with the severity of negative symptoms.

  14. Increased neural response to peer rejection associated with adolescent depression and pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jennifer S; Siegle, Greg J; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Nelson, Eric E; Stroud, Laura R; Dahl, Ronald E

    2014-11-01

    Sensitivity to social evaluation has been proposed as a potential marker or risk factor for depression, and has also been theorized to increase with pubertal maturation. This study utilized an ecologically valid paradigm to test the hypothesis that adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) would show altered reactivity to peer rejection and acceptance relative to healthy controls in a network of ventral brain regions implicated in affective processing of social information. A total of 48 adolescents (ages 11-17), including 21 with a current diagnosis of MDD and 27 age- and gender-matched controls, received rigged acceptance and rejection feedback from fictitious peers during a simulated online peer interaction during functional neuroimaging. MDD youth showed increased activation to rejection relative to controls in the bilateral amygdala, subgenual anterior cingulate, left anterior insula and left nucleus accumbens. MDD and healthy youth did not differ in response to acceptance. Youth more advanced in pubertal maturation also showed increased reactivity to rejection in the bilateral amygdala/parahippocampal gyrus and the caudate/subgenual anterior cingulate, and these effects remained significant when controlling for chronological age. Findings suggest that increased reactivity to peer rejection is a normative developmental process associated with pubertal development, but is particularly enhanced among youth with depression. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Retrieval with gene queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Padmini

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Results Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline. For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. Conclusion We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents.

  16. Longitudinal Associations Between Preschool Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder Symptoms and Neural Reactivity to Monetary Reward During Preadolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Lea R.; Kujawa, Autumn; Hajcak, Greg; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Reward-processing abnormalities are thought to be a key feature of various psychiatric disorders and may also play a role in disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD), a new diagnosis in DSM-5. In the current study, we used event-related potentials (ERP) sensitive to monetary gains (i.e., the reward positivity [RewP]) and losses (i.e., the N200) to examine associations between symptoms of DMDD during early childhood and later reward processing during preadolescence. Methods: To assess early emerging DMDD symptoms in a large longitudinal community sample (n=373) of 3-year old children, we administered a diagnostic interview, Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA) with parents. At a later assessment, ∼6 years later, children completed a monetary reward task while an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. Children's lifetime history of psychopathology was also assessed at that time using Kiddie-Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS) with the child and parent. Results: Multiple regression analyses revealed that age 3 DMDD symptoms predicted an enhanced RewP to monetary rewards in preadolescence. This association is independent of demographics and lifetime history of symptoms of depression, any anxiety disorder, attention-deficit disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or conduct disorder Conclusions: Early manifestations of DMDD in children as young as 3 years old predicted enhanced reward processing later in development. These findings add to the growing corpus of literature on the pathophysiology of DMDD, and underscore the predictive validity of preschool DMDD on a neural level. PMID:26771832

  17. Cardiac, mandibular and thymic phenotypical association indicates that cranial neural crest underlies bicuspid aortic valve formation in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Martínez-Vargas

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most prevalent human congenital cardiac malformation. It may appear isolated, associated with other cardiovascular malformations, or forming part of syndromes. Cranial neural crest (NC defects are supposed to be the cause of the spectrum of disorders associated with syndromic BAV. Experimental studies with an inbred hamster model of isolated BAV showed that alterations in the migration or differentiation of the cardiac NC cells in the embryonic cardiac outflow tract are most probably responsible for the development of this congenital valvular defect. We hypothesize that isolated BAV is not the result of local, but of early alterations in the behavior of the NC cells, thus also affecting other cranial NC-derived structures. Therefore, we tested whether morphological variation of the aortic valve is linked to phenotypic variation of the mandible and the thymus in the hamster model of isolated BAV, compared to a control strain. Our results show significant differences in the size and shape of the mandible as well as in the cellular composition of the thymus between the two strains, and in mandible shape regarding the morphology of the aortic valve. Given that both the mandible and the thymus are cranial NC derivatives, and that the cardiac NC belongs to the cephalic domain, we propose that the causal defect leading to isolated BAV during embryonic development is not restricted to local alterations of the cardiac NC cells in the cardiac outflow tract, but it is of pleiotropic or polytopic nature. Our results suggest that isolated BAV may be the forme fruste of a polytopic syndrome involving the cranial NC in the hamster model and in a proportion of affected patients.

  18. AX Tank Farm waste retrieval alternatives cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, S.A.

    1998-07-21

    This report presents the estimated costs associated with retrieval of the wastes from the four tanks in AX Tank Farm. The engineering cost estimates developed for this report are based on previous cost data prepared for Project W-320 and the HTI 241-C-106 Heel Retrieval System. The costs presented in this report address only the retrieval of the wastes from the four AX Farm tanks. This includes costs for equipment procurement, fabrication, installation, and operation to retrieve the wastes. The costs to modify the existing plant equipment and systems to support the retrieval equipment are also included. The estimates do not include operational costs associated with pumping the waste out of the waste receiver tank (241-AY-102) between AX Farm retrieval campaigns or transportation, processing, and disposal of the retrieved waste.

  19. Associations of the Intellectual Disability Gene MYT1L with Helix-Loop-Helix Gene Expression, Hippocampus Volume and Hippocampus Activation During Memory Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Kepa, Agnes; Medina, Lourdes Martinez; Erk, Susanne; Srivastava, Deepak P.; Fernandes, Alinda; Toro, Roberto; Lévi, Sabine; Ruggeri, Barbara; Fernandes, Cathy; Degenhardt, Franziska; Witt, Stephanie H.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Poncer, Jean-Christophe; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Martinot, Marie-Laure Paillère

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental role of the brain-specific myelin transcription factor 1-like (MYT1L) gene in cases of intellectual disability and in the aetiology of neurodevelopmental disorders is increasingly recognised. Yet, its function remains under-investigated. Here, we identify a network of helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional regulators controlled by MYT1L, as indicated by our analyses in human neural stem cells and in the human brain. Using cell-based knockdown approaches and microarray analyses...

  20. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-08-11

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

  1. Care episode retrieval: distributional semantic models for information retrieval in the clinical domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Hans; Ginter, Filip; Marsi, Erwin; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Salakoski, Tapio; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Patients' health related information is stored in electronic health records (EHRs) by health service providers. These records include sequential documentation of care episodes in the form of clinical notes. EHRs are used throughout the health care sector by professionals, administrators and patients, primarily for clinical purposes, but also for secondary purposes such as decision support and research. The vast amounts of information in EHR systems complicate information management and increase the risk of information overload. Therefore, clinicians and researchers need new tools to manage the information stored in the EHRs. A common use case is, given a--possibly unfinished--care episode, to retrieve the most similar care episodes among the records. This paper presents several methods for information retrieval, focusing on care episode retrieval, based on textual similarity, where similarity is measured through domain-specific modelling of the distributional semantics of words. Models include variants of random indexing and the semantic neural network model word2vec. Two novel methods are introduced that utilize the ICD-10 codes attached to care episodes to better induce domain-specificity in the semantic model. We report on experimental evaluation of care episode retrieval that circumvents the lack of human judgements regarding episode relevance. Results suggest that several of the methods proposed outperform a state-of-the art search engine (Lucene) on the retrieval task.

  2. Associative memory in phasing neuron networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Niketh S [ORNL; Bochove, Erik J. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base; Braiman, Yehuda [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We studied pattern formation in a network of coupled Hindmarsh-Rose model neurons and introduced a new model for associative memory retrieval using networks of Kuramoto oscillators. Hindmarsh-Rose Neural Networks can exhibit a rich set of collective dynamics that can be controlled by their connectivity. Specifically, we showed an instance of Hebb's rule where spiking was correlated with network topology. Based on this, we presented a simple model of associative memory in coupled phase oscillators.

  3. Patient and surgery related factors associated with fatigue type polyethylene wear on 49 PCA and DURACON retrievals at autopsy and revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochsner Peter E

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyethylene wear is an important factor for longevity of total knee arthroplasty. Proven and suspicious factors causing wear can be grouped as material, patient and surgery related. There are more studies correlating design and/or biomaterial factors to in vivo wear than those to patient and surgery related factors. Many retrieval studies just include revision implants and therefore may not be representative. This study is aimed to correlate patient- and surgery- related factors to visual wear score by minimizing design influence and include both autopsy and revision implants. Comparison between the groups was expected to unmask patient and surgery-related factors responsible for wear. Methods The amount of joint side wear on polyethylene retrievals was measured using a modification of an established visual wear score. Fatigue type wear was defined as summation of the most severe wear modes of delamination, pitting and cracks. Analysis of patient and surgery related variables suspicious to cause wear included prospectively sampled patient activity which was measured by self reported walking capacity. Statistical analysis was done by univariate analysis of variance. Activity level and implantation time were merged to an index of use and correlated to the wear score. Results Wear score after comparable implantation time was significantly less in the autopsy group. Even so, fatigue type wear accounted for 84 and 93 % of total wear score on autopsy and revision implants respectively. A highly significant influence on wear score was found in time of implantation (p = 0.002, level of activity (p = 0.025 and inserts belonging to revision group (p = 0.006. No influence was found for the kind of patella replacement (p = 0.483. Body mass index and accuracy of component alignment had no significant influence on visual wear score. Fatigue-type wear in the medial compartment was closely correlated to the index of use in the autopsy (R2

  4. Noncompetitive retrieval practice causes retrieval-induced forgetting in cued recall but not in recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundgeiger, Tobias

    2014-04-01

    Retrieving a subset of learned items can lead to the forgetting of related items. Such retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) can be explained by the inhibition of irrelevant items in order to overcome retrieval competition when the target item is retrieved. According to the retrieval inhibition account, such retrieval competition is a necessary condition for RIF. However, research has indicated that noncompetitive retrieval practice can also cause RIF by strengthening cue-item associations. According to the strength-dependent competition account, the strengthened items interfere with the retrieval of weaker items, resulting in impaired recall of weaker items in the final memory test. The aim of this study was to replicate RIF caused by noncompetitive retrieval practice and to determine whether this forgetting is also observed in recognition tests. In the context of RIF, it has been assumed that recognition tests circumvent interference and, therefore, should not be sensitive to forgetting due to strength-dependent competition. However, this has not been empirically tested, and it has been suggested that participants may reinstate learned cues as retrieval aids during the final test. In the present experiments, competitive practice or noncompetitive practice was followed by either final cued-recall tests or recognition tests. In cued-recall tests, RIF was observed in both competitive and noncompetitive conditions. However, in recognition tests, RIF was observed only in the competitive condition and was absent in the noncompetitive condition. The result underscores the contribution of strength-dependent competition to RIF. However, recognition tests seem to be a reliable way of distinguishing between RIF due to retrieval inhibition or strength-dependent competition.

  5. Introduction to information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Christopher D; Schütze, Hinrich

    2008-01-01

    Class-tested and coherent, this textbook teaches classical and web information retrieval, including web search and the related areas of text classification and text clustering from basic concepts. It gives an up-to-date treatment of all aspects of the design and implementation of systems for gathering, indexing, and searching documents; methods for evaluating systems; and an introduction to the use of machine learning methods on text collections. All the important ideas are explained using examples and figures, making it perfect for introductory courses in information retrieval for advanced un

  6. Information Retrieval Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation has always played a major role in information retrieval, with the early pioneers such as Cyril Cleverdon and Gerard Salton laying the foundations for most of the evaluation methodologies in use today. The retrieval community has been extremely fortunate to have such a well-grounded evaluation paradigm during a period when most of the human language technologies were just developing. This lecture has the goal of explaining where these evaluation methodologies came from and how they have continued to adapt to the vastly changed environment in the search engine world today. The lecture

  7. Neural correlates of stress- and food cue-induced food craving in obesity: association with insulin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl; Small, Dana M; Sherwin, Robert S; Potenza, Marc N

    2013-02-01

    Obesity is associated with alterations in corticolimbic-striatal brain regions involved in food motivation and reward. Stress and the presence of food cues may each motivate eating and engage corticolimibic-striatal neurocircuitry. It is unknown how these factors interact to influence brain responses and whether these interactions are influenced by obesity, insulin levels, and insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that obese individuals would show greater responses in corticolimbic-striatal neurocircuitry after exposure to stress and food cues and that brain activations would correlate with subjective food craving, insulin levels, and HOMA-IR. Fasting insulin levels were assessed in obese and lean subjects who were exposed to individualized stress and favorite-food cues during functional MRI. Obese, but not lean, individuals exhibited increased activation in striatal, insular, and hypothalamic regions during exposure to favorite-food and stress cues. In obese but not lean individuals, food craving, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels correlated positively with neural activity in corticolimbic-striatal brain regions during favorite-food and stress cues. The relationship between insulin resistance and food craving in obese individuals was mediated by activity in motivation-reward regions including the striatum, insula, and thalamus. These findings demonstrate that obese, but not lean, individuals exhibit increased corticolimbic-striatal activation in response to favorite-food and stress cues and that these brain responses mediate the relationship between HOMA-IR and food craving. Improving insulin sensitivity and in turn reducing corticolimbic-striatal reactivity to food cues and stress may diminish food craving and affect eating behavior in obesity.

  8. The extraction of neural strategies from the surface EMG: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merletti, Roberto; Enoka, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    A surface EMG signal represents the linear transformation of motor neuron discharge times by the compound action potentials of the innervated muscle fibers and is often used as a source of information about neural activation of muscle. However, retrieving the embedded neural code from a surface EMG signal is extremely challenging. Most studies use indirect approaches in which selected features of the signal are interpreted as indicating certain characteristics of the neural code. These indirect associations are constrained by limitations that have been detailed previously (Farina D, Merletti R, Enoka RM. J Appl Physiol 96: 1486–1495, 2004) and are generally difficult to overcome. In an update on these issues, the current review extends the discussion to EMG-based coherence methods for assessing neural connectivity. We focus first on EMG amplitude cancellation, which intrinsically limits the association between EMG amplitude and the intensity of the neural activation and then discuss the limitations of coherence methods (EEG-EMG, EMG-EMG) as a way to assess the strength of the transmission of synaptic inputs into trains of motor unit action potentials. The debated influence of rectification on EMG spectral analysis and coherence measures is also discussed. Alternatively, there have been a number of attempts to identify the neural information directly by decomposing surface EMG signals into the discharge times of motor unit action potentials. The application of this approach is extremely powerful, but validation remains a central issue. PMID:25277737

  9. The extraction of neural strategies from the surface EMG: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Dario; Merletti, Roberto; Enoka, Roger M

    2014-12-01

    A surface EMG signal represents the linear transformation of motor neuron discharge times by the compound action potentials of the innervated muscle fibers and is often used as a source of information about neural activation of muscle. However, retrieving the embedded neural code from a surface EMG signal is extremely challenging. Most studies use indirect approaches in which selected features of the signal are interpreted as indicating certain characteristics of the neural code. These indirect associations are constrained by limitations that have been detailed previously (Farina D, Merletti R, Enoka RM. J Appl Physiol 96: 1486-1495, 2004) and are generally difficult to overcome. In an update on these issues, the current review extends the discussion to EMG-based coherence methods for assessing neural connectivity. We focus first on EMG amplitude cancellation, which intrinsically limits the association between EMG amplitude and the intensity of the neural activation and then discuss the limitations of coherence methods (EEG-EMG, EMG-EMG) as a way to assess the strength of the transmission of synaptic inputs into trains of motor unit action potentials. The debated influence of rectification on EMG spectral analysis and coherence measures is also discussed. Alternatively, there have been a number of attempts to identify the neural information directly by decomposing surface EMG signals into the discharge times of motor unit action potentials. The application of this approach is extremely powerful, but validation remains a central issue. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. ERP evidence for the control of emotional memories during strategic retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Jane E

    2017-05-08

    Neural evidence for the strategic retrieval of task-relevant 'target' memories at the expense of less relevant 'nontarget' memories has been demonstrated across a wide variety of studies. In ERP studies, this evidence consists of the ERP correlate of recollection (i.e. the 'left parietal old/new effect') being evident for targets and attenuated for nontargets. It is not yet known, however, whether this degree of strategic control can be extended to emotionally valenced words, or whether these items instead reactivate associated memories. The present study used a paradigm previously employed to demonstrate the strategic retrieval of neutral words (Herron & Rugg, Psychonomic Bulletin and & Review, 10(3), 703--710, 2003b) to assess the effects of stimulus valence on behavioural and event-related potential (ERP) measures of strategic retrieval. While response accuracy and reaction times associated with targets were unaffected by valence, negative nontargets and new items were both associated with an elevated false alarm rate and longer RTs than their neutral equivalents. Both neutral and negative targets and nontargets elicited early old/new effects between 300 and 500 ms. Critically, whereas neutral and negative targets elicited robust and statistically equivalent left parietal old/new effects between 500 and 800 ms, these were absent for neutral and negative nontargets. A right frontal positivity associated with postretrieval monitoring was evident for neutral targets versus nontargets, for negative versus neutral nontargets, and for targets versus new items. It can therefore be concluded that the recollection of negatively valenced words is subject to strategic control during retrieval, and that postretrieval monitoring processes are influenced by emotional valence.

  11. An investigation of response competition in retrieval-induced forgetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina A. Glanc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that retrieval practice on a subset of studied items can cause forgetting of different related studied items. This retrieval-induced forgetting (the RIF effect has been demonstrated in a variety of recall studies and has been attributed to an inhibitory mechanism activated during retrieval practice by competition for a shared retrieval cue. The current study generalizes the RIF effect to recognition memory and investigates this competition assumption. Experiment 1 demonstrated an effect of RIF effect in item recognition with incidental encoding of category-exemplar association during the study phase. Experiment 2 demonstrated evidence of RIF with use of an independent retrieval cue during retrieval practice. Results from this study indicate that response competition may occur outside of the retrieval-practice phase, or may not be limited to situations where there is an overt link to a shared category cue.

  12. Derivative-free neural network for optimizing the scoring functions associated with dynamic programming of pairwise-profile alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazunori D

    2018-01-01

    A profile-comparison method with position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) is among the most accurate alignment methods. Currently, cosine similarity and correlation coefficients are used as scoring functions of dynamic programming to calculate similarity between PSSMs. However, it is unclear whether these functions are optimal for profile alignment methods. By definition, these functions cannot capture nonlinear relationships between profiles. Therefore, we attempted to discover a novel scoring function, which was more suitable for the profile-comparison method than existing functions, using neural networks. Although neural networks required derivative-of-cost functions, the problem being addressed in this study lacked them. Therefore, we implemented a novel derivative-free neural network by combining a conventional neural network with an evolutionary strategy optimization method used as a solver. Using this novel neural network system, we optimized the scoring function to align remote sequence pairs. Our results showed that the pairwise-profile aligner using the novel scoring function significantly improved both alignment sensitivity and precision relative to aligners using existing functions. We developed and implemented a novel derivative-free neural network and aligner (Nepal) for optimizing sequence alignments. Nepal improved alignment quality by adapting to remote sequence alignments and increasing the expressiveness of similarity scores. Additionally, this novel scoring function can be realized using a simple matrix operation and easily incorporated into other aligners. Moreover our scoring function could potentially improve the performance of homology detection and/or multiple-sequence alignment of remote homologous sequences. The goal of the study was to provide a novel scoring function for profile alignment method and develop a novel learning system capable of addressing derivative-free problems. Our system is capable of optimizing the performance of other

  13. Information Retrieval Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Göker, Ayse; Davies, John

    2009-01-01

    Many applications that handle information on the internet would be completely inadequate without the support of information retrieval technology. How would we find information on the world wide web if there were no web search engines? How would we manage our email without spam filtering? Much of the

  14. Music Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J. Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Identifies MIR (Music Information Retrieval) computer system problems, historic influences, current state-of-the-art, and future MIR solutions through an examination of the multidisciplinary approach to MIR. Highlights include pitch; temporal factors; harmonics; tone; editorial, textual, and bibliographic facets; multicultural factors; locating…

  15. Energy Storage and Retrieval

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Energy Storage and Retrieval The Secondary Battery Route. A K Shukla P Vishnu Kamath. General Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 61-68 ...

  16. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Foreign Body Retrieval Foreign ...

  17. Neural activity during interoceptive awareness and its associations with alexithymia – An fMRI study in major depressive disorder and non-psychiatric controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eWiebking

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Alexithymia relates to difficulties recognizing and describing emotions. It has been linked to subjectively increased interoceptive awareness (IA and to psychiatric illnesses such as major depressive disorder (MDD and somatization. MDD in turn is characterized by aberrant emotion processing and IA on the subjective as well as on the neural level. However, a link between neural activity in response to IA and alexithymic traits in health and depression remains unclear. Methods: A well-established fMRI task was used to investigate neural activity during IA (heartbeat counting and exteroceptive awareness (tone counting in non-psychiatric controls (NC and MDD. Firstly, comparing MDD and NC, a linear relationship between IA-related activity and scores of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS was investigated through whole-brain regression. Secondly, NC were divided by median-split of TAS scores into groups showing low (NC-low or high (NC-high alexithymia. MDD and NC-high showed equally high TAS scores. Finally, IA-related neural activity was compared on a whole-brain level between the three independent samples (MDD, NC-low, NC-high. Results: Whole-brain regressions between MDD and NC revealed neural differences during IA as a function of TAS-DD (subscale difficulty describing feelings in the supragenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC; BA 24/32, which were due to negative associations between TAS-DD and IA-related activity in NC. Contrasting NC subgroups, high TAS scores were associated with decreased neural activity during IA in the sACC and increased insula activity. Though having equally high alexithymia scores, NC-high showed increased insula activity during IA compared to MDD, whilst both groups showed decreased activity in the sACC. Conclusions: Within the context of decreased sACC activity during IA in alexithymia (NC-high and MDD, increased insula activity might mirror a compensatory mechanism in NC-high, which is disrupted in MDD.

  18. Revealing the neural networks associated with processing of natural social interaction and the related effects of actor-orientation and face-visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Manish; Shelly, Elizabeth Walter; Lepage, Jean-Francois; Hoeft, Fumiko; Reiss, Allan L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the intentions and desires of those around us is vital for adapting to a dynamic social environment. In this paper, a novel event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) paradigm with dynamic and natural stimuli (2s video clips) was developed to directly examine the neural networks associated with processing of gestures with social intent as compared to nonsocial intent. When comparing social to nonsocial gestures, increased activation in both the mentalizing (or theory of mind) and amygdala networks was found. As a secondary aim, a factor of actor-orientation was included in the paradigm to examine how the neural mechanisms differ with respect to personal engagement during a social interaction versus passively observing an interaction. Activity in the lateral occipital cortex and precentral gyrus was found sensitive to actor-orientation during social interactions. Lastly, by manipulating face-visibility we tested whether facial information alone is the primary driver of neural activation differences observed between social and nonsocial gestures. We discovered that activity in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and fusiform gyrus (FFG) was partially driven by observing facial expressions during social gestures. Altogether, using multiple factors associated with processing of natural social interaction, we conceptually advance our understanding of how social stimuli is processed in the brain and discuss the application of this paradigm to clinical populations where atypical social cognition is manifested as a key symptom. © 2013.

  19. Memory networks supporting retrieval effort and retrieval success under conditions of full and divided attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Erin I; Fernandes, Myra A; Grady, Cheryl L

    2009-01-01

    We used a multivariate analysis technique, partial least squares (PLS), to identify distributed patterns of brain activity associated with retrieval effort and retrieval success. Participants performed a recognition memory task under full attention (FA) or two different divided attention (DA) conditions during retrieval. Behaviorally, recognition was disrupted when a word, but not digit-based distracting task, was performed concurrently with retrieval. PLS was used to identify patterns of brain activation that together covaried with the three memory conditions and which were functionally connected with activity in the right hippocampus to produce successful memory performance. Results indicate that activity in the right dorsolateral frontal cortex increases during conditions of DA at retrieval, and that successful memory performance in the DA-digit condition is associated with activation of the same network of brain regions functionally connected to the right hippocampus, as under FA, which increases with increasing memory performance. Finally, DA conditions that disrupt successful memory performance (DA-word) interfere with recruitment of both retrieval-effort and retrieval-success networks.

  20. The Influence of Music on Prefrontal Cortex during Episodic Encoding and Retrieval of Verbal Information: A Multichannel fNIRS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Laura; Bigand, Emmanuel; Bard, Patrick; Bugaiska, Aurélia

    2015-01-01

    Music can be thought of as a complex stimulus able to enrich the encoding of an event thus boosting its subsequent retrieval. However, several findings suggest that music can also interfere with memory performance. A better understanding of the behavioral and neural processes involved can substantially improve knowledge and shed new light on the most efficient music-based interventions. Based on fNIRS studies on music, episodic encoding, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), this work aims to extend previous findings by monitoring the entire lateral PFC during both encoding and retrieval of verbal material. Nineteen participants were asked to encode lists of words presented with either background music or silence and subsequently tested during a free recall task. Meanwhile, their PFC was monitored using a 48-channel fNIRS system. Behavioral results showed greater chunking of words under the music condition, suggesting the employment of associative strategies for items encoded with music. fNIRS results showed that music provided a less demanding way of modulating both episodic encoding and retrieval, with a general prefrontal decreased activity under the music versus silence condition. This suggests that music-related memory processes rely on specific neural mechanisms and that music can positively influence both episodic encoding and retrieval of verbal information. PMID:26508813

  1. The Influence of Music on Prefrontal Cortex during Episodic Encoding and Retrieval of Verbal Information: A Multichannel fNIRS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Laura; Bigand, Emmanuel; Bard, Patrick; Bugaiska, Aurélia

    2015-01-01

    Music can be thought of as a complex stimulus able to enrich the encoding of an event thus boosting its subsequent retrieval. However, several findings suggest that music can also interfere with memory performance. A better understanding of the behavioral and neural processes involved can substantially improve knowledge and shed new light on the most efficient music-based interventions. Based on fNIRS studies on music, episodic encoding, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), this work aims to extend previous findings by monitoring the entire lateral PFC during both encoding and retrieval of verbal material. Nineteen participants were asked to encode lists of words presented with either background music or silence and subsequently tested during a free recall task. Meanwhile, their PFC was monitored using a 48-channel fNIRS system. Behavioral results showed greater chunking of words under the music condition, suggesting the employment of associative strategies for items encoded with music. fNIRS results showed that music provided a less demanding way of modulating both episodic encoding and retrieval, with a general prefrontal decreased activity under the music versus silence condition. This suggests that music-related memory processes rely on specific neural mechanisms and that music can positively influence both episodic encoding and retrieval of verbal information.

  2. The Influence of Music on Prefrontal Cortex during Episodic Encoding and Retrieval of Verbal Information: A Multichannel fNIRS Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferreri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Music can be thought of as a complex stimulus able to enrich the encoding of an event thus boosting its subsequent retrieval. However, several findings suggest that music can also interfere with memory performance. A better understanding of the behavioral and neural processes involved can substantially improve knowledge and shed new light on the most efficient music-based interventions. Based on fNIRS studies on music, episodic encoding, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC, this work aims to extend previous findings by monitoring the entire lateral PFC during both encoding and retrieval of verbal material. Nineteen participants were asked to encode lists of words presented with either background music or silence and subsequently tested during a free recall task. Meanwhile, their PFC was monitored using a 48-channel fNIRS system. Behavioral results showed greater chunking of words under the music condition, suggesting the employment of associative strategies for items encoded with music. fNIRS results showed that music provided a less demanding way of modulating both episodic encoding and retrieval, with a general prefrontal decreased activity under the music versus silence condition. This suggests that music-related memory processes rely on specific neural mechanisms and that music can positively influence both episodic encoding and retrieval of verbal information.

  3. Interference from retrieval cues in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Cristiano; Marin, Dario; Del Missier, Fabio; Biasutti, Emanuele; Shallice, Tim

    2011-11-01

    Existing studies on memory interference in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have provided mixed results and it is unknown whether PD patients have problems in overcoming interference from retrieval cues. We investigated this issue by using a part-list cuing paradigm. In this paradigm, after the study of a list of items, the presentation of some of these items as retrieval cues hinders the recall of the remaining ones. We tested PD patients' (n = 19) and control participants' (n = 16) episodic memory in the presence and absence of part-list cues, using initial-letter probes, and following either weak or strong serial associative encoding of list items. Both PD patients and control participants showed a comparable and significant part-list cuing effect after weak associative encoding (13% vs. 12% decrease in retrieval in part-list cuing vs. no part-list cuing -control- conditions in PD patients and control participants, respectively), denoting a similar effect of cue-driven interference in the two populations when a serial retrieval strategy is hard to develop. However, only PD patients showed a significant part-list cuing effect after strong associative encoding (20% vs. 5% decrease in retrieval in patients and controls, respectively). When encoding promotes the development of an effective serial retrieval strategy, the presentation of part-list cues has a specifically disruptive effect in PD patients. This indicates problems in strategic retrieval, probably related to PD patients' increased tendency to rely on external cues. Findings in control conditions suggest that less effective encoding may have contributed to PD patients' memory performance.

  4. Retrieval of Sentence Sequences for an Image Stream via Coherence Recurrent Convolutional Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cesc; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Gunhee

    2017-05-02

    We propose an approach for retrieving a sequence of natural sentences for an image stream. Since general users often take a series of pictures on their experiences, much online visual information exists in the form of image streams, for which it would better take into consideration of the whole image stream to produce natural language descriptions. While almost all previous studies have dealt with the relation between a single image and a single natural sentence, our work extends both input and output dimension to a sequence of images and a sequence of sentences. For retrieving a coherent flow of multiple sentences for a photo stream, we propose a multimodal neural architecture called coherence recurrent convolutional network (CRCN), which consists of convolutional neural networks, bidirectional long short-term memory (LSTM) networks, and an entity-based local coherence model. Our approach directly learns from vast user-generated resource of blog posts as text-image parallel training data. We collect more than 22K unique blog posts with 170K associated images for the travel topics of NYC, Disneyland, Australia, and Hawaii. We demonstrate that our approach outperforms other state-of-the-art image captioning methods for text sequence generation, using both quantitative measures and user studies via Amazon Mechanical Turk.

  5. RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

    2006-01-20

    The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next

  6. Applications of Pulse-Coupled Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yide; Wang, Zhaobin

    2011-01-01

    "Applications of Pulse-Coupled Neural Networks" explores the fields of image processing, including image filtering, image segmentation, image fusion, image coding, image retrieval, and biometric recognition, and the role of pulse-coupled neural networks in these fields. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students in artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, electronic engineering, and computer science. Prof. Yide Ma conducts research on intelligent information processing, biomedical image processing, and embedded system development at the School of Information Sci

  7. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montserrat Guerra, Maria; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vio, Karin; Jimenez, Antonio J.; Dolores Dominguez-Pinos, Maria; Gonzalez, Cesar; Clara Jara, Maria; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.; Perez-Figares, Jose M.; McAllister, James P.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Rodriguez, Esteban M.

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable

  8. Impaired neurogenesis, learning and memory and low seizure threshold associated with loss of neural precursor cell survivin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisch Amelia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a unique member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP family in that it exhibits antiapoptotic properties and also promotes the cell cycle and mediates mitosis as a chromosome passenger protein. Survivin is highly expressed in neural precursor cells in the brain, yet its function there has not been elucidated. Results To examine the role of neural precursor cell survivin, we first showed that survivin is normally expressed in periventricular neurogenic regions in the embryo, becoming restricted postnatally to proliferating and migrating NPCs in the key neurogenic sites, the subventricular zone (SVZ and the subgranular zone (SGZ. We then used a conditional gene inactivation strategy to delete the survivin gene prenatally in those neurogenic regions. Lack of embryonic NPC survivin results in viable, fertile mice (SurvivinCamcre with reduced numbers of SVZ NPCs, absent rostral migratory stream, and olfactory bulb hypoplasia. The phenotype can be partially rescued, as intracerebroventricular gene delivery of survivin during embryonic development increases olfactory bulb neurogenesis, detected postnatally. SurvivinCamcre brains have fewer cortical inhibitory interneurons, contributing to enhanced sensitivity to seizures, and profound deficits in memory and learning. Conclusions The findings highlight the critical role that survivin plays during neural development, deficiencies of which dramatically impact on postnatal neural function.

  9. A Smarter Brain Is Associated with Stronger Neural Interaction in Healthy Young Females: A Resting EEG Coherence Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tien-Wen; Wu, Yu-Te; Yu, Younger W.-Y.; Wu, Hung-Chi; Chen, Tai-Jui

    2012-01-01

    General intelligence, the "g" factor, is a major issue in psychology and neuroscience. However, the neural mechanism of the "g" factor is still not clear. It is suggested that the "g" factor should be non-modular (a property across the brain) and show good colinearity with various cognitive tests. This study examines…

  10. Iterative free-energy optimization for recurrent neural networks (INFERNO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The intra-parietal lobe coupled with the Basal Ganglia forms a working memory that demonstrates strong planning capabilities for generating robust yet flexible neuronal sequences. Neurocomputational models however, often fails to control long range neural synchrony in recurrent spiking networks due to spontaneous activity. As a novel framework based on the free-energy principle, we propose to see the problem of spikes’ synchrony as an optimization problem of the neurons sub-threshold activity for the generation of long neuronal chains. Using a stochastic gradient descent, a reinforcement signal (presumably dopaminergic) evaluates the quality of one input vector to move the recurrent neural network to a desired activity; depending on the error made, this input vector is strengthened to hill-climb the gradient or elicited to search for another solution. This vector can be learned then by one associative memory as a model of the basal-ganglia to control the recurrent neural network. Experiments on habit learning and on sequence retrieving demonstrate the capabilities of the dual system to generate very long and precise spatio-temporal sequences, above two hundred iterations. Its features are applied then to the sequential planning of arm movements. In line with neurobiological theories, we discuss its relevance for modeling the cortico-basal working memory to initiate flexible goal-directed neuronal chains of causation and its relation to novel architectures such as Deep Networks, Neural Turing Machines and the Free-Energy Principle. PMID:28282439

  11. Iterative free-energy optimization for recurrent neural networks (INFERNO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitti, Alexandre; Gaussier, Philippe; Quoy, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    The intra-parietal lobe coupled with the Basal Ganglia forms a working memory that demonstrates strong planning capabilities for generating robust yet flexible neuronal sequences. Neurocomputational models however, often fails to control long range neural synchrony in recurrent spiking networks due to spontaneous activity. As a novel framework based on the free-energy principle, we propose to see the problem of spikes' synchrony as an optimization problem of the neurons sub-threshold activity for the generation of long neuronal chains. Using a stochastic gradient descent, a reinforcement signal (presumably dopaminergic) evaluates the quality of one input vector to move the recurrent neural network to a desired activity; depending on the error made, this input vector is strengthened to hill-climb the gradient or elicited to search for another solution. This vector can be learned then by one associative memory as a model of the basal-ganglia to control the recurrent neural network. Experiments on habit learning and on sequence retrieving demonstrate the capabilities of the dual system to generate very long and precise spatio-temporal sequences, above two hundred iterations. Its features are applied then to the sequential planning of arm movements. In line with neurobiological theories, we discuss its relevance for modeling the cortico-basal working memory to initiate flexible goal-directed neuronal chains of causation and its relation to novel architectures such as Deep Networks, Neural Turing Machines and the Free-Energy Principle.

  12. Iterative free-energy optimization for recurrent neural networks (INFERNO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Pitti

    Full Text Available The intra-parietal lobe coupled with the Basal Ganglia forms a working memory that demonstrates strong planning capabilities for generating robust yet flexible neuronal sequences. Neurocomputational models however, often fails to control long range neural synchrony in recurrent spiking networks due to spontaneous activity. As a novel framework based on the free-energy principle, we propose to see the problem of spikes' synchrony as an optimization problem of the neurons sub-threshold activity for the generation of long neuronal chains. Using a stochastic gradient descent, a reinforcement signal (presumably dopaminergic evaluates the quality of one input vector to move the recurrent neural network to a desired activity; depending on the error made, this input vector is strengthened to hill-climb the gradient or elicited to search for another solution. This vector can be learned then by one associative memory as a model of the basal-ganglia to control the recurrent neural network. Experiments on habit learning and on sequence retrieving demonstrate the capabilities of the dual system to generate very long and precise spatio-temporal sequences, above two hundred iterations. Its features are applied then to the sequential planning of arm movements. In line with neurobiological theories, we discuss its relevance for modeling the cortico-basal working memory to initiate flexible goal-directed neuronal chains of causation and its relation to novel architectures such as Deep Networks, Neural Turing Machines and the Free-Energy Principle.

  13. Mobile medical image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  14. Introduction to information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Christopher D; Schütze, Hinrich

    2008-01-01

    Class-tested and coherent, this textbook teaches classical and web information retrieval, including web search and the related areas of text classification and text clustering from basic concepts. It gives an up-to-date treatment of all aspects of the design and implementation of systems for gathering, indexing, and searching documents; methods for evaluating systems; and an introduction to the use of machine learning methods on text collections. All the important ideas are explained using examples and figures, making it perfect for introductory courses in information retrieval for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in computer science. Based on feedback from extensive classroom experience, the book has been carefully structured in order to make teaching more natural and effective. Slides and additional exercises (with solutions for lecturers) are also available through the book's supporting website to help course instructors prepare their lectures.

  15. Interactive Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The paper introduces the research area of interactive information retrieval (IIR) from a historical point of view. Further, the focus here is on evaluation, because much research in IR deals with IR evaluation methodology due to the core research interest in IR performance, system interaction...... and satisfaction with retrieved information. In order to position IIR evaluation, the Cranfield model and the series of tests that led to the Cranfield model are outlined. Three iconic user-oriented studies and projects that all have contributed to how IIR is perceived and understood today are presented....... As a response to this call the ‘IIR evaluation model’ by Borlund (e.g., 2003a) is introduced. The objective of the IIR evaluation model is to facilitate IIR evaluation as close as possible to actual information searching and IR processes, though still in a relatively controlled evaluation environment, in which...

  16. Source Retrieval for Plagiarism Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Suchomel Šimon; Brandejs Michal

    2015-01-01

    Plagiarism has become a serious problem mainly because of the electronically available documents. An online document retrieval is a weighty part of a modern anti-plagiarism tool. This paper describes an architecture and concepts of a real-world document retrieval system, which is a part of a general anti-plagiarism software. Up to date systems for plagiarism detection are discussed from the source retrieval perspective. The key approaches of source retrieval are compared. The system recommend...

  17. Automated Medical Literature Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hawking

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The constantly growing publication rate of medical research articles puts increasing pressure on medical specialists who need to be aware of the recent developments in their field. The currently used literature retrieval systems allow researchers to find specific papers; however the search task is still repetitive and time-consuming. Aims In this paper we describe a system that retrieves medical publications by automatically generating queries based on data from an electronic patient record. This allows the doctor to focus on medical issues and provide an improved service to the patient, with higher confidence that it is underpinned by current research. Method Our research prototype automatically generates query terms based on the patient record and adds weight factors for each term. Currently the patient’s age is taken into account with a fuzzy logic derived weight, and terms describing blood-related anomalies are derived from recent blood test results. Conditionally selected homonyms are used for query expansion. The query retrieves matching records from a local index of PubMed publications and displays results in descending relevance for the given patient. Recent publications are clearly highlighted for instant recognition by the researcher. Results Nine medical specialists from the Royal Adelaide Hospital evaluated the system and submitted pre-trial and post-trial questionnaires. Throughout the study we received positive feedback as doctors felt the support provided by the prototype was useful, and which they would like to use in their daily routine. Conclusion By supporting the time-consuming task of query formulation and iterative modification as well as by presenting the search results in order of relevance for the specific patient, literature retrieval becomes part of the daily workflow of busy professionals.

  18. A Neural Information Field Approach to Computational Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    of irrelevant information) during the task. The spiking neural model accounts for the probability of first recall, recency effects , primacy effects ...neuron models, allowing the simulated testing of drug effects on cognitive performance; demonstrated a scalable neural model of motor planning... effects of distraction in working memory; shown a hippocampal model able to perform context sensitive sequence encoding and retrieval; proposed what is

  19. Using Graph Components Derived from an Associative Concept Dictionary to Predict fMRI Neural Activation Patterns that Represent the Meaning of Nouns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Akama

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce an original distance definition for graphs, called the Markov-inverse-F measure (MiF. This measure enables the integration of classical graph theory indices with new knowledge pertaining to structural feature extraction from semantic networks. MiF improves the conventional Jaccard and/or Simpson indices, and reconciles both the geodesic information (random walk and co-occurrence adjustment (degree balance and distribution. We measure the effectiveness of graph-based coefficients through the application of linguistic graph information for a neural activity recorded during conceptual processing in the human brain. Specifically, the MiF distance is computed between each of the nouns used in a previous neural experiment and each of the in-between words in a subgraph derived from the Edinburgh Word Association Thesaurus of English. From the MiF-based information matrix, a machine learning model can accurately obtain a scalar parameter that specifies the degree to which each voxel in (the MRI image of the brain is activated by each word or each principal component of the intermediate semantic features. Furthermore, correlating the voxel information with the MiF-based principal components, a new computational neurolinguistics model with a network connectivity paradigm is created. This allows two dimensions of context space to be incorporated with both semantic and neural distributional representations.

  20. Using Graph Components Derived from an Associative Concept Dictionary to Predict fMRI Neural Activation Patterns that Represent the Meaning of Nouns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akama, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Maki; Jung, Jaeyoung; Murphy, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we introduce an original distance definition for graphs, called the Markov-inverse-F measure (MiF). This measure enables the integration of classical graph theory indices with new knowledge pertaining to structural feature extraction from semantic networks. MiF improves the conventional Jaccard and/or Simpson indices, and reconciles both the geodesic information (random walk) and co-occurrence adjustment (degree balance and distribution). We measure the effectiveness of graph-based coefficients through the application of linguistic graph information for a neural activity recorded during conceptual processing in the human brain. Specifically, the MiF distance is computed between each of the nouns used in a previous neural experiment and each of the in-between words in a subgraph derived from the Edinburgh Word Association Thesaurus of English. From the MiF-based information matrix, a machine learning model can accurately obtain a scalar parameter that specifies the degree to which each voxel in (the MRI image of) the brain is activated by each word or each principal component of the intermediate semantic features. Furthermore, correlating the voxel information with the MiF-based principal components, a new computational neurolinguistics model with a network connectivity paradigm is created. This allows two dimensions of context space to be incorporated with both semantic and neural distributional representations.

  1. Enhanced theta synchronization correlates with the successful retrieval of trace fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yujin; An, Bobae; Choi, Sukwoo

    2016-11-25

    Mechanisms underlying delay fear conditioning in which conditioned stimuli (CS) are paired and co-terminated with unconditioned stimuli (US), have been extensively characterized, thus expanding knowledge concerning learning and memory. However, trace fear conditioning in which CS and US are separated by trace interval periods, has received much less attention though it involves cognitive processes including timing and working memories. Various brain regions including the hippocampus are known to play an important role in memory acquisition and/or retrieval of trace fear conditioning. However, neural correlates, which are specific for the discrete steps in trace fear conditioning, have not been characterized thoroughly. Here, we investigated the network activities between the dorsal and ventral hippocampi at different stages of memory processing after trace fear conditioning. When fear memory was retrieved successfully, theta synchronization between the two regions was enhanced relative to preconditioning levels. The enhancement in theta synchronization was observed only during the trace interval period but not during CS presentation or after the trace interval period. Thus, the enhanced theta synchronization between the dorsal and ventral hippocampi may underlie a cognitive process associated with the trace interval period when fear memory is retrieved successfully. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  3. [Neural codes for perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, R; Salinas, E; Hernández, A; Zainos, A; Lemus, L; de Lafuente, V; Luna, R

    This article describes experiments designed to show the neural codes associated with the perception and processing of tactile information. The results of these experiments have shown the neural activity correlated with tactile perception. The neurones of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) represent the physical attributes of tactile perception. We found that these representations correlated with tactile perception. By means of intracortical microstimulation we demonstrated the causal relationship between S1 activity and tactile perception. In the motor areas of the frontal lobe is to be found the connection between sensorial and motor representation whilst decisions are being taken. S1 generates neural representations of the somatosensory stimuli which seen to be sufficient for tactile perception. These neural representations are subsequently processed by central areas to S1 and seem useful in perception, memory and decision making.

  4. Language Processing in Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doszkocs, Tamase

    1986-01-01

    Examines role and contributions of natural-language processing in information retrieval and artificial intelligence research in context of large operational information retrieval systems and services. State-of-the-art information retrieval systems combining the functional capabilities of conventional inverted file term adjacency approach with…

  5. Mining knowledge from corpora: an application to retrieval and indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soualmia, Lina F; Dahamna, Badisse; Darmoni, Stéfan

    2008-01-01

    The present work aims at discovering new associations between medical concepts to be exploited as input in retrieval and indexing. Association rules method is applied to documents. The process is carried out on three major document categories referring to e-health information consumers: health professionals, students and lay people. Association rules evaluation is founded on statistical measures combined with domain knowledge. Association rules represent existing relations between medical concepts (60.62%) and new knowledge (54.21%). Based on observations, 463 expert rules are defined by medical librarians for retrieval and indexing. Association rules bear out existing relations, produce new knowledge and support users and indexers in document retrieval and indexing.

  6. The association and significance of H3K27me3 and a folate metabolic gene ACat2 in neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Sifan; Zhao, Mingzuo; Zhou, Changcheng; Lu, Fenggang; Zhang, Huankai; Na, Li; Feng, Shanshan; Qiang, Xiaoxin; Du, Yong

    2016-11-03

    To study the association between the expression of H3K27me3 and ACat2 (a folate metabolic protein), in order to elucidate the protective mechanism of folic acid (FA) in neural tube defects (NTDs). Eighteen female SD rats were randomly divided into normal, NTD and FA group. NTD group was induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) at E10d. FA group was fed with FA supplementation since 2 weeks before pregnancy, followed by ATRA induction. At E15d, FA level in the embryonic neural tube was determined by ELISA. Neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated. Cell proliferation was compared by CCK-8 assay. The differentiation potency was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. H3K27me3 expression was measured by immunofluorescence method and Western blot. ACat2 mRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. Cultured NSCs formed numerous Nestin-positive neurospheres. After 5 days, they differentiated into NSE-positive neurons and GFAP-positive astrocytes. When compared with controls, the FA level in NTD group was significantly lower, the ability of cell proliferation and differentiation was significantly reduced, H3K27me3 expression was increased, and ACat2 mRNA expression was decreased (P neural tube. The increased H3K27me3 expression might cause a disorder of folate metabolic pathway by silencing ACat2 expression, leading to reduced proliferation and differentiation of NSCs, and ultimately the occurrence of NTD. FA supplementation may reverse this process.

  7. Neural circulatory control in vasovagal syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, J. J.; Wieling, W.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The orthostatic volume displacement associated with the upright position necessitates effective neural cardiovascular modulation. Neural control of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy, and vasomotor tone aims at maintaining venous return, thus opposing gravitational pooling of blood in the lower part

  8. A negative modulatory role for rho and rho-associated kinase signaling in delamination of neural crest cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groysman, Maya; Shoval, Irit; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural crest progenitors arise as epithelial cells and then undergo a process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition that precedes the generation of cellular motility and subsequent migration. We aim at understanding the underlying molecular network. Along this line, possible roles of Rho GTPases that act as molecular switches to control a variety of signal transduction pathways remain virtually unexplored, as are putative interactions between Rho proteins and additional known components of this cascade. Results We investigated the role of Rho/Rock signaling in neural crest delamination. Active RhoA and RhoB are expressed in the membrane of epithelial progenitors and are downregulated upon delamination. In vivo loss-of-function of RhoA or RhoB or of overall Rho signaling by C3 transferase enhanced and/or triggered premature crest delamination yet had no effect on cell specification. Consistently, treatment of explanted neural primordia with membrane-permeable C3 or with the Rock inhibitor Y27632 both accelerated and enhanced crest emigration without affecting cell proliferation. These treatments altered neural crest morphology by reducing stress fibers, focal adhesions and downregulating membrane-bound N-cadherin. Reciprocally, activation of endogenous Rho by lysophosphatidic acid inhibited emigration while enhancing the above. Since delamination is triggered by BMP and requires G1/S transition, we examined their relationship with Rho. Blocking Rho/Rock function rescued crest emigration upon treatment with noggin or with the G1/S inhibitor mimosine. In the latter condition, cells emigrated while arrested at G1. Conversely, BMP4 was unable to rescue cell emigration when endogenous Rho activity was enhanced by lysophosphatidic acid. Conclusion Rho-GTPases, through Rock, act downstream of BMP and of G1/S transition to negatively regulate crest delamination by modifying cytoskeleton assembly and intercellular adhesion. PMID:18945340

  9. Retrieval, monitoring and control processes: A 7 Tesla fMRI approach to memory accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J. Markowitsch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Memory research has been guided by two powerful metaphors: the storehouse (computer and the correspondence metaphor. The latter emphasizes the dependability of retrieved mnemonic information and draws upon ideas about the state dependency and reconstructive character of episodic memory. We used a new movie to unveil the neural correlates connected with retrieval, monitoring and control processes, and memory accuracy (MAC, according to the paradigm of Koriat and Goldsmith (1996a, b. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, subjects performed a memory task which required (after an initial learning phase rating true and false statements (retrieval phase, RP, making confidence judgments in the respective statement (monitoring phase, MP and deciding for either venturing (volunteering the respective answer or withholding the response (control phase, CP. Imaging data pointed to common and unique neural correlates. Activations in brain regions related to RP and MAC were observed in the precuneus, middle temporal gyrus and left hippocampus. MP was associated with activation in the left anterior and posterior cingulate cortex along with bilateral medial temporal regions. If an answer was volunteered (as opposed to being withheld during the CP, temporal and frontal as well as middle and posterior cingulate areas and the precuneus revealed activations. Increased bilateral hippocampal activity was found during withholding compared to volunteering answers. The left caudate activation detected during withholding compared to venturing an answer supports the involvement of the left caudate in inhibiting unwanted responses. Contrary to expectations, we did not evidence prefrontal activations during withholding (as opposed to volunteering answers. This may reflect our design specifications, but alternative interpretations are put forth.

  10. Retrieval, monitoring, and control processes: a 7 tesla FMRI approach to memory accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risius, Uda-Mareke; Staniloiu, Angelica; Piefke, Martina; Maderwald, Stefan; Schulte, Frank P; Brand, Matthias; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    MEMORY RESEARCH HAS BEEN GUIDED BY TWO POWERFUL METAPHORS: the storehouse (computer) and the correspondence metaphor. The latter emphasizes the dependability of retrieved mnemonic information and draws upon ideas about the state dependency and reconstructive character of episodic memory. We used a new movie to unveil the neural correlates connected with retrieval, monitoring, and control processes, and memory accuracy (MAC), according to the paradigm of Koriat and Goldsmith (1996a,b). During functional magnetic resonance imaging, subjects performed a memory task which required (after an initial learning phase) rating true and false statements [retrieval phase (RP)], making confidence judgments in the respective statement [monitoring phase (MP)], and deciding for either venturing (volunteering) the respective answer or withholding the response [control phase (CP)]. Imaging data pointed to common and unique neural correlates. Activations in brain regions related to RP and MAC were observed in the precuneus, middle temporal gyrus, and left hippocampus. MP was associated with activation in the left anterior and posterior cingulate cortex along with bilateral medial temporal regions. If an answer was volunteered (as opposed to being withheld) during the CP, temporal, and frontal as well as middle and posterior cingulate areas and the precuneus revealed activations. Increased bilateral hippocampal activity was found during withholding compared to volunteering answers. The left caudate activation detected during withholding compared to venturing an answer supports the involvement of the left caudate in inhibiting unwanted responses. Contrary to expectations, we did not evidence prefrontal activations during withholding (as opposed to volunteering) answers. This may reflect our design specifications, but alternative interpretations are put forth.

  11. Impact of sleep loss before learning on cortical dynamics during memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberca-Reina, E; Cantero, J L; Atienza, M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence shows that sleep loss before learning decreases activation of the hippocampus during encoding and promotes forgetting. But it remains to be determined which neural systems are functionally affected during memory retrieval after one night of recovery sleep. To investigate this issue, we evaluated memory for pairs of famous people's faces with the same or different profession (i.e., semantically congruent or incongruent faces) after one night of undisturbed sleep in subjects who either underwent 4hours of acute sleep restriction (ASR, N=20) or who slept 8hours the pre-training night (controls, N=20). EEG recordings were collected during the recognition memory task in both groups, and the cortical sources generating this activity localized by applying a spatial beamforming filter in the frequency domain. Even though sleep restriction did not affect accuracy of memory performance, controls showed a much larger decrease of alpha power relative to a baseline period when compared to sleep-deprived subjects. These group differences affected a widespread frontotemporoparietal network involved in retrieval of episodic/semantic memories. Regression analyses further revealed that associative memory in the ASR group was negatively correlated with alpha power in the occipital regions, whereas the benefit of congruency in the same group was positively correlated with delta power in the left lateral prefrontal cortex. Retrieval-related decreases of alpha power have been associated with the reactivation of material-specific memory representations, whereas increases of delta power have been related to inhibition of interferences that may affect the performance of the task. We can therefore draw the conclusion that a few hours of sleep loss in the pre-training night, though insufficient to change the memory performance, is sufficient to alter the processes involved in retrieving and manipulating episodic and semantic information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Multitasking associative networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Elena; Barra, Adriano; Galluzzi, Andrea; Guerra, Francesco; Moauro, Francesco

    2012-12-28

    We introduce a bipartite, diluted and frustrated, network as a sparse restricted Boltzmann machine and we show its thermodynamical equivalence to an associative working memory able to retrieve several patterns in parallel without falling into spurious states typical of classical neural networks. We focus on systems processing in parallel a finite (up to logarithmic growth in the volume) amount of patterns, mirroring the low-level storage of standard Amit-Gutfreund-Sompolinsky theory. Results obtained through statistical mechanics, the signal-to-noise technique, and Monte Carlo simulations are overall in perfect agreement and carry interesting biological insights. Indeed, these associative networks pave new perspectives in the understanding of multitasking features expressed by complex systems, e.g., neural and immune networks.

  13. Assessing concept selection for video retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, B.; Hofmann, K.; de Rijke, M.

    2008-01-01

    We explore the use of benchmarks to address the problem of assessing concept selection in video retrieval systems. Two benchmarks are presented, one created by human association of queries to concepts, the other generated from an extensively tagged collection. They are compared in terms of

  14. How are depression and autobiographical memory retrieval related to culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dritschel, Barbara; Kao, Chih-Mei; Astell, Arlene; Neufeind, Julia; Lai, Te-Jen

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated how culture influences the association between autobiographical memory retrieval and depression. Thirty clinically depressed patients and 30 controls, 15 each from Britain and Taiwan, completed the English and Chinese versions of the Autobiographical Memory Cueing Task (AMT). Overall, the depressed individuals from both cultural groups retrieved significantly fewer specific and more categoric autobiographical memories than their matched, nondepressed controls. Within the control groups, the British participants retrieved significantly more specific autobiographical memories and fewer categoric memories than their Taiwanese counterparts. These results suggest that difficulty in retrieving specific autobiographical memories typical of depression may be a cognitive bias that occurs across cultures.

  15. Global attractor alphabet of neural firing modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, Yoram

    2013-08-01

    The elementary set, or alphabet, of neural firing modes is derived from the widely accepted conductance-based rectified firing-rate model. The firing dynamics of interacting neurons are shown to be governed by a multidimensional bilinear threshold discrete iteration map. The parameter-dependent global attractors of the map morph into 12 attractor types. Consistent with the dynamic modes observed in biological neuronal firing, the global attractor alphabet is highly visual and intuitive in the scalar, single-neuron case. As synapse permeability varies from high depression to high potentiation, the global attractor type varies from chaotic to multiplexed, oscillatory, fixed, and saturated. As membrane permeability decreases, the global attractor transforms from active to passive state. Under the same activation, learning and retrieval end at the same global attractor. The bilinear threshold structure of the multidimensional map associated with interacting neurons generalizes the global attractor alphabet of neuronal firing modes to multineuron systems. Selective positive or negative activation and neural interaction yield combinatorial revelation and concealment of stored neuronal global attractors.

  16. Frontolimbic Neural Circuit Changes in Emotional Processing and Inhibitory Control Associated With Clinical Improvement Following Transference-Focused Psychotherapy in Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L.; Vago, David R.; Pan, Hong; Root, James; Tuescher, Oliver; Fuchs, Benjamin H.; Leung, Lorene; Epstein, Jane; Cain, Nicole M.; Clarkin, John F.; Lenzenweger, Mark F.; Kernberg, Otto F.; Levy, Kenneth N.; Silbersweig, David A.; Stern, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Aim Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by self-regulation deficits, including impulsivity and affective lability. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) is an evidence-based treatment proven to reduce symptoms across multiple cognitive-emotional domains in BPD. This pilot study aims to investigate neural activation associated with, and predictive of, clinical improvement in emotional and behavioral regulation in BPD following TFP. Methods BPD subjects (N=10) were scanned pre- and post-TFP treatment using a within-subjects design. A disorder-specific emotional-linguistic go/no-go fMRI paradigm was used to probe the interaction between negative emotional processing and inhibitory control. Results Analyses demonstrated significant treatment-related effects with relative increased dorsal prefrontal (dorsal anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices) activation, and relative decreased ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal activation following treatment. Clinical improvement in constraint correlated positively with relative increased left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex activation. Clinical improvement in affective lability correlated positively with left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum activation, and negatively with right amygdala/parahippocampal activation. Post-treatment improvements in constraint were predicted by pre-treatment right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex hypoactivation, and pre-treatment left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum hypoactivation predicted improvements in affective lability. Conclusions These preliminary findings demonstrate potential TFP-associated alterations in frontolimbic circuitry and begin to identify neural mechanisms associated with a psychodynamically-oriented psychotherapy. PMID:26289141

  17. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Phase I Retrieval Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD, K.M.

    2000-09-28

    From 1970 to 1987, TRU and suspect TRU wastes at Hanford were placed in the SWBG. At the time of placement in the SWBG these wastes were not regulated under existing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations, since they were generated and disposed of prior to the effective date of RCRA at the Hanford Site (1987). From the standpoint of DOE Order 5820.2A1, the TRU wastes are considered retrievably stored, and current plans are to retrieve these wastes for shipment to WIPP for disposal. This plan provides a strategy for the Phase I retrieval that meets the intent of TPA milestone M-91 and Project W-113, and incorporates the lessons learned during TRU retrieval campaigns at Hanford, LANL, and SRS. As in the original Project W-113 plans, the current plan calls for examination of approximately 10,000 suspect-TRU drums located in the 218-W-4C burial ground followed by the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Unlike the older plan, however, this plan proposes an open-air retrieval scenario similar to those used for TRU drum retrieval at LANL and SRS. Phase I retrieval consists of the activities associated with the assessment of approximately 10,000 55-gallon drums of suspect TRU-waste in burial ground 218-W-4C and the retrieval of those drums verified to contain TRU waste. Four of the trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 1, 4, 20, and 29) are prime candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain large numbers of suspect TRU drums, stacked from 2 to 5 drums high, on an asphalt pad. In fact, three of the trenches (Trenches 1 , 20, and 29) contain waste that has not been covered with soil, and about 1500 drums can be retrieved without excavation. The other three trenches in 218-W-4C (Trenches 7, 19, and 24) are not candidates for Phase I retrieval because they contain significant numbers of boxes. Drums will be retrieved from the four candidate trenches, checked for structural integrity, overpacked, if necessary, and assayed at the burial

  18. Ultraspectral Sounding Retrieval Error Budget and Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The ultraspectral infrared radiances obtained from satellite observations provide atmospheric, surface, and/or cloud information. The intent of the measurement of the thermodynamic state is the initialization of weather and climate models. Great effort has been given to retrieving and validating these atmospheric, surface, and/or cloud properties. Error Consistency Analysis Scheme (ECAS), through fast radiative transfer model (RTM) forward and inverse calculations, has been developed to estimate the error budget in terms of absolute and standard deviation of differences in both spectral radiance and retrieved geophysical parameter domains. The retrieval error is assessed through ECAS without assistance of other independent measurements such as radiosonde data. ECAS re-evaluates instrument random noise, and establishes the link between radiometric accuracy and retrieved geophysical parameter accuracy. ECAS can be applied to measurements of any ultraspectral instrument and any retrieval scheme with associated RTM. In this paper, ECAS is described and demonstration is made with the measurements of the METOP-A satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)..

  19. Information, conservation and retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, T. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Norberg, E. [National Swedish Archives, Stockholm (Sweden); Torbacke, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History; Jensen, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The seminar took place on the Swedish ship for transportation of radioactive wastes, M/S Sigyn, which at summer time is used for exhibitions. The seminar treated items related to general information needs in society and questions related to radioactive waste, i.e. how knowledge about a waste repository should be passed on to future generations. Three contributions are contained in the report from the seminar and are indexed separately: `Active preservation - otherwise no achieves`; `The conservation and dissemination of information - A democratic issue`; and, `Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories`.

  20. Multimedia Information Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Rueger, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    At its very core multimedia information retrieval means the process of searching for and finding multimedia documents; the corresponding research field is concerned with building the best possible multimedia search engines. The intriguing bit here is that the query itself can be a multimedia excerpt: For example, when you walk around in an unknown place and stumble across an interesting landmark, would it not be great if you could just take a picture with your mobile phone and send it to a service that finds a similar picture in a database and tells you more about the building -- and about its

  1. Music retrieval in ICOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterle, Lutz; Fischer, Stephan; Rimac, Ivica; Steinmetz, Ralf

    1999-08-01

    In this paper we describe music retrieval in ICOR, a project of Darmstadt TU. It is the goal of ICOR to find new interfaces to support applications of music video and music CDs. Although the project consists of audio and video analysis we concentrate on a description of the audio algorithms in this paper. We describe our MPEG-7 like data structure to store meta information for music pieces and explain which algorithms we use to analyze the content of music pieces automatically. We currently use an applause detection to distinguish live music from studio recordings, a genre classifier to distinguish pieces with beats form classical music, and a singer recognition.

  2. Maladaptive Sexual Behavior Following Concurrent Methamphetamine and Sexual Experience in Male Rats is Associated with Altered Neural Activity in Frontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Lindsey B; Frohmader, Karla S; Coolen, Lique M

    2017-09-01

    The use of psychostimulants is often associated with hypersexuality, and psychostimulant users have identified the effects of drug on sexual behavior as a reason for further use. It was previously demonstrated in male rats that methamphetamine (Meth), when administered concurrently with sexual behavior results in impairment of inhibition of sexual behavior in a conditioned sex aversion (CSA) paradigm where mating is paired with illness. This is indicative of maladaptive sex behavior following Meth and sex experience. The present study examined the neural pathways activated during inhibition of sexual behavior in male rats and the effects of concurrent Meth and sexual behavior on neural activity, using ERK phosphorylation (pERK). First, exposure to conditioned aversive stimuli in males trained to inhibit sexual behavior in the CSA paradigm increased pERK expression in medial prefrontal (mPFC), orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and areas in striatum and amygdala. Second, effects of concurrent Meth and sex experience were tested in males that were exposed to four daily sessions of concurrent Meth (1 mg/kg) or saline and mating and subsequently exposed to CSA one week after last treatment. Meth and mating-treated males showed significant impairment of inhibition of mating, higher pERK expression under baseline conditions, and disrupted pERK induction by exposure to the conditioned aversive stimuli in mPFC and OFC. These alterations of pERK occurred in CaMKII-expressing neurons, suggesting changes in efferent projections of these areas. Altogether, these data show that concurrent Meth and mating experience causes maladapative sexual behavior that is associated with alterations in neural activation in mPFC and OFC.

  3. Neural basis of the association between depressive symptoms and memory deficits in nondemented subjects: resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chunming; Goveas, Joseph; Wu, Zhilin; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Guangyu; Franczak, Malgorzata; Antuono, Piero G; Jones, Jennifer L; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2012-06-01

    Depressive symptoms often coexist with memory deficits in older adults and also are associated with incident cognitive decline in the elderly. However, little is known about the neural correlates of the association between depressive symptoms and memory deficits in nondemented elderly. Fifteen amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and 20 cognitively normal (CN) subjects completed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) scans. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to test the main effects of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall (RAVLT-DR) scores, and their interaction on the intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity (AFC) network activity. Severer depressive symptoms and memory deficits were found in the aMCI group than in the CN group. Partial correlation analysis identified that the RAVLT-DR scores were significantly correlated with the AFC network in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), dorsomedial and anterior prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), middle occipital gyrus, right inferior parietal cortex, and left middle temporal gyrus (MTG). The GDS scores were positively correlated with the AFC network in the bilateral PCC and MTG, and left DLPFC. The interactive effects of the GDS and RAVLT-DR scores on the AFC network were seen in the bilateral PCC, MTG, and left DLPFC. These findings not only supported that there were interactive neural links between depressive symptoms and memory functions in nondemented elderly at the system level, but also demonstrated that R-fMRI has advantages in investigating the interactive nature of different neural networks involved in complex functions, such as emotion and cognition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Working Memory Retrieval: Contributions of the Left Prefrontal Cortex, the Left Posterior Parietal Cortex, and the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekin, Ilke; McElree, Brian; Staresina, Bernhard P.; Davachi, Lila

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify regions involved in working memory (WM) retrieval. Neural activation was examined in two WM tasks: an item recognition task, which can be mediated by a direct-access retrieval process, and a judgment of recency task that requires a serial search. Dissociations were found in the activation…

  5. Development of an AQUA Based Near-Surface Parameter Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brent; Clayson, Carol Anne

    2010-01-01

    The production of a satellite based turbulent surface flux product relies critically upon the near-surface input parameters. Development of retrieval algorithms for the necessary near-surface variables of wind speed, specific humidity, air temperature, and sea surface temperature has proceeded relatively independent of each another until recently. The use of a neural network approach using Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data in conjunction with a first guess sea surface temperature has led to successful retrieval of all parameters simultaneously. However, SSM/I frequencies lack inherent sensitivity to the sea surface temperature (SST). Recent studies have found improved air temperature and humidity retrievals can be obtained via inclusion of microwave sounding channels weighted in the lower troposphere. The inclusion of SSM/I-like frequencies as well as SST-sensitive microwave channels on AMSR-E along with AMSU-A sounding data onboard the AQUA platform provides an unique opportunity. That is the ability to provide near-simultaneous (in space and time) measurements allowing the retrieval of all the near-surface variables, including SST. This study shows results of a new algorithm designed to take advantage of the unique sampling ability of AQUA based sensors. Results from a neural network based methodology will be shown as compared to in-situ based observations of near-surface variables. Implications for creation of an AQUA based turbulent surface product are also discussed.

  6. Enhanced food anticipatory activity associated with enhanced activation of extrahypothalamic neural pathways in serotonin2C receptor null mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Hsu

    Full Text Available The ability to entrain circadian rhythms to food availability is important for survival. Food-entrained circadian rhythms are characterized by increased locomotor activity in anticipation of food availability (food anticipatory activity. However, the molecular components and neural circuitry underlying the regulation of food anticipatory activity remain unclear. Here we show that serotonin(2C receptor (5-HT2CR null mutant mice subjected to a daytime restricted feeding schedule exhibit enhanced food anticipatory activity compared to wild-type littermates, without phenotypic differences in the impact of restricted feeding on food consumption, body weight loss, or blood glucose levels. Moreover, we show that the enhanced food anticipatory activity in 5-HT2CR null mutant mice develops independent of external light cues and persists during two days of total food deprivation, indicating that food anticipatory activity in 5-HT2CR null mutant mice reflects the locomotor output of a food-entrainable oscillator. Whereas restricted feeding induces c-fos expression to a similar extent in hypothalamic nuclei of wild-type and null mutant animals, it produces enhanced expression in the nucleus accumbens and other extrahypothalamic regions of null mutant mice relative to wild-type subjects. These data suggest that 5-HT2CRs gate food anticipatory activity through mechanisms involving extrahypothalamic neural pathways.

  7. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  8. Neutrosophic Features for Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Salama

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of an Image Retrieval System is to retrieve images that are relevant to the user's request from a large image collection. In this paper, we present texture features for images embedded in the neutrosophic domain. The aim is to extract a set of features to represent the content of each image in the training database to be used for the purpose of retrieving images from the database similar to the image under consideration.

  9. Advanced Topics in Information Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Melucci, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Information retrieval is the science concerned with the effective and efficient retrieval of documents starting from their semantic content. It is employed to fulfill some information need from a large number of digital documents. Given the ever-growing amount of documents available and the heterogeneous data structures used for storage, information retrieval has recently faced and tackled novel applications. In this book, Melucci and Baeza-Yates present a wide-spectrum illustration of recent research results in advanced areas related to information retrieval. Readers will find chapters on e.g

  10. Name Searching and Information Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, P; Thompson, Paul; Dozier, Christopher C.

    1997-01-01

    The main application of name searching has been name matching in a database of names. This paper discusses a different application: improving information retrieval through name recognition. It investigates name recognition accuracy, and the effect on retrieval performance of indexing and searching personal names differently from non-name terms in the context of ranked retrieval. The main conclusions are: that name recognition in text can be effective; that names occur frequently enough in a variety of domains, including those of legal documents and news databases, to make recognition worthwhile; and that retrieval performance can be improved using name searching.

  11. Changing Information Retrieval Behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantiou, Ioanna D.; Lehrer, Christiane; Hess, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of smartphones and the accompanying profusion of mobile data services have had a profound effect on individuals' lives. One of the most influential service categories is location-based services (LBS). Based on insights from behavioural decision-making, a conceptual framework...... is developed to analyse individuals' decisions to use LBS, focusing on the cognitive processes involved in the decision-making. Our research is based on two studies. First, we investigate the use of LBS through semi-structured interviews of smartphone users. Second, we explore daily LBS use through a study...... on the continuance of LBS use and indicate changes in individuals' information retrieval behaviours in everyday life. In particular, the distinct value dimension of LBS in specific contexts of use changes individuals' behaviours towards accessing location-related information....

  12. [Effects of Chinese herbal medicine Shenxiong Yujing Granule on regeneration of neural cells in rats with diabetes-associated cerebral ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Wu, Li-min; Han, Ming-xiang; Yang, Wen-ming; Xie, Dao-jun; Fang, Zhao-hui; Chu, Dan-chen; Fang, Fang

    2012-10-01

    To establish a rat model of diabetes-associated cerebral ischemia due to qi and yin deficiency and blood stasis, and to investigate the effects of Radix Ginseng, Rhizoma Chuanxiong, Rhizoma Polygonati Odorati and Rhizoma Polygonati Sibirici Granule (Shenxiong Yujing Granule), which has the function of strengthening qi, nourishing yin, and activating blood, on proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural cells in rats with diabetes-associated cerebral ischemia. Rats were divided into sham-operation, diabetes plus ischemia reperfusion injury model, Shenxiong Yujing Granule and Radix Ginseng and Rhizoma Chuanxiong Granule (Shenxiong Granule) groups with 20 rats in each. The 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay and immunohistochemical method were used to investigate the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural cells in dentate gyrus of rats with diabetes-associated cerebral ischemia. The number of newly proliferating cells in subgranular zone of dentate gyrus was increased in the model group, but there was no significant difference compared with 7 day treatment with Shenxiong Yujing Granule. Shenxiong Yujing Granule significantly increased the survival rate and promoted the differentiation of newly proliferating neurons after 21-day treatment (P<0.01). In addition, the beneficial effect of Shenxiong Yujing Granule was considerably greater than that of the Shenxiong Granule (P<0.01). Shenxiong Yujing Granule can increase the survival rate and promote the differentiation of newly proliferating neurons in rats with diabetes-associated cerebral ischemia of dual deficiency of qi and yin and blood stasis obstructing the collaterals. The effect is greater than that of Shenxiong Granule.

  13. Auto-Associative Recurrent Neural Networks and Long Term Dependencies in Novelty Detection for Audio Surveillance Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A.; Montefoschi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Diligenti, M.; Festucci, C.

    2017-10-01

    Machine Learning applied to Automatic Audio Surveillance has been attracting increasing attention in recent years. In spite of several investigations based on a large number of different approaches, little attention had been paid to the environmental temporal evolution of the input signal. In this work, we propose an exploration in this direction comparing the temporal correlations extracted at the feature level with the one learned by a representational structure. To this aim we analysed the prediction performances of a Recurrent Neural Network architecture varying the length of the processed input sequence and the size of the time window used in the feature extraction. Results corroborated the hypothesis that sequential models work better when dealing with data characterized by temporal order. However, so far the optimization of the temporal dimension remains an open issue.

  14. Association of Irritability and Anxiety With the Neural Mechanisms of Implicit Face Emotion Processing in Youths With Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Joel; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Kim, Pilyoung; Chen, Gang; Yi, Jennifer; Donahue, Laura; Brotman, Melissa A; Towbin, Kenneth E; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity complicates clinical care and confounds efforts to elucidate the pathophysiology of commonly occurring symptoms in youths. To our knowledge, few studies have simultaneously assessed the effect of 2 continuously distributed traits on brain-behavior relationships in children with psychopathology. To determine shared and unique effects of 2 major dimensions of child psychopathology, irritability and anxiety, on neural responses to facial emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Cross-sectional functional magnetic resonance imaging study in a large, well-characterized clinical sample at a research clinic at the National Institute of Mental Health. The referred sample included youths ages 8 to 17 years, 93 youths with anxiety, disruptive mood dysregulation, and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders and 22 healthy youths. The child's irritability and anxiety were rated by both parent and child on the Affective Reactivity Index and Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, respectively. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, neural response was measured across the brain during gender labeling of varying intensities of angry, happy, or fearful face emotions. In mixed-effects analyses, the shared and unique effects of irritability and anxiety were tested on amygdala functional connectivity and activation to face emotions. The mean (SD) age of participants was 13.2 (2.6) years; of the 115 included, 64 were male. Irritability and/or anxiety influenced amygdala connectivity to the prefrontal and temporal cortex. Specifically, irritability and anxiety jointly influenced left amygdala to left medial prefrontal cortex connectivity during face emotion viewing (F4,888 = 9.20; P emotions in several areas (F2, 888 ≥ 13.45; all P emotion dysregulation when very anxious and irritable youth process threat-related faces. Activation in the ventral visual circuitry suggests a mechanism through which signals of social approach

  15. Testing native language neural commitment at the brainstem level: A cross-linguistic investigation of the association between frequency-following response and speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Luodi; Zhang, Yang

    2017-12-12

    A current topic in auditory neurophysiology is how brainstem sensory coding contributes to higher-level perceptual, linguistic and cognitive skills. This cross-language study was designed to compare frequency following responses (FFRs) for lexical tones in tonal (Mandarin Chinese) and non-tonal (English) language users and test the correlational strength between FFRs and behavior as a function of language experience. The behavioral measures were obtained in the Garner paradigm to assess how lexical tones might interfere with vowel category and duration judgement. The FFR results replicated previous findings about between-group differences, showing enhanced pitch tracking responses in the Chinese subjects. The behavioral data from the two subject groups showed that lexical tone variation in the vowel stimuli significantly interfered with vowel identification with a greater effect in the Chinese group. Moreover, the FFRs for lexical tone contours were significantly correlated with the behavioral interference only in the Chinese group. This pattern of language-specific association between speech perception and brainstem-level neural phase-locking of linguistic pitch information provides evidence for a possible native language neural commitment at the subcortical level, highlighting the role of experience-dependent brainstem tuning in influencing subsequent linguistic processing in the adult brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Module for Assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation System for Unique Forecasting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounder radiance data are assimilated into operational modeling systems however the process is computationally expensive and only approximately 1% of available data are assimilated due to data thinning as well as the fact that radiances are restricted to cloud-free fields of view. In contrast, the number of hyperspectral infrared profiles assimilated is much higher since the retrieved profiles can be assimilated in some partly cloudy scenes due to profile coupling other data, such as microwave or neural networks, as first guesses to the retrieval process. As the operational data assimilation community attempts to assimilate cloud-affected radiances, it is possible that the use of retrieved profiles might offer an alternative methodology that is less complex and more computationally efficient to solve this problem. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has assimilated hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles into Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulations using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System. Early research at SPoRT demonstrated improved initial conditions when assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) thermodynamic profiles into WRF (using WRF-Var and assigning more appropriate error weighting to the profiles) to improve regional analysis and heavy precipitation forecasts. Successful early work has led to more recent research utilizing WRF and GSI for applications including the assimilation of AIRS profiles to improve WRF forecasts of atmospheric rivers and assimilation of AIRS, Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) profiles to improve model representation of tropopause folds and associated non-convective wind events. Although more hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles can be assimilated into model forecasts, one disadvantage is the retrieved profiles have traditionally been assigned the

  17. Frontolimbic neural circuit changes in emotional processing and inhibitory control associated with clinical improvement following transference-focused psychotherapy in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Vago, David R; Pan, Hong; Root, James; Tuescher, Oliver; Fuchs, Benjamin H; Leung, Lorene; Epstein, Jane; Cain, Nicole M; Clarkin, John F; Lenzenweger, Mark F; Kernberg, Otto F; Levy, Kenneth N; Silbersweig, David A; Stern, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by self-regulation deficits, including impulsivity and affective lability. Transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) is an evidence-based treatment proven to reduce symptoms across multiple cognitive-emotional domains in BPD. This pilot study aimed to investigate neural activation associated with, and predictive of, clinical improvement in emotional and behavioral regulation in BPD following TFP. BPD subjects (n = 10) were scanned pre- and post-TFP treatment using a within-subjects design. A disorder-specific emotional-linguistic go/no-go functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm was used to probe the interaction between negative emotional processing and inhibitory control. Analyses demonstrated significant treatment-related effects with relative increased dorsal prefrontal (dorsal anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, and frontopolar cortices) activation, and relative decreased ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal activation following treatment. Clinical improvement in constraint correlated positively with relative increased left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex activation. Clinical improvement in affective lability correlated positively with left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum activation, and negatively with right amygdala/parahippocampal activation. Post-treatment improvements in constraint were predicted by pre-treatment right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex hypoactivation, and pre-treatment left posterior-medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum hypoactivation predicted improvements in affective lability. These preliminary findings demonstrate potential TFP-associated alterations in frontolimbic circuitry and begin to identify neural mechanisms associated with a psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. Asociación inversa entre asma y defectos del tubo neural: estudio ecológico binacional Inverse association between asthma and neural tube defects: a binational ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario H Vargas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Los donadores de metilo como el ácido fólico previenen defectos del tubo neural (DTN, pero estudios recientes sugieren que también favorecen el desarrollo de asma. En este trabajo exploramos una posible asociación ecológica entre DTN y asma. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se consultaron bases de datos de México y EUA para obtener información sobre distribución geográfica (por estado y tendencia temporal (por año de DTN y asma. RESULTADOS: Los estados con menor frecuencia de DTN tuvieron mayor frecuencia de asma, tanto en México (rS=-0.48, p=0.005 como en EUA (rS=-0.39, p=0.005. Las tendencias temporales también mostraron correlación inversa en México (1997-2007, rS=-0.73, p=0.01 y EUA (1979-1998, rS=-0.91, pOBJECTIVE: Dietary intake of methyl donors such as folic acid prevents neural tube defects (NTD, but recent studies showed that it might also favor the development of asthma. In this work a possible ecological association between NTD and asthma was explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data bases from Mexico and the United States (US were reviewed to obtain information about geographical distribution (by state and temporal trends (by year of NTD and asthma. RESULTS: Those states with the lowest frequency of NTD had the highest frequency of asthma, both in Mexico (rS=-0.48, p=0.005 and US (rS=-0.39, p=0.005. Temporal trends also showed an inverse correlation in Mexico (1997-2007, rS=-0.73, p=0.01 and US (1979-1998, rS=-0.91, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In both countries the frequency of asthma inversely correlated with the frequency of NTD, both in geographical distribution and annual trends, giving support to the possibility that methyl donors intake in diet or supplements is influencing the asthma frequency.

  19. Passage Retrieval: A Probabilistic Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Massimo

    1998-01-01

    Presents a probabilistic technique to retrieve passages from texts having a large size or heterogeneous semantic content. Results of experiments comparing the probabilistic technique to one based on a text segmentation algorithm revealed that the passage size affects passage retrieval performance; text organization and query generality may have an…

  20. Contextual Bandits for Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.; Whiteson, S.; de Rijke, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give an overview of and outlook on research at the intersection of information retrieval (IR) and contextual bandit problems. A critical problem in information retrieval is online learning to rank, where a search engine strives to improve the quality of the ranked result lists it

  1. MOPITT Gridded Monthly CO Retrievals (Thermal Infrared Radiances) V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT L3 files contain daily and monthly mean gridded versions of the daily L2 CO profile and total column retrievals. The averaging kernels associated with...

  2. Object-Centered Knowledge Representation and Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyr, Jiri

    1996-01-01

    Discusses object-centered knowledge representation and information retrieval. Highlights include semantic networks; frames; predicative (declarative) and associative knowledge; cluster analysis; creation of subconcepts and superconcepts; automatic classification; hierarchies and pseudohierarchies; graph theory; term classification; clustering of…

  3. MOPITT Gridded Monthly CO Retrievals (Near Infrared Radiances) V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT L3 files contain daily and monthly mean gridded versions of the daily L2 CO profile and total column retrievals. The averaging kernels associated with...

  4. Data storage and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisman, M; Kalisman, A

    1986-07-01

    The entire face of modern medical and surgical practice is being significantly affected by the application of technologic developments to the practice of surgery--developments that will tie together such areas as information management and processing, robotics, communication networks, and computerized surgical equipment. The achievements in these areas will create a sophisticated, fully automatic system that will assist the plastic surgeon in many aspects of work, such as regular office activities, doctor-patient interaction, professional updating, communication, and even assistance during the operational process itself. It will be as simple as dialing a telephone today. When it is necessary to consult with other colleagues, a combined vocal and visual consulting network in other medical centers as well as consulting computerized expert systems will be available all day and night as part of the communication services. The plastic surgical expert systems will store valuable information, based on the knowledge of the best human experts, on any important subtopics and will be accessed in a very friendly way. This will be an invaluable tool for the residents in training, for emergency room work, and for just getting a second opinion, even for the more experienced practitioner. All the electronic mail, professional magazines, and any other required professional information will flow between central and personal retrieval systems. The doctor, at a desired time in the privacy and comfort of his or her own home or office, can read the mail, make required changes to suit his or her needs, and store, send back, or distribute information, all in a speedy and efficient manner. The simulation of a planned surgery will give the surgeon the ability to prepare and will prevent difficulties during complicated procedures through the luxury of a dry run, without any sequelae if certain expected outcomes fail to materialize. The preprogrammed control of sophisticated surgical

  5. Decoding Episodic Retrieval Processes: Frontoparietal and Medial Temporal Lobe Contributions to Free Recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragel, James E; Polyn, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of recognition memory have identified distinct patterns of cortical activity associated with two sets of cognitive processes: Recollective processes supporting retrieval of information specifying a probe item's original source are associated with the posterior hippocampus, ventral posterior parietal cortex, and medial pFC. Familiarity processes supporting the correct identification of previously studied probes (in the absence of a recollective response) are associated with activity in anterior medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures including the perirhinal cortex and anterior hippocampus, in addition to lateral prefrontal and dorsal posterior parietal cortex. Here, we address an open question in the cognitive neuroscientific literature: To what extent are these same neurocognitive processes engaged during an internally directed memory search task like free recall? We recorded fMRI activity while participants performed a series of free recall and source recognition trials, and we used a combination of univariate and multivariate analysis techniques to compare neural activation profiles across the two tasks. Univariate analyses showed that posterior MTL regions were commonly associated with recollective processes during source recognition and with free recall responses. Prefrontal and posterior parietal regions were commonly associated with familiarity processes and free recall responses, whereas anterior MTL regions were only associated with familiarity processes during recognition. In contrast with the univariate results, free recall activity patterns characterized using multivariate pattern analysis did not reliably match the neural patterns associated with recollective processes. However, these free recall patterns did reliably match patterns associated with familiarity processes, supporting theories of memory in which common cognitive mechanisms support both item recognition and free recall.

  6. Metadata for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Sterca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image retrieval technique that combines content based image retrieval with pre-computed metadata-based image retrieval. The resulting system will have the advantages of both approaches: the speed/efficiency of metadata-based image retrieval and the accuracy/power of content-based image retrieval.

  7. Convolutional neural network approach for enhanced capture of breast parenchymal complexity patterns associated with breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustimov, Andrew; Gastounioti, Aimilia; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Pantalone, Lauren; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2017-03-01

    We assess the feasibility of a parenchymal texture feature fusion approach, utilizing a convolutional neural network (ConvNet) architecture, to benefit breast cancer risk assessment. Hypothesizing that by capturing sparse, subtle interactions between localized motifs present in two-dimensional texture feature maps derived from mammographic images, a multitude of texture feature descriptors can be optimally reduced to five meta-features capable of serving as a basis on which a linear classifier, such as logistic regression, can efficiently assess breast cancer risk. We combine this methodology with our previously validated lattice-based strategy for parenchymal texture analysis and we evaluate the feasibility of this approach in a case-control study with 424 digital mammograms. In a randomized split-sample setting, we optimize our framework in training/validation sets (N=300) and evaluate its descriminatory performance in an independent test set (N=124). The discriminatory capacity is assessed in terms of the the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC). The resulting meta-features exhibited strong classification capability in the test dataset (AUC = 0.90), outperforming conventional, non-fused, texture analysis which previously resulted in an AUC=0.85 on the same case-control dataset. Our results suggest that informative interactions between localized motifs exist and can be extracted and summarized via a fairly simple ConvNet architecture.

  8. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibition of monocyte binding by vascular endothelium is associated with sialylation of neural cell adhesion molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatola, Anna-Maria; Huang, Kui; Naftolin, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium is necessary for atheroma formation. This adhesion requires binding of endothelial neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) to monocyte NCAM. NCAM:NCAM binding is blocked by sialylation of NCAM (polysialylated NCAM; PSA-NCAM). Since estradiol (E2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced PSA-NCAM and decreased monocyte adhesion, in consideration of possible clinical applications we tested whether their prohormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has similar effects. (1) DHEA was administered to cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) from men and women. Monocyte binding was assessed using fluorescence-labeled monocytes. (2) HCEACs were incubated with E2, DHT, DHEA alone, or with trilostane, fulvestrant or flutamide. Expression of PSA-NCAM was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibited monocyte adhesion to HCAECs by ≥50% (P DHEA's inhibition of monocyte binding appeared to be gender dependent. The DHEA-induced expression of PSA-NCAM was completely blocked by trilostane. In these preliminary in vitro studies, DHEA increased PSA-NCAM expression and inhibited monocyte binding in an estrogen- and androgen receptor-dependent manner. Dehydroepiandrosteroneappears to act via its end metabolites, E2 and DHT. Dehydroepiandrosterone could furnish clinical prevention against atherogenesis and arteriosclerosis.

  9. Early life social stress induced changes in depression and anxiety associated neural pathways which are correlated with impaired maternal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgatroyd, Christopher A; Peña, Catherine J; Podda, Giovanni; Nestler, Eric J; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2015-08-01

    Exposures to various types of early life stress can be robust predictors of the development of psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. The objective of the current study was to investigate the roles of the translationally relevant targets of central vasopressin, oxytocin, ghrelin, orexin, glucocorticoid, and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway in an early chronic social stress (ECSS) based rodent model of postpartum depression and anxiety. The present study reports novel changes in gene expression and extracellular signal related kinase (ERK) protein levels in the brains of ECSS exposed rat dams that display previously reported depressed maternal care and increased maternal anxiety. Decreases in oxytocin, orexin, and ERK proteins, increases in ghrelin receptor, glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNA levels, and bidirectional changes in vasopressin underscore related work on the adverse long-term effects of early life stress on neural activity and plasticity, maternal behavior, responses to stress, and depression and anxiety-related behavior. The differences in gene and protein expression and robust correlations between expression and maternal care and anxiety support increased focus on these targets in animal and clinical studies of the adverse effects of early life stress, especially those focusing on depression and anxiety in mothers and the transgenerational effects of these disorders on offspring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Neural Correlates of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tiffany A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral analyses are a natural choice for understanding the wide-ranging behavioral consequences of racial stereotyping and prejudice. However, neuroimaging and electrophysiological research has recently considered the neural mechanisms that underlie racial categorization and the activation and application of racial stereotypes and prejudice, revealing exciting new insights. Work reviewed here points to the importance of neural structures previously associated with face processing, semantic knowledge activation, evaluation, and self-regulatory behavioral control, allowing for the specification of a neural model of race processing. We show how research on the neural correlates of race can serve to link otherwise disparate lines of evidence on the neural underpinnings of a broad array of social-cognitive phenomena, and consider implications for effecting change in race relations. PMID:19896410

  11. Uncertainty Assessment of Space-Borne Passive Soil Moisture Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quets, Jan; De Lannoy, Gabrielle; Reichle, Rolf; Cosh, Michael; van der Schalie, Robin; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The uncertainty associated with passive soil moisture retrieval is hard to quantify, and known to be underlain by various, diverse, and complex causes. Factors affecting space-borne retrieved soil moisture estimation include: (i) the optimization or inversion method applied to the radiative transfer model (RTM), such as e.g. the Single Channel Algorithm (SCA), or the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), (ii) the selection of the observed brightness temperatures (Tbs), e.g. polarization and incidence angle, (iii) the definition of the cost function and the impact of prior information in it, and (iv) the RTM parameterization (e.g. parameterizations officially used by the SMOS L2 and SMAP L2 retrieval products, ECMWF-based SMOS assimilation product, SMAP L4 assimilation product, and perturbations from those configurations). This study aims at disentangling the relative importance of the above-mentioned sources of uncertainty, by carrying out soil moisture retrieval experiments, using SMOS Tb observations in different settings, of which some are mentioned above. The ensemble uncertainties are evaluated at 11 reference CalVal sites, over a time period of more than 5 years. These experimental retrievals were inter-compared, and further confronted with in situ soil moisture measurements and operational SMOS L2 retrievals, using commonly used skill metrics to quantify the temporal uncertainty in the retrievals.

  12. Episodic Memory Retrieval Benefits from a Less Modular Brain Network Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J; Wang, Siliang; Rissman, Jesse

    2017-03-29

    Most complex cognitive tasks require the coordinated interplay of multiple brain networks, but the act of retrieving an episodic memory may place especially heavy demands for communication between the frontoparietal control network (FPCN) and the default mode network (DMN), two networks that do not strongly interact with one another in many task contexts. We applied graph theoretical analysis to task-related fMRI functional connectivity data from 20 human participants and found that global brain modularity-a measure of network segregation-is markedly reduced during episodic memory retrieval relative to closely matched analogical reasoning and visuospatial perception tasks. Individual differences in modularity were correlated with memory task performance, such that lower modularity levels were associated with a lower false alarm rate. Moreover, the FPCN and DMN showed significantly elevated coupling with each other during the memory task, which correlated with the global reduction in brain modularity. Both networks also strengthened their functional connectivity with the hippocampus during the memory task. Together, these results provide a novel demonstration that reduced modularity is conducive to effective episodic retrieval, which requires close collaboration between goal-directed control processes supported by the FPCN and internally oriented self-referential processing supported by the DMN.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Modularity, an index of the degree to which nodes of a complex system are organized into discrete communities, has emerged as an important construct in the characterization of brain connectivity dynamics. We provide novel evidence that the modularity of the human brain is reduced when individuals engage in episodic memory retrieval, relative to other cognitive tasks, and that this state of lower modularity is associated with improved memory performance. We propose a neural systems mechanism for this finding where the nodes of the frontoparietal control

  13. Neural correlates of the encoding of multimodal contextual features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Lauren J.; Wong, Jenny; de Chastelaine, Marianne; Rugg, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was employed to identify neural regions engaged during the encoding of contextual features belonging to different modalities. Subjects studied objects that were presented to the left or right of fixation. Each object was paired with its name, spoken in either a male or a female voice. The test requirement was to discriminate studied from unstudied pictures and, for each picture judged old, to retrieve its study location and the gender of the voice that spoke its name. Study trials associated with accurate rather than inaccurate location memory demonstrated enhanced activity in the fusiform and parahippocampal cortex and the hippocampus and reduced activity (a negative subsequent memory effect) in the medial occipital cortex. Successful encoding of voice information was associated with enhanced study activity in the right middle superior temporal sulcus and activity reduction in the right superior frontal cortex. These findings support the proposal that encoding of a contextual feature is associated with enhanced activity in regions engaged during its online processing. In addition, they indicate that negative subsequent memory effects can also demonstrate feature-selectivity. Relative to other classes of study trials, trials for which both contextual features were later retrieved demonstrated enhanced activity in the lateral occipital complex and reduced activity in the temporo-parietal junction. These findings suggest that multifeatural encoding was facilitated when the study item was processed efficiently and study processing was not interrupted by redirection of attention toward extraneous events. PMID:23166292

  14. The neural bases of the multiplication problem-size effect across countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Jérôme; Lu, Jiayan; Liu, Li; Dong, Qi; Zhou, Xinlin; Booth, James R

    2013-01-01

    Multiplication problems involving large numbers (e.g., 9 × 8) are more difficult to solve than problems involving small numbers (e.g., 2 × 3). Behavioral research indicates that this problem-size effect might be due to different factors across countries and educational systems. However, there is no neuroimaging evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we compared the neural correlates of the multiplication problem-size effect in adults educated in China and the United States. We found a greater neural problem-size effect in Chinese than American participants in bilateral superior temporal regions associated with phonological processing. However, we found a greater neural problem-size effect in American than Chinese participants in right intra-parietal sulcus (IPS) associated with calculation procedures. Therefore, while the multiplication problem-size effect might be a verbal retrieval effect in Chinese as compared to American participants, it may instead stem from the use of calculation procedures in American as compared to Chinese participants. Our results indicate that differences in educational practices might affect the neural bases of symbolic arithmetic.

  15. Mobile medical visual information retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Duc, Samuel; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose mobile access to peer-reviewed medical information based on textual search and content-based visual image retrieval. Web-based interfaces designed for limited screen space were developed to query via web services a medical information retrieval engine optimizing the amount of data to be transferred in wireless form. Visual and textual retrieval engines with state-of-the-art performance were integrated. Results obtained show a good usability of the software. Future use in clinical environments has the potential of increasing quality of patient care through bedside access to the medical literature in context.

  16. Interactive Exploration for Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Fournier

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new version of our content-based image retrieval system RETIN. It is based on adaptive quantization of the color space, together with new features aiming at representing the spatial relationship between colors. Color analysis is also extended to texture. Using these powerful indexes, an original interactive retrieval strategy is introduced. The process is based on two steps for handling the retrieval of very large image categories. First, a controlled exploration method of the database is presented. Second, a relevance feedback method based on statistical learning is proposed. All the steps are evaluated by experiments on a generalist database.

  17. Pattern recognition via synchronization in phase-locked loop neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppensteadt, F C; Izhikevich, E M

    2000-01-01

    We propose a novel architecture of an oscillatory neural network that consists of phase-locked loop (PLL) circuits. It stores and retrieves complex oscillatory patterns as synchronized states with appropriate phase relations between neurons.

  18. Association of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms with diabetic foot ulcers and application of artificial neural network in DFU risk assessment in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Agrawal, Neeraj K; Gupta, Sanjeev K; Singh, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-Like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in immunity, tissue repair, and regeneration. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the association of TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4986790, rs4986791, rs11536858 (merged into rs10759931), rs1927911, and rs1927914 with increased diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). PCR-RFLP was used for genotyping TLR4 SNPs in 125 T2DM patients with DFU and 130 controls. The haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium between the SNPs were determined using Haploview software. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) modeling was done to observe their predictability for the risk of DFU in T2DM patients. Risk genotypes of all SNPs except rs1927914 were significantly associated with DFU. Haplotype ACATC (P value = 9.3E - 5) showed strong association with DFU risk. Two haplotypes ATATC (P value = 0.0119) and ATGTT (P value = 0.0087) were found to be protective against DFU. In conclusion TLR4 SNPs and their haplotypes may increase the risk of impairment of wound healing in T2DM patients. ANN model (83%) is found to be better than the MLR model (76%) and can be used as a tool for the DFU risk assessment in T2DM patients.

  19. Association of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Polymorphisms with Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Application of Artificial Neural Network in DFU Risk Assessment in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanhaiya Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Toll-Like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays an important role in immunity, tissue repair, and regeneration. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the association of TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs4986790, rs4986791, rs11536858 (merged into rs10759931, rs1927911, and rs1927914 with increased diabetic foot ulcer (DFU risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. PCR-RFLP was used for genotyping TLR4 SNPs in 125 T2DM patients with DFU and 130 controls. The haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium between the SNPs were determined using Haploview software. Multivariate linear regression (MLR and artificial neural network (ANN modeling was done to observe their predictability for the risk of DFU in T2DM patients. Risk genotypes of all SNPs except rs1927914 were significantly associated with DFU. Haplotype ACATC (P value = 9.3E-5 showed strong association with DFU risk. Two haplotypes ATATC (P value = 0.0119 and ATGTT (P value = 0.0087 were found to be protective against DFU. In conclusion TLR4 SNPs and their haplotypes may increase the risk of impairment of wound healing in T2DM patients. ANN model (83% is found to be better than the MLR model (76% and can be used as a tool for the DFU risk assessment in T2DM patients.

  20. Memory structures for encoding and retrieving a piece of music: an ERP investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamon, Aaron; Egner, Tobias

    2004-12-01

    This study examined behavioral and neural correlates of expert musical memory, specifically the hypothesis that particular bars within a complex piece of music would serve as structural markers for encoding to and retrieval from memory. Six pianists were asked to learn and memorize a set prelude by J.S. Bach for performance, and to identify bars that they employed for structuring the prelude into component sections. Following performance from memory, the participants took part in a visual recognition memory task, in which single bars from the prelude had to be distinguished from matched new bars. During the recognition task, the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, and event-related potentials (ERPs) from correctly identified prelude stimulus trials were averaged according to their hypothesized status into "structural" and "nonstructural" bars. The results showed that correct identification of structural bars was significantly faster (and tended to display higher accuracy) than recognition of non-structural ones. In addition, recognition of structural bars was associated with a significantly greater negative ERP peak of 300-400 ms latency and a right centro-parietal scalp distribution. This mid-latency negativity appears to index processing of stimuli that served as cues for encoding and retrieval of a complex semantic structure, and is qualitatively and conceptually different from other previously identified recognition memory ERPs (such as the "old/new" effect), as well as from the classic N400 ERP. The data support existing theories of expert memory and music cognition.

  1. Retrieved Latent Heating from TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Smith, Eric A.; Houze Jr, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The global hydrological cycle is central to the Earth's climate system, with rainfall and the physics of precipitation formation acting as the key links in the cycle. Two-thirds of global rainfall occurs in the tropics with the associated latent heating (LH) accounting for three-fourths of the total heat energy available to the Earth's atmosphere. In addition, fresh water provided by tropical rainfall and its variability exerts a large impact upon the structure and motions of the upper ocean layer. In the last decade, it has been established that standard products of LH from satellite measurements, particularly TRMM measurements, would be a valuable resource for scientific research and applications. Such products would enable new insights and investigations concerning the complexities of convection system life cycles, the diabatic heating controls and feedbacks related to meso-synoptic circulations and their forecasting, the relationship of tropical patterns of LH to the global circulation and climate, and strategies for improving cloud parameterizations in environmental prediction models. The status of retrieved TRMM LH products, TRMM LH inter-comparison and validation project, current TRMM LH applications and critic issues/action items (based on previous five TRMM LH workshops) is presented in this article.

  2. Listening for recollection: a multi-voxel pattern analysis of recognition memory retrieval strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel R Quamme

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of recognition memory indicate that subjects can strategically vary how much they rely on recollection of specific details vs. feelings of familiarity when making recognition judgments. One possible explanation of these results is that subjects can establish an internally-directed attentional state (listening for recollection that enhances retrieval of studied details; fluctuations in this attentional state over time should be associated with fluctuations in subjects' recognition behavior. In this study, we used multi-voxel pattern analysis of fMRI data to identify brain regions that are involved in listening for recollection. Specifically, we looked for brain regions that met the following criteria: 1 Distinct neural patterns should be present when subjects are instructed to rely on recollection vs. familiarity, and 2 fluctuations in these neural patterns should be related to recognition behavior in the manner predicted by dual-process theories of recognition: Specifically, the presence of the recollection pattern during the pre-stimulus interval (indicating that subjects are listening for recollection at that moment should be associated with a selective decrease in false alarms to related lures. We found that pre-stimulus activity in the right supramarginal gyrus met all of these criteria, suggesting that this region proactively establishes an internally-directed attentional state that fosters recollection. We also found other regions (e.g., left middle temporal gyrus where the pattern of neural activity was related to subjects’ responding to related lures after stimulus onset (but not before, suggesting that these regions implement processes that are engaged in a reactive fashion to boost recollection.

  3. Topic structure for information retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, J.; Sanderson, M.; Zhai, C.; Zobel, J.; Allan, J.; Aslam, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In my research, I propose a coherence measure, with the goal of discovering and using topic structures within and between documents, of which I explore its extensions and applications in information retrieval.

  4. Ontology-based Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styltsvig, Henrik Bulskov

    In this thesis, we will present methods for introducing ontologies in information retrieval. The main hypothesis is that the inclusion of conceptual knowledge such as ontologies in the information retrieval process can contribute to the solution of major problems currently found in information...... retrieval. This utilization of ontologies has a number of challenges. Our focus is on the use of similarity measures derived from the knowledge about relations between concepts in ontologies, the recognition of semantic information in texts and the mapping of this knowledge into the ontologies in use......, as well as how to fuse together the ideas of ontological similarity and ontological indexing into a realistic information retrieval scenario. To achieve the recognition of semantic knowledge in a text, shallow natural language processing is used during indexing that reveals knowledge to the level of noun...

  5. Hooked on Music Information Retrieval

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    W. Bas de Haas; Frans Wiering

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a reply to 'Lure(d) into listening: The potential of cognition-based music information retrieval,' in which Henkjan Honing discusses the potential impact of his proposed Listen, Lure...

  6. Hooked on Music Information Retrieval

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Haas, W Bas

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a reply to 'Lure(d) into listening: The potential of cognition-based music information retrieval,' in which Henkjan Honing discusses the potential impact of his proposed Listen, Lure...

  7. A neural algorithm for a fundamental computing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sanjoy; Stevens, Charles F; Navlakha, Saket

    2017-11-10

    Similarity search-for example, identifying similar images in a database or similar documents on the web-is a fundamental computing problem faced by large-scale information retrieval systems. We discovered that the fruit fly olfactory circuit solves this problem with a variant of a computer science algorithm (called locality-sensitive hashing). The fly circuit assigns similar neural activity patterns to similar odors, so that behaviors learned from one odor can be applied when a similar odor is experienced. The fly algorithm, however, uses three computational strategies that depart from traditional approaches. These strategies can be translated to improve the performance of computational similarity searches. This perspective helps illuminate the logic supporting an important sensory function and provides a conceptually new algorithm for solving a fundamental computational problem. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  8. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  9. The Text Retrieval Conferences (TRECs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    pertinent facts related to the science of hydroponics . Related information includes, but is not limited to, the history of hydroponics , advantages ...312 <title> Hydroponics <desc> Description: Document will discuss the science of growing plants in water or some substance other than soil... advantage of not requiring complicated segmentation schemes. A confounding factor in the analysis of the retrieval results was that the retrieval

  10. Changes in the neural bases of emotion regulation associated with clinical improvement in children with behavior problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.D.; Granic, I.; Lamm, C.; Zelazo, P.D.; Stieben, J.; Todd, R.M.; Moadab, I.; Pepler, D.

    2008-01-01

    Children's behavior problems may stem from ineffective cortical mechanisms for regulating negative emotions, and the success of interventions may depend on their impact on such mechanisms. We examined neurophysiological markers associated with emotion regulation in children comorbid for

  11. The GRAPE aerosol retrieval algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol component of the Oxford-Rutherford Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC combined cloud and aerosol retrieval scheme is described and the theoretical performance of the algorithm is analysed. ORAC is an optimal estimation retrieval scheme for deriving cloud and aerosol properties from measurements made by imaging satellite radiometers and, when applied to cloud free radiances, provides estimates of aerosol optical depth at a wavelength of 550 nm, aerosol effective radius and surface reflectance at 550 nm. The aerosol retrieval component of ORAC has several incarnations – this paper addresses the version which operates in conjunction with the cloud retrieval component of ORAC (described by Watts et al., 1998, as applied in producing the Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE data-set.

    The algorithm is described in detail and its performance examined. This includes a discussion of errors resulting from the formulation of the forward model, sensitivity of the retrieval to the measurements and a priori constraints, and errors resulting from assumptions made about the atmospheric/surface state.

  12. Image migration: measured retrieval rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert M.

    2007-03-01

    When the Indianapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center changed Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) vendors, we chose to use "on demand" image migration as the more cost effective solution. The legacy PACS stores the image data on optical disks in multi-platter jukeboxes. The estimated size of the legacy image data is about 5 terabytes containing studies from ~1997 to ~2003. Both the legacy and the new PACS support a manual DICOM query/retrieve. We implemented workflow rules to determine when to fetch the relevant priors from the legacy PACS. When a patient presents for a new radiology study, we used the following rules to initiate the manual DICOM query/retrieve. For general radiography we retrieved the two most recent prior examinations and for the modalities MR and CT we retrieved the clinically relevant prior examinations. We monitored the number of studies retrieved each week for about a 12 month period. For our facility which performs about 70,000 radiology examinations per year, we observed an essentially constant retrieval rate of slightly less than 50 studies per week. Some explanations for what may be considered an anomalous result maybe related to the fact that we are a tertiary care facility and a teaching hospital.

  13. Video databases: automatic retrieval based on content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolle, R. M.; Yeo, B.-L.; Yeung, M.

    Digital video databases are becoming more and more pervasive and finding video of interest in large databases is rapidly becoming a problem. Intelligent means of quick content-based video retrieval and content-based rapid video viewing is, therefore, an important topic of research. Video is a rich source of data, it contains visual and audio information, and in many cases, there is text associated with the video. Content-based video retrieval should use all this information in an efficient and effective way. From a human perspective, a video query can be viewed as an iterated sequence of navigating, searching, browsing, and viewing. This paper addresses video search in terms of these phases.

  14. Maladaptive Plasticity in Aphasia: Brain Activation Maps Underlying Verb Retrieval Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Kerstin; Durand, Edith; Marcotte, Karine; Ansaldo, Ana Inés

    2016-01-01

    Anomia, or impaired word retrieval, is the most widespread symptom of aphasia, an acquired language impairment secondary to brain damage. In the last decades, functional neuroimaging techniques have enabled studying the neural basis underlying anomia and its recovery. The present study aimed to explore maladaptive plasticity in persistent verb anomia, in three male participants with chronic nonfluent aphasia. Brain activation maps associated with semantic verb paraphasia occurring within an oral picture-naming task were identified with an event-related fMRI paradigm. These maps were compared with those obtained in our previous study examining adaptive plasticity (i.e., successful verb naming) in the same participants. The results show that activation patterns related to semantic verb paraphasia and successful verb naming comprise a number of common areas, contributing to both maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms. This finding suggests that the segregation of brain areas provides only a partial view of the neural basis of verb anomia and successful verb naming. Therefore, it indicates the importance of network approaches which may better capture the complexity of maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms in anomia recovery.

  15. A Novel Method of Case Representation and Retrieval in CBR for E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamparia, Aditya; Pandey, Babita

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we have discussed a novel method which has been developed for representation and retrieval of cases in case based reasoning (CBR) as a part of e-learning system which is based on various student features. In this approach we have integrated Artificial Neural Network (ANN) with Data mining (DM) and CBR. ANN is used to find the…

  16. Using a multi-port architecture of neural-net associative memory based on the equivalency paradigm for parallel cluster image analysis and self-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Grabovlyak, Sveta K.; Nikitovich, Diana V.

    2013-01-01

    We consider equivalency models, including matrix-matrix and matrix-tensor and with the dual adaptive-weighted correlation, multi-port neural-net auto-associative and hetero-associative memory (MP NN AAM and HAP), which are equivalency paradigm and the theoretical basis of our work. We make a brief overview of the possible implementations of the MP NN AAM and of their architectures proposed and investigated earlier by us. The main base unit of such architectures is a matrix-matrix or matrix-tensor equivalentor. We show that the MP NN AAM based on the equivalency paradigm and optoelectronic architectures with space-time integration and parallel-serial 2D images processing have advantages such as increased memory capacity (more than ten times of the number of neurons!), high performance in different modes (1010 - 1012 connections per second!) And the ability to process, store and associatively recognize highly correlated images. Next, we show that with minor modifications, such MP NN AAM can be successfully used for highperformance parallel clustering processing of images. We show simulation results of using these modifications for clustering and learning models and algorithms for cluster analysis of specific images and divide them into categories of the array. Show example of a cluster division of 32 images (40x32 pixels) letters and graphics for 12 clusters with simultaneous formation of the output-weighted space allocated images for each cluster. We discuss algorithms for learning and self-learning in such structures and their comparative evaluations based on Mathcad simulations are made. It is shown that, unlike the traditional Kohonen self-organizing maps, time of learning in the proposed structures of multi-port neuronet classifier/clusterizer (MP NN C) on the basis of equivalency paradigm, due to their multi-port, decreases by orders and can be, in some cases, just a few epochs. Estimates show that in the test clustering of 32 1280- element images into 12

  17. Foreign Body Retrieval

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prevent a potentially deadly infection of the nervous system. In some cases, your ... procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed ...

  18. EMIR: A novel emotion-based music retrieval system

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lijuan Marissa; Lin, Hongfei; Gurrin, Cathal

    2012-01-01

    Music is inherently expressive of emotion meaning and affects the mood of people. In this paper, we present a novel EMIR (Emotional Music Information Retrieval) System that uses latent emotion elements both in music and non-descriptive queries (NDQs) to detect implicit emotional association between users and music to enhance Music Information Retrieval (MIR). We try to understand the latent emotional intent of queries via machine learning for emotion classification and compare the performance...

  19. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna L. Bowtell

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCaffeine has been shown to enhance exercise performance and capacity. The mechanisms remain unclear but are suggested to relate to adenosine receptor antagonism, resulting in increased central motor drive, reduced perception of effort, and altered peripheral processes such as enhanced calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We hypothesized that the caffeine-induced extension of exercise capacity during repeated sets of exercise would occur despite greater disturbance of the muscle milieu due to enhanced peripheral and corticospinal excitatory output, central motor drive, and muscle contractility.MethodsNine healthy active young men performed five sets of intense single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure on four separate occasions: for two visits (6 mg·kg−1 caffeine vs placebo, quadriceps 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans were performed to quantify phosphocreatine kinetics and pH, and for the remaining two visits (6 mg·kg−1 caffeine vs placebo, femoral nerve electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the quadriceps cortical motor area were applied pre- and post exercise.ResultsThe total exercise time was 17.9 ± 6.0% longer in the caffeine (1,225 ± 86 s than in the placebo trial (1,049 ± 73 s, p = 0.016, and muscle phosphocreatine concentration and pH (p < 0.05 were significantly lower in the latter sets of exercise after caffeine ingestion. Voluntary activation (VA (peripheral, p = 0.007; but not supraspinal, p = 0.074, motor-evoked potential (MEP amplitude (p = 0.007, and contractility (contraction time, p = 0.009; and relaxation rate, p = 0.003 were significantly higher after caffeine consumption, but at

  20. Local adaptations of two naturally occurring neuronal conductances, gK + (A) and gK + (Ca), allow for associative conditioning and contiguity judgements in artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, J; Woody, C D

    1991-01-01

    Features of two potassium conductances implicated in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes, the slow calcium dependent conductance (gK + (Ca] and the fast transient conductance (gK + (A], were incorporated into a 6 x 6 element artificial neural network. Adaptive algorithms derived from observations of cortical neurons during associative learning changed gK + (A) in proportion to the product of this current and an EPSP-induced second messenger concentration, and changed gK + (Ca) as a function of a spike-induced second messenger concentration. This network concurrently acquired two distinct representations in response to presentation of stimuli: one resembled associative conditioning (defined in terms of its sensitivity to forward pairing vs. simultaneous or backward pairing); the other reflected contiguous pairings of stimuli. The acquisition of one representation did not markedly interfere with acquisition of the other. This network may accordingly serve as an example of a self-organizing system which minimizes the postulated inherent cross talk between functionally dissiminar representations (Minsky and Papert 1988).

  1. Automatic welding quality classification for the spot welding based on the Hopfield associative memory neural network and Chernoff face description of the electrode displacement signal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Hou, Yanyan; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Lijing; Xi, Tao; Li, Yafeng

    2017-02-01

    To develop an automatic welding quality classification method for the spot welding based on the Chernoff face image created by the electrode displacement signal features, an effective pattern feature extraction method was proposed by which the Chernoff face images were converted to binary ones, and each binary image could be characterized by a binary matrix. According to expression categories on the Chernoff face images, welding quality was classified into five levels and each level just corresponded to a kind of expression. The Hopfield associative memory neural network was used to build a welding quality classifier in which the pattern feature matrices of some weld samples with different welding quality levels were remembered as the stable states. When the pattern feature matrix of a test weld is input into the classifier, it can be converged to the most similar stable state through associative memory, thus, welding quality corresponding to this finally locked stable state can represent the welding quality of the test weld. The classification performance test results show that the proposed method significantly improves the applicability and efficiency of the Chernoff faces technique for spot welding quality evaluation and it is feasible, effective and reliable.

  2. Neural Activity Associated with Visual Search for Line Drawings on AAC Displays: An Exploration of the Use of fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Krista M; Dennis, Nancy A; Webb, Christina E; Therrien, Mari; Stradtman, Megan; Farmer, Jacquelyn; Leach, Raevynn; Warrenfeltz, Megan; Zeuner, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Visual aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) consists of books or technologies that contain visual symbols to supplement spoken language. A common observation concerning some forms of aided AAC is that message preparation can be frustratingly slow. We explored the uses of fMRI to examine the neural correlates of visual search for line drawings on AAC displays in 18 college students under two experimental conditions. Under one condition, the location of the icons remained stable and participants were able to learn the spatial layout of the display. Under the other condition, constant shuffling of the locations of the icons prevented participants from learning the layout, impeding rapid search. Brain activation was contrasted under these conditions. Rapid search in the stable display was associated with greater activation of cortical and subcortical regions associated with memory, motor learning, and dorsal visual pathways compared to the search in the unpredictable display. Rapid search for line drawings on stable AAC displays involves not just the conceptual knowledge of the symbol meaning but also the integration of motor, memory, and visual-spatial knowledge about the display layout. Further research must study individuals who use AAC, as well as the functional effect of interventions that promote knowledge about array layout.

  3. A pilot study on the association between rare earth elements in maternal hair and the risk of neural tube defects in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Wenhua; Zhu, Yibing; Li, Zhenjiang; Pang, Yiming; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhiwen

    2017-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have many applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, resulting in occupational and environmental exposure and concerns regarding REE-associated health effects. However, few epidemiological studies have examined the adverse effects of REEs on pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between the REE concentrations in maternal hair growing during early pregnancy and the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. We included 191 women with NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 261 women delivering healthy infants (controls). The cases were divided into three subtypes: anencephaly, spina bifida, and encephalocele. Four REEs in maternal hair were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), and neodymium (Nd). A questionnaire was used to collect information about maternal sociodemographic characteristics and dietary habits. The median concentrations of Ce and Pr in the NTD group were higher than those in the control group, whereas there were no significant differences for La and Nd. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the four REE concentrations above the median in the case groups were not significantly > 1. An increasing frequency of the consumption of beans or bean products and fresh fruit was negatively correlated with the four REE concentrations. Our results did not suggest that the concentrations of REEs in maternal hair were associated with the risk of NTDs or any subtype of NTDs in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Forgetting, reminding, and remembering: the retrieval of lost spatial memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia de Hoz

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde amnesia can occur after brain damage because this disrupts sites of storage, interrupts memory consolidation, or interferes with memory retrieval. While the retrieval failure account has been considered in several animal studies, recent work has focused mainly on memory consolidation, and the neural mechanisms responsible for reactivating memory from stored traces remain poorly understood. We now describe a new retrieval phenomenon in which rats' memory for a spatial location in a watermaze was first weakened by partial lesions of the hippocampus to a level at which it could not be detected. The animals were then reminded by the provision of incomplete and potentially misleading information-an escape platform in a novel location. Paradoxically, both incorrect and correct place information reactivated dormant memory traces equally, such that the previously trained spatial memory was now expressed. It was also established that the reminding procedure could not itself generate new learning in either the original environment, or in a new training situation. The key finding is the development of a protocol that definitively distinguishes reminding from new place learning and thereby reveals that a failure of memory during watermaze testing can arise, at least in part, from a disruption of memory retrieval.

  5. Deep Nonlinear Metric Learning for 3-D Shape Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin; Dai, Guoxian; Zhu, Fan; Shao, Ling; Fang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Effective 3-D shape retrieval is an important problem in 3-D shape analysis. Recently, feature learning-based shape retrieval methods have been widely studied, where the distance metrics between 3-D shape descriptors are usually hand-crafted. In this paper, motivated by the fact that deep neural network has the good ability to model nonlinearity, we propose to learn an effective nonlinear distance metric between 3-D shape descriptors for retrieval. First, the locality-constrained linear coding method is employed to encode each vertex on the shape and the encoding coefficient histogram is formed as the global 3-D shape descriptor to represent the shape. Then, a novel deep metric network is proposed to learn a nonlinear transformation to map the 3-D shape descriptors to a nonlinear feature space. The proposed deep metric network minimizes a discriminative loss function that can enforce the similarity between a pair of samples from the same class to be small and the similarity between a pair of samples from different classes to be large. Finally, the distance between the outputs of the metric network is used as the similarity for shape retrieval. The proposed method is evaluated on the McGill, SHREC'10 ShapeGoogle, and SHREC'14 Human shape datasets. Experimental results on the three datasets validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Erythropoietin enhances hippocampal response during memory retrieval in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla; O'Sullivan, Ursula; Harmer, Catherine J

    2007-01-01

    Although erythropoietin (Epo) is best known for its effects on erythropoiesis, recent evidence suggests that it also has neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in animal models of hippocampal function. Such an action in humans would make it an intriguing novel compound for the treatment......) or saline in a between-subjects, double-blind, randomized design. Neural response during picture encoding and retrieval was tested 1 week later. Epo increased hippocampus response during picture retrieval (n = 11) compared with placebo (n = 12; p = 0.04) independent of changes in hematocrit....... This is consistent with upregulation of hippocampal BDNF and neurotrophic actions found in animals and highlights Epo as a promising candidate for treatment of psychiatric disorders....

  7. Neural Mobilization: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials with an Analysis of Therapeutic Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Richard F.; Hing, Wayne A.

    2008-01-01

    Neural mobilization is a treatment modality used in relation to pathologies of the nervous system. It has been suggested that neural mobilization is an effective treatment modality, although support of this suggestion is primarily anecdotal. The purpose of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the literature pertaining to the therapeutic efficacy of neural mobilization. A search to identify randomized controlled trials investigating neural mobilization was conducted using the key words neural mobilisation/mobilization, nerve mobilisation/mobilization, neural manipulative physical therapy, physical therapy, neural/nerve glide, nerve glide exercises, nerve/neural treatment, nerve/neural stretching, neurodynamics, and nerve/neural physiotherapy. The titles and abstracts of the papers identified were reviewed to select papers specifically detailing neural mobilization as a treatment modality. The PEDro scale, a systematic tool used to critique RCTs and grade methodological quality, was used to assess these trials. Methodological assessment allowed an analysis of research investigating therapeutic efficacy of neural mobilization. Ten randomized clinical trials (discussed in 11 retrieved articles) were identified that discussed the therapeutic effect of neural mobilization. This review highlights the lack in quantity and quality of the available research. Qualitative analysis of these studies revealed that there is only limited evidence to support the use of neural mobilization. Future research needs to re-examine the application of neural mobilization with use of more homogeneous study designs and pathologies; in addition, it should standardize the neural mobilization interventions used in the study. PMID:19119380

  8. Individual Differences in Skilled Adult Readers Reveal Dissociable Patterns of Neural Activity Associated with Component Processes of Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Suzanne E.; Joanisse, Marc F.

    2012-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine patterns of brain activity associated with component processes of visual word recognition and their relationships to individual differences in reading skill. We manipulated both the judgments adults made on written stimuli and the characteristics of the stimuli. Phonological processing led to activation in left inferior…

  9. Probing the neural correlates of associative memory formation : a parametrically analyzed event-related functional MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendolkar, I.; Arnold, J.F.; Petersson, K.M.; Weis, S.; Eijndhoven, P. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Fernandez, G.

    2007-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is crucial for declarative memory formation, but the function of its subcomponents in associative memory formation remains controversial. Most functional imaging studies on this topic are based on a stepwise approach comparing a condition with and one without

  10. Ventrolateral and dorsomedial frontal cortex lesions impair mnemonic context retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapados, Catherine; Petrides, Michael

    2015-02-22

    The prefrontal cortex appears to contribute to the mnemonic retrieval of the context within which stimuli are experienced, but only under certain conditions that remain to be clarified. Patients with lesions to the frontal cortex, the temporal lobe and neurologically intact individuals were tested for context memory retrieval when verbal stimuli (words) had been experienced across multiple (unstable context condition) or unique (stable context condition) contexts; basic recognition memory of these words-in-contexts was also tested. Patients with lesions to the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) were impaired on context retrieval only when the words had been seen in multiple contexts, demonstrating that this prefrontal region is critical for active retrieval processing necessary to disambiguate memory items embedded across multiple contexts. Patients with lesions to the left dorsomedial prefrontal region were impaired on both context retrieval conditions, regardless of the stability of the stimulus-to-context associations. Conversely, prefrontal lesions sparing the ventrolateral and dorsomedial regions did not impair context retrieval. Only patients with temporal lobe excisions were impaired on basic recognition memory. The results demonstrate a basic contribution of the left dorsomedial frontal region to mnemonic context retrieval, with the VLPFC engaged, selectively, when contextual relations are unstable and require disambiguation. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Effortful retrieval reduces hippocampal activity and impairs incidental encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reas, Emilie T; Brewer, James B

    2013-05-01

    Functional imaging studies frequently report that the hippocampus is engaged by successful episodic memory retrieval. However, considering that concurrent encoding of the background environment occurs during retrieval and influences medial temporal lobe activity, it is plausible that hippocampal encoding functions are reduced with increased attentional engagement during effortful retrieval. Expanding upon evidence that retrieval efforts suppress activity in hippocampal regions implicated in encoding, this study examines the influence of retrieval effort on encoding performance and the interactive effects of encoding and retrieval on hippocampal and neocortical activity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while subjects performed a word recognition task with incidental picture encoding. Both lower memory strength and increased search duration were associated with encoding failure and reduced hippocampal and default network activity. Activity in the anterior hippocampus tracked encoding, which was more strongly deactivated when incidental encoding was unsuccessful. These findings highlight potential contributions from background encoding processes to hippocampal activations during neuroimaging studies of episodic memory retrieval. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Material-Specific Neural Correlates of Recollection: Objects, Words, and Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Giulia; Otten, Leun J.

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear how neural correlates of episodic memory retrieval differ depending on the type of material that is retrieved. Here, we used a source memory task to compare electrical brain activity for the recollection of three types of stimulus material. At study, healthy adults judged how well visually presented objects, words, and faces fitted…

  13. Similarity evaluation between query and retrieved masses using a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) CADx system for characterization of breast masses on ultrasound images: an observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-chong; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark; Nees, Alexis V.; Paramagul, Chintana

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the similarity between the query and retrieved masses by a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) system for characterization of breast masses on ultrasound (US) images based on radiologists' visual similarity assessment. We are developing a CADx system to assist radiologists in characterizing masses on US images. The CADx system retrieves masses that are similar to a query mass from a reference library based on automatically extracted image features. An observer study was performed to compare the retrieval performance of four similarity measures: Euclidean distance (ED), Cosine (Cos), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Bayesian Neural Network (BNN). For ED and Cos, a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) algorithm was used for retrieval. For LDA and BNN, the features of a query mass were combined first into a malignancy score and then masses with similar scores were retrieved. For a query mass, three most similar masses were retrieved with each method and were presented to the radiologists in random order. Three MQSA radiologists rated the similarity between the query mass and the computer-retrieved masses using a nine-point similarity scale (1=very dissimilar, 9=very similar). The average similarity ratings of all radiologists for LDA, BNN, Cos, and ED were 4.71, 4.95, 5.18 and 5.32. The ED measures retrieved masses of significantly higher similarity (p<0.008) than LDA and BNN. Although the BNN measure had the best classification performance (Az: 0.90+/-0.03) in the CBIR scheme, ED exhibited higher image retrieval performance than others based on radiologists' assessment.

  14. Simultenious binary hash and features learning for image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantc, V. A.; Makov, S. V.; Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Semenishchev, E. A.; Egiazarian, K. O.; Agaian, S.

    2016-05-01

    Content-based image retrieval systems have plenty of applications in modern world. The most important one is the image search by query image or by semantic description. Approaches to this problem are employed in personal photo-collection management systems, web-scale image search engines, medical systems, etc. Automatic analysis of large unlabeled image datasets is virtually impossible without satisfactory image-retrieval technique. It's the main reason why this kind of automatic image processing has attracted so much attention during recent years. Despite rather huge progress in the field, semantically meaningful image retrieval still remains a challenging task. The main issue here is the demand to provide reliable results in short amount of time. This paper addresses the problem by novel technique for simultaneous learning of global image features and binary hash codes. Our approach provide mapping of pixel-based image representation to hash-value space simultaneously trying to save as much of semantic image content as possible. We use deep learning methodology to generate image description with properties of similarity preservation and statistical independence. The main advantage of our approach in contrast to existing is ability to fine-tune retrieval procedure for very specific application which allow us to provide better results in comparison to general techniques. Presented in the paper framework for data- dependent image hashing is based on use two different kinds of neural networks: convolutional neural networks for image description and autoencoder for feature to hash space mapping. Experimental results confirmed that our approach has shown promising results in compare to other state-of-the-art methods.

  15. Visual working memory buffers information retrieved from visual long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Keisuke; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2017-05-16

    Human memory is thought to consist of long-term storage and short-term storage mechanisms, the latter known as working memory. Although it has long been assumed that information retrieved from long-term memory is represented in working memory, we lack neural evidence for this and need neural measures that allow us to watch this retrieval into working memory unfold with high temporal resolution. Here, we show that human electrophysiology can be used to track information as it is brought back into working memory during retrieval from long-term memory. Specifically, we found that the retrieval of information from long-term memory was limited to just a few simple objects' worth of information at once, and elicited a pattern of neurophysiological activity similar to that observed when people encode new information into working memory. Our findings suggest that working memory is where information is buffered when being retrieved from long-term memory and reconcile current theories of memory retrieval with classic notions about the memory mechanisms involved.

  16. Acute stress and episodic memory retrieval: neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Stephanie A; Wagner, Anthony D

    2016-04-01

    Episodic retrieval allows people to access memories from the past to guide current thoughts and decisions. In many real-world situations, retrieval occurs under conditions of acute stress, either elicited by the retrieval task or driven by other, unrelated concerns. Memory under such conditions may be hindered, as acute stress initiates a cascade of neuromodulatory changes that can impair episodic retrieval. Here, we review emerging evidence showing that dissociable stress systems interact over time, influencing neural function. In addition to the adverse effects of stress on hippocampal-dependent retrieval, we consider how stress biases attention and prefrontal cortical function, which could further affect controlled retrieval processes. Finally, we consider recent data indicating that stress at retrieval increases activity in a network of brain regions that enable reflexive, rapid responding to upcoming threats, while transiently taking offline regions supporting flexible, goal-directed thinking. Given the ubiquity of episodic memory retrieval in everyday life, it is critical to understand the theoretical and applied implications of acute stress. The present review highlights the progress that has been made, along with important open questions. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Retrieval-induced NMDA receptor-dependent Arc expression in two models of cocaine-cue memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghband, Yasaman; O'Dell, Steven J; Azarnia, Siavash; Khalaj, Anna J; Guzowski, John F; Marshall, John F

    2014-12-01

    The association of environmental cues with drugs of abuse results in persistent drug-cue memories. These memories contribute significantly to relapse among addicts. While conditioned place preference (CPP) is a well-established paradigm frequently used to examine the modulation of drug-cue memories, very few studies have used the non-preference-based model conditioned activity (CA) for this purpose. Here, we used both experimental approaches to investigate the neural substrates of cocaine-cue memories. First, we directly compared, in a consistent setting, the involvement of cortical and subcortical brain regions in cocaine-cue memory retrieval by quantifying activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated (Arc) protein expression in both the CPP and CA models. Second, because NMDA receptor activation is required for Arc expression, we investigated the NMDA receptor dependency of memory persistence using the CA model. In both the CPP and CA models, drug-paired animals showed significant increases in Arc immunoreactivity in regions of the frontal cortex and amygdala compared to unpaired controls. Additionally, administration of a NMDA receptor antagonist (MK-801 or memantine) immediately after cocaine-CA memory reactivation impaired the subsequent conditioned locomotion associated with the cocaine-paired environment. The enhanced Arc expression evident in a subset of corticolimbic regions after retrieval of a cocaine-context memory, observed in both the CPP and CA paradigms, likely signifies that these regions: (i) are activated during retrieval of these memories irrespective of preference-based decisions, and (ii) undergo neuroplasticity in order to update information about cues previously associated with cocaine. This study also establishes the involvement of NMDA receptors in maintaining memories established using the CA model, a characteristic previously demonstrated using CPP. Overall, these results demonstrate the utility of the CA model for studies of cocaine

  18. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin, before and during pregnancy prevents most neural tube defects. Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ... or imaging tests. There is no cure for neural tube defects. The nerve damage and loss of function ...

  19. A model for integrating elementary neural functions into delayed-response behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gisiger

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that various cortical regions can implement a wide array of neural processes, yet the mechanisms which integrate these processes into behavior-producing, brain-scale activity remain elusive. We propose that an important role in this respect might be played by executive structures controlling the traffic of information between the cortical regions involved. To illustrate this hypothesis, we present a neural network model comprising a set of interconnected structures harboring stimulus-related activity (visual representation, working memory, and planning, and a group of executive units with task-related activity patterns that manage the information flowing between them. The resulting dynamics allows the network to perform the dual task of either retaining an image during a delay (delayed-matching to sample task, or recalling from this image another one that has been associated with it during training (delayed-pair association task. The model reproduces behavioral and electrophysiological data gathered on the inferior temporal and prefrontal cortices of primates performing these same tasks. It also makes predictions on how neural activity coding for the recall of the image associated with the sample emerges and becomes prospective during the training phase. The network dynamics proves to be very stable against perturbations, and it exhibits signs of scale-invariant organization and cooperativity. The present network represents a possible neural implementation for active, top-down, prospective memory retrieval in primates. The model suggests that brain activity leading to performance of cognitive tasks might be organized in modular fashion, simple neural functions becoming integrated into more complex behavior by executive structures harbored in prefrontal cortex and/or basal ganglia.

  20. Association Between Placebo-Activated Neural Systems and Antidepressant Responses: Neurochemistry of Placebo Effects in Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S B; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T; Langenecker, Scott A; Mickey, Brian J; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-11-01

    High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. To examine neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). In this study involving 2 placebo lead-in phases followed by an open antidepressant administration, we performed a single-blinded 2-week crossover randomized clinical trial of 2 identical oral placebos (described as having either active or inactive fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or, in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers (35 medication-free patients with MDD at a university health system) were studied with positron emission tomography and the µ-opioid receptor-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week inactive and active oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously within sight of the volunteer during positron emission tomographic scanning every 4 minutes over 20 minutes only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was used to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Changes in depressive symptoms in response to active placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of µ-opioid receptor binding. Higher baseline µ-opioid receptor binding in the nucleus accumbens was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r = 0.48; P = .02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1 week of active placebo treatment, compared with the inactive, were associated with increased placebo-induced µ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress

  1. Disease-associated prion protein in neural and lymphoid tissues of mink (Mustela vison) inoculated with transmissible mink encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D A; Harrington, R D; Zhuang, D; Yan, H; Truscott, T C; Dassanayake, R P; O'Rourke, K I

    2012-11-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are diagnosed by immunodetection of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)). The distribution of PrP(d) within the body varies with the time-course of infection and between species, during interspecies transmission, as well as with prion strain. Mink are susceptible to a form of TSE known as transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), presumed to arise due to consumption of feed contaminated with a single prion strain of ruminant origin. After extended passage of TME isolates in hamsters, two strains emerge, HY and DY, each of which is associated with unique structural isoforms of PrP(TME) and of which only the HY strain is associated with accumulation of PrP(TME) in lymphoid tissues. Information on the structural nature and lymphoid accumulation of PrP(TME) in mink is limited. In this study, 13 mink were challenged by intracerebral inoculation using late passage TME inoculum, after which brain and lymphoid tissues were collected at preclinical and clinical time points. The distribution and molecular nature of PrP(TME) was investigated by techniques including blotting of paraffin wax-embedded tissue and epitope mapping by western blotting. PrP(TME) was detected readily in the brain and retropharyngeal lymph node during preclinical infection, with delayed progression of accumulation within other lymphoid tissues. For comparison, three mink were inoculated by the oral route and examined during clinical disease. Accumulation of PrP(TME) in these mink was greater and more widespread, including follicles of rectoanal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Western blot analyses revealed that PrP(TME) accumulating in the brain of mink is structurally most similar to that accumulating in the brain of hamsters infected with the DY strain. Collectively, the results of extended passage in mink are consistent with the presence of only a single strain of TME, the DY strain, capable of inducing accumulation of PrP(TME) in the lymphoid

  2. Association of the maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism with susceptibility to neural tube defects in offsprings: evidence from 25 case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Yan

    <