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Sample records for neural adaptive sensory

  1. Neural Adaptive Sensory Processing for Undersea Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    neurobionic conceptual framework- [71 -, "Neural target locator," Naval Ocean Systems Center, Tech. Mr. Speidel is a member of the American Association...for the Ad- Document 77)1914, 1990. vancement of Science (AAAS), the International Neural Network Soci- [8) -, "Sonar scene analysis using neurobionic

  2. Electrical stimulation superimposed on voluntary training can limit sensory integration in neural adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    P. Bezerra, S. Zhou, Z. Crowley, A. Davie, and R. Baglin (2011) suggested that the neural mechanisms responsible for steadiness improvement relate in particular to the discharge behavior of motor units and the practice and learning of skills rather than the strength gain after electromyostimulation superimposed over voluntary training. However, the afferent inputs are determining in control of the force level produced and thus contribute to ensure muscle steadiness. Hence, it is possible that electromyostimulation interferes in neurophysiological afference integration and prevents neural adaptations that enable improvement of the control of force (and then muscle steadiness) to occur. Therefore, the neural adaptations induced by electromyostimulation superimposed onto voluntary training should also be researched in relation to the sensory pathways.

  3. The neural response properties and cortical organization of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with the frequencies that elicit the kinesthetic illusion.

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    Marasco, Paul D; Bourbeau, Dennis J; Shell, Courtney E; Granja-Vazquez, Rafael; Ina, Jason G

    2017-01-01

    Kinesthesia is the sense of limb movement. It is fundamental to efficient motor control, yet its neurophysiological components remain poorly understood. The contributions of primary muscle spindles and cutaneous afferents to the kinesthetic sense have been well studied; however, potential contributions from muscle sensory group responses that are different than the muscle spindles have not been ruled out. Electrophysiological recordings in peripheral nerves and brains of male Sprague Dawley rats with a degloved forelimb preparation provide evidence of a rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response that overlaps with vibratory inputs known to generate illusionary perceptions of limb movement in humans (kinesthetic illusion). This group was characteristically distinct from type Ia muscle spindle fibers, the receptor historically attributed to limb movement sensation, suggesting that type Ia muscle spindle fibers may not be the sole carrier of kinesthetic information. The sensory-neural structure of muscles is complex and there are a number of possible sources for this response group; with Golgi tendon organs being the most likely candidate. The rapidly adapting muscle sensory group response projected to proprioceptive brain regions, the rodent homolog of cortical area 3a and the second somatosensory area (S2), with similar adaption and frequency response profiles between the brain and peripheral nerves. Their representational organization was muscle-specific (myocentric) and magnified for proximal and multi-articulate limb joints. Projection to proprioceptive brain areas, myocentric representational magnification of muscles prone to movement error, overlap with illusionary vibrational input, and resonant frequencies of volitional motor unit contraction suggest that this group response may be involved with limb movement processing.

  4. Adaptation to sensory input tunes visual cortex to criticality

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    Shew, Woodrow L.; Clawson, Wesley P.; Pobst, Jeff; Karimipanah, Yahya; Wright, Nathaniel C.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    A long-standing hypothesis at the interface of physics and neuroscience is that neural networks self-organize to the critical point of a phase transition, thereby optimizing aspects of sensory information processing. This idea is partially supported by strong evidence for critical dynamics observed in the cerebral cortex, but the impact of sensory input on these dynamics is largely unknown. Thus, the foundations of this hypothesis--the self-organization process and how it manifests during strong sensory input--remain unstudied experimentally. Here we show in visual cortex and in a computational model that strong sensory input initially elicits cortical network dynamics that are not critical, but adaptive changes in the network rapidly tune the system to criticality. This conclusion is based on observations of multifaceted scaling laws predicted to occur at criticality. Our findings establish sensory adaptation as a self-organizing mechanism that maintains criticality in visual cortex during sensory information processing.

  5. Neural Network Approach To Sensory Fusion

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    Pearson, John C.; Gelfand, Jack J.; Sullivan, W. E.; Peterson, Richard M.; Spence, Clay D.

    1988-08-01

    We present a neural network model for sensory fusion based on the design of the visual/acoustic target localiza-tion system of the barn owl. This system adaptively fuses its separate visual and acoustic representations of object position into a single joint representation used for head orientation. The building block in this system, as in much of the brain, is the neuronal map. Neuronal maps are large arrays of locally interconnected neurons that represent information in a map-like form, that is, parameter values are systematically encoded by the position of neural activation in the array. The computational load is distributed to a hierarchy of maps, and the computation is performed in stages by transforming the representation from map to map via the geometry of the projections between the maps and the local interactions within the maps. For example, azimuthal position is computed from the frequency and binaural phase information encoded in the signals of the acoustic sensors, while elevation is computed in a separate stream using binaural intensity information. These separate streams are merged in their joint projection onto the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus, a two dimensional array of cells which contains a map of acoustic space. This acoustic map, and the visual map of the retina, jointly project onto the optic tectum, creating a fused visual/acoustic representation of position in space that is used for object localization. In this paper we describe our mathematical model of the stage of visual/acoustic fusion in the optic tectum. The model assumes that the acoustic projection from the external nucleus onto the tectum is roughly topographic and one-to-many, while the visual projection from the retina onto the tectum is topographic and one-to-one. A simple process of self-organization alters the strengths of the acoustic connections, effectively forming a focused beam of strong acoustic connections whose inputs are coincident with the visual inputs

  6. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... medical treatment. (c) VA will furnish needed hearing aids to those veterans who have service-connected... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other...

  7. Cellular adaptation facilitates sparse and reliable coding in sensory pathways.

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    Farkhooi, Farzad; Froese, Anja; Muller, Eilif; Menzel, Randolf; Nawrot, Martin P

    2013-01-01

    Most neurons in peripheral sensory pathways initially respond vigorously when a preferred stimulus is presented, but adapt as stimulation continues. It is unclear how this phenomenon affects stimulus coding in the later stages of sensory processing. Here, we show that a temporally sparse and reliable stimulus representation develops naturally in sequential stages of a sensory network with adapting neurons. As a modeling framework we employ a mean-field approach together with an adaptive population density treatment, accompanied by numerical simulations of spiking neural networks. We find that cellular adaptation plays a critical role in the dynamic reduction of the trial-by-trial variability of cortical spike responses by transiently suppressing self-generated fast fluctuations in the cortical balanced network. This provides an explanation for a widespread cortical phenomenon by a simple mechanism. We further show that in the insect olfactory system cellular adaptation is sufficient to explain the emergence of the temporally sparse and reliable stimulus representation in the mushroom body. Our results reveal a generic, biophysically plausible mechanism that can explain the emergence of a temporally sparse and reliable stimulus representation within a sequential processing architecture.

  8. Adaptive Regularization of Neural Classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1997-01-01

    We present a regularization scheme which iteratively adapts the regularization parameters by minimizing the validation error. It is suggested to use the adaptive regularization scheme in conjunction with optimal brain damage pruning to optimize the architecture and to avoid overfitting. Furthermore......, we propose an improved neural classification architecture eliminating an inherent redundancy in the widely used SoftMax classification network. Numerical results demonstrate the viability of the method...

  9. Mirror adaptation in sensory-motor simultaneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Watanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When one watches a sports game, one may feel her/his own muscles moving in synchrony with the player's. Such parallels between observed actions of others and one's own has been well supported in the latest progress in neuroscience, and coined "mirror system." It is likely that due to such phenomena, we are able to learn motor skills just by observing an expert's performance. Yet it is unknown whether such indirect learning occurs only at higher cognitive levels, or also at basic sensorimotor levels where sensorimotor delay is compensated and the timing of sensory feedback is constantly calibrated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that the subject's passive observation of an actor manipulating a computer mouse with delayed auditory feedback led to shifts in subjective simultaneity of self mouse manipulation and auditory stimulus in the observing subjects. Likewise, self adaptation to the delayed feedback modulated the simultaneity judgment of the other subjects manipulating a mouse and an auditory stimulus. Meanwhile, subjective simultaneity of a simple visual disc and the auditory stimulus (flash test was not affected by observation of an actor nor self-adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of shift in the flash test for both conditions indicates that the recalibration transfer is specific to the action domain, and is not due to a general sensory adaptation. This points to the involvement of a system for the temporal monitoring of actions, one that processes both one's own actions and those of others.

  10. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural...... mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online...... correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking...

  11. Intrinsic gain modulation and adaptive neural coding.

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    Sungho Hong

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, the computation of a neural system can be reduced to a receptive field, or a set of linear filters, and a thresholding function, or gain curve, which determines the firing probability; this is known as a linear/nonlinear model. In some forms of sensory adaptation, these linear filters and gain curve adjust very rapidly to changes in the variance of a randomly varying driving input. An apparently similar but previously unrelated issue is the observation of gain control by background noise in cortical neurons: the slope of the firing rate versus current (f-I curve changes with the variance of background random input. Here, we show a direct correspondence between these two observations by relating variance-dependent changes in the gain of f-I curves to characteristics of the changing empirical linear/nonlinear model obtained by sampling. In the case that the underlying system is fixed, we derive relationships relating the change of the gain with respect to both mean and variance with the receptive fields derived from reverse correlation on a white noise stimulus. Using two conductance-based model neurons that display distinct gain modulation properties through a simple change in parameters, we show that coding properties of both these models quantitatively satisfy the predicted relationships. Our results describe how both variance-dependent gain modulation and adaptive neural computation result from intrinsic nonlinearity.

  12. Sensory Processing Subtypes in Autism: Association with Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Young, Robyn L.; Baker, Amy E. Z.; Angley, Manya T.

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism are frequently observed to experience difficulties in sensory processing. This study examined specific patterns of sensory processing in 54 children with autistic disorder and their association with adaptive behavior. Model-based cluster analysis revealed three distinct sensory processing subtypes in autism. These subtypes…

  13. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate eManoonpong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs and sensory feedback (afferent-based control but also on internal forward models (efference copies. They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines.

  14. Neural control and adaptive neural forward models for insect-like, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion of walking machines.

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    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by using different approaches including machine learning algorithms, classical engineering control techniques, and biologically-inspired control mechanisms. However, their levels of performance are still far from the natural ones. By contrast, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize basic rhythmic motions which are shaped by sensory feedback while internal models are used for sensory prediction and state estimations. According to this concept, we present here adaptive neural locomotion control consisting of a CPG mechanism with neuromodulation and local leg control mechanisms based on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models allow the machine to autonomously adapt its locomotion to deal with a change of terrain, losing of ground contact during stance phase, stepping on or hitting an obstacle during swing phase, leg damage, and even to promote cockroach-like climbing behavior. Thus, the results presented here show that the employed embodied neural closed-loop system can be a powerful way for developing robust and adaptable machines.

  15. Sensory Entrainment Mechanisms in Auditory Perception: Neural Synchronization Cortico-Striatal Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameiro-Barbosa, Catia M.; Geiser, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    The auditory system displays modulations in sensitivity that can align with the temporal structure of the acoustic environment. This sensory entrainment can facilitate sensory perception and is particularly relevant for audition. Systems neuroscience is slowly uncovering the neural mechanisms underlying the behaviorally observed sensory entrainment effects in the human sensory system. The present article summarizes the prominent behavioral effects of sensory entrainment and reviews our current understanding of the neural basis of sensory entrainment, such as synchronized neural oscillations, and potentially, neural activation in the cortico-striatal system. PMID:27559306

  16. Neural Control and Adaptive Neural Forward Models for Insect-like, Energy-Efficient, and Adaptable Locomotion of Walking Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Parlitz, Ulrich; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate......, animal locomotion mechanisms seem to largely depend not only on central mechanisms (central pattern generators, CPGs) and sensory feedback (afferent-based control) but also on internal forward models (efference copies). They are used to a different degree in different animals. Generally, CPGs organize...... on sensory feedback and adaptive neural forward models with efference copies. This neural closed-loop controller enables a walking machine to perform a multitude of different walking patterns including insect-like leg movements and gaits as well as energy-efficient locomotion. In addition, the forward models...

  17. Efficient sensory encoding and Bayesian inference with heterogeneous neural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Deep; Simoncelli, Eero P

    2014-10-01

    The efficient coding hypothesis posits that sensory systems maximize information transmitted to the brain about the environment. We develop a precise and testable form of this hypothesis in the context of encoding a sensory variable with a population of noisy neurons, each characterized by a tuning curve. We parameterize the population with two continuous functions that control the density and amplitude of the tuning curves, assuming that the tuning widths vary inversely with the cell density. This parameterization allows us to solve, in closed form, for the information-maximizing allocation of tuning curves as a function of the prior probability distribution of sensory variables. For the optimal population, the cell density is proportional to the prior, such that more cells with narrower tuning are allocated to encode higher-probability stimuli and that each cell transmits an equal portion of the stimulus probability mass. We also compute the stimulus discrimination capabilities of a perceptual system that relies on this neural representation and find that the best achievable discrimination thresholds are inversely proportional to the sensory prior. We examine how the prior information that is implicitly encoded in the tuning curves of the optimal population may be used for perceptual inference and derive a novel decoder, the Bayesian population vector, that closely approximates a Bayesian least-squares estimator that has explicit access to the prior. Finally, we generalize these results to sigmoidal tuning curves, correlated neural variability, and a broader class of objective functions. These results provide a principled embedding of sensory prior information in neural populations and yield predictions that are readily testable with environmental, physiological, and perceptual data.

  18. Sensori-neural hearing loss following radiotherapy to the nasopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, J.A.

    1976-04-01

    A retrospective study was done to ascertain the risks of cochlear damage from radiotherapy of the nasopharynx. Audiometric evaluation, pre- and post-radiotherapy, revealed that 7 out of 13 patients had sustained sensori-neural deafness. Contrary to what is generally believed of the resistance of the cochlea to radiotherapeutic damage, eventual loss of hearing can occasionally be expected in patients undergoing radiation therapy for head and neck tumors.

  19. Sensory processing subtypes in autism: association with adaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E; Young, Robyn L; Baker, Amy E Z; Angley, Manya T

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism are frequently observed to experience difficulties in sensory processing. This study examined specific patterns of sensory processing in 54 children with autistic disorder and their association with adaptive behavior. Model-based cluster analysis revealed three distinct sensory processing subtypes in autism. These subtypes were differentiated by taste and smell sensitivity and movement-related sensory behavior. Further, sensory processing subtypes predicted communication competence and maladaptive behavior. The findings of this study lay the foundation for the generation of more specific hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of sensory processing dysfunction in autism, and support the continued use of sensory-based interventions in the remediation of communication and behavioral difficulties in autism.

  20. Shaping embodied neural networks for adaptive goal-directed behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenas C Chao

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The acts of learning and memory are thought to emerge from the modifications of synaptic connections between neurons, as guided by sensory feedback during behavior. However, much is unknown about how such synaptic processes can sculpt and are sculpted by neuronal population dynamics and an interaction with the environment. Here, we embodied a simulated network, inspired by dissociated cortical neuronal cultures, with an artificial animal (an animat through a sensory-motor loop consisting of structured stimuli, detailed activity metrics incorporating spatial information, and an adaptive training algorithm that takes advantage of spike timing dependent plasticity. By using our design, we demonstrated that the network was capable of learning associations between multiple sensory inputs and motor outputs, and the animat was able to adapt to a new sensory mapping to restore its goal behavior: move toward and stay within a user-defined area. We further showed that successful learning required proper selections of stimuli to encode sensory inputs and a variety of training stimuli with adaptive selection contingent on the animat's behavior. We also found that an individual network had the flexibility to achieve different multi-task goals, and the same goal behavior could be exhibited with different sets of network synaptic strengths. While lacking the characteristic layered structure of in vivo cortical tissue, the biologically inspired simulated networks could tune their activity in behaviorally relevant manners, demonstrating that leaky integrate-and-fire neural networks have an innate ability to process information. This closed-loop hybrid system is a useful tool to study the network properties intermediating synaptic plasticity and behavioral adaptation. The training algorithm provides a stepping stone towards designing future control systems, whether with artificial neural networks or biological animats themselves.

  1. KCNQ potassium channels in sensory system and neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-jing; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    M channels, an important regulator of neural excitability, are composed of four subunits of the Kv7 (KCNQ) K(+) channel family. M channels were named as such because their activity was suppressed by stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. These channels are of particular interest because they are activated at the subthreshold membrane potentials. Furthermore, neural KCNQ channels are drug targets for the treatments of epilepsy and a variety of neurological disorders, including chronic and neuropathic pain, deafness, and mental illness. This review will update readers on the roles of KCNQ channels in the sensory system and neural circuits as well as discuss their respective mechanisms and the implications for physiology and medicine. We will also consider future perspectives and the development of additional pharmacological models, such as seizure, stroke, pain and mental illness, which work in combination with drug-design targeting of KCNQ channels. These models will hopefully deepen our understanding of KCNQ channels and provide general therapeutic prospects of related channelopathies.

  2. Dysfunction of Rapid Neural Adaptation in Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrachione, Tyler K; Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Winter, Rebecca; Murtagh, Jack; Cyr, Abigail; Chang, Patricia; Halverson, Kelly; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Christodoulou, Joanna A; Gabrieli, John D E

    2016-12-21

    Identification of specific neurophysiological dysfunctions resulting in selective reading difficulty (dyslexia) has remained elusive. In addition to impaired reading development, individuals with dyslexia frequently exhibit behavioral deficits in perceptual adaptation. Here, we assessed neurophysiological adaptation to stimulus repetition in adults and children with dyslexia for a wide variety of stimuli, spoken words, written words, visual objects, and faces. For every stimulus type, individuals with dyslexia exhibited significantly diminished neural adaptation compared to controls in stimulus-specific cortical areas. Better reading skills in adults and children with dyslexia were associated with greater repetition-induced neural adaptation. These results highlight a dysfunction of rapid neural adaptation as a core neurophysiological difference in dyslexia that may underlie impaired reading development. Reduced neurophysiological adaptation may relate to prior reports of reduced behavioral adaptation in dyslexia and may reveal a difference in brain functions that ultimately results in a specific reading impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neural adaptations to electrical stimulation strength training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, Tibor; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides evidence for the hypothesis that electrostimulation strength training (EST) increases the force of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) through neural adaptations in healthy skeletal muscle. Although electrical stimulation and voluntary effort activate muscle differently, there

  4. The predictive roles of neural oscillations in speech motor adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ranit; Nasir, Sazzad M

    2016-06-01

    The human speech system exhibits a remarkable flexibility by adapting to alterations in speaking environments. While it is believed that speech motor adaptation under altered sensory feedback involves rapid reorganization of speech motor networks, the mechanisms by which different brain regions communicate and coordinate their activity to mediate adaptation remain unknown, and explanations of outcome differences in adaption remain largely elusive. In this study, under the paradigm of altered auditory feedback with continuous EEG recordings, the differential roles of oscillatory neural processes in motor speech adaptability were investigated. The predictive capacities of different EEG frequency bands were assessed, and it was found that theta-, beta-, and gamma-band activities during speech planning and production contained significant and reliable information about motor speech adaptability. It was further observed that these bands do not work independently but interact with each other suggesting an underlying brain network operating across hierarchically organized frequency bands to support motor speech adaptation. These results provide novel insights into both learning and disorders of speech using time frequency analysis of neural oscillations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia

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    Pichet Termsarasab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD, who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms. We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder.

  6. Hardware Acceleration of Adaptive Neural Algorithms.

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    James, Conrad D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    As tradit ional numerical computing has faced challenges, researchers have turned towards alternative computing approaches to reduce power - per - computation metrics and improve algorithm performance. Here, we describe an approach towards non - conventional computing that strengthens the connection between machine learning and neuroscience concepts. The Hardware Acceleration of Adaptive Neural Algorithms (HAANA) project ha s develop ed neural machine learning algorithms and hardware for applications in image processing and cybersecurity. While machine learning methods are effective at extracting relevant features from many types of data, the effectiveness of these algorithms degrades when subjected to real - world conditions. Our team has generated novel neural - inspired approa ches to improve the resiliency and adaptability of machine learning algorithms. In addition, we have also designed and fabricated hardware architectures and microelectronic devices specifically tuned towards the training and inference operations of neural - inspired algorithms. Finally, our multi - scale simulation framework allows us to assess the impact of microelectronic device properties on algorithm performance.

  7. Navigating sensory conflict in dynamic environments using adaptive state estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Theresa J; Jeka, John; Kiemel, Tim; Lewis, M Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Most conventional robots rely on controlling the location of the center of pressure to maintain balance, relying mainly on foot pressure sensors for information. By contrast,humans rely on sensory data from multiple sources, including proprioceptive, visual, and vestibular sources. Several models have been developed to explain how humans reconcile information from disparate sources to form a stable sense of balance. These models may be useful for developing robots that are able to maintain dynamic balance more readily using multiple sensory sources. Since these information sources may conflict, reliance by the nervous system on any one channel can lead to ambiguity in the system state. In humans, experiments that create conflicts between different sensory channels by moving the visual field or the support surface indicate that sensory information is adaptively reweighted. Unreliable information is rapidly down-weighted,then gradually up-weighted when it becomes valid again.Human balance can also be studied by building robots that model features of human bodies and testing them under similar experimental conditions. We implement a sensory reweighting model based on an adaptive Kalman filter in abipedal robot, and subject it to sensory tests similar to those used on human subjects. Unlike other implementations of sensory reweighting in robots, our implementation includes vision, by using optic flow to calculate forward rotation using a camera (visual modality), as well as a three-axis gyro to represent the vestibular system (non-visual modality), and foot pressure sensors (proprioceptive modality). Our model estimates measurement noise in real time, which is then used to recompute the Kalman gain on each iteration, improving the ability of the robot to dynamically balance. We observe that we can duplicate many important features of postural sw ay in humans, including automatic sensory reweighting,effects, constant phase with respect to amplitude, and a temporal

  8. Adaptive Neurotechnology for Making Neural Circuits Functional .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ranu

    2008-03-01

    Two of the most important trends in recent technological developments are that technology is increasingly integrated with biological systems and that it is increasingly adaptive in its capabilities. Neuroprosthetic systems that provide lost sensorimotor function after a neural disability offer a platform to investigate this interplay between biological and engineered systems. Adaptive neurotechnology (hardware and software) could be designed to be biomimetic, guided by the physical and programmatic constraints observed in biological systems, and allow for real-time learning, stability, and error correction. An example will present biomimetic neural-network hardware that can be interfaced with the isolated spinal cord of a lower vertebrate to allow phase-locked real-time neural control. Another will present adaptive neural network control algorithms for functional electrical stimulation of the peripheral nervous system to provide desired movements of paralyzed limbs in rodents or people. Ultimately, the frontier lies in being able to utilize the adaptive neurotechnology to promote neuroplasticity in the living system on a long-time scale under co-adaptive conditions.

  9. Cortical Neural Activity Predicts Sensory Acuity Under Optogenetic Manipulation.

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    Briguglio, John J; Aizenberg, Mark; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Geffen, Maria N

    2018-02-21

    Excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the mammalian sensory cortex form interconnected circuits that control cortical stimulus selectivity and sensory acuity. Theoretical studies have predicted that suppression of inhibition in such excitatory-inhibitory networks can lead to either an increase or, paradoxically, a decrease in excitatory neuronal firing, with consequent effects on stimulus selectivity. We tested whether modulation of inhibition or excitation in the auditory cortex of male mice could evoke such a variety of effects in tone-evoked responses and in behavioral frequency discrimination acuity. We found that, indeed, the effects of optogenetic manipulation on stimulus selectivity and behavior varied in both magnitude and sign across subjects, possibly reflecting differences in circuitry or expression of optogenetic factors. Changes in neural population responses consistently predicted behavioral changes for individuals separately, including improvement and impairment in acuity. This correlation between cortical and behavioral change demonstrates that, despite the complex and varied effects that these manipulations can have on neuronal dynamics, the resulting changes in cortical activity account for accompanying changes in behavioral acuity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Excitatory and inhibitory interactions determine stimulus specificity and tuning in sensory cortex, thereby controlling perceptual discrimination acuity. Modeling has predicted that suppressing the activity of inhibitory neurons can lead to increased or, paradoxically, decreased excitatory activity depending on the architecture of the network. Here, we capitalized on differences between subjects to test whether suppressing/activating inhibition and excitation can in fact exhibit such paradoxical effects for both stimulus sensitivity and behavioral discriminability. Indeed, the same optogenetic manipulation in the auditory cortex of different mice could improve or impair frequency discrimination

  10. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard eGrinke

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. They can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a walking robot is a challenging task. In this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a biomechanical walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations as well as escaping from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles. Consequently, it can successfully explore and navigate in complex environments.

  11. Self-Organizing Neural Circuits for Sensory-Guided Motor Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grossberg, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    The reported projects developed mathematical models to explain how self-organizing neural circuits that operate under continuous or intermittent sensory guidance achieve flexible and accurate control of human movement...

  12. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables the robot to effectively escape from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles

  13. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements to deal with an unknown situation. As a consequence, they successfully navigate through their complex environment. The versatile and adaptive abilities are the result of an integration of several ingredients embedded in their sensorimotor loop. Biological studies reveal that the ingredients include neural dynamics, plasticity, sensory feedback, and biomechanics. Generating such versatile and adaptive behaviors for a many degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) walking robot is a challenging task. Thus, in this study, we present a bio-inspired approach to solve this task. Specifically, the approach combines neural mechanisms with plasticity, exteroceptive sensory feedback, and biomechanics. The neural mechanisms consist of adaptive neural sensory processing and modular neural locomotion control. The sensory processing is based on a small recurrent neural network consisting of two fully connected neurons. Online correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables the robot to effectively escape from sharp corners or deadlocks. Using backbone joint control embedded in the the locomotion control allows the robot to climb over small obstacles

  14. Neural correlates of adaptation to voice identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinberger, Stefan R; Walther, Christian; Zäske, Romi; Kovács, Gyula

    2011-11-01

    Apart from speech content, the human voice also carries paralinguistic information about speaker identity. Voice identification and its neural correlates have received little scientific attention up to now. Here we use event-related potentials (ERPs) in an adaptation paradigm, in order to investigate the neural representation and the time course of vocal identity processing. Participants adapted to repeated utterances of vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) of one personally familiar speaker (either A or B), before classifying a subsequent test voice varying on an identity continuum between these two speakers. Following adaptation to speaker A, test voices were more likely perceived as speaker B and vice versa, and these contrastive voice identity aftereffects (VIAEs) were much more pronounced when the same syllable, rather than a different syllable, was used as adaptor. Adaptation induced amplitude reductions of the frontocentral N1-P2 complex and a prominent reduction of the parietal P3 component, for test voices preceded by identity-corresponding adaptors. Importantly, only the P3 modulation remained clear for across-syllable combinations of adaptor and test stimuli. Our results suggest that voice identity is contrastively processed by specialized neurons in auditory cortex within ∼250 ms after stimulus onset, with identity processing becoming less dependent on speech content after ∼300 ms. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Sensor selection and chemo-sensory optimization: toward an adaptable chemo-sensory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eVergara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, despite the tremendous research effort performed on chemical sensors and machine olfaction to develop micro-sensory systems that will accomplish the growing existent needs in personal health (implantable sensors, environment monitoring (widely distributed sensor networks, and security/threat detection (chemo/bio warfare agents, simple, low-cost molecular sensing platforms capable of long-term autonomous operation remain beyond the current state-of-the-art of chemical sensing. A fundamental issue within this context is that most of the chemical sensors depend on interactions between the targeted species and the surfaces functionalized with receptors that bind the target species selectively, and that these binding events are coupled with transduction processes that begin to change when they are exposed to the messy world of real samples. With the advent of fundamental breakthroughs at the intersection of materials science, micro/nano-technology, and signal processing, hybrid chemo-sensory systems have incorporated tunable, optimizable operating parameters, through which changes in the response characteristics can be modeled and compensated as the environmental conditions or application needs change.The objective of this article, in this context, is to bring together the key advances at the device, data processing, and system levels that enable chemo-sensory systems to adapt in response to their environments. Accordingly, in this review we will feature the research effort made by selected experts on chemical sensing and information theory, whose work has been devoted to develop strategies that provide tunability and adaptability to single sensor devices or sensory array systems. Particularly, we consider sensor-array selection, modulation of internal sensing parameters, and active sensing. The article ends with some conclusions drawn from the results presented and a visionary look toward the future in terms of how the

  16. Neural Adaptation Effects in Conceptual Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara F. M. Marino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the conceptual processing of nouns referring to objects characterized by a highly typical color and orientation. We used a go/no-go task in which we asked participants to categorize each noun as referring or not to natural entities (e.g., animals after a selective adaptation of color-edge neurons in the posterior LV4 region of the visual cortex was induced by means of a McCollough effect procedure. This manipulation affected categorization: the green-vertical adaptation led to slower responses than the green-horizontal adaptation, regardless of the specific color and orientation of the to-be-categorized noun. This result suggests that the conceptual processing of natural entities may entail the activation of modality-specific neural channels with weights proportional to the reliability of the signals produced by these channels during actual perception. This finding is discussed with reference to the debate about the grounded cognition view.

  17. Sensory-related neural activity regulates the structure of vascular networks in the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Baptiste; Comin, Cesar H.; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Xu, Xiaoyin; Costa, Luciano da F.; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurovascular interactions are essential for proper brain function. While the effect of neural activity on cerebral blood flow has been extensively studied, whether neural activity influences vascular patterning remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that neural activity promotes the formation of vascular networks in the early postnatal mouse barrel cortex. Using a combination of genetics, imaging, and computational tools to allow simultaneous analysis of neuronal and vascular components, we found that vascular density and branching were decreased in the barrel cortex when sensory input was reduced by either a complete deafferentation, a genetic impairment of neurotransmitter release at thalamocortical synapses, or a selective reduction of sensory-related neural activity by whisker plucking. In contrast, enhancement of neural activity by whisker stimulation led to an increase in vascular density and branching. The finding that neural activity is necessary and sufficient to trigger alterations of vascular networks reveals a novel feature of neurovascular interactions. PMID:25155955

  18. Sensory-related neural activity regulates the structure of vascular networks in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Baptiste; Comin, Cesar H; Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Kaeser, Pascal S; Xu, Xiaoyin; Costa, Luciano da F; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-09-03

    Neurovascular interactions are essential for proper brain function. While the effect of neural activity on cerebral blood flow has been extensively studied, whether or not neural activity influences vascular patterning remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that neural activity promotes the formation of vascular networks in the early postnatal mouse barrel cortex. Using a combination of genetics, imaging, and computational tools to allow simultaneous analysis of neuronal and vascular components, we found that vascular density and branching were decreased in the barrel cortex when sensory input was reduced by either a complete deafferentation, a genetic impairment of neurotransmitter release at thalamocortical synapses, or a selective reduction of sensory-related neural activity by whisker plucking. In contrast, enhancement of neural activity by whisker stimulation led to an increase in vascular density and branching. The finding that neural activity is necessary and sufficient to trigger alterations of vascular networks reveals an important feature of neurovascular interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensor Selection and Chemo-Sensory Optimization: Toward an Adaptable Chemo-Sensory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Alexander; Llobet, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, despite the tremendous research on chemical sensors and machine olfaction to develop micro-sensory systems that will accomplish the growing existent needs in personal health (implantable sensors), environment monitoring (widely distributed sensor networks), and security/threat detection (chemo/bio warfare agents), simple, low-cost molecular sensing platforms capable of long-term autonomous operation remain beyond the current state-of-the-art of chemical sensing. A fundamental issue within this context is that most of the chemical sensors depend on interactions between the targeted species and the surfaces functionalized with receptors that bind the target species selectively, and that these binding events are coupled with transduction processes that begin to change when they are exposed to the messy world of real samples. With the advent of fundamental breakthroughs at the intersection of materials science, micro- and nano-technology, and signal processing, hybrid chemo-sensory systems have incorporated tunable, optimizable operating parameters, through which changes in the response characteristics can be modeled and compensated as the environmental conditions or application needs change. The objective of this article, in this context, is to bring together the key advances at the device, data processing, and system levels that enable chemo-sensory systems to “adapt” in response to their environments. Accordingly, in this review we will feature the research effort made by selected experts on chemical sensing and information theory, whose work has been devoted to develop strategies that provide tunability and adaptability to single sensor devices or sensory array systems. Particularly, we consider sensor-array selection, modulation of internal sensing parameters, and active sensing. The article ends with some conclusions drawn from the results presented and a visionary look toward the future in terms of how the field may evolve. PMID

  20. Adaptation in human somatosensory cortex as a model of sensory memory construction: a study using high-density EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Claire; Joyce, Niamh; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation in sensory cortices has been seen as a mechanism allowing the creation of transient memory representations. Here we tested the adapting properties of early responses in human somatosensory areas SI and SII by analysing somatosensory-evoked potentials over the very first repetitions of a stimulus. SI and SII generators were identified by well-defined scalp potentials and source localisation from high-density 128-channel EEG. Earliest responses (~20 ms) from area 3b in the depth of the post-central gyrus did not show significant adaptation to stimuli repeated at 300 ms intervals. In contrast, responses around 45 ms from the crown of the gyrus (areas 1 and 2) rapidly lessened to a plateau and abated at the 20th stimulation, and activities from SII in the parietal operculum at ~100 ms displayed strong adaptation with a steady amplitude decrease from the first repetition. Although responses in both SI (1-2) and SII areas showed adapting properties and hence sensory memory capacities, evidence of sensory mismatch detection has been demonstrated only for responses reflecting SII activation. This may index the passage from an early form of sensory storage in SI to more operational memory codes in SII, allowing the prediction of forthcoming input and the triggering of a specific signal when such input differs from the previous sequence. This is consistent with a model whereby the length of temporal receptive windows increases with progression in the cortical hierarchy, in parallel with the complexity and abstraction of neural representations.

  1. Influence of neural adaptation on dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2017-12-01

    How neural adaptation affects neural information processing (i.e. the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities) is a central question in computational neuroscience. In my previous works, I analytically clarified the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring-type neural network model that is widely used to model the visual cortex, motor cortex, and several other brain regions. The neural dynamics and the equilibrium state in the neural network model corresponded to a Bayesian computation and statistically optimal multiple information integration, respectively, under a biologically inspired condition. These results were revealed in an analytically tractable manner; however, adaptation effects were not considered. Here, I analytically reveal how the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network are influenced by spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). SFA is an adaptation that causes gradual inhibition of neural activity when a sustained stimulus is applied, and the strength of this inhibition depends on neural activities. I reveal that SFA plays three roles: (1) SFA amplifies the influence of external input in neural dynamics; (2) SFA allows the history of the external input to affect neural dynamics; and (3) the equilibrium state corresponds to the statistically optimal multiple information integration independent of the existence of SFA. In addition, the equilibrium state in a ring neural network model corresponds to the statistically optimal integration of multiple information sources under biologically inspired conditions, independent of the existence of SFA.

  2. Robust Adaptive Control via Neural Linearization and Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Carmona Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new type of neural adaptive control via dynamic neural networks. For a class of unknown nonlinear systems, a neural identifier-based feedback linearization controller is first used. Dead-zone and projection techniques are applied to assure the stability of neural identification. Then four types of compensator are addressed. The stability of closed-loop system is also proven.

  3. Behavioral, perceptual, and neural alterations in sensory and multisensory function in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Sarah H; Stevenson, Ryan A; Wallace, Mark T

    2015-11-01

    Although sensory processing challenges have been noted since the first clinical descriptions of autism, it has taken until the release of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) in 2013 for sensory problems to be included as part of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the diagnostic profile. Because sensory information forms the building blocks for higher-order social and cognitive functions, we argue that sensory processing is not only an additional piece of the puzzle, but rather a critical cornerstone for characterizing and understanding ASD. In this review we discuss what is currently known about sensory processing in ASD, how sensory function fits within contemporary models of ASD, and what is understood about the differences in the underlying neural processing of sensory and social communication observed between individuals with and without ASD. In addition to highlighting the sensory features associated with ASD, we also emphasize the importance of multisensory processing in building perceptual and cognitive representations, and how deficits in multisensory integration may also be a core characteristic of ASD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The neural circuits and sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Kang, Lijun; Piggott, Beverly J; Feng, Zhaoyang; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Most animals can distinguish two distinct types of touch stimuli: gentle (innocuous) and harsh (noxious/painful) touch, however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model for the study of gentle touch sensation. However, little is known about harsh touch sensation in this organism. Here we characterize harsh touch sensation in C. elegans. We show that C. elegans exhibits differential behavioural responses to harsh touch and gentle touch. Laser ablations identify distinct sets of sensory neurons and interneurons required for harsh touch sensation at different body segments. Optogenetic stimulation of the circuitry can drive behaviour. Patch-clamp recordings reveal that TRP family and amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels mediate touch-evoked currents in different sensory neurons. Our work identifies the neural circuits and characterizes the sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in C. elegans, establishing it as a genetic model for studying this sensory modality.

  5. Adaptive training of feedforward neural networks by Kalman filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftcioglu, Oe. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Tuerkcan, E. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    1995-02-01

    Adaptive training of feedforward neural networks by Kalman filtering is described. Adaptive training is particularly important in estimation by neural network in real-time environmental where the trained network is used for system estimation while the network is further trained by means of the information provided by the experienced/exercised ongoing operation. As result of this, neural network adapts itself to a changing environment to perform its mission without recourse to re-training. The performance of the training method is demonstrated by means of actual process signals from a nuclear power plant. (orig.).

  6. Adaptive optimization and control using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, W.C.; Brown, S.K.; Jones, R.D.; Bowling, P.S.; Barnes, C.W.

    1993-10-22

    Recent work has demonstrated the ability of neural-network-based controllers to optimize and control machines with complex, non-linear, relatively unknown control spaces. We present a brief overview of neural networks via a taxonomy illustrating some capabilities of different kinds of neural networks. We present some successful control examples, particularly the optimization and control of a small-angle negative ion source.

  7. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  8. The trait of sensory processing sensitivity and neural responses to changes in visual scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiellowicz, Jadzia; Xu, Xiaomeng; Aron, Arthur; Aron, Elaine; Cao, Guikang; Feng, Tingyong; Weng, Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the extent to which individual differences in sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), a temperament/personality trait characterized by social, emotional and physical sensitivity, are associated with neural response in visual areas in response to subtle changes in visual scenes. Sixteen participants completed the Highly Sensitive Person questionnaire, a standard measure of SPS. Subsequently, they were tested on a change detection task while undergoing functional m...

  9. Artificial neural networks (ANN): prediction of sensory measurements from instrumental data

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,Naiara Barbosa; Minim,Valéria Paula Rodrigues; Silva,Rita de Cássia dos Santos Navarro; Della Lucia,Suzana Maria; Minim,Luis Aantonio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to predict by means of Artificial Neural Network (ANN), multilayer perceptrons, the texture attributes of light cheesecurds perceived by trained judges based on instrumental texture measurements. Inputs to the network were the instrumental texture measurements of light cheesecurd (imitative and fundamental parameters). Output variables were the sensory attributes consistency and spreadability. Nine light cheesecurd formulations composed of different combination...

  10. Artificial neural networks (ANN: prediction of sensory measurements from instrumental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara Barbosa Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to predict by means of Artificial Neural Network (ANN, multilayer perceptrons, the texture attributes of light cheesecurds perceived by trained judges based on instrumental texture measurements. Inputs to the network were the instrumental texture measurements of light cheesecurd (imitative and fundamental parameters. Output variables were the sensory attributes consistency and spreadability. Nine light cheesecurd formulations composed of different combinations of fat and water were evaluated. The measurements obtained by the instrumental and sensory analyses of these formulations constituted the data set used for training and validation of the network. Network training was performed using a back-propagation algorithm. The network architecture selected was composed of 8-3-9-2 neurons in its layers, which quickly and accurately predicted the sensory texture attributes studied, showing a high correlation between the predicted and experimental values for the validation data set and excellent generalization ability, with a validation RMSE of 0.0506.

  11. Xenopus laevis: an ideal experimental model for studying the developmental dynamics of neural network assembly and sensory-motor computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Hans; Simmers, John

    2012-04-01

    The amphibian Xenopus laevis represents a highly amenable model system for exploring the ontogeny of central neural networks, the functional establishment of sensory-motor transformations, and the generation of effective motor commands for complex behaviors. Specifically, the ability to employ a range of semi-intact and isolated preparations for in vitro morphophysiological experimentation has provided new insights into the developmental and integrative processes associated with the generation of locomotory behavior during changing life styles. In vitro electrophysiological studies have begun to explore the functional assembly, disassembly and dynamic plasticity of spinal pattern generating circuits as Xenopus undergoes the developmental switch from larval tail-based swimming to adult limb-based locomotion. Major advances have also been made in understanding the developmental onset of multisensory signal processing for reactive gaze and posture stabilizing reflexes during self-motion. Additionally, recent evidence from semi-intact animal and isolated CNS experiments has provided compelling evidence that in Xenopus tadpoles, predictive feed-forward signaling from the spinal locomotor pattern generator are engaged in minimizing visual disturbances during tail-based swimming. This new concept questions the traditional view of retinal image stabilization that in vertebrates has been exclusively attributed to sensory-motor transformations of body/head motion-detecting signals. Moreover, changes in visuomotor demands associated with the developmental transition in propulsive strategy from tail- to limb-based locomotion during metamorphosis presumably necessitates corresponding adaptive alterations in the intrinsic spinoextraocular coupling mechanism. Consequently, Xenopus provides a unique opportunity to address basic questions on the developmental dynamics of neural network assembly and sensory-motor computations for vertebrate motor behavior in general. Copyright

  12. A self-organized artificial neural network architecture for sensory integration with applications to letter-phoneme integration

    OpenAIRE

    Jantvik, Tamas; Gustafsson, Lennart; Paplinski, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The multimodal self-organizing network (MMSON), an artificial neural network architecture carrying out sensory integration, is presented here. The architecture is designed using neurophysiological findings and imaging studies that pertain to sensory integration and consists of interconnected lattices of artificial neurons. In this artificial neural architecture, the degree of recognition of stimuli, that is, the perceived reliability of stimuli in the various subnetworks, is included in the c...

  13. Adaptive Synchronization of Memristor-based Chaotic Neural Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chaotic neural networks consisting of a great number of chaotic neurons are able to reproduce the rich dynamics observed in biological nervous systems. In recent years, the memristor has attracted much interest in the efficient implementation of artificial synapses and neurons. This work addresses adaptive synchronization of a class of memristor-based neural chaotic systems using a novel adaptive backstepping approach. A systematic design procedure is presented. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive synchronization method and its potential in practical application of memristive chaotic oscillators in secure communication.

  14. Toward an Interdisciplinary Understanding of Sensory Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Integration of the Neural and Symptom Literatures

    OpenAIRE

    Schauder, Kimberly B.; Bennetto, Loisa

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing differences have long been associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and they have recently been added to the diagnostic criteria for the disorder. The focus on sensory processing in ASD research has increased substantially in the last decade. This research has been approached from two different perspectives: the first focuses on characterizing the symptoms that manifest in response to real world sensory stimulation, and the second focuses on the neural pathways and m...

  15. Online adaptive neural control of a robotic lower limb prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanias, J. A.; Simon, A. M.; Finucane, S. B.; Perreault, E. J.; Hargrove, L. J.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an adaptive intent recognition algorithm that continuously learns to incorporate a lower limb amputee’s neural information (acquired via electromyography (EMG)) as they ambulate with a robotic leg prosthesis. Approach. We present a powered lower limb prosthesis that was configured to acquire the user’s neural information and kinetic/kinematic information from embedded mechanical sensors, and identify and respond to the user’s intent. We conducted an experiment with eight transfemoral amputees over multiple days. EMG and mechanical sensor data were collected while subjects using a powered knee/ankle prosthesis completed various ambulation activities such as walking on level ground, stairs, and ramps. Our adaptive intent recognition algorithm automatically transitioned the prosthesis into the different locomotion modes and continuously updated the user’s model of neural data during ambulation. Main results. Our proposed algorithm accurately and consistently identified the user’s intent over multiple days, despite changing neural signals. The algorithm incorporated 96.31% [0.91%] (mean, [standard error]) of neural information across multiple experimental sessions, and outperformed non-adaptive versions of our algorithm—with a 6.66% [3.16%] relative decrease in error rate. Significance. This study demonstrates that our adaptive intent recognition algorithm enables incorporation of neural information over long periods of use, allowing assistive robotic devices to accurately respond to the user’s intent with low error rates.

  16. Neural interface methods and apparatus to provide artificial sensory capabilities to a subject

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stephen P.; Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Novick, David K.; Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.

    2017-01-24

    Embodiments of neural interfaces according to the present invention comprise sensor modules for sensing environmental attributes beyond the natural sensory capability of a subject, and communicating the attributes wirelessly to an external (ex-vivo) portable module attached to the subject. The ex-vivo module encodes and communicates the attributes via a transcutaneous inductively coupled link to an internal (in-vivo) module implanted within the subject. The in-vivo module converts the attribute information into electrical neural stimuli that are delivered to a peripheral nerve bundle within the subject, via an implanted electrode. Methods and apparatus according to the invention incorporate implantable batteries to power the in-vivo module allowing for transcutaneous bidirectional communication of low voltage (e.g. on the order of 5 volts) encoded signals as stimuli commands and neural responses, in a robust, low-error rate, communication channel with minimal effects to the subjects' skin.

  17. Neural interface methods and apparatus to provide artificial sensory capabilities to a subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerger, Stephen P.; Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Novick, David K.; Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.

    2017-01-24

    Embodiments of neural interfaces according to the present invention comprise sensor modules for sensing environmental attributes beyond the natural sensory capability of a subject, and communicating the attributes wirelessly to an external (ex-vivo) portable module attached to the subject. The ex-vivo module encodes and communicates the attributes via a transcutaneous inductively coupled link to an internal (in-vivo) module implanted within the subject. The in-vivo module converts the attribute information into electrical neural stimuli that are delivered to a peripheral nerve bundle within the subject, via an implanted electrode. Methods and apparatus according to the invention incorporate implantable batteries to power the in-vivo module allowing for transcutaneous bidirectional communication of low voltage (e.g. on the order of 5 volts) encoded signals as stimuli commands and neural responses, in a robust, low-error rate, communication channel with minimal effects to the subjects' skin.

  18. Effect of pulsed infrared lasers on neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselmann, Ursula; Rymer, William Z.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    1990-06-01

    Over the past ten years there has been an increasing interest in the use of lasers for neurosurgical and neurological procedures. Novel recent applications range from neurosurgical procedures such as dorsal root entry zone lesions made with argon and carbon dioxide microsurgical lasers to pain relief by low power laser irradiation of the appropriate painful nerve or affected region1 '2 However, despite the widespread clinical applications of laser light, very little is known about the photobiological interactions between laser light and nervous tissue. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser light on neural impulse conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves in rats and cats. Our data indicate that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can induce a preferential impairment of (1) the synaptic effects of small afferent fibers on dorsal horn cells in the spinal cord and of (2) small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers in dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. These results imply that laser light might have selective effects on impulse conduction in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers. In agreement with our elecirophysiological observations recent histological data from our laboratory show, that axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase is selectively impaired in small sensory nerve fibers. In summary these data indicate, that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can selectively impair neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in small sensory nerve fibers as compared to fast conducting fibers. A selective influence of laser irradiation on slow conducting fibers could have important clinical applications, especially for the treatment of chronic pain.

  19. Sex-Specific Links in Motor and Sensory Adaptations to Repetitive Motion-Induced Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Zachary R; Srinivasan, Divya; Côté, Julie N

    2017-11-11

    The objectives of this study were to assess the sex-specific relationships between motor and sensory adaptations to repetitive arm motion-induced neck/shoulder fatigue, and to measure how additional sensory stimulation affects these adaptations. Twenty-three participants performed two sessions of a repetitive pointing task until scoring 8 on the Borg CR10 scale for neck/shoulder exertion or for a maximum of 45 min, with and without sensory stimulation (i.e., light touch) applied on the fatiguing shoulder. Just before reaching the task termination criteria, all participants showed changes in mean and variability of arm joint angles and experienced a fivefold increase in anterior deltoid sensory threshold in the stimulus-present condition. Women with the greatest increases in anterior deltoid sensory thresholds demonstrated the greatest increases in shoulder variability (r = .66), whereas men with the greatest increases in upper-trapezius sensory thresholds demonstrated the greatest changes in shoulder angle (r = -.60) and coordination (r = .65) variability. Thus, sensory stimulation had no influence on time to termination but affected how men and women differently adapted, suggesting sex differences in sensorimotor fatigue response mechanisms.

  20. Toward an Interdisciplinary Understanding of Sensory Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Integration of the Neural and Symptom Literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauder, Kimberly B; Bennetto, Loisa

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing differences have long been associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and they have recently been added to the diagnostic criteria for the disorder. The focus on sensory processing in ASD research has increased substantially in the last decade. This research has been approached from two different perspectives: the first focuses on characterizing the symptoms that manifest in response to real world sensory stimulation, and the second focuses on the neural pathways and mechanisms underlying sensory processing. The purpose of this paper is to integrate the empirical literature on sensory processing in ASD from the last decade, including both studies characterizing sensory symptoms and those that investigate neural response to sensory stimuli. We begin with a discussion of definitions to clarify some of the inconsistencies in terminology that currently exist in the field. Next, the sensory symptoms literature is reviewed with a particular focus on developmental considerations and the relationship of sensory symptoms to other core features of the disorder. Then, the neuroscience literature is reviewed with a focus on methodological approaches and specific sensory modalities. Currently, these sensory symptoms and neuroscience perspectives are largely developing independently from each other leading to multiple, but separate, theories and methods, thus creating a multidisciplinary approach to sensory processing in ASD. In order to progress our understanding of sensory processing in ASD, it is now critical to integrate these two research perspectives and move toward an interdisciplinary approach. This will inevitably aid in a better understanding of the underlying biological basis of these symptoms and help realize the translational value through its application to early identification and treatment. The review ends with specific recommendations for future research to help bridge these two research perspectives in order to advance our understanding

  1. Frequency of Congenital Heart Diseases in Prelingual Sensory-Neural Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing impairment is the most frequent sensorial congenital defect in newborns and has increased to 2–4 cases per 1,000 live births. Sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL accounts for more than 90% of all hearing loss. This disorder is associated with other congenital disorders such as renal, skeletal, ocular, and cardiac disorders. Given that congenital heart diseases are life-threatening, we decided to study the frequency of congenital heart diseases in children with congenital sensory-neural deafness.  Materials and Methods: All children who had undergone cochlear implantation surgery due to SNHL and who had attended our hospital for speech therapy during 2008–2011 were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography.  Results: Thirty-one children (15 boys and 16 girls with a mean age of 55.70 months were examined, and underwent electrocardiography (ECG and echocardiography. None of the children had any signs of heart problems in their medical records. Most of their heart examinations were normal, one patient had expiratory wheeze, four (12% had mid-systolic click, and four (12% had an intensified S1 sound. In echocardiography, 15 children (46% had mitral valve prolapse (MVP and two (6% had minimal mitral regurgitation (MR. Mean ejection fraction (EF was 69% and the mean fractional shortening (FS was 38%.  Conclusion:  This study indicates the need for echocardiography and heart examinations in children with SNHL.

  2. Anxiety dissociates the adaptive functions of sensory and motor response enhancements to social threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zein, Marwa; Wyart, Valentin; Grèzes, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Efficient detection and reaction to negative signals in the environment is essential for survival. In social situations, these signals are often ambiguous and can imply different levels of threat for the observer, thereby making their recognition susceptible to contextual cues – such as gaze direction when judging facial displays of emotion. However, the mechanisms underlying such contextual effects remain poorly understood. By computational modeling of human behavior and electrical brain activity, we demonstrate that gaze direction enhances the perceptual sensitivity to threat-signaling emotions – anger paired with direct gaze, and fear paired with averted gaze. This effect arises simultaneously in ventral face-selective and dorsal motor cortices at 200 ms following face presentation, dissociates across individuals as a function of anxiety, and does not reflect increased attention to threat-signaling emotions. These findings reveal that threat tunes neural processing in fast, selective, yet attention-independent fashion in sensory and motor systems, for different adaptive purposes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10274.001 PMID:26712157

  3. Excessive Sensory Stimulation during Development Alters Neural Plasticity and Vulnerability to Cocaine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinder, Shilpa; Donckels, Elizabeth A; Ramirez, Julian S B; Christakis, Dimitri A; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Ferguson, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Early life experiences affect the formation of neuronal networks, which can have a profound impact on brain function and behavior later in life. Previous work has shown that mice exposed to excessive sensory stimulation during development are hyperactive and novelty seeking, and display impaired cognition compared with controls. In this study, we addressed the issue of whether excessive sensory stimulation during development could alter behaviors related to addiction and underlying circuitry in CD-1 mice. We found that the reinforcing properties of cocaine were significantly enhanced in mice exposed to excessive sensory stimulation. Moreover, although these mice displayed hyperactivity that became more pronounced over time, they showed impaired persistence of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. These behavioral effects were associated with alterations in glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Together, these findings suggest that excessive sensory stimulation in early life significantly alters drug reward and the neural circuits that regulate addiction and attention deficit hyperactivity. These observations highlight the consequences of early life experiences and may have important implications for children growing up in today's complex technological environment.

  4. Neural Adaptation Leads to Cognitive Ethanol Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Brooks G.; Khurana, Sukant; Kuperman, Anna; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2012-01-01

    Physiological alcohol dependence is a key adaptation to chronic ethanol consumption that underlies withdrawal symptoms, is thought to directly contribute to alcohol addiction behaviors, and is associated with cognitive problems such as deficits in learning and memory [1–3]. Based on the idea that an ethanol-adapted (dependent) animal will perform better in a learning assay than an animal experiencing ethanol withdrawal will, we have used a learning paradigm to detect physiological ethanol dep...

  5. Multiple conserved cell adhesion protein interactions mediate neural wiring of a sensory circuit in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byunghyuk; Emmons, Scott W

    2017-09-13

    Nervous system function relies on precise synaptic connections. A number of widely-conserved cell adhesion proteins are implicated in cell recognition between synaptic partners, but how these proteins act as a group to specify a complex neural network is poorly understood. Taking advantage of known connectivity in C. elegans, we identified and studied cell adhesion genes expressed in three interacting neurons in the mating circuits of the adult male. Two interacting pairs of cell surface proteins independently promote fasciculation between sensory neuron HOA and its postsynaptic target interneuron AVG: BAM-2/neurexin-related in HOA binds to CASY-1/calsyntenin in AVG; SAX-7/L1CAM in sensory neuron PHC binds to RIG-6/contactin in AVG. A third, basal pathway results in considerable HOA-AVG fasciculation and synapse formation in the absence of the other two. The features of this multiplexed mechanism help to explain how complex connectivity is encoded and robustly established during nervous system development.

  6. Augmenting sensory-motor conflict promotes adaptation of postural behaviors in a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshner, Emily A; Slaboda, Jill C; Buddharaju, Ravi; Lanaria, Lois; Norman, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a series of studies that investigated how multimodal mismatches in a virtual environment modified postural response organization. Adaptation of motor commands to functional circumstances is driven directly by error signals. Thus, motor relearning should increase when performing in environments containing sensory mismatch. We hypothesized that kinematics of the response would be linked to specific characteristics of the sensory array. Sensory weighting was varied by: 1) rotating the visual field about the talo-crural joint or the interaural axis, 2) adding stochastic vibrations at the sole of the foot, and 3) combining galvanic vestibular stimulation with rotations of the visual field. Results indicated that postural responses are shaped by the location of a sensory disturbance and also by the processing demands of the environmental array. Sensory-motor demands need to be structured when developing therapeutic interventions for patients with balance disorders.

  7. Rivalry of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions: Dehydration attenuates olfactory disgust and its neural correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Lea; Friedrich, Hergen; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay; Morishima, Yosuke; Landis, Basile Nicolas; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Neural correlates have been described for emotions evoked by states of homeostatic imbalance (e.g. thirst, hunger, and breathlessness) and for emotions induced by external sensory stimulation (such as fear and disgust). However, the neurobiological mechanisms of their interaction, when they are experienced simultaneously, are still unknown. We investigated the interaction on the neurobiological and the perceptional level using subjective ratings, serum parameters, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a situation of emotional rivalry, when both a homeostatic and a sensory-evoked emotion were experienced at the same time. Twenty highly dehydrated male subjects rated a disgusting odor as significantly less repulsive when they were thirsty. On the neurobiological level, we found that this reduction in subjective disgust during thirst was accompanied by a significantly reduced neural activity in the insular cortex, a brain area known to be considerably involved in processing of disgust. Furthermore, during the experience of disgust in the satiated condition, we observed a significant functional connectivity between brain areas responding to the disgusting odor, which was absent during the stimulation in the thirsty condition. These results suggest interference of conflicting emotions: an acute homeostatic imbalance can attenuate the experience of another emotion evoked by the sensory perception of a potentially harmful external agent. This finding offers novel insights with regard to the behavioral relevance of biologically different types of emotions, indicating that some types of emotions are more imperative for behavior than others. As a general principle, this modulatory effect during the conflict of homeostatic and sensory-evoked emotions may function to safeguard survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dual adaptive dynamic control of mobile robots using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Marvin K; Fabri, Simon G; Camilleri, Liberato

    2009-02-01

    This paper proposes two novel dual adaptive neural control schemes for the dynamic control of nonholonomic mobile robots. The two schemes are developed in discrete time, and the robot's nonlinear dynamic functions are assumed to be unknown. Gaussian radial basis function and sigmoidal multilayer perceptron neural networks are used for function approximation. In each scheme, the unknown network parameters are estimated stochastically in real time, and no preliminary offline neural network training is used. In contrast to other adaptive techniques hitherto proposed in the literature on mobile robots, the dual control laws presented in this paper do not rely on the heuristic certainty equivalence property but account for the uncertainty in the estimates. This results in a major improvement in tracking performance, despite the plant uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. Monte Carlo simulation and statistical hypothesis testing are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the two proposed stochastic controllers as applied to the trajectory-tracking problem of a differentially driven wheeled mobile robot.

  9. Dynamic Adaptive Neural Network Arrays: A Neuromorphic Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disney, Adam [University of Tennessee (UT); Reynolds, John [University of Tennessee (UT)

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Adaptive Neural Network Array (DANNA) is a neuromorphic hardware implementation. It differs from most other neuromorphic projects in that it allows for programmability of structure, and it is trained or designed using evolutionary optimization. This paper describes the DANNA structure, how DANNA is trained using evolutionary optimization, and an application of DANNA to a very simple classification task.

  10. Improved probabilistic neural networks with self-adaptive strategies for transformer fault diagnosis problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Hong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic neural network has successfully solved all kinds of engineering problems in various fields since it is proposed. In probabilistic neural network, Spread has great influence on its performance, and probabilistic neural network will generate bad prediction results if it is improperly selected. It is difficult to select the optimal manually. In this article, a variant of probabilistic neural network with self-adaptive strategy, called self-adaptive probabilistic neural network, is proposed. In self-adaptive probabilistic neural network, Spread can be self-adaptively adjusted and selected and then the best selected Spread is used to guide the self-adaptive probabilistic neural network train and test. In addition, two simplified strategies are incorporated into the proposed self-adaptive probabilistic neural network with the aim of further improving its performance and then two versions of simplified self-adaptive probabilistic neural network (simplified self-adaptive probabilistic neural networks 1 and 2 are proposed. The variants of self-adaptive probabilistic neural networks are further applied to solve the transformer fault diagnosis problem. By comparing them with basic probabilistic neural network, and the traditional back propagation, extreme learning machine, general regression neural network, and self-adaptive extreme learning machine, the results have experimentally proven that self-adaptive probabilistic neural networks have a more accurate prediction and better generalization performance when addressing the transformer fault diagnosis problem.

  11. Sensory processing and adaptive behavior deficits of children across the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joshua L; Agnihotri, Sabrina; Keightley, Michelle

    2010-06-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can have detrimental effects on a child's development of adaptive behaviors necessary for success in the areas of academic achievement, socialization, and self-care. Sensory processing abilities have been found to affect a child's ability to successfully perform adaptive behaviors. The current study explored whether significant differences in sensory processing abilities, adaptive behavior, and neurocognitive functioning are observed between children diagnosed with partial Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (pFAS), Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND), or children who were prenatally exposed to alcohol (PEA), but did not meet criteria for an FASD diagnosis. The influence of IQ on adaptive behavior as well as further exploration of the relationship between sensory processing and adaptive behavior deficits among these children was also examined. A secondary analysis was conducted on some of the Short Sensory Profile (SSP) scores, Adaptive Behavior Assessment System--Second Edition (ABAS-II) scores, and Wechsler Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition/Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence--Third Edition (WISC- IV/WPPSI-III) scores of 46 children between 3 and 14 years of age with pFAS, ARND, or who were PEA. Greater sensory processing deficits were found in children with a diagnosis of pFAS and ARND compared to those in the PEA group. Children with an ARND diagnosis scored significantly worse on measures of adaptive behavior than the PEA group. Children with pFAS scored significantly lower than children with ARND or PEA on perceptual/performance IQ. No correlation was found between IQ scores and adaptive behaviors across the FASD diagnostic categories. A significant positive correlation was found between SSP and ABAS-II scores. Regardless of the diagnosis received under the FASD umbrella, functional difficulties that could not be observed using traditional measures of intelligence were found, supporting guidelines that a broad

  12. Octopamine selectively modifies the slow component of sensory adaptation in an insect mechanoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B G; Torkkeli, P H; French, A S

    1992-09-25

    The effects of octopamine were studied on the dynamic behavior of the sensory neuron in the cockroach femoral tactile spine. The neuron is a rapidly adapting mechanoreceptor in which adaptation occurs by elevation of the threshold for action potential encoding. The threshold follows increases or decreases of membrane potential, with a delay that involves two separate exponential components. Previous evidence has associated the slow component with sodium pumping and the fast component with sodium channel inactivation. Octopamine reversibly raised the resting threshold and increased but slowed the slow component. These data indicate that octopamine has specific effects on membrane-ionic processes in insect sensory neurons.

  13. Sensori-neural hearing loss in patients treated with irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau, C.; Moller, K.; Overgaard, M.; Overgaard, J.; Elbrond, O. (University of Aarhus (Denmark))

    1991-08-01

    The present investigation has been carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the inner ear to irradiation. Cochlear function was tested in a cohort of 22 patients before and 7-84 months after receiving external irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The pre-irradiation sensori-neural hearing threshold at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz was used as a baseline for the individual patient, and the observed sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) was calculated as the difference between pre- and post-irradiation values. The pre-irradiation hearing level or patient age was not correlated with the actual SNHL. In contrast, there was a significant correlation between the total radiation dose to the inner ear and the observed hearing impairment. SNHL was most pronounced in the high frequencies, with values up to 35 dB (4000 Hz) and 25 dB (2000 Hz) in some patients. The latent period for the complication appeared to be 12 months or more. The deleterious effect of irradiation on the hearing should be kept in mind both in treatment planning and in the follow-up after radiotherapy.

  14. Neural evidence supports a dual sensory-motor role for insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Brandon; Deora, Tanvi; Mohren, Thomas; Daniel, Thomas

    2017-09-13

    Flying insects use feedback from various sensory modalities including vision and mechanosensation to navigate through their environment. The rapid speed of mechanosensory information acquisition and processing compensates for the slower processing times associated with vision, particularly under low light conditions. While halteres in dipteran species are well known to provide such information for flight control, less is understood about the mechanosensory roles of their evolutionary antecedent, wings. The features that wing mechanosensory neurons (campaniform sensilla) encode remains relatively unexplored. We hypothesized that the wing campaniform sensilla of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, rapidly and selectively extract mechanical stimulus features in a manner similar to halteres. We used electrophysiological and computational techniques to characterize the encoding properties of wing campaniform sensilla. To accomplish this, we developed a novel technique for localizing receptive fields using a focused IR laser that elicits changes in the neural activity of mechanoreceptors. We found that (i) most wing mechanosensors encoded mechanical stimulus features rapidly and precisely, (ii) they are selective for specific stimulus features, and (iii) there is diversity in the encoding properties of wing campaniform sensilla. We found that the encoding properties of wing campaniform sensilla are similar to those for haltere neurons. Therefore, it appears that the neural architecture that underlies the haltere sensory function is present in wings, which lends credence to the notion that wings themselves may serve a similar sensory function. Thus, wings may not only function as the primary actuator of the organism but also as sensors of the inertial dynamics of the animal. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Predictive Acoustic Tracking with an Adaptive Neural Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    model of the lizard peripheral auditory system to extract information regarding sound direction. This information is utilised by a neural machinery to learn the acoustic signal’s velocity through fast and unsupervised correlation-based learning adapted from differential Hebbian learning. This approach...... has previously been validated in simulation and via robotic trials to track a continuous pure tone acoustic signal with a semi-circular motion trajectory and a constant but unknown angular velocity. The neural machinery has been shown to be able to learn different target angular velocities...

  16. A biologically inspired neural model for visual and proprioceptive integration including sensory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Maryam; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Lari, Abdolaziz Azizi

    2013-12-01

    Humans perceive the surrounding world by integration of information through different sensory modalities. Earlier models of multisensory integration rely mainly on traditional Bayesian and causal Bayesian inferences for single causal (source) and two causal (for two senses such as visual and auditory systems), respectively. In this paper a new recurrent neural model is presented for integration of visual and proprioceptive information. This model is based on population coding which is able to mimic multisensory integration of neural centers in the human brain. The simulation results agree with those achieved by casual Bayesian inference. The model can also simulate the sensory training process of visual and proprioceptive information in human. Training process in multisensory integration is a point with less attention in the literature before. The effect of proprioceptive training on multisensory perception was investigated through a set of experiments in our previous study. The current study, evaluates the effect of both modalities, i.e., visual and proprioceptive training and compares them with each other through a set of new experiments. In these experiments, the subject was asked to move his/her hand in a circle and estimate its position. The experiments were performed on eight subjects with proprioception training and eight subjects with visual training. Results of the experiments show three important points: (1) visual learning rate is significantly more than that of proprioception; (2) means of visual and proprioceptive errors are decreased by training but statistical analysis shows that this decrement is significant for proprioceptive error and non-significant for visual error, and (3) visual errors in training phase even in the beginning of it, is much less than errors of the main test stage because in the main test, the subject has to focus on two senses. The results of the experiments in this paper is in agreement with the results of the neural model

  17. Evolving RBF neural networks for adaptive soft-sensor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandridis, Alex

    2013-12-01

    This work presents an adaptive framework for building soft-sensors based on radial basis function (RBF) neural network models. The adaptive fuzzy means algorithm is utilized in order to evolve an RBF network, which approximates the unknown system based on input-output data from it. The methodology gradually builds the RBF network model, based on two separate levels of adaptation: On the first level, the structure of the hidden layer is modified by adding or deleting RBF centers, while on the second level, the synaptic weights are adjusted with the recursive least squares with exponential forgetting algorithm. The proposed approach is tested on two different systems, namely a simulated nonlinear DC Motor and a real industrial reactor. The results show that the produced soft-sensors can be successfully applied to model the two nonlinear systems. A comparison with two different adaptive modeling techniques, namely a dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy inference system (DENFIS) and neural networks trained with online backpropagation, highlights the advantages of the proposed methodology.

  18. Adapting Choral Singing Experiences for Older Adults: The Implications of Sensory, Perceptual, and Cognitive Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, Olivia Swedberg

    2014-01-01

    As people age, they naturally experience sensory, perceptual, and cognitive changes. Many of these changes necessitate adaptations in designing programs for older adults. Choral singing is an activity that has many potential benefits for older adults, yet the rehearsal environment, presentation style, and content of material presented may need to…

  19. Neural Control of Chronic Stress Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eHerman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress initiates adaptive processes that allow the organism to physiologically cope with prolonged or intermittent exposure to real or perceived threats. A major component of this response is repeated activation of glucocorticoid secretion by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis, which promotes redistribution of energy in a wide range of organ systems, including the brain. Prolonged or cumulative increases in glucocorticoid secretion can reduce benefits afforded by enhanced stress reactivity and eventually become maladaptive. The long-term impact of stress is kept in check by the process of habituation, which reduces HPA axis responses upon repeated exposure to homotypic stressors and likely limits deleterious actions of prolonged glucocorticoid secretion. Habituation is regulated by limbic stress-regulatory sites, and is at least in part glucocorticoid feedback-dependent. Chronic stress also sensitizes reactivity to new stimuli. While sensitization may be important in maintaining response flexibility in response to new threats, it may also add to the cumulative impact of glucocorticoids on the brain and body. Finally, unpredictable or severe stress exposure may cause long-term and lasting dysregulation of the HPA axis, likely due to altered limbic control of stress effector pathways. Stress-related disorders, such as depression and PTSD, are accompanied by glucocorticoid imbalances and structural/ functional alterations in limbic circuits that resemble those seen following chronic stress, suggesting that inappropriate processing of stressful information may be part of the pathological process.

  20. Linking Man and Machine Through Adaptive Sensory Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-02

    and in single unit recordings in non- human primates . In the second year of our grant, we finished data collection and developed a computational...Stephanie C Wissig, Carlyn A Patterson, Adam Kohn. Adaptation improves performance on a visual search task, (submitted) Jounal of Vision (08 2012) Ruben...Coen-Cagli, Odelia Schwartz. The impact on mid-level vision of statistically optimal divisive normalization in V1., PLoS Computational Biology (09

  1. Adaptive nonlinear control of missiles using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Michael Bryan

    Research has shown that neural networks can be used to improve upon approximate dynamic inversion for control of uncertain nonlinear systems. In one architecture, the neural network adaptively cancels inversion errors through on-line learning. Such learning is accomplished by a simple weight update rule derived from Lyapunov theory, thus assuring stability of the closed-loop system. In this research, previous results using linear-in-parameters neural networks were reformulated in the context of a more general class of composite nonlinear systems, and the control scheme was shown to possess important similarities and major differences with established methods of adaptive control. The neural-adaptive nonlinear control methodology in question has been used to design an autopilot for an anti-air missile with enhanced agile maneuvering capability, and simulation results indicate that this approach is a feasible one. There are, however, certain difficulties associated with choosing the proper network architecture which make it difficult to achieve the rapid learning required in this application. Accordingly, this technique has been further extended to incorporate the important class of feedforward neural networks with a single hidden layer. These neural networks feature well-known approximation capabilities and provide an effective, although nonlinear, parameterization of the adaptive control problem. Numerical results from a six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear agile anti-air missile simulation demonstrate the effectiveness of the autopilot design based on multilayer networks. Previous work in this area has implicitly assumed precise knowledge of the plant order, and made no allowances for unmodeled dynamics. This thesis describes an approach to the problem of controlling a class of nonlinear systems in the face of both unknown nonlinearities and unmodeled dynamics. The proposed methodology is similar to robust adaptive control techniques derived for control of linear

  2. Neural adaptations in isometric contractions with EMG and force biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Locks

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the quadriceps femoris neural adaptations during isometric contractions using force and electromyogram (EMG signals as visual biofeedback. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to three groups: EMG group, tested with EMG biofeedback; Force group, tested with force biofeedback; and Control group, tested without biofeedback. Evaluations were performed pre (baseline and post-tests to determine the maximum force and EMG amplitude during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC. The tests consisted of series of MVICs in which the participants were encouraged to surpass the force or EMG thresholds determined at baseline. The vastus lateralis EMG amplitude and knee extensor force increased significantly in all groups when compared the baseline and post-test evaluations values (p < .05. EMG percentage gain was significantly different between Force and Control groups (p < .01, while force percentage gain was not different between groups. Force biofeedback was more effective in producing neural adaptations.

  3. Bridging the divide between sensory integration and binding theory: Using a binding-like neural synchronization mechanism to model sensory enhancements during multisensory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billock, Vincent A; Tsou, Brian H

    2014-07-01

    Neural information combination problems are ubiquitous in cognitive neuroscience. Two important disciplines, although conceptually similar, take radically different approaches to these problems. Sensory binding theory is largely grounded in synchronization of neurons responding to different aspects of a stimulus, resulting in a coherent percept. Sensory integration focuses more on the influences of the senses on each other and is largely grounded in the study of neurons that respond to more than one sense. It would be desirable to bridge these disciplines, so that insights gleaned from either could be harnessed by the other. To link these two fields, we used a binding-like oscillatory synchronization mechanism to simulate neurons in rattlesnake that are driven by one sense but modulated by another. Mutual excitatory coupling produces synchronized trains of action potentials with enhanced firing rates. The same neural synchronization mechanism models the behavior of a population of cells in cat visual cortex that are modulated by auditory activation. The coupling strength of the synchronizing neurons is crucial to the outcome; a criterion of strong coupling (kept weak enough to avoid seriously distorting action potential amplitude) results in intensity-dependent sensory enhancement-the principle of inverse effectiveness-a key property of sensory integration.

  4. Neural adaptations in isometric contractions with EMG and force biofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Locks; Heleodório Honorato dos Santos; Luis Carlos Carvalho; Lígia Raquel Ortiz Gomes Stolt; José Jamacy de Almeida Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the quadriceps femoris neural adaptations during isometric contractions using force and electromyogram (EMG) signals as visual biofeedback. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to three groups: EMG group, tested with EMG biofeedback; Force group, tested with force biofeedback; and Control group, tested without biofeedback. Evaluations were performed pre (baseline) and post-tests to determine the maximum force and EMG amplitude during maximal voluntary iso...

  5. A neural architecture for nonlinear adaptive filtering of time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Nils; Larsen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    A neural architecture for adaptive filtering which incorporates a modularization principle is proposed. It facilitates a sparse parameterization, i.e. fewer parameters have to be estimated in a supervised training procedure. The main idea is to use a preprocessor which determines the dimension...... of the polynominals by scaling and limiting the inputs signals. The nonlinearity is constructed from Chebychev polynominals. The authors apply a second-order algorithm for updating the weights for adaptive nonlinearities. Finally the simulations indicate that the two kinds of preprocessing tend to complement each...

  6. Adaptive thresholds for neural networks with synaptic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollé, D; Heylen, R

    2007-08-01

    The inclusion of a macroscopic adaptive threshold is studied for the retrieval dynamics of both layered feedforward and fully connected neural network models with synaptic noise. These two types of architectures require a different method to be solved numerically. In both cases it is shown that, if the threshold is chosen appropriately as a function of the cross-talk noise and of the activity of the stored patterns, adapting itself automatically in the course of the recall process, an autonomous functioning of the network is guaranteed. This self-control mechanism considerably improves the quality of retrieval, in particular the storage capacity, the basins of attraction and the mutual information content.

  7. Adaptive Regularization of Neural Networks Using Conjugate Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Andersen et al. (1997) and Larsen et al. (1996, 1997) suggested a regularization scheme which iteratively adapts regularization parameters by minimizing validation error using simple gradient descent. In this contribution we present an improved algorithm based on the conjugate gradient technique........ Numerical experiments with feedforward neural networks successfully demonstrate improved generalization ability and lower computational cost......Andersen et al. (1997) and Larsen et al. (1996, 1997) suggested a regularization scheme which iteratively adapts regularization parameters by minimizing validation error using simple gradient descent. In this contribution we present an improved algorithm based on the conjugate gradient technique...

  8. Neural network based adaptive control for nonlinear dynamic regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoonghyun

    Adaptive control designs using neural networks (NNs) based on dynamic inversion are investigated for aerospace vehicles which are operated at highly nonlinear dynamic regimes. NNs play a key role as the principal element of adaptation to approximately cancel the effect of inversion error, which subsequently improves robustness to parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics in nonlinear regimes. An adaptive control scheme previously named 'composite model reference adaptive control' is further developed so that it can be applied to multi-input multi-output output feedback dynamic inversion. It can have adaptive elements in both the dynamic compensator (linear controller) part and/or in the conventional adaptive controller part, also utilizing state estimation information for NN adaptation. This methodology has more flexibility and thus hopefully greater potential than conventional adaptive designs for adaptive flight control in highly nonlinear flight regimes. The stability of the control system is proved through Lyapunov theorems, and validated with simulations. The control designs in this thesis also include the use of 'pseudo-control hedging' techniques which are introduced to prevent the NNs from attempting to adapt to various actuation nonlinearities such as actuator position and rate saturations. Control allocation is introduced for the case of redundant control effectors including thrust vectoring nozzles. A thorough comparison study of conventional and NN-based adaptive designs for a system under a limit cycle, wing-rock, is included in this research, and the NN-based adaptive control designs demonstrate their performances for two highly maneuverable aerial vehicles, NASA F-15 ACTIVE and FQM-117B unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), operated under various nonlinearities and uncertainties.

  9. Distributed recurrent neural forward models with synaptic adaptation and CPG-based control for complex behaviors of walking robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures) with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of (1) central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models

  10. Understanding the neural mechanisms involved in sensory control of voice production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Amy L; Flagmeier, Sabina G; Manes, Jordan L; Larson, Charles R; Rogers, Bill; Robin, Donald A

    2012-05-15

    Auditory feedback is important for the control of voice fundamental frequency (F0). In the present study we used neuroimaging to identify regions of the brain responsible for sensory control of the voice. We used a pitch-shift paradigm where subjects respond to an alteration, or shift, of voice pitch auditory feedback with a reflexive change in F0. To determine the neural substrates involved in these audio-vocal responses, subjects underwent fMRI scanning while vocalizing with or without pitch-shifted feedback. The comparison of shifted and unshifted vocalization revealed activation bilaterally in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) in response to the pitch shifted feedback. We hypothesize that the STG activity is related to error detection by auditory error cells located in the superior temporal cortex and efference copy mechanisms whereby this region is responsible for the coding of a mismatch between actual and predicted voice F0. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A self-organized artificial neural network architecture for sensory integration with applications to letter-phoneme integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantvik, Tamas; Gustafsson, Lennart; Papliński, Andrew P

    2011-08-01

    The multimodal self-organizing network (MMSON), an artificial neural network architecture carrying out sensory integration, is presented here. The architecture is designed using neurophysiological findings and imaging studies that pertain to sensory integration and consists of interconnected lattices of artificial neurons. In this artificial neural architecture, the degree of recognition of stimuli, that is, the perceived reliability of stimuli in the various subnetworks, is included in the computation. The MMSON's behavior is compared to aspects of brain function that deal with sensory integration. According to human behavioral studies, integration of signals from sensory receptors of different modalities enhances perception of objects and events and also reduces time to detection. In neocortex, integration takes place in bimodal and multimodal association areas and result, not only in feedback-mediated enhanced unimodal perception and shortened reaction time, but also in robust bimodal or multimodal percepts. Simulation data from the presented artificial neural network architecture show that it replicates these important psychological and neuroscientific characteristics of sensory integration.

  12. Implications of a neural network model of early sensori-motor development for the field of developmental neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijst, JJ; Touwen, BCL; Vos, JE

    This paper reports on a neural network model for early sensori-motor development and on the possible implications of this research for our understanding and, eventually, treatment of motor disorders like cerebral palsy. We recapitulate the results we published in detail in a series of papers [1-4].

  13. Neural correlates of sensory prediction errors in monkeys: evidence for internal models of voluntary self-motion in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Kathleen E; Brooks, Jessica X

    2015-02-01

    During self-motion, the vestibular system makes essential contributions to postural stability and self-motion perception. To ensure accurate perception and motor control, it is critical to distinguish between vestibular sensory inputs that are the result of externally applied motion (exafference) and that are the result of our own actions (reafference). Indeed, although the vestibular sensors encode vestibular afference and reafference with equal fidelity, neurons at the first central stage of sensory processing selectively encode vestibular exafference. The mechanism underlying this reafferent suppression compares the brain's motor-based expectation of sensory feedback with the actual sensory consequences of voluntary self-motion, effectively computing the sensory prediction error (i.e., exafference). It is generally thought that sensory prediction errors are computed in the cerebellum, yet it has been challenging to explicitly demonstrate this. We have recently addressed this question and found that deep cerebellar nuclei neurons explicitly encode sensory prediction errors during self-motion. Importantly, in everyday life, sensory prediction errors occur in response to changes in the effector or world (muscle strength, load, etc.), as well as in response to externally applied sensory stimulation. Accordingly, we hypothesize that altering the relationship between motor commands and the actual movement parameters will result in the updating in the cerebellum-based computation of exafference. If our hypothesis is correct, under these conditions, neuronal responses should initially be increased--consistent with a sudden increase in the sensory prediction error. Then, over time, as the internal model is updated, response modulation should decrease in parallel with a reduction in sensory prediction error, until vestibular reafference is again suppressed. The finding that the internal model predicting the sensory consequences of motor commands adapts for new

  14. Short-Term Neural Adaptation to Simultaneous Bifocal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Aiswaryah; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Sawides, Lucie; Marcos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous vision is an increasingly used solution for the correction of presbyopia (the age-related loss of ability to focus near images). Simultaneous Vision corrections, normally delivered in the form of contact or intraocular lenses, project on the patient's retina a focused image for near vision superimposed with a degraded image for far vision, or a focused image for far vision superimposed with the defocused image of the near scene. It is expected that patients with these corrections are able to adapt to the complex Simultaneous Vision retinal images, although the mechanisms or the extent to which this happens is not known. We studied the neural adaptation to simultaneous vision by studying changes in the Natural Perceived Focus and in the Perceptual Score of image quality in subjects after exposure to Simultaneous Vision. We show that Natural Perceived Focus shifts after a brief period of adaptation to a Simultaneous Vision blur, similar to adaptation to Pure Defocus. This shift strongly correlates with the magnitude and proportion of defocus in the adapting image. The magnitude of defocus affects perceived quality of Simultaneous Vision images, with 0.5 D defocus scored lowest and beyond 1.5 D scored “sharp”. Adaptation to Simultaneous Vision shifts the Perceptual Score of these images towards higher rankings. Larger improvements occurred when testing simultaneous images with the same magnitude of defocus as the adapting images, indicating that wearing a particular bifocal correction improves the perception of images provided by that correction. PMID:24664087

  15. Short-term neural adaptation to simultaneous bifocal images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiswaryah Radhakrishnan

    Full Text Available Simultaneous vision is an increasingly used solution for the correction of presbyopia (the age-related loss of ability to focus near images. Simultaneous Vision corrections, normally delivered in the form of contact or intraocular lenses, project on the patient's retina a focused image for near vision superimposed with a degraded image for far vision, or a focused image for far vision superimposed with the defocused image of the near scene. It is expected that patients with these corrections are able to adapt to the complex Simultaneous Vision retinal images, although the mechanisms or the extent to which this happens is not known. We studied the neural adaptation to simultaneous vision by studying changes in the Natural Perceived Focus and in the Perceptual Score of image quality in subjects after exposure to Simultaneous Vision. We show that Natural Perceived Focus shifts after a brief period of adaptation to a Simultaneous Vision blur, similar to adaptation to Pure Defocus. This shift strongly correlates with the magnitude and proportion of defocus in the adapting image. The magnitude of defocus affects perceived quality of Simultaneous Vision images, with 0.5 D defocus scored lowest and beyond 1.5 D scored "sharp". Adaptation to Simultaneous Vision shifts the Perceptual Score of these images towards higher rankings. Larger improvements occurred when testing simultaneous images with the same magnitude of defocus as the adapting images, indicating that wearing a particular bifocal correction improves the perception of images provided by that correction.

  16. Adaptive Gain Scheduled Semiactive Vibration Control Using a Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an adaptive gain scheduled semiactive control method using an artificial neural network for structural systems subject to earthquake disturbance. In order to design a semiactive control system with high control performance against earthquakes with different time and/or frequency properties, multiple semiactive control laws with high performance for each of multiple earthquake disturbances are scheduled with an adaptive manner. Each semiactive control law to be scheduled is designed based on the output emulation approach that has been proposed by the authors. As the adaptive gain scheduling mechanism, we introduce an artificial neural network (ANN. Input signals of the ANN are the measured earthquake disturbance itself, for example, the acceleration, velocity, and displacement. The output of the ANN is the parameter for the scheduling of multiple semiactive control laws each of which has been optimized for a single disturbance. Parameters such as weight and bias in the ANN are optimized by the genetic algorithm (GA. The proposed design method is applied to semiactive control design of a base-isolated building with a semiactive damper. With simulation study, the proposed adaptive gain scheduling method realizes control performance exceeding single semiactive control optimizing the average of the control performance subject to various earthquake disturbances.

  17. Patterns of interval correlations in neural oscillators with adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neural firing is often subject to negative feedback by adaptation currents. These currents can induce strong correlations among the time intervals between spikes. Here we study analytically the interval correlations of a broad class of noisy neural oscillators with spike-triggered adaptation of arbitrary strength and time scale. Our weak-noise theory provides a general relation between the correlations and the phase-response curve (PRC) of the oscillator, proves anti-correlations between neighboring intervals for adapting neurons with type I PRC and identifies a single order parameter that determines the qualitative pattern of correlations. Monotonically decaying or oscillating correlation structures can be related to qualitatively different voltage traces after spiking, which can be explained by the phase plane geometry. At high firing rates, the long-term variability of the spike train associated with the cumulative interval correlations becomes small, independent of model details. Our results are verified by comparison with stochastic simulations of the exponential, leaky, and generalized integrate-and-fire models with adaptation.

  18. Complex Environmental Data Modelling Using Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevski, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    The research deals with an adaptation and application of Adaptive General Regression Neural Networks (GRNN) to high dimensional environmental data. GRNN [1,2,3] are efficient modelling tools both for spatial and temporal data and are based on nonparametric kernel methods closely related to classical Nadaraya-Watson estimator. Adaptive GRNN, using anisotropic kernels, can be also applied for features selection tasks when working with high dimensional data [1,3]. In the present research Adaptive GRNN are used to study geospatial data predictability and relevant feature selection using both simulated and real data case studies. The original raw data were either three dimensional monthly precipitation data or monthly wind speeds embedded into 13 dimensional space constructed by geographical coordinates and geo-features calculated from digital elevation model. GRNN were applied in two different ways: 1) adaptive GRNN with the resulting list of features ordered according to their relevancy; and 2) adaptive GRNN applied to evaluate all possible models N [in case of wind fields N=(2^13 -1)=8191] and rank them according to the cross-validation error. In both cases training were carried out applying leave-one-out procedure. An important result of the study is that the set of the most relevant features depends on the month (strong seasonal effect) and year. The predictabilities of precipitation and wind field patterns, estimated using the cross-validation and testing errors of raw and shuffled data, were studied in detail. The results of both approaches were qualitatively and quantitatively compared. In conclusion, Adaptive GRNN with their ability to select features and efficient modelling of complex high dimensional data can be widely used in automatic/on-line mapping and as an integrated part of environmental decision support systems. 1. Kanevski M., Pozdnoukhov A., Timonin V. Machine Learning for Spatial Environmental Data. Theory, applications and software. EPFL Press

  19. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Synaptic Adaptation and CPG-based control for Complex Behaviors of Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyasingha eDasgupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of 1 central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, 2 distributed (at each leg recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and 3 searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to sensorimotor prediction outperforms the previous state of the art adaptive neuron

  20. Robust adaptive fuzzy neural tracking control for a class of unknown ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy neural controller (AFNC) for a class of unknown chaotic systems is proposed. The proposed AFNC is comprised of a fuzzy neural controller and a robust controller. The fuzzy neural controller including a fuzzy neural network identifier (FNNI) is the principal controller. The FNNI is used for ...

  1. Adaptive model predictive process control using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescher, K.L.; Baum, C.C.; Jones, R.D.

    1997-08-19

    A control system for controlling the output of at least one plant process output parameter is implemented by adaptive model predictive control using a neural network. An improved method and apparatus provides for sampling plant output and control input at a first sampling rate to provide control inputs at the fast rate. The MPC system is, however, provided with a network state vector that is constructed at a second, slower rate so that the input control values used by the MPC system are averaged over a gapped time period. Another improvement is a provision for on-line training that may include difference training, curvature training, and basis center adjustment to maintain the weights and basis centers of the neural in an updated state that can follow changes in the plant operation apart from initial off-line training data. 46 figs.

  2. Neuromusculoskeletal models based on the muscle synergy hypothesis for the investigation of adaptive motor control in locomotion via sensory-motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shinya; Funato, Tetsuro

    2016-03-01

    Humans and animals walk adaptively in diverse situations by skillfully manipulating their complicated and redundant musculoskeletal systems. From an analysis of measured electromyographic (EMG) data, it appears that despite complicated spatiotemporal properties, muscle activation patterns can be explained by a low dimensional spatiotemporal structure. More specifically, they can be accounted for by the combination of a small number of basic activation patterns. The basic patterns and distribution weights indicate temporal and spatial structures, respectively, and the weights show the muscle sets that are activated synchronously. In addition, various locomotor behaviors have similar low dimensional structures and major differences appear in the basic patterns. These analysis results suggest that neural systems use muscle group combinations to solve motor control redundancy problems (muscle synergy hypothesis) and manipulate those basic patterns to create various locomotor functions. However, it remains unclear how the neural system controls such muscle groups and basic patterns through neuromechanical interactions in order to achieve adaptive locomotor behavior. This paper reviews simulation studies that explored adaptive motor control in locomotion via sensory-motor coordination using neuromusculoskeletal models based on the muscle synergy hypothesis. Herein, the neural mechanism in motor control related to the muscle synergy for adaptive locomotion and a potential muscle synergy analysis method including neuromusculoskeletal modeling for motor impairments and rehabilitation are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling development of natural multi-sensory integration using neural self-organisation and probabilistic population codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes; Dávila-Chacón, Jorge; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Humans and other animals have been shown to perform near-optimally in multi-sensory integration tasks. Probabilistic population codes (PPCs) have been proposed as a mechanism by which optimal integration can be accomplished. Previous approaches have focussed on how neural networks might produce PPCs from sensory input or perform calculations using them, like combining multiple PPCs. Less attention has been given to the question of how the necessary organisation of neurons can arise and how the required knowledge about the input statistics can be learned. In this paper, we propose a model of learning multi-sensory integration based on an unsupervised learning algorithm in which an artificial neural network learns the noise characteristics of each of its sources of input. Our algorithm borrows from the self-organising map the ability to learn latent-variable models of the input and extends it to learning to produce a PPC approximating a probability density function over the latent variable behind its (noisy) input. The neurons in our network are only required to perform simple calculations and we make few assumptions about input noise properties and tuning functions. We report on a neurorobotic experiment in which we apply our algorithm to multi-sensory integration in a humanoid robot to demonstrate its effectiveness and compare it to human multi-sensory integration on the behavioural level. We also show in simulations that our algorithm performs near-optimally under certain plausible conditions, and that it reproduces important aspects of natural multi-sensory integration on the neural level.

  4. Ouabain selectively affects the slow component of sensory adaptation in an insect mechanoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, A S

    1989-12-11

    Sensory activity in the cockroach tactile spine neuron adapts rapidly to a step deflection. This rapid adaptation is caused by a rise in the threshold for action potential production, which has two components with different time constants and drug sensitivities. The basis of the slow component is unknown but it is insensitive to a wide range of ion channel blockers. In the present experiments the slow component was selectively reduced by ouabain, suggesting that it is due to the activation of an electrogenic sodium pump.

  5. Informational basis of sensory adaptation: entropy and single-spike efficiency in rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibi, Mehdi; Clifford, Colin W G; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2013-09-11

    We showed recently that exposure to whisker vibrations enhances coding efficiency in rat barrel cortex despite increasing correlations in variability (Adibi et al., 2013). Here, to understand how adaptation achieves this improvement in sensory representation, we decomposed the stimulus information carried in neuronal population activity into its fundamental components in the framework of information theory. In the context of sensory coding, these components are the entropy of the responses across the entire stimulus set (response entropy) and the entropy of the responses conditional on the stimulus (conditional response entropy). We found that adaptation decreased response entropy and conditional response entropy at both the level of single neurons and the pooled activity of neuronal populations. However, the net effect of adaptation was to increase the mutual information because the drop in the conditional entropy outweighed the drop in the response entropy. The information transmitted by a single spike also increased under adaptation. As population size increased, the information content of individual spikes declined but the relative improvement attributable to adaptation was maintained.

  6. Sensory Adapted Dental Environments to Enhance Oral Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Sharon A.; Stein Duker, Leah I.; Williams, Marian E.; Dawson, Michael E.; Lane, Christianne J.; Polido, José C.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot and feasibility study examined the impact of a sensory adapted dental environment (SADE) to reduce distress, sensory discomfort, and perception of pain during oral prophylaxis for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 44 children ages 6-12 (n = 22 typical, n = 22 ASD). In an experimental crossover design, each…

  7. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  8. Adaptive PID control based on orthogonal endocrine neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanović, Miroslav B; Antić, Dragan S; Milojković, Marko T; Nikolić, Saša S; Perić, Staniša Lj; Spasić, Miodrag D

    2016-12-01

    A new intelligent hybrid structure used for online tuning of a PID controller is proposed in this paper. The structure is based on two adaptive neural networks, both with built-in Chebyshev orthogonal polynomials. First substructure network is a regular orthogonal neural network with implemented artificial endocrine factor (OENN), in the form of environmental stimuli, to its weights. It is used for approximation of control signals and for processing system deviation/disturbance signals which are introduced in the form of environmental stimuli. The output values of OENN are used to calculate artificial environmental stimuli (AES), which represent required adaptation measure of a second network-orthogonal endocrine adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (OEANFIS). OEANFIS is used to process control, output and error signals of a system and to generate adjustable values of proportional, derivative, and integral parameters, used for online tuning of a PID controller. The developed structure is experimentally tested on a laboratory model of the 3D crane system in terms of analysing tracking performances and deviation signals (error signals) of a payload. OENN-OEANFIS performances are compared with traditional PID and 6 intelligent PID type controllers. Tracking performance comparisons (in transient and steady-state period) showed that the proposed adaptive controller possesses performances within the range of other tested controllers. The main contribution of OENN-OEANFIS structure is significant minimization of deviation signals (17%-79%) compared to other controllers. It is recommended to exploit it when dealing with a highly nonlinear system which operates in the presence of undesirable disturbances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Approach to Stable Gradient-Descent Adaptation of Higher Order Neural Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, Ivo; Homma, Noriyasu

    2017-09-01

    Stability evaluation of a weight-update system of higher order neural units (HONUs) with polynomial aggregation of neural inputs (also known as classes of polynomial neural networks) for adaptation of both feedforward and recurrent HONUs by a gradient descent method is introduced. An essential core of the approach is based on the spectral radius of a weight-update system, and it allows stability monitoring and its maintenance at every adaptation step individually. Assuring the stability of the weight-update system (at every single adaptation step) naturally results in the adaptation stability of the whole neural architecture that adapts to the target data. As an aside, the used approach highlights the fact that the weight optimization of HONU is a linear problem, so the proposed approach can be generally extended to any neural architecture that is linear in its adaptable parameters.

  10. Sequential Sparsening by Successive Adaptation in Neural Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Nawrot, Martin P; 10.1186/1471-2202-10-S1-O10

    2010-01-01

    In the principal cells of the insect mushroom body, the Kenyon cells (KC), olfactory information is represented by a spatially and temporally sparse code. Each odor stimulus will activate only a small portion of neurons and each stimulus leads to only a short phasic response following stimulus onset irrespective of the actual duration of a constant stimulus. The mechanisms responsible for the sparse code in the KCs are yet unresolved. Here, we explore the role of the neuron-intrinsic mechanism of spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) in producing temporally sparse responses to sensory stimulation in higher processing stages. Our single neuron model is defined through a conductance-based integrate-and-fire neuron with spike-frequency adaptation [1]. We study a fully connected feed-forward network architecture in coarse analogy to the insect olfactory pathway. A first layer of ten neurons represents the projection neurons (PNs) of the antenna lobe. All PNs receive a step-like input from the olfactory receptor neuron...

  11. The interaction of bayesian priors and sensory data and its neural circuit implementation in visually guided movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Lee, Joonyeol; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2012-12-05

    Sensory-motor behavior results from a complex interaction of noisy sensory data with priors based on recent experience. By varying the stimulus form and contrast for the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements in monkeys, we show that visual motion inputs compete with two independent priors: one prior biases eye speed toward zero; the other prior attracts eye direction according to the past several days' history of target directions. The priors bias the speed and direction of the initiation of pursuit for the weak sensory data provided by the motion of a low-contrast sine wave grating. However, the priors have relatively little effect on pursuit speed and direction when the visual stimulus arises from the coherent motion of a high-contrast patch of dots. For any given stimulus form, the mean and variance of eye speed covary in the initiation of pursuit, as expected for signal-dependent noise. This relationship suggests that pursuit implements a trade-off between movement accuracy and variation, reducing both when the sensory signals are noisy. The tradeoff is implemented as a competition of sensory data and priors that follows the rules of Bayesian estimation. Computer simulations show that the priors can be understood as direction-specific control of the strength of visual-motor transmission, and can be implemented in a neural-network model that makes testable predictions about the population response in the smooth eye movement region of the frontal eye fields.

  12. The interaction of Bayesian priors and sensory data and its neural circuit implementation in visually-guided movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Lee, Joonyeol; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory-motor behavior results from a complex interaction of noisy sensory data with priors based on recent experience. By varying the stimulus form and contrast for the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements in monkeys, we show that visual motion inputs compete with two independent priors: one prior biases eye speed toward zero; the other prior attracts eye direction according to the past several days’ history of target directions. The priors bias the speed and direction of the initiation of pursuit for the weak sensory data provided by the motion of a low-contrast sine wave grating. However, the priors have relatively little effect on pursuit speed and direction when the visual stimulus arises from the coherent motion of a high-contrast patch of dots. For any given stimulus form, the mean and variance of eye speed co-vary in the initiation of pursuit, as expected for signal-dependent noise. This relationship suggests that pursuit implements a trade-off between movement accuracy and variation, reducing both when the sensory signals are noisy. The tradeoff is implemented as a competition of sensory data and priors that follows the rules of Bayesian estimation. Computer simulations show that the priors can be understood as direction specific control of the strength of visual-motor transmission, and can be implemented in a neural-network model that makes testable predictions about the population response in the smooth eye movement region of the frontal eye fields. PMID:23223286

  13. An Adaptive Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Method Based on Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Fault Diagnosis of Planetary Gearbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyang Jing

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A fault diagnosis approach based on multi-sensor data fusion is a promising tool to deal with complicated damage detection problems of mechanical systems. Nevertheless, this approach suffers from two challenges, which are (1 the feature extraction from various types of sensory data and (2 the selection of a suitable fusion level. It is usually difficult to choose an optimal feature or fusion level for a specific fault diagnosis task, and extensive domain expertise and human labor are also highly required during these selections. To address these two challenges, we propose an adaptive multi-sensor data fusion method based on deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN for fault diagnosis. The proposed method can learn features from raw data and optimize a combination of different fusion levels adaptively to satisfy the requirements of any fault diagnosis task. The proposed method is tested through a planetary gearbox test rig. Handcraft features, manual-selected fusion levels, single sensory data, and two traditional intelligent models, back-propagation neural networks (BPNN and a support vector machine (SVM, are used as comparisons in the experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to detect the conditions of the planetary gearbox effectively with the best diagnosis accuracy among all comparative methods in the experiment.

  14. An Adaptive Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Method Based on Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Fault Diagnosis of Planetary Gearbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Luyang; Wang, Taiyong; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Peng

    2017-02-21

    A fault diagnosis approach based on multi-sensor data fusion is a promising tool to deal with complicated damage detection problems of mechanical systems. Nevertheless, this approach suffers from two challenges, which are (1) the feature extraction from various types of sensory data and (2) the selection of a suitable fusion level. It is usually difficult to choose an optimal feature or fusion level for a specific fault diagnosis task, and extensive domain expertise and human labor are also highly required during these selections. To address these two challenges, we propose an adaptive multi-sensor data fusion method based on deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN) for fault diagnosis. The proposed method can learn features from raw data and optimize a combination of different fusion levels adaptively to satisfy the requirements of any fault diagnosis task. The proposed method is tested through a planetary gearbox test rig. Handcraft features, manual-selected fusion levels, single sensory data, and two traditional intelligent models, back-propagation neural networks (BPNN) and a support vector machine (SVM), are used as comparisons in the experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to detect the conditions of the planetary gearbox effectively with the best diagnosis accuracy among all comparative methods in the experiment.

  15. An Adaptive Multi-Sensor Data Fusion Method Based on Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Fault Diagnosis of Planetary Gearbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Luyang; Wang, Taiyong; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    A fault diagnosis approach based on multi-sensor data fusion is a promising tool to deal with complicated damage detection problems of mechanical systems. Nevertheless, this approach suffers from two challenges, which are (1) the feature extraction from various types of sensory data and (2) the selection of a suitable fusion level. It is usually difficult to choose an optimal feature or fusion level for a specific fault diagnosis task, and extensive domain expertise and human labor are also highly required during these selections. To address these two challenges, we propose an adaptive multi-sensor data fusion method based on deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN) for fault diagnosis. The proposed method can learn features from raw data and optimize a combination of different fusion levels adaptively to satisfy the requirements of any fault diagnosis task. The proposed method is tested through a planetary gearbox test rig. Handcraft features, manual-selected fusion levels, single sensory data, and two traditional intelligent models, back-propagation neural networks (BPNN) and a support vector machine (SVM), are used as comparisons in the experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to detect the conditions of the planetary gearbox effectively with the best diagnosis accuracy among all comparative methods in the experiment. PMID:28230767

  16. Neural adaptations underlying cross-education after unilateral strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimland, Marius S; Helgerud, Jan; Solstad, Gerd Marie; Iversen, Vegard Moe; Leivseth, Gunnar; Hoff, Jan

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 4-week (16 sessions) unilateral, maximal isometric strength training on contralateral neural adaptations. Subjects were randomised to a strength training group (TG, n = 15) or to a control group (CG, n = 11). Both legs of both groups were tested for plantar flexion maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs), surface electromyogram (EMG), H-reflexes and V-waves in the soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) superimposed during MVC and normalised by the M-wave (EMG/M(SUP), H(SUP)/M(SUP), V/M(SUP), respectively), before and after the training period. For the untrained leg, the TG increased compared to the CG for MVC torque (33%, P cross-education of strength.

  17. Robust adaptive learning of feedforward neural networks via LMI optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xingjian

    2012-07-01

    Feedforward neural networks (FNNs) have been extensively applied to various areas such as control, system identification, function approximation, pattern recognition etc. A novel robust control approach to the learning problems of FNNs is further investigated in this study in order to develop efficient learning algorithms which can be implemented with optimal parameter settings and considering noise effect in the data. To this aim, the learning problem of a FNN is cast into a robust output feedback control problem of a discrete time-varying linear dynamic system. New robust learning algorithms with adaptive learning rate are therefore developed, using linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques to find the appropriate learning rates and to guarantee the fast and robust convergence. Theoretical analysis and examples are given to illustrate the theoretical results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural circuitry at age 6 months associated with later repetitive behavior and sensory responsiveness in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J; Swanson, Meghan R; Elison, Jed T; Gerig, Guido; Pruett, John R; Styner, Martin A; Vachet, Clement; Botteron, Kelly N; Dager, Stephen R; Estes, Annette M; Hazlett, Heather C; Schultz, Robert T; Shen, Mark D; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Piven, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors are defining features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Under revised diagnostic criteria for ASD, this behavioral domain now includes atypical responses to sensory stimuli. To date, little is known about the neural circuitry underlying these features of ASD early in life. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data were collected from 217 infants at high familial risk for ASD. Forty-four of these infants were diagnosed with ASD at age 2. Targeted cortical, cerebellar, and striatal white matter pathways were defined and measured at ages 6, 12, and 24 months. Dependent variables included the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised and the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire. Among children diagnosed with ASD, repetitive behaviors and sensory response patterns were strongly correlated, even when accounting for developmental level or social impairment. Longitudinal analyses indicated that the genu and cerebellar pathways were significantly associated with both repetitive behaviors and sensory responsiveness but not social deficits. At age 6 months, fractional anisotropy in the genu significantly predicted repetitive behaviors and sensory responsiveness at age 2. Cerebellar pathways significantly predicted later sensory responsiveness. Exploratory analyses suggested a possible disordinal interaction based on diagnostic status for the association between fractional anisotropy and repetitive behavior. Our findings suggest that restricted and repetitive behaviors contributing to a diagnosis of ASD at age 2 years are associated with structural properties of callosal and cerebellar white matter pathways measured during infancy and toddlerhood. We further identified that repetitive behaviors and unusual sensory response patterns co-occur and share common brain-behavior relationships. These results were strikingly specific given the absence of association between targeted pathways and social deficits.

  19. Neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear plants using random search optimization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a method for utilizing artificial neural networks for direct adaptive control of dynamic systems with poorly known dynamics. The neural network weights (controller gains) are adapted in real time using state measurements and a random search optimization algorithm. The results are demonstrated via simulation using two highly nonlinear systems.

  20. Adaptive Neural Network Nonparametric Identifier With Normalized Learning Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairez, Isaac

    2017-05-01

    This paper addresses the design of a normalized convergent learning law for neural networks (NNs) with continuous dynamics. The NN is used here to obtain a nonparametric model for uncertain systems described by a set of ordinary differential equations. The source of uncertainties is the presence of some external perturbations and poor knowledge of the nonlinear function describing the system dynamics. A new adaptive algorithm based on normalized algorithms was used to adjust the weights of the NN. The adaptive algorithm was derived by means of a nonstandard logarithmic Lyapunov function (LLF). Two identifiers were designed using two variations of LLFs leading to a normalized learning law for the first identifier and a variable gain normalized learning law. In the case of the second identifier, the inclusion of normalized learning laws yields to reduce the size of the convergence region obtained as solution of the practical stability analysis. On the other hand, the velocity of convergence for the learning laws depends on the norm of errors in inverse form. This fact avoids the peaking transient behavior in the time evolution of weights that accelerates the convergence of identification error. A numerical example demonstrates the improvements achieved by the algorithm introduced in this paper compared with classical schemes with no-normalized continuous learning methods. A comparison of the identification performance achieved by the no-normalized identifier and the ones developed in this paper shows the benefits of the learning law proposed in this paper.

  1. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection.

  2. Neural network based adaptive output feedback control: Applications and improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutay, Ali Turker

    Application of recently developed neural network based adaptive output feedback controllers to a diverse range of problems both in simulations and experiments is investigated in this thesis. The purpose is to evaluate the theory behind the development of these controllers numerically and experimentally, identify the needs for further development in practical applications, and to conduct further research in directions that are identified to ultimately enhance applicability of adaptive controllers to real world problems. We mainly focus our attention on adaptive controllers that augment existing fixed gain controllers. A recently developed approach holds great potential for successful implementations on real world applications due to its applicability to systems with minimal information concerning the plant model and the existing controller. In this thesis the formulation is extended to the multi-input multi-output case for distributed control of interconnected systems and successfully tested on a formation flight wind tunnel experiment. The command hedging method is formulated for the approach to further broaden the class of systems it can address by including systems with input nonlinearities. Also a formulation is adopted that allows the approach to be applied to non-minimum phase systems for which non-minimum phase characteristics are modeled with sufficient accuracy and treated properly in the design of the existing controller. It is shown that the approach can also be applied to augment nonlinear controllers under certain conditions and an example is presented where the nonlinear guidance law of a spinning projectile is augmented. Simulation results on a high fidelity 6 degrees-of-freedom nonlinear simulation code are presented. The thesis also presents a preliminary adaptive controller design for closed loop flight control with active flow actuators. Behavior of such actuators in dynamic flight conditions is not known. To test the adaptive controller design in

  3. Adaptation to Delayed Speech Feedback Induces Temporal Recalibration between Vocal Sensory and Auditory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. Participants read some sentences with specific delay times of DAF (0, 30, 75, 120 ms during three minutes to induce ‘Lag Adaptation’. After the adaptation, they then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback in producing simple voice but not speech. We found that speech production with lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  4. Neural feedback linearization adaptive control for affine nonlinear systems based on neural network estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahita Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce an adaptive neural network controller for a class of nonlinear systems. The approach uses two Radial Basis Functions, RBF networks. The first RBF network is used to approximate the ideal control law which cannot be implemented since the dynamics of the system are unknown. The second RBF network is used for on-line estimating the control gain which is a nonlinear and unknown function of the states. The updating laws for the combined estimator and controller are derived through Lyapunov analysis. Asymptotic stability is established with the tracking errors converging to a neighborhood of the origin. Finally, the proposed method is applied to control and stabilize the inverted pendulum system.

  5. The effects of increased serotonergic activity on human sensory gating and its neural generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Oranje, Bob; Wienberg, Malene

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Schizophrenia is a disabling illness with deficits in core mental functions such as sensory gating. The P50 amplitude is an (usually auditory) evoked brain potential that, in a so-called double-click paradigm, can be used to quantify sensory gating. Reports on serotonergic modulation o...

  6. A symmetry perceiving adaptive neural network and facial image recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, P

    1998-11-30

    The paper deals with the forensic problem of comparing nearly from view and facial images for personal identification. The human recognition process for such problems, is primarily based on both holistic as well as feature-wise symmetry perception aided by subjective analysis for detecting ill-defined features. It has been attempted to approach the modelling of such a process by designing a robust symmetry perceiving adaptive neural network. The pair of images to be compared should be presented to the proposed neural network (NN) as source (input) and target images. The NN learns about the symmetry between the pair of images by analysing examples of associated feature pairs belonging to the source and the target images. In order to prepare a paired example of associated features for training purpose, when we select one particular feature on the source image as a unique pixel, we must associate it with the corresponding feature on the target image also. But, in practice, it is not always possible to fix the latter feature also as a unique pixel due to pictorial ambiguity. The robust or fault tolerant NN takes care of such a situation and allows fixing the associated target feature as a rectangular array of pixels, rather than fixing it as a unique pixel, which is pretty difficult to be done with certainty. From such a pair of sets of associated features, the NN searches out proper locations of the target features from the sets of ambiguous target features by a fuzzy analysis during its learning. If any of target features, searched out by the NN, lies outside the prespecified zone, the training of the NN is unsuccessful. This amounts to non-existence of symmetry between the pair of images and confirms non-identity. In case of a successful training, the NN gets adapted with appropriate symmetry relation between the pair of images and when the source image is input to the trained NN, it responds by outputting a processed source image which is superimposable over the

  7. Spike-frequency adapting neural ensembles: beyond mean adaptation and renewal theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Eilif; Buesing, Lars; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2007-11-01

    We propose a Markov process model for spike-frequency adapting neural ensembles that synthesizes existing mean-adaptation approaches, population density methods, and inhomogeneous renewal theory, resulting in a unified and tractable framework that goes beyond renewal and mean-adaptation theories by accounting for correlations between subsequent interspike intervals. A method for efficiently generating inhomogeneous realizations of the proposed Markov process is given, numerical methods for solving the population equation are presented, and an expression for the first-order interspike interval correlation is derived. Further, we show that the full five-dimensional master equation for a conductance-based integrate-and-fire neuron with spike-frequency adaptation and a relative refractory mechanism driven by Poisson spike trains can be reduced to a two-dimensional generalization of the proposed Markov process by an adiabatic elimination of fast variables. For static and dynamic stimulation, negative serial interspike interval correlations and transient population responses, respectively, of Monte Carlo simulations of the full five-dimensional system can be accurately described by the proposed two-dimensional Markov process.

  8. Multiple Decoupled CPGs with Local Sensory Feedback for Adaptive Locomotion Behaviors of Bio-inspired Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker Barikhan, Subhi; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2014-01-01

    Walking animals show versatile locomotion. They can also adapt their movement according to the changes of their morphology and the environmental conditions. These emergent properties are realized by biomechanics, distributed central pattern generators (CPGs), local sensory feedback, and their int...... of the front legs, to deal with morphological change, and to synchronize its movement with another robot during a collaborative task....... and the environment through local sensory feedback of each leg. Simulation results show that this bio-inspired approach generates self-organizing emergent locomotion allowing the robot to adaptively form regular patterns, to stably walk while pushing an object with its front legs or performing multiple stepping...

  9. Deblurring adaptive optics retinal images using deep convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xiao; Zhao, Junlei; Zhao, Haoxin; Yun, Dai; Zhang, Yudong

    2017-12-01

    The adaptive optics (AO) can be used to compensate for ocular aberrations to achieve near diffraction limited high-resolution retinal images. However, many factors such as the limited aberration measurement and correction accuracy with AO, intraocular scatter, imaging noise and so on will degrade the quality of retinal images. Image post processing is an indispensable and economical method to make up for the limitation of AO retinal imaging procedure. In this paper, we proposed a deep learning method to restore the degraded retinal images for the first time. The method directly learned an end-to-end mapping between the blurred and restored retinal images. The mapping was represented as a deep convolutional neural network that was trained to output high-quality images directly from blurry inputs without any preprocessing. This network was validated on synthetically generated retinal images as well as real AO retinal images. The assessment of the restored retinal images demonstrated that the image quality had been significantly improved.

  10. A Bayesian regularized artificial neural network for adaptive optics forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi; Chen, Ying; Li, Xinyang; Qin, Xiaolin; Wang, Huiyong

    2017-01-01

    Real-time adaptive optics is a technology for enhancing the resolution of ground-based optical telescopes and overcoming the disturbance of atmospheric turbulence. The performance of the system is limited by delay errors induced by the servo system and photoelectrons noise of wavefront sensor. In order to cut these delay errors, this paper proposes a novel model to forecast the future control voltages of the deformable mirror. The predictive model is constructed by a multi-layered back propagation network with Bayesian regularization (BRBP). For the purpose of parallel computation and less disturbance, we adopt a number of sub-BP neural networks to substitute the whole network. The Bayesian regularized network assigns a probability to the network weights, allowing the network to automatically and optimally penalize excessively complex models. The simulation results show that the BRBP introduces smaller mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square errors (MSE) than other typical algorithms. Meanwhile, real data analysis results show that the BRBP model has strong generalization capability and parallelism.

  11. Composite learning from adaptive backstepping neural network control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yongping; Sun, Tairen; Liu, Yiqi; Yu, Haoyong

    2017-11-01

    In existing neural network (NN) learning control methods, the trajectory of NN inputs must be recurrent to satisfy a stringent condition termed persistent excitation (PE) so that NN parameter convergence is obtainable. This paper focuses on command-filtered backstepping adaptive control for a class of strict-feedback nonlinear systems with functional uncertainties, where an NN composite learning technique is proposed to guarantee convergence of NN weights to their ideal values without the PE condition. In the NN composite learning, spatially localized NN approximation is employed to handle functional uncertainties, online historical data together with instantaneous data are exploited to generate prediction errors, and both tracking errors and prediction errors are employed to update NN weights. The influence of NN approximation errors on the control performance is also clearly shown. The distinctive feature of the proposed NN composite learning is that NN parameter convergence is guaranteed without the requirement of the trajectory of NN inputs being recurrent. Illustrative results have verified effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method compared with existing NN learning control methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural adaptations to resistive exercise: mechanisms and recommendations for training practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, David A; Kamen, Gary; Frost, Gail

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that neural factors play an important role in muscle strength gains. This article reviews the neural adaptations in strength, with the goal of laying the foundations for practical applications in sports medicine and rehabilitation. An increase in muscular strength without noticeable hypertrophy is the first line of evidence for neural involvement in acquisition of muscular strength. The use of surface electromyographic (SEMG) techniques reveal that strength gains in the early phase of a training regimen are associated with an increase in the amplitude of SEMG activity. This has been interpreted as an increase in neural drive, which denotes the magnitude of efferent neural output from the CNS to active muscle fibres. However, SEMG activity is a global measure of muscle activity. Underlying alterations in SEMG activity are changes in motor unit firing patterns as measured by indwelling (wire or needle) electrodes. Some studies have reported a transient increase in motor unit firing rate. Training-related increases in the rate of tension development have also been linked with an increased probability of doublet firing in individual motor units. A doublet is a very short interspike interval in a motor unit train, and usually occurs at the onset of a muscular contraction. Motor unit synchronisation is another possible mechanism for increases in muscle strength, but has yet to be definitely demonstrated. There are several lines of evidence for central control of training-related adaptation to resistive exercise. Mental practice using imagined contractions has been shown to increase the excitability of the cortical areas involved in movement and motion planning. However, training using imagined contractions is unlikely to be as effective as physical training, and it may be more applicable to rehabilitation. Retention of strength gains after dissipation of physiological effects demonstrates a strong practice effect. Bilateral contractions are

  13. When the Sense of Smell Meets Emotion: Anxiety-State-Dependent Olfactory Processing and Neural Circuitry Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Lucas R.; Gitelman, Darren R.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetically the most ancient sense, olfaction is characterized by a unique intimacy with the emotion system. However, mechanisms underlying olfaction–emotion interaction remain unclear, especially in an ever-changing environment and dynamic internal milieu. Perturbing the internal state with anxiety induction in human subjects, we interrogated emotion-state-dependent olfactory processing in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Following anxiety induction, initially neutral odors become unpleasant and take longer to detect, accompanied by augmented response to these odors in the olfactory (anterior piriform and orbitofrontal) cortices and emotion-relevant pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. In parallel, the olfactory sensory relay adapts with increased anxiety, incorporating amygdala as an integral step via strengthened (afferent or efferent) connections between amygdala and all levels of the olfactory cortical hierarchy. This anxiety-state-dependent neural circuitry thus enables cumulative infusion of limbic affective information throughout the olfactory sensory progression, thereby driving affectively charged olfactory perception. These findings could constitute an olfactory etiology model of emotional disorders, as exaggerated emotion–olfaction interaction in negative mood states turns innocuous odors aversive, fueling anxiety and depression with rising ambient sensory stress. PMID:24068799

  14. Behavioural and physiological effect of dental environment sensory adaptation on children's dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Michele; Melmed, Raphael N; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D; Eli, Ilana; Parush, Shula

    2007-12-01

    Dental anxiety is a serious obstacle in conventional oral healthcare delivery. A sensory adapted dental environment (SDE) might be effective in reducing anxiety and inducing relaxation. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a Snoezelen SDE in reducing anxiety among children undergoing scaling and polishing by a dental hygienist. The Snoezelen environment consists of a partially dimmed room with lighting effects, vibroacoustic stimuli, and deep pressure. Nineteen children, aged 6-11 yr, participated in a cross-over intervention trial. Behavioral parameters included the mean number, duration, and magnitude of anxious behaviors, as monitored by videotaped recordings. Physiological parameters reflecting arousal were monitored by changes in dermal resistance. Results, by all measures, consistently indicated that both behavioral and psychophysiological measures of relaxation improved significantly in the SDE compared with a conventional dental environment. The findings support recommending the SDE as an effective and practical alternative in oral healthcare delivery to anxious children.

  15. Adaptation of postural recovery responses to a vestibular sensory illusion in individuals with Parkinson disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Mark E; Cavanaugh, James T; Foreman, K Bo; Shaffer, Scott W; Marcus, Robin; Dibble, Leland E

    2017-10-01

    The ability to adapt postural responses to sensory illusions diminishes with age and is further impaired by Parkinson disease. However, limited information exists regarding training-related adaptions of sensory reweighting in these populations. This study sought to determine whether Parkinson disease or age would differentially affect acute postural recovery or adaptive postural responses to novel or repeated exposure to sensory illusions using galvanic vestibular stimulation during quiet stance. Acutely, individuals with Parkinson disease demonstrated larger center of pressure coefficient of variation compared to controls. Unlike individuals with Parkinson disease and asymptomatic older adults, healthy young adults acutely demonstrated a reduction in Sample Entropy to the sensory illusion. Following a period of consolidation Sample Entropy increased in the healthy young group, which coincided with a decreased center of pressure coefficient of variation. Similar changes were not observed in the Parkinson disease or older adult groups. Taken together, these results suggest that young adults learn to adapt to vestibular illusion in a more robust manner than older adults or those with Parkinson disease. Further investigation into the nature of this adaptive difference is warranted. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Adaptive Neural Control for a Class of Outputs Time-Delay Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruliang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an adaptive neural control for a class of outputs time-delay nonlinear systems with perturbed or no. Based on RBF neural networks, the radius basis function (RBF neural networks is employed to estimate the unknown continuous functions. The proposed control guarantees that all closed-loop signals remain bounded. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  17. Adaptive RBF Neural Network Control for Three-Phase Active Power Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntao Fei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An adaptive radial basis function (RBF neural network control system for three-phase active power filter (APF is proposed to eliminate harmonics. Compensation current is generated to track command current so as to eliminate the harmonic current of non-linear load and improve the quality of the power system. The asymptotical stability of the APF system can be guaranteed with the proposed adaptive neural network strategy. The parameters of the neural network can be adaptively updated to achieve the desired tracking task. The simulation results demonstrate good performance, for example showing small current tracking error, reduced total harmonic distortion (THD, improved accuracy and strong robustness in the presence of parameters variation and nonlinear load. It is shown that the adaptive RBF neural network control system for three-phase APF gives better control than hysteresis control.

  18. Adaptation as a sensorial profile in trait anxiety: a study with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaud-Delmon, I; Ivanenko, Y P; Berthoz, A; Jouvent, R

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-four volunteers were recruited on the basis of their trait anxiety scores (low trait anxiety [LTA] and high trait anxiety [HTA]) as assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Adaptation to conflicting visual-vestibular stimulation (VVS) was used to study integration of space-related multi-sensory information in trait anxiety. First, vestibular perception was assessed by rotating the blindfolded subjects about the vertical axis (horizontal plane rotations) on a remote-controlled mobile robot. The subjects were asked to indicate the perceived rotation by use of an angular pointer. Subjects were then immersed into the center of a visual virtual square room by means of a head-mounted display. They were asked to control the robot with a joystick in order to perform 90 degrees rotations in the virtual room. However, a gain of 0.5 was introduced between visual scene and robot rotation so that the subjects were submitted to a conflict situation in which the 90 degrees rotational visual input was concurrent with a 180 degrees vestibular input. After 45 min of training with the virtual reality display, subjects were tested again in total darkness in order to determine whether their vestibular system had been reset by the conflicting visual signals. We found significant differences in adaptation to VVS between HTA and LTA groups as well as between males and females. Subjects of the HTA group demonstrated larger adaptation than that of the LTA group. Males also showed a greater level of adaptation compared to females. Our results suggest greater visual dependence in HTA subjects. This might be important for understanding the mechanisms underlying pathological anxiety and particularly agoraphobia.

  19. Cross-sensory facilitation reveals neural interactions between visual and tactile motion in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eGori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and tactile velocity discrimination thresholds over a wide range of base velocities and conditions. Thresholds for both visual and tactile stimuli showed the characteristic dipper function, with the minimum thresholds occurring at a given pedestal speed. When visual and tactile coherent stimuli were combined (summation condition the thresholds for these multi-sensory stimuli also showed a dipper function with the minimum thresholds occurring in a similar range to that for unisensory signals. However, the improvement of multisensory thresholds was weak and not directionally specific, well predicted by the maximum likelihood estimation model (agreeing with previous research. A different technique (facilitation did, however, reveal direction-specific enhancement. Adding a non-informative pedestal motion stimulus in one sensory modality (vision or touch selectively lowered thresholds in the other, by the same amount as pedestals in the same modality. Facilitation did not occur for neutral stimuli like sounds (that would also have reduced temporal uncertainty, nor for motion in opposite direction, even in blocked trials where the subjects knew that the motion was in the opposite direction showing that the facilitation was not under subject control. Cross-sensory facilitation is strong evidence for functionally relevant cross-sensory integration at early levels of sensory

  20. Domain specialization: a post-training domain adaptation for Neural Machine Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Servan, Christophe; Crego, Josep; Senellart, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Domain adaptation is a key feature in Machine Translation. It generally encompasses terminology, domain and style adaptation, especially for human post-editing workflows in Computer Assisted Translation (CAT). With Neural Machine Translation (NMT), we introduce a new notion of domain adaptation that we call "specialization" and which is showing promising results both in the learning speed and in adaptation accuracy. In this paper, we propose to explore this approach under several perspectives.

  1. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  2. Genetic algorithm based adaptive neural network ensemble and its application in predicting carbon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y.; Liu, S.; Hu, Y.; Yang, J.; Chen, Q.

    2007-01-01

    To improve the accuracy in prediction, Genetic Algorithm based Adaptive Neural Network Ensemble (GA-ANNE) is presented. Intersections are allowed between different training sets based on the fuzzy clustering analysis, which ensures the diversity as well as the accuracy of individual Neural Networks (NNs). Moreover, to improve the accuracy of the adaptive weights of individual NNs, GA is used to optimize the cluster centers. Empirical results in predicting carbon flux of Duke Forest reveal that GA-ANNE can predict the carbon flux more accurately than Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN), Bagging NN ensemble, and ANNE. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  3. Rhythmic entrainment source separation: Optimizing analyses of neural responses to rhythmic sensory stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.S.; Gulbinaite, R.

    2017-01-01

    Steady-state evoked potentials (SSEPs) are rhythmic brain responses to rhythmic sensory stimulation, and are often used to study perceptual and attentional processes. We present a data analysis method for maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the narrow-band steady-state response in the frequency

  4. [Robustness analysis of adaptive neural network model based on spike timing-dependent plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunzhi; Xu, Guizhi; Zhou, Qian; Guo, Miaomiao; Guo, Lei; Wan, Xiaowei

    2015-02-01

    To explore the self-organization robustness of the biological neural network, and thus to provide new ideas and methods for the electromagnetic bionic protection, we studied both the information transmission mechanism of neural network and spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) mechanism, and then investigated the relationship between synaptic plastic and adaptive characteristic of biology. Then a feedforward neural network with the Izhikevich model and the STDP mechanism was constructed, and the adaptive robust capacity of the network was analyzed. Simulation results showed that the neural network based on STDP mechanism had good rubustness capacity, and this characteristics is closely related to the STDP mechanisms. Based on this simulation work, the cell circuit with neurons and synaptic circuit which can simulate the information processing mechanisms of biological nervous system will be further built, then the electronic circuits with adaptive robustness will be designed based on the cell circuit.

  5. Adaptive Output-Feedback Neural Control of Switched Uncertain Nonlinear Systems With Average Dwell Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of adaptive neural tracking control via output-feedback for a class of switched uncertain nonlinear systems without the measurements of the system states. The unknown control signals are approximated directly by neural networks. A novel adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is set up by exploiting the average dwell time method and backstepping. A switched filter and different update laws are designed to reduce the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer and a common update law for all subsystems. The proposed controllers of subsystems guarantee that all closed-loop signals remain bounded under a class of switching signals with average dwell time, while the output tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. As an application of the proposed design method, adaptive output feedback neural tracking controllers for a mass-spring-damper system are constructed.

  6. An Evaluation of Sensory Neural Hearing Loss in Thalassaemic Patients Treated with Desferrioxamine and Its Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sonbolestan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Back ground: In major thalassaemia patients who need blood transfusion, iron overload is a major therapeutic disadvantage that leads to heart failure which is the major cause of death in such patients. Desferrioxamine (DFO is the most efficient factor for iron chelation, but it carries adverse effects such sensory-neural hearing loss. Methods: The study began in March 2002 and continued untill March 2003, on 160 cases of thalassaemia to determine the incidence of sensoryneural hearing loss and its risk factors in patients who received Desferrioxamine (DFO. All cases underwent audiometric tests. Retrospectively, other needed information were either obtained through interview or extracted from the medical files. Results were analyzed with ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests. Results: Seventy-six patients of the total 156 patients showed impairment in PTA (48.7% with 24 of them suffering significant involvement (15.4%. These abnormalities generally affected high frequencies including, 4000 and 8000 Hz. Male gender, increased serum billirubin level and fasting blood sugar were statistically correlated with hearing loss (p.v = 0.038, p.v = 0.38, p.v = 0.002 respectively. There was no significant correlation between hearing loss and other factors. Mean DFO administration in patients, was 29.69 mg/kg/day and mean therapeutic index of DFO was 0.01 mg/kg/day/mg/lit. Both of them were below the critical level (<40mg/kg/day and <0.025mg/kg/day/mg/lit respectively, however hearing loss had developed. Conclusion: Controlling DFO dosage per se does not seem to be enough for decreasing ototoxicity rate. Periodic audiometric tests are highly recommended to detect hearing loss as soon as possible. There are some other factors such as male gender, increased billirubin and FBS, which contribute to DFO ototoxicity. Looking for these risk factors and controlling them, would help identifying susceptible patients and preventing this complication. Key words

  7. An Adaptive-PSO-Based Self-Organizing RBF Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hong-Gui; Lu, Wei; Hou, Ying; Qiao, Jun-Fei

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a self-organizing radial basis function (SORBF) neural network is designed to improve both accuracy and parsimony with the aid of adaptive particle swarm optimization (APSO). In the proposed APSO algorithm, to avoid being trapped into local optimal values, a nonlinear regressive function is developed to adjust the inertia weight. Furthermore, the APSO algorithm can optimize both the network size and the parameters of an RBF neural network simultaneously. As a result, the proposed APSO-SORBF neural network can effectively generate a network model with a compact structure and high accuracy. Moreover, the analysis of convergence is given to guarantee the successful application of the APSO-SORBF neural network. Finally, multiple numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed APSO-SORBF neural network. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is more competitive in solving nonlinear problems than some other existing SORBF neural networks.

  8. A Dung Beetle-like Leg and its Adaptive Neural Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Canio, Giuliano; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Larsen, Jørgen Christian

    2016-01-01

    also apply adaptive neural control, based on a central pattern generator (CPG) circuit with synaptic plasticity, to autonomously generate a proper stepping frequency of the leg. The controller can also adapt the leg movement to deal with external perturbations within a few steps....

  9. Active random noise control using adaptive learning rate neural networks with an immune feedback law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kuribayashi, Takumi; Ito, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    In this paper an active random noise control using adaptive learning rate neural networks with an immune feedback law is presented. The adaptive learning rate strategy increases the learning rate by a small constant if the current partial derivative of the objective function with respect to the weight and the exponential average of the previous derivatives have the same sign, otherwise the learning rate is decreased by a proportion of its value. The use of an adaptive learning rate attempts to keep the learning step size as large as possible without leading to oscillation. In the proposed method, because of the immune feedback law change a learning rate of the neural networks individually and adaptively, it is expected that a cost function minimize rapidly and training time is decreased. Numerical simulations and experiments of active random noise control with the transfer function of the error path will be performed, to validate the convergence properties of the adaptive learning rate Neural Networks with the immune feedback law. Control results show that adaptive learning rate Neural Networks control structure can outperform linear controllers and conventional neural network controller for the active random noise control.

  10. Matched Behavioral and Neural Adaptations for Low Sound Level Echolocation in a Gleaning Bat, Antrozous pallidus

    OpenAIRE

    Measor, Kevin R.; Leavell, Brian C.; Brewton, Dustin H.; Rumschlag, Jeffrey; Barber, Jesse R.; Razak, Khaleel A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In active sensing, animals make motor adjustments to match sensory inputs to specialized neural circuitry. Here, we describe an active sensing system for sound level processing. The pallid bat uses downward frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps as echolocation calls for general orientation and obstacle avoidance. The bat?s auditory cortex contains a region selective for these FM sweeps (FM sweep-selective region, FMSR). We show that the vast majority of FMSR neurons are sensitive and stron...

  11. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control of Chaos in Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor via Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat-Bao-Thien Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, based on fuzzy neural networks, we develop an adaptive sliding mode controller for chaos suppression and tracking control in a chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM drive system. The proposed controller consists of two parts. The first is an adaptive sliding mode controller which employs a fuzzy neural network to estimate the unknown nonlinear models for constructing the sliding mode controller. The second is a compensational controller which adaptively compensates estimation errors. For stability analysis, the Lyapunov synthesis approach is used to ensure the stability of controlled systems. Finally, simulation results are provided to verify the validity and superiority of the proposed method.

  12. Neural network-based adaptive dynamic surface control for permanent magnet synchronous motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinpeng; Shi, Peng; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Bing; Lin, Chong

    2015-03-01

    This brief considers the problem of neural networks (NNs)-based adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) for permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) with parameter uncertainties and load torque disturbance. First, NNs are used to approximate the unknown and nonlinear functions of PMSM drive system and a novel adaptive DSC is constructed to avoid the explosion of complexity in the backstepping design. Next, under the proposed adaptive neural DSC, the number of adaptive parameters required is reduced to only one, and the designed neural controllers structure is much simpler than some existing results in literature, which can guarantee that the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Then, simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness and potential of the new design technique.

  13. The complex tibial organ of the New Zealand ground weta: sensory adaptations for vibrational signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, Johannes; Lomas, Kathryn; Field, Laurence H

    2017-05-17

    In orthopteran insects, a complex tibial organ has evolved to detect substrate vibrations and/or airborne sound. Species of New Zealand weta (Anostostomatidae) with tympanal ears on the foreleg tibia use this organ to communicate by sound, while in atympanate species (which communicate by substrate drumming) the organ is unstudied. We investigated the complex tibial organ of the atympanate ground weta, Hemiandrus pallitarsis, for vibration detection adaptations. This system contains four sensory components (subgenual organ, intermediate organ, crista acustica homolog, accessory organ) in all legs, together with up to 90 scolopidial sensilla. Microcomputed tomography shows that the subgenual organ spans the hemolymph channel, with attachments suggesting that hemolymph oscillations displace the organ in a hinged-plate fashion. Subgenual sensilla are likely excited by substrate oscillations transmitted within the leg. Instead of the usual suspension within the middle of the tibial cavity, we show that the intermediate organ and crista acustica homolog comprise a cellular mass broadly attached to the anterior tibial wall. They likely detect cuticular vibrations, and not airborne sound. This atympanate complex tibial organ shows elaborate structural changes suggesting detection of vibrational stimuli by parallel input pathways, thus correlating well with the burrowing lifestyle and communication by substrate-transmitted vibration.

  14. Feasibility of a sensory-adapted dental environment for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Sharon A; Stein Duker, Leah I; Williams, Marian E; Lane, Christianne Joy; Dawson, Michael E; Borreson, Ann E; Polido, José C

    2015-01-01

    To provide an example of an occupational therapy feasibility study and evaluate the implementation of a randomized controlled pilot and feasibility trial examining the impact of a sensory-adapted dental environment (SADE) to enhance oral care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twenty-two children with ASD and 22 typically developing children, ages 6-12 yr, attended a dental clinic in an urban hospital. Participants completed two dental cleanings, 3-4 mo apart, one in a regular environment and one in a SADE. Feasibility outcome measures were recruitment, retention, accrual, dropout, and protocol adherence. Intervention outcome measures were physiological stress, behavioral distress, pain, and cost. We successfully recruited and retained participants. Parents expressed satisfaction with research study participation. Dentists stated that the intervention could be incorporated in normal practice. Intervention outcome measures favored the SADE condition. Preliminary positive benefit of SADE in children with ASD warrants moving forward with a large-scale clinical trial. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  15. Feasibility of a Sensory-Adapted Dental Environment for Children With Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein Duker, Leah I.; Williams, Marian E.; Lane, Christianne Joy; Dawson, Michael E.; Borreson, Ann E.; Polido, José C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To provide an example of an occupational therapy feasibility study and evaluate the implementation of a randomized controlled pilot and feasibility trial examining the impact of a sensory-adapted dental environment (SADE) to enhance oral care for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). METHOD. Twenty-two children with ASD and 22 typically developing children, ages 6–12 yr, attended a dental clinic in an urban hospital. Participants completed two dental cleanings, 3–4 mo apart, one in a regular environment and one in a SADE. Feasibility outcome measures were recruitment, retention, accrual, dropout, and protocol adherence. Intervention outcome measures were physiological stress, behavioral distress, pain, and cost. RESULTS. We successfully recruited and retained participants. Parents expressed satisfaction with research study participation. Dentists stated that the intervention could be incorporated in normal practice. Intervention outcome measures favored the SADE condition. CONCLUSION. Preliminary positive benefit of SADE in children with ASD warrants moving forward with a large-scale clinical trial. PMID:25871593

  16. Tracking error constrained robust adaptive neural prescribed performance control for flexible hypersonic flight vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A robust adaptive neural control scheme based on a back-stepping technique is developed for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible hypersonic flight vehicle, which is able to ensure the state tracking error being confined in the prescribed bounds, in spite of the existing model uncertainties and actuator constraints. Minimal learning parameter technique–based neural networks are used to estimate the model uncertainties; thus, the amount of online updated parameters is largely lessened, and the prior information of the aerodynamic parameters is dispensable. With the utilization of an assistant compensation system, the problem of actuator constraint is overcome. By combining the prescribed performance function and sliding mode differentiator into the neural back-stepping control design procedure, a composite state tracking error constrained adaptive neural control approach is presented, and a new type of adaptive law is constructed. As compared with other adaptive neural control designs for hypersonic flight vehicle, the proposed composite control scheme exhibits not only low-computation property but also strong robustness. Finally, two comparative simulations are performed to demonstrate the robustness of this neural prescribed performance controller.

  17. Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems by Using OS-ELM Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a kind of novel feedforward neural network with single hidden layer, ELM (extreme learning machine neural networks are studied for the identification and control of nonlinear dynamic systems. The property of simple structure and fast convergence of ELM can be shown clearly. In this paper, we are interested in adaptive control of nonlinear dynamic plants by using OS-ELM (online sequential extreme learning machine neural networks. Based on data scope division, the problem that training process of ELM neural network is sensitive to the initial training data is also solved. According to the output range of the controlled plant, the data corresponding to this range will be used to initialize ELM. Furthermore, due to the drawback of conventional adaptive control, when the OS-ELM neural network is used for adaptive control of the system with jumping parameters, the topological structure of the neural network can be adjusted dynamically by using multiple model switching strategy, and an MMAC (multiple model adaptive control will be used to improve the control performance. Simulation results are included to complement the theoretical results.

  18. Fast and Efficient Asynchronous Neural Computation with Adapting Spiking Neural Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zambrano (Davide); S.M. Bohte (Sander)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBiological neurons communicate with a sparing exchange of pulses - spikes. It is an open question how real spiking neurons produce the kind of powerful neural computation that is possible with deep artificial neural networks, using only so very few spikes to communicate. Building on

  19. Neural Predictors of Visuomotor Adaptation Rate and Multi-Day Savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, Kaitlin; Ruitenberg, Marit; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia; De Dios, Yiri; Gadd, Nichole; Wood, Scott; Riascos Castenada, Roy; Kofman, Igor; Bloomberg, Jacob; hide

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies of sensorimotor adaptation have found that individual differences in task-based functional brain activation are associated with the rate of adaptation and savings at subsequent sessions. However, few studies to date have investigated offline neural predictors of adaptation and multi-day savings. In the present study, we explore whether individual differences in the rate of visuomotor adaptation and multi-day savings are associated with differences in resting state functional connectivity and gray matter volume. Thirty-four participants performed a manual adaptation task during two separate test sessions, on average 9 days apart. We found that resting state functional connectivity strength between sensorimotor, anterior cingulate, and temporoparietal areas of the brain was a significant predictor of adaptation rate during the early, cognitive phase of practice. In contrast, default mode network functional connectivity strength was found to predict late adaptation rate and savings on day two, which suggests that these behaviors may rely on overlapping processes. We also found that gray matter volume in temporoparietal and occipital regions was a significant predictor of early learning, whereas gray matter volume in superior posterior regions of the cerebellum was a significant predictor of late adaptation. The results from this study suggest that offline neural predictors of early adaptation facilitate the cognitive mechanisms of sensorimotor adaptation, with support from by the involvement of temporoparietal and cingulate networks. In contrast, the neural predictors of late adaptation and savings, including the default mode network and the cerebellum, likely support the storage and modification of newly acquired sensorimotor representations. These findings provide novel insights into the neural processes associated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptation.

  20. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Sassa, Yuko; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-01-01

    Background Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are ?self-performing? and ?contain a solution.? The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one?s aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-lif...

  1. Cross cultural adaptation of the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile: establishing linguistic equivalency and psychometric properties of the Arabic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almomani, Fidaa M; Brown, Catana; Dahab, Sana Abu; Almomani, Murad; Nadar, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Cross-cultural adaptation of standardized outcome measures between different languages is a common procedure that allows healthcare professionals around the world to utilize such measures in their own languages. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of translating and cross-culturally adapting the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile from English to Arabic and to assess the psychometric properties of the Arabic version. A backward-forward translation process was used to translate the measure. Eighty-seven bilingual participants completed an English and an Arabic translated version of the measure. The percent agreement for each of the Arabic and English items ranges from 0.77 to 0.98. The kappa values range from 0.79 to 0.84. Test-re-test reliability of the Arabic version was tested on 35 participants. The percent agreement between the first and the second assessment using the Arabic version of the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile ranges from 0.80 to 0.96. The kappa values range from 0.82 to 0.88. Internal consistency for the Arabic version was 0.84 and 0.82 for the English version. Construct validity of the Arabic version (n = 560) was tested using factor analysis. Four factors were rotated using a Varimax rotation procedure. The factors' classification and the items' distribution related to these factors were very similar to the English version of the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile. Only 9 items of the 60 items (15%) had different distribution than the original version. The Arabic version of the Adolescent/Adult Sensory profile has very good psychometric properties and can be utilized with confidence with Arabic-speaking individuals. Implications for Rehabilitation Arabic-speaking countries lack standardized rehabilitation assessments written in Arabic. The Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile is a widely used measure with good psychometric properties and one of rare instruments that measures sensory processing in adult and adolescent. The

  2. Neural and morphological adaptations of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles to isokinetic eccentric training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Azevedo Franke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vastus lateralis (VL and vastus medialis (VM are frequently targeted in conditioning/rehabilitation programs due to their role in patellar stabilization during knee extension. This study assessed neural and muscular adaptations in these two muscles after an isokinetic eccentric training program. Twenty healthy men underwent a four-week control period followed by a 12-week period of isokinetic eccentric training. Ultrasound evaluations of VL and VM muscle thickness at rest and electromyographic evaluations during maximal isometric tests were used to assess the morphological and neural properties, respectively. No morphological and neural changes were found throughout the control period, whereas both muscles showed significant increases in thickness (VL = 6.9%; p .05 post-training. Isokinetic eccentric training produces neural and greater morphological adaptations in VM compared to VL, which shows that synergistic muscles respond differently to an eccentric isokinetic strength training program

  3. An adaptive neural mechanism for acoustic motion perception with varying sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    Biological motion-sensitive neural circuits are quite adept in perceiving the relative motion of a relevant stimulus. Motion perception is a fundamental ability in neural sensory processing and crucial in target tracking tasks. Tracking a stimulus entails the ability to perceive its motion, i.......e. extracting information about its direction and velocity. Here we focus on auditory motion perception of sound stimuli, which is poorly understood as compared to its visual counterpart. In earlier work we have developed a bio-inspired neural learning mechanism for acoustic motion perception. The mechanism...... be occluded by artefacts in the environment, such as an escaping prey momentarily disappearing behind a cover of trees. This article extends the earlier work by presenting a comparative investigation of auditory motion perception for unoccluded and occluded tonal sound stimuli with a frequency of 2.2 k...

  4. Adaptive Noise Cancellation for speech Employing Fuzzy and Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Hussein Miry; Ali Hussein Miry; Hussain Kareem Khleaf

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive filtering constitutes one of the core technologies in digital signal processing and finds numerous application areas in science as well as in industry. Adaptive filtering techniques are used in a wide range of applications such as noise cancellation. Noise cancellation is a common occurrence in today telecommunication systems. The LMS algorithm which is one of the most efficient criteria for determining the values of the adaptive noise cancellation coefficient...

  5. An Adaptive Recurrent Neural Network for Remaining Useful Life Prediction of Lithium-ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    application for RUL prediction. We compare its performance with the classical recurrent neural network (RNN) and the recurrent neural fuzzy system ...Jang (1993). ANFIS: adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system , IEEE Transactions on Systems , Man, and Cybernetics-Part B: Cybernetics, vol. 23...pp. 665-685, 1993. J. Jang, C. T. Sun, and E. Mizutani (1997). Neuro - Fuzzy and Soft Computing: A computational approach to learning and machine

  6. Robust Adaptive Exponential Synchronization of Stochastic Perturbed Chaotic Delayed Neural Networks with Parametric Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the robust adaptive exponential synchronization in mean square of stochastic perturbed chaotic delayed neural networks with nonidentical parametric uncertainties. A robust adaptive feedback controller is proposed based on Gronwally’s inequality, drive-response concept, and adaptive feedback control technique with the update laws of nonidentical parametric uncertainties as well as linear matrix inequality (LMI approach. The sufficient conditions for robust adaptive exponential synchronization in mean square of uncoupled uncertain stochastic chaotic delayed neural networks are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. The effect of nonidentical uncertain parameter uncertainties is suppressed by the designed robust adaptive feedback controller rapidly. A numerical example is provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Bilingualism increases neural response consistency and attentional control: Evidence for sensory and cognitive coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizman, Jennifer; Skoe, Erika; Marian, Viorica; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing is presumed to be influenced by cognitive processes – including attentional control – in a top-down manner. In bilinguals, activation of both languages during daily communication hones inhibitory skills, which subsequently bolster attentional control. We hypothesize that the heightened attentional demands of bilingual communication strengthens connections between cognitive (i.e., attentional control) and auditory processing, leading to greater across-trial consistency in the auditory evoked response (i.e., neural consistency) in bilinguals. To assess this, we collected passively-elicited auditory evoked responses to the syllable [da] and separately obtained measures of attentional control and language ability in adolescent Spanish-English bilinguals and English monolinguals. Bilinguals demonstrated enhanced attentional control and more consistent brainstem and cortical responses. In bilinguals, but not monolinguals, brainstem consistency tracked with language proficiency and attentional control. We interpret these enhancements in neural consistency as the outcome of strengthened attentional control that emerged from experience communicating in two languages. PMID:24413593

  8. Synaptic plasticity in a recurrent neural network for versatile and adaptive behaviors of a walking robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinke, Eduard; Tetzlaff, Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like insects, with little neural computing can effectively perform complex behaviors. For example, they can walk around their environment, escape from corners/deadlocks, and avoid or climb over obstacles. While performing all these behaviors, they can also adapt their movements...... correlation-based learning with synaptic scaling is applied to adequately change the connections of the network. By doing so, we can effectively exploit neural dynamics (i.e., hysteresis effects and single attractors) in the network to generate different turning angles with short-term memory for a walking...... robot. The turning information is transmitted as descending steering signals to the neural locomotion control which translates the signals into motor actions. As a result, the robot can walk around and adapt its turning angle for avoiding obstacles in different situations. The adaptation also enables...

  9. Adaptive Global Sliding Mode Control for MEMS Gyroscope Using RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yundi Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive global sliding mode control (AGSMC using RBF neural network (RBFNN is proposed for the system identification and tracking control of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS gyroscope. Firstly, a new kind of adaptive identification method based on the global sliding mode controller is designed to update and estimate angular velocity and other system parameters of MEMS gyroscope online. Moreover, the output of adaptive neural network control is used to adjust the switch gain of sliding mode control dynamically to approach the upper bound of unknown disturbances. In this way, the switch item of sliding mode control can be converted to the output of continuous neural network which can weaken the chattering in the sliding mode control in contrast to the conventional fixed gain sliding mode control. Simulation results show that the designed control system can get satisfactory tracking performance and effective estimation of unknown parameters of MEMS gyroscope.

  10. Rapid adaptive remote focusing microscope for sensing of volumetric neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žurauskas, Mantas; Barnstedt, Oliver; Frade-Rodriguez, Maria; Waddell, Scott; Booth, Martin J

    2017-10-01

    The ability to record neural activity in the brain of a living organism at cellular resolution is of great importance for defining the neural circuit mechanisms that direct behavior. Here we present an adaptive two-photon microscope optimized for extraction of neural signals over volumes in intact Drosophila brains, even in the presence of specimen motion. High speed volume imaging was made possible through reduction of spatial resolution while maintaining the light collection efficiency of a high resolution, high numerical aperture microscope. This enabled simultaneous recording of odor-evoked calcium transients in a defined volume of mushroom body Kenyon cell bodies in a live fruit fly.

  11. Adaptive Neural Network Sliding Mode Control for Quad Tilt Rotor Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanchao Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel neural network sliding mode control based on multicommunity bidirectional drive collaborative search algorithm (M-CBDCS is proposed to design a flight controller for performing the attitude tracking control of a quad tilt rotors aircraft (QTRA. Firstly, the attitude dynamic model of the QTRA concerning propeller tension, channel arm, and moment of inertia is formulated, and the equivalent sliding mode control law is stated. Secondly, an adaptive control algorithm is presented to eliminate the approximation error, where a radial basis function (RBF neural network is used to online regulate the equivalent sliding mode control law, and the novel M-CBDCS algorithm is developed to uniformly update the unknown neural network weights and essential model parameters adaptively. The nonlinear approximation error is obtained and serves as a novel leakage term in the adaptations to guarantee the sliding surface convergence and eliminate the chattering phenomenon, which benefit the overall attitude control performance for QTRA. Finally, the appropriate comparisons among the novel adaptive neural network sliding mode control, the classical neural network sliding mode control, and the dynamic inverse PID control are examined, and comparative simulations are included to verify the efficacy of the proposed control method.

  12. Adaptive Synchronization for a Class of Uncertain Fractional-Order Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, synchronization for a class of uncertain fractional-order neural networks subject to external disturbances and disturbed system parameters is studied. Based on the fractional-order extension of the Lyapunov stability criterion, an adaptive synchronization controller is designed, and fractional-order adaptation law is proposed to update the controller parameter online. The proposed controller can guarantee that the synchronization errors between two uncertain fractional-order neural networks converge to zero asymptotically. By using some proposed lemmas, the quadratic Lyapunov functions are employed in the stability analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Vocal learning in elephants: neural bases and adaptive context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, Angela S; Manger, Paul

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade clear evidence has accumulated that elephants are capable of vocal production learning. Examples of vocal imitation are documented in African (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) elephants, but little is known about the function of vocal learning within the natural communication systems of either species. We are also just starting to identify the neural basis of elephant vocalizations. The African elephant diencephalon and brainstem possess specializations related to aspects of neural information processing in the motor system (affecting the timing and learning of trunk movements) and the auditory and vocalization system. Comparative interdisciplinary (from behavioral to neuroanatomical) studies are strongly warranted to increase our understanding of both vocal learning and vocal behavior in elephants. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluid intelligence and neural mechanisms of conflict adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tongran; Xiao, Tong; Jiannong, Shi

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether adolescents with different intellectual levels have different conflict adaptation processes. Adolescents with high and average IQ abilities were enrolled, and their behavioral responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a modified Erik...... adaptation control processing with smaller SP amplitude-CAE values. In conclusion, the present study revealed the essential association between fluid intelligence and conflict adaptation processes....... that high IQ adolescents had shorter RTs than their average-IQ counterparts in the cI, iC, and iI conditions, with smaller RT-CAE values. These findings indicated that high IQ adolescents had superior conflict adaptation processes. The electrophysiological findings showed that the cI condition required more...

  15. Neural regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in the gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhawan, S.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), in modulating the innate and adaptive immune function in the intestine, during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Furthermore, this thesis attempts to advance our current understanding

  16. The Adaptive Neural Network Control of Quadrotor Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Yushenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current steady-rising interest in using the unmanned multi-rotor aerial vehicles (UMAV designed to solve a wide range of tasks is, mainly, due to their simple design and high weight-carrying capacity as compared to classical helicopter options. Unfortunately, to solve a problem of multi-copter control is complicated because of essential nonlinearity and environmental perturbations. The most widely spread PID controllers and linear-quadratic regulators do not quite well cope with this task. The need arises for the prompt adjustment of PID controller coefficients in the course of operation or their complete re-tuning in cases of changing parameters of the control object.One of the control methods under changing conditions is the use of the sliding mode. This technology enables us to reach the stabilization and proper operation of the controlled system even under accidental external exposures and when there is a lack of the reasonably accurate mathematical model of the control object. The sliding principle is to ensure the system motion in the immediate vicinity of the sliding surface in the phase space. On the other hand, the sliding mode has some essential disadvantages. The most significant one is the high-frequency jitter of the system near the sliding surface. The sliding mode also implies the complete knowledge of the system dynamics. Various methods have been proposed to eliminate these drawbacks. For example, A.G. Aissaoui’s, H. Abid’s and M. Abid’s paper describes the application of fuzzy logic to control a drive and in Lon-Chen Hung’s and Hung-Yuan Chung’s paper an artificial neural network is used for the manipulator control.This paper presents a method of the quad-copter control with the aid of a neural network controller. This method enables us to control the system without a priori information on parameters of the dynamic model of the controlled object. The main neural network is a MIMO (“Multiple Input Multiple

  17. Bilingualism increases neural response consistency and attentional control: evidence for sensory and cognitive coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizman, Jennifer; Skoe, Erika; Marian, Viorica; Kraus, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing is presumed to be influenced by cognitive processes - including attentional control - in a top-down manner. In bilinguals, activation of both languages during daily communication hones inhibitory skills, which subsequently bolster attentional control. We hypothesize that the heightened attentional demands of bilingual communication strengthens connections between cognitive (i.e., attentional control) and auditory processing, leading to greater across-trial consistency in the auditory evoked response (i.e., neural consistency) in bilinguals. To assess this, we collected passively-elicited auditory evoked responses to the syllable [da] in adolescent Spanish-English bilinguals and English monolinguals and separately obtained measures of attentional control and language ability. Bilinguals demonstrated enhanced attentional control and more consistent brainstem and cortical responses. In bilinguals, but not monolinguals, brainstem consistency tracked with language proficiency and attentional control. We interpret these enhancements in neural consistency as the outcome of strengthened attentional control that emerged from experience communicating in two languages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lithofacies identification using multiple adaptive resonance theory neural networks and group decision expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-C.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Chen, H.-C.; Rocky, Durrans S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithofacies identification supplies qualitative information about rocks. Lithofacies represent rock textures and are important components of hydrocarbon reservoir description. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly and different geologists may provide different interpretations. In this paper, we present a low-cost intelligent system consisting of three adaptive resonance theory neural networks and a rule-based expert system to consistently and objectively identify lithofacies from well-log data. The input data are altered into different forms representing different perspectives of observation of lithofacies. Each form of input is processed by a different adaptive resonance theory neural network. Among these three adaptive resonance theory neural networks, one neural network processes the raw continuous data, another processes categorial data, and the third processes fuzzy-set data. Outputs from these three networks are then combined by the expert system using fuzzy inference to determine to which facies the input data should be assigned. Rules are prioritized to emphasize the importance of firing order. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural networks, the adaptability of fuzzy logic, and the expertise of geologists to infer facies of the rocks. This approach is applied to the Appleton Field, an oil field located in Escambia County, Alabama. The hybrid intelligence system predicts lithofacies identity from log data with 87.6% accuracy. This prediction is more accurate than those of single adaptive resonance theory networks, 79.3%, 68.0% and 66.0%, using raw, fuzzy-set, and categorical data, respectively, and by an error-backpropagation neural network, 57.3%. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural network L1 adaptive control of MIMO systems with nonlinear uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Hong-tao; Qi, Xiao-hui; Li, Jie; Tian, Qing-min

    2014-01-01

    An indirect adaptive controller is developed for a class of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear systems with unknown uncertainties. This control system is comprised of an L 1 adaptive controller and an auxiliary neural network (NN) compensation controller. The L 1 adaptive controller has guaranteed transient response in addition to stable tracking. In this architecture, a low-pass filter is adopted to guarantee fast adaptive rate without generating high-frequency oscillations in control signals. The auxiliary compensation controller is designed to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions by MIMO RBF neural networks to suppress the influence of uncertainties. NN weights are tuned on-line with no prior training and the project operator ensures the weights bounded. The global stability of the closed-system is derived based on the Lyapunov function. Numerical simulations of an MIMO system coupled with nonlinear uncertainties are used to illustrate the practical potential of our theoretical results.

  20. GAUSSIAN MIXTURE MODELS FOR ADAPTATION OF DEEP NEURAL NETWORK ACOUSTIC MODELS IN AUTOMATIC SPEECH RECOGNITION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Tomashenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. We study speaker adaptation of deep neural network (DNN acoustic models in automatic speech recognition systems. The aim of speaker adaptation techniques is to improve the accuracy of the speech recognition system for a particular speaker. Method. A novel method for training and adaptation of deep neural network acoustic models has been developed. It is based on using an auxiliary GMM (Gaussian Mixture Models model and GMMD (GMM-derived features. The principle advantage of the proposed GMMD features is the possibility of performing the adaptation of a DNN through the adaptation of the auxiliary GMM. In the proposed approach any methods for the adaptation of the auxiliary GMM can be used, hence, it provides a universal method for transferring adaptation algorithms developed for GMMs to DNN adaptation.Main Results. The effectiveness of the proposed approach was shown by means of one of the most common adaptation algorithms for GMM models – MAP (Maximum A Posteriori adaptation. Different ways of integration of the proposed approach into state-of-the-art DNN architecture have been proposed and explored. Analysis of choosing the type of the auxiliary GMM model is given. Experimental results on the TED-LIUM corpus demonstrate that, in an unsupervised adaptation mode, the proposed adaptation technique can provide, approximately, a 11–18% relative word error reduction (WER on different adaptation sets, compared to the speaker-independent DNN system built on conventional features, and a 3–6% relative WER reduction compared to the SAT-DNN trained on fMLLR adapted features.

  1. Modeling multiple time scale firing rate adaptation in a neural network of local field potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Brian Nils

    2015-02-01

    In response to stimulus changes, the firing rates of many neurons adapt, such that stimulus change is emphasized. Previous work has emphasized that rate adaptation can span a wide range of time scales and produce time scale invariant power law adaptation. However, neuronal rate adaptation is typically modeled using single time scale dynamics, and constructing a conductance-based model with arbitrary adaptation dynamics is nontrivial. Here, a modeling approach is developed in which firing rate adaptation, or spike frequency adaptation, can be understood as a filtering of slow stimulus statistics. Adaptation dynamics are modeled by a stimulus filter, and quantified by measuring the phase leads of the firing rate in response to varying input frequencies. Arbitrary adaptation dynamics are approximated by a set of weighted exponentials with parameters obtained by fitting to a desired filter. With this approach it is straightforward to assess the effect of multiple time scale adaptation dynamics on neural networks. To demonstrate this, single time scale and power law adaptation were added to a network model of local field potentials. Rate adaptation enhanced the slow oscillations of the network and flattened the output power spectrum, dampening intrinsic network frequencies. Thus, rate adaptation may play an important role in network dynamics.

  2. A simple mechanical system for studying adaptive oscillatory neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Guillaume; Jouffroy, Jerome

    model, etc.) might be too complex to study. In this paper, we use a comparatively simple mechanical system, the nonholonomic vehicle referred to as the Roller-Racer, as a means towards testing different learning strategies for an Recurrent Neural Network-based (RNN) controller/guidance system. After...... a brief description of the Roller-Racer, we present as a preliminary study an RNN-based feed-forward controller whose parameters are obtained through the well-known teacher forcing learning algorithm, extended to learn signals with a continuous component....

  3. Adaptive Synchronization of Fractional Neural Networks with Unknown Parameters and Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyuan Ma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the parameters identification and synchronization problem of fractional-order neural networks with time delays are investigated. Based on some analytical techniques and an adaptive control method, a simple adaptive synchronization controller and parameter update laws are designed to synchronize two uncertain complex networks with time delays. Besides, the system parameters in the uncertain network can be identified in the process of synchronization. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed method, several illustrative examples are presented.

  4. Neural response in vestibular organ of Helix aspersa to centrifugation and re-adaptation to normal gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Gravity plays a key role in shaping the vestibular sensitivity (VS) of terrestrial organisms. We studied VS changes in the statocyst of the gastropod Helix aspersa immediately after 4-, 16-, and 32-day exposures to a 1.4G hypergravic field or following a 7-day recovery period. In the same animals we measured latencies of behavioral "negative gravitaxis" responses to a head-down pitch before and after centrifugation and found significant delays after 16- and 32-day runs. In an isolated neural preparation we recorded the electrophysiological responses of the statocyst nerve to static tilt (±19°) and sinusoids (±12°; 0.1 Hz). Spike sorting software was used to separate individual sensory cells' patterns out of a common trace. In correspondence with behavior we observed a VS decrease in animals after 16- (p < 0.05) and 32-day (p < 0.01) centrifugations. These findings reveal the capability of statoreceptors to adjust their sensitivity in response to a prolonged change in the force of gravity. Interestingly, background discharge rate increased after 16 and 32 days in hypergravity and continued to rise through the recovery period. This result indicates that adaptive mechanisms to novel gravity levels were long lasting, and re-adaptation from hypergravity is a more complex process than just "return to normal".

  5. Neural tuning for face wholes and parts in human fusiform gyrus revealed by FMRI adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alison; Aguirre, Geoffrey Karl

    2010-07-01

    Although the right fusiform face area (FFA) is often linked to holistic processing, new data suggest this region also encodes part-based face representations. We examined this question by assessing the metric of neural similarity for faces using a continuous carryover functional MRI (fMRI) design. Using faces varying along dimensions of eye and mouth identity, we tested whether these axes are coded independently by separate part-tuned neural populations or conjointly by a single population of holistically tuned neurons. Consistent with prior results, we found a subadditive adaptation response in the right FFA, as predicted for holistic processing. However, when holistic processing was disrupted by misaligning the halves of the face, the right FFA continued to show significant adaptation, but in an additive pattern indicative of part-based neural tuning. Thus this region seems to contain neural populations capable of representing both individual parts and their integration into a face gestalt. A third experiment, which varied the asymmetry of changes in the eye and mouth identity dimensions, also showed part-based tuning from the right FFA. In contrast to the right FFA, the left FFA consistently showed a part-based pattern of neural tuning across all experiments. Together, these data support the existence of both part-based and holistic neural tuning within the right FFA, further suggesting that such tuning is surprisingly flexible and dynamic.

  6. Identification and adaptive neural network control of a DC motor system with dead-zone characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzhu; Dubay, Rickey

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, an adaptive control approach based on the neural networks is presented to control a DC motor system with dead-zone characteristics (DZC), where two neural networks are proposed to formulate the traditional identification and control approaches. First, a Wiener-type neural network (WNN) is proposed to identify the motor DZC, which formulates the Wiener model with a linear dynamic block in cascade with a nonlinear static gain. Second, a feedforward neural network is proposed to formulate the traditional PID controller, termed as PID-type neural network (PIDNN), which is then used to control and compensate for the DZC. In this way, the DC motor system with DZC is identified by the WNN identifier, which provides model information to the PIDNN controller in order to make it adaptive. Back-propagation algorithms are used to train both neural networks. Also, stability and convergence analysis are conducted using the Lyapunov theorem. Finally, experiments on the DC motor system demonstrated accurate identification and good compensation for dead-zone with improved control performance over the conventional PID control. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Classification of children with autism spectrum disorder by sensory subtype: a case for sensory-based phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E; Molloy, Cynthia A; Bishop, Somer L

    2014-06-01

    This study examines whether sensory differences can be used to classify meaningful subgroups of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Caregivers of children with ASD aged 2-10 years (n = 228) completed the Short Sensory Profile. Model-based cluster analysis was used to extract sensory subtypes. The relationship of these subtypes to age, gender, autism symptom severity, and nonverbal intelligence quotient (IQ) was further explored. Four distinct sensory subtypes were identified: (a) sensory adaptive; (b) taste smell sensitive; (c) postural inattentive; and (d) generalized sensory difference. The sensory subtypes differ from each other on two dimensions: (a) the severity of reported sensory differences; and (b) the focus of differences across auditory, taste, smell, vestibular and proprioceptive domains. Examination of the clinical features of each subtype reveals two possible mechanisms of sensory disturbance in autism: (a) sensory hyperreactivity; and (b) difficulties with multisensory processing. Further, the sensory subtypes are not well explained by other variables such as age, gender, IQ, and autism symptom severity. We conclude that classification of children using sensory differences offers a promising method by which to identify phenotypes in ASD. Sensory-based phenotypes may be useful in identifying behavioral features responsive to specific interventions thereby improving intervention effectiveness. Further validation of the sensory-based phenotypes by establishing neural and physiological correlates is recommended. © 2014 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Neural Code That Is Isometric to Vocal Output and Correlates with Its Sensory Consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei L Vyssotski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available What cortical inputs are provided to motor control areas while they drive complex learned behaviors? We study this question in the nucleus interface of the nidopallium (NIf, which is required for normal birdsong production and provides the main source of auditory input to HVC, the driver of adult song. In juvenile and adult zebra finches, we find that spikes in NIf projection neurons precede vocalizations by several tens of milliseconds and are insensitive to distortions of auditory feedback. We identify a local isometry between NIf output and vocalizations: quasi-identical notes produced in different syllables are preceded by highly similar NIf spike patterns. NIf multiunit firing during song precedes responses in auditory cortical neurons by about 50 ms, revealing delayed congruence between NIf spiking and a neural representation of auditory feedback. Our findings suggest that NIf codes for imminent acoustic events within vocal performance.

  9. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. © 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Adaptive inverse control of neural spatiotemporal spike patterns with a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Park, Il Memming; Brockmeier, Austin; Chen, Badong; Seth, Sohan; Francis, Joseph T; Sanchez, Justin C; Príncipe, José C

    2013-07-01

    The precise control of spiking in a population of neurons via applied electrical stimulation is a challenge due to the sparseness of spiking responses and neural system plasticity. We pose neural stimulation as a system control problem where the system input is a multidimensional time-varying signal representing the stimulation, and the output is a set of spike trains; the goal is to drive the output such that the elicited population spiking activity is as close as possible to some desired activity, where closeness is defined by a cost function. If the neural system can be described by a time-invariant (homogeneous) model, then offline procedures can be used to derive the control procedure; however, for arbitrary neural systems this is not tractable. Furthermore, standard control methodologies are not suited to directly operate on spike trains that represent both the target and elicited system response. In this paper, we propose a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) adaptive inverse control scheme that operates on spike trains in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). The control scheme uses an inverse controller to approximate the inverse of the neural circuit. The proposed control system takes advantage of the precise timing of the neural events by using a Schoenberg kernel defined directly in the space of spike trains. The Schoenberg kernel maps the spike train to an RKHS and allows linear algorithm to control the nonlinear neural system without the danger of converging to local minima. During operation, the adaptation of the controller minimizes a difference defined in the spike train RKHS between the system and the target response and keeps the inverse controller close to the inverse of the current neural circuit, which enables adapting to neural perturbations. The results on a realistic synthetic neural circuit show that the inverse controller based on the Schoenberg kernel outperforms the decoding accuracy of other models based on the conventional rate

  11. ER fluid applications to vibration control devices and an adaptive neural-net controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shin; Ura, Tamaki

    1993-07-01

    Four applications of electrorheological (ER) fluid to vibration control actuators and an adaptive neural-net control system suitable for the controller of ER actuators are described: a shock absorber system for automobiles, a squeeze film damper bearing for rotational machines, a dynamic damper for multidegree-of-freedom structures, and a vibration isolator. An adaptive neural-net control system composed of a forward model network for structural identification and a controller network is introduced for the control system of these ER actuators. As an example study of intelligent vibration control systems, an experiment was performed in which the ER dynamic damper was attached to a beam structure and controlled by the present neural-net controller so that the vibration in several modes of the beam was reduced with a single dynamic damper.

  12. Adaptive Sliding Mode Control of MEMS Gyroscope Based on Neural Network Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive sliding controller using radial basis function (RBF network to approximate the unknown system dynamics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS gyroscope sensor is proposed. Neural controller is proposed to approximate the unknown system model and sliding controller is employed to eliminate the approximation error and attenuate the model uncertainties and external disturbances. Online neural network (NN weight tuning algorithms, including correction terms, are designed based on Lyapunov stability theory, which can guarantee bounded tracking errors as well as bounded NN weights. The tracking error bound can be made arbitrarily small by increasing a certain feedback gain. Numerical simulation for a MEMS angular velocity sensor is investigated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive neural control scheme and demonstrate the satisfactory tracking performance and robustness.

  13. On-line identification of hybrid systems using an adaptive growing and pruning RBF neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alizadeh, Tohid

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an adaptive growing and pruning radial basis function (GAP-RBF) neural network for on-line identification of hybrid systems. The main idea is to identify a global nonlinear model that can predict the continuous outputs of hybrid systems. In the proposed approach, GAP-RBF neu...

  14. Adaptive Neural Output Feedback Control for Uncertain Robot Manipulators with Input Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Mei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive neural output feedback control scheme for uncertain robot manipulators with input saturation using the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN and disturbance observer. First, the RBFNN is used to approximate the system uncertainty, and the unknown approximation error of the RBFNN and the time-varying unknown external disturbance of robot manipulators are integrated as a compounded disturbance. Then, the state observer and the disturbance observer are proposed to estimate the unmeasured system state and the unknown compounded disturbance based on RBFNN. At the same time, the adaptation technique is employed to tackle the control input saturation problem. Utilizing the estimate outputs of the RBFNN, the state observer, and the disturbance observer, the adaptive neural output feedback control scheme is developed for robot manipulators using the backstepping technique. The convergence of all closed-loop signals is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis and the asymptotically convergent tracking error is obtained under the integrated effect of the system uncertainty, the unmeasured system state, the unknown external disturbance, and the input saturation. Finally, numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive neural output feedback control scheme for uncertain robot manipulators.

  15. An Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) for Adaptive Filters in Neural Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yao; Li, Will X Y; Zhang, Zhaorui; Cheung, Ray C C; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    Neural coding is an essential process for neuroprosthetic design, in which adaptive filters have been widely utilized. In a practical application, it is needed to switch between different filters, which could be based on continuous observations or point process, when the neuron models, conditions, or system requirements have changed. As candidates of coding chip for neural prostheses, low-power general purpose processors are not computationally efficient especially for large scale neural population coding. Application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) do not have flexibility to switch between different adaptive filters while the cost for design and fabrication is formidable. In this research work, we explore an application specific instruction set processor (ASIP) for adaptive filters in neural decoding activity. The proposed architecture focuses on efficient computation for the most time-consuming matrix/vector operations among commonly used adaptive filters, being able to provide both flexibility and throughput. Evaluation and implementation results are provided to demonstrate that the proposed ASIP design is area-efficient while being competitive to commercial CPUs in computational performance.

  16. Multi-channel holographic birfurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Diep, J.; Huang, K.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on multi-channel holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive Earth Observing System (EOS) data analysis are presented. The objective is to research and develop an optical bifurcating neuromorphic pattern recognition system for making optical data array comparisons and to evaluate the use of the system for EOS data classification, reduction, analysis, and other applications.

  17. Adaptive control using a hybrid-neural model: application to a polymerisation reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubillos F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the use of a hybrid-neural model for predictive control of a plug flow polymerisation reactor. The hybrid-neural model (HNM is based on fundamental conservation laws associated with a neural network (NN used to model the uncertain parameters. By simulations, the performance of this approach was studied for a peroxide-initiated styrene tubular reactor. The HNM was synthesised for a CSTR reactor with a radial basis function neural net (RBFN used to estimate the reaction rates recursively. The adaptive HNM was incorporated in two model predictive control strategies, a direct synthesis scheme and an optimum steady state scheme. Tests for servo and regulator control showed excellent behaviour following different setpoint variations, and rejecting perturbations. The good generalisation and training capacities of hybrid models, associated with the simplicity and robustness characteristics of the MPC formulations, make an attractive combination for the control of a polymerisation reactor.

  18. Finite-Time Stabilization and Adaptive Control of Memristor-Based Delayed Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Guodong

    Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.Finite-time stability problem has been a hot topic in control and system engineering. This paper deals with the finite-time stabilization issue of memristor-based delayed neural networks (MDNNs) via two control approaches. First, in order to realize the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, a delayed state feedback controller is proposed. Then, a novel adaptive strategy is applied to the delayed controller, and finite-time stabilization of MDNNs can also be achieved by using the adaptive control law. Some easily verified algebraic criteria are derived to ensure the stabilization of MDNNs in finite time, and the estimation of the settling time functional is given. Moreover, several finite-time stability results as our special cases for both memristor-based neural networks (MNNs) without delays and neural networks are given. Finally, three examples are provided for the illustration of the theoretical results.

  19. Quaternion-based adaptive output feedback attitude control of spacecraft using Chebyshev neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An-Min; Dev Kumar, Krishna; Hou, Zeng-Guang

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of output feedback attitude control of an uncertain spacecraft. Two robust adaptive output feedback controllers based on Chebyshev neural networks (CNN) termed adaptive neural networks (NN) controller-I and adaptive NN controller-II are proposed for the attitude tracking control of spacecraft. The four-parameter representations (quaternion) are employed to describe the spacecraft attitude for global representation without singularities. The nonlinear reduced-order observer is used to estimate the derivative of the spacecraft output, and the CNN is introduced to further improve the control performance through approximating the spacecraft attitude motion. The implementation of the basis functions of the CNN used in the proposed controllers depends only on the desired signals, and the smooth robust compensator using the hyperbolic tangent function is employed to counteract the CNN approximation errors and external disturbances. The adaptive NN controller-II can efficiently avoid the over-estimation problem (i.e., the bound of the CNNs output is much larger than that of the approximated unknown function, and hence, the control input may be very large) existing in the adaptive NN controller-I. Both adaptive output feedback controllers using CNN can guarantee that all signals in the resulting closed-loop system are uniformly ultimately bounded. For performance comparisons, the standard adaptive controller using the linear parameterization of spacecraft attitude motion is also developed. Simulation studies are presented to show the advantages of the proposed CNN-based output feedback approach over the standard adaptive output feedback approach.

  20. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Sassa, Yuko; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-03-13

    Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are "self-performing" and "contain a solution." The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one's aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-life situations, whereas external causality refers to environmental factors, such as experimental conditions, causing such responses. To investigate the issue, we developed a novel approach that assesses causal attribution under experimental conditions. During fMRI scanning, subjects were required to engage in virtual frustrating situations and play the role of protagonists by verbalizing social responses, which were socially adaptive or non-adaptive. After fMRI scanning, the subjects reported their causal attribution index of the psychological reaction to the experimental condition. We performed a correlation analysis between the causal attribution index and brain activity. We hypothesized that the brain region whose activation would have a positive and negative correlation with the self-reported index of the causal attributions would be regarded as neural correlates of internal and external causal attribution of social responses, respectively. We found a significant negative correlation between external causal attribution and neural responses in the right anterior temporal lobe for adaptive social behaviors. This region is involved in the integration of emotional and social information. These results suggest that, particularly in adaptive social behavior, the social demands of frustrating situations, which involve external causality, may be integrated by a neural response in the right anterior temporal lobe.

  1. Neural Circuitry that Evokes Escape Behavior upon Activation of Nociceptive Sensory Neurons in Drosophila Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Jiro; Morikawa, Rei K; Hasegawa, Eri; Emoto, Kazuo

    2017-08-21

    Noxious stimuli trigger a stereotyped escape response in animals. In Drosophila larvae, class IV dendrite arborization (C4 da) sensory neurons in the peripheral nervous system are responsible for perception of multiple nociceptive modalities, including noxious heat and harsh mechanical stimulation, through distinct receptors [1-9]. Silencing or ablation of C4 da neurons largely eliminates larval responses to noxious stimuli [10-12], whereas optogenetic activation of C4 da neurons is sufficient to provoke corkscrew-like rolling behavior similar to what is observed when larvae receive noxious stimuli, such as high temperature or harsh mechanical stimulation [10-12]. The receptors and the regulatory mechanisms for C4 da activation in response to a variety of noxious stimuli have been well studied [13-23], yet how C4 da activation triggers the escape behavior in the circuit level is still incompletely understood. Here we identify segmentally arrayed local interneurons (medial clusters of C4 da second-order interneurons [mCSIs]) in the ventral nerve cord that are necessary and sufficient to trigger rolling behavior. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) analysis indicates that C4 da axons form synapses with mCSI dendrites. Optogenetic activation of mCSIs induces the rolling behavior, whereas silencing mCSIs reduces the probability of rolling behavior upon C4 da activation. Further anatomical and functional studies suggest that the C4 da-mCSI nociceptive circuit evokes rolling behavior at least in part through segmental nerve a (SNa) motor neurons. Our findings thus uncover a local circuit that promotes escape behavior upon noxious stimuli in Drosophila larvae and provide mechanistic insights into how noxious stimuli are transduced into the stereotyped escape behavior in the circuit level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved methods in neural network-based adaptive output feedback control, with applications to flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nakwan

    Utilizing the universal approximation property of neural networks, we develop several novel approaches to neural network-based adaptive output feedback control of nonlinear systems, and illustrate these approaches for several flight control applications. In particular, we address the problem of non-affine systems and eliminate the fixed point assumption present in earlier work. All of the stability proofs are carried out in a form that eliminates an algebraic loop in the neural network implementation. An approximate input/output feedback linearizing controller is augmented with a neural network using input/output sequences of the uncertain system. These approaches permit adaptation to both parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. All physical systems also have control position and rate limits, which may either deteriorate performance or cause instability for a sufficiently high control bandwidth. Here we apply a method for protecting an adaptive process from the effects of input saturation and time delays, known as "pseudo control hedging". This method was originally developed for the state feedback case, and we provide a stability analysis that extends its domain of applicability to the case of output feedback. The approach is illustrated by the design of a pitch-attitude flight control system for a linearized model of an R-50 experimental helicopter, and by the design of a pitch-rate control system for a 58-state model of a flexible aircraft consisting of rigid body dynamics coupled with actuator and flexible modes. A new approach to augmentation of an existing linear controller is introduced. It is especially useful when there is limited information concerning the plant model, and the existing controller. The approach is applied to the design of an adaptive autopilot for a guided munition. Design of a neural network adaptive control that ensures asymptotically stable tracking performance is also addressed.

  3. Task relevance modulates the behavioural and neural effects of sensory predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auksztulewicz, Ryszard; Friston, Karl J; Nobre, Anna C

    2017-12-01

    The brain is thought to generate internal predictions to optimize behaviour. However, it is unclear whether predictions signalling is an automatic brain function or depends on task demands. Here, we manipulated the spatial/temporal predictability of visual targets, and the relevance of spatial/temporal information provided by auditory cues. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure participants' brain activity during task performance. Task relevance modulated the influence of predictions on behaviour: spatial/temporal predictability improved spatial/temporal discrimination accuracy, but not vice versa. To explain these effects, we used behavioural responses to estimate subjective predictions under an ideal-observer model. Model-based time-series of predictions and prediction errors (PEs) were associated with dissociable neural responses: predictions correlated with cue-induced beta-band activity in auditory regions and alpha-band activity in visual regions, while stimulus-bound PEs correlated with gamma-band activity in posterior regions. Crucially, task relevance modulated these spectral correlates, suggesting that current goals influence PE and prediction signalling.

  4. Evolving artificial neural networks for cross-adaptive audio effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jordal, Iver

    2017-01-01

    Cross-adaptive audio effects have many applications within music technology, including for automatic mixing and live music. Commonly used methods of signal analysis capture the acoustical and mathematical features of the signal well, but struggle to capture the musical meaning. Together with the vast number of possible signal interactions, this makes manual exploration of signal interactions difficult and tedious. This project investigates Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for finding usef...

  5. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratollah Hedayatpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  6. Indirect adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural network with self- recurrent consequent part for AC servo system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Runmin; Wang, Li; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Yuanglong; Wang, Chao

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel indirect adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural network (IAFWNN) to control the nonlinearity, wide variations in loads, time-variation and uncertain disturbance of the ac servo system. In the proposed approach, the self-recurrent wavelet neural network (SRWNN) is employed to construct an adaptive self-recurrent consequent part for each fuzzy rule of TSK fuzzy model. For the IAFWNN controller, the online learning algorithm is based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. Moreover, an improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) is used to adapt the learning rate. The aid of an adaptive SRWNN identifier offers the real-time gradient information to the adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural controller to overcome the impact of parameter variations, load disturbances and other uncertainties effectively, and has a good dynamic. The asymptotical stability of the system is guaranteed by using the Lyapunov method. The result of the simulation and the prototype test prove that the proposed are effective and suitable. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Comparative Study of Neural Network Frameworks for the Next Generation of Adaptive Optics Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Santos, Jesús Daniel; Martínez-Zarzuela, Mario; Basden, Alistair G; Osborn, James; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco Javier; De Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2017-06-02

    Many of the next generation of adaptive optics systems on large and extremely large telescopes require tomographic techniques in order to correct for atmospheric turbulence over a large field of view. Multi-object adaptive optics is one such technique. In this paper, different implementations of a tomographic reconstructor based on a machine learning architecture named "CARMEN" are presented. Basic concepts of adaptive optics are introduced first, with a short explanation of three different control systems used on real telescopes and the sensors utilised. The operation of the reconstructor, along with the three neural network frameworks used, and the developed CUDA code are detailed. Changes to the size of the reconstructor influence the training and execution time of the neural network. The native CUDA code turns out to be the best choice for all the systems, although some of the other frameworks offer good performance under certain circumstances.

  8. Adaptive complementary fuzzy self-recurrent wavelet neural network controller for the electric load simulator system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexities existing in the electric load simulator, this article develops a high-performance nonlinear adaptive controller to improve the torque tracking performance of the electric load simulator, which mainly consists of an adaptive fuzzy self-recurrent wavelet neural network controller with variable structure (VSFSWC and a complementary controller. The VSFSWC is clearly and easily used for real-time systems and greatly improves the convergence rate and control precision. The complementary controller is designed to eliminate the effect of the approximation error between the proposed neural network controller and the ideal feedback controller without chattering phenomena. Moreover, adaptive learning laws are derived to guarantee the system stability in the sense of the Lyapunov theory. Finally, the hardware-in-the-loop simulations are carried out to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms in different working styles.

  9. A neural learning classifier system with self-adaptive constructivism for mobile robot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jacob; Bull, Larry

    2006-01-01

    For artificial entities to achieve true autonomy and display complex lifelike behavior, they will need to exploit appropriate adaptable learning algorithms. In this context adaptability implies flexibility guided by the environment at any given time and an open-ended ability to learn appropriate behaviors. This article examines the use of constructivism-inspired mechanisms within a neural learning classifier system architecture that exploits parameter self-adaptation as an approach to realize such behavior. The system uses a rule structure in which each rule is represented by an artificial neural network. It is shown that appropriate internal rule complexity emerges during learning at a rate controlled by the learner and that the structure indicates underlying features of the task. Results are presented in simulated mazes before moving to a mobile robot platform.

  10. Brightness in human rod vision depends on slow neural adaptation to quantum statistics of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E; Rieke, Fred

    2016-11-01

    In human rod-mediated vision, threshold for small, brief flashes rises in proportion to the square root of adapting luminance at all but the lowest and highest adapting intensities. A classical signal detection theory from Rose (1942, 1948) and de Vries (1943) attributed this rise to the perceptual masking of weak flashes by Poisson fluctuations in photon absorptions from the adapting field. However, previous work by Brown and Rudd (1998) demonstrated that the square-root law also holds for suprathreshold brightness judgments, a finding that supports an alternative explanation of the square-root sensitivity changes as a consequence of physiological adaptation (i.e., neural gain control). Here, we employ a dichoptic matching technique to investigate the properties of this brightness gain control. We show that the brightness gain control: 1) affects the brightness of high-intensity suprathreshold flashes for which assumptions of the de Vries-Rose theory are strongly violated; 2) exhibits a long time course of 100-200 s; and 3) is subject to modulation by temporal contrast noise when the mean adapting luminance is held constant. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the square-root law results from a slow neural adaptation to statistical noise in the rod pool. We suggest that such adaptation may function to reduce the probability of spurious ganglion cell spiking activity due to photon fluctuation noise as the ambient illumination level is increased.

  11. Neural communication patterns underlying conflict detection, resolution, and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehrn, Carina R; Hanslmayr, Simon; Fell, Juergen; Deuker, Lorena; Kremers, Nico A; Do Lam, Anne T; Elger, Christian E; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2014-07-30

    In an ever-changing environment, selecting appropriate responses in conflicting situations is essential for biological survival and social success and requires cognitive control, which is mediated by dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). How these brain regions communicate during conflict processing (detection, resolution, and adaptation), however, is still unknown. The Stroop task provides a well-established paradigm to investigate the cognitive mechanisms mediating such response conflict. Here, we explore the oscillatory patterns within and between the DMPFC and DLPFC in human epilepsy patients with intracranial EEG electrodes during an auditory Stroop experiment. Data from the DLPFC were obtained from 12 patients. Thereof four patients had additional DMPFC electrodes available for interaction analyses. Our results show that an early θ (4-8 Hz) modulated enhancement of DLPFC γ-band (30-100 Hz) activity constituted a prerequisite for later successful conflict processing. Subsequent conflict detection was reflected in a DMPFC θ power increase that causally entrained DLPFC θ activity (DMPFC to DLPFC). Conflict resolution was thereafter completed by coupling of DLPFC γ power to DMPFC θ oscillations. Finally, conflict adaptation was related to increased postresponse DLPFC γ-band activity and to θ coupling in the reverse direction (DLPFC to DMPFC). These results draw a detailed picture on how two regions in the prefrontal cortex communicate to resolve cognitive conflicts. In conclusion, our data show that conflict detection, control, and adaptation are supported by a sequence of processes that use the interplay of θ and γ oscillations within and between DMPFC and DLPFC. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410438-15$15.00/0.

  12. Design of an Adaptive-Neural Network Attitude Controller of a Satellite using Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ajorkar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is developed based on neural network for a satellite using four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. Then, an attitude control based on feedback linearization control has been designed and uncertainties in the moment of inertia matrix and disturbances torque have been considered. In order to eliminate the effect of these uncertainties, a multilayer neural network with back-propagation law is designed. In this structure, the parameters of the moment of inertia matrix and external disturbances are estimated and used in feedback linearization control law. Finally, the performance of the designed attitude controller is investigated by several simulations.

  13. Combining decoder design and neural adaptation in brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Krishna V; Carmena, Jose M

    2014-11-19

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to help people with paralysis by decoding movement-related neural signals into control signals for guiding computer cursors, prosthetic arms, and other assistive devices. Despite compelling laboratory experiments and ongoing FDA pilot clinical trials, system performance, robustness, and generalization remain challenges. We provide a perspective on how two complementary lines of investigation, that have focused on decoder design and neural adaptation largely separately, could be brought together to advance BMIs. This BMI paradigm should also yield new scientific insights into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimal-Learning-Parameter Technique Based Adaptive Neural Sliding Mode Control of MEMS Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an adaptive neural sliding mode controller for MEMS gyroscopes with minimal-learning-parameter technique. Considering the system uncertainty in dynamics, neural network is employed for approximation. Minimal-learning-parameter technique is constructed to decrease the number of update parameters, and in this way the computation burden is greatly reduced. Sliding mode control is designed to cancel the effect of time-varying disturbance. The closed-loop stability analysis is established via Lyapunov approach. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  15. Neural adaptive observer-based sensor and actuator fault detection in nonlinear systems: Application in UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Alireza; Aboutalebi, Payam; Yen, Kang K; Sargolzaei, Arman

    2017-03-01

    A new online detection strategy is developed to detect faults in sensors and actuators of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems. In this design, the weighting parameters of the Neural Network (NN) are updated by using the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). Online adaptation of these weighting parameters helps to detect abrupt, intermittent, and incipient faults accurately. We apply the proposed fault detection system to a nonlinear dynamic model of the WVU YF-22 unmanned aircraft for its evaluation. The simulation results show that the new method has better performance in comparison with conventional recurrent neural network-based fault detection strategies. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adaptive Critic Neural Network-Based Terminal Area Energy Management and Approach and Landing Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, Katie

    2003-01-01

    Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) have different mission requirements than the Space Shuttle, which is used for benchmark guidance design. Therefore, alternative Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) and Approach and Landing (A/L) Guidance schemes can be examined in the interest of cost reduction. A neural network based solution for a finite horizon trajectory optimization problem is presented in this paper. In this approach the optimal trajectory of the vehicle is produced by adaptive critic based neural networks, which were trained off-line to maintain a gradual glideslope.

  17. Learning about stress: neural, endocrine and behavioral adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Richard

    2016-09-01

    In this review, nonassociative learning is advanced as an organizing principle to draw together findings from both sympathetic-adrenal medullary and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis responses to chronic intermittent exposure to a variety of stressors. Studies of habituation, facilitation and sensitization of stress effector systems are reviewed and linked to an animal's prior experience with a given stressor, the intensity of the stressor and the appraisal by the animal of its ability to mobilize physiological systems to adapt to the stressor. Brain pathways that regulate physiological and behavioral responses to stress are discussed, especially in light of their regulation of nonassociative processes in chronic intermittent stress. These findings may have special relevance to various psychiatric diseases, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  18. Gas chromatography/olfactometry and electronic nose analyses of retronasal aroma of espresso and correlation with sensory evaluation by an artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Tomomi; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hirano, Yuta; Ikeda, Michio; Sagara, Yasuyuki; Araki, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    To develop a method for evaluating and designing the retronasal aroma of espresso, sensory evaluation data was correlated with data obtained from gas chromatography/olfactometry (GC/O, CharmAnalysis™) and from an electronic nose system αFOX4000 (E-nose). The volatile compounds of various kinds of espresso (arabica coffee beans from 6 production countries: Brazil, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Colombia, Indonesia, and Tanzania; 3 roasting degrees for each country: L values, 18, 23, and 26) were collected with a retronasal aroma simulator (RAS) and examined by GC/O and E-nose. In addition, sensory descriptive analysis using a 7-point scale for RAS effluent gas was performed by 5 trained flavorists using sensory descriptors selected based on the frequency in use and coefficient of correlation. The charm values of 10 odor descriptions obtained from GC/O analysis exhibited the significant (P sensory evaluation scores showed that the differences of aroma characteristics among the roasting degrees were larger than those among the origins. Based on an artificial neural network (ANN) model applied to the data from GC/O analyses and sensory evaluations, the perceptual factor of the RAS aroma was predicted to be mainly affected by sweet-caramel, smoke-roast, and acidic odors. Also, 3 metal oxide semiconductor sensors (LY2/Gh, P30/1, and T40/1) of E-nose were selected for analyses of RAS aroma and correlated with the sensory descriptive scores by the ANN to support sensory evaluation. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Adaptive Neural Network Algorithm for Power Control in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri Husam Fayiz, Al

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to design, test and evaluate a prototype of an adaptive neural network algorithm for the power controlling system of a nuclear power plant. The task of power control in nuclear reactors is one of the fundamental tasks in this field. Therefore, researches are constantly conducted to ameliorate the power reactor control process. Currently, in the Department of Automation in the National Research Nuclear University (NRNU) MEPhI, numerous studies are utilizing various methodologies of artificial intelligence (expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy systems and genetic algorithms) to enhance the performance, safety, efficiency and reliability of nuclear power plants. In particular, a study of an adaptive artificial intelligent power regulator in the control systems of nuclear power reactors is being undertaken to enhance performance and to minimize the output error of the Automatic Power Controller (APC) on the grounds of a multifunctional computer analyzer (simulator) of the Water-Water Energetic Reactor known as Vodo-Vodyanoi Energetichesky Reaktor (VVER) in Russian. In this paper, a block diagram of an adaptive reactor power controller was built on the basis of an intelligent control algorithm. When implementing intelligent neural network principles, it is possible to improve the quality and dynamic of any control system in accordance with the principles of adaptive control. It is common knowledge that an adaptive control system permits adjusting the controller’s parameters according to the transitions in the characteristics of the control object or external disturbances. In this project, it is demonstrated that the propitious options for an automatic power controller in nuclear power plants is a control system constructed on intelligent neural network algorithms.

  20. Highly sensitive avoidance plays a key role in sensory adaptation to deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogino

    Full Text Available The environments around deep-sea hydrothermal vents are very harsh conditions for organisms due to the possibility of exposure to highly toxic compounds and extremely hot venting there. Despite such extreme environments, some indigenous species have thrived there. Alvinellid worms (Annelida are among the organisms best adapted to high-temperature and oxidatively stressful venting regions. Although intensive studies of the adaptation of these worms to the environments of hydrothermal vents have been made, little is known about the worms' sensory adaptation to the severe chemical conditions there. To examine the sensitivity of the vent-endemic worm Paralvinella hessleri to low pH and oxidative stress, we determined the concentration of acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide that induced avoidance behavior of this worm, and compared these concentrations to those obtained for related species inhabiting intertidal zones, Thelepus sp. The concentrations of the chemicals that induced avoidance behavior of P. hessleri were 10-100 times lower than those for Thelepus sp. To identify the receptors for these chemicals, chemical avoidance tests were performed with the addition of ruthenium red, a blocker of transient receptor potential (TRP channels. This treatment suppressed the chemical avoidance behavior of P. hessleri, which suggests that TRP channels are involved in the chemical avoidance behavior of this species. Our results revealed for the first time hypersensitive detection systems for acid and for oxidative stress in the vent-endemic worm P. hessleri, possibly mediated by TRP channels, suggesting that such sensory systems may have facilitated the adaptation of this organism to harsh vent environments.

  1. How sensory-motor systems impact the neural organization for language: direct contrasts between spoken and signed language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; McCullough, Stephen; Mehta, Sonya; Grabowski, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of sensory-motor systems on the neural organization for language, we conducted an H215O-PET study of sign and spoken word production (picture-naming) and an fMRI study of sign and audio-visual spoken language comprehension (detection of a semantically anomalous sentence) with hearing bilinguals who are native users of American Sign Language (ASL) and English. Directly contrasting speech and sign production revealed greater activation in bilateral parietal cortex for signing, while speaking resulted in greater activation in bilateral superior temporal cortex (STC) and right frontal cortex, likely reflecting auditory feedback control. Surprisingly, the language production contrast revealed a relative increase in activation in bilateral occipital cortex for speaking. We speculate that greater activation in visual cortex for speaking may actually reflect cortical attenuation when signing, which functions to distinguish self-produced from externally generated visual input. Directly contrasting speech and sign comprehension revealed greater activation in bilateral STC for speech and greater activation in bilateral occipital-temporal cortex for sign. Sign comprehension, like sign production, engaged bilateral parietal cortex to a greater extent than spoken language. We hypothesize that posterior parietal activation in part reflects processing related to spatial classifier constructions in ASL and that anterior parietal activation may reflect covert imitation that functions as a predictive model during sign comprehension. The conjunction analysis for comprehension revealed that both speech and sign bilaterally engaged the inferior frontal gyrus (with more extensive activation on the left) and the superior temporal sulcus, suggesting an invariant bilateral perisylvian language system. We conclude that surface level differences between sign and spoken languages should not be dismissed and are critical for understanding the neurobiology of language

  2. How sensory-motor systems impact the neural organization for language: Direct contrasts between spoken and signed language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eEmmorey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of sensory-motor systems on the neural organization for language, we conducted an H215O-PET study of sign and spoken word production (picture-naming and an fMRI study of sign and audio-visual spoken language comprehension (detection of a semantically anomalous sentence with hearing bilinguals who are native users of American Sign Language (ASL and English. Directly contrasting speech and sign production revealed greater activation in bilateral parietal cortex for signing, while speaking resulted in greater activation in bilateral superior temporal cortex (STC and right frontal cortex, likely reflecting auditory feedback control. Surprisingly, the language production contrast revealed a relative increase in activation in bilateral occipital cortex for speaking. We speculate that greater activation in visual cortex for speaking may actually reflect cortical attenuation when signing, which functions to distinguish self-produced from externally generated visual input. Directly contrasting speech and sign comprehension revealed greater activation in bilateral STC for speech and greater activation in bilateral occipital-temporal cortex for sign. Sign comprehension, like sign production, engaged bilateral parietal cortex to a greater extent than spoken language. We hypothesize that posterior parietal activation in part reflects processing related to spatial classifier constructions in ASL and that anterior parietal activation may reflect covert imitation that functions as a predictive model during sign comprehension. The conjunction analysis for comprehension revealed that both speech and sign bilaterally engaged the inferior frontal gyrus (with more extensive activation on the left and the superior temporal sulcus, suggesting an invariant bilateral perisylvian language system. We conclude that surface level differences between sign and spoken languages should not be dismissed and are critical for understanding the

  3. Dynamics of dual prism adaptation: relating novel experimental results to a minimalistic neural model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Arévalo

    Full Text Available In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo-motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements ('dual-adaptation'. A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual-adaptation be faster if switches ('phase changes' between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual-adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo-motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual-adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual-adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of prism

  4. Phentolamine selectively affects the fast sodium component of sensory adaptation in an insect mechanoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, J M; French, A S

    1990-09-01

    Phentolamine and related compounds have several different actions on nervous tissues in vertebrates and invertebrates, including a local anesthetic effect. However, recent work suggests that phentolamine can interfere with sensory transduction in insect mechanoreceptors at significantly lower concentrations than are required for conduction block. We tested the actions of phentolamine on sensory transduction and encoding in an insect mechanoreceptor, the cockroach tactile spine neuron and found that 500 microM phentolamine increased the action potential threshold by 50%. The passive membrane properties of the neuron were not affected, but one component of dynamic threshold change was strongly and selectively reduced. This component has previously been attributed to slowly inactivating sodium channels in the action potential initiating region, suggesting that these channels are the most phentolamine-sensitive sites.

  5. Training-specific functional, neural, and hypertrophic adaptations to explosive- vs. sustained-contraction strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balshaw, Thomas G; Massey, Garry J; Maden-Wilkinson, Thomas M; Tillin, Neale A; Folland, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Training specificity is considered important for strength training, although the functional and underpinning physiological adaptations to different types of training, including brief explosive contractions, are poorly understood. This study compared the effects of 12 wk of explosive-contraction (ECT, n = 13) vs. sustained-contraction (SCT, n = 16) strength training vs. control (n = 14) on the functional, neural, hypertrophic, and intrinsic contractile characteristics of healthy young men. Training involved 40 isometric knee extension repetitions (3 times/wk): contracting as fast and hard as possible for ∼1 s (ECT) or gradually increasing to 75% of maximum voluntary torque (MVT) before holding for 3 s (SCT). Torque and electromyography during maximum and explosive contractions, torque during evoked octet contractions, and total quadriceps muscle volume (QUADSVOL) were quantified pre and post training. MVT increased more after SCT than ECT [23 vs. 17%; effect size (ES) = 0.69], with similar increases in neural drive, but greater QUADSVOL changes after SCT (8.1 vs. 2.6%; ES = 0.74). ECT improved explosive torque at all time points (17-34%; 0.54 ≤ ES ≤ 0.76) because of increased neural drive (17-28%), whereas only late-phase explosive torque (150 ms, 12%; ES = 1.48) and corresponding neural drive (18%) increased after SCT. Changes in evoked torque indicated slowing of the contractile properties of the muscle-tendon unit after both training interventions. These results showed training-specific functional changes that appeared to be due to distinct neural and hypertrophic adaptations. ECT produced a wider range of functional adaptations than SCT, and given the lesser demands of ECT, this type of training provides a highly efficient means of increasing function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Command Filtered Adaptive Fuzzy Neural Network Backstepping Control for Marine Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to retrain chaotic oscillation of marine power system which is excited by periodic electromagnetism perturbation, a novel command-filtered adaptive fuzzy neural network backstepping control method is designed. First, the mathematical model of marine power system is established based on the two parallel nonlinear model. Then, main results of command-filtered adaptive fuzzy neural network backstepping control law are given. And the Lyapunov stability theory is applied to prove that the system can remain closed-loop asymptotically stable with this controller. Finally, simulation results indicate that the designed controller can suppress chaotic oscillation with fast convergence speed that makes the system return to the equilibrium point quickly; meanwhile, the parameter which induces chaotic oscillation can also be discriminated.

  7. Social Categories Shape the Neural Representation of Emotion: Evidence from a Visual Face Adaptation Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte eOtten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of recent behavioral studies have shown that emotional expressions are differently perceived depending on the race of a face, and that that perception of race cues is influenced by emotional expressions. However, neural processes related to the perception of invariant cues that indicate the identity of a face (such as race are often described to proceed independently of processes related to the perception of cues that can vary over time (such as emotion. Using a visual face adaptation paradigm, we tested whether these behavioral interactions between emotion and race also reflect interdependent neural representation of emotion and race. We compared visual emotion aftereffects when the adapting face and ambiguous test face differed in race or not. Emotion aftereffects were much smaller in different race trials than same race trials, indicating that the neural representation of a facial expression is significantly different depending on whether the emotional face is black or white. It thus seems that invariable cues such as race interact with variable face cues such as emotion not just at a response level, but also at the level of perception and neural representation.

  8. Neural and morphological adaptations of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis muscles to isokinetic eccentric training

    OpenAIRE

    Franke,Rodrigo de Azevedo; Baroni,Bruno Manfredini; Rodrigues,Rodrigo; Geremia,Jeam Marcel; Lanferdini,Fábio Juner; Vaz,Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) are frequently targeted in conditioning/rehabilitation programs due to their role in patellar stabilization during knee extension. This study assessed neural and muscular adaptations in these two muscles after an isokinetic eccentric training program. Twenty healthy men underwent a four-week control period followed by a 12-week period of isokinetic eccentric training. Ultrasound evaluations of VL and VM muscle thickness at rest and electromyograp...

  9. TCSC Nonlinear Adaptive Damping Controller Design Based on RBF Neural Network to Enhance Power System Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wei; Fang, Jiakun; Zhao, Ping

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear adaptive damping controller based on radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), which can infinitely approximate to nonlinear system, is proposed for thyristor controlled series capacitor (TCSC). The proposed TCSC adaptive damping controller can not only have...... system and a four-machine two-area power system under different operating conditions in comparison with the lead-lag damping controller tuned by evolutionary algorithm (EA). Simulation results show that the proposed damping controller achieves good robust performance for damping the low frequency...

  10. Dynamic Learning from Adaptive Neural Control of Uncertain Robots with Guaranteed Full-State Tracking Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic learning method is developed for an uncertain n-link robot with unknown system dynamics, achieving predefined performance attributes on the link angular position and velocity tracking errors. For a known nonsingular initial robotic condition, performance functions and unconstrained transformation errors are employed to prevent the violation of the full-state tracking error constraints. By combining two independent Lyapunov functions and radial basis function (RBF neural network (NN approximator, a novel and simple adaptive neural control scheme is proposed for the dynamics of the unconstrained transformation errors, which guarantees uniformly ultimate boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system. In the steady-state control process, RBF NNs are verified to satisfy the partial persistent excitation (PE condition. Subsequently, an appropriate state transformation is adopted to achieve the accurate convergence of neural weight estimates. The corresponding experienced knowledge on unknown robotic dynamics is stored in NNs with constant neural weight values. Using the stored knowledge, a static neural learning controller is developed to improve the full-state tracking performance. A comparative simulation study on a 2-link robot illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  11. Neural adaptations to strength training: moving beyond transcranial magnetic stimulation and reflex studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T J; Selvanayagam, V S; Riek, S; Semmler, J G

    2011-06-01

    It has long been believed that training for increased strength not only affects muscle tissue, but also results in adaptive changes in the central nervous system. However, only in the last 10 years has the use of methods to study the neurophysiological details of putative neural adaptations to training become widespread. There are now many published reports that have used single motor unit recordings, electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, and non-invasive stimulation of the human brain [i.e. transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)] to study neural responses to strength training. In this review, we aim to summarize what has been learned from single motor unit, reflex and TMS studies, and identify the most promising avenues to advance our conceptual understanding with these methods. We also consider the few strength training studies that have employed alternative neurophysiological techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography. The nature of the information that these techniques can provide, as well as their major technical and conceptual pitfalls, are briefly described. The overall conclusion of the review is that the current evidence regarding neural adaptations to strength training is inconsistent and incomplete. In order to move forward in our understanding, it will be necessary to design studies that are based on a rigorous consideration of the limitations of the available techniques, and that are specifically targeted to address important conceptual questions. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2011 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  12. Neuroplasticity beyond Sounds: Neural Adaptations Following Long-Term Musical Aesthetic Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Reybrouck

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Capitalizing from neuroscience knowledge on how individuals are affected by the sound environment, we propose to adopt a cybernetic and ecological point of view on the musical aesthetic experience, which includes subprocesses, such as feature extraction and integration, early affective reactions and motor actions, style mastering and conceptualization, emotion and proprioception, evaluation and preference. In this perspective, the role of the listener/composer/performer is seen as that of an active “agent” coping in highly individual ways with the sounds. The findings concerning the neural adaptations in musicians, following long-term exposure to music, are then reviewed by keeping in mind the distinct subprocesses of a musical aesthetic experience. We conclude that these neural adaptations can be conceived of as the immediate and lifelong interactions with multisensorial stimuli (having a predominant auditory component, which result in lasting changes of the internal state of the “agent”. In a continuous loop, these changes affect, in turn, the subprocesses involved in a musical aesthetic experience, towards the final goal of achieving better perceptual, motor and proprioceptive responses to the immediate demands of the sounding environment. The resulting neural adaptations in musicians closely depend on the duration of the interactions, the starting age, the involvement of attention, the amount of motor practice and the musical genre played.

  13. Single neural adaptive controller and neural network identifier based on PSO algorithm for spherical actuators with 3D magnet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Zhang, Lu; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Jingying; Jiao, Zongxia

    2017-10-01

    Permanent magnet spherical actuator (PMSA) is a multi-variable featured and inter-axis coupled nonlinear system, which unavoidably compromises its motion control implementation. Uncertainties such as external load and friction torque of ball bearing and manufacturing errors also influence motion performance significantly. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to propose a controller based on a single neural adaptive (SNA) algorithm and a neural network (NN) identifier optimized with a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to improve the motion stability of PMSA with three-dimensional magnet arrays. The dynamic model and computed torque model are formulated for the spherical actuator, and a dynamic decoupling control algorithm is developed. By utilizing the global-optimization property of the PSO algorithm, the NN identifier is trained to avoid locally optimal solution and achieve high-precision compensations to uncertainties. The employment of the SNA controller helps to reduce the effect of compensation errors and convert the system to a stable one, even if there is difference between the compensations and uncertainties due to external disturbances. A simulation model is established, and experiments are conducted on the research prototype to validate the proposed control algorithm. The amplitude of the parameter perturbation is set to 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively. The strong robustness of the proposed hybrid algorithm is validated by the abundant simulation data. It shows that the proposed algorithm can effectively compensate the influence of uncertainties and eliminate the effect of inter-axis couplings of the spherical actuator.

  14. Both attention and prediction are necessary for adaptive neuronal tuning in sensory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fang eHsu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain as a proactive system processes sensory information under the top-down influence of attention and prediction. However, the relation between attention and prediction remains undetermined given the conflation of these two mechanisms in the literature. To evaluate whether attention and prediction are dependent of each other, and if so, how these two top-down mechanisms may interact in sensory processing, we orthogonally manipulated attention and prediction in a target detection task. Participants were instructed to pay attention to one of two interleaved stimulus streams of predictable/unpredictable tone frequency. We found that attention and prediction interacted on the amplitude of the N1 ERP component. The N1 amplitude in the attended/predictable condition was larger than that in any of the other conditions. Dipole source localisation analysis showed that the effect came from the activation in bilateral auditory areas. No significant effect was found in the P2 time window. Our results suggest that attention and prediction are dependent of each other. While attention might determine the overall cortical responsiveness to stimuli when prediction is involved, prediction might provide an anchor for the modulation of the synaptic input strengths which needs to be operated on the basis of attention.

  15. Reactive Power based Model Reference Neural Learning Adaptive System for Speed Estimation in Sensor-less Induction Motor Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sedhuraman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel reactive power based model reference neural learning adaptive system (RP-MRNLAS is proposed. The model reference adaptive system (MRAS based speed estimation is one of the most popular methods used for sensor-less controlled induction motor drives. In conventional MRAS, the error adaptation is done using a Proportional-integral-(PI. The non-linear mapping capability of a neural network (NN and the powerful learning algorithms have increased the applications of NN in power electronics and drives. Thus, a neural learning algorithm is used for the adaptation mechanism in MRAS and is often referred to as a model reference neural learning adaptive system (MRNLAS. In MRNLAS, the error between the reference and neural learning adaptive models is back propagated to adjust the weights of the neural network for rotor speed estimation. The two different methods of MRNLAS are flux based (RF-MRNLAS and reactive power based (RP-MRNLAS. The reactive power- based methods are simple and free from integral equations as compared to flux based methods. The advantage of the reactive power based method and the NN learning algorithms are exploited in this work to yield a RPMRNLAS. The performance of the proposed RP-MRNLAS is analyzed extensively. The proposed RP-MRNLAS is compared in terms of accuracy and integrator drift problems with popular rotor flux-based MRNLAS for the same system and validated through Matlab/Simulink. The superiority of the RP- MRNLAS technique is demonstrated

  16. Integrating sensory evaluation in adaptive conjoint analysis to elaborate the conflicting influence of intrinsic and extrinsic attributes on food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppert, Karin; Mai, Robert; Zahn, Susann; Hoffmann, Stefan; Rohm, Harald

    2012-12-01

    Sensory properties and packaging information are factors which considerably contribute to food choice. We present a new methodology in which sensory preference testing was integrated in adaptive conjoint analysis. By simultaneous variation of intrinsic and extrinsic attributes on identical levels, this procedure allows assessing the importance of attribute/level combinations on product selection. In a set-up with nine pair-wise comparisons and four subsequent calibration assessments, 101 young consumers evaluated vanilla yoghurt which was varied in fat content (four levels), sugar content (two levels) and flavour intensity (two levels); the same attribute/level combinations were also presented as extrinsic information. The results indicate that the evaluation of a particular attribute may largely diverge in intrinsic and in extrinsic processing. We noticed from our utility values that, for example, the acceptance of yoghurt increases with an increasing level of the actual fat content, whereas acceptance diminishes when a high fat content is labelled on the product. This article further implicates that neglecting these diverging relationships may lead to an over- or underestimation of the importance of an attribute for food choice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Matched Comparison Across Three Different Sensory Pairs of Cross-Modal Temporal Recalibration From Sustained and Transient Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alais, David; Ho, Tam; Han, Shui'er; Van der Burg, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sustained exposure to an asynchronous multisensory signal causes perceived simultaneity to shift in the direction of the leading component of the adapting stimulus. This is known as temporal recalibration, and recent evidence suggests that it can occur very rapidly, even after a single asynchronous audiovisual (AV) stimulus. However, this form of rapid recalibration appears to be unique to AV stimuli, in contrast to recalibration following sustained asynchronies which occurs with audiotactile (AT) and visuotactile (VT) stimuli. This study examines temporal recalibration to AV, VT and AT asynchrony with spatially collocated stimuli using a design that produces both sustained and inter-trial recalibration by combining the traditional sustained adaptation approach with an inter-trial analysis of sequential dependencies in an extended test period. Thus, we compare temporal recalibration to both sustained and transient asynchrony in three crossmodal combinations using the same design, stimuli and observers. The results reveal that prolonged exposure to asynchrony produced equivalent temporal recalibration for all combinations: AV, AT and VT. The pattern for rapid, inter-trial recalibration was very different. Rapid recalibration occurred strongly for AV stimuli, weakly for AT and did not occur at all for VT. For all sensory pairings, recalibration from sustained asynchrony decayed to baseline during the test phase while inter-trial recalibration was present and stable throughout testing, suggesting different mechanisms may underlie adaptation at long and short timescales.

  18. Adaptive Neural Network Control for the Trajectory Tracking of the Furuta Pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Valenzuela, Javier; Aguilar-Avelar, Carlos; Puga-Guzman, Sergio A; Santibanez, Victor

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel adaptive neural network-based control scheme for the Furuta pendulum, which is a two degree-of-freedom underactuated system. Adaptation laws for the input and output weights are also provided. The proposed controller is able to guarantee tracking of a reference signal for the arm while the pendulum remains in the upright position. The key aspect of the derivation of the controller is the definition of an output function that depends on the position and velocity errors. The internal and external dynamics are rigorously analyzed, thereby proving the uniform ultimate boundedness of the error trajectories. By using real-time experiments, the new scheme is compared with other control methodologies, therein demonstrating the improved performance of the proposed adaptive algorithm.

  19. Cancellation of artifacts in ECG signals using a normalized adaptive neural filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunfeng; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ng, Sin-Chun

    2007-01-01

    Denoising electrocardiographic (ECG) signals is an essential procedure prior to their analysis. In this paper, we present a normalized adaptive neural filter (NANF) for cancellation of artifacts in ECG signals. The normalized filter coefficients are updated by the steepest-descent algorithm; the adaptation process is designed to minimize the difference between second-order estimated output values and the desired artifact-free ECG signals. Empirical results with benchmark data show that the adaptive artifact canceller that includes the NANF can effectively remove muscle-contraction artifacts and high-frequency noise in ambulatory ECG recordings, leading to a high signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, the performance of the NANF in terms of the root-mean-squared error, normalized correlation coefficient, and filtered artifact entropy is significantly better than that of the popular least-mean-square (LMS) filter.

  20. Learning from adaptive neural network output feedback control of a unicycle-type mobile robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Wang, Qinghui; Liu, Fenglin; Wang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies learning from adaptive neural network (NN) output feedback control of nonholonomic unicycle-type mobile robots. The major difficulties are caused by the unknown robot system dynamics and the unmeasurable states. To overcome these difficulties, a new adaptive control scheme is proposed including designing a new adaptive NN output feedback controller and two high-gain observers. It is shown that the stability of the closed-loop robot system and the convergence of tracking errors are guaranteed. The unknown robot system dynamics can be approximated by radial basis function NNs. When repeating same or similar control tasks, the learned knowledge can be recalled and reused to achieve guaranteed stability and better control performance, thereby avoiding the tremendous repeated training process of NNs. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Adaptive Robust Control for Space Robot with Ucertainty base on Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wenhui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The trajectory tracking problems of a class of space robot manipulators with parameters and non-parameters uncertainty are considered. An adaptive robust control algorithm based on neural network is proposed by the paper. Neutral network is used to adaptive learn and compensate the unknown system for parameters uncertainties? the weight adaptive laws are designed by the paper? System stability base on Lyapunov theory is analysised to ensure the convergence of the algorithm. Non-parameters uncertainties are estimated and compensated by robust controller. It is proven that the designed controller can guarantee the asymptotic convergence of tracking error. The controller could guarantee good robust and the stability of closed-loop system. The simulation results show that the presented method is effective.

  2. Age related neural adaptation following short term resistance training in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemben, M G; Murphy, R E

    2001-09-01

    This study examined the influence of age on neural facilitation and neural cross-education following short term unilateral dynamic resistance training with the hypothesis that older women may have a diminished ability for adaptation. This was a prospective, repeated measures design. The non-dominant left arm served as a control limb and follow-up testing was performed two weeks after pretesting. Testing was conducted in the Neuromuscular Research Laboratory at the University of Oklahoma. 20 females (n=10, young (YF) 20.8+/-0.1 yrs; n=10, older (OF) 58.1+/-0.14) were assessed. 14 days of training of the right elbow flexors only. On each day, subjects performed four sets of ten repetitions using 70 percent of maximal strength of the biceps brachii. The following variables in both right and left elbow flexor muscle groups were evaluated; isometric strength (IMS), efficiency of electrical activity (EEA) and estimated upper arm cross-sectional area (CSA). There were significant increases (peffects. Short term unilateral dynamic resistance training is a sufficient stimulus to induce significant strength increases in both trained and untrained contralateral limbs and that a neural mechanism is responsible for the muscular adaptation in both young and older women. Implication exists for unilateral stroke victims, individuals with single hip or knee replacements, or single limb casts.

  3. Switched-Observer-Based Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Switched Nonlinear Systems With Unknown Control Gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive neural output-feedback control is addressed for a class of multi-input multioutput (MIMO) switched uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown control gains. Neural networks (NNs) are used to approximate unknown nonlinear functions. In order to avoid the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer for all subsystems, an MIMO NN switched observer is designed to estimate unmeasurable states. A new switched observer-based adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is then provided by exploiting the classical average dwell time (ADT) method and the backstepping method and the Nussbaum gain technique. It effectively handles the obstacle about the coexistence of multiple Nussbaum-type function terms, and improves the classical ADT method, since the exponential decline property of Lyapunov functions for individual subsystems is no longer satisfied. It is shown that the technique proposed is able to guarantee semiglobal uniformly ultimately boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system under a class of switching signals with ADT, and the tracking errors converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. The effectiveness of the approach proposed is illustrated by its application to a two inverted pendulum system.

  4. Constrained adaptive neural network control of an MIMO aeroelastic system with input nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyong Gou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A constrained adaptive neural network control scheme is proposed for a multi-input and multi-output (MIMO aeroelastic system in the presence of wind gust, system uncertainties, and input nonlinearities consisting of input saturation and dead-zone. In regard to the input nonlinearities, the right inverse function block of the dead-zone is added before the input nonlinearities, which simplifies the input nonlinearities into an equivalent input saturation. To deal with the equivalent input saturation, an auxiliary error system is designed to compensate for the impact of the input saturation. Meanwhile, uncertainties in pitch stiffness, plunge stiffness, and pitch damping are all considered, and radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs are applied to approximate the system uncertainties. In combination with the designed auxiliary error system and the backstepping control technique, a constrained adaptive neural network controller is designed, and it is proven that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly bounded via the Lyapunov stability analysis method. Finally, extensive digital simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme towards flutter suppression in spite of the integrated effects of wind gust, system uncertainties, and input nonlinearities.

  5. Adaptive neural networks control for camera stabilization with active suspension system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The camera always suffers from image instability on the moving vehicle due to unintentional vibrations caused by road roughness. This article presents an adaptive neural network approach mixed with linear quadratic regulator control for a quarter-car active suspension system to stabilize the image captured area of the camera. An active suspension system provides extra force through the actuator which allows it to suppress vertical vibration of sprung mass. First, to deal with the road disturbance and the system uncertainties, radial basis function neural network is proposed to construct the map between the state error and the compensation component, which can correct the optimal state-feedback control law. The weights matrix of radial basis function neural network is adaptively tuned online. Then, the closed-loop stability and asymptotic convergence performance is guaranteed by Lyapunov analysis. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the proposed controller effectively suppresses the vibration of the camera and enhances the stabilization of the entire camera, where different excitations are considered to validate the system performance.

  6. Moving forward with prisms: Sensory-motor adaptation improves gait initiation in Parkinson’s disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Helen Bultitude

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that the decreased walking speed; small, shuffling steps; and ‘freezing’ shown by patients with Parkinson’s disease could stem from an inability to tilt the body forward enough to provide sufficient forward propulsion. In two repeated-measures studies we examined whether adaptation to upward-shifting prisms, resulting in a downward after-effect, could improve gait initiation in healthy participants and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Faster forward stepping followed a brief (5 min exposure period for patients, and a longer (20 min exposure period for age-matched controls. Backward stepping was unchanged, and adaptation to downward-shifting prisms with control participants showed no effect on forward or backward stepping. These results suggest that adaptation of arm proprioception in the vertical plane may generalise to anterior-posterior postural control, presenting new possibilities for the treatment of gait disturbance in basal ganglia disorders.

  7. Adaptive exponential synchronization of complex-valued Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with known and unknown parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jin; Zeng, Chunna

    2017-02-01

    The complex-valued Cohen-Grossberg neural network is a special kind of complex-valued neural network. In this paper, the synchronization problem of a class of complex-valued Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with known and unknown parameters is investigated. By using Lyapunov functionals and the adaptive control method based on parameter identification, some adaptive feedback schemes are proposed to achieve synchronization exponentially between the drive and response systems. The results obtained in this paper have extended and improved some previous works on adaptive synchronization of Cohen-Grossberg neural networks. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Immature visual neural system in children reflected by contrast sensitivity with adaptive optics correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhao, Haoxin; Dai, Yun; Zhang, Yudong; Tang, Yong; Zhou, Yifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the neural development status of the visual system of children (around 8 years old) using contrast sensitivity. We achieved this by eliminating the influence of higher order aberrations (HOAs) with adaptive optics correction. We measured HOAs, modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of six children and five adults with both corrected and uncorrected HOAs. We found that when HOAs were corrected, children and adults both showed improvements in MTF and CSF. However, the CSF of children was still lower than the adult level, indicating the difference in contrast sensitivity between groups cannot be explained by differences in optical factors. Further study showed that the difference between the groups also could not be explained by differences in non-visual factors. With these results we concluded that the neural systems underlying vision in children of around 8 years old are still immature in contrast sensitivity. PMID:24732728

  9. Adaptive Neural Back-Stepping Control with Constrains for a Flexible Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of an adaptive neural back-stepping control for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV in the presence of input constraint and aerodynamic uncertainty is discussed. Based on functional decomposition, the dynamics can be decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem. To guarantee the exploited controller’s robustness with respect to parametric uncertainties, neural network (NN is applied to approximate the lumped uncertainty of each subsystem of AHV model. The exceptional contribution is that novel auxiliary systems are introduced to compensate both the tracking errors and desired control laws, based on which the explored controller can still provide effective tracking of velocity and altitude commands when the actuators are saturated. Finally, simulation studies are made to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach in spite of the flexible effects, system uncertainties, and varying disturbances.

  10. Multi-layer holographic bifurcative neural network system for real-time adaptive EOS data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Huang, K. S.; Diep, J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data processing techniques have the inherent advantage of high data throughout, low weight and low power requirements. These features are particularly desirable for onboard spacecraft in-situ real-time data analysis and data compression applications. the proposed multi-layer optical holographic neural net pattern recognition technique will utilize the nonlinear photorefractive devices for real-time adaptive learning to classify input data content and recognize unexpected features. Information can be stored either in analog or digital form in a nonlinear photofractive device. The recording can be accomplished in time scales ranging from milliseconds to microseconds. When a system consisting of these devices is organized in a multi-layer structure, a feedforward neural net with bifurcating data classification capability is formed. The interdisciplinary research will involve the collaboration with top digital computer architecture experts at the University of Southern California.

  11. Adaptive Neural Tracking Control for Discrete-Time Switched Nonlinear Systems with Dead Zone Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jidong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the adaptive neural controllers of subsystems are proposed for a class of discrete-time switched nonlinear systems with dead zone inputs under arbitrary switching signals. Due to the complicated framework of the discrete-time switched nonlinear systems and the existence of the dead zone, it brings about difficulties for controlling such a class of systems. In addition, the radial basis function neural networks are employed to approximate the unknown terms of each subsystem. Switched update laws are designed while the parameter estimation is invariable until its corresponding subsystem is active. Then, the closed-loop system is stable and all the signals are bounded. Finally, to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, an example is employed.

  12. Artificial neural networks for adaptability and stability evaluation in alfalfa genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moysés Nascimento

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to evaluate a methodology of adaptability and phenotypic stability of alfalfa genotypes basedon the training of an artificial neural network considering the methodology of Eberhart and Russell. Data from an experiment on drymatter production of 92 alfalfa genotypes (Medicago sativa L. were used. The experimental design constituted of randomized blocks,with two repetitions. The genotypes were submitted to 20 cuttings, in the growing season of November 2004 to June 2006. Each cuttingwas considered an environment. The artificial neural network was able to satisfactorily classify the genotypes. In addition, the analysispresented high agreement rates, compared with the results obtained by the methodology of Eberhart and Russell.

  13. Growing adaptive machines combining development and learning in artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bredeche, Nicolas; Doursat, René

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of artificial intelligence has been a highly active domain of research for decades, yielding exciting scientific insights and productive new technologies. In terms of generating intelligence, however, this pursuit has yielded only limited success. This book explores the hypothesis that adaptive growth is a means of moving forward. By emulating the biological process of development, we can incorporate desirable characteristics of natural neural systems into engineered designs, and thus move closer towards the creation of brain-like systems. The particular focus is on how to design artificial neural networks for engineering tasks. The book consists of contributions from 18 researchers, ranging from detailed reviews of recent domains by senior scientists, to exciting new contributions representing the state of the art in machine learning research. The book begins with broad overviews of artificial neurogenesis and bio-inspired machine learning, suitable both as an introduction to the domains and as a...

  14. Neural adaptation to thin and fat bodies in the fusiform body area and middle occipital gyrus: an fMRI adaptation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Dennis; Rudolf, Anne K; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Untch, Karl-Heinz; Grabhorn, Ralph; Hampel, Harald; Mohr, Harald M

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception can be strongly biased due to exposure to specific stimuli in the environment, often causing neural adaptation and visual aftereffects. In this study, we investigated whether adaptation to certain body shapes biases the perception of the own body shape. Furthermore, we aimed to evoke neural adaptation to certain body shapes. Participants completed a behavioral experiment (n = 14) to rate manipulated pictures of their own bodies after adaptation to demonstratively thin or fat pictures of their own bodies. The same stimuli were used in a second experiment (n = 16) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation. In the behavioral experiment, after adapting to a thin picture of the own body participants also judged a thinner than actual body picture to be the most realistic and vice versa, resembling a typical aftereffect. The fusiform body area (FBA) and the right middle occipital gyrus (rMOG) show neural adaptation to specific body shapes while the extrastriate body area (EBA) bilaterally does not. The rMOG cluster is highly selective for bodies and perhaps body parts. The findings of the behavioral experiment support the existence of a perceptual body shape aftereffect, resulting from a specific adaptation to thin and fat pictures of one's own body. The fMRI results imply that body shape adaptation occurs in the FBA and the rMOG. The role of the EBA in body shape processing remains unclear. The results are also discussed in the light of clinical body image disturbances. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Redistribution of neural phase coherence reflects establishment of feedforward map in speech motor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ranit; Nasir, Sazzad M

    2015-04-01

    Despite recent progress in our understanding of sensorimotor integration in speech learning, a comprehensive framework to investigate its neural basis is lacking at behaviorally relevant timescales. Structural and functional imaging studies in humans have helped us identify brain networks that support speech but fail to capture the precise spatiotemporal coordination within the networks that takes place during speech learning. Here we use neuronal oscillations to investigate interactions within speech motor networks in a paradigm of speech motor adaptation under altered feedback with continuous recording of EEG in which subjects adapted to the real-time auditory perturbation of a target vowel sound. As subjects adapted to the task, concurrent changes were observed in the theta-gamma phase coherence during speech planning at several distinct scalp regions that is consistent with the establishment of a feedforward map. In particular, there was an increase in coherence over the central region and a decrease over the fronto-temporal regions, revealing a redistribution of coherence over an interacting network of brain regions that could be a general feature of error-based motor learning in general. Our findings have implications for understanding the neural basis of speech motor learning and could elucidate how transient breakdown of neuronal communication within speech networks relates to speech disorders. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Neural network-aided variational Bayesian adaptive cubature Kalman filtering for nonlinear state estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhiyong; Shi, Hongyang; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Fan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a new variational Bayesian adaptive cubature Kalman filter (VBACKF) is proposed for nonlinear state estimation. Although the conventional VBACKF performs better than cubature Kalman filtering (CKF) in solving nonlinear systems with time-varying measurement noise, its performance may degrade due to the uncertainty of the system model. To overcome this drawback, a multilayer feed-forward neural network (MFNN) is used to aid the conventional VBACKF, generalizing it to attain higher estimation accuracy and robustness. In the proposed neural-network-aided variational Bayesian adaptive cubature Kalman filter (NN-VBACKF), the MFNN is used to turn the state estimation of the VBACKF adaptively, and it is used for both state estimation and in the online training paradigm simultaneously. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, it is compared with CKF and VBACKF via target tracking problems. The simulation results demonstrate that the estimation accuracy and robustness of the proposed method are better than those of the CKF and VBACKF.

  17. Respiratory signal prediction based on adaptive boosting and multi-layer perceptron neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. Z.; Jiang, M. Y.; Ren, L.; Dang, J.; You, T.; Yin, F.-F.

    2017-09-01

    To improve the prediction accuracy of respiratory signals using adaptive boosting and multi-layer perceptron neural network (ADMLP-NN) for gated treatment of moving target in radiation therapy. The respiratory signals acquired using a real-time position management (RPM) device from 138 previous 4DCT scans were retrospectively used in this study. The ADMLP-NN was composed of several artificial neural networks (ANNs) which were used as weaker predictors to compose a stronger predictor. The respiratory signal was initially smoothed using a Savitzky-Golay finite impulse response smoothing filter (S-G filter). Then, several similar multi-layer perceptron neural networks (MLP-NNs) were configured to estimate future respiratory signal position from its previous positions. Finally, an adaptive boosting (Adaboost) decision algorithm was used to set weights for each MLP-NN based on the sample prediction error of each MLP-NN. Two prediction methods, MLP-NN and ADMLP-NN (MLP-NN plus adaptive boosting), were evaluated by calculating correlation coefficient and root-mean-square-error between true and predicted signals. For predicting 500 ms ahead of prediction, average correlation coefficients were improved from 0.83 (MLP-NN method) to 0.89 (ADMLP-NN method). The average of root-mean-square-error (relative unit) for 500 ms ahead of prediction using ADMLP-NN were reduced by 27.9%, compared to those using MLP-NN. The preliminary results demonstrate that the ADMLP-NN respiratory prediction method is more accurate than the MLP-NN method and can improve the respiration prediction accuracy.

  18. Neural Plasticity in the Gustatory System

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Sensory systems adapt to changing environmental influences by coordinated alterations in structure and function. These alterations are referred to as plastic changes. The gustatory system displays numerous plastic changes even in receptor cells. This review focuses on the plasticity of gustatory structures through the first synaptic relay in the brain. Unlike other sensory systems, there is a remarkable amount of environmentally induced changes in these peripheral-most neural structures. The ...

  19. Optimal Information Representation and Criticality in an Adaptive Sensory Recurrent Neuronal Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Shriki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent connections play an important role in cortical function, yet their exact contribution to the network computation remains unknown. The principles guiding the long-term evolution of these connections are poorly understood as well. Therefore, gaining insight into their computational role and into the mechanism shaping their pattern would be of great importance. To that end, we studied the learning dynamics and emergent recurrent connectivity in a sensory network model based on a first-principle information theoretic approach. As a test case, we applied this framework to a model of a hypercolumn in the visual cortex and found that the evolved connections between orientation columns have a "Mexican hat" profile, consistent with empirical data and previous modeling work. Furthermore, we found that optimal information representation is achieved when the network operates near a critical point in its dynamics. Neuronal networks working near such a phase transition are most sensitive to their inputs and are thus optimal in terms of information representation. Nevertheless, a mild change in the pattern of interactions may cause such networks to undergo a transition into a different regime of behavior in which the network activity is dominated by its internal recurrent dynamics and does not reflect the objective input. We discuss several mechanisms by which the pattern of interactions can be driven into this supercritical regime and relate them to various neurological and neuropsychiatric phenomena.

  20. Adaptive, integrated sensor processing to compensate for drift and uncertainty: a stochastic 'neural' approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T B; Chen, H; Murray, A F

    2004-02-01

    An adaptive stochastic classifier based on a simple, novel neural architecture--the Continuous Restricted Boltzmann Machine (CRBM) is demonstrated. Together with sensors and signal conditioning circuits, the classifier is capable of measuring and classifying (with high accuracy) the H+ ion concentration, in the presence of both random noise and sensor drift. Training on-line, the stochastic classifier is able to overcome significant drift of real incomplete sensor data dynamically. As analogue hardware, this signal-level sensor fusion scheme is therefore suitable for real-time analysis in a miniaturised multisensor microsystem such as a Lab-in-a-Pill (LIAP).

  1. Discrete-time adaptive backstepping nonlinear control via high-order neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis, Alma Y; Sanchez, Edgar N; Loukianov, Alexander G

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with adaptive tracking for discrete-time multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear systems in presence of bounded disturbances. In this paper, a high-order neural network (HONN) structure is used to approximate a control law designed by the backstepping technique, applied to a block strict feedback form (BSFF). This paper also includes the respective stability analysis, on the basis of the Lyapunov approach, for the whole controlled system, including the extended Kalman filter (EKF)-based NN learning algorithm. Applicability of the scheme is illustrated via simulation for a discrete-time nonlinear model of an electric induction motor.

  2. Motion fading and the motion aftereffect share a common process of neural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, P-J; Tse, P U

    2009-05-01

    After prolonged viewing of a slowly drifting or rotating pattern under strict fixation, the pattern appears to slow down and then momentarily stop. Here, we show that this motion fading occurs not only for slowly moving stimuli, but also for stimuli moving at high speed; after prolonged viewing of high-speed stimuli, the stimuli appear to slow down but not to stop. We report psychophysical evidence that the same neural adaptation process likely gives rise to motion fading and to the motion aftereffect.

  3. Performance assessment of electric power generations using an adaptive neural network algorithm and fuzzy DEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javaheri, Zahra

    2010-09-15

    Modeling, evaluating and analyzing performance of Iranian thermal power plants is the main goal of this study which is based on multi variant methods analysis. These methods include fuzzy DEA and adaptive neural network algorithm. At first, we determine indicators, then data is collected, next we obtained values of ranking and efficiency by Fuzzy DEA, Case study is thermal power plants In view of the fact that investment to establish on power plant is very high, and maintenance of power plant causes an expensive expenditure, moreover using fossil fuel effected environment hence optimum produce of current power plants is important.

  4. Adaptive Steganalysis Based on Selection Region and Combined Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image steganalysis is the art of detecting the presence of information hiding in carrier images. When detecting recently developed adaptive image steganography methods, state-of-art steganalysis methods cannot achieve satisfactory detection accuracy, because the adaptive steganography methods can adaptively embed information into regions with rich textures via the guidance of distortion function and thus make the effective steganalysis features hard to be extracted. Inspired by the promising success which convolutional neural network (CNN has achieved in the fields of digital image analysis, increasing researchers are devoted to designing CNN based steganalysis methods. But as for detecting adaptive steganography methods, the results achieved by CNN based methods are still far from expected. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach by designing a region selection method and a new CNN framework. In order to make the CNN focus on the regions with complex textures, we design a region selection method by finding a region with the maximal sum of the embedding probabilities. To evolve more diverse and effective steganalysis features, we design a new CNN framework consisting of three separate subnets with independent structure and configuration parameters and then merge and split the three subnets repeatedly. Experimental results indicate that our approach can lead to performance improvement in detecting adaptive steganography.

  5. Modeling the behavioral substrates of associate learning and memory - Adaptive neural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chuen-Chien

    1991-01-01

    Three adaptive single-neuron models based on neural analogies of behavior modification episodes are proposed, which attempt to bridge the gap between psychology and neurophysiology. The proposed models capture the predictive nature of Pavlovian conditioning, which is essential to the theory of adaptive/learning systems. The models learn to anticipate the occurrence of a conditioned response before the presence of a reinforcing stimulus when training is complete. Furthermore, each model can find the most nonredundant and earliest predictor of reinforcement. The behavior of the models accounts for several aspects of basic animal learning phenomena in Pavlovian conditioning beyond previous related models. Computer simulations show how well the models fit empirical data from various animal learning paradigms.

  6. An adaptive deep convolutional neural network for rolling bearing fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuan, Wang; Hongkai, Jiang; Haidong, Shao; Wenjing, Duan; Shuaipeng, Wu

    2017-09-01

    The working conditions of rolling bearings usually is very complex, which makes it difficult to diagnose rolling bearing faults. In this paper, a novel method called the adaptive deep convolutional neural network (CNN) is proposed for rolling bearing fault diagnosis. Firstly, to get rid of manual feature extraction, the deep CNN model is initialized for automatic feature learning. Secondly, to adapt to different signal characteristics, the main parameters of the deep CNN model are determined with a particle swarm optimization method. Thirdly, to evaluate the feature learning ability of the proposed method, t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) is further adopted to visualize the hierarchical feature learning process. The proposed method is applied to diagnose rolling bearing faults, and the results confirm that the proposed method is more effective and robust than other intelligent methods.

  7. Visual evoked potential estimation by adaptive noise cancellation with neural-network-based fuzzy inference system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y; Zhang, J; Yin, H; Pan, Y

    2007-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) are time-varying signals typically buried in relatively large background noise known as the electroencephalogram (EEG). In this paper, an adaptive noise cancellation with neural network-based fuzzy inference system (NNFIS) was used and the NNFIS was carefully designed to model the VEP signal. It is assumed that VEP responses can be modelled by NNFIS with the centres of its membership functions evenly distributed over time. The weights of NNFIS are adaptively determined by minimizing the variance of the error signal using the least mean squares (LMS) algorithm. As the NNFIS is dynamic to any change of VEP, the non-stationary characteristics of VEP can be tracked. Thus, this method should be able to track the VEP. Four sets of simulated data indicate that the proposed method is appropriate to estimate VEP. A total of 150 trials are processed to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method.

  8. Diagonal recurrent neural network based adaptive control of nonlinear dynamical systems using lyapunov stability criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Smriti; Gupta, J R P

    2017-03-01

    In this paper adaptive control of nonlinear dynamical systems using diagonal recurrent neural network (DRNN) is proposed. The structure of DRNN is a modification of fully connected recurrent neural network (FCRNN). Presence of self-recurrent neurons in the hidden layer of DRNN gives it an ability to capture the dynamic behaviour of the nonlinear plant under consideration (to be controlled). To ensure stability, update rules are developed using lyapunov stability criterion. These rules are then used for adjusting the various parameters of DRNN. The responses of plants obtained with DRNN are compared with those obtained when multi-layer feed forward neural network (MLFFNN) is used as a controller. Also, in example 4, FCRNN is also investigated and compared with DRNN and MLFFNN. Robustness of the proposed control scheme is also tested against parameter variations and disturbance signals. Four simulation examples including one-link robotic manipulator and inverted pendulum are considered on which the proposed controller is applied. The results so obtained show the superiority of DRNN over MLFFNN as a controller. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulated apoptosis/neurogenesis regulates learning and memory capabilities of adaptive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, R Andrew; Potenza, Marc N; Hoffman, Ralph E; Miranker, Willard

    2004-04-01

    Characterization of neuronal death and neurogenesis in the adult brain of birds, humans, and other mammals raises the possibility that neuronal turnover represents a special form of neuroplasticity associated with stress responses, cognition, and the pathophysiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Multilayer neural network models capable of learning alphabetic character representations via incremental synaptic connection strength changes were used to assess additional learning and memory effects incurred by simulation of coordinated apoptotic and neurogenic events in the middle layer. Using a consistent incremental learning capability across all neurons and experimental conditions, increasing the number of middle layer neurons undergoing turnover increased network learning capacity for new information, and increased forgetting of old information. Simulations also showed that specific patterns of neural turnover based on individual neuronal connection characteristics, or the temporal-spatial pattern of neurons chosen for turnover during new learning impacts new learning performance. These simulations predict that apoptotic and neurogenic events could act together to produce specific learning and memory effects beyond those provided by ongoing mechanisms of connection plasticity in neuronal populations. Regulation of rates as well as patterns of neuronal turnover may serve an important function in tuning the informatic properties of plastic networks according to novel informational demands. Analogous regulation in the hippocampus may provide for adaptive cognitive and emotional responses to novel and stressful contexts, or operate suboptimally as a basis for psychiatric disorders. The implications of these elementary simulations for future biological and neural modeling research on apoptosis and neurogenesis are discussed.

  10. Adaptive Neural-Sliding Mode Control of Active Suspension System for Camera Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The camera always suffers from image instability on the moving vehicle due to the unintentional vibrations caused by road roughness. This paper presents a novel adaptive neural network based on sliding mode control strategy to stabilize the image captured area of the camera. The purpose is to suppress vertical displacement of sprung mass with the application of active suspension system. Since the active suspension system has nonlinear and time varying characteristics, adaptive neural network (ANN is proposed to make the controller robustness against systematic uncertainties, which release the model-based requirement of the sliding model control, and the weighting matrix is adjusted online according to Lyapunov function. The control system consists of two loops. The outer loop is a position controller designed with sliding mode strategy, while the PID controller in the inner loop is to track the desired force. The closed loop stability and asymptotic convergence performance can be guaranteed on the basis of the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, the simulation results show that the employed controller effectively suppresses the vibration of the camera and enhances the stabilization of the entire camera, where different excitations are considered to validate the system performance.

  11. Bayesian filtering in spiking neural networks: noise, adaptation, and multisensory integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowski, Omer; Meir, Ron; Eldar, Yonina C

    2009-05-01

    A key requirement facing organisms acting in uncertain dynamic environments is the real-time estimation and prediction of environmental states, based on which effective actions can be selected. While it is becoming evident that organisms employ exact or approximate Bayesian statistical calculations for these purposes, it is far less clear how these putative computations are implemented by neural networks in a strictly dynamic setting. In this work, we make use of rigorous mathematical results from the theory of continuous time point process filtering and show how optimal real-time state estimation and prediction may be implemented in a general setting using simple recurrent neural networks. The framework is applicable to many situations of common interest, including noisy observations, non-Poisson spike trains (incorporating adaptation), multisensory integration, and state prediction. The optimal network properties are shown to relate to the statistical structure of the environment, and the benefits of adaptation are studied and explicitly demonstrated. Finally, we recover several existing results as appropriate limits of our general setting.

  12. Motor learning and cross-limb transfer rely upon distinct neural adaptation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Timothy J.; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Performance benefits conferred in the untrained limb after unilateral motor practice are termed cross-limb transfer. Although the effect is robust, the neural mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In this study we used noninvasive brain stimulation to reveal that the neural adaptations that mediate motor learning in the trained limb are distinct from those that underlie cross-limb transfer to the opposite limb. Thirty-six participants practiced a ballistic motor task with their right index finger (150 trials), followed by intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) applied to the trained (contralateral) primary motor cortex (cM1 group), the untrained (ipsilateral) M1 (iM1 group), or the vertex (sham group). After stimulation, another 150 training trials were undertaken. Motor performance and corticospinal excitability were assessed before motor training, pre- and post-iTBS, and after the second training bout. For all groups, training significantly increased performance and excitability of the trained hand, and performance, but not excitability, of the untrained hand, indicating transfer at the level of task performance. The typical facilitatory effect of iTBS on MEPs was reversed for cM1, suggesting homeostatic metaplasticity, and prior performance gains in the trained hand were degraded, suggesting that iTBS interfered with learning. In stark contrast, iM1 iTBS facilitated both performance and excitability for the untrained hand. Importantly, the effects of cM1 and iM1 iTBS on behavior were exclusive to the hand contralateral to stimulation, suggesting that adaptations within the untrained M1 contribute to cross-limb transfer. However, the neural processes that mediate learning in the trained hemisphere vs. transfer in the untrained hemisphere appear distinct. PMID:27169508

  13. Stability of bumps in piecewise smooth neural fields with nonlinear adaptation

    KAUST Repository

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.

    2010-06-01

    We study the linear stability of stationary bumps in piecewise smooth neural fields with local negative feedback in the form of synaptic depression or spike frequency adaptation. The continuum dynamics is described in terms of a nonlocal integrodifferential equation, in which the integral kernel represents the spatial distribution of synaptic weights between populations of neurons whose mean firing rate is taken to be a Heaviside function of local activity. Discontinuities in the adaptation variable associated with a bump solution means that bump stability cannot be analyzed by constructing the Evans function for a network with a sigmoidal gain function and then taking the high-gain limit. In the case of synaptic depression, we show that linear stability can be formulated in terms of solutions to a system of pseudo-linear equations. We thus establish that sufficiently strong synaptic depression can destabilize a bump that is stable in the absence of depression. These instabilities are dominated by shift perturbations that evolve into traveling pulses. In the case of spike frequency adaptation, we show that for a wide class of perturbations the activity and adaptation variables decouple in the linear regime, thus allowing us to explicitly determine stability in terms of the spectrum of a smooth linear operator. We find that bumps are always unstable with respect to this class of perturbations, and destabilization of a bump can result in either a traveling pulse or a spatially localized breather. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptive Predistortions Based on Neural Networks Associated with Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Satellite Down Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roviras Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents adaptive predistortion techniques based on a feed-forward neural network (NN to linearize power amplifiers such as those used in satellite communications. Indeed, it presents the suitable NN structures which give the best performances for three satellite down links. The first link is a stationary memoryless travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA, the second one is a nonstationary memoryless TWT amplifier while the third is an amplifier with memory modeled by a memoryless amplifier followed by a linear filter. Equally important, it puts forward the studies concerning the application of different NN training algorithms in order to determine the most prefermant for adaptive predistortions. This comparison examined through computer simulation for 64 carriers and 16-QAM OFDM system, with a Saleh's TWT amplifier, is based on some quality measure (mean square error, the required training time to reach a particular quality level, and computation complexity. The chosen adaptive predistortions (NN structures associated with an adaptive algorithm have a low complexity, fast convergence, and best performance.

  15. Adaptive Predistortions Based on Neural Networks Associated with Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Satellite Down Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Roviras

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents adaptive predistortion techniques based on a feed-forward neural network (NN to linearize power amplifiers such as those used in satellite communications. Indeed, it presents the suitable NN structures which give the best performances for three satellite down links. The first link is a stationary memoryless travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA, the second one is a nonstationary memoryless TWT amplifier while the third is an amplifier with memory modeled by a memoryless amplifier followed by a linear filter. Equally important, it puts forward the studies concerning the application of different NN training algorithms in order to determine the most prefermant for adaptive predistortions. This comparison examined through computer simulation for 64 carriers and 16-QAM OFDM system, with a Saleh's TWT amplifier, is based on some quality measure (mean square error, the required training time to reach a particular quality level, and computation complexity. The chosen adaptive predistortions (NN structures associated with an adaptive algorithm have a low complexity, fast convergence, and best performance.

  16. In the ear of the beholder: neural correlates of adaptation to voice gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zäske, Romi; Schweinberger, Stefan R; Kaufmann, Jürgen M; Kawahara, Hideki

    2009-08-01

    While high-level adaptation to faces has been extensively investigated, research on behavioural and neural correlates of auditory adaptation to paralinguistic social information in voices has been largely neglected. Here we replicate novel findings that adaptation to voice gender causes systematic contrastive aftereffects such that repeated exposure to female voice adaptors causes a subsequent test voice to be perceived as more male (and vice versa), even minutes after adaptation [S.R. Schweinberger et al., (2008), Current Biology, 18, 684-688). In addition, we recorded event-related potentials to test-voices morphed along a gender continuum. An attenuation in frontocentral N1-P2 amplitudes was seen when a test voice was preceded by gender-congruent voice adaptors. Additionally, similar amplitude attenuations were seen in a late parietal positive component (P3, 300-700 ms). These findings suggest that contrastive coding of voice gender takes place within the first few hundred milliseconds from voice onset, and is implemented by neurons in auditory areas that are specialised for detecting male and female voice quality.

  17. Multivariate adaptive regression splines and neural network models for prediction of pile drivability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengang Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piles are long, slender structural elements used to transfer the loads from the superstructure through weak strata onto stiffer soils or rocks. For driven piles, the impact of the piling hammer induces compression and tension stresses in the piles. Hence, an important design consideration is to check that the strength of the pile is sufficient to resist the stresses caused by the impact of the pile hammer. Due to its complexity, pile drivability lacks a precise analytical solution with regard to the phenomena involved. In situations where measured data or numerical hypothetical results are available, neural networks stand out in mapping the nonlinear interactions and relationships between the system's predictors and dependent responses. In addition, unlike most computational tools, no mathematical relationship assumption between the dependent and independent variables has to be made. Nevertheless, neural networks have been criticized for their long trial-and-error training process since the optimal configuration is not known a priori. This paper investigates the use of a fairly simple nonparametric regression algorithm known as multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS, as an alternative to neural networks, to approximate the relationship between the inputs and dependent response, and to mathematically interpret the relationship between the various parameters. In this paper, the Back propagation neural network (BPNN and MARS models are developed for assessing pile drivability in relation to the prediction of the Maximum compressive stresses (MCS, Maximum tensile stresses (MTS, and Blow per foot (BPF. A database of more than four thousand piles is utilized for model development and comparative performance between BPNN and MARS predictions.

  18. A Novel Sensory Mapping Design for Bipedal Walking on a Sloped Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Min Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an environment recognition method for bipedal robots using a time-delay neural network. For a robot to walk in a varying terrain, it is desirable that the robot can adapt to any environment encountered in real-time. This paper aims to develop a sensory mapping unit to recognize environment types from the input sensory data based on an artificial neural network approach. With the proposed sensory mapping design, a bipedal walking robot can obtain real-time environment information and select an appropriate walking pattern accordingly. Due to the time-dependent property of sensory data, the sensory mapping is realized by using a time-delay neural network. The sensory data of earlier time sequences combined with current sensory data are sent to the neural network. The proposed method has been implemented on the humanoid robot NAO for verification. Several interesting experiments were carried out to verify the effectiveness of the sensory mapping design. The mapping design is validated for the uphill, downhill and flat surface cases, where three types of environment can be recognized by the NAO robot online.

  19. Prescribed performance synchronization controller design of fractional-order chaotic systems: An adaptive neural network control approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an adaptive neural network synchronization (NNS approach, capable of guaranteeing prescribed performance (PP, is designed for non-identical fractional-order chaotic systems (FOCSs. For PP synchronization, we mean that the synchronization error converges to an arbitrary small region of the origin with convergence rate greater than some function given in advance. Neural networks are utilized to estimate unknown nonlinear functions in the closed-loop system. Based on the integer-order Lyapunov stability theorem, a fractional-order adaptive NNS controller is designed, and the PP can be guaranteed. Finally, simulation results are presented to confirm our results.

  20. Prescribed performance synchronization controller design of fractional-order chaotic systems: An adaptive neural network control approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Lv, Hui; Jiao, Dongxiu

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an adaptive neural network synchronization (NNS) approach, capable of guaranteeing prescribed performance (PP), is designed for non-identical fractional-order chaotic systems (FOCSs). For PP synchronization, we mean that the synchronization error converges to an arbitrary small region of the origin with convergence rate greater than some function given in advance. Neural networks are utilized to estimate unknown nonlinear functions in the closed-loop system. Based on the integer-order Lyapunov stability theorem, a fractional-order adaptive NNS controller is designed, and the PP can be guaranteed. Finally, simulation results are presented to confirm our results.

  1. Improving Stability and Convergence for Adaptive Radial Basis Function Neural Networks Algorithm. (On-Line Harmonics Estimation Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyad K Almaita

    2017-03-01

    Keywords: Energy efficiency, Power quality, Radial basis function, neural networks, adaptive, harmonic. Article History: Received Dec 15, 2016; Received in revised form Feb 2nd 2017; Accepted 13rd 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Almaita, E.K and Shawawreh J.Al (2017 Improving Stability and Convergence for Adaptive Radial Basis Function Neural Networks Algorithm (On-Line Harmonics Estimation Application.  International Journal of Renewable Energy Develeopment, 6(1, 9-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.1.9-17

  2. A spiking neural network model of model-free reinforcement learning with high-dimensional sensory input and perceptual ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takashi; Otsuka, Makoto; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Doya, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical framework of reinforcement learning plays an important role in understanding action selection in animals. Spiking neural networks provide a theoretically grounded means to test computational hypotheses on neurally plausible algorithms of reinforcement learning through numerical simulation. However, most of these models cannot handle observations which are noisy, or occurred in the past, even though these are inevitable and constraining features of learning in real environments. This class of problem is formally known as partially observable reinforcement learning (PORL) problems. It provides a generalization of reinforcement learning to partially observable domains. In addition, observations in the real world tend to be rich and high-dimensional. In this work, we use a spiking neural network model to approximate the free energy of a restricted Boltzmann machine and apply it to the solution of PORL problems with high-dimensional observations. Our spiking network model solves maze tasks with perceptually ambiguous high-dimensional observations without knowledge of the true environment. An extended model with working memory also solves history-dependent tasks. The way spiking neural networks handle PORL problems may provide a glimpse into the underlying laws of neural information processing which can only be discovered through such a top-down approach.

  3. Dynamic recurrent neural networks for stable adaptive control of wing rock motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Steven Boon-Lam

    Wing rock is a self-sustaining limit cycle oscillation (LCO) which occurs as the result of nonlinear coupling between the dynamic response of the aircraft and the unsteady aerodynamic forces. In this thesis, dynamic recurrent RBF (Radial Basis Function) network control methodology is proposed to control the wing rock motion. The concept based on the properties of the Presiach hysteresis model is used in the design of dynamic neural networks. The structure and memory mechanism in the Preisach model is analogous to the parallel connectivity and memory formation in the RBF neural networks. The proposed dynamic recurrent neural network has a feature for adding or pruning the neurons in the hidden layer according to the growth criteria based on the properties of ensemble average memory formation of the Preisach model. The recurrent feature of the RBF network deals with the dynamic nonlinearities and endowed temporal memories of the hysteresis model. The control of wing rock is a tracking problem, the trajectory starts from non-zero initial conditions and it tends to zero as time goes to infinity. In the proposed neural control structure, the recurrent dynamic RBF network performs identification process in order to approximate the unknown non-linearities of the physical system based on the input-output data obtained from the wing rock phenomenon. The design of the RBF networks together with the network controllers are carried out in discrete time domain. The recurrent RBF networks employ two separate adaptation schemes where the RBF's centre and width are adjusted by the Extended Kalman Filter in order to give a minimum networks size, while the outer networks layer weights are updated using the algorithm derived from Lyapunov stability analysis for the stable closed loop control. The issue of the robustness of the recurrent RBF networks is also addressed. The effectiveness of the proposed dynamic recurrent neural control methodology is demonstrated through simulations to

  4. Modeling of genetic regulatory networks in the differentiation of neural crest stem cells to sensory neurons by means of boolean networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcelo Aráus Patiño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we have generated a GRN comprising the process by which neural crest stem cells develop to two types of sensory neurons (Propioceptors and Nocioceptors. We have also been able to fi nd patterns of regulation (motifs that act cooperatively to control such process. Surprisingly, these motifs take place in similar stages during the development of erythrocytes from hematopoietic stem cells. Regarding the complexity of the GRN found, we then used Random Boolean Networks (RBN for this purpose, which showed key components as well as the dynamics of the process through changes in initial conditions. Finally, the motifs were refl ected in the model, suggesting insights for further studies.

  5. Modeling and adaptive control of a camless engine using neural networks and estimation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashhab, S. [Hashemite Univ., Zarqa (Jordan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-08-09

    A system to control the cylinder air charge (CAC) in a camless internal combustion (IC) engine was recently developed. The performance of an IC engine connected to an adaptive artificial neural network (ANN) based feedback controller was then investigated. A control oriented model for the engine intake process was created based on thermodynamics laws and was validated against engine experimental data. Input-output data at a speed of 1500 RPM was generated and used to train an ANN model for the engine. The inputs were the intake valve lift (IVL) and closing timing (IVC). The output was the CAC. The controller consisted of a feedforward controller, CAC estimator, and on-line ANN parameter estimator. The feedforward controller provided IVL and IVC that satisfied the driver's torque demand and was the inverse of the engine ANN model. The on-line ANN used the error between the CAC measurement from the CAC estimator and its predicted value from the ANN to update the network's parameters. The feedforward controller was therefore adapted since its operation depended on the ANN model. The adaptation scheme improved the ANN prediction accuracy when the engine parts degraded, the speed changed or when modeling errors occurred. The engine controller exhibited good CAC tracking performance. Computer simulation demonstrated the capability of the camless engine controller. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  6. An adaptive recurrent-neural-network motion controller for X-Y table in CNC machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Faa-Jeng; Shieh, Hsin-Jang; Shieh, Po-Huang; Shen, Po-Hung

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, an adaptive recurrent-neural-network (ARNN) motion control system for a biaxial motion mechanism driven by two field-oriented control permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) in the computer numerical control (CNC) machine is proposed. In the proposed ARNN control system, a RNN with accurate approximation capability is employed to approximate an unknown dynamic function, and the adaptive learning algorithms that can learn the parameters of the RNN on line are derived using Lyapunov stability theorem. Moreover, a robust controller is proposed to confront the uncertainties including approximation error, optimal parameter vectors, higher-order terms in Taylor series, external disturbances, cross-coupled interference and friction torque of the system. To relax the requirement for the value of lumped uncertainty in the robust controller, an adaptive lumped uncertainty estimation law is investigated. Using the proposed control, the position tracking performance is substantially improved and the robustness to uncertainties including cross-coupled interference and friction torque can be obtained as well. Finally, some experimental results of the tracking of various reference contours demonstrate the validity of the proposed design for practical applications.

  7. FPGA IMPLEMENTATION OF ADAPTIVE INTEGRATED SPIKING NEURAL NETWORK FOR EFFICIENT IMAGE RECOGNITION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pasupathi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Image recognition is a technology which can be used in various applications such as medical image recognition systems, security, defense video tracking, and factory automation. In this paper we present a novel pipelined architecture of an adaptive integrated Artificial Neural Network for image recognition. In our proposed work we have combined the feature of spiking neuron concept with ANN to achieve the efficient architecture for image recognition. The set of training images are trained by ANN and target output has been identified. Real time videos are captured and then converted into frames for testing purpose and the image were recognized. The machine can operate at up to 40 frames/sec using images acquired from the camera. The system has been implemented on XC3S400 SPARTAN-3 Field Programmable Gate Arrays.

  8. Adaptive Neural Control of Nonaffine Nonlinear Systems without Differential Condition for Nonaffine Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojiao Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive neural control scheme is proposed for nonaffine nonlinear system without using the implicit function theorem or mean value theorem. The differential conditions on nonaffine nonlinear functions are removed. The control-gain function is modeled with the nonaffine function probably being indifferentiable. Furthermore, only a semibounded condition for nonaffine nonlinear function is required in the proposed method, and the basic idea of invariant set theory is then constructively introduced to cope with the difficulty in the control design for nonaffine nonlinear systems. It is rigorously proved that all the closed-loop signals are bounded and the tracking error converges to a small residual set asymptotically. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the designed method.

  9. Neural-network-observer-based optimal control for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Derong; Huang, Yuzhu; Wang, Ding; Wei, Qinglai

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an observer-based optimal control scheme is developed for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm. First, a neural-network (NN) observer is designed to estimate system states. Then, based on the observed states, a neuro-controller is constructed via ADP method to obtain the optimal control. In this design, two NN structures are used: a three-layer NN is used to construct the observer which can be applied to systems with higher degrees of nonlinearity and without a priori knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the value function. The optimal control law is computed using the critic NN and the observer NN. Uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is guaranteed. The actor, critic, and observer structures are all implemented in real-time, continuously and simultaneously. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  10. Investigations on Incipient Fault Diagnosis of Power Transformer Using Neural Networks and Adaptive Neurofuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandkumar Wagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuity of power supply is of utmost importance to the consumers and is only possible by coordination and reliable operation of power system components. Power transformer is such a prime equipment of the transmission and distribution system and needs to be continuously monitored for its well-being. Since ratio methods cannot provide correct diagnosis due to the borderline problems and the probability of existence of multiple faults, artificial intelligence could be the best approach. Dissolved gas analysis (DGA interpretation may provide an insight into the developing incipient faults and is adopted as the preliminary diagnosis tool. In the proposed work, a comparison of the diagnosis ability of backpropagation (BP, radial basis function (RBF neural network, and adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS has been investigated and the diagnosis results in terms of error measure, accuracy, network training time, and number of iterations are presented.

  11. Detection of Bundle Branch Block using Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavthi Kora

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The medical practitioners analyze the electrical activity of the human heart so as to predict various ailments by studying the data collected from the Electrocardiogram (ECG. A Bundle Branch Block (BBB is a type of heart disease which occurs when there is an obstruction along the pathway of an electrical impulse. This abnormality makes the heart beat irregular as there is an obstruction in the branches of heart, this results in pulses to travel slower than the usual. Our current study involved is to diagnose this heart problem using Adaptive Bacterial Foraging Optimization (ABFO Algorithm. The Data collected from MIT/BIH arrhythmia BBB database applied to an ABFO Algorithm for obtaining best(important feature from each ECG beat. These features later fed to Levenberg Marquardt Neural Network (LMNN based classifier. The results show the proposed classification using ABFO is better than some recent algorithms reported in the literature.

  12. Convergence of batch gradient learning with smoothing regularization and adaptive momentum for neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qinwei; Wu, Wei; Zurada, Jacek M

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents new theoretical results on the backpropagation algorithm with smoothing [Formula: see text] regularization and adaptive momentum for feedforward neural networks with a single hidden layer, i.e., we show that the gradient of error function goes to zero and the weight sequence goes to a fixed point as n (n is iteration steps) tends to infinity, respectively. Also, our results are more general since we do not require the error function to be quadratic or uniformly convex, and neuronal activation functions are relaxed. Moreover, compared with existed algorithms, our novel algorithm can get more sparse network structure, namely it forces weights to become smaller during the training and can eventually removed after the training, which means that it can simply the network structure and lower operation time. Finally, two numerical experiments are presented to show the characteristics of the main results in detail.

  13. Short-Term Load Forecasting Using Adaptive Annealing Learning Algorithm Based Reinforcement Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ming Lee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A reinforcement learning algorithm is proposed to improve the accuracy of short-term load forecasting (STLF in this article. The proposed model integrates radial basis function neural network (RBFNN, support vector regression (SVR, and adaptive annealing learning algorithm (AALA. In the proposed methodology, firstly, the initial structure of RBFNN is determined by using an SVR. Then, an AALA with time-varying learning rates is used to optimize the initial parameters of SVR-RBFNN (AALA-SVR-RBFNN. In order to overcome the stagnation for searching optimal RBFNN, a particle swarm optimization (PSO is applied to simultaneously find promising learning rates in AALA. Finally, the short-term load demands are predicted by using the optimal RBFNN. The performance of the proposed methodology is verified on the actual load dataset from the Taiwan Power Company (TPC. Simulation results reveal that the proposed AALA-SVR-RBFNN can achieve a better load forecasting precision compared to various RBFNNs.

  14. Representing molecule-surface interactions with symmetry-adapted neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, Jörg; Lorenz, Sönke; Reuter, Karsten

    2007-07-07

    The accurate description of molecule-surface interactions requires a detailed knowledge of the underlying potential-energy surface (PES). Recently, neural networks (NNs) have been shown to be an efficient technique to accurately interpolate the PES information provided for a set of molecular configurations, e.g., by first-principles calculations. Here, we further develop this approach by building the NN on a new type of symmetry functions, which allows to take the symmetry of the surface exactly into account. The accuracy and efficiency of such symmetry-adapted NNs is illustrated by the application to a six-dimensional PES describing the interaction of oxygen molecules with the Al(111) surface.

  15. Self: an adaptive pressure arising from self-organization, chaotic dynamics, and neural Darwinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzo, Angela Alessia; Vimal, Ram Lakhan Pandey

    2007-12-01

    In this article, we establish a model to delineate the emergence of "self" in the brain making recourse to the theory of chaos. Self is considered as the subjective experience of a subject. As essential ingredients of subjective experiences, our model includes wakefulness, re-entry, attention, memory, and proto-experiences. The stability as stated by chaos theory can potentially describe the non-linear function of "self" as sensitive to initial conditions and can characterize it as underlying order from apparently random signals. Self-similarity is discussed as a latent menace of a pathological confusion between "self" and "others". Our test hypothesis is that (1) consciousness might have emerged and evolved from a primordial potential or proto-experience in matter, such as the physical attractions and repulsions experienced by electrons, and (2) "self" arises from chaotic dynamics, self-organization and selective mechanisms during ontogenesis, while emerging post-ontogenically as an adaptive pressure driven by both volume and synaptic-neural transmission and influencing the functional connectivity of neural nets (structure).

  16. Adaptive neural reward processing during anticipation and receipt of monetary rewards in mindfulness meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ulrich; Brown, Kirk Warren; Downar, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Reward seeking is ubiquitous and adaptive in humans. But excessive reward seeking behavior, such as chasing monetary rewards, may lead to diminished subjective well-being. This study examined whether individuals trained in mindfulness meditation show neural evidence of lower susceptibility to monetary rewards. Seventy-eight participants (34 meditators, 44 matched controls) completed the monetary incentive delay task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. The groups performed equally on the task, but meditators showed lower neural activations in the caudate nucleus during reward anticipation, and elevated bilateral posterior insula activation during reward anticipation. Meditators also evidenced reduced activations in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex during reward receipt compared with controls. Connectivity parameters between the right caudate and bilateral anterior insula were attenuated in meditators during incentive anticipation. In summary, brain regions involved in reward processing-both during reward anticipation and receipt of reward-responded differently in mindfulness meditators than in nonmeditators, indicating that the former are less susceptible to monetary incentives. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Metaplasticity as a Neural Substrate for Adaptive Learning and Choice under Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashahi, Shiva; Donahue, Christopher H; Khorsand, Peyman; Seo, Hyojung; Lee, Daeyeol; Soltani, Alireza

    2017-04-19

    Value-based decision making often involves integration of reward outcomes over time, but this becomes considerably more challenging if reward assignments on alternative options are probabilistic and non-stationary. Despite the existence of various models for optimally integrating reward under uncertainty, the underlying neural mechanisms are still unknown. Here we propose that reward-dependent metaplasticity (RDMP) can provide a plausible mechanism for both integration of reward under uncertainty and estimation of uncertainty itself. We show that a model based on RDMP can robustly perform the probabilistic reversal learning task via dynamic adjustment of learning based on reward feedback, while changes in its activity signal unexpected uncertainty. The model predicts time-dependent and choice-specific learning rates that strongly depend on reward history. Key predictions from this model were confirmed with behavioral data from non-human primates. Overall, our results suggest that metaplasticity can provide a neural substrate for adaptive learning and choice under uncertainty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An adaptive neural swarm approach for intrusion defense in ad hoc networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannady, James

    2011-06-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) and mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) are being increasingly deployed in critical applications due to the flexibility and extensibility of the technology. While these networks possess numerous advantages over traditional wireless systems in dynamic environments they are still vulnerable to many of the same types of host-based and distributed attacks common to those systems. Unfortunately, the limited power and bandwidth available in WSNs and MANETs, combined with the dynamic connectivity that is a defining characteristic of the technology, makes it extremely difficult to utilize traditional intrusion detection techniques. This paper describes an approach to accurately and efficiently detect potentially damaging activity in WSNs and MANETs. It enables the network as a whole to recognize attacks, anomalies, and potential vulnerabilities in a distributive manner that reflects the autonomic processes of biological systems. Each component of the network recognizes activity in its local environment and then contributes to the overall situational awareness of the entire system. The approach utilizes agent-based swarm intelligence to adaptively identify potential data sources on each node and on adjacent nodes throughout the network. The swarm agents then self-organize into modular neural networks that utilize a reinforcement learning algorithm to identify relevant behavior patterns in the data without supervision. Once the modular neural networks have established interconnectivity both locally and with neighboring nodes the analysis of events within the network can be conducted collectively in real-time. The approach has been shown to be extremely effective in identifying distributed network attacks.

  19. Making Decisions with Unknown Sensory Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneve, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    To make fast and accurate behavioral choices, we need to integrate noisy sensory input, take prior knowledge into account, and adjust our decision criteria. It was shown previously that in two-alternative-forced-choice tasks, optimal decision making can be formalized in the framework of a sequential probability ratio test and is then equivalent to a diffusion model. However, this analogy hides a “chicken and egg” problem: to know how quickly we should integrate the sensory input and set the optimal decision threshold, the reliability of the sensory observations must be known in advance. Most of the time, we cannot know this reliability without first observing the decision outcome. We consider here a Bayesian decision model that simultaneously infers the probability of two different choices and at the same time estimates the reliability of the sensory information on which this choice is based. We show that this can be achieved within a single trial, based on the noisy responses of sensory spiking neurons. The resulting model is a non-linear diffusion to bound where the weight of the sensory inputs and the decision threshold are both dynamically changing over time. In difficult decision trials, early sensory inputs have a stronger impact on the decision, and the threshold collapses such that choices are made faster but with low accuracy. The reverse is true in easy trials: the sensory weight and the threshold increase over time, leading to slower decisions but at much higher accuracy. In contrast to standard diffusion models, adaptive sensory weights construct an accurate representation for the probability of each choice. This information can then be combined appropriately with other unreliable cues, such as priors. We show that this model can account for recent findings in a motion discrimination task, and can be implemented in a neural architecture using fast Hebbian learning. PMID:22679418

  20. Making decisions with unknown sensory reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneve, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    To make fast and accurate behavioral choices, we need to integrate noisy sensory input, take prior knowledge into account, and adjust our decision criteria. It was shown previously that in two-alternative-forced-choice tasks, optimal decision making can be formalized in the framework of a sequential probability ratio test and is then equivalent to a diffusion model. However, this analogy hides a "chicken and egg" problem: to know how quickly we should integrate the sensory input and set the optimal decision threshold, the reliability of the sensory observations must be known in advance. Most of the time, we cannot know this reliability without first observing the decision outcome. We consider here a Bayesian decision model that simultaneously infers the probability of two different choices and at the same time estimates the reliability of the sensory information on which this choice is based. We show that this can be achieved within a single trial, based on the noisy responses of sensory spiking neurons. The resulting model is a non-linear diffusion to bound where the weight of the sensory inputs and the decision threshold are both dynamically changing over time. In difficult decision trials, early sensory inputs have a stronger impact on the decision, and the threshold collapses such that choices are made faster but with low accuracy. The reverse is true in easy trials: the sensory weight and the threshold increase over time, leading to slower decisions but at much higher accuracy. In contrast to standard diffusion models, adaptive sensory weights construct an accurate representation for the probability of each choice. This information can then be combined appropriately with other unreliable cues, such as priors. We show that this model can account for recent findings in a motion discrimination task, and can be implemented in a neural architecture using fast Hebbian learning.

  1. Robust Decentralized Adaptive Neural Control for a Class of Nonaffine Nonlinear Large-Scale Systems with Unknown Dead Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanqing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of robust decentralized adaptive neural stabilization control is investigated for a class of nonaffine nonlinear interconnected large-scale systems with unknown dead zones. In the controller design procedure, radical basis function (RBF neural networks are applied to approximate packaged unknown nonlinearities and then an adaptive neural decentralized controller is systematically derived without requiring any information on the boundedness of dead zone parameters (slopes and break points. It is proven that the developed control scheme can ensure that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded in the sense of mean square. Simulation study is provided to further demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed control scheme.

  2. Neural activity in the dorsal medial superior temporal area of monkeys represents retinal error during adaptive motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Aya; Ofuji, Tomoyo; Miura, Kenichiro; Kawano, Kenji

    2017-01-19

    To adapt to variable environments, humans regulate their behavior by modulating gains in sensory-to-motor processing. In this study, we measured a simple eye movement, the ocular following response (OFR), in monkeys to study the neuronal basis of adaptive motor learning in the visuomotor processing stream. The medial superior temporal (MST) area of the cerebral cortex is a critical site for contextual gain modulation of the OFR. However, the role of MST neurons in adaptive gain modulation of the OFR remains unknown. We adopted a velocity step-down sequence paradigm that was designed to promote adaptive gain modulation of the OFR to investigate the role of the dorsal MST (MSTd) in adaptive motor learning. In the initial learning stage, we observed a reduction in the OFR but no significant change in the "open-loop" responses for the majority of the MSTd neurons. However, in the late learning stage, some MSTd neurons exhibited significantly enhanced "closed-loop" responses in association with increases in retinal error velocity. These results indicate that the MSTd area primarily encodes visual motion, suggesting that MSTd neurons function upstream of the motor learning site to provide sensory signals to the downstream structures involved in adaptive motor learning.

  3. Reservoir-based Online Adaptive Forward Models with Neural Control for Complex Locomotion in a Hexapod Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Walking animals show fascinating locomotor abilities and complex behaviors. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors is a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanisms. While biomechanics allows for flexibility and a variety of movements, neural mechanisms generate...... locomotion, make predictions, and provide adaptation. Inspired by this finding, we present here an artificial bio-inspired walking system which combines biomechanics (in terms of its body and leg structures) and neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of 1) central pattern generator-based control...... conditions. Simulation results show that this bio-inspired approach allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotor abilities including walking on undulated terrains, crossing a large gap, as well as climbing over a high obstacle and a fleet of stairs....

  4. Enhanced neural function in highly aberrated eyes following perceptual learning with adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Barbot, Antoine; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2017-03-01

    Highly aberrated keratoconic (KC) eyes do not elicit the expected visual advantage from customized optical corrections. This is attributed to the neural insensitivity arising from chronic visual experience with poor retinal image quality, dominated by low spatial frequencies. The goal of this study was to investigate if targeted perceptual learning with adaptive optics (AO) can stimulate neural plasticity in these highly aberrated eyes. The worse eye of 2 KC subjects was trained in a contrast threshold test under AO correction. Prior to training, tumbling 'E' visual acuity and contrast sensitivity at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 c/deg were measured in both the trained and untrained eyes of each subject with their routine prescription and with AO correction for a 6mm pupil. The high spatial frequency requiring 50% contrast for detection with AO correction was picked as the training frequency. Subjects were required to train on a contrast detection test with AO correction for 1h for 5 consecutive days. During each training session, threshold contrast measurement at the training frequency with AO was conducted. Pre-training measures were repeated after the 5 training sessions in both eyes (i.e., post-training). After training, contrast sensitivity under AO correction improved on average across spatial frequency by a factor of 1.91 (range: 1.77-2.04) and 1.75 (1.22-2.34) for the two subjects. This improvement in contrast sensitivity transferred to visual acuity with the two subjects improving by 1.5 and 1.3 lines respectively with AO following training. One of the two subjects denoted an interocular transfer of training and an improvement in performance with their routine prescription post-training. This training-induced visual benefit demonstrates the potential of AO as a tool for neural rehabilitation in patients with abnormal corneas. Moreover, it reveals a sufficient degree of neural plasticity in normally developed adults who have a long history of abnormal visual

  5. Neural adaptations after short-term wingate-based high-intensity interval training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Ibañez, Antonio; Colomer-Poveda, David; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Viñuela-García, Manuel; Márquez, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the neural adaptations associated with a low-volume Wingate-based High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). Methods: Fourteen recreationally trained males were divided into an experimental (HIIT) and a control group to determine whether a short-term (4 weeks) Wingate-based HIIT program could alter the Hoffmann (H-) reflex, volitional (V-) wave and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the plantar-flexor muscles, and the peak power achieved during a Wingate test. Results: Absolute and relative peak power increased in the HIIT group (ABS_Ppeak: +14.7%, P=0.001; and REL_Ppeak: +15.0%, P=0.001), but not in the control group (ABS_Ppeak: P=0.466; and REL_Ppeak: P=0.493). However, no significant changes were found in the MVC (P>0.05 for both groups). There was a significant increase in H-reflex size after HIIT (+24.5%, P=0.004), while it remained unchanged in the control group (P=0.134). No significant changes were observed either in the V-wave or in the Vwave/Mwave ratio (P>0.05 for both groups). Conclusion: The Wingate-based training led to an increased peak power together with a higher spinal excitability. However, no changes were found either in the volitional wave or in the MVC, indicating a lack of adaptation in the central motor drive. PMID:29199186

  6. Robust adaptive gradient-descent training algorithm for recurrent neural networks in discrete time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing; Wu, Yilei; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2008-11-01

    For a recurrent neural network (RNN), its transient response is a critical issue, especially for real-time signal processing applications. The conventional RNN training algorithms, such as backpropagation through time (BPTT) and real-time recurrent learning (RTRL), have not adequately addressed this problem because they suffer from low convergence speed. While increasing the learning rate may help to improve the performance of the RNN, it can result in unstable training in terms of weight divergence. Therefore, an optimal tradeoff between RNN training speed and weight convergence is desired. In this paper, a robust adaptive gradient-descent (RAGD) training algorithm of RNN is developed based on a novel RNN hybrid training concept. It switches the training patterns between standard real-time online backpropagation (BP) and RTRL according to the derived convergence and stability conditions. The weight convergence and L(2)-stability of the algorithm are derived via the conic sector theorem. The optimized adaptive learning maximizes the training speed of the RNN for each weight update without violating the stability and convergence criteria. Computer simulations are carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical results.

  7. Implications of movement-related cortical potential for understanding neural adaptations in muscle strength tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide information about the implications of the movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) in acute and chronic responses to the counter resistance training. The structuring of the methods of this study followed the proposals of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). It was performed an electronically search in Pubmed/Medline and ISI Web of Knowledge data bases, from 1987 to 2013, besides the manual search in the selected references. The following terms were used: Bereitschaftspotential, MRCP, strength and force. The logical operator “AND” was used to combine descriptors and terms used to search publications. At the end, 11 studies attended all the eligibility criteria and the results demonstrated that the behavior of MRCP is altered because of different factors such as: force level, rate of force development, fatigue induced by exercise, and the specific phase of muscular action, leading to an increase in the amplitude in eccentric actions compared to concentric actions, in acute effects. The long-term adaptations demonstrated that the counter resistance training provokes an attenuation in the amplitude in areas related to the movement, which may be caused by neural adaptation occurred in the motor cortex. PMID:24602228

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Quantum Mechanics / Molecular Mechanics and Adaptive Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2018-02-13

    Direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with ab initio quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods is very powerful for studying the mechanism of chemical reactions in complex environment but very time consuming. The computational cost on QM/MM calculations during MD simulations can be reduced significantly using semiempirical QM/MM methods with lower accuracy. To achieve higher accuracy at the ab initio QM/MM level, a correction on the existing semiempirical QM/MM model is an attractive way. Recently, we reported a neural network (NN) method as QM/MM-NN to predict the potential energy difference between semiempirical and ab initio QM/MM approaches. The high-level results can be obtained using neural network based on semiempirical QM/MM MD simulations, but the lack of direct MD samplings at the ab initio QM/MM level is still a deficiency that limits the applications of QM/MM-NN. In the present paper, we developed a dynamic scheme of QM/MM-NN for direct MD simulations on the NN-predicted potential energy surface to approximate ab initio QM/MM MD. Since some configurations excluded from the database for NN training were encountered during simulations, which may cause some difficulties on MD samplings, an adaptive procedure inspired by the selection scheme reported by Behler was employed with some adaptions to update NN and carry out MD iteratively. We further applied the adaptive QM/MM-NN MD method to the free energy calculation and transition path optimization on chemical reactions in water. The results at the ab initio QM/MM level can be well reproduced using this method after 2-4 iteration cycles. The saving in computational cost is about 2 orders of magnitude. It demonstrates that the QM/MM-NN with direct MD simulations has great potentials not only for the calculation of thermodynamic properties but also for the characterization of reaction dynamics, which provides a useful tool to study chemical or biochemical systems in solution or enzymes.

  9. Adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks for Dark-Spot Detection from SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Taravat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spills represent a major threat to ocean ecosystems and their environmental status. Previous studies have shown that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR, as its recording is independent of clouds and weather, can be effectively used for the detection and classification of oil spills. Dark formation detection is the first and critical stage in oil-spill detection procedures. In this paper, a novel approach for automated dark-spot detection in SAR imagery is presented. A new approach from the combination of adaptive Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM and MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP neural networks is proposed to differentiate between dark spots and the background. The results have been compared with the results of a model combining non-adaptive WMM and pulse coupled neural networks. The presented approach overcomes the non-adaptive WMM filter setting parameters by developing an adaptive WMM model which is a step ahead towards a full automatic dark spot detection. The proposed approach was tested on 60 ENVISAT and ERS2 images which contained dark spots. For the overall dataset, an average accuracy of 94.65% was obtained. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach is very robust and effective where the non-adaptive WMM & pulse coupled neural network (PCNN model generates poor accuracies.

  10. Learning from adaptive neural dynamic surface control of strict-feedback systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Cong

    2015-06-01

    Learning plays an essential role in autonomous control systems. However, how to achieve learning in the nonstationary environment for nonlinear systems is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present learning method for a class of n th-order strict-feedback systems by adaptive dynamic surface control (DSC) technology, which achieves the human-like ability of learning by doing and doing with learned knowledge. To achieve the learning, this paper first proposes stable adaptive DSC with auxiliary first-order filters, which ensures the boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system and the convergence of tracking errors in a finite time. With the help of DSC, the derivative of the filter output variable is used as the neural network (NN) input instead of traditional intermediate variables. As a result, the proposed adaptive DSC method reduces greatly the dimension of NN inputs, especially for high-order systems. After the stable DSC design, we decompose the stable closed-loop system into a series of linear time-varying perturbed subsystems. Using a recursive design, the recurrent property of NN input variables is easily verified since the complexity is overcome using DSC. Subsequently, the partial persistent excitation condition of the radial basis function NN is satisfied. By combining a state transformation, accurate approximations of the closed-loop system dynamics are recursively achieved in a local region along recurrent orbits. Then, the learning control method using the learned knowledge is proposed to achieve the closed-loop stability and the improved control performance. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the proposed scheme can not only reuse the learned knowledge to achieve the better control performance with the faster tracking convergence rate and the smaller tracking error but also greatly alleviate the computational burden because of reducing the number and complexity of NN input variables.

  11. A new constructive algorithm for architectural and functional adaptation of artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Monirul; Sattar, Md Abdus; Amin, Md Faijul; Yao, Xin; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2009-12-01

    The generalization ability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) is greatly dependent on their architectures. Constructive algorithms provide an attractive automatic way of determining a near-optimal ANN architecture for a given problem. Several such algorithms have been proposed in the literature and shown their effectiveness. This paper presents a new constructive algorithm (NCA) in automatically determining ANN architectures. Unlike most previous studies on determining ANN architectures, NCA puts emphasis on architectural adaptation and functional adaptation in its architecture determination process. It uses a constructive approach to determine the number of hidden layers in an ANN and of neurons in each hidden layer. To achieve functional adaptation, NCA trains hidden neurons in the ANN by using different training sets that were created by employing a similar concept used in the boosting algorithm. The purpose of using different training sets is to encourage hidden neurons to learn different parts or aspects of the training data so that the ANN can learn the whole training data in a better way. In this paper, the convergence and computational issues of NCA are analytically studied. The computational complexity of NCA is found to be O(W xP(t) xtau), where W is the number of weights in the ANN, P(t) is the number of training examples, and tau is the number of training epochs. This complexity has the same order as what the backpropagation learning algorithm requires for training a fixed ANN architecture. A set of eight classification and two approximation benchmark problems was used to evaluate the performance of NCA. The experimental results show that NCA can produce ANN architectures with fewer hidden neurons and better generalization ability compared to existing constructive and nonconstructive algorithms.

  12. Almost Sure Asymptotical Adaptive Synchronization for Neutral-Type Neural Networks with Stochastic Perturbation and Markovian Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuneng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of almost sure (a.s. asymptotic adaptive synchronization for neutral-type neural networks with stochastic perturbation and Markovian switching is researched. Firstly, we proposed a new criterion of a.s. asymptotic stability for a general neutral-type stochastic differential equation which extends the existing results. Secondly, based upon this stability criterion, by making use of Lyapunov functional method and designing an adaptive controller, we obtained a condition of a.s. asymptotic adaptive synchronization for neutral-type neural networks with stochastic perturbation and Markovian switching. The synchronization condition is expressed as linear matrix inequality which can be easily solved by Matlab. Finally, we introduced a numerical example to illustrate the effectiveness of the method and result obtained in this paper.

  13. Adaptive pattern recognition by mini-max neural networks as a part of an intelligent processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    In this decade and progressing into 21st Century, NASA will have missions including Space Station and the Earth related Planet Sciences. To support these missions, a high degree of sophistication in machine automation and an increasing amount of data processing throughput rate are necessary. Meeting these challenges requires intelligent machines, designed to support the necessary automations in a remote space and hazardous environment. There are two approaches to designing these intelligent machines. One of these is the knowledge-based expert system approach, namely AI. The other is a non-rule approach based on parallel and distributed computing for adaptive fault-tolerances, namely Neural or Natural Intelligence (NI). The union of AI and NI is the solution to the problem stated above. The NI segment of this unit extracts features automatically by applying Cauchy simulated annealing to a mini-max cost energy function. The feature discovered by NI can then be passed to the AI system for future processing, and vice versa. This passing increases reliability, for AI can follow the NI formulated algorithm exactly, and can provide the context knowledge base as the constraints of neurocomputing. The mini-max cost function that solves the unknown feature can furthermore give us a top-down architectural design of neural networks by means of Taylor series expansion of the cost function. A typical mini-max cost function consists of the sample variance of each class in the numerator, and separation of the center of each class in the denominator. Thus, when the total cost energy is minimized, the conflicting goals of intraclass clustering and interclass segregation are achieved simultaneously.

  14. Entry Abort Determination Using Non-Adaptive Neural Networks for Mars Precision Landers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, Sarah R.; Kranzusch, Kara M.

    2005-01-01

    The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will attempt the first precision landing on Mars using a modified version of the Apollo Earth entry guidance program. The guidance routine, Entry Terminal Point Controller (ETPC), commands the deployment of a supersonic parachute after converging the range to the landing target. For very dispersed cases, ETPC may not converge the range to the target and safely command parachute deployment within Mach number and dynamic pressure constraints. A full-lift up abort can save 85% of these failed trajectories while abandoning the precision landing objective. Though current MSL requirements do not call for an abort capability, an autonomous abort capability may be desired, for this mission or future Mars precision landers, to make the vehicle more robust. The application of artificial neural networks (NNs) as an abort determination technique was evaluated by personnel at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC). In order to implement an abort, a failed trajectory needs to be recognized in real time. Abort determination is dependent upon several trajectory parameters whose relationships to vehicle survival are not well understood, and yet the lander must be trained to recognize unsafe situations. Artificial neural networks (NNs) provide a way to model these parameters and can provide MSL with the artificial intelligence necessary to independently declare an abort. Using the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission as a case study, a non-adaptive NN was designed, trained and tested using Monte Carlo simulations of MSL descent and incorporated into ETPC. Neural network theory, the development history of the MSL NN, and initial testing with severe dust storm entry trajectory cases are discussed in Reference 1 and will not be repeated here. That analysis demonstrated that NNs are capable of recognizing failed descent trajectories and can significantly increase the survivability of MSL for very

  15. Greater Neural Adaptations following High- vs. Low-Load Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Miramonti, Amelia A; Hill, Ethan C; Smith, Cory M; Cochrane-Snyman, Kristen C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel T

    2017-01-01

    We examined the neuromuscular adaptations following 3 and 6 weeks of 80 vs. 30% one repetition maximum (1RM) resistance training to failure in the leg extensors. Twenty-six men (age = 23.1 ± 4.7 years) were randomly assigned to a high- (80% 1RM; n = 13) or low-load (30% 1RM; n = 13) resistance training group and completed leg extension resistance training to failure 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Testing was completed at baseline, 3, and 6 weeks of training. During each testing session, ultrasound muscle thickness and echo intensity, 1RM strength, maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, and contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris were measured. Percent voluntary activation (VA) and electromyographic (EMG) amplitude were measured during MVIC, and during randomly ordered isometric step muscle actions at 10-100% of baseline MVIC. There were similar increases in muscle thickness from Baseline to Week 3 and 6 in the 80 and 30% 1RM groups. However, both 1RM and MVIC strength increased from Baseline to Week 3 and 6 to a greater degree in the 80% than 30% 1RM group. VA during MVIC was also greater in the 80 vs. 30% 1RM group at Week 6, and only training at 80% 1RM elicited a significant increase in EMG amplitude during MVIC. The peak twitch torque to MVIC ratio was also significantly reduced in the 80%, but not 30% 1RM group, at Week 3 and 6. Finally, VA and EMG amplitude were reduced during submaximal torque production as a result of training at 80% 1RM, but not 30% 1RM. Despite eliciting similar hypertrophy, 80% 1RM improved muscle strength more than 30% 1RM, and was accompanied by increases in VA and EMG amplitude during maximal force production. Furthermore, training at 80% 1RM resulted in a decreased neural cost to produce the same relative submaximal torques after training, whereas training at 30% 1RM did not. Therefore, our data suggest that high-load training results in greater neural adaptations that may explain the disparate increases in

  16. Greater Neural Adaptations following High- vs. Low-Load Resistance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel D. M. Jenkins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the neuromuscular adaptations following 3 and 6 weeks of 80 vs. 30% one repetition maximum (1RM resistance training to failure in the leg extensors. Twenty-six men (age = 23.1 ± 4.7 years were randomly assigned to a high- (80% 1RM; n = 13 or low-load (30% 1RM; n = 13 resistance training group and completed leg extension resistance training to failure 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Testing was completed at baseline, 3, and 6 weeks of training. During each testing session, ultrasound muscle thickness and echo intensity, 1RM strength, maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC strength, and contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris were measured. Percent voluntary activation (VA and electromyographic (EMG amplitude were measured during MVIC, and during randomly ordered isometric step muscle actions at 10–100% of baseline MVIC. There were similar increases in muscle thickness from Baseline to Week 3 and 6 in the 80 and 30% 1RM groups. However, both 1RM and MVIC strength increased from Baseline to Week 3 and 6 to a greater degree in the 80% than 30% 1RM group. VA during MVIC was also greater in the 80 vs. 30% 1RM group at Week 6, and only training at 80% 1RM elicited a significant increase in EMG amplitude during MVIC. The peak twitch torque to MVIC ratio was also significantly reduced in the 80%, but not 30% 1RM group, at Week 3 and 6. Finally, VA and EMG amplitude were reduced during submaximal torque production as a result of training at 80% 1RM, but not 30% 1RM. Despite eliciting similar hypertrophy, 80% 1RM improved muscle strength more than 30% 1RM, and was accompanied by increases in VA and EMG amplitude during maximal force production. Furthermore, training at 80% 1RM resulted in a decreased neural cost to produce the same relative submaximal torques after training, whereas training at 30% 1RM did not. Therefore, our data suggest that high-load training results in greater neural adaptations that may explain the

  17. A Neural-Network-Based Nonlinear Adaptive State-Observer for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been some severe nuclear accidents such as Three Mile Island (USA, Chernobyl (Ukraine and Fukushima (Japan, nuclear fission energy is still a source of clean energy that can substitute for fossil fuels in a centralized way and in a great amount with commercial availability and economic competitiveness. Since the pressurized water reactor (PWR is the most widely used nuclear fission reactor, its safe, stable and efficient operation is meaningful to the current rebirth of the nuclear fission energy industry. Power-level regulation is an important technique which can deeply affect the operation stability and efficiency of PWRs. Compared with the classical power-level controllers, the advanced power-level regulators could strengthen both the closed-loop stability and control performance by feeding back the internal state-variables. However, not all of the internal state variables of a PWR can be obtained directly by measurements. To implement advanced PWR power-level control law, it is necessary to develop a state-observer to reconstruct the unmeasurable state-variables. Since a PWR is naturally a complex nonlinear system with parameters varying with power-level, fuel burnup, xenon isotope production, control rod worth and etc., it is meaningful to design a nonlinear observer for the PWR with adaptability to system uncertainties. Due to this and the strong learning capability of the multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural network, an MLP-based nonlinear adaptive observer is given for PWRs. Based upon Lyapunov stability theory, it is proved theoretically that this newly-built observer can provide bounded and convergent state-observation. This observer is then applied to the state-observation of a special PWR, i.e., the nuclear heating reactor (NHR, and numerical simulation results not only verify its feasibility but also give the relationship between the observation performance and observer parameters.

  18. Sensory neural pathways revisited to unravel the temporal dynamics of the Simon effect: A model-based cognitive neuroscience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Yael; de Hollander, Gilles; Forstmann, Birte U

    2017-06-01

    The Simon task is one of the most prominent interference tasks and has been extensively studied in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Despite years of research, the underlying mechanism driving the phenomenon and its temporal dynamics are still disputed. Within the framework of the review, we adopt a model-based cognitive neuroscience approach. We first go over key findings in the literature of the Simon task, discuss competing qualitative cognitive theories and the difficulty of testing them empirically. We then introduce sequential sampling models, a particular class of mathematical cognitive process models. Finally, we argue that the brain architecture accountable for the processing of spatial ('where') and non-spatial ('what') information, could constrain these models. We conclude that there is a clear need to bridge neural and behavioral measures, and that mathematical cognitive models may facilitate the construction of this bridge and work towards revealing the underlying mechanisms of the Simon effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Artificial neural networks and adaptive neuro-fuzzy assessments for ground-coupled heat pump system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esen, Hikmet; Esen, Mehmet [Department of Mechanical Education, Faculty of Technical Education, Firat University, 23119 Elazig (Turkey); Inalli, Mustafa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey); Sengur, Abdulkadir [Department of Electronic and Computer Science, Faculty of Technical Education, Firat University, 23119 Elazig (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    This article present a comparison of artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) applied for modelling a ground-coupled heat pump system (GCHP). The aim of this study is predicting system performance related to ground and air (condenser inlet and outlet) temperatures by using desired models. Performance forecasting is the precondition for the optimal design and energy-saving operation of air-conditioning systems. So obtained models will help the system designer to realize this precondition. The most suitable algorithm and neuron number in the hidden layer are found as Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) with seven neurons for ANN model whereas the most suitable membership function and number of membership functions are found as Gauss and two, respectively, for ANFIS model. The root-mean squared (RMS) value and the coefficient of variation in percent (cov) value are 0.0047 and 0.1363, respectively. The absolute fraction of variance (R{sup 2}) is 0.9999 which can be considered as very promising. This paper shows the appropriateness of ANFIS for the quantitative modeling of GCHP systems. (author)

  20. Fundamental Active Current Adaptive Linear Neural Networks for Photovoltaic Shunt Active Power Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ammirrul Atiqi Mohd Zainuri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents improvement of a harmonics extraction algorithm, known as the fundamental active current (FAC adaptive linear element (ADALINE neural network with the integration of photovoltaic (PV to shunt active power filters (SAPFs as active current source. Active PV injection in SAPFs should reduce dependency on grid supply current to supply the system. In addition, with a better and faster harmonics extraction algorithm, the SAPF should perform well, especially under dynamic PV and load conditions. The role of the actual injection current from SAPF after connecting PVs will be evaluated, and the better effect of using FAC ADALINE will be confirmed. The proposed SAPF was simulated and evaluated in MATLAB/Simulink first. Then, an experimental laboratory prototype was also developed to be tested with a PV simulator (CHROMA 62100H-600S, and the algorithm was implemented using a TMS320F28335 Digital Signal Processor (DSP. From simulation and experimental results, significant improvements in terms of total harmonic distortion (THD, time response and reduction of source power from grid have successfully been verified and achieved.

  1. Differences in the relationship between sensory adaptation of antennae and concentration of aerial pheromone in the oriental fruit moth and obliquebanded leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): implications for the role of adaptation in sex pheromone-mediated mating disruption of these species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, R M; Marshall, D B

    2010-04-01

    The antennae of Grapholita molesta (Busck) are more susceptible to sex pheromone-induced sensory adaptation than the antennae of Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris). Adaptation is detectable in G. molesta at 1/1,000th the aerial concentration of pheromone (i.e., 5.0 x 10(-7) ng Z8-12:OAc/ml air) that is required to induce detectable adaptation in C. rosaceana (i.e., 5.0 x 10(-4) ng Z11-14:OAc/ml air). In addition, the predicted concentration of pheromone required to induce 50% adaptation in G. molesta (i.e., 1.2 x 10(-3) ng Z8-12:OAc/ml air) after 15 min of exposure is only one sixth the estimated aerial concentration required to induce the same level of adaptation in C. rosaceana (i.e., 7.5 x 10(-3) ng Z11-14:OAc/ml air) after 15 min of exposure. Sixteen percent and 28% adaptation of G. molesta antennae is predicted after 15 and 30 min of exposure to the equivalent of 1 ng Z8-12:OAc/m(3) air (i.e., 1 x 10(-6) ng Z8-12:OAc/ml air). The predicted level of adaptation in C. rosaceana antennae, however, is only 1.5 and 9.9% after 15 and 30 min of exposure, respectively, to the equivalent of 1 ng Z11-14:OAc/m(3) air (i.e., 1 x 10(-6) ng Z11-14:OAc/ml air). The approximately three-fold greater level of sensory adaptation in G. molesta antennae after 30 min of exposure to a pheromone concentration measured in pheromone-treated orchards (i.e., 1 ng/m(3)) may be one reason why this species is more readily controlled than C. rosaceana using mating disruption.

  2. Progress Toward Adaptive Integration and Optimization of Automated and Neural Processing Systems: Establishing Neural and Behavioral Benchmarks of Optimized Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    grid, using an Advanced Brain Monitoring (ABM) ×24 system configured with the single-trial event - related potential (ERP) sensor strip and operating...ROC curve BCI brain-computer interface EEG electroencephalogram ERP event - related potential EVUS estimated volume under the surface FOV field of...stations. 15. SUBJECT TERMS rapid serial visual presentation, RSVP, EEG, neural classification, P300 , brain-computer interface 16. SECURITY

  3. Neural adaptations associated with interlimb transfer in a ballistic wrist flexion task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy L Ruddy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1 to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left limb. These were: mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; no visual feedback of either limb; and visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realised through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS.

  4. Neural Adaptations Associated with Interlimb Transfer in a Ballistic Wrist Flexion Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Rudolf, Anne K.; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J.; Carson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE) arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right) limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left) limb. These were: (1) mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; (2) no visual feedback of either limb; and (3) visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realized through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS. PMID:27199722

  5. USING MULTIVARIATE ADAPTIVE REGRESSION SPLINE AND ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK TO SIMULATE URBANIZATION IN MUMBAI, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmadlou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Land use change (LUC models used for modelling urban growth are different in structure and performance. Local models divide the data into separate subsets and fit distinct models on each of the subsets. Non-parametric models are data driven and usually do not have a fixed model structure or model structure is unknown before the modelling process. On the other hand, global models perform modelling using all the available data. In addition, parametric models have a fixed structure before the modelling process and they are model driven. Since few studies have compared local non-parametric models with global parametric models, this study compares a local non-parametric model called multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS, and a global parametric model called artificial neural network (ANN to simulate urbanization in Mumbai, India. Both models determine the relationship between a dependent variable and multiple independent variables. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC to compare the power of the both models for simulating urbanization. Landsat images of 1991 (TM and 2010 (ETM+ were used for modelling the urbanization process. The drivers considered for urbanization in this area were distance to urban areas, urban density, distance to roads, distance to water, distance to forest, distance to railway, distance to central business district, number of agricultural cells in a 7 by 7 neighbourhoods, and slope in 1991. The results showed that the area under the ROC curve for MARS and ANN was 94.77% and 95.36%, respectively. Thus, ANN performed slightly better than MARS to simulate urban areas in Mumbai, India.

  6. An Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure using Geoinformatics and Artificial Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Andre Michael [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-01

    The Adaptive Landscape Classification Procedure (ALCP), which links the advanced geospatial analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems (GISs) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and particularly Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs), is proposed as a method for establishing and reducing complex data relationships. Its adaptive and evolutionary capability is evaluated for situations where varying types of data can be combined to address different prediction and/or management needs such as hydrologic response, water quality, aquatic habitat, groundwater recharge, land use, instrumentation placement, and forecast scenarios. The research presented here documents and presents favorable results of a procedure that aims to be a powerful and flexible spatial data classifier that fuses the strengths of geoinformatics and the intelligence of SOMs to provide data patterns and spatial information for environmental managers and researchers. This research shows how evaluation and analysis of spatial and/or temporal patterns in the landscape can provide insight into complex ecological, hydrological, climatic, and other natural and anthropogenic-influenced processes. Certainly, environmental management and research within heterogeneous watersheds provide challenges for consistent evaluation and understanding of system functions. For instance, watersheds over a range of scales are likely to exhibit varying levels of diversity in their characteristics of climate, hydrology, physiography, ecology, and anthropogenic influence. Furthermore, it has become evident that understanding and analyzing these diverse systems can be difficult not only because of varying natural characteristics, but also because of the availability, quality, and variability of spatial and temporal data. Developments in geospatial technologies, however, are providing a wide range of relevant data, and in many cases, at a high temporal and spatial resolution. Such data resources can take the form of high

  7. Adaptive control of two-wheeled mobile balance robot capable to adapt different surfaces using a novel artificial neural network–based real-time switching dynamic controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Unluturk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a novel real-time artificial neural network–based adaptable switching dynamic controller is developed and practically implemented. It will be used for real-time control of two-wheeled balance robot which can balance itself upright position on different surfaces. In order to examine the efficiency of the proposed controller, a two-wheeled mobile balance robot is designed and a test platform for experimental setup is made for balance problem on different surfaces. In a developed adaptive controller algorithm which is capable to adapt different surfaces, mean absolute target angle deviation error, mean absolute target displacement deviation error and mean absolute controller output data are employed for surface estimation by using artificial neural network. In a designed two-wheeled mobile balance robot system, robot tilt angle is estimated via Kalman filter from accelerometer and gyroscope sensor signals. Furthermore, a visual robot control interface is developed in C++ software development environment so that robot controller parameters can be changed as desired. In addition, robot balance angle, linear displacement and controller output can be observed online on personal computer. According to the real-time experimental results, the proposed novel type controller gives more effective results than the classic ones.

  8. A 41 μW real-time adaptive neural spike classifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zjajo, A.; van Leuken, T.G.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Robust, power- and area-efficient spike classifier, capable of accurate identification of the neural spikes even for low SNR, is a prerequisite for the real-time, implantable, closed-loop brain-machine interface. In this paper, we propose an easily-scalable, 128-channel, programmable, neural spike

  9. Adaptive Output Neural Network Control for a Class of Stochastic Nonlinear Systems With Dead-Zone Nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Bing; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the problem of adaptive output neural network (NN) control for a class of stochastic nonaffine and nonlinear systems with actuator dead-zone inputs. First, based on the intermediate value theorem, a novel design scheme that converts the nonaffine system into the corresponding affine system is developed. In particular, the priori knowledge of the bound of the derivative of the nonaffine and nonlinear functions is removed; then, by employing NNs to approximate the appropriate nonlinear functions, the corresponding adaptive NN tracking controller with the adjustable parameter updated laws is designed through a backstepping technique. Furthermore, it is shown that all the closed-loop signals are bounded in probability, and the system output tracking error can converge to a small neighborhood in the sense of a mean quartic value. Finally, experimental simulations are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed adaptive NN tracking control method.

  10. Advancing interconnect density for spiking neural network hardware implementations using traffic-aware adaptive network-on-chip routers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Snaider; Harkin, Jim; McDaid, Liam; Pande, Sandeep; Cawley, Seamus; McGinley, Brian; Morgan, Fearghal

    2012-09-01

    The brain is highly efficient in how it processes information and tolerates faults. Arguably, the basic processing units are neurons and synapses that are interconnected in a complex pattern. Computer scientists and engineers aim to harness this efficiency and build artificial neural systems that can emulate the key information processing principles of the brain. However, existing approaches cannot provide the dense interconnect for the billions of neurons and synapses that are required. Recently a reconfigurable and biologically inspired paradigm based on network-on-chip (NoC) and spiking neural networks (SNNs) has been proposed as a new method of realising an efficient, robust computing platform. However, the use of the NoC as an interconnection fabric for large-scale SNNs demands a good trade-off between scalability, throughput, neuron/synapse ratio and power consumption. This paper presents a novel traffic-aware, adaptive NoC router, which forms part of a proposed embedded mixed-signal SNN architecture called EMBRACE (EMulating Biologically-inspiRed ArChitectures in hardwarE). The proposed adaptive NoC router provides the inter-neuron connectivity for EMBRACE, maintaining router communication and avoiding dropped router packets by adapting to router traffic congestion. Results are presented on throughput, power and area performance analysis of the adaptive router using a 90 nm CMOS technology which outperforms existing NoCs in this domain. The adaptive behaviour of the router is also verified on a Stratix II FPGA implementation of a 4 × 2 router array with real-time traffic congestion. The presented results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed adaptive NoC router within the EMBRACE architecture to realise large-scale SNNs on embedded hardware. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Behavioral and neural adaptations in response to five weeks of balance training in older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffieux, Jan; Mouthon, Audrey; Keller, Martin; Wälchli, Michael; Taube, Wolfgang

    2017-06-13

    While the positive effect of balance training on age-related impairments in postural stability is well-documented, the neural correlates of such training adaptations in older adults remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to shed more light on neural adaptations in response to balance training in older adults. Postural stability as well as spinal reflex and cortical excitability was measured in older adults (65-80 years) before and after 5 weeks of balance training (n = 15) or habitual activity (n = 13). Postural stability was assessed during one- and two-legged quiet standing on a force plate (static task) and a free-swinging platform (dynamic task). The total sway path was calculated for all tasks. Additionally, the number of errors was counted for the one-legged tasks. To investigate changes in spinal reflex excitability, the H-reflex was assessed in the soleus muscle during quiet upright stance. Cortical excitability was assessed during an antero-posterior perturbation by conditioning the H-reflex with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation. A significant training effect in favor of the training group was found for the number of errors conducted during one-legged standing (p = .050 for the static and p = .042 for the dynamic task) but not for the sway parameters in any task. In contrast, no significant effect was found for cortical excitability (p = 0.703). For spinal excitability, an effect of session (p line with previous results, older adults' postural stability was improved after balance training. However, these improvements were not accompanied by significant neural adaptations. Since almost identical studies in young adults found significant behavioral and neural adaptations after four weeks of training, we assume that age has an influence on the time course of such adaptations to balance training and/or the ability to transfer them from a trained to an untrained task.

  12. Self-Adaptive Prediction of Cloud Resource Demands Using Ensemble Model and Subtractive-Fuzzy Clustering Based Fuzzy Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijia Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In IaaS (infrastructure as a service cloud environment, users are provisioned with virtual machines (VMs. To allocate resources for users dynamically and effectively, accurate resource demands predicting is essential. For this purpose, this paper proposes a self-adaptive prediction method using ensemble model and subtractive-fuzzy clustering based fuzzy neural network (ESFCFNN. We analyze the characters of user preferences and demands. Then the architecture of the prediction model is constructed. We adopt some base predictors to compose the ensemble model. Then the structure and learning algorithm of fuzzy neural network is researched. To obtain the number of fuzzy rules and the initial value of the premise and consequent parameters, this paper proposes the fuzzy c-means combined with subtractive clustering algorithm, that is, the subtractive-fuzzy clustering. Finally, we adopt different criteria to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the method is accurate and effective in predicting the resource demands.

  13. Self-Adaptive Prediction of Cloud Resource Demands Using Ensemble Model and Subtractive-Fuzzy Clustering Based Fuzzy Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijia; Zhu, Yuanchang; Di, Yanqiang; Feng, Shaochong

    2015-01-01

    In IaaS (infrastructure as a service) cloud environment, users are provisioned with virtual machines (VMs). To allocate resources for users dynamically and effectively, accurate resource demands predicting is essential. For this purpose, this paper proposes a self-adaptive prediction method using ensemble model and subtractive-fuzzy clustering based fuzzy neural network (ESFCFNN). We analyze the characters of user preferences and demands. Then the architecture of the prediction model is constructed. We adopt some base predictors to compose the ensemble model. Then the structure and learning algorithm of fuzzy neural network is researched. To obtain the number of fuzzy rules and the initial value of the premise and consequent parameters, this paper proposes the fuzzy c-means combined with subtractive clustering algorithm, that is, the subtractive-fuzzy clustering. Finally, we adopt different criteria to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the method is accurate and effective in predicting the resource demands. PMID:25691896

  14. An FPGA Implementation of a Polychronous Spiking Neural Network with Delay Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runchun; Cohen, Gregory; Stiefel, Klaus M.; Hamilton, Tara Julia; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André

    2013-01-01

    We present an FPGA implementation of a re-configurable, polychronous spiking neural network with a large capacity for spatial-temporal patterns. The proposed neural network generates delay paths de novo, so that only connections that actually appear in the training patterns will be created. This allows the proposed network to use all the axons (variables) to store information. Spike Timing Dependent Delay Plasticity is used to fine-tune and add dynamics to the network. We use a time multiplexing approach allowing us to achieve 4096 (4k) neurons and up to 1.15 million programmable delay axons on a Virtex 6 FPGA. Test results show that the proposed neural network is capable of successfully recalling more than 95% of all spikes for 96% of the stored patterns. The tests also show that the neural network is robust to noise from random input spikes. PMID:23408739

  15. Adaptive Position/Attitude Tracking Control of Aerial Robot With Unknown Inertial Matrix Based on a New Robust Neural Identifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guanyu; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Yun; Chen, C L Philip

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel adaptive controller for controlling an autonomous helicopter with unknown inertial matrix to asymptotically track the desired trajectory. To identify the unknown inertial matrix included in the attitude dynamic model, this paper proposes a new structural identifier that differs from those previously proposed in that it additionally contains a neural networks (NNs) mechanism and a robust adaptive mechanism, respectively. Using the NNs to compensate the unknown aerodynamic forces online and the robust adaptive mechanism to cancel the combination of the overlarge NNs compensation error and the external disturbances, the new robust neural identifier exhibits a better identification performance in the complex flight environment. Moreover, an optimized algorithm is included in the NNs mechanism to alleviate the burdensome online computation. By the strict Lyapunov argument, the asymptotic convergence of the inertial matrix identification error, position tracking error, and attitude tracking error to arbitrarily small neighborhood of the origin is proved. The simulation and implementation results are provided to evaluate the performance of the proposed controller.

  16. Adaptive Wavelet Neural Network Backstepping Sliding Mode Tracking Control for PMSM Drive System

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Da; Li, Muguo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a wavelet neural network backstepping sliding mode controller (WNNBSSM) for permanent-magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) position servo control system. Backstepping sliding mode (BSSM) is utilized to guarantee favorable tracking performance and stability of the whole system, meanwhile, wavelet neural network (WNN) is used for approximating nonlinear uncertainties. The designed controller combined the merits of the backstepping sliding mode control with robust characteristics ...

  17. The increase in surface EMG could be a misleading measure of neural adaptation during the early gains in strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabadzhiev, Todor I; Dimitrov, Vladimir G; Dimitrov, George V

    2014-08-01

    To test the validity of using the increase in surface EMG as a measure of neural adaptation during the early gains in strength. Simulation of EMG signals detected by surface bipolar electrode with 20-mm inter-pole distance at different radial distances from the muscle and longitudinal distances from the end-plate area. The increases in the root mean square (RMS) of the EMG signal due to possible alteration in the neural drive or elevation of the intracellular negative after-potentials, detected in fast fatigable muscle fibres during post-tetanic potentiation and assumed to accompany post-activation potentiation, were compared. Lengthening of the intracellular action potential (IAP) profile due to elevation of the negative after-potentials could affect amplitude characteristics of surface EMG detected at any axial distance stronger than alteration in the neural drive. This was irrespective of the fact that the elevation of IAP negative after-potential was applied to fast fatigable motor units (MUs) only, while changes in frequency of activation (simulating neural drive changes) were applied to all MUs. In deeper muscles, where the fibre-electrode distance was larger, the peripheral effect was more pronounced. The normalization of EMG amplitude characteristics to an M-wave one could result only in partial elimination of peripheral factor influence The increase in RMS of surface EMG during the early gains in strength should not be directly related to the changes in the neural drive. The relatively small but long-lasting elevated free resting calcium after high-resistance strength training could result in force potentiation and EMG increase.

  18. Analysis of the Earth's magnetosphere states using the algorithm of adaptive construction of hierarchical neural network classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenko, Sergey; Svetlov, Vsevolod; Isaev, Igor; Myagkova, Irina

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents analysis of the results of clusterization of the array of increases in the flux of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt of the Earth by two clustering algorithms. One of them is the algorithm for adaptive construction of hierarchical neural network classifiers developed by the authors, applied in clustering mode; the other one is the well-known k-means clusterization algorithm. The obtained clusters are analysed from the point of view of their possible matching to characteristic types of events, the partitions obtained by both methods are compared with each other.

  19. Analysis of the Earth's magnetosphere states using the algorithm of adaptive construction of hierarchical neural network classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolenko Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents analysis of the results of clusterization of the array of increases in the flux of relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt of the Earth by two clustering algorithms. One of them is the algorithm for adaptive construction of hierarchical neural network classifiers developed by the authors, applied in clustering mode; the other one is the well-known k-means clusterization algorithm. The obtained clusters are analysed from the point of view of their possible matching to characteristic types of events, the partitions obtained by both methods are compared with each other.

  20. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Neural Control for Complex Locomotion in Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different...... conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain...... a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present...

  1. A Neural Path Integration Mechanism for Adaptive Vector Navigation in Autonomous Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dennis; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    Animals show remarkable capabilities in navigating their habitat in a fully autonomous and energy-efficient way. In many species, these capabilities rely on a process called path integration, which enables them to estimate their current location and to find their way back home after long......-distance journeys. Path integration is achieved by integrating compass and odometric cues. Here we introduce a neural path integration mechanism that interacts with a neural locomotion control to simulate homing behavior and path integration-related behaviors observed in animals. The mechanism is applied...... to a simulated sixlegged artificial agent. Input signals from an allothetic compass and odometry are sustained through leaky neural integrator circuits, which are then used to compute the home vector by local excitation-global inhibition interactions. The home vector is computed and represented in circular...

  2. An indirect adaptive neural control of a visual-based quadrotor robot for pursuing a moving target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzadeh, Masoud; Amirkhani, Abdollah; Jalali, Aliakbar; Mosavi, Mohammad R

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to use a visual-based control mechanism to control a quadrotor type aerial robot which is in pursuit of a moving target. The nonlinear nature of a quadrotor, on the one hand, and the difficulty of obtaining an exact model for it, on the other hand, constitute two serious challenges in designing a controller for this UAV. A potential solution for such problems is the use of intelligent control methods such as those that rely on artificial neural networks and other similar approaches. In addition to the two mentioned problems, another problem that emerges due to the moving nature of a target is the uncertainty that exists in the target image. By employing an artificial neural network with a Radial Basis Function (RBF) an indirect adaptive neural controller has been designed for a quadrotor robot in search of a moving target. The results of the simulation for different paths show that the quadrotor has efficiently tracked the moving target. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An application of neural network for Structural Health Monitoring of an adaptive wing with an array of FBG sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieloszyk, Magdalena; Skarbek, Lukasz; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw [IFFM PASci, Fiszera14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Krawczuk, Marek, E-mail: mmieloszyk@imp.gda.pl [IFFM PASci, Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk and Technical University of Gdansk, Wlasna Strzecha 18a Street, 80-233, Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-07-19

    This paper presents an application of neural networks to determinate the level of activation of shape memory alloy actuators of an adaptive wing. In this concept the shape of the wing can be controlled and altered thanks to the wing design and the use of integrated shape memory alloy actuators. The wing is assumed as assembled from a number of wing sections that relative positions can be controlled independently by thermal activation of shape memory actuators. The investigated wing is employed with an array of Fibre Bragg Grating sensors. The Fibre Bragg Grating sensors with combination of a neural network have been used to Structural Health Monitoring of the wing condition. The FBG sensors are a great tool to control the condition of composite structures due to their immunity to electromagnetic fields as well as their small size and weight. They can be mounted onto the surface or embedded into the wing composite material without any significant influence on the wing strength. The paper concentrates on analysis of the determination of the twisting moment produced by an activated shape memory alloy actuator. This has been analysed both numerically using the finite element method by a commercial code ABAQUS (registered) and experimentally using Fibre Bragg Grating sensor measurements. The results of the analysis have been then used by a neural network to determine twisting moments produced by each shape memory alloy actuator.

  4. Prediction of the Wrist Joint Position During a Postural Tremor Using Neural Oscillators and an Adaptive Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobravi, Hamid Reza; Ali, Sara Hemmati; Vatandoust, Masood; Marvi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the joint angle position, especially during tremor bursts, can be useful for detecting, tracking, and forecasting tremors. Thus, this research proposes a new model for predicting the wrist joint position during rhythmic bursts and inter-burst intervals. Since a tremor is an approximately rhythmic and roughly sinusoidal movement, neural oscillators have been selected to underlie the proposed model. Two neural oscillators were adopted. Electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles concurrent with the joint angle signals of a stroke subject in an arm constant-posture. The output frequency of each oscillator was equal to the frequency corresponding to the maximum value of power spectrum related to the rhythmic wrist joint angle signals which had been recorded during a postural tremor. The phase shift between the outputs of the two oscillators was equal to the phase shift between the muscle activation of the wrist flexor and extensor muscles. The difference between the two oscillators' output signals was considered the main pattern. Along with a proportional compensator, an adaptive neural controller has adjusted the amplitude of the main pattern in such a way so as to minimize the wrist joint prediction error during a stroke patient's tremor burst and a healthy subject's generated artificial tremor. In regard to the range of wrist joint movement during the observed rhythmic motions, a calculated prediction error is deemed acceptable.

  5. An Adaptive Neural Mechanism with a Lizard Ear Model for Binaural Acoustic Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic tracking of a moving sound source is relevant in many domains including robotic phonotaxis and human-robot interaction. Typical approaches rely on processing time-difference-of-arrival cues obtained via multi-microphone arrays with Kalman or particle filters, or other computationally...... expensive algorithms. We present a novel bioinspired solution to acoustic tracking that uses only two microphones. The system is based on a neural mechanism coupled with a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The peripheral auditory model provides sound direction information which the neural...

  6. Sorting of pistachio nuts using image processing techniques and an adaptive neural-fuzzy inference system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R Abdollahnejad Barough

    2016-04-01

    . Finally, a total amount of the second moment (m2 and matrix vectors of image were selected as features. Features and rules produced from decision tree fed into an Adaptable Neuro-fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS. ANFIS provides a neural network based on Fuzzy Inference System (FIS can produce appropriate output corresponding input patterns. Results and Discussion: The proposed model was trained and tested inside ANFIS Editor of the MATLAB software. 300 images, including closed shell, pithy and empty pistachio were selected for training and testing. This network uses 200 data related to these two features and were trained over 200 courses, the accuracy of the result was 95.8%. 100 image have been used to test network over 40 courses with accuracy 97%. The time for the training and testing steps are 0.73 and 0.31 seconds, respectively, and the time to choose the features and rules was 2.1 seconds. Conclusions: In this study, a model was introduced to sort non- split nuts, blank nuts and filled nuts pistachios. Evaluation of training and testing, shows that the model has the ability to classify different types of nuts with high precision. In the previously proposed methods, merely non-split and split pistachio nuts were sorted and being filled or blank nuts is unrecognizable. Nevertheless, accuracy of the mentioned method is 95.56 percent. As well as, other method sorted non-split and split pistachio nuts with an accuracy of 98% and 85% respectively for training and testing steps. The model proposed in this study is better than the other methods and it is encouraging for the improvement and development of the model.

  7. An adaptive PID like controller using mix locally recurrent neural network for robotic manipulator with variable payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Kumar, Vikas; Gaur, Prerna; Mittal, A P

    2016-05-01

    Being complex, non-linear and coupled system, the robotic manipulator cannot be effectively controlled using classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. To enhance the effectiveness of the conventional PID controller for the nonlinear and uncertain systems, gains of the PID controller should be conservatively tuned and should adapt to the process parameter variations. In this work, a mix locally recurrent neural network (MLRNN) architecture is investigated to mimic a conventional PID controller which consists of at most three hidden nodes which act as proportional, integral and derivative node. The gains of the mix locally recurrent neural network based PID (MLRNNPID) controller scheme are initialized with a newly developed cuckoo search algorithm (CSA) based optimization method rather than assuming randomly. A sequential learning based least square algorithm is then investigated for the on-line adaptation of the gains of MLRNNPID controller. The performance of the proposed controller scheme is tested against the plant parameters uncertainties and external disturbances for both links of the two link robotic manipulator with variable payload (TL-RMWVP). The stability of the proposed controller is analyzed using Lyapunov stability criteria. A performance comparison is carried out among MLRNNPID controller, CSA optimized NNPID (OPTNNPID) controller and CSA optimized conventional PID (OPTPID) controller in order to establish the effectiveness of the MLRNNPID controller. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adaptive neural control of MIMO nonlinear systems with a block-triangular pure-feedback control structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenfeng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Zhang, Yun; Li, Yanan

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents adaptive neural tracking control for a class of uncertain multiinput-multioutput (MIMO) nonlinear systems in block-triangular form. All subsystems within these MIMO nonlinear systems are of completely nonaffine pure-feedback form and allowed to have different orders. To deal with the nonaffine appearance of the control variables, the mean value theorem is employed to transform the systems into a block-triangular strict-feedback form with control coefficients being couplings among various inputs and outputs. A systematic procedure is proposed for the design of a new singularity-free adaptive neural tracking control strategy. Such a design procedure can remove the couplings among subsystems and hence avoids the possible circular control construction problem. As a consequence, all the signals in the closed-loop system are guaranteed to be semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Moreover, the outputs of the systems are ensured to converge to a small neighborhood of the desired trajectories. Simulation studies verify the theoretical findings revealed in this paper.

  9. Adaptive neural network output feedback control for stochastic nonlinear systems with unknown dead-zone and unmodeled dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shaocheng; Wang, Tong; Li, Yongming; Zhang, Huaguang

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses the problem of adaptive neural network output feedback control for a class of stochastic nonlinear strict-feedback systems. The concerned systems have certain characteristics, such as unknown nonlinear uncertainties, unknown dead-zones, unmodeled dynamics and without the direct measurements of state variables. In this paper, the neural networks (NNs) are employed to approximate the unknown nonlinear uncertainties, and then by representing the dead-zone as a time-varying system with a bounded disturbance. An NN state observer is designed to estimate the unmeasured states. Based on both backstepping design technique and a stochastic small-gain theorem, a robust adaptive NN output feedback control scheme is developed. It is proved that all the variables involved in the closed-loop system are input-state-practically stable in probability, and also have robustness to the unmodeled dynamics. Meanwhile, the observer errors and the output of the system can be regulated to a small neighborhood of the origin by selecting appropriate design parameters. Simulation examples are also provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. The specificity of neural responses to music and their relation to voice processing: an fMRI-adaptation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armony, Jorge L; Aubé, William; Angulo-Perkins, Arafat; Peretz, Isabelle; Concha, Luis

    2015-04-23

    Several studies have identified, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a region within the superior temporal gyrus that preferentially responds to musical stimuli. However, in most cases, significant responses to other complex stimuli, particularly human voice, were also observed. Thus, it remains unknown if the same neurons respond to both stimulus types, albeit with different strengths, or whether the responses observed with fMRI are generated by distinct, overlapping neural populations. To address this question, we conducted an fMRI experiment in which short music excerpts and human vocalizations were presented in a pseudo-random order. Critically, we performed an adaptation-based analysis in which responses to the stimuli were analyzed taking into account the category of the preceding stimulus. Our results confirm the presence of a region in the anterior STG that responds more strongly to music than voice. Moreover, we found a music-specific adaptation effect in this area, consistent with the existence of music-preferred neurons. Lack of differences between musicians and non-musicians argues against an expertise effect. These findings provide further support for neural separability between music and speech within the temporal lobe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A practical application and implementation of adaptive techniques using neural networks in autoreclose protection and system control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, I.P.

    1997-12-31

    Reyrolle Protection have carried out research in conjunction with Bath University into applying adaptive techniques to autoreclose schemes and have produced an algorithm based on an artificial neural network which can recognise when it is ``safe to reclose`` and when it is ``unsafe to reclose``. This algorithm is based on examination of the induced voltage on the faulted phase and by applying pattern recognition techniques determines when the secondary arc extinguishes. Significant operational advantages can now be realised using this technology resulting in changes to existing operational philosophy. Conventional autoreclose relays applied to the system have followed the philosophy of ``reclose to restore the system``, but a progression from this philosophy to ``reclose only if safe to do so`` can now be made using this adaptive approach. With this adaptive technique the main requirement remains to protect the investment i.e. the system, by reducing damaging shocks and voltage dips and maintaining continuity of supply. The adaptive technique can be incorporated into a variety of schemes which will act to further this goal in comparison with conventional autoreclose. (Author)

  12. Highly Adaptive Primary Mirror Having Embedded Actuators, Sensors, and Neural Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Xinetics has demonstrated the technology required to fabricate a self-compensating highly adaptive silicon carbide primary mirror system having embedded actuators,...

  13. Robust adaptive fuzzy neural tracking control for a class of unknown ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    difficulties encountered in handling chaotic systems have posed a real need for using some intelligent approaches. The application of neural network and fuzzy logic controllers to chaotic systems was proposed [18–23], which appears to be quite promising. Recently,. FNN incorporated the advantages of fuzzy inference and ...

  14. Social categories shape the neural representation of emotion: evidence from a visual face adaptation task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.; Banaji, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent behavioral studies have shown that emotional expressions are differently perceived depending on the race of a face, and that perception of race cues is influenced by emotional expressions. However, neural processes related to the perception of invariant cues that indicate the

  15. Research of Recurrent Dynamic Neural Networks for Adaptive Control of Complex Dynamic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    of human brain . Neural Dynamic Associative Memory can be considered as an analogue of mechanisms of brain memory that explains processes of forming...4402.85 UAH. Total, without VAT 13164.30 UAH. Pure VAT 2632.86 UAH. Total with VAT

  16. Chaos control of the brushless direct current motor using adaptive dynamic surface control based on neural network with the minimum weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shaohua; Wu, Songli; Gao, Ruizhen

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates chaos control for the brushless DC motor (BLDCM) system by adaptive dynamic surface approach based on neural network with the minimum weights. The BLDCM system contains parameter perturbation, chaotic behavior, and uncertainty. With the help of radial basis function (RBF) neural network to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, the adaptive law is established to overcome uncertainty of the control gain. By introducing the RBF neural network and adaptive technology into the dynamic surface control design, a robust chaos control scheme is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly bounded, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Simulation results are provided to show that the proposed approach works well in suppressing chaos and parameter perturbation.

  17. Chaos control of the brushless direct current motor using adaptive dynamic surface control based on neural network with the minimum weights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shaohua [School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chongqing Aerospace Polytechnic, Chongqing, 400021 (China); Wu, Songli [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chongqing Aerospace Polytechnic, Chongqing, 400021 (China); Gao, Ruizhen [School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates chaos control for the brushless DC motor (BLDCM) system by adaptive dynamic surface approach based on neural network with the minimum weights. The BLDCM system contains parameter perturbation, chaotic behavior, and uncertainty. With the help of radial basis function (RBF) neural network to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions, the adaptive law is established to overcome uncertainty of the control gain. By introducing the RBF neural network and adaptive technology into the dynamic surface control design, a robust chaos control scheme is developed. It is proved that the proposed control approach can guarantee that all signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly bounded, and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin. Simulation results are provided to show that the proposed approach works well in suppressing chaos and parameter perturbation.

  18. Robot manipulator identification based on adaptive multiple-input and multiple-output neural model optimized by advanced differential evolution algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Ngoc Son

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a novel advanced differential evolution method which combines the differential evolution with the modified back-propagation algorithm. This new proposed approach is applied to train an adaptive enhanced neural model for approximating the inverse model of the industrial robot arm. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed modeling procedure using the new identification approach obtains better convergence and more precision than the traditional back-propagation method or the lonely differential evolution approach. Furthermore, the inverse model of the industrial robot arm using the adaptive enhanced neural model performs outstanding results.

  19. A neural model of normal and abnormal learning and memory consolidation: adaptively timed conditioning, hippocampus, amnesia, neurotrophins, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Daniel J; Grossberg, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    How do the hippocampus and amygdala interact with thalamocortical systems to regulate cognitive and cognitive-emotional learning? Why do lesions of thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and cortex have differential effects depending on the phase of learning when they occur? In particular, why is the hippocampus typically needed for trace conditioning, but not delay conditioning, and what do the exceptions reveal? Why do amygdala lesions made before or immediately after training decelerate conditioning while those made later do not? Why do thalamic or sensory cortical lesions degrade trace conditioning more than delay conditioning? Why do hippocampal lesions during trace conditioning experiments degrade recent but not temporally remote learning? Why do orbitofrontal cortical lesions degrade temporally remote but not recent or post-lesion learning? How is temporally graded amnesia caused by ablation of prefrontal cortex after memory consolidation? How are attention and consciousness linked during conditioning? How do neurotrophins, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), influence memory formation and consolidation? Is there a common output path for learned performance? A neural model proposes a unified answer to these questions that overcome problems of alternative memory models.

  20. The influence of cochlear traveling wave and neural adaptation on auditory brainstem responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junius, D.; Dau, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    ), disparities occurred between the responses, reflecting a nonlinearity in the processing when neural activity is integrated across frequency. In the third experiment, the effect of within-train rate on wave-V response was investigated. The response to the chirp presented at a within-train rate of 95 Hz...... processing in the human auditory system. The findings might also be useful for the development of effective stimulation paradigms in clinical applications....

  1. Neural Adaptive Decentralized Coordinated Control with Fault-Tolerant Capability for DFIGs under Stochastic Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ming Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, most methodologies proposed to control over double fed induction generators (DFIGs are based on single machine model, where the interactions from network have been neglected. Considering this, this paper proposes a decentralized coordinated control of DFIG based on the neural interaction measurement observer. An artificial neural network is employed to approximate the nonlinear model of DFIG, and the approximation error due to neural approximation has been considered. A robust stabilization technique is also proposed to override the effect of approximation error. A H2 controller and a H∞ controller are employed to achieve specified engineering purposes, respectively. Then, the controller design is formulated as a mixed H2/H∞ optimization with constrains of regional pole placement and proportional plus integral (PI structure, which can be solved easily by using linear matrix inequality (LMI technology. The results of simulations are presented and discussed, which show the capabilities of DFIG with the proposed control strategy to fault-tolerant control of the maximum power point tracking (MPPT under slight sensor faults, low voltage ride-through (LVRT, and its contribution to power system transient stability support.

  2. Adaptive Neural Coding Dependent on the Time-Varying Statistics of the Somatic Input Current

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jonghan; Koch, Christof; Douglas, Rodney

    1999-01-01

    It is generally assumed that nerve cells optimize their performance to reflect the statistics of their input. Electronic circuit analogs of neurons require similar methods of self-optimization for stable and autonomous operation. We here describe and demonstrate a biologically plausible adaptive algorithm that enables a neuron to adapt the current threshold and the slope (or gain) of its current-frequency relationship to match the mean (or dc offset) and variance (or dynamic range or contrast...

  3. Research on Adaptive Neural Network Control System Based on Nonlinear U-Model with Time-Varying Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxia Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available U-model can approximate a large class of smooth nonlinear time-varying delay system to any accuracy by using time-varying delay parameters polynomial. This paper proposes a new approach, namely, U-model approach, to solving the problems of analysis and synthesis for nonlinear systems. Based on the idea of discrete-time U-model with time-varying delay, the identification algorithm of adaptive neural network is given for the nonlinear model. Then, the controller is designed by using the Newton-Raphson formula and the stability analysis is given for the closed-loop nonlinear systems. Finally, illustrative examples are given to show the validity and applicability of the obtained results.

  4. Adaptive neural control for dual-arm coordination of humanoid robot with unknown nonlinearities in output mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Chen, Ci; Zhang, Yun; Chen, C L P

    2015-03-01

    To achieve an excellent dual-arm coordination of the humanoid robot, it is essential to deal with the nonlinearities existing in the system dynamics. The literatures so far on the humanoid robot control have a common assumption that the problem of output hysteresis could be ignored. However, in the practical applications, the output hysteresis is widely spread; and its existing limits the motion/force performances of the robotic system. In this paper, an adaptive neural control scheme, which takes the unknown output hysteresis and computational efficiency into account, is presented and investigated. In the controller design, the prior knowledge of system dynamics is assumed to be unknown. The motion error is guaranteed to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin by Lyapunov's stability theory. Simultaneously, the internal force is kept bounded and its error can be made arbitrarily small.

  5. Adaptiveness in monotone pseudo-Boolean optimization and stochastic neural computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Giuliano

    2009-08-01

    Hopfield neural network (HNN) is a nonlinear computational model successfully applied in finding near-optimal solutions of several difficult combinatorial problems. In many cases, the network energy function is obtained through a learning procedure so that its minima are states falling into a proper subspace (feasible region) of the search space. However, because of the network nonlinearity, a number of undesirable local energy minima emerge from the learning procedure, significantly effecting the network performance. In the neural model analyzed here, we combine both a penalty and a stochastic process in order to enhance the performance of a binary HNN. The penalty strategy allows us to gradually lead the search towards states representing feasible solutions, so avoiding oscillatory behaviors or asymptotically instable convergence. Presence of stochastic dynamics potentially prevents the network to fall into shallow local minima of the energy function, i.e., quite far from global optimum. Hence, for a given fixed network topology, the desired final distribution on the states can be reached by carefully modulating such process. The model uses pseudo-Boolean functions both to express problem constraints and cost function; a combination of these two functions is then interpreted as energy of the neural network. A wide variety of NP-hard problems fall in the class of problems that can be solved by the model at hand, particularly those having a monotonic quadratic pseudo-Boolean function as constraint function. That is, functions easily derived by closed algebraic expressions representing the constraint structure and easy (polynomial time) to maximize. We show the asymptotic convergence properties of this model characterizing its state space distribution at thermal equilibrium in terms of Markov chain and give evidence of its ability to find high quality solutions on benchmarks and randomly generated instances of two specific problems taken from the computational graph

  6. Power maximization of variable-speed variable-pitch wind turbines using passive adaptive neural fault tolerant control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Hamed; Rahimi Nohooji, Hamed; Howard, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Power maximization has always been a practical consideration in wind turbines. The question of how to address optimal power capture, especially when the system dynamics are nonlinear and the actuators are subject to unknown faults, is significant. This paper studies the control methodology for variable-speed variable-pitch wind turbines including the effects of uncertain nonlinear dynamics, system fault uncertainties, and unknown external disturbances. The nonlinear model of the wind turbine is presented, and the problem of maximizing extracted energy is formulated by designing the optimal desired states. With the known system, a model-based nonlinear controller is designed; then, to handle uncertainties, the unknown nonlinearities of the wind turbine are estimated by utilizing radial basis function neural networks. The adaptive neural fault tolerant control is designed passively to be robust on model uncertainties, disturbances including wind speed and model noises, and completely unknown actuator faults including generator torque and pitch actuator torque. The Lyapunov direct method is employed to prove that the closed-loop system is uniformly bounded. Simulation studies are performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Asynchronous BCI and local neural classifiers: an overview of the Adaptive Brain Interface project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José del R; Mouriño, Josep

    2003-06-01

    In this communication, we give an overview of our work on an asynchronous brain-computer interface (where the subject makes self-paced decisions on when to switch from one mental task to the next) that responds every 0.5 s. A local neural classifier tries to recognize three different mental tasks; it may also respond "unknown" for uncertain samples as the classifier has incorporated statistical rejection criteria. We report our experience with 15 subjects. We also briefly describe two brain-actuated applications we have developed: a virtual keyboard and a mobile robot (emulating a motorized wheelchair).

  8. Neural substrates of normal and impaired preattentive sensory discrimination in large cohorts of nonpsychiatric subjects and schizophrenia patients as indexed by MMN and P3a change detection responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Rissling, Anthony J; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto; Kirihara, Kenji; Pela, Marlena; Sprock, Joyce; Braff, David L; Light, Gregory A

    2013-02-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) patients have information processing deficits, spanning from low level sensory processing to higher-order cognitive functions. Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are event-related potential (ERP) components that are automatically elicited in response to unattended changes in ongoing, repetitive stimuli that provide a window into abnormal information processing in SZ. MMN and P3a are among the most robust and consistently identified deficits in SZ, yet the neural substrates of these responses and their associated deficits in SZ are not fully understood. This study examined the neural sources of MMN and P3a components in a large cohort of SZ and nonpsychiatric control subjects (NCS) using Exact Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Analyses (eLORETA) in order to identify the neural sources of MMN and P3a as well as the brain regions associated with deficits commonly observed among SZ patients. 410 SZ and 247 NCS underwent EEG testing using a duration-deviant auditory oddball paradigm (1-kHz tones, 500ms SOA; standard p=0.90, 50-ms duration; deviant tones P=0.10, 100-ms duration) while passively watching a silent video. Voxel-by-voxel within- (MMN vs. P3a) and between-group (SZ vs. NCS) comparisons were performed using eLORETA. SZ had robust deficits in MMN and P3a responses measured at scalp electrodes consistent with other studies. These components mapped onto neural sources broadly distributed across temporal, frontal, and parietal regions. MMN deficits in SZ were associated with reduced activations in discrete medial frontal brain regions, including the anterior-posterior cingulate and medial frontal gyri. These early sensory discriminatory MMN impairments were followed by P3a deficits associated with widespread reductions in the activation of attentional networks (frontal, temporal, parietal regions), reflecting impaired orienting or shifts of attention to the infrequent stimuli. MMN and P3a are dissociable responses associated with broadly

  9. Neural substrates of normal and impaired preattentive sensory discrimination in large cohorts of nonpsychiatric subjects and schizophrenia patients as indexed by MMN and P3a change detection responses☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Rissling, Anthony J.; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto; Kirihara, Kenji; Pela, Marlena; Sprock, Joyce; Braff, David L.; Light, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Schizophrenia (SZ) patients have information processing deficits, spanning from low level sensory processing to higher-order cognitive functions. Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are event-related potential (ERP) components that are automatically elicited in response to unattended changes in ongoing, repetitive stimuli that provide a window into abnormal information processing in SZ. MMN and P3a are among the most robust and consistently identified deficits in SZ, yet the neural substrates of these responses and their associated deficits in SZ are not fully understood. This study examined the neural sources of MMN and P3a components in a large cohort of SZ and nonpsychiatric control subjects (NCS) using Exact Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Analyses (eLORETA) in order to identify the neural sources of MMN and P3a as well as the brain regions associated with deficits commonly observed among SZ patients. Methods 410 SZ and 247 NCS underwent EEG testing using a duration-deviant auditory oddball paradigm (1-kHz tones, 500 ms SOA; standard p=0.90, 50-ms duration; deviant tones P=0.10, 100-ms duration) while passively watching a silent video. Voxel-by-voxel within- (MMN vs. P3a) and between-group (SZ vs. NCS) comparisons were performed using eLORETA. Results SZ had robust deficits in MMN and P3a responses measured at scalp electrodes consistent with other studies. These components mapped onto neural sources broadly distributed across temporal, frontal, and parietal regions. MMN deficits in SZ were associated with reduced activations in discrete medial frontal brain regions, including the anterior–posterior cingulate and medial frontal gyri. These early sensory discriminatory MMN impairments were followed by P3a deficits associated with widespread reductions in the activation of attentional networks (frontal, temporal, parietal regions), reflecting impaired orienting or shifts of attention to the infrequent stimuli. Conclusions MMN and P3a are

  10. Evaluation of a Neural-Network-Based adaptive Beamforming Scheme with Magnitude-Only Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldi, G.; Galdi, V.; Gerini, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive beamforming scheme for smart antenna arrays in the presence of several desired and interfering signals, and additive white Gaussian noise. As compared with standard schemes, the proposed algorithm minimizes the noise and interference contributions, but enforces

  11. Sensory Feedback Plays a Significant Role in Generating Walking Gait and in Gait Transition in Salamanders: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harischandra, Nalin; Knuesel, Jeremie; Kozlov, Alexander; Bicanski, Andrej; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie; Ijspeert, Auke; Ekeberg, Örjan

    2011-01-01

    Here, we investigate the role of sensory feedback in gait generation and transition by using a three-dimensional, neuro-musculo-mechanical model of a salamander with realistic physical parameters. Activation of limb and axial muscles were driven by neural output patterns obtained from a central pattern generator (CPG) which is composed of simulated spiking neurons with adaptation. The CPG consists of a body-CPG and four limb-CPGs that are interconnected via synapses both ipsilaterally and contralaterally. We use the model both with and without sensory modulation and four different combinations of ipsilateral and contralateral coupling between the limb-CPGs. We found that the proprioceptive sensory inputs are essential in obtaining a coordinated lateral sequence walking gait (walking). The sensory feedback includes the signals coming from the stretch receptor like intraspinal neurons located in the girdle regions and the limb stretch receptors residing in the hip and scapula regions of the salamander. On the other hand, walking trot gait (trotting) is more under central (CPG) influence compared to that of the peripheral or sensory feedback. We found that the gait transition from walking to trotting can be induced by increased activity of the descending drive coming from the mesencephalic locomotor region and is helped by the sensory inputs at the hip and scapula regions detecting the late stance phase. More neurophysiological experiments are required to identify the precise type of mechanoreceptors in the salamander and the neural mechanisms mediating the sensory modulation. PMID:22069388

  12. Sensory feedback plays a significant role in generating walking gait and in gait transition in salamanders: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin eHarischandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, we use a three-dimensional, neuro-musculo-mechanical model of a salamander with realistic physical parameters in order to investigate the role of sensory feedback in gait generation and transition. Activation of limb and axial muscles were driven by neural output patterns obtained from a central pattern generator (CPG which is composed of simulated spiking neurons with adaptation. The CPG consists of a body CPG and four limb CPGs that are interconnected via synapses both ipsilateraly and contralaterally. We use the model both with and without sensory modulation and for different combinations of ipsilateral and contralateral coupling between the limb CPGs. We found that the proprioceptive sensory inputs are essential in obtaining a coordinated walking gait. The sensory feedback includes the signals coming from the stretch receptor like intraspinal neurons located in the girdle regions and the limb stretch receptors residing in the hip and scapula regions of the salamander. On the other hand, coordinated motor output patterns for the trotting gait were obtainable without the sensory inputs. We found that the gait transition from walking to trotting can be induced by increased activity of the descending drive coming from the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR and is helped by the sensory inputs at the hip and scapula regions detecting the late stance phase. More neurophysiological experiments are required to identify the precise type of mechanoreceptors in the salamander and the neural mechanisms mediating the sensory modulation.

  13. An adaptive neural mechanism for acoustic motion perception with varying sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    .e. extracting information about its direction and velocity. Here we focus on auditory motion perception of sound stimuli, which is poorly understood as compared to its visual counterpart. In earlier work we have developed a bio-inspired neural learning mechanism for acoustic motion perception. The mechanism...... extracts directional information via a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The mechanism uses only this directional information obtained via specific motor behaviour to learn the angular velocity of unoccluded sound stimuli in motion. In nature however the stimulus being tracked may...... be occluded by artefacts in the environment, such as an escaping prey momentarily disappearing behind a cover of trees. This article extends the earlier work by presenting a comparative investigation of auditory motion perception for unoccluded and occluded tonal sound stimuli with a frequency of 2.2 k...

  14. Neural network-based optimal adaptive output feedback control of a helicopter UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodland, David; Zargarzadeh, Hassan; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2013-07-01

    Helicopter unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are widely used for both military and civilian operations. Because the helicopter UAVs are underactuated nonlinear mechanical systems, high-performance controller design for them presents a challenge. This paper introduces an optimal controller design via an output feedback for trajectory tracking of a helicopter UAV, using a neural network (NN). The output-feedback control system utilizes the backstepping methodology, employing kinematic and dynamic controllers and an NN observer. The online approximator-based dynamic controller learns the infinite-horizon Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation in continuous time and calculates the corresponding optimal control input by minimizing a cost function, forward-in-time, without using the value and policy iterations. Optimal tracking is accomplished by using a single NN utilized for the cost function approximation. The overall closed-loop system stability is demonstrated using Lyapunov analysis. Finally, simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control design for trajectory tracking.

  15. A review on intelligent sensory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, H. J.; Tang, S. Y.; Teo, K. T. K.; Loh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Sensory evaluation plays an important role in the quality control of food productions. Sensory data obtained through sensory evaluation are generally subjective, vague and uncertain. Classically, factorial multivariate methods such as Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Partial Least Square (PLS) method, Multiple Regression (MLR) method and Response Surface Method (RSM) are the common tools used to analyse sensory data. These methods can model some of the sensory data but may not be robust enough to analyse nonlinear data. In these situations, intelligent modelling techniques such as Fuzzy Logic and Artificial neural network (ANNs) emerged to solve the vagueness and uncertainty of sensory data. This paper outlines literature of intelligent sensory modelling on sensory data analysis.

  16. Automated detection of semagram-laden images using adaptive neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkez, Paul S.; Cannady, James D.

    2012-04-01

    Digital steganography is gaining wide acceptance in the world of electronic copyright stamping. Digital media that are easy to steal, such as graphics, photos and audio files, are being tagged with both visible and invisible copyright stamps (known as digital watermarking). However, these same techniques can also be used to hide communications between actors in criminal or covert activities. An inherent difficulty in detecting steganography is overcoming the variety of methods for hiding a message and the multitude of choices of available media. Another problem in steganography defense is the issue of detection speed since the encoded data is frequently time-sensitive. When a message is visually transmitted in a non-textual format (i.e., in an image) it is referred to as a semagram. Semagrams are relatively easy to create, but very difficult to detect. While steganography can often be identified by detecting digital modifications to an image's structure, an image-based semagram is more difficult because the message is the image itself. The work presented describes the creation of a novel, computer-based application, which uses hybrid hierarchical neural network architecture to detect the likely presence of a semagram message in an image. The prototype system was used to detect semagrams containing Morse Code messages. Based on the results of these experiments our approach provides a significant advance in the detection of complex semagram patterns. Specific results of the experiments and the potential practical applications of the neural network-based technology are discussed. This presentation provides the final results of our research experiments.

  17. PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF A BATCH POLYMERIZATION SYSTEM USING A FEEDFORWARD NEURAL NETWORK WITH ONLINE ADAPTATION BY GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cancelier

    Full Text Available Abstract This study used a predictive controller based on an empirical nonlinear model comprising a three-layer feedforward neural network for temperature control of the suspension polymerization process. In addition to the offline training technique, an algorithm was also analyzed for online adaptation of its parameters. For the offline training, the network was statically trained and the genetic algorithm technique was used in combination with the least squares method. For online training, the network was trained on a recurring basis and only the technique of genetic algorithms was used. In this case, only the weights and bias of the output layer neuron were modified, starting from the parameters obtained from the offline training. From the experimental results obtained in a pilot plant, a good performance was observed for the proposed control system, with superior performance for the control algorithm with online adaptation of the model, particularly with respect to the presence of off-set for the case of the fixed parameters model.

  18. Neural correlates of the age-related changes in motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley R King

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As the world’s population ages, a deeper understanding of the relationship between aging and motor learning will become increasingly relevant in basic research and applied settings. In this context, this review aims to address the effects of age on motor sequence learning (MSL and motor adaptation (MA with respect to behavioral, neurological and neuroimaging findings. Previous behavioral research investigating the influence of aging on motor learning has consistently reported the following results. First, the initial acquisition of motor sequences is not altered, except under conditions of increased task complexity. Second, older adults demonstrate deficits in motor sequence memory consolidation. And, third, although older adults demonstrate deficits during the exposure phase of MA paradigms, the aftereffects following removal of the sensorimotor perturbation are similar to young adults, suggesting that the adaptive ability of older adults is relatively intact. This paper will review the potential neural underpinnings of these behavioral results, with a particular emphasis on the influence of age-related dysfunctions in the cortico-striatal system on motor learning.

  19. A neural network-based design of an on-off adaptive control for Deep Brain Stimulation in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pitamber; Basu, Ishita; Graupe, Daniel; Tuninetti, Daniela; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2012-01-01

    The current Food and Drug Administration approved system for the treatment of tremor disorders through Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the area of the brain that controls movement, operates open-loop. It does not automatically adapt to the instantaneous patient's needs or to the progression of the disease. This paper demonstrates an adaptive closed-loop controlled DBS that, after switching off stimulation, tracks few physiological signals to predict the reappearance of tremor before the patient experiences discomfort, at which point it instructs the DBS controller to switch on stimulation again. The core of the proposed approach is a Neural Network (NN) which effectively extracts tremor predictive information from non-invasively recorded surface-electromyogram(sEMG) and accelerometer signals measured at the symptomatic extremities. A simple feed-forward back-propagation NN architecture is shown to successfully predict tremor in 31 out of 33 trials in two Parkinson's Disease patients with an overall accuracy of 75.8% and sensitivity of 92.3%. This work therefore shows that closed-loop DBS control is feasible in the near future and that it can be achieved without modifications of the electrodes implanted in the brain, i.e., is backward compatible with approved DBS systems.

  20. Normal perception of Mooney faces in developmental prosopagnosia: Evidence from the N170 component and rapid neural adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towler, John; Gosling, Angela; Duchaine, Bradley; Eimer, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have a severe difficulty recognizing the faces of known individuals in the absence of any history of neurological damage. These recognition problems may be linked to selective deficits in the holistic/configural processing of faces. We used two-tone Mooney images to study the processing of faces versus non-face objects in DP when it is based on holistic information (or the facial gestalt) in the absence of obvious local cues about facial features. A rapid adaptation procedure was employed for a group of 16 DPs. Naturalistic photographs of upright faces were preceded by upright or inverted Mooney faces or by Mooney houses. DPs showed face-sensitive N170 components in response to Mooney faces versus houses, and N170 amplitude reductions for inverted as compared to upright Mooney faces. They also showed the typical pattern of N170 adaptation effects, with reduced N170 components when upright naturalistic test faces were preceded by upright Mooney faces, demonstrating that the perception of Mooney and naturalistic faces recruits shared neural populations. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with DP can utilize global information about face configurations for categorical discriminations between faces and non-face objects, and suggest that face processing deficits emerge primarily at more fine-grained higher level stages of face perception. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Behavioral and neural Darwinism: selectionist function and mechanism in adaptive behavior dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, J J

    2010-05-01

    An evolutionary theory of behavior dynamics and a theory of neuronal group selection share a common selectionist framework. The theory of behavior dynamics instantiates abstractly the idea that behavior is selected by its consequences. It implements Darwinian principles of selection, reproduction, and mutation to generate adaptive behavior in virtual organisms. The behavior generated by the theory has been shown to be quantitatively indistinguishable from that of live organisms. The theory of neuronal group selection suggests a mechanism whereby the abstract principles of the evolutionary theory may be implemented in the nervous systems of biological organisms. According to this theory, groups of neurons subserving behavior may be selected by synaptic modifications that occur when the consequences of behavior activate value systems in the brain. Together, these theories constitute a framework for a comprehensive account of adaptive behavior that extends from brain function to the behavior of whole organisms in quantitative detail. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Complementary fMRI and EEG evidence for more efficient neural processing of rhythmic vs. unpredictably timed sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Atteveldt, N.M.; Musacchia, G.; Zion-Golumbic, E.; Sehatpour, P.; Javitt, D.C.; Schroeder, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    The brain's fascinating ability to adapt its internal neural dynamics to the temporal structure of the sensory environment is becoming increasingly clear. It is thought to be metabolically beneficial to align ongoing oscillatory activity to the relevant inputs in a predictable stream, so that they

  3. Using Adaptive Neural-Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS for Demand Forecasting and an Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Doğan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid increase in global competition among organizations and companies, rational approaches in decision making have become indispensable for organizations in today’s world. Establishing a safe and robust path through uncertainties and risks depends on the decision units’ ability of using scientific methods as well as technology. Demand forecasting is known to be one of the most critical problems in organizations.  A company which supports its demand forecasting mechanism with scientific methodologies could increase its productivity and efficiency in all other functions. New methods, such as fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks are frequently being used as a decision-making mechanism in organizations and companies recently.  In this study, it is aimed to solve a critical demand forecasting problem with ANFIS. In the first phase of the study, the factors which impact demand forecasting are determined, and then a database of the model is established using these factors. It has been shown that ANFIS could be used for demand forecasting.

  4. The Lateral Tracking Control for the Intelligent Vehicle Based on Adaptive PID Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gaining; Fu, Weiping; Wang, Wen; Wu, Zongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The intelligent vehicle is a complicated nonlinear system, and the design of a path tracking controller is one of the key technologies in intelligent vehicle research. This paper mainly designs a lateral control dynamic model of the intelligent vehicle, which is used for lateral tracking control. Firstly, the vehicle dynamics model (i.e., transfer function) is established according to the vehicle parameters. Secondly, according to the vehicle steering control system and the CARMA (Controlled Auto-Regression and Moving-Average) model, a second-order control system model is built. Using forgetting factor recursive least square estimation (FFRLS), the system parameters are identified. Finally, a neural network PID (Proportion Integral Derivative) controller is established for lateral path tracking control based on the vehicle model and the steering system model. Experimental simulation results show that the proposed model and algorithm have the high real-time and robustness in path tracing control. This provides a certain theoretical basis for intelligent vehicle autonomous navigation tracking control, and lays the foundation for the vertical and lateral coupling control. PMID:28556817

  5. The Lateral Tracking Control for the Intelligent Vehicle Based on Adaptive PID Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gaining; Fu, Weiping; Wang, Wen; Wu, Zongsheng

    2017-05-30

    The intelligent vehicle is a complicated nonlinear system, and the design of a path tracking controller is one of the key technologies in intelligent vehicle research. This paper mainly designs a lateral control dynamic model of the intelligent vehicle, which is used for lateral tracking control. Firstly, the vehicle dynamics model (i.e., transfer function) is established according to the vehicle parameters. Secondly, according to the vehicle steering control system and the CARMA (Controlled Auto-Regression and Moving-Average) model, a second-order control system model is built. Using forgetting factor recursive least square estimation (FFRLS), the system parameters are identified. Finally, a neural network PID (Proportion Integral Derivative) controller is established for lateral path tracking control based on the vehicle model and the steering system model. Experimental simulation results show that the proposed model and algorithm have the high real-time and robustness in path tracing control. This provides a certain theoretical basis for intelligent vehicle autonomous navigation tracking control, and lays the foundation for the vertical and lateral coupling control.

  6. The Glutamatergic System in Primary Somatosensory Neurons and Its Involvement in Sensory Input-Dependent Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Montoya, Julia; Avendaño, Carlos; Negredo, Pilar

    2017-12-27

    Glutamate is the most common neurotransmitter in both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Glutamate is present in all types of neurons in sensory ganglia, and is released not only from their peripheral and central axon terminals but also from their cell bodies. Consistently, these neurons express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, as well as other molecules involved in the synthesis, transport and release of the neurotransmitter. Primary sensory neurons are the first neurons in the sensory channels, which receive information from the periphery, and are thus key players in the sensory transduction and in the transmission of this information to higher centers in the pathway. These neurons are tightly enclosed by satellite glial cells, which also express several ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, and display increases in intracellular calcium accompanying the release of glutamate. One of the main interests in our group has been the study of the implication of the peripheral nervous system in sensory-dependent plasticity. Recently, we have provided novel evidence in favor of morphological changes in first- and second-order neurons of the trigeminal system after sustained alterations of the sensory input. Moreover, these anatomical changes are paralleled by several molecular changes, among which those related to glutamatergic neurotransmission are particularly relevant. In this review, we will describe the state of the art of the glutamatergic system in sensory ganglia and its involvement in input-dependent plasticity, a fundamental ground for advancing our knowledge of the neural mechanisms of learning and adaptation, reaction to injury, and chronic pain.

  7. Six1 is a key regulator of the developmental and evolutionary architecture of sensory neurons in craniates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Ochi, Haruki; Ikeda, Keiko; Sato, Shigeru; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Ogino, Hajime; Ueno, Naoto; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-29

    Various senses and sensory nerve architectures of animals have evolved during adaptation to exploit diverse environments. In craniates, the trunk sensory system has evolved from simple mechanosensory neurons inside the spinal cord (intramedullary), called Rohon-Beard (RB) cells, to multimodal sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) outside the spinal cord (extramedullary). The fish and amphibian trunk sensory systems switch from RB cells to DRG during development, while amniotes rely exclusively on the DRG system. The mechanisms underlying the ontogenic switching and its link to phylogenetic transition remain unknown. In Xenopus, Six1 overexpression promoted precocious apoptosis of RB cells and emergence of extramedullary sensory neurons, whereas Six1 knockdown delayed the reduction in RB cell number. Genetic ablation of Six1 and Six4 in mice led to the appearance of intramedullary sensory neuron-like cells as a result of medial migration of neural crest cells into the spinal cord and production of immature DRG neurons and fused DRG. Restoration of SIX1 expression in the neural crest-linage partially rescued the phenotype, indicating the cell autonomous requirements of SIX1 for normal extramedullary sensory neurogenesis. Mouse Six1 enhancer that mediates the expression in DRG neurons activated transcription in Xenopus RB cells earlier than endogenous six1 expression, suggesting earlier onset of mouse SIX1 expression than Xenopus during sensory development. The results indicated the critical role of Six1 in transition of RB cells to DRG neurons during Xenopus development and establishment of exclusive DRG system of mice. The study provided evidence that early appearance of SIX1 expression, which correlated with mouse Six1 enhancer, is essential for the formation of DRG-dominant system in mice, suggesting that heterochronic changes in Six1 enhancer sequence play an important role in alteration of trunk sensory architecture and contribute to the evolution of the

  8. Multi-sensory integration in a small brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepner, Ruben; Wolk, Jason; Gershow, Marc

    Understanding how fluctuating multi-sensory stimuli are integrated and transformed in neural circuits has proved a difficult task. To address this question, we study the sensori-motor transformations happening in the brain of the Drosophila larva, a tractable model system with about 10,000 neurons. Using genetic tools that allow us to manipulate the activity of individual brain cells through their transparent body, we observe the stochastic decisions made by freely-behaving animals as their visual and olfactory environments fluctuate independently. We then use simple linear-nonlinear models to correlate outputs with relevant features in the inputs, and adaptive filtering processes to track changes in these relevant parameters used by the larva's brain to make decisions. We show how these techniques allow us to probe how statistics of stimuli from different sensory modalities combine to affect behavior, and can potentially guide our understanding of how neural circuits are anatomically and functionally integrated. Supported by NIH Grant 1DP2EB022359 and NSF Grant PHY-1455015.

  9. Learning structure of sensory inputs with synaptic plasticity leads to interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is often explored as a form of unsupervised adaptation in cortical microcircuits to learn the structure of complex sensory inputs and thereby improve performance of classification and prediction. The question of whether the specific structure of the input patterns is encoded in the structure of neural networks has been largely neglected. Existing studies that have analyzed input-specific structural adaptation have used simplified, synthetic inputs in contrast to complex and noisy patterns found in real-world sensory data. In this work, input-specific structural changes are analyzed for three empirically derived models of plasticity applied to three temporal sensory classification tasks that include complex, real-world visual and auditory data. Two forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and the Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM) plasticity rule are used to adapt the recurrent network structure during the training process before performance is tested on the pattern recognition tasks. It is shown that synaptic adaptation is highly sensitive to specific classes of input pattern. However, plasticity does not improve the performance on sensory pattern recognition tasks, partly due to synaptic interference between consecutively presented input samples. The changes in synaptic strength produced by one stimulus are reversed by the presentation of another, thus largely preventing input-specific synaptic changes from being retained in the structure of the network. To solve the problem of interference, we suggest that models of plasticity be extended to restrict neural activity and synaptic modification to a subset of the neural circuit, which is increasingly found to be the case in experimental neuroscience.

  10. An adaptive artificial neural network model for sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems: application for isolated sites in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellit, A. [Univ. Center of Medea, Inst. of Engineering Sciences, Ain Dahab (Algeria); Benghanem, M. [Univ. of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Algiers (Algeria); Arab, A. Hadj [Development Center of Renewable Energy (CDER), Algiers (Algeria); CIEMAT, Dept. de Energias Renerables, Madrid (Spain); Guessoum, A. [Ministry for the Higher Education and Scientific Research, Algiers (Algeria)

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we investigate, the possibility of using an adaptive Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in order to find a suitable model for sizing Stand-Alone Photovoltaic (SAPV) systems, based on a minimum of input data. The model combines Radial Basis Function (RBF) network and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filter in order to accelerate the convergence of the network. For the sizing of a photovoltaic (PV) systems, we need to determine the optimal sizing coefficients (K{sub PV}, K{sub B}). These coefficients allow us to determine the number of solar panels and storage batteries necessary to satisfy a given consumption, especially in isolated sites where the global solar radiation data is not always available. These coefficients are considered the most important parameters for sizing a PV system. Results obtained by classical models (analytical, numerical, analytical-numerical, B-spline function) and new models like feed-forward (MLP), radial basis function (RBF), MLP-IIR and RBF-IIR are compared with experimental sizing coefficients in order to illustrate the accuracy of the new developed model. This model has been trained by using 200 known optimal sizing coefficients corresponding to 200 locations in Algeria. In this way, the adaptive model was trained to accept and handle a number of unusual cases. The unknown validation sizing coefficients set produced very accurate estimation with a correlation coefficient of 98%. This result indicates that the proposed method can be successfully used for the estimation of optimal sizing coefficients of SAPV systems for any locations in Algeria. The methodology proposed in this paper however, can be generalized using different locations of the world. (Author)

  11. Adaptive eye-gaze tracking using neural-network-based user profiles to assist people with motor disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesin, Anaelis; Adjouadi, Malek; Cabrerizo, Mercedes; Ayala, Melvin; Barreto, Armando

    2008-01-01

    This study developed an adaptive real-time human-computer interface (HCI) that serves as an assistive technology tool for people with severe motor disability. The proposed HCI design uses eye gaze as the primary computer input device. Controlling the mouse cursor with raw eye coordinates results in sporadic motion of the pointer because of the saccadic nature of the eye. Even though eye movements are subtle and completely imperceptible under normal circumstances, they considerably affect the accuracy of an eye-gaze-based HCI. The proposed HCI system is novel because it adapts to each specific user's different and potentially changing jitter characteristics through the configuration and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) that is structured to minimize the mouse jitter. This task is based on feeding the ANN a user's initially recorded eye-gaze behavior through a short training session. The ANN finds the relationship between the gaze coordinates and the mouse cursor position based on the multilayer perceptron model. An embedded graphical interface is used during the training session to generate user profiles that make up these unique ANN configurations. The results with 12 subjects in test 1, which involved following a moving target, showed an average jitter reduction of 35%; the results with 9 subjects in test 2, which involved following the contour of a square object, showed an average jitter reduction of 53%. For both results, the outcomes led to trajectories that were significantly smoother and apt at reaching fixed or moving targets with relative ease and within a 5% error margin or deviation from desired trajectories. The positive effects of such jitter reduction are presented graphically for visual appreciation.

  12. An internal model architecture for novelty detection: implications for cerebellar and collicular roles in sensory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J; Pipe, Anthony G; Prescott, Tony J; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A(2) that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts.

  13. Error-based analysis of optimal tuning functions explains phenomena observed in sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Yaeli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems display impressive capabilities in effectively responding to environmental signals in real time. There is increasing evidence that organisms may indeed be employing near optimal Bayesian calculations in their decision-making. An intriguing question relates to the properties of optimal encoding methods, namely determining the properties of neural populations in sensory layers that optimize performance, subject to physiological constraints. Within an ecological theory of neural encoding/decoding, we show that optimal Bayesian performance requires neural adaptation which reflects environmental changes. Specifically, we predict that neuronal tuning functions possess an optimal width, which increases with prior uncertainty and environmental noise, and decreases with the decoding time window. Furthermore, even for static stimuli, we demonstrate that dynamic sensory tuning functions, acting at relatively short time scales, lead to improved performance. Interestingly, the narrowing of tuning functions as a function of time was recently observed in several biological systems. Such results set the stage for a functional theory which may explain the high reliability of sensory systems, and the utility of neuronal adaptation occurring at multiple time scales.

  14. Neural-Fuzzy Digital Strategy of Continuous-Time Nonlinear Systems Using Adaptive Prediction and Random-Local-Optimization Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ren Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A tracking problem, time-delay, uncertainty and stability analysis of a predictive control system are considered. The predictive control design is based on the input and output of neural plant model (NPM, and a recursive fuzzy predictive tracker has scaling factors which limit the value zone of measured data and cause the tuned parameters to converge to obtain a robust control performance. To improve the further control performance, the proposed random-local-optimization design (RLO for a model/controller uses offline initialization to obtain a near global optimal model/controller. Other issues are the considerations of modeling error, input-delay, sampling distortion, cost, greater flexibility, and highly reliable digital products of the model-based controller for the continuous-time (CT nonlinear system. They are solved by a recommended two-stage control design with the first-stage (offline RLO and second-stage (online adaptive steps. A theorizing method is then put forward to replace the sensitivity calculation, which reduces the calculation of Jacobin matrices of the back-propagation (BP method. Finally, the feedforward input of reference signals helps the digital fuzzy controller improve the control performance, and the technique works to control the CT systems precisely.

  15. Prediction of Tensile Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints with Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Huggett, Daniel J.; Liao, T. Warren; Wahab, Muhammad A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2015-01-01

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process where joint properties are dependent on welding process parameters. In the current study three critical process parameters including spindle speed (??), plunge force (????), and welding speed (??) are considered key factors in the determination of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of welded aluminum alloy joints. A total of 73 weld schedules were welded and tensile properties were subsequently obtained experimentally. It is observed that all three process parameters have direct influence on UTS of the welded joints. Utilizing experimental data, an optimized adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model has been developed to predict UTS of FSW joints. A total of 1200 models were developed by varying the number of membership functions (MFs), type of MFs, and combination of four input variables (??,??,????,??????) utilizing a MATLAB platform. Note EFI denotes an empirical force index derived from the three process parameters. For comparison, optimized artificial neural network (ANN) models were also developed to predict UTS from FSW process parameters. By comparing ANFIS and ANN predicted results, it was found that optimized ANFIS models provide better results than ANN. This newly developed best ANFIS model could be utilized for prediction of UTS of FSW joints.

  16. Prediction of matching condition for a microstrip subsystem using artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Noori, Leila; Abiri, Ebrahim

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a subsystem consisting of a microstrip bandpass filter and a microstrip low noise amplifier (LNA) is designed for WLAN applications. The proposed filter has a small implementation area (49 mm2), small insertion loss (0.08 dB) and wide fractional bandwidth (FBW) (61%). To design the proposed LNA, the compact microstrip cells, an field effect transistor, and only a lumped capacitor are used. It has a low supply voltage and a low return loss (-40 dB) at the operation frequency. The matching condition of the proposed subsystem is predicted using subsystem analysis, artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). To design the proposed filter, the transmission matrix of the proposed resonator is obtained and analysed. The performance of the proposed ANN and ANFIS models is tested using the numerical data by four performance measures, namely the correlation coefficient (CC), the mean absolute error (MAE), the average percentage error (APE) and the root mean square error (RMSE). The obtained results show that these models are in good agreement with the numerical data, and a small error between the predicted values and numerical solution is obtained.

  17. Comparative analysis of an evaporative condenser using artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metin Ertunc, H. [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Kocaeli University, Umuttepe, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Hosoz, Murat [Department of Mechanical Education, Kocaeli University, Umuttepe, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    This study deals with predicting the performance of an evaporative condenser using both artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) techniques. For this aim, an experimental evaporative condenser consisting of a copper tube condensing coil along with air and water circuit elements was developed and equipped with instruments used for temperature, pressure and flow rate measurements. After the condenser was connected to an R134a vapour-compression refrigeration circuit, it was operated at steady state conditions, while varying both dry and wet bulb temperatures of the air stream entering the condenser, air and water flow rates as well as pressure, temperature and flow rate of the entering refrigerant. Using some of the experimental data for training, ANN and ANFIS models for the evaporative condenser were developed. These models were used for predicting the condenser heat rejection rate, refrigerant temperature leaving the condenser along with dry and wet bulb temperatures of the leaving air stream. Although it was observed that both ANN and ANFIS models yielded a good statistical prediction performance in terms of correlation coefficient, mean relative error, root mean square error and absolute fraction of variance, the accuracies of ANFIS predictions were usually slightly better than those of ANN predictions. This study reveals that, having an extended prediction capability compared to ANN, the ANFIS technique can also be used for predicting the performance of evaporative condensers. (author)

  18. Emergence of resonances in neural systems: the interplay between adaptive threshold and short-term synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F Mejias

    Full Text Available In this work we study the detection of weak stimuli by spiking (integrate-and-fire neurons in the presence of certain level of noisy background neural activity. Our study has focused in the realistic assumption that the synapses in the network present activity-dependent processes, such as short-term synaptic depression and facilitation. Employing mean-field techniques as well as numerical simulations, we found that there are two possible noise levels which optimize signal transmission. This new finding is in contrast with the classical theory of stochastic resonance which is able to predict only one optimal level of noise. We found that the complex interplay between adaptive neuron threshold and activity-dependent synaptic mechanisms is responsible for this new phenomenology. Our main results are confirmed by employing a more realistic FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model, which displays threshold variability, as well as by considering more realistic stochastic synaptic models and realistic signals such as poissonian spike trains.

  19. A Unified Approach to Adaptive Neural Control for Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems With Nonlinear Dead-Zone Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Gao, Ying; Tong, Shaocheng; Chen, C L Philip

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an effective adaptive control approach is constructed to stabilize a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems, which contain unknown functions, unknown dead-zone input, and unknown control direction. Different from linear dead zone, the dead zone, in this paper, is a kind of nonlinear dead zone. To overcome the noncausal problem, which leads to the control scheme infeasible, the systems can be transformed into a m -step-ahead predictor. Due to nonlinear dead-zone appearance, the transformed predictor still contains the nonaffine function. In addition, it is assumed that the gain function of dead-zone input and the control direction are unknown. These conditions bring about the difficulties and the complicacy in the controller design. Thus, the implicit function theorem is applied to deal with nonaffine dead-zone appearance, the problem caused by the unknown control direction can be resolved through applying the discrete Nussbaum gain, and the neural networks are used to approximate the unknown function. Based on the Lyapunov theory, all the signals of the resulting closed-loop system are proved to be semiglobal uniformly ultimately bounded. Moreover, the tracking error is proved to be regulated to a small neighborhood around zero. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a simulation example.

  20. Application of Reinforcement Learning Algorithms for the Adaptive Computation of the Smoothing Parameter for Probabilistic Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusy, Maciej; Zajdel, Roman

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we propose new methods for the choice and adaptation of the smoothing parameter of the probabilistic neural network (PNN). These methods are based on three reinforcement learning algorithms: Q(0)-learning, Q(λ)-learning, and stateless Q-learning. We regard three types of PNN classifiers: the model that uses single smoothing parameter for the whole network, the model that utilizes single smoothing parameter for each data attribute, and the model that possesses the matrix of smoothing parameters different for each data variable and data class. Reinforcement learning is applied as the method of finding such a value of the smoothing parameter, which ensures the maximization of the prediction ability. PNN models with smoothing parameters computed according to the proposed algorithms are tested on eight databases by calculating the test error with the use of the cross validation procedure. The results are compared with state-of-the-art methods for PNN training published in the literature up to date and, additionally, with PNN whose sigma is determined by means of the conjugate gradient approach. The results demonstrate that the proposed approaches can be used as alternative PNN training procedures.

  1. Adaptive prognosis of lithium-ion batteries based on the combination of particle filters and radial basis function neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarufatti, Claudio; Corbetta, Matteo; Giglio, Marco; Cadini, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Lithium-Ion rechargeable batteries are widespread power sources with applications to consumer electronics, electrical vehicles, unmanned aerial and spatial vehicles, etc. The failure to supply the required power levels may lead to severe safety and economical consequences. Thus, in view of the implementation of adequate maintenance strategies, the development of diagnostic and prognostic tools for monitoring the state of health of the batteries and predicting their remaining useful life is becoming a crucial task. Here, we propose a method for predicting the end of discharge of Li-Ion batteries, which stems from the combination of particle filters with radial basis function neural networks. The major innovation lies in the fact that the radial basis function model is adaptively trained on-line, i.e., its parameters are identified in real time by the particle filter as new observations of the battery terminal voltage become available. By doing so, the prognostic algorithm achieves the flexibility needed to provide sound end-of-discharge time predictions as the charge-discharge cycles progress, even in presence of anomalous behaviors due to failures or unforeseen operating conditions. The method is demonstrated with reference to actual Li-Ion battery discharge data contained in the prognostics data repository of the NASA Ames Research Center database.

  2. Integration of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System, Neural Networks and Geostatistical Methods for Fracture Density Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja’fari A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image logs provide useful information for fracture study in naturally fractured reservoir. Fracture dip, azimuth, aperture and fracture density can be obtained from image logs and have great importance in naturally fractured reservoir characterization. Imaging all fractured parts of hydrocarbon reservoirs and interpreting the results is expensive and time consuming. In this study, an improved method to make a quantitative correlation between fracture densities obtained from image logs and conventional well log data by integration of different artificial intelligence systems was proposed. The proposed method combines the results of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS and Neural Networks (NN algorithms for overall estimation of fracture density from conventional well log data. A simple averaging method was used to obtain a better result by combining results of ANFIS and NN. The algorithm applied on other wells of the field to obtain fracture density. In order to model the fracture density in the reservoir, we used variography and sequential simulation algorithms like Sequential Indicator Simulation (SIS and Truncated Gaussian Simulation (TGS. The overall algorithm applied to Asmari reservoir one of the SW Iranian oil fields. Histogram analysis applied to control the quality of the obtained models. Results of this study show that for higher number of fracture facies the TGS algorithm works better than SIS but in small number of fracture facies both algorithms provide approximately same results.

  3. Million city traveling salesman problem solution by divide and conquer clustering with adaptive resonance neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Samuel A; Wunsch, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) is a very hard optimization problem in the field of operations research. It has been shown to be NP-complete, and is an often-used benchmark for new optimization techniques. One of the main challenges with this problem is that standard, non-AI heuristic approaches such as the Lin-Kernighan algorithm (LK) and the chained LK variant are currently very effective and in wide use for the common fully connected, Euclidean variant that is considered here. This paper presents an algorithm that uses adaptive resonance theory (ART) in combination with a variation of the Lin-Kernighan local optimization algorithm to solve very large instances of the TSP. The primary advantage of this algorithm over traditional LK and chained-LK approaches is the increased scalability and parallelism allowed by the divide-and-conquer clustering paradigm. Tours obtained by the algorithm are lower quality, but scaling is much better and there is a high potential for increasing performance using parallel hardware.

  4. Neural indicators of the depth of cognitive processing for user-adaptive neurotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae, I E; Acqualagna, L; Blankertz, B

    2015-08-01

    The ability to infer implicit user variables in realtime and in an unobtrusive way would open a broad variety of applications such as adapting the user interface in human-computer interaction or developing safety assistance systems in industrial workplaces. Such information may be extracted from behavior, peripheral physiology and brain activity. Each of these sensors has its advantages and disadvantages suggesting that finally all available features should be fused. While in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research powerful methods for the real-time extraction of information from brain signals have been developed, comparatively little effort was spent on the extraction of hidden user states. As a further step in this direction, we propose a novel experimental paradigm to study the feasibility of quantifying how deeply presented information is processed in the brain. An investigation of event-related potentials (ERPs) demonstrates the effectiveness of our task in inducing different levels of cognitive processing and shows which features of brain activity provide discriminative information.

  5. Generation of sensory neurons is stimulated by leukemia inhibitory factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, M; Reid, K; Hilton, D J; Bartlett, P F

    1991-01-01

    The processes that regulate the development of peripheral neurons from their precursors in the embryonic neural crest are essentially unknown. In this report, we show that leukemia inhibitory factor stimulates the generation of neurons in cultures of mouse neural crest. These neurons have the morphology of sensory neurons and contain neuropeptides found in mammalian sensory neurons. Consistent with these neurons being of the sensory lineage is the finding that they arise from nondividing prec...

  6. Exponential Antisynchronization Control of Stochastic Memristive Neural Networks with Mixed Time-Varying Delays Based on Novel Delay-Dependent or Delay-Independent Adaptive Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The global exponential antisynchronization in mean square of memristive neural networks with stochastic perturbation and mixed time-varying delays is studied in this paper. Then, two kinds of novel delay-dependent and delay-independent adaptive controllers are designed. With the ability of adapting to environment changes, the proposed controllers can modify their behaviors to achieve the best performance. In particular, on the basis of the differential inclusions theory, inequality theory, and stochastic analysis techniques, several sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the exponential antisynchronization between the drive system and response system. Furthermore, two numerical simulation examples are provided to the validity of the derived criteria.

  7. Neural Plasticity: For Good and Bad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A. R.

    The brain's ability to change its organization and function is necessary for normal development of the nervous system and it makes it possible to adapt to changing demands but it can also cause disorders when going awry. This property, known as neural plasticity, is only evident when induced, very much like genes. Plastic changes may be programmed and providing a ``midcourse correction" during childhood development. If that is not executed in the normal way severe developmental disorders such as autism may results. Normal development of functions and anatomical organization of the brain and the spinal cord depend on appropriate sensory stimulation and motor activations. So-called enriched sensory environments have been shown to be beneficial for cognitive development and enriched acoustic environment may even slow the progression of age-related hearing loss. It is possible that the beneficial effect of physical exercise is achieved through activation of neural plasticity. The beneficial effect of training after trauma to the brain or spinal cord is mainly achieved through shifting functions from damaged brain area to other parts of the central nervous system and adapting these parts to take over the functions that are lost. This is accomplished through activation of neural plasticity. Plastic changes can also be harmful and cause symptoms and signs of disorders such as some forms of chronic pain (central neuropathic pain) and severe tinnitus. We will call such disorders ``plasticity disorders".

  8. Reciprocal inhibition between sensory ASH and ASI neurons modulates nociception and avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Wu, Tai-Hong; Song, Yan-Xue; Ge, Ming-Hai; Su, Chun-Ming; Niu, Wei-Pin; Li, Lan-Lan; Xu, Zi-Jing; Ge, Chang-Li; Al-Mhanawi, Maha T H; Wu, Shi-Ping; Wu, Zheng-Xing

    2015-01-13

    Sensory modulation is essential for animal sensations, behaviours and survival. Peripheral modulations of nociceptive sensations and aversive behaviours are poorly understood. Here we identify a biased cross-inhibitory neural circuit between ASH and ASI sensory neurons. This inhibition is essential to drive normal adaptive avoidance of a CuSO4 (Cu(2+)) challenge in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the circuit, ASHs respond to Cu(2+) robustly and suppress ASIs via electro-synaptically exciting octopaminergic RIC interneurons, which release octopamine (OA), and neuroendocrinally inhibit ASI by acting on the SER-3 receptor. In addition, ASIs sense Cu(2+) and permit a rapid onset of Cu(2+)-evoked responses in Cu(2+)-sensitive ADF neurons via neuropeptides possibly, to inhibit ASHs. ADFs function as interneurons to mediate ASI inhibition of ASHs by releasing serotonin (5-HT) that binds with the SER-5 receptor on ASHs. This elaborate modulation among sensory neurons via reciprocal inhibition fine-tunes the nociception and avoidance behaviour.

  9. Lag synchronization of unknown chaotic delayed Yang-Yang-type fuzzy neural networks with noise perturbation based on adaptive control and parameter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yonghui; Yang, Zijiang; Han, Maoan

    2009-07-01

    This paper considers the lag synchronization (LS) issue of unknown coupled chaotic delayed Yang-Yang-type fuzzy neural networks (YYFCNN) with noise perturbation. Separate research work has been published on the stability of fuzzy neural network and LS issue of unknown coupled chaotic neural networks, as well as its application in secure communication. However, there have not been any studies that integrate the two. Motivated by the achievements from both fields, we explored the benefits of integrating fuzzy logic theories into the study of LS problems and applied the findings to secure communication. Based on adaptive feedback control techniques and suitable parameter identification, several sufficient conditions are developed to guarantee the LS of coupled chaotic delayed YYFCNN with or without noise perturbation. The problem studied in this paper is more general in many aspects. Various problems studied extensively in the literature can be treated as special cases of the findings of this paper, such as complete synchronization (CS), effect of fuzzy logic, and noise perturbation. This paper presents an illustrative example and uses simulated results of this example to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed adaptive scheme. This research also demonstrates the effectiveness of application of the proposed adaptive feedback scheme in secure communication by comparing chaotic masking with fuzziness with some previous studies. Chaotic signal with fuzziness is more complex, which makes unmasking more difficult due to the added fuzzy logic.

  10. An Adapting Auditory-motor Feedback Loop Can Contribute to Generating Vocal Repetition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Wittenbach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Consecutive repetition of actions is common in behavioral sequences. Although integration of sensory feedback with internal motor programs is important for sequence generation, if and how feedback contributes to repetitive actions is poorly understood. Here we study how auditory feedback contributes to generating repetitive syllable sequences in songbirds. We propose that auditory signals provide positive feedback to ongoing motor commands, but this influence decays as feedback weakens from response adaptation during syllable repetitions. Computational models show that this mechanism explains repeat distributions observed in Bengalese finch song. We experimentally confirmed two predictions of this mechanism in Bengalese finches: removal of auditory feedback by deafening reduces syllable repetitions; and neural responses to auditory playback of repeated syllable sequences gradually adapt in sensory-motor nucleus HVC. Together, our results implicate a positive auditory-feedback loop with adaptation in generating repetitive vocalizations, and suggest sensory adaptation is important for feedback control of motor sequences.

  11. An Adaptive B-Spline Neural Network and Its Application in Terminal Sliding Mode Control for a Mobile Satcom Antenna Inertially Stabilized Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Yan; Guo, Kai; Li, Gaoliang; Deng, Nianmao

    2017-01-01

    The mobile satcom antenna (MSA) enables a moving vehicle to communicate with a geostationary Earth orbit satellite. To realize continuous communication, the MSA should be aligned with the satellite in both sight and polarization all the time. Because of coupling effects, unknown disturbances, sensor noises and unmodeled dynamics existing in the system, the control system should have a strong adaptability. The significant features of terminal sliding mode control method are robustness and finite time convergence, but the robustness is related to the large switching control gain which is determined by uncertain issues and can lead to chattering phenomena. Neural networks can reduce the chattering and approximate nonlinear issues. In this work, a novel B-spline curve-based B-spline neural network (BSNN) is developed. The improved BSNN has the capability of shape changing and self-adaption. In addition, the output of the proposed BSNN is applied to approximate the nonlinear function in the system. The results of simulations and experiments are also compared with those of PID method, non-singularity fast terminal sliding mode (NFTSM) control and radial basis function (RBF) neural network-based NFTSM. It is shown that the proposed method has the best performance, with reliable control precision. PMID:28452931

  12. Observer-based adaptive fuzzy-neural control for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown dead-zone input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Ning

    2010-10-01

    Based on the universal approximation property of the fuzzy-neural networks, an adaptive fuzzy-neural observer design algorithm is studied for a class of nonlinear SISO systems with both a completely unknown function and an unknown dead-zone input. The fuzzy-neural networks are used to approximate the unknown nonlinear function. Because it is assumed that the system states are unmeasured, an observer needs to be designed to estimate those unmeasured states. In the previous works with the observer design based on the universal approximator, when the dead-zone input appears it is ignored and the stability of the closed-loop system will be affected. In this paper, the proposed algorithm overcomes the affections of dead-zone input for the stability of the systems. Moreover, the dead-zone parameters are assumed to be unknown and will be adjusted adaptively as well as the sign function being introduced to compensate the dead-zone. With the aid of the Lyapunov analysis method, the stability of the closed-loop system is proven. A simulation example is provided to illustrate the feasibility of the control algorithm presented in this paper. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. An Adaptive B-Spline Neural Network and Its Application in Terminal Sliding Mode Control for a Mobile Satcom Antenna Inertially Stabilized Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Yan; Guo, Kai; Li, Gaoliang; Deng, Nianmao

    2017-04-28

    The mobile satcom antenna (MSA) enables a moving vehicle to communicate with a geostationary Earth orbit satellite. To realize continuous communication, the MSA should be aligned with the satellite in both sight and polarization all the time. Because of coupling effects, unknown disturbances, sensor noises and unmodeled dynamics existing in the system, the control system should have a strong adaptability. The significant features of terminal sliding mode control method are robustness and finite time convergence, but the robustness is related to the large switching control gain which is determined by uncertain issues and can lead to chattering phenomena. Neural networks can reduce the chattering and approximate nonlinear issues. In this work, a novel B-spline curve-based B-spline neural network (BSNN) is developed. The improved BSNN has the capability of shape changing and self-adaption. In addition, the output of the proposed BSNN is applied to approximate the nonlinear function in the system. The results of simulations and experiments are also compared with those of PID method, non-singularity fast terminal sliding mode (NFTSM) control and radial basis function (RBF) neural network-based NFTSM. It is shown that the proposed method has the best performance, with reliable control precision.

  14. Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditye, Thomas; Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Walsh, Vincent

    2013-10-22

    Adaptation is an automatic neural mechanism supporting the optimization of visual processing on the basis of previous experiences. While the short-term effects of adaptation on behaviour and physiology have been studied extensively, perceptual long-term changes associated with adaptation are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the integration of adaptation-dependent long-term shifts in neural function is facilitated by sleep. Perceptual shifts induced by adaptation to a distorted image of a famous person were larger in a group of participants who had slept (experiment 1) or merely napped for 90 min (experiment 2) during the interval between adaptation and test compared with controls who stayed awake. Participants' individual rapid eye movement sleep duration predicted the size of post-sleep behavioural adaptation effects. Our data suggest that sleep prevented decay of adaptation in a way that is qualitatively different from the effects of reduced visual interference known as 'storage'. In the light of the well-established link between sleep and memory consolidation, our findings link the perceptual mechanisms of sensory adaptation--which are usually not considered to play a relevant role in mnemonic processes--with learning and memory, and at the same time reveal a new function of sleep in cognition.

  15. Space-time adaptive decision feedback neural receivers with data selection for high-data-rate users in DS-CDMA systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lamare, Rodrigo C; Sampaio-Neto, Raimundo

    2008-11-01

    A space-time adaptive decision feedback (DF) receiver using recurrent neural networks (RNNs) is proposed for joint equalization and interference suppression in direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) systems equipped with antenna arrays. The proposed receiver structure employs dynamically driven RNNs in the feedforward section for equalization and multiaccess interference (MAI) suppression and a finite impulse response (FIR) linear filter in the feedback section for performing interference cancellation. A data selective gradient algorithm, based upon the set-membership (SM) design framework, is proposed for the estimation of the coefficients of RNN structures and is applied to the estimation of the parameters of the proposed neural receiver structure. Simulation results show that the proposed techniques achieve significant performance gains over existing schemes.

  16. On the role of sensory feedbacks in Rowat-Selverston CPG to improve robot legged locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira eAmrollah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of Rowat and Selverston-type of CPG to control locomotion. It focuses on the role of afferent exteroceptive and proprioceptive signals in the dynamic phase synchronization in CPG legged robots. The sensori-motor neural network architecture is evaluated to control a two-joint planar robot leg that slips on a rail. Then, the closed loop between the CPG and the mechanical system allows to study the modulation of rhythmic patterns and the effect of the sensing loop via sensory neurons during the locomotion task. Firstly simulations show that the proposed architecture easily allows to modulate rhythmic patterns of the leg, and therefore the velocity of the robot. Secondly, simulations show that sensori-feedbacks from foot/ground contact of the leg make the hip velocity smoother and larger. The results show that the Rowat-Selverston-type CPG with sensory feedbacks is an effective choice for building adaptive Neural Central Pattern Generators for legged robots.

  17. Integrated control of wind farms, FACTS devices and the power network using neural networks and adaptive critic designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wei

    Worldwide concern about the environmental problems and a possible energy crisis has led to increasing interest in clean and renewable energy generation. Among various renewable energy sources, wind power is the most rapidly growing one. Therefore, how to provide efficient, reliable, and high-performance wind power generation and distribution has become an important and practical issue in the power industry. In addition, because of the new constraints placed by the environmental and economical factors, the trend of power system planning and operation is toward maximum utilization of the existing infrastructure with tight system operating and stability margins. This trend, together with the increased penetration of renewable energy sources, will bring new challenges to power system operation, control, stability and reliability which require innovative solutions. Flexible ac transmission system (FACTS) devices, through their fast, flexible, and effective control capability, provide one possible solution to these challenges. To fully utilize the capability of individual power system components, e.g., wind turbine generators (WTGs) and FACTS devices, their control systems must be suitably designed with high reliability. Moreover, in order to optimize local as well as system-wide performance and stability of the power system, real-time local and wide-area coordinated control is becoming an important issue. Power systems containing conventional synchronous generators, WTGs, and FACTS devices are large-scale, nonlinear, nonstationary, stochastic and complex systems distributed over large geographic areas. Traditional mathematical tools and system control techniques have limitations to control such complex systems to achieve an optimal performance. Intelligent and bio-inspired techniques, such as swarm intelligence, neural networks, and adaptive critic designs, are emerging as promising alternative technologies for power system control and performance optimization. This

  18. A new method based on Adaptive Discrete Wavelet Entropy Energy and Neural Network Classifier (ADWEENN) for recognition of urine cells from microscopic images independent of rotation and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Derya; Leblebicioglu, Mehmet Kemal; Poyraz, Mustafa; Dogantekin, Esin

    2014-02-01

    So far, analysis and classification of urine cells number has become an important topic for medical diagnosis of some diseases. Therefore, in this study, we suggest a new technique based on Adaptive Discrete Wavelet Entropy Energy and Neural Network Classifier (ADWEENN) for Recognition of Urine Cells from Microscopic Images Independent of Rotation and Scaling. Some digital image processing methods such as noise reduction, contrast enhancement, segmentation, and morphological process are used for feature extraction stage of this ADWEENN in this study. Nowadays, the image processing and pattern recognition topics have come into prominence. The image processing concludes operation and design of systems that recognize patterns in data sets. In the past years, very difficulty in classification of microscopic images was the deficiency of enough methods to characterize. Lately, it is seen that, multi-resolution image analysis methods such as Gabor filters, discrete wavelet decompositions are superior to other classic methods for analysis of these microscopic images. In this study, the structure of the ADWEENN method composes of four stages. These are preprocessing stage, feature extraction stage, classification stage and testing stage. The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and adaptive wavelet entropy and energy is used for adaptive feature extraction in feature extraction stage to strengthen the premium features of the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier in this study. Efficiency of the developed ADWEENN method was tested showing that an avarage of 97.58% recognition succes was obtained.

  19. Do infants represent the face in a viewpoint-invariant manner? Neural adaptation study as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi eKobayashi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent adult fMRI studies reported that face sensitive cortical areas showed attenuated responses to the repeated presentation of an identical facial image compared to the presentation of different facial images (fMRI-adaptation effects: e.g., Andrews & Ewbank, 2004. Building upon this finding, the current study, employing the adaptation paradigm, used NIRS to explore the neural basis of face processing in infants. In Experiment 1, we compared hemodynamic responses in the bilateral temporal regions during the repeated presentation of the same face (the same-face condition and the sequential presentation of different faces (the different-face condition. We found that 1 hemodynamic responses in the channels around the T5 and T6 regions increased during the presentation of different faces compared to those during the presentation of different objects; and that 2 these channels showed significantly lower response in the same-face condition than in the different-face condition, demonstrating the neural adaptation effect in 5- to 8-month-olds as measured by NIRS. In Experiment 2, when faces in both the same-face and different-face conditions were changed in viewpoint, lower hemodynamic responses in the same-face condition were found in 7- to 8-month-olds but not in 5- to 6-month-olds. Our results suggest that faces are represented in a viewpoint-invariant manner in 7- and 8-month-old infants.

  20. A-Lamp: Adaptive Layout-Aware Multi-Patch Deep Convolutional Neural Network for Photo Aesthetic Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Shuang; Liu, Jing; Chen, Chang Wen

    2017-01-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) have recently been shown to generate promising results for aesthetics assessment. However, the performance of these deep CNN methods is often compromised by the constraint that the neural network only takes the fixed-size input. To accommodate this requirement, input images need to be transformed via cropping, warping, or padding, which often alter image composition, reduce image resolution, or cause image distortion. Thus the aesthetics of the origina...

  1. Adaptive neural network backstepping control for a class of uncertain fractional-order chaotic systems with unknown backlash-like hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the control problem of a class of uncertain fractional-order chaotic systems preceded by unknown backlash-like hysteresis nonlinearities based on backstepping control algorithm. We model the hysteresis by using a differential equation. Based on the fractional Lyapunov stability criterion and the backstepping algorithm procedures, an adaptive neural network controller is driven. No knowledge of the upper bound of the disturbance and system uncertainty is required in our controller, and the asymptotical convergence of the tracking error can be guaranteed. Finally, we give two simulation examples to confirm our theoretical results.

  2. Adaptation tunes cortical dynamics to a critical regime during vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Woodrow; Clawson, Wesley; Pobst, Jeff; Karimipanah, Yahya; Wright, Nathaniel; Wessel, Ralf; Shew Lab Team; Wessel Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    A long-standing hypothesis at the interface of physics and neuroscience is that neural networks self-organize to the critical point of a phase transition, thereby optimizing aspects of sensory information processing. This idea is partially supported by strong evidence for critical dynamics observed in the cerebral cortex, but has not been tested in systems with significant sensory input. Thus, the foundations of this hypothesis - the self-organization process and how it manifests during strong sensory input - remain unstudied experimentally. Here we report microelectrode array measurements from visual cortex of turtles during visual stimulation of the retina. We show experimentally and in a computational model that strong sensory input initially elicits cortical network dynamics that are not critical, but adaptive changes in the network rapidly tune the system to criticality. This conclusion is based on observations of multifaceted scaling laws predicted to occur at criticality. Our findings establish sensory adaptation as a self-organizing mechanism which maintains criticality in visual cortex during sensory information processing. Supported by NSF CRCNS Grant 1308174.

  3. Sensory modulation disorders in childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Campen, Jolien S; Jansen, Floor E; Kleinrensink, Nienke J; Joëls, Marian; Braun, Kees Pj; Bruining, Hilgo

    2015-01-01

    Altered sensory sensitivity is generally linked to seizure-susceptibility in childhood epilepsy but may also be associated to the highly prevalent problems in behavioral adaptation. This association is further suggested by the frequent overlap of childhood epilepsy with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conditions in which altered behavioral responses to sensory stimuli have been firmly established. A continuum of sensory processing defects due to imbalanced neuronal inhibition and excitation across these disorders has been hypothesizedthat may lead to common symptoms of inadequate modulation of behavioral responses to sensory stimuli. Here, we investigated the prevalence of sensory modulation disorders among children with epilepsy and their relation with symptomatology of neurodevelopmental disorders. We used the Sensory Profile questionnaire to assess behavioral responses to sensory stimuli and categorize sensory modulation disorders in children with active epilepsy (aged 4-17 years). We related these outcomes to epilepsy characteristics and tested their association with comorbid symptoms of ASD (Social Responsiveness Scale) and ADHD (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire). Sensory modulation disorders were reported in 49 % of the 158 children. Children with epilepsy reported increased behavioral responses associated with sensory "sensitivity," "sensory avoidance," and "poor registration" but not "sensory seeking." Comorbidity of ASD and ADHD was associated with more severe sensory modulation problems, although 27 % of typically developing children with epilepsy also reported a sensory modulation disorder. Sensory modulation disorders are an under-recognized problem in children with epilepsy. The extent of the modulation difficulties indicates a substantial burden on daily functioning and may explain an important part of the behavioral distress associated with childhood epilepsy.

  4. Mixed H∞ and passive projective synchronization for fractional-order memristor-based neural networks with time delays via adaptive sliding mode control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuai; Song, Xiaona; Balsera, Ines Tejado

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the mixed H∞ and passive projective synchronization problem for fractional-order (FO) memristor-based neural networks with time delays. Our aim is to design a controller such that, though the unavoidable phenomena of time delay and external disturbances is fully considered, the resulting closed-loop system is stable with a mixed H∞ and passive performance level. By combining sliding mode control and adaptive control methods, a novel adaptive sliding mode control strategy is designed for the synchronization of time-delayed FO dynamic networks. Via the application of FO system stability theory, the projective synchronization conditions are addressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Based on the conditions, a desired controller which can guarantee the stability of the closed-loop system and also ensure a mixed H∞ and passive performance level is designed. Finally, two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. A neural model for temporal order judgments and their active recalibration: a common mechanism for space and time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingbo eCai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available When observers experience a constant delay between their motor actions and sensory feedback, their perception of the temporal order between actions and sensations adapt (Stetson et al., 2006a. We present here a novel neural model that can explain temporal order judgments (TOJs and their recalibration. Our model employs three ubiquitous features of neural systems: 1 information pooling, 2 opponent processing, and 3 synaptic scaling. Specifically, the model proposes that different populations of neurons encode different delays between motor-sensory events, the outputs of these populations feed into rivaling neural populations (encoding before and after, and the activity difference between these populations determines the perceptual judgment. As a consequence of synaptic scaling of input weights, motor acts which are consistently followed by delayed sensory feedback will cause the network to recalibrate its point of subjective simultaneity. The structure of our model raises the possibility that recalibration of TOJs is a temporal analogue to the motion aftereffect. In other words, identical neural mechanisms may be used to make perceptual determinations about both space and time. Our model captures behavioral recalibration results for different numbers of adapting trials and different adapting delays. In line with predictions of the model, we additionally demonstrate that temporal recalibration can last through time, in analogy to storage of the motion aftereffect.

  6. Learning Structure of Sensory Inputs with Synaptic Plasticity Leads to Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph eChrol-Cannon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is often explored as a form of unsupervised adaptationin cortical microcircuits to learn the structure of complex sensoryinputs and thereby improve performance of classification and prediction. The question of whether the specific structure of the input patterns is encoded in the structure of neural networks has been largely neglected. Existing studies that have analyzed input-specific structural adaptation have used simplified, synthetic inputs in contrast to complex and noisy patterns found in real-world sensory data.In this work, input-specific structural changes are analyzed forthree empirically derived models of plasticity applied to three temporal sensory classification tasks that include complex, real-world visual and auditory data. Two forms of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP and the Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM plasticity rule are used to adapt the recurrent network structure during the training process before performance is tested on the pattern recognition tasks.It is shown that synaptic adaptation is highly sensitive to specific classes of input pattern. However, plasticity does not improve the performance on sensory pattern recognition tasks, partly due to synaptic interference between consecutively presented input samples. The changes in synaptic strength produced by one stimulus are reversed by thepresentation of another, thus largely preventing input-specific synaptic changes from being retained in the structure of the network.To solve the problem of interference, we suggest that models of plasticitybe extended to restrict neural activity and synaptic modification to a subset of the neural circuit, which is increasingly found to be the casein experimental neuroscience.

  7. Model-free adaptive sliding mode controller design for generalized projective synchronization of the fractional-order chaotic system via radial basis function neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L. M.

    2017-09-01

    A novel model-free adaptive sliding mode strategy is proposed for a generalized projective synchronization (GPS) between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the external disturbances. To solve the difficulties from the little knowledge about the master-slave system and to overcome the bad effects of the external disturbances on the generalized projective synchronization, the radial basis function neural networks are used to approach the packaged unknown master system and the packaged unknown slave system (including the external disturbances). Consequently, based on the slide mode technology and the neural network theory, a model-free adaptive sliding mode controller is designed to guarantee asymptotic stability of the generalized projective synchronization error. The main contribution of this paper is that a control strategy is provided for the generalized projective synchronization between two entirely unknown fractional-order chaotic systems subject to the unknown external disturbances, and the proposed control strategy only requires that the master system has the same fractional orders as the slave system. Moreover, the proposed method allows us to achieve all kinds of generalized projective chaos synchronizations by turning the user-defined parameters onto the desired values. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method and the robustness of the controlled system.

  8. Neural Mechanisms and Information Processing in Recognition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamiko Ozaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nestmate recognition is a hallmark of social insects. It is based on the match/mismatch of an identity signal carried by members of the society with that of the perceiving individual. While the behavioral response, amicable or aggressive, is very clear, the neural systems underlying recognition are not fully understood. Here we contrast two alternative hypotheses for the neural mechanisms that are responsible for the perception and information processing in recognition. We focus on recognition via chemical signals, as the common modality in social insects. The first, classical, hypothesis states that upon perception of recognition cues by the sensory system the information is passed as is to the antennal lobes and to higher brain centers where the information is deciphered and compared to a neural template. Match or mismatch information is then transferred to some behavior-generating centers where the appropriate response is elicited. An alternative hypothesis, that of “pre-filter mechanism”, posits that the decision as to whether to pass on the information to the central nervous system takes place in the peripheral sensory system. We suggest that, through sensory adaptation, only alien signals are passed on to the brain, specifically to an “aggressive-behavior-switching center”, where the response is generated if the signal is above a certain threshold.

  9. An adaptive recurrent neural-network controller using a stabilization matrix and predictive inputs to solve a tracking problem under disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbank, Michael; Li, Shuhui; Fu, Xingang; Alonso, Eduardo; Wunsch, Donald

    2014-01-01

    We present a recurrent neural-network (RNN) controller designed to solve the tracking problem for control systems. We demonstrate that a major difficulty in training any RNN is the problem of exploding gradients, and we propose a solution to this in the case of tracking problems, by introducing a stabilization matrix and by using carefully constrained context units. This solution allows us to achieve consistently lower training errors, and hence allows us to more easily introduce adaptive capabilities. The resulting RNN is one that has been trained off-line to be rapidly adaptive to changing plant conditions and changing tracking targets. The case study we use is a renewable-energy generator application; that of producing an efficient controller for a three-phase grid-connected converter. The controller we produce can cope with the random variation of system parameters and fluctuating grid voltages. It produces tracking control with almost instantaneous response to changing reference states, and virtually zero oscillation. This compares very favorably to the classical proportional integrator (PI) controllers, which we show produce a much slower response and settling time. In addition, the RNN we propose exhibits better learning stability and convergence properties, and can exhibit faster adaptation, than has been achieved with adaptive critic designs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physiologically-Based Vision Modeling Applications and Gradient Descent-Based Parameter Adaptation of Pulse Coupled Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, vol.SMC- 13, no.5, p. 815-26 (1983). 14. Crick , F. and C. Kosch. "The problem of consciousness." Mind and Brain...cortical maps via synchronization," Parallel Pro- cessing in Neural Systems and Computers, p. xv+626, 101-4 (1990). 25. Francis , Gregory and Stephen

  11. Heart rate variability, prefrontal neural function, and cognitive performance: the neurovisceral integration perspective on self-regulation, adaptation, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Julian F; Hansen, Anita L; Saus-Rose, Evelyn; Johnsen, Bjorn Helge

    2009-04-01

    In the present paper, we describe a model of neurovisceral integration in which a set of neural structures involved in cognitive, affective, and autonomic regulation are related to heart rate variability (HRV) and cognitive performance. We detail the pathways involved in the neural regulation of the cardiovascular system and provide pharmacological and neuroimaging data in support of the neural structures linking the central nervous system to HRV in humans. We review a number of studies from our group showing that individual differences in HRV are related to performance on tasks associated with executive function and prefrontal cortical activity. These studies include comparisons of executive- and nonexecutive-function tasks in healthy participants, in both threatening and nonthreatening conditions. In addition, we show that manipulating resting HRV levels is associated with changes in performance on executive-function tasks. We also examine the relationship between HRV and cognitive performance in ecologically valid situations using a police shooting simulation and a naval navigation simulation. Finally, we review our studies in anxiety patients, as well as studies examining psychopathy. These findings in total suggest an important relationship among cognitive performance, HRV, and prefrontal neural function that has important implications for both physical and mental health. Future studies are needed to determine exactly which executive functions are associated with individual differences in HRV in a wider range of situations and populations.

  12. Modular Adaptive System Based on a Multi-Stage Neural Structure for Recognition of 2D Objects of Discontinuous Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Topalova

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a presentation of a new system for invariant recognition of 2D objects with overlapping classes, that can not be effectively recognized with the traditional methods. The translation, scale and partial rotation invariant contour object description is transformed in a DCT spectrum space. The obtained frequency spectrums are decomposed into frequency bands in order to feed different BPG neural nets (NNs. The NNs are structured in three stages - filtering and full rotation invariance; partial recognition; general classification. The designed multi-stage BPG Neural Structure shows very good accuracy and flexibility when tested with 2D objects used in the discontinuous production. The reached speed and the opportunuty for an easy restructuring and reprogramming of the system makes it suitable for application in different applied systems for real time work.

  13. Rate and timing of cortical responses driven by separate sensory channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Hannes P; Harvey, Michael A; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2015-12-09

    The sense of touch comprises multiple sensory channels that each conveys characteristic signals during interactions with objects. These neural signals must then be integrated in such a way that behaviorally relevant information about the objects is preserved. To understand the process of integration, we implement a simple computational model that describes how the responses of neurons in somatosensory cortex-recorded from awake, behaving monkeys-are shaped by the peripheral input, reconstructed using simulations of neuronal populations that reproduce natural spiking responses in the nerve with millisecond precision. First, we find that the strength of cortical responses is driven by one population of nerve fibers (rapidly adapting) whereas the timing of cortical responses is shaped by the other (Pacinian). Second, we show that input from these sensory channels is integrated in an optimal fashion that exploits the disparate response behaviors of different fiber types.

  14. An integral term adaptive neural control of fed-batch fermentation biotechnological process; Control neuronal adaptable con termino integral para un proceso biotecnologico de fermentacion por lote alimentado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruch, Ieroham; Hernandez, Luis Alberto; Barrera Cortes, Josefina [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-15

    A nonlinear mathematical model of aerobic biotechnological process of a fed-batch fermentation system is derived using ordinary differential equations. A neurocontrol is applied using Recurrent Trainable Neural Network (RTNN) plus integral term; the first network performs an approximation of the plant's output; the second network generates the control signal so that the biomass concentration could be regulated by the nutrient influent flow rate into the bioreactor. [Spanish] Un modelo matematico no lineal de un proceso biotecnologico aerobio de un sistema de fermentacion por lote alimentado es presentado mediante ecuaciones diferenciales ordinarias. Es propuesto un control utilizando dos redes neuronales recurrentes entrenables (RNRE) con la adicion de un termino integral; la primera red representa un aproximador de la salida de la planta y la segunda genera la senal de control tal que la concentracion de la biomasa pueda ser regulada mediante la alimentacion de un flujo con nutrientes al biorreactor.

  15. A genetically explicit model of speciation by sensory drive within a continuous population in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Seehausen Ole; Kawamura Shoji; Shoji Ayako; Kawata Masakado

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The sensory drive hypothesis predicts that divergent sensory adaptation in different habitats may lead to premating isolation upon secondary contact of populations. Speciation by sensory drive has traditionally been treated as a special case of speciation as a byproduct of adaptation to divergent environments in geographically isolated populations. However, if habitats are heterogeneous, local adaptation in the sensory systems may cause the emergence of reproductively isol...

  16. Neural synchronization during face-to-face communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Dai, Bohan; Peng, Danling; Zhu, Chaozhe; Liu, Li; Lu, Chunming

    2012-11-07

    Although the human brain may have evolutionarily adapted to face-to-face communication, other modes of communication, e.g., telephone and e-mail, increasingly dominate our modern daily life. This study examined the neural difference between face-to-face communication and other types of communication by simultaneously measuring two brains using a hyperscanning approach. The results showed a significant increase in the neural synchronization in the left inferior frontal cortex during a face-to-face dialog between partners but none during a back-to-back dialog, a face-to-face monologue, or a back-to-back monologue. Moreover, the neural synchronization between partners during the face-to-face dialog resulted primarily from the direct interactions between the partners, including multimodal sensory information integration and turn-taking behavior. The communicating behavior during the face-to-face dialog could be predicted accurately based on the neural synchronization level. These results suggest that face-to-face communication, particularly dialog, has special neural features that other types of communication do not have and that the neural synchronization between partners may underlie successful face-to-face communication.

  17. Usage of case-based reasoning, neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system classification techniques in breast cancer dataset classification diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mei-Ling; Hung, Yung-Hsiang; Lee, Wen-Ming; Li, R K; Wang, Tzu-Hao

    2012-04-01

    Breast cancer is a common to females worldwide. Today, technological advancements in cancer treatment innovations have increased the survival rates. Many theoretical and experimental studies have shown that a multiple classifier system is an effective technique for reducing prediction errors. This study compared the particle swarm optimizer (PSO) based artificial neural network (ANN), the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), and a case-based reasoning (CBR) classifier with a logistic regression model and decision tree model. It also applied three classification techniques to the Mammographic Mass Data Set, and measured its improvements in accuracy and classification errors. The experimental results showed that, the best CBR-based classification accuracy is 83.60%, and the classification accuracies of the PSO-based ANN classifier and ANFIS are 91.10% and 92.80%, respectively.

  18. Distributed Adaptive Neural Network Output Tracking of Leader-Following High-Order Stochastic Nonlinear Multiagent Systems With Unknown Dead-Zone Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Changchun; Zhang, Liuliu; Guan, Xinping

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of distributed output tracking consensus control for a class of high-order stochastic nonlinear multiagent systems with unknown nonlinear dead-zone under a directed graph topology. The adaptive neural networks are used to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions and a new inequality is used to deal with the completely unknown dead-zone input. Then, we design the controllers based on backstepping method and the dynamic surface control technique. It is strictly proved that the resulting closed-loop system is stable in probability in the sense of semiglobally uniform ultimate boundedness and the tracking errors between the leader and the followers approach to a small residual set based on Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to show the effectiveness and the advantages of the proposed techniques.

  19. Sudden Sensory-Neural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Slambol Nassaj

    1993-01-01

    Sudden hearing loss is a type of hearing loss that occurs in three successive frequencies by more than 30 dB and in less than 72 hours. Every 10 person in 100000 in the world and 25000 people in USA suffer this kind of hearing loss. The average age of the onset is 43 years old.

  20. Neural Correlates of Face Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Xiaokun; Biederman, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Although face detection likely played an essential adaptive role in our evolutionary past and in contemporary social interactions, there have been few rigorous studies investigating its neural correlates...

  1. Sensory processing abilities of children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitoria T. Shimizu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess and compare the sensory processing abilities of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD and children without disabilities, and to analyze the relationship between sensory processing difficulties and behavioural symptoms presented by children with ADHD. METHOD : Thirty-seven children with ADHD were compared with thirty-seven controls using a translated and adapted version of the "Sensory Profile" answered by the parents/caregivers. For the ADHD group, Sensory Profile scores were correlated to behavioural symptoms assessed using the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL and the Behavioural Teacher Rating Scale (EACI-P. The statistical analyses were conducted using the Mann Whitney test and Pearson correlation coefficients. RESULTS : Children with ADHD showed significant impairments compared to the control group in sensory processing and modulation, as well as in behavioural and emotional responses as observed in 11 out of 14 sections and 6 out of 9 factors. Differences in all Sensory Profile response patterns were also observed between the two groups of children. Sensory Profile scores showed a moderately negative correlation with CBCL and EACI-P scores in the ADHD group. CONCLUSION : These results indicate that children with ADHD may present sensory processing impairments, which may contribute to the inappropriate behavioural and learning responses displayed by children with ADHD. It also suggests the importance of understanding the sensory processing difficulties and its possible contribution to the ADHD symptomatology.

  2. Sensory processing abilities of children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Vitoria T; Bueno, Orlando F A; Miranda, Mônica C

    2014-01-01

    To assess and compare the sensory processing abilities of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and children without disabilities, and to analyze the relationship between sensory processing difficulties and behavioural symptoms presented by children with ADHD. Thirty-seven children with ADHD were compared with thirty-seven controls using a translated and adapted version of the "Sensory Profile" answered by the parents/caregivers. For the ADHD group, Sensory Profile scores were correlated to behavioural symptoms assessed using the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) and the Behavioural Teacher Rating Scale (EACI-P). The statistical analyses were conducted using the Mann Whitney test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Children with ADHD showed significant impairments compared to the control group in sensory processing and modulation, as well as in behavioural and emotional responses as observed in 11 out of 14 sections and 6 out of 9 factors. Differences in all Sensory Profile response patterns were also observed between the two groups of children. Sensory Profile scores showed a moderately negative correlation with CBCL and EACI-P scores in the ADHD group. These results indicate that children with ADHD may present sensory processing impairments, which may contribute to the inappropriate behavioural and learning responses displayed by children with ADHD. It also suggests the importance of understanding the sensory processing difficulties and its possible contribution to the ADHD symptomatology.

  3. A Combination of Central Pattern Generator-based and Reflex-based Neural Networks for Dynamic, Adaptive, Robust Bipedal Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Canio, Giuliano; Larsen, Jørgen Christian; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    Robotic systems inspired from humans have always been lightening up the curiosity of engineers and scientists. Of many challenges, human locomotion is a very difficult one where a number of different systems needs to interact in order to generate a correct and balanced pattern. To simulate the in...... network to generate basic walking patterns of a dynamic bipedal walking robot (DACBOT) and then a CPG-based neural network to ensure robust walking behavior......Robotic systems inspired from humans have always been lightening up the curiosity of engineers and scientists. Of many challenges, human locomotion is a very difficult one where a number of different systems needs to interact in order to generate a correct and balanced pattern. To simulate...... the interaction of these systems, implementations with reflexbased or central pattern generator (CPG)-based controllers have been tested on bipedal robot systems. In this paper we will combine the two controller types, into a controller that works with both reflex and CPG signals. We use a reflex-based neural...

  4. A SOLUTION TO THE DOUBLE DUMMY CONTRACT BRIDGE PROBLEM INFLUENCED BY SUPERVISED LEARNING MODULE ADAPTED BY ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dharmalingam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Contract Bridge is an intellectual game which motivates multiple skills and application of prior experience and knowledge, as no player knows accurately what moves other players are capable of making. The Bridge is a game played in the presence of imperfect information, yet its strategies must be well formulated, since the outcome at any intermediate stage is solely based on the choices made during the immediately preceding phase. In this paper, we train an Artificial Neural Network architecture using sample deals and use it to estimate the number of tricks to be taken by one pair of bridge players, which is the main challenge in the Double Dummy Bridge Problem. We focus on Back Propagation Neural Network Architecture with Back Propagation Algorithm with Sigmoidal transfer functions. We used two approaches namely, High – Card Point Count System and Distribution Point Method during the bidding phase of Contract Bridge. We experimented with two sigmoidal transfer functions namely, Log Sigmoid transfer function and the Hyperbolic Tangent Sigmoid function. Results reveal that the later performs better giving lower mean squared error on the output.

  5. Dynamic Neural Fields with Intrinsic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, Claudius; Schöner, Gregor; Wörgötter, Florentin; Sandamirskaya, Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic neural fields (DNFs) are dynamical systems models that approximate the activity of large, homogeneous, and recurrently connected neural networks based on a mean field approach. Within dynamic field theory, the DNFs have been used as building blocks in architectures to model sensorimotor embedding of cognitive processes. Typically, the parameters of a DNF in an architecture are manually tuned in order to achieve a specific dynamic behavior (e.g., decision making, selection, or working memory) for a given input pattern. This manual parameters search requires expert knowledge and time to find and verify a suited set of parameters. The DNF parametrization may be particular challenging if the input distribution is not known in advance, e.g., when processing sensory information. In this paper, we propose the autonomous adaptation of the DNF resting level and gain by a learning mechanism of intrinsic plasticity (IP). To enable this adaptation, an input and output measure for the DNF are introduced, together with a hyper parameter to define the desired output distribution. The online adaptation by IP gives the possibility to pre-define the DNF output statistics without knowledge of the input distribution and thus, also to compensate for changes in it. The capabilities and limitations of this approach are evaluated in a number of experiments.

  6. Prefrontal cortex and sensory cortices during working memory: quantity and quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Yixuan; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2015-01-01

    The activity in sensory cortices and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) throughout the delay interval of working memory (WM) tasks reflect two aspects of WM—quality and quantity, respectively. The delay activity in sensory cortices is fine-tuned to sensory information and forms the neural basis of the precision of WM storage, while the delay activity in the PFC appears to represent behavioral goals and filters out irrelevant distractions, forming the neural basis of the quantity of task-relevant inf...

  7. Controlling the elements: an optogenetic approach to understanding the neural circuits of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Joshua P; Wolff, Steffen B E; Lüthi, Andreas; LeDoux, Joseph E

    2012-06-15

    Neural circuits underlie our ability to interact in the world and to learn adaptively from experience. Understanding neural circuits and how circuit structure gives rise to neural firing patterns or computations is fundamental to our understanding of human experience and behavior. Fear conditioning is a powerful model system in which to study neural circuits and information processing and relate them to learning and behavior. Until recently, technological limitations have made it difficult to study the causal role of specific circuit elements during fear conditioning. However, newly developed optogenetic tools allow researchers to manipulate individual circuit components such as anatomically or molecularly defined cell populations, with high temporal precision. Applying these tools to the study of fear conditioning to control specific neural subpopulations in the fear circuit will facilitate a causal analysis of the role of these circuit elements in fear learning and memory. By combining this approach with in vivo electrophysiological recordings in awake, behaving animals, it will also be possible to determine the functional contribution of specific cell populations to neural processing in the fear circuit. As a result, the application of optogenetics to fear conditioning could shed light on how specific circuit elements contribute to neural coding and to fear learning and memory. Furthermore, this approach may reveal general rules for how circuit structure and neural coding within circuits gives rise to sensory experience and behavior. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A biologically based model for the integration of sensory-motor contingencies in rules and plans: a prefrontal cortex based extension of the Distributed Adaptive Control architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Armin; Fibla, Marti Sanchez; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    Intelligence depends on the ability of the brain to acquire and apply rules and representations. At the neuronal level these properties have been shown to critically depend on the prefrontal cortex. Here we present, in the context of the Distributed Adaptive Control architecture (DAC), a biologically based model for flexible control and planning based on key physiological properties of the prefrontal cortex, i.e. reward modulated sustained activity and plasticity of lateral connectivity. We test the model in a series of pertinent tasks, including multiple T-mazes and the Tower of London that are standard experimental tasks to assess flexible control and planning. We show that the model is both able to acquire and express rules that capture the properties of the task and to quickly adapt to changes. Further, we demonstrate that this biomimetic self-contained cognitive architecture generalizes to planning. In addition, we analyze the extended DAC architecture, called DAC 6, as a model that can be applied for the creation of intelligent and psychologically believable synthetic agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Neural Mechanism Exploration of Adaptive Motor Control: Dynamical Economic Cell Allocation in the Primary Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Guo, Yangyang; Fan, Jing; Ma, Chaolin; Ma, Xuan; Chen, Xi; He, Jiping

    2017-05-01

    Adaptive flexibility is of significance for the smooth and efficient movements in goal attainment. However, the underlying work mechanism of the cerebral cortex in adaptive motor control still remains unclear. How does the cerebral cortex organize and coordinate the activity of a large population of cells in the implementation of various motor strategies? To explore this issue, single-unit activities from the M1 region and kinematic data were recorded simultaneously in monkeys performing 3D reach-to-grasp tasks with different perturbations. Varying motor control strategies were employed and achieved in different perturbed tasks, via the dynamic allocation of cells to modulate specific movement parameters. An economic principle was proposed for the first time to describe a basic rule for cell allocation in the primary motor cortex. This principle, defined as the Dynamic Economic Cell Allocation Mechanism (DECAM), guarantees benefit maximization in cell allocation under limited neuronal resources, and avoids committing resources to uneconomic investments for unreliable factors with no or little revenue. That is to say, the cells recruited are always preferentially allocated to those factors with reliable return; otherwise, the cells are dispatched to respond to other factors about task. The findings of this study might partially reveal the working mechanisms underlying the role of the cerebral cortex in adaptive motor control, wherein is also of significance for the design of future intelligent brain-machine interfaces and rehabilitation device.

  10. The endocranial anatomy of therizinosauria and its implications for sensory and cognitive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Lautenschlager

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therizinosauria is one of the most enigmatic and peculiar clades among theropod dinosaurs, exhibiting an unusual suite of characters, such as lanceolate teeth, a rostral rhamphotheca, long manual claws, and a wide, opisthopubic pelvis. This specialized anatomy has been associated with a shift in dietary preferences and an adaptation to herbivory. Despite a large number of discoveries in recent years, the fossil record for Therizinosauria is still relatively poor, and cranial remains are particularly rare. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on computed tomographic (CT scanning of the nearly complete and articulated skull of Erlikosaurus andrewsi, as well as partial braincases of two other therizinosaurian taxa, the endocranial anatomy is reconstructed and described. The wider phylogenetic range of the described specimens permits the evaluation of sensory and cognitive capabilities of Therizinosauria in an evolutionary context. The endocranial anatomy reveals a mosaic of plesiomorphic and derived characters in therizinosaurians. The anatomy of the olfactory apparatus and the endosseous labyrinth suggests that olfaction, hearing, and equilibrium were well-developed in therizinosaurians and might have affected or benefited from an enlarged telencephalon. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents the first appraisal of the evolution of endocranial anatomy and sensory adaptations in Therizinosauria. Despite their phylogenetically basal position among maniraptoran dinosaurs, therizinosaurians had developed the neural pathways for a well developed sensory repertoire. In particular olfaction and hearing may have played an important role in foraging, predator evasion, and/or social complexity.

  11. Aging Affects Adaptation to Sound-Level Statistics in Human Auditory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Maess, Burkhard; Johnsrude, Ingrid S

    2018-01-22

    Optimal perception requires efficient and adaptive neural processing of sensory input. Neurons in nonhuman mammals adapt to the statistical properties of acoustic feature distributions such that they become sensitive to sounds that are most likely to occur in the environment. However, whether human auditory responses adapt to stimulus statistical distributions and how aging affects adaptation to stimulus statistics is unknown. We used magnetoencephalography to study how exposure to different distributions of sound levels affects adaptation in auditory cortex of younger (mean: 25 years; N=19) and older (mean: 64 years; N=20) adults (male and female). Participants passively listened to two sound-level distributions with different modes (either 15 or 45 dB sensation level). In a control block with long inter-stimulus intervals, allowing neural populations to recover from adaptation, neural response magnitudes were similar between younger and older adults. Critically, both age groups demonstrated adaptation to sound-level stimulus statistics, but adaptation was altered for older compared to younger people: in the older group, neural responses continued to be sensitive to sound level under conditions where responses were fully adapted in the younger group. The lack of full adaptation to the statistics of the sensory environment may be a physiological mechanism underlying the known difficulty older adults have with filtering out irrelevant sensory information.Significance statementBehavior requires efficient processing of acoustic stimulation. Animal work suggests that neurons accomplish efficient processing by adjusting their response sensitivity depending on statistical properties of the acoustic environment. Little is known about the extent to which this adaptation to stimulus statistics generalizes to humans, particularly to older humans. We used magnetoencephalography to investigate how aging influences adaptation to sound-level statistics. Listeners were presented

  12. When global rule reversal meets local task switching: The neural mechanisms of coordinated behavioral adaptation to instructed multi-level demand changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yiquan; Wolfensteller, Uta; Schubert, Torsten; Ruge, Hannes

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive flexibility is essential to cope with changing task demands and often it is necessary to adapt to combined changes in a coordinated manner. The present fMRI study examined how the brain implements such multi-level adaptation processes. Specifically, on a "local," hierarchically lower level, switching between two tasks was required across trials while the rules of each task remained unchanged for blocks of trials. On a "global" level regarding blocks of twelve trials, the task rules could reverse or remain the same. The current task was cued at the start of each trial while the current task rules were instructed before the start of a new block. We found that partly overlapping and partly segregated neural networks play different roles when coping with the combination of global rule reversal and local task switching. The fronto-parietal control network (FPN) supported the encoding of reversed rules at the time of explicit rule instruction. The same regions subsequently supported local task switching processes during actual implementation trials, irrespective of rule reversal condition. By contrast, a cortico-striatal network (CSN) including supplementary motor area and putamen was increasingly engaged across implementation trials and more so for rule reversal than for nonreversal blocks, irrespective of task switching condition. Together, these findings suggest that the brain accomplishes the coordinated adaptation to multi-level demand changes by distributing processing resources either across time (FPN for reversed rule encoding and later for task switching) or across regions (CSN for reversed rule implementation and FPN for concurrent task switching). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Combinatorial Approach to Induce Sensory Axon Regeneration into the Dorsal Root Avulsed Spinal Cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeber, Jan; Konig, Niclas; Trolle, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Spinal root injuries result in newly formed glial scar formation, which prevents regeneration of sensory axons causing permanent sensory loss. Previous studies showed that delivery of trophic factors or implantation of human neural progenitor cells supports sensory axon regeneration and partly...... restores sensory functions. In this study, we elucidate mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated ingrowth of sensory axons after dorsal root avulsion (DRA). We show that human spinal cord neural stem/progenitor cells (hscNSPC), and also, mesoporous silica particles loaded with growth factor mimetics (Meso......MIM), supported sensory axon regeneration. However, when hscNSPC and MesoMIM were combined, sensory axon regeneration failed. Morphological and tracing analysis showed that sensory axons grow through the newly established glial scar along “bridges” formed by migrating stem cells. Coimplantation of Meso...

  14. Sensory-motor transformations for speech occur bilaterally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Gregory B; Thesen, Thomas; Carlson, Chad; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Pesaran, Bijan

    2014-03-06

    Historically, the study of speech processing has emphasized a strong link between auditory perceptual input and motor production output. A kind of 'parity' is essential, as both perception- and production-based representations must form a unified interface to facilitate access to higher-order language processes such as syntax and semantics, believed to be computed in the dominant, typically left hemisphere. Although various theories have been proposed to unite perception and production, the underlying neural mechanisms are unclear. Early models of speech and language processing proposed that perceptual processing occurred in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus (Wernicke's area) and motor production processes occurred in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area). Sensory activity was proposed to link to production activity through connecting fibre tracts, forming the left lateralized speech sensory-motor system. Although recent evidence indicates that speech perception occurs bilaterally, prevailing models maintain that the speech sensory-motor system is left lateralized and facilitates the transformation from sensory-based auditory representations to motor-based production representations. However, evidence for the lateralized computation of sensory-motor speech transformations is indirect and primarily comes from stroke patients that have speech repetition deficits (conduction aphasia) and studies using covert speech and haemodynamic functional imaging. Whether the speech sensory-motor system is lateralized, like higher-order language processes, or bilateral, like speech perception, is controversial. Here we use direct neural recordings in subjects performing sensory-motor tasks involving overt speech production to show that sensory-motor transformations occur bilaterally. We demonstrate that electrodes over bilateral inferior frontal, inferior parietal, superior temporal, premotor and somatosensory cortices exhibit robust sensory-motor neural

  15. Higher-order neural processing tunes motion neurons to visual ecology in three species of hawkmoths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckl, A L; O'Carroll, D; Warrant, E J

    2017-06-28

    To sample information optimally, sensory systems must adapt to the ecological demands of each animal species. These adaptations can occur peripherally, in the anatomical structures of sensory organs and their receptors; and centrally, as higher-order neural processing in the brain. While a rich body of investigations has focused on peripheral adaptations, our understanding is sparse when it comes to central mechanisms. We quantified how peripheral adaptations in the eyes, and central adaptations in the wide-field motion vision system, set the trade-off between resolution and sensitivity in three species of hawkmoths active at very different light levels: nocturnal Deilephila elpenor, crepuscular Manduca sexta, and diurnal Macroglossum stellatarum. Using optical measurements and physiological recordings from the photoreceptors and wide-field motion neurons in the lobula complex, we demonstrate that all three species use spatial and temporal summation to improve visual performance in dim light. The diurnal Macroglossum relies least on summation, but can only see at brighter intensities. Manduca, with large sensitive eyes, relies less on neural summation than the smaller eyed Deilephila, but both species attain similar visual performance at nocturnal light levels. Our results reveal how the visual systems of these three hawkmoth species are intimately matched to their visual ecologies. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Somatosensory-motor adaptation of orofacial actions in posterior parietal and ventral premotor cortices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Grabski

    Full Text Available Recent studies have provided evidence for sensory-motor adaptive changes and action goal coding of visually guided manual action in premotor and posterior parietal cortices. To extend these results to orofacial actions, devoid of auditory and visual feedback, we used a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging during repeated intransitive and silent lip, jaw and tongue movements. In the motor domain, this paradigm refers to decreased activity in specific neural populations due to repeated motor acts and has been proposed to reflect sensory-motor adaptation. Orofacial movements activated a set of largely overlapping, common brain areas forming a core neural network classically involved in orofacial motor control. Crucially, suppressed neural responses during repeated orofacial actions were specifically observed in the left ventral premotor cortex, the intraparietal sulcus, the inferior parietal lobule and the superior parietal lobule. Since no visual and auditory feedback were provided during orofacial actions, these results suggest somatosensory-motor adaptive control of intransitive and silent orofacial actions in these premotor and parietal regions.

  17. Somatosensory-Motor Adaptation of Orofacial Actions in Posterior Parietal and Ventral Premotor Cortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabski, Krystyna; Lamalle, Laurent; Sato, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for sensory-motor adaptive changes and action goal coding of visually guided manual action in premotor and posterior parietal cortices. To extend these results to orofacial actions, devoid of auditory and visual feedback, we used a repetition suppression paradigm while measuring neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging during repeated intransitive and silent lip, jaw and tongue movements. In the motor domain, this paradigm refers to decreased activity in specific neural populations due to repeated motor acts and has been proposed to reflect sensory-motor adaptation. Orofacial movements activated a set of largely overlapping, common brain areas forming a core neural network classically involved in orofacial motor control. Crucially, suppressed neural responses during repeated orofacial actions were specifically observed in the left ventral premotor cortex, the intraparietal sulcus, the inferior parietal lobule and the superior parietal lobule. Since no visual and auditory feedback were provided during orofacial actions, these results suggest somatosensory-motor adaptive control of intransitive and silent orofacial actions in these premotor and parietal regions. PMID:23185300

  18. Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Kofman, I. S.; Cassady, K.; Yuan, P.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Riascos, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post spaceflight. Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that are conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. We have collected data on several crewmembers and preliminary findings will be presented. Eventual comparison to results from our parallel bed rest study will enable us to parse out the multiple mechanisms contributing to any spaceflight-induced neural structural and behavioral changes that we observe.

  19. [Neural codes for perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, R; Salinas, E; Hernández, A; Zainos, A; Lemus, L; de Lafuente, V; Luna, R

    This article describes experiments designed to show the neural codes associated with the perception and processing of tactile information. The results of these experiments have shown the neural activity correlated with tactile perception. The neurones of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) represent the physical attributes of tactile perception. We found that these representations correlated with tactile perception. By means of intracortical microstimulation we demonstrated the causal relationship between S1 activity and tactile perception. In the motor areas of the frontal lobe is to be found the connection between sensorial and motor representation whilst decisions are being taken. S1 generates neural representations of the somatosensory stimuli which seen to be sufficient for tactile perception. These neural representations are subsequently processed by central areas to S1 and seem useful in perception, memory and decision making.

  20. A new model for sizing of stand-alone photovoltaic systems using neural network adaptive frame wavelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellit, A. [University Center of Medea, Institute of Engineering Sciences, Ain Dahab (Algeria); Benghanem, M. [University of Sciences Technology Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Faculty of ElectricalEngineering, El-Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Hadj Arab, A. [Development Center of Renewable Energy (CDER), Bouzareah, Algiers (Algeria); Guessoum, A. [Ministry for the Higher Education and Scientific Research, Algiers (Algeria)

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work is to train the MLP-IIR model to learn the estimation and modeling of the optimal sizing coefficients of stand-alone PV system with a minimum of input data. Once trained, the MLP-IIR estimates these coefficients faster. The validation of the model was performed with unknown sizing coefficient, which the network has not seen before. The ability of the network to make acceptable estimations even in an unusual day is an advantage of the present method. It should be stressed that the training of the network required about 1 minute on a Pentium III 800MHz machine. The estimation with correlation coefficient of 98 % was obtained. This accuracy is well within the acceptable level used by design engineers. The traditional methods of sizing PV system (empirical, analytical, numerical and hybrid) allows to estimate the sizing of PV system for one given site, and requires the availability of several parameters such as the daily solar radiation data, altitude, longitude, the load, the characteristics of stand alone PV system, the inclination of the panels and to take very much computing time for estimation of optimal coefficients. On the other hand, the model that we developed allows estimating the PV-array area and the storage capacity from a minimum input data (altitude, longitude) based on the optimal sizing coefficients and does not take much time for simulation. The advantage of this model is to estimate of the PV-array area and the storage capacity in any site in Algeria particularly in isolated sites, where the global solar radiation data is not always available. Also, this presents a good result compared between other neural network architecture. The results have been obtained for Algerian meteorological data, but the methodology can be applied to any geographical area. (orig.)

  1. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  2. Adaptive Tracking Control for Robots With an Interneural Computing Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Sheng; Hsu, Sheng-Yi; Shih, Mau-Hsiang

    2017-01-24

    Adaptive tracking control of mobile robots requires the ability to follow a trajectory generated by a moving target. The conventional analysis of adaptive tracking uses energy minimization to study the convergence and robustness of the tracking error when the mobile robot follows a desired trajectory. However, in the case that the moving target generates trajectories with uncertainties, a common Lyapunov-like function for energy minimization may be extremely difficult to determine. Here, to solve the adaptive tracking problem with uncertainties, we wish to implement an interneural computing scheme in the design of a mobile robot for behavior-based navigation. The behavior-based navigation adopts an adaptive plan of behavior patterns learning from the uncertainties of the environment. The characteristic feature of the interneural computing scheme is the use of neural path pruning with rewards and punishment interacting with the environment. On this basis, the mobile robot can be exploited to change its coupling weights in paths of neural connections systematically, which can then inhibit or enhance the effect of flow elimination in the dynamics of the evolutionary neural network. Such dynamical flow translation ultimately leads to robust sensory-to-motor transformations adapting to the uncertainties of the environment. A simulation result shows that the mobile robot with the interneural computing scheme can perform fault-tolerant behavior of tracking by maintaining suitable behavior patterns at high frequency levels.

  3. Concept hierarchy memory model: a neural architecture for conceptual knowledge representation, learning, and commonsense reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A H; Soon, H S

    1996-07-01

    This article introduces a neural network based cognitive architecture termed Concept Hierarchy Memory Model (CHMM) for conceptual knowledge representation and commonsense reasoning. CHMM is composed of two subnetworks: a Concept Formation Network (CFN), that acquires concepts based on their sensory representations; and a Concept Hierarchy Network (CHN), that encodes hierarchical relationships between concepts. Based on Adaptive Resonance Associative Map (ARAM), a supervised Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) model, CHMM provides a systematic treatment for concept formation and organization of a concept hierarchy. Specifically, a concept can be learned by sampling activities across multiple sensory fields. By chunking relations between concepts as cognitive codes, a concept hierarchy can be learned/modified through experience. Also, fuzzy relations between concepts can now be represented in terms of the weights on the links connecting them. Using a unified inferencing mechanism based on code firing, CHMM performs an important class of commonsense reasoning, including concept recognition and property inheritance.

  4. Outsourcing neural active control to passive composite mechanics: a tissue engineered cyborg ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Park, Sung Jin; Park, Kyung Soo; Park, Shirley; di Santo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Lauder, George V.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-11-01

    Translating the blueprint that stingrays and skates provide, we create a cyborg swimming ray capable of orchestrating adaptive maneuvering and phototactic navigation. The impossibility of replicating the neural system of batoids fish is bypassed by outsourcing algorithmic functionalities to the body composite mechanics, hence casting the active control problem into a design, passive one. We present a first step in engineering multilevel "brain-body-flow" systems that couple sensory information to motor coordination and movement, leading to behavior. This work paves the way for the development of autonomous and adaptive artificial creatures able to process multiple sensory inputs and produce complex behaviors in distributed systems and may represent a path toward soft-robotic "embodied cognition".

  5. Neural control of choroidal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Anton; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Del Mar, Nobel; Li, Chunyan

    2017-12-08

    The choroid is richly innervated by parasympathetic, sympathetic and trigeminal sensory nerve fibers that regulate choroidal blood flow in birds and mammals, and presumably other vertebrate classes as well. The parasympathetic innervation has been shown to vasodilate and increase choroidal blood flow, the sympathetic input has been shown to vasoconstrict and decrease choroidal blood flow, and the sensory input has been shown to both convey pain and thermal information centrally and act locally to vasodilate and increase choroidal blood flow. As the choroid lies behind the retina and cannot respond readily to retinal metabolic signals, its innervation is important for adjustments in flow required by either retinal activity, by fluctuations in the systemic blood pressure driving choroidal perfusion, and possibly by retinal temperature. The former two appear to be mediated by the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, via central circuits responsive to retinal activity and systemic blood pressure, but adjustments for ocular perfusion pressure also appear to be influenced by local autoregulatory myogenic mechanisms. Adaptive choroidal responses to temperature may be mediated by trigeminal sensory fibers. Impairments in the neural control of choroidal blood flow occur with aging, and various ocular or systemic diseases such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), hypertension, and diabetes, and may contribute to retinal pathology and dysfunction in these conditions, or in the case of AMD be a precondition. The present manuscript reviews findings in birds and mammals that contribute to the above-summarized understanding of the roles of the autonomic and sensory innervation of the choroid in controlling choroidal blood flow, and in the importance of such regulation for maintaining retinal health. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Local adaptations of two naturally occurring neuronal conductances, gK + (A) and gK + (Ca), allow for associative conditioning and contiguity judgements in artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, J; Woody, C D

    1991-01-01

    Features of two potassium conductances implicated in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes, the slow calcium dependent conductance (gK + (Ca] and the fast transient conductance (gK + (A], were incorporated into a 6 x 6 element artificial neural network. Adaptive algorithms derived from observations of cortical neurons during associative learning changed gK + (A) in proportion to the product of this current and an EPSP-induced second messenger concentration, and changed gK + (Ca) as a function of a spike-induced second messenger concentration. This network concurrently acquired two distinct representations in response to presentation of stimuli: one resembled associative conditioning (defined in terms of its sensitivity to forward pairing vs. simultaneous or backward pairing); the other reflected contiguous pairings of stimuli. The acquisition of one representation did not markedly interfere with acquisition of the other. This network may accordingly serve as an example of a self-organizing system which minimizes the postulated inherent cross talk between functionally dissiminar representations (Minsky and Papert 1988).

  7. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  8. Genetic algorithm-artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling of antibacterial activity of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolmeh, Mahmoud; Habibi Najafi, Mohammad B; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2014-01-01

    Annatto is commonly used as a coloring agent in the food industry and has antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. In this study, genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) models were used to predict the effect of annatto dye on Salmonella enteritidis in mayonnaise. The GA-ANN and ANFIS were fed with 3 inputs of annatto dye concentration (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4%), storage temperature (4 and 25°C) and storage time (1-20 days) for prediction of S. enteritidis population. Both models were trained with experimental data. The results showed that the annatto dye was able to reduce of S. enteritidis and its effect was stronger at 25°C than 4°C. The developed GA-ANN, which included 8 hidden neurons, could predict S. enteritidis population with correlation coefficient of 0.999. The overall agreement between ANFIS predictions and experimental data was also very good (r=0.998). Sensitivity analysis results showed that storage temperature was the most sensitive factor for prediction of S. enteritidis population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and artificial neural networks for estimation of oxidation parameters of sunflower oil added with some natural byproduct extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Safa; Ozturk, Ismet; Yalcin, Hasan; Kayacier, Ahmed; Sagdic, Osman

    2012-01-15

    Apple pomace, orange peel and potato peel, which have important antioxidative compounds in their structures, are byproducts obtained from fruit or vegetable processing. Use of vegetable extracts is popular and a common technique in the preservation of vegetable oils. Utilization of apple pomace, orange peel and potato peel extracts as natural antioxidant agents in refined sunflower oil during storage in order to reduce or retard oxidation was investigated. All byproduct extracts were added at 3000 ppm to sunflower oil and different nonlinear models were constructed for the estimation of oxidation parameters. Peroxide values of sunflower oil samples containing different natural extracts were found to be lower compared to control sample. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural networks (ANN) were used for the construction of models that could predict the oxidation parameters and were compared to multiple linear regression (MLR) for the determination of the best model with high accuracy. It was shown that the ANFIS model with high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.999) performed better compared to ANN (R(2) = 0.899) and MLR (R(2) = 0.636) for the prediction of oxidation parameters Incorporation of different natural byproduct extracts into sunflower oil provided an important retardation in oxidation during storage. Effective predictive models were constructed for the estimation of oxidation parameters using ANFIS and ANN modeling techniques. These models can be used to predict oxidative parameter values. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Prediction of effect of natural antioxidant compounds on hazelnut oil oxidation by adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Hasan; Ozturk, Ismet; Karaman, Safa; Kisi, Ozgur; Sagdic, Osman; Kayacier, Ahmed

    2011-05-01

    In this study, natural compounds including gallic acid, ellagic acid, quercetin, β-carotene, and retinol were used as antioxidant agents in order to prevent and decrease oxidation in hazelnut oil. Quercetin showed the strongest antioxidative effect among the antioxidative agents, during storage. The accuracy of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network (ANN) models was studied to estimate the oil samples' peroxide value (PV), free fatty acid (FFA), and iodine values (IV). The root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and determination coefficient (R(2)) statistics were used to evaluate the models' accuracy. Comparison of the models showed that the ANFIS model performed better than the ANN and multiple linear regressions (MLR) models for estimating the PV, FFA, and IV. The values of R(2) and RMSE were found to be 0.9966 and 2.51, 0.6269 and 88.55, 0.5120 and 101.8 for the ANFIS, ANN, and MLR models for PV in testing period, respectively. The MLR was found to be insufficient for estimating various properties of the oil samples. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. arXiv The prototype of the HL-LHC magnets monitoring system based on Recurrent Neural Networks and adaptive quantization

    CERN Document Server

    Wielgosz, Maciej; Skoczeń, Andrzej

    This paper focuses on an examination of an applicability of Recurrent Neural Network models for detecting anomalous behavior of the CERN superconducting magnets. In order to conduct the experiments, the authors designed and implemented an adaptive signal quantization algorithm and a custom GRU-based detector and developed a method for the detector parameters selection. Three different datasets were used for testing the detector. Two artificially generated datasets were used to assess the raw performance of the system whereas the 231 MB dataset composed of the signals acquired from HiLumi magnets was intended for real-life experiments and model training. Several different setups of the developed anomaly detection system were evaluated and compared with state-of-the-art OC-SVM reference model operating on the same data. The OC-SVM model was equipped with a rich set of feature extractors accounting for a range of the input signal properties. It was determined in the course of the experiments that the detector, a...

  12. Adaptive Spatial Filter Based on Similarity Indices to Preserve the Neural Information on EEG Signals during On-Line Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Parra, Ana Cecilia; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; López-Delis, Alberto; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a new on-line adaptive filter, which is based on a similarity analysis between standard electrode locations, in order to reduce artifacts and common interferences throughout electroencephalography (EEG) signals, but preserving the useful information. Standard deviation and Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) between target electrodes and its correspondent neighbor electrodes are analyzed on sliding windows to select those neighbors that are highly correlated. Afterwards, a model based on CCC is applied to provide higher values of weight to those correlated electrodes with lower similarity to the target electrode. The approach was applied to brain computer-interfaces (BCIs) based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) to recognize 40 targets of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP), providing an accuracy (ACC) of 86.44 ± 2.81%. In addition, also using this approach, features of low frequency were selected in the pre-processing stage of another BCI to recognize gait planning. In this case, the recognition was significantly (p<0.01) improved for most of the subjects (ACC≥74.79%), when compared with other BCIs based on Common Spatial Pattern, Filter Bank-Common Spatial Pattern, and Riemannian Geometry. PMID:29186848

  13. Adaptive Spatial Filter Based on Similarity Indices to Preserve the Neural Information on EEG Signals during On-Line Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Delisle-Rodriguez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new on-line adaptive filter, which is based on a similarity analysis between standard electrode locations, in order to reduce artifacts and common interferences throughout electroencephalography (EEG signals, but preserving the useful information. Standard deviation and Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC between target electrodes and its correspondent neighbor electrodes are analyzed on sliding windows to select those neighbors that are highly correlated. Afterwards, a model based on CCC is applied to provide higher values of weight to those correlated electrodes with lower similarity to the target electrode. The approach was applied to brain computer-interfaces (BCIs based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA to recognize 40 targets of steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP, providing an accuracy (ACC of 86.44 ± 2.81%. In addition, also using this approach, features of low frequency were selected in the pre-processing stage of another BCI to recognize gait planning. In this case, the recognition was significantly ( p < 0.01 improved for most of the subjects ( A C C ≥ 74.79 % , when compared with other BCIs based on Common Spatial Pattern, Filter Bank-Common Spatial Pattern, and Riemannian Geometry.

  14. Bayesian optimal adaptation explains age-related human sensorimotor changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Faisal; Whitman, Gregory T; Lewis, Richard F

    2017-11-08

    The brain uses information from different sensory systems to guide motor behavior, and aging is associated with a simultaneous decline in the quality of sensory information provided to the brain and a deterioration in motor control. Correlations between age-dependent decline in sensory anatomical structures and behavior have been demonstrated, and it has recently been suggested that a Bayesian framework could explain these relationships. Here we show that age-dependent changes in a human sensorimotor reflex, the vestibulo-ocular reflex, are explained by a Bayesian optimal adaptation in the brain occurring in response to death of motion-sensing hair cells. Specifically, we found that the temporal dynamics of the reflex as a function of age are predicted (r=0.93, pBayesian framework has been shown to be a general neural principle for multimodal sensory integration and dynamic sensory estimation, these findings provide evidence of longitudinal Bayesian processing over the human lifespan. These results illuminate how the aging brain strives to optimize motor behavior when faced with deterioration in the peripheral and central nervous system, and have implications in the field of vestibular and balance disorders, as they will likely provide guidance for physical therapy and for prosthetic aids that aim to reduce falls in the elderly. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  15. Prefrontal cortex and sensory cortices during working memory: quantity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yixuan; Bodner, Mark; Zhou, Yong-Di

    2015-04-01

    The activity in sensory cortices and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) throughout the delay interval of working memory (WM) tasks reflect two aspects of WM-quality and quantity, respectively. The delay activity in sensory cortices is fine-tuned to sensory information and forms the neural basis of the precision of WM storage, while the delay activity in the PFC appears to represent behavioral goals and filters out irrelevant distractions, forming the neural basis of the quantity of task-relevant information in WM. The PFC and sensory cortices interact through different frequency bands of neuronal oscillation (theta, alpha, and gamma) to fulfill goal-directed behaviors.

  16. Neural Dynamics Underlying Event-Related Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankoor S.; Bressler, Steven L.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Ding, Ming-Zhou; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Ulbert, Istvan; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    There are two opposing hypotheses about the brain mechanisms underlying sensory event-related potentials (ERPs). One holds that sensory ERPs are generated by phase resetting of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, and the other that they result from signal averaging of stimulus-evoked neural responses. We tested several contrasting predictions of these hypotheses by direct intracortical analysis of neural activity in monkeys. Our findings clearly demonstrate evoked response contributions to the sensory ERP in the monkey, and they suggest the likelihood that a mixed (Evoked/Phase Resetting) model may account for the generation of scalp ERPs in humans.

  17. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    , for a fixed mean of the odor waveform, independent of the stimulus contrast. This suggests that white noise system identification of Or59b OSNs only depends on the first moment of the odor concentration. Finally, by comparing the 2D Encoding Manifold and the 2D LNP model, we demonstrate that the OSN identification results depend on the particular type of the employed test odor waveforms. This suggests an adaptive neural encoding model for Or59b OSNs that changes its nonlinearity in response to the odor concentration waveforms.

  18. Attenuated Auditory Event-Related Potentials and Associations with Atypical Sensory Response Patterns in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkers, Franc C. L.; Schipul, Sarah E.; Baranek, Grace T.; Cleary, Katherine M.; Willoughby, Michael T.; Evans, Anna M.; Bulluck, John C.; Lovmo, Jeanne E.; Belger, Aysenil

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological underpinnings of unusual sensory features in individuals with autism are unknown. Event-related potentials elicited by task-irrelevant sounds were used to elucidate neural correlates of auditory processing and associations with three common sensory response patterns (hyperresponsiveness; hyporesponsiveness; sensory seeking).…

  19. Approaching neuropsychological tasks through adaptive neurorobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotta, Onofrio; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Miglino, Orazio

    2015-04-01

    Neuropsychological phenomena have been modelized mainly, by the mainstream approach, by attempting to reproduce their neural substrate whereas sensory-motor contingencies have attracted less attention. In this work, we introduce a simulator based on the evolutionary robotics platform Evorobot* in order to setting up in silico neuropsychological tasks. Moreover, in this study we trained artificial embodied neurorobotic agents equipped with a pan/tilt camera, provided with different neural and motor capabilities, to solve a well-known neuropsychological test: the cancellation task in which an individual is asked to cancel target stimuli surrounded by distractors. Results showed that embodied agents provided with additional motor capabilities (a zooming/attentional actuator) outperformed simple pan/tilt agents, even those equipped with more complex neural controllers and that the zooming ability is exploited to correctly categorising presented stimuli. We conclude that since the sole neural computational power cannot explain the (artificial) cognition which emerged throughout the adaptive process, such kind of modelling approach can be fruitful in neuropsychological modelling where the importance of having a body is often neglected.

  20. Development and Training of a Neural Controller for Hind Leg Walking in a Dog Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alexander; Szczecinski, Nicholas; Quinn, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Animals dynamically adapt to varying terrain and small perturbations with remarkable ease. These adaptations arise from complex interactions between the environment and biomechanical and neural components of the animal's body and nervous system. Research into mammalian locomotion has resulted in several neural and neuro-mechanical models, some of which have been tested in simulation, but few “synthetic nervous systems” have been implemented in physical hardware models of animal systems. One reason is that the implementation into a physical system is not straightforward. For example, it is difficult to make robotic actuators and sensors that model those in the animal. Therefore, even if the sensorimotor circuits were known in great detail, those parameters would not be applicable and new parameter values must be found for the network in the robotic model of the animal. This manuscript demonstrates an automatic method for setting parameter values in a synthetic nervous system composed of non-spiking leaky integrator neuron models. This method works by first using a model of the system to determine required motor neuron activations to produce stable walking. Parameters in the neural system are then tuned systematically such that it produces similar activations to the desired pattern determined using expected sensory feedback. We demonstrate that the developed method successfully produces adaptive locomotion in the rear legs of a dog-like robot actuated by artificial muscles. Furthermore, the results support the validity of current models of mammalian locomotion. This research will serve as a basis for testing more complex locomotion controllers and for testing specific sensory pathways and biomechanical designs. Additionally, the developed method can be used to automatically adapt the neural controller for different mechanical designs such that it could be used to control different robotic systems. PMID:28420977

  1. Sensory modulation disorders in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Campen, Jolien S; Jansen, Floor E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815640; Kleinrensink, Nienke J; Joëls, Marian|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070219249; Braun, Kees Pj|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207237239; Bruining, Hilgo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304811440

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Altered sensory sensitivity is generally linked to seizure-susceptibility in childhood epilepsy but may also be associated to the highly prevalent problems in behavioral adaptation. This association is further suggested by the frequent overlap of childhood epilepsy with autism spectrum

  2. Automated tracking of animal posture and movement during exploration and sensory orientation behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gomez-Marin

    Full Text Available The nervous functions of an organism are primarily reflected in the behavior it is capable of. Measuring behavior quantitatively, at high-resolution and in an automated fashion provides valuable information about the underlying neural circuit computation. Accordingly, computer-vision applications for animal tracking are becoming a key complementary toolkit to genetic, molecular and electrophysiological characterization in systems neuroscience.We present Sensory Orientation Software (SOS to measure behavior and infer sensory experience correlates. SOS is a simple and versatile system to track body posture and motion of single animals in two-dimensional environments. In the presence of a sensory landscape, tracking the trajectory of the animal's sensors and its postural evolution provides a quantitative framework to study sensorimotor integration. To illustrate the utility of SOS, we examine the orientation behavior of fruit fly larvae in response to odor, temperature and light gradients. We show that SOS is suitable to carry out high-resolution behavioral tracking for a wide range of organisms including flatworms, fishes and mice.Our work contributes to the growing repertoire of behavioral analysis tools for collecting rich and fine-grained data to draw and test hypothesis about the functioning of the nervous system. By providing open-access to our code and documenting the software design, we aim to encourage the adaptation of SOS by a wide community of non-specialists to their particular model organism and questions of interest.

  3. Sensing deep extreme environments: the receptor cell types, brain centers, and multi-layer neural packaging of hydrothermal vent endemic worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ogura, Atsushi; Mori, Tsukasa; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Takao; Tsuchida, Shinji; Fujikura, Katsunori

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea alvinellid worm species endemic to hydrothermal vents, such as Alvinella and Paralvinella, are considered to be among the most thermotolerant animals known with their adaptability to toxic heavy metals, and tolerance of highly reductive and oxidative stressful environments. Despite the number of recent studies focused on their overall transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolic stabilities, little is known regarding their sensory receptor cells and electrically active neuro-processing centers, and how these can tolerate and function in such harsh conditions. We examined the extra- and intracellular organizations of the epidermal ciliated sensory cells and their higher centers in the central nervous system through immunocytochemical, ultrastructural, and neurotracing analyses. We observed that these cells were rich in mitochondria and possessed many electron-dense granules, and identified specialized glial cells and serial myelin-like repeats in the head sensory systems of Paralvinella hessleri. Additionally, we identified the major epidermal sensory pathways, in which a pair of distinct mushroom bodies-like or small interneuron clusters was observed. These sensory learning and memory systems are commonly found in insects and annelids, but the alvinellid inputs are unlikely derived from the sensory ciliary cells of the dorsal head regions. Our evidence provides insight into the cellular and system-wide adaptive structure used to sense, process, and combat the deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment. The alvinellid sensory cells exhibit characteristics of annelid ciliary types, and among the most unique features were the head sensory inputs and structure of the neural cell bodies of the brain, which were surrounded by multiple membranes. We speculated that such enhanced protection is required for the production of normal electrical signals, and to avoid the breakdown of the membrane surrounding metabolically fragile neurons from oxidative stress. Such pivotal

  4. Modeling and simulation of a stand-alone photovoltaic system using an adaptive artificial neural network: Proposition for a new sizing procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellit, A. [University Centre of Medea, Institute of Science Engineering, Medea (Algeria). Department of Electronics; Benghanem, M. [University of Sciences and Technologies Houari Boumadiene, Algiers (Algeria). Faculty of Electrical Engineering; Kalogirou, S.A. [Higher Technical Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents an adaptive artificial neural network (ANN) for modeling and simulation of a Stand-Alone photovoltaic (SAPV) system operating under variable climatic conditions. The ANN combines the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LM) with an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter in order to accelerate the convergence of the network. SAPV systems are widely used in renewable energy source (RES) applications and it is important to be able to evaluate the performance of installed systems. The modeling of the complete SAPV system is achieved by combining the models of the different components of the system (PV-generator, battery and regulator). A global model can identify the SAPV characteristics by knowing only the climatological conditions. In addition, a new procedure proposed for SAPV system sizing is presented in this work. Different measured signals of solar radiation sequences and electrical parameters (photovoltaic voltage and current) from a SAPV system installed at the south of Algeria have been recorded during a period of 5-years. These signals have been used for the training and testing the developed models, one for each component of the system and a global model of the complete system. The ANN model predictions allow the users of SAPV systems to predict the different signals for each model and identify the output current of the system for different climatological conditions. The comparison between simulated and experimental signals of the SAPV gave good results. The correlation coefficient obtained varies from 90% to 96% for each estimated signals, which is considered satisfactory. A comparison between multilayer perceptron (MLP), radial basis function (RBF) network and the proposed LM-IIR model is presented in order to confirm the advantage of this model. (author)

  5. Auditory P3a and P3b neural generators in schizophrenia: An adaptive sLORETA P300 localization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachiller, Alejandro; Romero, Sergio; Molina, Vicente; Alonso, Joan F; Mañanas, Miguel A; Poza, Jesús; Hornero, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigates the neural substrates underlying cognitive processing in schizophrenia (Sz) patients. To this end, an auditory 3-stimulus oddball paradigm was used to identify P3a and P3b components, elicited by rare-distractor and rare-target tones, respectively. Event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded from 31 Sz patients and 38 healthy controls. The P3a and P3b brain-source generators were identified by time-averaging of low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) current density images. In contrast with the commonly used fixed window of interest (WOI), we proposed to apply an adaptive WOI, which takes into account subjects' P300 latency variability. Our results showed different P3a and P3b source activation patterns in both groups. P3b sources included frontal, parietal and limbic lobes, whereas P3a response generators were localized over bilateral frontal and superior temporal regions. These areas have been related to the discrimination of auditory stimulus and to the inhibition (P3a) or the initiation (P3b) of motor response in a cognitive task. In addition, differences in source localization between Sz and control groups were observed. Sz patients showed lower P3b source activity in bilateral frontal structures and the cingulate. P3a generators were less widespread for Sz patients than for controls in right superior, medial and middle frontal gyrus. Our findings suggest that target and distractor processing involves distinct attentional subsystems, both being altered in Sz. Hence, the study of neuroelectric brain information can provide further insights to understand cognitive processes and underlying mechanisms in Sz. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term, passive exposure to non-traumatic acoustic noise induces neural adaptation in the adult rat medial geniculate body and auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Condon; Zhang, Jevin W; McPherson, Bradley; Pienkowski, Martin; Wu, Ed X

    2015-02-15

    Exposure to loud sounds can lead to permanent hearing loss, i.e., the elevation of hearing thresholds. Exposure at more moderate sound pressure levels (SPLs) (non-traumatic and within occupational limits) may not elevate thresholds, but could in the long-term be detrimental to speech intelligibility by altering its spectrotemporal representation in the central auditory system. In support of this, electrophysiological and behavioral changes following long-term, passive (no conditioned learning) exposure at moderate SPLs have recently been observed in adult animals. To assess the potential effects of moderately loud noise on the entire auditory brain, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study noise-exposed adult rats. We find that passive, pulsed broadband noise exposure for two months at 65 dB SPL leads to a decrease of the sound-evoked blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI signal in the thalamic medial geniculate body (MGB) and in the auditory cortex (AC). This points to the thalamo-cortex as the site of the neural adaptation to the moderately noisy environment. The signal reduction is statistically significant during 10 Hz pulsed acoustic stimulation (MGB: pnoise exposure has a greater effect on the processing of higher pulse rate sounds. This study has enhanced our understanding of functional changes following exposure by mapping changes across the entire auditory brain. These findings have important implications for speech processing, which depends on accurate processing of sounds with a wide spectrum of pulse rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pedestrian Detection Based on Adaptive Selection of Visible Light or Far-Infrared Light Camera Image by Fuzzy Inference System and Convolutional Neural Network-Based Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Kyu; Hong, Hyung Gil; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-07-08

    A number of studies have been conducted to enhance the pedestrian detection accuracy of intelligent surveillance systems. However, detecting pedestrians under outdoor conditions is a challenging problem due to the varying lighting, shadows, and occlusions. In recent times, a growing number of studies have been performed on visible light camera-based pedestrian detection systems using a convolutional neural network (CNN) in order to make the pedestrian detection process more resilient to such conditions. However, visible light cameras still cannot detect pedestrians during nighttime, and are easily affected by shadows and lighting. There are many studies on CNN-based pedestrian detection through the use of far-infrared (FIR) light cameras (i.e., thermal cameras) to address such difficulties. However, when the solar radiation increases and the background temperature reaches the same level as the body temperature, it remains difficult for the FIR light camera to detect pedestrians due to the insignificant difference between the pedestrian and non-pedestrian features within the images. Researchers have been trying to solve this issue by inputting both the visible light and the FIR camera images into the CNN as the input. This, however, takes a longer time to process, and makes the system structure more complex as the CNN needs to process both camera images. This research adaptively selects a more appropriate candidate between two pedestrian images from visible light and FIR cameras based on a fuzzy inference system (FIS), and the selected candidate is verified with a CNN. Three types of databases were tested, taking into account various environmental factors using visible light and FIR cameras. The results showed that the proposed method performs better than the previously reported methods.

  8. Perspectives on sensory processing disorder: a call for translational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy J Miller

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the convergence of two fields, which have similar theoretical origins: a clinical field originally known as sensory integration and a branch of neuroscience that conducts research in an area also called sensory integration. Clinically, the term was used to identify a pattern of dysfunction in children and adults, as well as a related theory, assessment, and treatment method for children who have atypical responses to ordinary sensory stimulation. Currently the term for the disorder is Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD. In neuroscience, the term sensory integration refers to converging information in the brain from one or more sensory domains. A recent subspecialty in neuroscience labeled multisensory integration (MSI refers to the neural process that occurs when sensory input from two or more different sensory modalities converge. Understanding the specific meanings of the term sensory integration intended by the clinical and neuroscience fields and the term multisensory integration in neuroscience is critical. A translational research approach would improve exploration of crucial research questions in both the basic science and clinical science. Refinement of the conceptual model of the disorder and the related treatment approach would help prioritize which specific hypotheses should be studied in both the clinical and neuroscience fields. The issue is how we can facilitate a translational approach between researchers in the two fields. Multidisciplinary, collaborative studies would increase knowledge of brain function and could make a significant contribution to alleviating the impairments of individuals with SPD and their families.

  9. Perspectives on sensory processing disorder: a call for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lucy J; Nielsen, Darci M; Schoen, Sarah A; Brett-Green, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    THIS ARTICLE EXPLORES THE CONVERGENCE OF TWO FIELDS, WHICH HAVE SIMILAR THEORETICAL ORIGINS: a clinical field originally known as sensory integration and a branch of neuroscience that conducts research in an area also called sensory integration. Clinically, the term was used to identify a pattern of dysfunction in children and adults, as well as a related theory, assessment, and treatment method for children who have atypical responses to ordinary sensory stimulation. Currently the term for the disorder is sensory processing disorder (SPD). In neuroscience, the term sensory integration refers to converging information in the brain from one or more sensory domains. A recent subspecialty in neuroscience labeled multisensory integration (MSI) refers to the neural process that occurs when sensory input from two or more different sensory modalities converge. Understanding the specific meanings of the term sensory integration intended by the clinical and neuroscience fields and the term MSI in neuroscience is critical. A translational research approach would improve exploration of crucial research questions in both the basic science and clinical science. Refinement of the conceptual model of the disorder and the related treatment approach would help prioritize which specific hypotheses should be studied in both the clinical and neuroscience fields. The issue is how we can facilitate a translational approach between researchers in the two fields. Multidisciplinary, collaborative studies would increase knowledge of brain function and could make a significant contribution to alleviating the impairments of individuals with SPD and their families.

  10. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Sensory Modulation Disorder: A Comparison of Behavior and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lucy Jane; Nielsen, Darci M.; Schoen, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are impulsive, inattentive and hyperactive, while children with sensory modulation disorder (SMD), one subtype of Sensory Processing Disorder, have difficulty responding adaptively to daily sensory experiences. ADHD and SMD are often difficult to distinguish. To differentiate these…

  11. UNCOMMON SENSORY METHODOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Vietoris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensory science is the young but the rapidly developing field of the food industry. Actually, the great emphasis is given to the production of rapid techniques of data collection, the difference between consumers and trained panel is obscured and the role of sensory methodologists is to prepare the ways for evaluation, by which a lay panel (consumers can achieve identical results as a trained panel. Currently, there are several conventional methods of sensory evaluation of food (ISO standards, but more sensory laboratories are developing methodologies that are not strict enough in the selection of evaluators, their mechanism is easily understandable and the results are easily interpretable. This paper deals with mapping of marginal methods used in sensory evaluation of food (new types of profiles, CATA, TDS, napping.

  12. Sensory correlations in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Janet K; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Grannemann, Bruce D; Garver, Carolyn R; Johnson, Danny G; Andrews, Alonzo A; Savla, Jayshree S; Mehta, Jyutika A; Schroeder, Jennifer L

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between auditory, visual, touch, and oral sensory dysfunction in autism and their relationship to multisensory dysfunction and severity of autism. The Sensory Profile was completed on 104 persons with a diagnosis of autism, 3 to 56 years of age. Analysis showed a significant correlation between the different processing modalities using total scores. Analysis also showed a significant correlation between processing modalities for both high and low thresholds, with the exception that auditory high threshold processing did not correlate with oral low threshold or touch low threshold processing. Examination of the different age groups suggests that sensory disturbance correlates with severity of autism in children, but not in adolescents and adults. Evidence from this study suggests that: all the main modalities and multisensory processing appear to be affected; sensory processing dysfunction in autism is global in nature; and sensory processing problems need to be considered part of the disorder.

  13. Accessibility and sensory experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses...... and accessibility. Sensory accessibility accommodates aspects of a sensory disability and describes