WorldWideScience

Sample records for networking coordination group

  1. Actions of health group coordinators within the teaching/care network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luciane de Medeiros dos; Oliveira, Eleonora Menicucci de; Crepaldi, Maria Aparecida; Da Ros, Marco Aurélio

    2010-02-01

    To analyze the model for actions by health promotion group coordinators, in primary healthcare units with links to professional training. A qualitative study was carried out in the municipality of Florianópolis, Southern Brazil, in 2001. Four groups were evaluated, over a total of 24 sessions at primary healthcare units. Participant observation was performed to start the fieldwork. The reports were analyzed by means of the technique of enunciative-pragmatic discourse analysis. The types of action among the coordinators that were congruent with the preventive model were: oppression, bench teaching, biologism and higienism, prescription of approaches, blame apportionment, infantilization, reduction of collective problems, denigration of group settings and use of monologue. The types of action consonant with the new promotion model were: facilitation of free expression and autonomy, empathetic communication, constructivism, receptiveness, active listening and promotion of overcoming of violence and alienation. The coordinators acted primarily by means of the preventive model, without using technical and theoretical resources that allude to group methodology in the field of healthcare. The actions within the preventive and new health promotion models that were identified reveal characteristics that are grounded in, respectively, the ethics of oppression/subordination of users and cooperation/acceptance of users as free and responsible for their choices and consequences.

  2. Coordinating Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  3. Coordination Games on Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Pestelacci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model in which agents of a population interacting according to a network of contacts play games of coordination with each other and can also dynamically break and redirect links to neighbors if they are unsatisfied. As a result, there is co-evolution of strategies in the population and of the graph that represents the network of contacts. We apply the model to the class of pure and general coordination games. For pure coordination games, the networks co-evolve towards the polarization of different strategies. In the case of general coordination games our results show that the possibility of refusing neighbors and choosing different partners increases the success rate of the Pareto-dominant equilibrium.

  4. 77 FR 58416 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN); Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO... to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The government seeks...

  5. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO... Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The government seeks individual input; attendees...

  6. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Middleware And Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO... Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The...

  7. Astroglial networks promote neuronal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chever, Oana; Dossi, Elena; Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-12

    Astrocytes interact with neurons to regulate network activity. Although the gap junction subunits connexin 30 and connexin 43 mediate the formation of extensive astroglial networks that cover large functional neuronal territories, their role in neuronal synchronization remains unknown. Using connexin 30- and connexin 43-deficient mice, we showed that astroglial networks promoted sustained population bursts in hippocampal slices by setting the basal active state of neurons. Astroglial networks limited excessive neuronal depolarization induced by spontaneous synaptic activity, increased neuronal release probability, and favored the recruitment of neurons during bursting, thus promoting the coordinated activation of neuronal networks. In vivo, this sustained neuronal coordination translated into increased severity of acutely evoked epileptiform events and convulsive behavior. These results revealed that connexin-mediated astroglial networks synchronize bursting of neuronal assemblies, which can exacerbate pathological network activity and associated behavior. Our data thus provide molecular and biophysical evidence predicting selective astroglial gap junction inhibitors as anticonvulsive drugs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. coordination polymer with a coordinated nitro group of 2-nitrobenzoate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    For correspondence. A one-dimensional barium(II) coordination polymer with a coordinated nitro group of 2-nitrobenzoate*. BIKSHANDARKOIL R SRINIVASAN. 1,#. , SANTOSH Y SHETGAONKAR. 1 and. PALLEPOGU RAGHAVAIAH. 1,2. 1. Department of Chemistry, Goa University, Goa 403 206. 2. School of Chemistry ...

  9. Coordinating knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Johansen, John; Boer, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Along with increasing globalization, the management of international manufacturing networks is becoming increasingly important for industrial companies. This paper mainly focuses on the coordination of knowledge transfer within manufacturing networks. In this context, we propose the time-place ma...

  10. Unpacking Coordination Benefits in Supply Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrick, Irene J.; Maitland, Carleen; Pogrebnyakov, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how coordination among firms in supply networks generates benefits in the short and long terms for firms. It focuses on information technology (IT) and process improvement coordination. Analysis was performed on quantitative and qualitative data from a sample of SMEs in plastics......). These results extend the understanding of how participation in supply networks benefits individual firms....

  11. Adaptive group coordination and role differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Roberts

    Full Text Available Many real world situations (potluck dinners, academic departments, sports teams, corporate divisions, committees, seminar classes, etc. involve actors adjusting their contributions in order to achieve a mutually satisfactory group goal, a win-win result. However, the majority of human group research has involved situations where groups perform poorly because task constraints promote either individual maximization behavior or diffusion of responsibility, and even successful tasks generally involve the propagation of one correct solution through a group. Here we introduce a group task that requires complementary actions among participants in order to reach a shared goal. Without communication, group members submit numbers in an attempt to collectively sum to a randomly selected target number. After receiving group feedback, members adjust their submitted numbers until the target number is reached. For all groups, performance improves with task experience, and group reactivity decreases over rounds. Our empirical results provide evidence for adaptive coordination in human groups, and as the coordination costs increase with group size, large groups adapt through spontaneous role differentiation and self-consistency among members. We suggest several agent-based models with different rules for agent reactions, and we show that the empirical results are best fit by a flexible, adaptive agent strategy in which agents decrease their reactions when the group feedback changes. The task offers a simple experimental platform for studying the general problem of group coordination while maximizing group returns, and we distinguish the task from several games in behavioral game theory.

  12. Learning and coordinating in a multilayer network

    CERN Document Server

    Lugo, Haydee

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a two layer network model for social coordination incorporating two relevant ingredients: a) different networks of interaction to learn and to obtain a payoff , and b) decision making processes based both on social and strategic motivations. Two populations of agents are distributed in two layers with intralayer learning processes and playing interlayer a coordination game. We find that the skepticism about the wisdom of crowd and the local connectivity are the driving forces to accomplish full coordination of the two populations, while polarized coordinated layers are only possible for all-to-all interactions. Local interactions also allow for full coordination in the socially efficient Pareto-dominant strategy in spite of being the riskier one.

  13. Learning and coordinating in a multilayer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Haydée; Miguel, Maxi San

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a two layer network model for social coordination incorporating two relevant ingredients: a) different networks of interaction to learn and to obtain a pay-off, and b) decision making processes based both on social and strategic motivations. Two populations of agents are distributed in two layers with intralayer learning processes and playing interlayer a coordination game. We find that the skepticism about the wisdom of crowd and the local connectivity are the driving forces to accomplish full coordination of the two populations, while polarized coordinated layers are only possible for all-to-all interactions. Local interactions also allow for full coordination in the socially efficient Pareto-dominant strategy in spite of being the riskier one.

  14. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bylaws, SOPs, and Guidelines Leadership and Operations Center Network Coordinating Center Statistical and Data Management Center Performance ... Accessibility Our Mission The mission of the ACTG Network is to cure HIV infection and reduce the ...

  15. Coordinated Platoon Routing in a Metropolitan Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Jeffrey; Munson, Todd; Sokolov, Vadim

    2016-10-10

    Platooning vehicles—connected and automated vehicles traveling with small intervehicle distances—use less fuel because of reduced aerodynamic drag. Given a network de- fined by vertex and edge sets and a set of vehicles with origin/destination nodes/times, we model and solve the combinatorial optimization problem of coordinated routing of vehicles in a manner that routes them to their destination on time while using the least amount of fuel. Common approaches decompose the platoon coordination and vehicle routing into separate problems. Our model addresses both problems simultaneously to obtain the best solution. We use modern modeling techniques and constraints implied from analyzing the platoon routing problem to address larger numbers of vehicles and larger networks than previously considered. While the numerical method used is unable to certify optimality for candidate solutions to all networks and parameters considered, we obtain excellent solutions in approximately one minute for much larger networks and vehicle sets than previously considered in the literature.

  16. Coordinated Voltage Control of Active Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a centralized coordinated voltage control method for active distribution network to solve off-limit problem of voltage after incorporation of distributed generation (DG. The proposed method consists of two parts, it coordinated primal-dual interior point method-based voltage regulation schemes of DG reactive powers and capacitors with centralized on-load tap changer (OLTC controlling method which utilizes system’s maximum and minimum voltages, to improve the qualified rate of voltage and reduce the operation numbers of OLTC. The proposed coordination has considered the cost of capacitors. The method is tested using a radial edited IEEE-33 nodes distribution network which is modelled using MATLAB.

  17. Towards an International Polar Data Coordination Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P L Pulsifer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data management is integral to sound polar science. Through analysis of documents reporting on meetings of the Arctic data management community, a set of priorities and strategies are identified. These include the need to improve data sharing, make use of existing resources, and better engage stakeholders. Network theory is applied to a preliminary inventory of polar and global data management actors to improve understanding of the emerging community of practice. Under the name the Arctic Data Coordination Network, we propose a model network that can support the community in achieving their goals through improving connectivity between existing actors.

  18. Symmetry and Reduction for Coordinated Rigid Body Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hanszligmann, H; Smith, T R

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by interest in the collective behavior of autonomous agents, we study networks of rigid bodies and the problem of coordinated orientation and position across the group. Our main result is the reduction of the networked system in the case that individuals are coupled by control inputs that depend only on relative configuration. We use reduction theory based on semi-direct products; this yields flat Poisson spaces which enable efficient formulation of control laws. In the second part of the paper, we apply the reduction results to particular choices of kinetic energy and prove stability of coordinated behaviors.

  19. Building AN International Polar Data Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsifer, P. L.; Yarmey, L.; Manley, W. F.; Gaylord, A. G.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    discuss remaining challenges. Lastly, to establish a sustainable Arctic Data Coordination Network (ADCN) as part of a broader polar Network will require adequate continued resources. We conclude by outlining proposed business models for the emerging Arctic Data Coordination Network and a broader polar Network.

  20. Coordinated Multicast Beamforming in Multicell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Zhengzheng; Tao, Meixia; Wang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    We study physical layer multicasting in multicell networks where each base station, equipped with multiple antennas, transmits a common message using a single beamformer to multiple users in the same cell. We investigate two coordinated beamforming designs: the quality-of-service (QoS) beamforming and the max-min SINR (signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio) beamforming. The goal of the QoS beamforming is to minimize the total power consumption while guaranteeing that received SINR at each u...

  1. 22 CFR 94.8 - Interagency coordinating group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interagency coordinating group. 94.8 Section 94... § 94.8 Interagency coordinating group. The U.S. Central Authority shall nominate federal employees and may, from time to time, nominate private citizens to serve on an interagency coordinating group to...

  2. Coordination mechanisms and software in industrial networks - a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mittermayer, Herwig; Rodríguez Monroy, Carlos; Pelaez Garcia, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    This paper groups recent supply chain management research focused on organizational design and its software support. The classification encompasses criteria related to research methodology and content. Empirical studies from management science focus on network types and organizational fit. Novel planning algorithms and innovative coordination schemes are developed mostly in the field of operations research in order to propose new software features. Operations and production management realize...

  3. How coordination trajectories influence the performance of interorganizational project networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros de Oliveira, N.R.; Lumineau, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how the joint use of integrators and contracts either enables or hampers coordination and, in turn, the performance of interorganizational project networks. Using extensive qualitative analyses and socio-metric techniques, we investigated coordination among organizations during

  4. A regulatory network for coordinated flower maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H Reeves

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available For self-pollinating plants to reproduce, male and female organ development must be coordinated as flowers mature. The Arabidopsis transcription factors AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 6 (ARF6 and ARF8 regulate this complex process by promoting petal expansion, stamen filament elongation, anther dehiscence, and gynoecium maturation, thereby ensuring that pollen released from the anthers is deposited on the stigma of a receptive gynoecium. ARF6 and ARF8 induce jasmonate production, which in turn triggers expression of MYB21 and MYB24, encoding R2R3 MYB transcription factors that promote petal and stamen growth. To understand the dynamics of this flower maturation regulatory network, we have characterized morphological, chemical, and global gene expression phenotypes of arf, myb, and jasmonate pathway mutant flowers. We found that MYB21 and MYB24 promoted not only petal and stamen development but also gynoecium growth. As well as regulating reproductive competence, both the ARF and MYB factors promoted nectary development or function and volatile sesquiterpene production, which may attract insect pollinators and/or repel pathogens. Mutants lacking jasmonate synthesis or response had decreased MYB21 expression and stamen and petal growth at the stage when flowers normally open, but had increased MYB21 expression in petals of older flowers, resulting in renewed and persistent petal expansion at later stages. Both auxin response and jasmonate synthesis promoted positive feedbacks that may ensure rapid petal and stamen growth as flowers open. MYB21 also fed back negatively on expression of jasmonate biosynthesis pathway genes to decrease flower jasmonate level, which correlated with termination of growth after flowers have opened. These dynamic feedbacks may promote timely, coordinated, and transient growth of flower organs.

  5. A regulatory network for coordinated flower maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Paul H; Ellis, Christine M; Ploense, Sara E; Wu, Miin-Feng; Yadav, Vandana; Tholl, Dorothea; Chételat, Aurore; Haupt, Ina; Kennerley, Brian J; Hodgens, Charles; Farmer, Edward E; Nagpal, Punita; Reed, Jason W

    2012-02-01

    For self-pollinating plants to reproduce, male and female organ development must be coordinated as flowers mature. The Arabidopsis transcription factors AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 6 (ARF6) and ARF8 regulate this complex process by promoting petal expansion, stamen filament elongation, anther dehiscence, and gynoecium maturation, thereby ensuring that pollen released from the anthers is deposited on the stigma of a receptive gynoecium. ARF6 and ARF8 induce jasmonate production, which in turn triggers expression of MYB21 and MYB24, encoding R2R3 MYB transcription factors that promote petal and stamen growth. To understand the dynamics of this flower maturation regulatory network, we have characterized morphological, chemical, and global gene expression phenotypes of arf, myb, and jasmonate pathway mutant flowers. We found that MYB21 and MYB24 promoted not only petal and stamen development but also gynoecium growth. As well as regulating reproductive competence, both the ARF and MYB factors promoted nectary development or function and volatile sesquiterpene production, which may attract insect pollinators and/or repel pathogens. Mutants lacking jasmonate synthesis or response had decreased MYB21 expression and stamen and petal growth at the stage when flowers normally open, but had increased MYB21 expression in petals of older flowers, resulting in renewed and persistent petal expansion at later stages. Both auxin response and jasmonate synthesis promoted positive feedbacks that may ensure rapid petal and stamen growth as flowers open. MYB21 also fed back negatively on expression of jasmonate biosynthesis pathway genes to decrease flower jasmonate level, which correlated with termination of growth after flowers have opened. These dynamic feedbacks may promote timely, coordinated, and transient growth of flower organs.

  6. Facilitating Group Decision-Making: Facilitator's Subjective Theories on Group Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Kolbe

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A key feature of group facilitation is motivating and coordinating people to perform their joint work. This paper focuses on group coordination which is a prerequisite to group effectiveness, especially in complex tasks. Decision-making in groups is a complex task that consequently needs to be coordinated by explicit rather than implicit coordination mechanisms. Based on the embedded definition that explicit coordination does not just happen but is purposely executed by individuals, we argue that individual coordination intentions and mechanisms should be taken into account. Thus far, the subjective perspective of coordination has been neglected in coordination theory, which is understandable given the difficulties in defining and measuring subjective aspects of group facilitation. We therefore conducted focused interviews with eight experts who either worked as senior managers or as experienced group facilitators and analysed their approaches to group coordination using methods of content analysis. Results show that these experts possess sophisticated mental representations of their coordination behaviour. These subjective coordination theories can be organised in terms of coordination schemes in which coordination-releasing situations are facilitated by special coordination mechanisms that, in turn, lead to the perception of specific consequences. We discuss the importance of these subjective coordination theories for effectively facilitating group decision-making and minimising process losses. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0901287

  7. The emergence of leadership in coordination-intensive groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Bond, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    Although group coordination was introduced to psychology in the early 1990s, it was not until the advent of nonlinear dynamical systems (NDS) that it was possible to gain an understanding of how the process of implicit learning and self-organization take place in conditions where no hierarchical (management) influences are involved. This experimental study examined how leaders might emerge from coordination-intensive task groups where verbal interaction is not possible. NDS and game-theoretical research indicate that the presence of leaders is not required to produce coordination. Thus the question remains as to whether leaders would emerge from coordination-intensive task groups in the similar manner to how they emerge from other types of groups. In the experiment, 13 4-person groups were allowed to discuss the coordination (card game) task while performing it; 13 other groups worked nonverbally. Split-plot ANOVA showed that verbalizing groups performed better than nonverbalizing groups overall and showed more acute coordination learning curves. Nonlinear regression for temporal dynamics within verbalizing and nonverbalizing groups showed asymptotic stability for initial coordination learning and transfer to a coordination rule of equal difficulty, but a chaotic function was observed when the teams switched to a more difficult coordination rule. A questionnaire measured leadership emergence at the end of the game along with other social contributions to the groups' efforts. The average level of leadership emergence for individuals did not differ between verbal and nonverbal conditions, although differences in other social contributions were observed. This experiment illustrates, furthermore, how the nonlinear science paradigm produces new hypotheses concerning verbalization that would not have been formulated otherwise. New avenues of study concerning coordination, leadership, and hierarchies are also discussed.

  8. Effect of mean network coordination number on dispersivity characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilyev, L.; Raoof, A.; Nordbotten, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the role of topology on the macroscopic (centimeter scale) dispersion characteristics derived from pore-network models.We consider 3D random porous networks extracted from a regular cubic lattice with coordination number distributed in accordance with real porous

  9. Interference Coordination for Dense Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of ubiquitous and super-fast connectivity for the upcoming years will be in large part fulfilled by the addition of base stations and spectral aggregation. The resulting very dense networks (DenseNets) will face a number of technical challenges. Among others, the interference emerges...

  10. Evolutionary Trends of Developer Coordination: A Network Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Joblin, Mitchell; Apel, Sven; Mauerer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Software evolution is a fundamental process that transcends the realm of technical artifacts and permeates the entire organizational structure of a software project. By means of a longitudinal empirical study of 18 large open-source projects, we examine and discuss the evolutionary principles that govern the coordination of developers. By applying a network-analytic approach, we found that the implicit and self-organizing structure of developer coordination is ubiquitously described by non-ra...

  11. Insulation Coordination in Modern Distribution Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Tossani, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The appropriate analysis of the response of distribution networks against Lightning Electro Magnetic Pulse (LEMP) – originated by nearby strikes – requires the availability of accurate coupling models in order to reproduce the real and complex configuration of distribution systems. The above models represent a fundamental tool for estimating the number of protective devices and their most appropriate location in order to guarantee a given minimum number of flashovers and outages per year....

  12. Coordinated Sensing in Intelligent Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Chong

    2013-01-01

    The cost and size of video sensors has led to camera networks becoming pervasive in our lives. However, the ability to analyze these images efficiently is very much a function of the quality of the acquired images. Human control of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras is impractical and unreliable when high quality images are needed of multiple events distributed over a large area. This dissertation considers the problem of automatically controlling the fields of view of individual cameras in a camera...

  13. Coordinated group response to nest intruders in social shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Tóth, Eva; Duffy, J. Emmett

    2005-01-01

    A key characteristic of highly social animals is collective group response to important stimuli such as invasion by enemies. The marine societies of social snapping shrimp share many convergences with terrestrial eusocial animals, including aggressive reaction to strangers, but no group actions have yet been observed in shrimp. Here we describe ‘coordinated snapping’, during which a sentinel shrimp reacts to danger by recruiting other colony members to snap in concert for several to tens of s...

  14. Experiments in the coordination of large groups of robots

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano Marcolino, Leandro; Chaimowicz, Luiz

    2008-01-01

    The use of large groups of robots, generally called swarms, has gained increased attention in recent years. In this paper, we present and experimentally validate an algorithm that allows a swarm of robots to navigate in an environment containing unknown obstacles. A coordination mechanism based on dynamic role assignment and local communication is used to help robots that may get stuck in regions of local minima. Experiments were performed using both a realistic simulator and a group of real ...

  15. On Money as a Means of Coordination between Network Packets

    OpenAIRE

    Efraimidis, Pavlos S.; Koutsiamanis, Remous-Aris

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we apply a common economic tool, namely money, to coordinate network packets. In particular, we present a network economy, called PacketEconomy, where each flow is modeled as a population of rational network packets, and these packets can self-regulate their access to network resources by mutually trading their positions in router queues. Every packet of the economy has its price, and this price determines if and when the packet will agree to buy or sell a better position. We co...

  16. Coordination in networks for improved mental health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Hansson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-organised clinical cooperation between health and social services has been difficult to achieve in Sweden as in other countries. Purpose: This paper presents an empirical study of a mental health coordination network in one area in Stockholm. The aim was to describe the development and nature of coordination within a mental health and social care consortium and to assess the impact on care processes and client outcomes. Method: Data was gathered through interviews with coordina­tors from three rehabilitation units. The interviews focused on coordination activities aimed at supporting the clients’ needs and investigated how the coordinators acted according to the consortium's holistic approach. Data on The Camberwell Assess­ment of Need (CAN-S showing clients’ satisfaction was used to assess on set of outcomes. Findings: The findings revealed different coordination activities and factors both helping and hindering the network coordination activities. One factor helping was the history of local and personal informal cooperation and shared responsibilities evident. Unclear roles and routines hindered cooperation Practical value: The contribution is an empirical example and a model for organisations establishing structures for network coordination. One lesson for current policy about integrated health care is to adapt and implement ”pair coordinators” where full structural integration is not possible. Another lesson, based on the idea of patient quality by coordinated care, is specific to adapt the work of the local psychiatric addictive team – an independent special team in the psychiatric outpatient care serving psychotic clients with complex addictive problems.

  17. Coordination in networks for improved mental health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Hansson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-organised clinical cooperation between health and social services has been difficult to achieve in Sweden as in other countries.Purpose: This paper presents an empirical study of a mental health coordination network in one area in Stockholm. The aim was to describe the development and nature of coordination within a mental health and social care consortium and to assess the impact on care processes and client outcomes.Method: Data was gathered through interviews with coordina­tors from three rehabilitation units. The interviews focused on coordination activities aimed at supporting the clients’ needs and investigated how the coordinators acted according to the consortium's holistic approach. Data on The Camberwell Assess­ment of Need (CAN-S showing clients’ satisfaction was used to assess on set of outcomes. Findings: The findings revealed different coordination activities and factors both helping and hindering the network coordination activities. One factor helping was the history of local and personal informal cooperation and shared responsibilities evident. Unclear roles and routines hindered cooperationPractical value: The contribution is an empirical example and a model for organisations establishing structures for network coordination. One lesson for current policy about integrated health care is to adapt and implement ”pair coordinators” where full structural integration is not possible. Another lesson, based on the idea of patient quality by coordinated care, is specific to adapt the work of the local psychiatric addictive team – an independent special team in the psychiatric outpatient care serving psychotic clients with complex addictive problems.

  18. Coordinated group response to nest intruders in social shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Eva; Duffy, J Emmett

    2005-03-22

    A key characteristic of highly social animals is collective group response to important stimuli such as invasion by enemies. The marine societies of social snapping shrimp share many convergences with terrestrial eusocial animals, including aggressive reaction to strangers, but no group actions have yet been observed in shrimp. Here we describe 'coordinated snapping', during which a sentinel shrimp reacts to danger by recruiting other colony members to snap in concert for several to tens of seconds. This distinctive behaviour is a specific response to intrusion by strange shrimp into the colony's sponge and is highly successful at repelling these intruders. Although coordinated snapping apparently functions analogously to alarm responses in other social animals, colony members in social shrimp do not rush to the site of the attack. Coordinated snapping appears instead to be a warning signal to would-be intruders that the sponge is occupied by a cooperative colony ready to defend it. This is the first evidence for coordinated communication in social shrimp and represents yet another remarkable convergence between social shrimp, insects and vertebrates.

  19. Cognitive Coordination on the Network Centric Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-06

    collection of team knowledge stores is also shared with much of the small group work on decision-making ( Festinger , 1954; Steiner, 1972), social decision...Ericsson, K. A. & Kintsch, W. (1995). "Long-term working memory". Psychological Review, Vol 102, pp. 211-245. Festinger , L. (1954). A theory of social

  20. Improving Dense Network Performance through Centralized Scheduling and Interference Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret

    2017-01-01

    and the receiver sides. As a network coordination scheme, we apply a centralized joint cell association and scheduling mechanism based on dynamic cell switching, by which users are not always served by the strongest perceived cell. The method simultaneously resultsin more balanced loads and increased performance...

  1. Coordinating face-to-face meetings in mobile network societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas; Urry, John; Axhausen, Kay

    2008-01-01

    This exploratory article describes and develops theoretical notions of how coordination takes place within mobile network societies, that is, societies where travel, ties at-a-distance, email and mobile communications are widespread. The article brings together studies of travel, communications...

  2. Multi-robot Coordination by using Cellular Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gacsadi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Vision-based algorithms for multi-robot coordination,are presented in this paper. Cellular Neural Networks (CNNsprocessing techniques are used for real time motion planning ofthe robots. The CNN methods are considered an advantageoussolution for image processing in autonomous mobile robotsguidance.

  3. Animal signals and emotion in music: Coordinating affect across groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on nonhuman animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allo...

  4. Communicability reveals a transition to coordinated behavior in multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2014-04-01

    We analyze the flow of information in multiplex networks by means of the communicability function. First, we generalize this measure from its definition from simple graphs to multiplex networks. Then, we study its relevance for the analysis of real-world systems by studying a social multiplex where information flows using formal-informal channels and an air transportation system where the layers represent different air companies. Accordingly, the communicability, which is essential for the good performance of these complex systems, emerges at a systemic operation point in the multiplex where the performance of the layers operates in a coordinated way very differently from the state represented by a collection of unconnected networks.

  5. Implementation of a Relay Coordination System for the Mars Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Mars network relay operations involve the coordination of lander and orbiter teams through long-term and short-term planning, tactical changes and post-pass analysis. Much of this coordination is managed through email traffic and point-to-point file data exchanges. It is often difficult to construct a complete and accurate picture of the relay situation at any given moment, as there is no centralized store of correlated relay data. The Mars Relay Operations Service (MaROS) is being implemented to address the problem of relay coordination for current and next-generation relay missions. The service is provided for the purpose of coordinating communications sessions between landed spacecraft assets and orbiting spacecraft assets at Mars. The service centralizes a set of functions previously distributed across multiple spacecraft operations teams, and as such greatly improves visibility into the end-to-end strategic coordination process. Most of the process revolves around the scheduling of communications sessions between the spacecraft during periods of time when a landed asset on Mars is geometrically visible by an orbiting spacecraft. These "relay" sessions are used to transfer data both to and from the landed asset via the orbiting asset on behalf of Earth-based spacecraft operators. This paper will discuss the relay coordination problem space, overview the architecture and design selected to meet system requirements, and describe the first phase of system implementation

  6. Coordination between Subway and Urban Space: A Networked Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Mao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper selects Changsha as a case study and constructs the models of the subway network and the urban spatial network by using planning data. In the network models, the districts of Changsha are regarded as nodes and the connections between each pair of districts are regarded as edges. The method is based on quantitative analysis of the node weights and the edge weights, which are defined in the complex network theory. And the structures of subway and urban space are visualized in the form of networks. Then, through analyzing the discrepancy coefficients of the corresponding nodes and edges, the paper carries out a comparison between the two networks to evaluate the coordination. The results indicate that only 21.4% of districts and 13.2% of district connections have a rational coordination. Finally, the strategies are put forward for optimization, which suggest adjusting subway transit density, regulating land-use intensity and planning new mass transits for the uncoordinated parts.

  7. Animal signals and emotion in music: coordinating affect across groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on non-human animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Recent work reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including (1) examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise) in non-human animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and (2) an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to non-human animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary by-products of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be driven by an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases - many shared across species - and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes.

  8. Animal signals and emotion in music: Coordinating affect across groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Bryant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on nonhuman animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. The emotional impact of music might be best understood as a proximate mechanism serving an ultimately social function. Here I describe recent work that reveals intimate connections between properties of certain animal signals and evocative aspects of human music, including 1 examinations of the role of nonlinearities (e.g., broadband noise in nonhuman animal vocalizations, and the analogous production and perception of these features in human music, and 2 an analysis of group musical performances and possible relationships to nonhuman animal chorusing and emotional contagion effects. Communicative features in music are likely due primarily to evolutionary byproducts of phylogenetically older, but still intact communication systems. But in some cases, such as the coordinated rhythmic sounds produced by groups of musicians, our appreciation and emotional engagement might be due to the operation of an adaptive social signaling system. Future empirical work should examine human musical behavior through the comparative lens of behavioral ecology and an adaptationist cognitive science. By this view, particular coordinated sound combinations generated by musicians exploit evolved perceptual response biases—many shared across species—and proliferate through cultural evolutionary processes.

  9. Adaptive protection coordination scheme for distribution network with distributed generation using ABC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ibrahim, A.M; El-Khattam, W; ElMesallamy, M; Talaat, H.A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive protection coordination scheme for optimal coordination of DOCRs in interconnected power networks with the impact of DG, the used coordination technique is the Artificial Bee Colony (ABC...

  10. Look Together: Analyzing Gaze Coordination with Epistemic Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eAndrist

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When conversing and collaborating in everyday situations, people naturally and interactively align their behaviors with each other across various communication channels, including speech, gesture, posture, and gaze. Having access to a partner's referential gaze behavior has been shown to be particularly important in achieving collaborative outcomes, but the process in which people's gaze behaviors unfold over the course of an interaction and become tightly coordinated is not well understood. In this paper, we present work to develop a deeper and more nuanced understanding of coordinated referential gaze in collaborating dyads. We recruited 13 dyads to participate in a collaborative sandwich-making task and used dual mobile eye tracking to synchronously record each participant's gaze behavior. We used a relatively new analysis technique—epistemic network analysis—to jointly model the gaze behaviors of both conversational participants. In this analysis, network nodes represent gaze targets for each participant, and edge strengths convey the likelihood of simultaneous gaze to the connected target nodes during a given time-slice. We divided collaborative task sequences into discrete phases to examine how the networks of shared gaze evolved over longer time windows. We conducted three separate analyses of the data to reveal (1 properties and patterns of how gaze coordination unfolds throughout an interaction sequence, (2 optimal time lags of gaze alignment within a dyad at different phases of the interaction, and (3 differences in gaze coordination patterns for interaction sequences that lead to breakdowns and repairs. In addition to contributing to the growing body of knowledge on the coordination of gaze behaviors in joint activities, this work has implications for the design of future technologies that engage in situated interactions with human users.

  11. Coordinated SLNR based Precoding in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Boukhedimi, Ikram

    2017-03-06

    This work focuses on the downlink of large-scale two-tier heterogeneous networks composed of a macro-cell overlaid by micro-cell networks. Our interest is on the design of coordinated beamforming techniques that allow to mitigate the inter-cell interference. Particularly, we consider the case in which the coordinating base stations (BSs) have imperfect knowledge of the channel state information. Under this setting, we propose a regularized SLNR based precoding design in which the regularization factor is used to allow better resilience with respect to the channel estimation errors. Based on tools from random matrix theory, we provide an analytical analysis of the SINR and SLNR performances. These results are then exploited to propose a proper setting of the regularization factor. Simulation results are finally provided in order to validate our findings and to confirm the performance of the proposed precoding scheme.

  12. Group Evolution Discovery in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bródka, Piotr; Saganowski, Stanisław; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Group extraction and their evolution are among the topics which arouse the greatest interest in the domain of social network analysis. However, while the grouping methods in social networks are developed very dynamically, the methods of group evolution discovery and analysis are still uncharted territory on the social network analysis map. Therefore the new method for the group evolution discovery called GED is proposed in this paper. Additionally, the results of the first experiments on the ...

  13. Joint Base Station Clustering and Beamformer Design for Partial Coordinated Transmission in Heterogenous Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Mingyi; Baligh, Hadi; Luo, Zhi-Quan

    2012-01-01

    We consider the interference management problem in a multicell MIMO heterogenous network. Within each cell there are a large number of distributed micro/pico base stations (BSs) that can be potentially coordinated for joint transmission. To reduce coordination overhead, we consider user-centric BS clustering so that each user is served by only a small number of (potentially overlapping) BSs. Thus, given the channel state information, our objective is to jointly design the BS clustering and the linear beamformers for all BSs in the network. In this paper, we formulate this problem from a {sparse optimization} perspective, and propose an efficient algorithm that is based on iteratively solving a sequence of group LASSO problems. A novel feature of the proposed algorithm is that it performs BS clustering and beamformer design jointly rather than separately as is done in the existing approaches for partial coordinated transmission. Moreover, the cluster size can be controlled by adjusting a single penalty paramet...

  14. Group-oriented coordination models for distributed client-server computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Richard M.; Hughes, Craig S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes group-oriented control models for distributed client-server interactions. These models transparently coordinate requests for services that involve multiple servers, such as queries across distributed databases. Specific capabilities include: decomposing and replicating client requests; dispatching request subtasks or copies to independent, networked servers; and combining server results into a single response for the client. The control models were implemented by combining request broker and process group technologies with an object-oriented communication middleware tool. The models are illustrated in the context of a distributed operations support application for space-based systems.

  15. Lanthanide Photoluminescence in Heterometallic Polycyanidometallate-Based Coordination Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Chorazy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state functional luminescent materials arouse an enormous scientific interest due to their diverse applications in lighting, display devices, photonics, optical communication, low energy scintillation, optical storage, light conversion, or photovoltaics. Among all types of solid luminophors, the emissive coordination polymers, especially those based on luminescent trivalent lanthanide ions, exhibit a particularly large scope of light-emitting functionalities, fruitfully investigated in the aspects of chemical sensing, display devices, and bioimaging. Here, we present the complete overview of one of the promising families of photoluminescent coordination compounds, that are heterometallic d–f cyanido-bridged networks composed of lanthanide(3+ ions connected through cyanide bridges with polycyanidometallates of d-block metal ions. We are showing that the combination of cationic lanthanide complexes of selected inorganic and organic ligands with anionic homoligand [M(CNx]n− (x = 2, 4, 6 and 8 or heteroligand [M(L(CN4]2− (L = bidentate organic ligand, M = transition metal ions anions is the efficient route towards the emissive coordination networks revealing important optical properties, including 4f-metal-centred visible and near-infrared emission sensitized through metal-to-metal and/or ligand-to-metal energy transfer processes, and multi-coloured photoluminescence switchable by external stimuli such as excitation wavelength, temperature, or pressure.

  16. Mental health network governance and coordination: comparative analysis across Canadian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Wiktorowicz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Modes of governance were compared in ten local mental health networks in diverse contexts (rural/urban and regionalized/non-regionalized to clarify the governance processes that foster inter-organizational collaboration and the conditions that support them.Methods: Case studies of ten local mental health networks were developed using qualitative methods of document review, semi-structured interviews and focus groups that incorporated provincial policy, network and organizational levels of analysis.Results: Mental health networks adopted either a corporate structure, mutual adjustment or an alliance governance model. A corporate structure supported by regionalization offered the most direct means for local governance to attain inter-organizational collaboration. The likelihood that networks with an alliance model developed coordination processes depended on the presence of the following conditions: a moderate number of organizations, goal consensus and trust among the organizations, and network-level competencies. In the small and mid-sized urban networks where these conditions were met their alliance realized the inter-organizational collaboration sought. In the large urban and rural networks where these conditions were not met, externally brokered forms of network governance were required to support alliance based models.Discussion: In metropolitan and rural networks with such shared forms of network governance as an alliance or voluntary mutual adjustment, external mediation by a regional or provincial authority was an important lever to foster inter-organizational collaboration.

  17. COORDINATION OF THE PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE NETWORK FOR MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Andrade

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to investigate the coordination of the psychosocial care network (RAPS for mental health crisis care, in its workers’ view. It is a descriptive exploratory study with qualitative approach. The study was carried out from 62 portfolios made by the students of the Mental Health Crisis and Urgency Course, who answered the reflective question: "Considering your workplace as a point of RAPS / RUE, describe, reflect and write a text with the synthesis regarding the articulation with the other network points in the reality of your municipality". The data were analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis method suggested by Bardin, which comprises three phases: Pre - analysis, Material Exploration and Treatment of the Information, inference and interpretation. As a result, three thematic categories were identified: Referral, the traditional way of referring to specialized care, which is associated to a more fragmented care process; Matrix support, the current proposal of collaborative care, a joint strategy that contributes to the complex care demanded by mental health services users; and new strategies for network care, exemplified by meetings or sessions that discuss new ways to enable the network care.

  18. Ocean Research - Perspectives from an international Ocean Research Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Williams, Albert, III

    2013-04-01

    The need for improved coordination in ocean observations is more urgent now given the issues of climate change, sustainable food sources and increased need for energy. Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide policy makers with clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions asked over the last 100 years at the time and space scales that are relevant. Programs like GLOBEC moved us forward but we are still challenged by the disciplinary divide. Interdisciplinary problem solving must be addressed not only by the exchange of data between the many sides, but through levels where questions require day-to-day collaboration. A National Science Foundation-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing approaches for improving interdisciplinary research capabilities in the ocean sciences. During the last year, the RCN had a working group for Open Data led by John Orcutt, Peter Pissierssens and Albert Williams III. The teams has focused on three areas: 1. Data and Information formats and standards; 2. Data access models (including IPR, business models for open data, data policies,...); 3. Data publishing, data citation. There has been a significant trend toward free and open access to data in the last few years. In 2007, the US announced that Landsat data would be available at no charge. Float data from the US (NDBC), JCOMM and OceanSites offer web-based access. The IODE is developing its Ocean Data Portal giving immediate and free access to ocean data. However, from the aspect of long-term collaborations across communities, this global trend is less robust than might appear at the surface. While there are many standard data formats for data exchange, there is not yet widespread uniformity in their adoption. Use of standard data formats can be encouraged in several ways: sponsors of

  19. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Magnesium Based Coordination Networks in Different Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Banerjee; J Finkelstein; A Smirnov; P Forster; L Borkowski; S Teat; J Parise

    2011-12-31

    Three magnesium based metal-organic frameworks, Mg{sub 3}(3,5-PDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3} {center_dot} DMF [1], Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O) {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O) [3], and Mg{sub 4}(3,5-PDC){sub 4}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} {center_dot} 2DMF {center_dot} 4.5H{sub 2}O [4], and a 2-D coordination polymer, [Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] [2] [PDC = pyridinedicarboxylate], were synthesized using a combination of DMF, methanol, ethanol, and water. Compound 1 [space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 12.3475(5) {angstrom}, b = 11.1929(5) {angstrom}, c = 28.6734(12) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.8160(10){sup o}, V = 3916.0(3) {angstrom}{sup 3}] consists of a combination of isolated and corner-sharing magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linkers to form a 3-D network with a 12.2 {angstrom} x 4.6 {angstrom} 1-D channel. The channel contains coordinated and free DMF molecules. In compound 2 [space group C2/c, a = 9.964(5) {angstrom}, b = 12.0694(6) {angstrom}, c = 7.2763(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 106.4970(6){sup o}, V = 836.70(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}], PDC connects isolated seven coordinated magnesium polyhedra into a layered structure. Compound 3 [space group P6{sub 1}22, a = 11.479(1) {angstrom}, c = 14.735(3) {angstrom}, V = 1681.7(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}] (previously reported) contains isolated magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linker with each other forming a 3D network. Compound 4 [space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 13.7442(14) {angstrom}, b = 14.2887(15) {angstrom}, c = 14.1178(14) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.912(2){sup o}, V = 2679.2(5) {angstrom}{sup 3}] also exhibits a 3D network based on isolated magnesium octahedra with square cavities containing both disordered DMF and water molecules. The structural topologies originate due to the variable coordination ability of solvent molecules with the metal center. Water molecules coordinate with the magnesium metal centers preferably over other polar solvents (DMF, methanol, ethanol) used to synthesize the coordination networks. Despite

  20. Interaction network among functional drug groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background More attention has been being paid to combinatorial effects of drugs to treat complex diseases or to avoid adverse combinations of drug cocktail. Although drug interaction information has been increasingly accumulated, a novel approach like network-based method is needed to analyse that information systematically and intuitively Results Beyond focussing on drug-drug interactions, we examined interactions between functional drug groups. In this work, functional drug groups were defined based on the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) Classification System. We defined criteria whether two functional drug groups are related. Then we constructed the interaction network of drug groups. The resulting network provides intuitive interpretations. We further constructed another network based on interaction sharing ratio of the first network. Subsequent analysis of the networks showed that some features of drugs can be well described by this kind of interaction even for the case of structurally dissimilar drugs. Conclusion Our networks in this work provide intuitive insights into interactions among drug groups rather than those among single drugs. In addition, information on these interactions can be used as a useful source to describe mechanisms and features of drugs. PMID:24555875

  1. Coordinating standards and applications for optical water quality sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, B.; Pellerin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Joint USGS-CUAHSI Workshop: In Situ Optical Water Quality Sensor Networks; Shepherdstown, West Virginia, 8-10 June 2011; Advanced in situ optical water quality sensors and new techniques for data analysis hold enormous promise for advancing scientific understanding of aquatic systems through measurements of important biogeochemical parameters at the time scales over which they vary. High-frequency and real-time water quality data also provide the opportunity for early warning of water quality deterioration, trend detection, and science-based decision support. However, developing networks of optical sensors in freshwater systems that report reliable and comparable data across and between sites remains a challenge to the research and monitoring community. To address this, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI), convened a 3-day workshop to explore ways to coordinate development of standards and applications for optical sensors, as well as handling, storage, and analysis of the continuous data they produce.

  2. Group colocation behavior in technological social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloë Brown

    Full Text Available We analyze two large datasets from technological networks with location and social data: user location records from an online location-based social networking service, and anonymized telecommunications data from a European cellphone operator, in order to investigate the differences between individual and group behavior with respect to physical location. We discover agreements between the two datasets: firstly, that individuals are more likely to meet with one friend at a place they have not visited before, but tend to meet at familiar locations when with a larger group. We also find that groups of individuals are more likely to meet at places that their other friends have visited, and that the type of a place strongly affects the propensity for groups to meet there. These differences between group and solo mobility has potential technological applications, for example, in venue recommendation in location-based social networks.

  3. Network-Based Coordination of Civil-Service Training: Lessons from the Case of Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metsma Merilin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the coordination of civil-service training in a decentralized civil-service system. The Estonian case is studied. The article investigates network-based coordination, analyzes the power sources of the central coordinator and discusses the opportunities and limitations of creating coherence through network-type cooperation. The article concludes that the key power sources for the central coordinator are financial, human and technical resources paired with knowledge, leadership and commitment. The case study shows that, in a decentralized civil service system, a common understanding on training and development can be fostered by intense collaboration through networks.

  4. Primary Health Care: care coordinator in regionalized networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Patty Fidelis de; Santos, Adriano Maia Dos

    2016-12-22

    To analyze the breadth of care coordination by Primary Health Care in three health regions. This is a quantitative and qualitative case study. Thirty-one semi-structured interviews with municipal, regional and state managers were carried out, besides a cross-sectional survey with the administration of questionnaires to physicians (74), nurses (127), and a representative sample of users (1,590) of Estratégia Saúde da Família (Family Health Strategy) in three municipal centers of health regions in the state of Bahia. Primary Health Care as first contact of preference faced strong competition from hospital outpatient and emergency services outside the network. Issues related to access to and provision of specialized care were aggravated by dependence on the private sector in the regions, despite progress observed in institutionalizing flows starting out from Primary Health Care. The counter-referral system was deficient and interprofessional communication was scarce, especially concerning services provided by the contracted network. Coordination capacity is affected both by the fragmentation of the regional network and intrinsic problems in Primary Health Care, which poorly supported in its essential attributes. Although the health regions have common problems, Primary Health Care remains a subject confined to municipal boundaries. Analisar o alcance da coordenação do cuidado pela Atenção Primária à Saúde em três regiões de saúde. Trata-se de estudo de caso, com abordagem quantitativa e qualitativa. Foram realizadas 31 entrevistas semiestruturadas com gestores municipais, regionais e estaduais e estudo transversal com aplicação de questionários para médicos (74), enfermeiros (127) e amostra representativa de usuários (1.590) da Estratégia Saúde da Família em três municípios-sede de regiões de saúde do estado da Bahia. A função de porta de entrada preferencial pela Atenção Primária à Saúde deparava-se com forte concorrência de servi

  5. Sink-to-Sink Coordination Framework Using RPL: Routing Protocol for Low Power and Lossy Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meer M. Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RPL (Routing Protocol for low power and Lossy networks is recommended by Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF for IPv6-based LLNs (Low Power and Lossy Networks. RPL uses a proactive routing approach and each node always maintains an active path to the sink node. Sink-to-sink coordination defines syntax and semantics for the exchange of any network defined parameters among sink nodes like network size, traffic load, mobility of a sink, and so forth. The coordination allows sink to learn about the network condition of neighboring sinks. As a result, sinks can make coordinated decision to increase/decrease their network size for optimizing over all network performance in terms of load sharing, increasing network lifetime, and lowering end-to-end latency of communication. Currently, RPL does not provide any coordination framework that can define message exchange between different sink nodes for enhancing the network performance. In this paper, a sink-to-sink coordination framework is proposed which utilizes the periodic route maintenance messages issued by RPL to exchange network status observed at a sink with its neighboring sinks. The proposed framework distributes network load among sink nodes for achieving higher throughputs and longer network’s life time.

  6. Protection coordination of the Kennedy Space Center electric distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A computer technique is described for visualizing the coordination and protection of any existing system of devices and settings by plotting the tripping characteristics of the involved devices on a common basis. The program determines the optimum settings of a given set of protective devices and configuration in the sense of the best expected coordinated operation of these devices. Subroutines are given for simulating time versus current characteristics of the different relays, circuit breakers, and fuses in the system; coordination index computation; protection checks; plotting; and coordination optimation.

  7. Optimal Coordinated Strategy Analysis for the Procurement Logistics of a Steel Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianbo Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the optimization of an internal coordinated procurement logistics system in a steel group and the decision on the coordinated procurement strategy by minimizing the logistics costs. Considering the coordinated procurement strategy and the procurement logistics costs, the aim of the optimization model was to maximize the degree of quality satisfaction and to minimize the procurement logistics costs. The model was transformed into a single-objective model and solved using a simulated annealing algorithm. In the algorithm, the supplier of each subsidiary was selected according to the evaluation result for independent procurement. Finally, the effect of different parameters on the coordinated procurement strategy was analysed. The results showed that the coordinated strategy can clearly save procurement costs; that the strategy appears to be more cooperative when the quality requirement is not stricter; and that the coordinated costs have a strong effect on the coordinated procurement strategy.

  8. The Stellar Observations Network Group - first results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, Victoria; Grundahl, Frank; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen

    SONG - the Stellar Observations Network Group is a Danish-led project set to design and build a global network of 1-m telescopes to carry out detailed studies of solar-like stars using asteroseismology and to discover and characterise exo-planets and their star system. Here we present more than 100...... nights of high-precision radial velocity measurements from 2014 of the subgiant mu Herculis. Preliminary analyses of the largest ground-based data set ever obtained for such as star clearly show the detection of stochastically excited pressure modes. The high quality of our data allows unique extraction...

  9. Active Coordinated Operation of Distribution Network System for Many Connections of Distributed Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Matsuki, Junya; Wakao, Shinji; Baba, Junpei; Hojo, Masahide; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Hirai, Takao; Oishi, Kohei

    Recently, total number of distributed generators (DGS) such as photovoltaic generation system and wind turbine generation system connected to an actual distribution network increases drastically. The distribution network connected with many distributed generators must be operated keeping reliability of power supply, power quality and loss minimization. In order to accomplish active distribution network operation to take advantage of many connections of DGS, a new coordinated operation of distribution system with many connections of DGS is necessary. In this paper, the authors propose a coordinated operation of distribution network system connected with many DGS by using newly proposed sectionalizing switches control, sending voltage control and computation of available DG connection capability. In order to check validity of the proposed coordinated operation of distribution system, numerical simulations using the proposed coordinated distribution system operation are carried out in a practical distribution network model.

  10. Social networks enabled coordination model for cost management of patient hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we introduce a social networks enabled coordination model for exploring the effect of network position of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors in a patient-centered care network that evolves during patient hospitalization period on the total cost of coordination. An actor is a node, which represents an entity such as individual and organization in a social network. In our analysis of actor networks and coordination in the healthcare literature, we identified that there is significant gap where a number of promising hospital coordination model have been developed (e.g., Guided Care Model, Chronic Care Model) for the current healthcare system focusing on quality of service and patient satisfaction. The health insurance dataset for total hip replacement (THR) from hospital contribution fund, a prominent Australian Health Insurance Company, are analyzed to examine our proposed coordination model. We consider network attributes of degree, connectedness, in-degree, out-degree, and tie strength to measure network position of actors. To measure the cost of coordination for a particular hospital, average of total hospitalization expenses for all THR hospital admissions is used. Results show that network positions of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors considering all hospital admissions that a particular hospital has have effect on the average of total hospitalization expenses of that hospital. These results can be used as guidelines to set up a cost-effective healthcare practice structure for patient hospitalization expenses. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  11. CB-REFIM: A Practical Coordinated Beamforming in Multicell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, Mohammad Hossein; Vakili, Vahid Tabataba

    2014-01-01

    Performance of multicell systems is inevitably limited by interference and available resources. Although intercell interference can be mitigated by Base Station (BS) Coordination, the demand on inter-BS information exchange and computational complexity grows rapidly with the number of cells, subcarriers, and users. On the other hand, some of the existing coordination beamforming methods need computation of pseudo-inverse or generalized eigenvector of a matrix, which are practically difficult ...

  12. The value of the participatory network mapping tool to facilitate and evaluate coordinated action in health promotion networks: two Dutch case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijenberg, Evianne; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Herens, Marion; Hartog, Franciska den; Koelen, Maria

    2017-08-01

    Facilitating processes for coordinated action in the field of health promotion is a challenge. Poorthuis and Bijl's (2006) Participatory Network Mapping Tool (PNMT) uses visualization and discussion to map the positions and roles of network actors, stimulate learning processes, and elicit actionable knowledge. This article describes the results from the application of the PNMT in networks of two Dutch health promotion programmes (Health Race and BeweegKuur) with the aim of determining the value of the PNMT to partners in health promotions networks. A qualitative secondary analysis (QSA) was conducted to clarify positions and roles, learning processes, and actionable knowledge of network actors in existing data sets including five group interviews of the Health Race programme and 16 individual interviews and 15 group interviews of the BeweegKuur programme. The PNMT maps both positions and roles of (missing) actors and makes successes (e.g. knowing each other) and challenges (e.g. implementing new activities) visible. Thus, the PNMT provides a starting point for discussion and reflection and eliciting actionable knowledge such as involving new actors and target populations in the programme. The PNMT contributes to the facilitation of coordinated action in health promotion networks by making positions and roles of network partners visible. In combination with dialogue and reflection the PNMT helps to elucidate factors influencing coordinated action and outcomes. The PNMT is valuable in grasping intangible aspects between actors by stimulating collective learning. These insights can be used by researchers and network actors to achieve more successful coordinated action for health promotion.

  13. Adaptive protection coordination scheme for distribution network with distributed generation using ABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Ibrahim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive protection coordination scheme for optimal coordination of DOCRs in interconnected power networks with the impact of DG, the used coordination technique is the Artificial Bee Colony (ABC. The scheme adapts to system changes; new relays settings are obtained as generation-level or system-topology changes. The developed adaptive scheme is applied on the IEEE 30-bus test system for both single- and multi-DG existence where results are shown and discussed.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF COORDINATION ABILITIES OF SPECIAL MEDICAL GROUPS STUDENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Dotsenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze the problem of motor abilities development and health of students of special medical group in the process of physical education in technical universities. Determine the major factors, characteristics, and the relationship of physical development, physical fitness and coordination abilities of female students in special medical group. Establish regularities in precise movements mastering of different coordination structure and develop model characteristics of the relationship of coordination abilities and motor characteristics of students in special medical group. To substantiate and verify efficiency of coordination abilities development method of female students with regard to their functional status in the course of physical education in higher school. Methodology. Theoretical and methodological argument, characteristic of the experimental program in physical education teaching process of students in special medical group was shown. Findings. Research is to develop the training content in special medical groups with the use of coordinating elements and exercises to enhance the motor abilities of female students. Their influence on the level of physical development, functional training, as well as regularities in mastering and movement control of different coordinating structure at the female students of special medical group was studied. The comparative characteristic of female students athletic ability in the dynamics of the educational process, differentiated into groups according to nosology was presented. The criterion of spare capacities upgrade of the motor system in controlling the movements of different coordination structure was determined. Originality. The method of coordination abilities development of female students in special medical group, that aims on the formation and correction of motor control system of different coordination structure, a sense of body position and its individual parts in space, improving

  15. Relay Protection Coordination for Photovoltaic Power Plant Connected on Distribution Network

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolovski, Srete; Papuga, Vanja; Knežević, Goran

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure and computation of relay protection coordination for a PV power plant connected to the distribution network. In recent years, the growing concern for environment preservation has caused expansion of photovoltaic PV power plants in distribution networks. Numerical computer simulation is an indispensable tool for studying photovoltaic (PV) systems protection coordination. In this paper, EasyPower computer program is used with the module Power Protector. Time-curr...

  16. Cerulean Warbler Technical Group: Coordinating international research and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, D.K.; Wigley, T.B.; Keyser, P.D.

    2012-01-01

    Effective conservation for species of concern requires interchange and collaboration among conservationists and stakeholders. The Cerulean Warbler Technical Group (CWTG) is a consortium of biologists and managers from government agencies, non-governmental organizations, academia, and industry, who are dedicated to finding pro-active, science-based solutions for conservation of the Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea). Formed in the United States in 2001, CWTG’s scope soon broadened to address the species’ ecology and conservation on both the breeding and non-breeding ranges, in partnership with biologists from South and Central America. In 2004, CWTG launched the Cerulean Warbler Conservation Initiative, a set of activities aimed at addressing information and conservation needs for the species. These include (1) studies in the core breeding range to assess Cerulean Warbler response to forest management practices and to identify mined lands that could be reforested to benefit the species, (2) ecological and demographic studies on the winter range, and (3) surveys of Cerulean Warbler distribution on the breeding and winter ranges and during migration. A rangewide conservation action plan has been completed, along with a more detailed conservation plan for the non-breeding range. CWTG and partners now move forward with on-the-ground conservation, while still addressing unmet information needs.

  17. Dual Coordination of Post Translational Modifications in Human Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodsmith, Jonathan; Kamburov, Atanas; Stelzl, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity, stability and interaction profiles and are critical for cellular functioning. Further regulation is gained through PTM interplay whereby modifications modulate the occurrence of other PTMs or act in combination. Integration of global acetylation, ubiquitination and tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphorylation datasets with protein interaction data identified hundreds of protein complexes that selectively accumulate each PTM, indicating coordinated targeting of specific molecular functions. A second layer of PTM coordination exists in these complexes, mediated by PTM integration (PTMi) spots. PTMi spots represent very dense modification patterns in disordered protein regions and showed an equally high mutation rate as functional protein domains in cancer, inferring equivocal importance for cellular functioning. Systematic PTMi spot identification highlighted more than 300 candidate proteins for combinatorial PTM regulation. This study reveals two global PTM coordination mechanisms and emphasizes dataset integration as requisite in proteomic PTM studies to better predict modification impact on cellular signaling. PMID:23505349

  18. Cilia and coordination of signaling networks during heart development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Karen; Veland, Iben Rønn; Pedersen, Lotte Bang

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate a wide variety of different signaling pathways to control cellular processes during development and in tissue homeostasis. Defects in function or assembly of these antenna-like structures are therefore associated with a broad range...... of developmental disorders and diseases called ciliopathies. Recent studies have indicated a major role of different populations of cilia, including nodal and cardiac primary cilia, in coordinating heart development, and defects in these cilia are associated with congenital heart diseases. Here, we present...

  19. Support for School-to-School Networks: How Networking Teachers Perceive Support Activities of a Local Coordinating Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartory, Katharina; Jungermann, Anja-Kristin; Järvinen, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    External support by a local coordinating agency facilitates the work of school-to-school networks. This study provides an innovative theoretical framework to analyse how support provided by local education offices for school-to-school networks is perceived by the participating teachers. Based on a quantitative survey and qualitative interview data…

  20. Topological traps control flow on real networks: the case of coordination failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Carlos P; Lozano, Sergi; Arenas, Alex; Sánchez, Angel

    2010-12-09

    We study evolutionary games in real social networks, with a focus on coordination games. We find that populations fail to coordinate in the same behavior for a wide range of parameters, a novel phenomenon not observed in most artificial model networks. We show that this result arises from the relevance of correlations beyond the first neighborhood, in particular from topological traps formed by links between nodes of different degrees in regions with few or no redundant paths. This specificity of real networks has not been modeled so far with synthetic networks. We thus conclude that model networks must be improved to include these mesoscopic structures, in order to successfully address issues such as the emergence of cooperation in real societies. We finally show that topological traps are a very generic phenomenon that may arise in very many different networks and fields, such as opinion models, spread of diseases or ecological networks.

  1. Inter-cell coordination in wireless data networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Bonald; S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Proutière

    2006-01-01

    htmlabstractOver the past few years, the design and performance of channel-aware scheduling strategies have attracted huge interest. In the present paper, we examine a somewhat different notion of scheduling, namely coordination of transmissions among base stations, which has received little

  2. Autonomous Vehicle Coordination with Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Perianu, Mihai; Bosch, S.; Marin Perianu, Raluca; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A coordinated team of mobile wireless sensor and actuator nodes can bring numerous benefits for various applications in the field of cooperative surveillance, mapping unknown areas, disaster management, automated highway and space exploration. This article explores the idea of mobile nodes using

  3. Supramolecular coordination polymers in water: rings, chains and networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermonden, T.

    2005-01-01

    Supramolecular polymers are polymers in which the monomers are held together by non-covalent interactions. In solution these polymers can break and recombine reversibly yielding polymers with an average degree of polymerization. This thesis is devoted to water-soluble coordination polymers, in which

  4. Effective Network Management via System-Wide Coordination and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    capacity of ISPs and socializes the performance benefits to all end-to-end traffic [30]. However, extending single-vantage solutions to a network-wide...O. Spatscheck, and V. Shkapenyuk. Gigascope: A stream database for network applications. In Proc. ACM SIGMOD, 2003. 185 [42] C. Kruegel, F. Valeur

  5. A Game-Theoretic Response Strategy for Coordinator Attack in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordinator is a specific node that controls the whole network and has a significant impact on the performance in cooperative multihop ZigBee wireless sensor networks (ZWSNs. However, the malicious node attacks coordinator nodes in an effort to waste the resources and disrupt the operation of the network. Attacking leads to a failure of one round of communication between the source nodes and destination nodes. Coordinator selection is a technique that can considerably defend against attack and reduce the data delivery delay, and increase network performance of cooperative communications. In this paper, we propose an adaptive coordinator selection algorithm using game and fuzzy logic aiming at both minimizing the average number of hops and maximizing network lifetime. The proposed game model consists of two interrelated formulations: a stochastic game for dynamic defense and a best response policy using evolutionary game formulation for coordinator selection. The stable equilibrium best policy to response defense is obtained from this game model. It is shown that the proposed scheme can improve reliability and save energy during the network lifetime with respect to security.

  6. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    computed, and the detection of a target is determined based on a Monte Carlo test. For each successful target confirmation, a measurement report is...detection based on Monte Carlo test • add appropriate random perturbations to detec- tion measurements Radar Targets Environment Input Parameters... Fuente and J.R. Casar-Corredera. Optimal radar pulse scheduling using a neural network. In IEEE Int. Conf. Neural Networks, volume 7, pages 4558–4591

  7. Kinetic products in coordination networks: ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Rujas, Javier; Kawano, Masaki

    2013-02-19

    Porous coordination networks are materials that maintain their crystal structure as molecular "guests" enter and exit their pores. They are of great research interest with applications in areas such as catalysis, gas adsorption, proton conductivity, and drug release. As with zeolite preparation, the kinetic states in coordination network preparation play a crucial role in determining the final products. Controlling the kinetic state during self-assembly of coordination networks is a fundamental aspect of developing further functionalization of this class of materials. However, unlike for zeolites, there are few structural studies reporting the kinetic products made during self-assembly of coordination networks. Synthetic routes that produce the necessary selectivity are complex. The structural knowledge obtained from X-ray crystallography has been crucial for developing rational strategies for design of organic-inorganic hybrid networks. However, despite the explosive progress in the solid-state study of coordination networks during the last 15 years, researchers still do not understand many chemical reaction processes because of the difficulties in growing single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction: Fast precipitation can lead to kinetic (metastable) products, but in microcrystalline form, unsuitable for single crystal X-ray analysis. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) routinely is used to check phase purity, crystallinity, and to monitor the stability of frameworks upon guest removal/inclusion under various conditions, but rarely is used for structure elucidation. Recent advances in structure determination of microcrystalline solids from ab initio XRPD have allowed three-dimensional structure determination when single crystals are not available. Thus, ab initio XRPD structure determination is becoming a powerful method for structure determination of microcrystalline solids, including porous coordination networks. Because of the great interest across scientific

  8. Metal-organic coordination architectures of tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups: Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo-Wen; Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Ding, Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Two new coordination complexes with tetrazole heterocycle ligands bearing acetate groups, [Co(L)2]n (1) and [Co3(L)4(N3)2·2MeOH]n (2) (L=tetrazole-1-acetate) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single crystal structure analysis shows that the cobalt-complex 1 has the 3D 3,6-connected (42.6)2(44.62.88.10)-ant topology. By introducing azide in this system, complex 2 forms the 2D network containing the [Co3] units. And the magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied.

  9. Dynamic Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination for Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Barcos, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    ICIC configuration leads to modest gains, whereas the set of proposed fast dynamic eICIC algorithms result in capacity gains on the order of 35-120% depending on the local environment characteristics. These attractive gains together with the simplicity of the proposed solutions underline the practical relevance...... area. Rather than the classical semi-static and network-wise configuration, the importance of having highly dynamic and distributed mechanisms that are able to adapt to local environment conditions is revealed. We propose two promising cell association algorithms: one aiming at pure load balancing...... and an opportunistic approach exploiting the varying cell conditions. Moreover, an autonomous fast distributed muting algorithm is presented, which is simple, robust, and well suited for irregular network deployments. Performance results for realistic network deployments show that the traditional semi-static e...

  10. Coordinated Broadcast-based Request-Reply and Group Management for Tightly-Coupled Wireless Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsoubelias, Manos; Lalis, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    As the domain of cyber-physical systems continues to grow, an increasing number of tightly-coupled distributed applications will be implemented on top of wireless networking technologies. Some of these applications, including collaborative robotic teams, work in a coordinated fashion, whereby a distinguished node takes control decisions and sends commands to other nodes, which in turn perform the requested action/operation and send back a reply/acknowledgment. The implementation of such inter...

  11. A coordination framework for self-organisation in LTE networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmelz, L.C.; Amirijoo, M.; Eisenblaetter, A.; Litjens, R.; Neuland, M.; Turk, J.

    2011-01-01

    Self-organising Networks (SON) as introduced for 3G Long Term Evolution (LTE) will typically involve several different SON functions. These functions are not necessarily aware of each other and may have complex relations and interdependencies, for example, conflicting parameter settings, depending

  12. Determinants of Informal Coordination in Networked Supply Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogulin, R.; Selen, W.; Ashayeri, J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – Provide insight into the determinants or constructs that enable informally networked supply chains to operate in order to achieve improved operational performance. Design/methodology/approach – The research is based on a wide literature review, focused on the identification of dimensions

  13. Feasibility of a clearing house for improved cooperation between telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services: acceptability to network coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Wootton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Telemedicine networks, which deliver humanitarian services, sometimes need to share expertise to find particular experts in other networks. It has been suggested that a mechanism for sharing expertise between networks (a ‘clearing house’ might be useful. Objective: To propose a mechanism for implementing the clearing house concept for sharing expertise, and to confirm its feasibility in terms of acceptability to the relevant networks. Design: We conducted a needs analysis among eight telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services. A small proportion of consultations (5–10% suggested that networks may experience difficulties in finding the right specialists from within their own resources. With the assistance of key stakeholders, many of whom were network coordinators, various methods of implementing a clearing house were considered. One simple solution is to establish a central database holding information about consultants who have agreed to provide help to other networks; this database could be made available to network coordinators who need a specialist when none was available in their own network. Results: The proposed solution was examined in a desktop simulation exercise, which confirmed its feasibility and probable value. Conclusions: This analysis informs full-scale implementation of a clearing house, and an associated examination of its costs and benefits.

  14. A Personal Health Network for Chemotherapy Care Coordination: Evaluation of Usability Among Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Katherine K; Bell, Janice F; Bold, Richard; Davis, Andra; Ngo, Victoria; Reed, Sarah C; Joseph, Jill G

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a top concern globally. Cancer care suffers from lack of coordination, silos of information, and high cost. Interest is emerging in person-centered technology to assist with coordination to address these challenges. This study evaluates the usability of the "personal health network" (PHN), a novel solution leveraging social networking and mobile technologies, among individuals undergoing chemotherapy and receiving care coordination. Early results from interviews of 12 participants in a randomized pragmatic trial suggest that they feel more connected to the healthcare team using the PHN, find value in access to the patient education library, and are better equipped to organize the many activities that occur during chemotherapy. Improvements are needed in navigation, connectivity, and integration with electronic health records. Findings contribute to improvements in the PHN and informs a roadmap for potentially greater impact in technology-enabled cancer care coordination.

  15. Simulation of Cell Group Formation Regulated by Coordination Number, Cell Cycle and Duplication Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of coordination number, a cell cycle and duplication frequency on cell-group formation have been investigated in a computer simulation. In the simulation, multiplication occurs in the last three steps of a cell cycle with a probability function to give variations in the interval. Each cell has a constant coordination number: four or six. When a cell gets surrounded by adjacent cells, its status changes from an active stage to a resting stage. Each cell repeats multiplication, and disappears when the times of multiplication reach to the limit. Variation was made in the coordination number, in the interval of multiplication and in the limited times of multiplication. The cells of the colony, which have the larger number of coordination, have reached the larger maximum population and disappeared earlier.

  16. Investigating the effect of Network Parameters on Coordinated Cyber Attacks against a Simulated Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    GENGE BELA; SIATERLIS CHRISTOS

    2011-01-01

    The fact that modern Networked Industrial Control Systems (NICS) depend on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), is well known. Although many studies have focused on the security of these systems, today we still lack the proper understanding of the effects that cyber attacks have on NICS. In this paper we use our previously developed framework to study the effects of coordinated cyber attacks against NICS. Coordinated attacks rely on several infected hosts to disrupt the ...

  17. Temperature-controlled metal/ligand stoichiometric ratio in Ag-TCNE coordination networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Jonathan [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lauwaet, Koen [IMDEA Nanoscience, c\\Faraday 9, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Herranz, Maria Ángeles [Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Nazario [IMDEA Nanoscience, c\\Faraday 9, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid (Spain); Gallego, José María [IMDEA Nanoscience, c\\Faraday 9, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz s\; Miranda, Rodolfo; Otero, Roberto [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Nanoscience, c\\Faraday 9, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-14

    The deposition of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) on Ag(111), both at Room Temperature (RT, 300 K) and low temperatures (150 K), leads to the formation of coordination networks involving silver adatoms, as revealed by Variable-Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscopy. Our results indicate that TCNE molecules etch away material from the step edges and possibly also from the terraces, which facilitates the formation of the observed coordination networks. Moreover, such process is temperature dependent, which allows for different stoichiometric ratios between Ag and TCNE just by adjusting the deposition temperature. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory calculations reveal that charge-transfer from the surface to the molecule and the concomitant geometrical distortions at both sides of the organic/inorganic interface might facilitate the extraction of silver atoms from the step-edges and, thus, its incorporation into the observed TCNE coordination networks.

  18. [Networking, Coordination and Responsibilities based on Health Regionsplus: New Health Political Approaches and Developments in Bavaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollederer, A; Eicher, A; Pfister, F; Stühler, K; Wildner, M

    2017-08-01

    For many health and health-care problems in the population, there is a need for professional management and coordination instruments as well as a competent local network. The new "Health Regions(plus)" in Bavaria offer such a structure. This new concept is presented in the following article. The "Health Regions(plus)" aim to improve the population's health, the health-related quality of life, equity in health, as well as to further develop the local health care. The Bavarian State Ministry of Health and Care will support up to 24 regions with a funding of up to 50 000 Euro yearly per "Health Region(plus)" until the end of 2019. The structure of "Health Regions(plus)" implies the establishment of a coordinating agency that works as a "motor", a health forum on the strategic level and relevant working groups. "Health Regions(plus)" involve all relevant stakeholders of the regional health system and are chaired by the district administrator or mayor. They work primarily in the fields of health care and prevention/health promotion but can also pursue other region-specific fields. The Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority supports and evaluates the "Health Regions(plus)". There is also a coordinating office which organises the exchange of information and experience among the "Health Regions(plus)". Although such a comprehensive regional approach does not change the statutory decision-making structures and responsibilities it does offer the communities an instrument to involve local needs in their decision-making processes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. A swallowtail catastrophe model for the emergence of leadership in coordination-intensive groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Bond, Robert W

    2007-04-01

    This research extended the previous studies concerning the swallowtail catastrophe model for leadership emergence to coordination-intensive groups. Thirteen 4-person groups composed of undergraduates played in Intersection coordination (card game) task and were allowed to talk while performing it; 13 other groups worked nonverbally. A questionnaire measured leadership emergence at the end of the game along with other social contributions to the groups' efforts. The swallowtail catastrophe model that was evident in previous leadership emergence phenomena in creative problem solving and production groups was found here also. All three control parameters were identified: a general participation variable that was akin to K in the rugged landscape model of self-organization, task control, and whether the groups worked verbally or nonverbally. Several new avenues for future research were delineated.

  20. Dynamic Routing and Coordination in Multi-Agent Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Cyberphysical Systems, University of New Mexico , Jan 2014 Plenary Speaker: 16th Latin American Congress of Automatic Control, Cancún, México, Oct 2014...Pasqualetti, R. Carli, and F. Bullo. Simultaneous boundary partitioning and cameras synchronization for optimal video surveillance. In IFAC Workshop on...convex programming. In Int. Conf. on Network Games , Control and Optimization (NetGCooP), pages 1–7, Paris, France, October 2011 8

  1. Decentralized Multi-Charger Coordination for Wireless Rechargeable Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Lei; You, Pengcheng; Cao, Xianghui; Song, Ye-Qiong; Chen, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Wireless charging is a promising technology for provisioning dynamic power supply in wireless rechargeable sensor networks (WRSNs). The charging equipment can be carried by some mobile nodes to enhance the charging flexibility. With such mobile chargers (MCs), the charging process should simultaneously address the MC scheduling, the moving and charging time allocation, while saving the total energy consumption of MCs. However, the efficient solutions that jointly solve...

  2. Coordinator Role Mobility Method for Increasing the Life Expectancy of Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurenoks Aleksejs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The general problem of wireless sensor network nodes is the low-power batteries that significantly limit the life expectancy of a network. Nowadays the technical solutions related to energy resource management are being rapidly developed and integrated into the daily lives of people. The energy resource management systems use sensor networks for receiving and processing information during the realia time. The present paper proposes using a coordinator role mobility method for controlling the routing processes for energy balancing in nodes, which provides dynamic network reconfiguration possibilities. The method is designed to operate fully in the background and can be integrated into any exiting working system.

  3. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Carboxylate-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks and Coordination Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Paul

    Coordination networks (CNs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline materials composed of metal ions linked by multifunctional organic ligands. From these connections, infinite arrays of one-, two-, or three-dimensional networks can be formed. Exploratory synthesis and research of novel CNs and MOFs is of current interest because of their many possible industrial applications including gas storage, catalysis, magnetism, and luminescence. A variety of metal centers and organic ligands can be used to synthesize MOFs and CNs under a range of reaction conditions, leading to extraordinary structural diversity. The characteristics of the metals and linkers, such as properties and coordination preferences, play the biggest role in determining the structure and properties of the resulting network. Thus, the choice of metal and linker is dictated by the desired traits of the target network. The pervasive use of transition metal centers in MOF synthesis stems from their well-known coordination behavior with carboxylate-based linkers, thus facilitating design strategies. Conversely, CNs and MOFs based on s-block and lanthanide metals are less studied because each group presents unique challenges to structure prediction. Lanthanide metals have variable coordination spheres capable of accommodating up to twelve atoms, while the bonding in s-block metals takes on a mainly ionic character. In spite of these obstacles, lanthanide and s-block CNs are worthwhile synthetic targets because of their unique properties. Interesting photoluminescent and sensing materials can be developed using lanthanide metals, whereas low atomic weight s-block metals may afford an advantage in gravimetric advantages for gas storage applications. The aim of this research was to expand the current understanding of carboxylate-based CN and MOF synthesis by varying the metals, solvents, and temperatures used. To this end, magnesium-based CNs were examined using a variety of aromatic carboxylate

  4. Social dilemmas and individual/group coordination strategies in a complex rural land-use game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis García-Barrios

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening ongoing bottom-up capacity building processes for local and sustainable landscape-level governance is a multi-dimensional social endeavor. One of the tasks involved – participatory rural land use planning – requires more understanding and more awareness among all stakeholders regarding the social dilemmas local people confront when responding to each other’s land-use decisions. In this paper we will analyze and discuss a version of our game SIERRA SPRINGS that is simple to play for any stakeholder that can count to 24, yet entails a complex-coordination land use game – with an extensive and yet finite set of solutions – which can mimic in a stylized form some of the dilemmas landowners could confront in a landscape planning process where there livelihoods are at stake. The game has helped researchers and players observe and reflect on the individual coordination strategies that emerge within a group in response to these stylized dilemmas. This paper (1 develops a game-theoretical approach to cooperation, competition and coordination of land uses in small rural watersheds, (2 describe the goal, rules and mechanics of the game, (3 analyzes the structure of each farms’ solution set vs. the whole watershed’s solution set, (4 derives from them the coordination dilemmas and the risk of coordination failure, (5 describes four individual coordination strategies consistently displayed by players; mapping them in a plane we have called Group-Level Coordination Space, and (6 discusses the strengths, limitations and actual and potential uses of the game both for research and as an introductory tool for stakeholders involved in participatory land use planning.

  5. A Research Coordination Network for Ecological Applications of Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, T. D.; Strahler, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Enhancing the development of terrestrial laser scanning for ecological applications is the objective of a Research Coordination Network (RCN) now funded by the US National Science Foundation. The activity has two primary goals: (1) development of a low-cost lidar scanner that will provide accurate estimates of above-ground forest biomass for carbon modeling and monitoring procedures; and (2) development of a range of new ecological applications for TLS, based on rapid forest structure measurements and 3-D reconstructions of forest plots and stands. The network, first constituted in 2015, presently includes 69 participants, including researchers, professors, postdocs, and students at 32 institutions from Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. It is led by a Steering Committee of 15 researchers from 12 of these institutions. A primary activity of the TLSRCN is to facilitate communication of TLS developments and applications both within the group and to the broader scientific community at meetings and workshops. In 2015, RCN participants presented 27 papers and posters at international meetings and forums, including the Annual Conference of the Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society of the UK, SilviLaser 2015, and the Fall Meeting of the AGU. Within the group, bimonthly telecons allow the exchange of recent research developments and planning for group meetings and international conference presentations. Encouraging collaborative publications is also a focus of the RCN; 9 of 11 journal papers published in 2015 that reported TLS research by participants also combined authors from more than one research group participating in the network. The TLSRCN is supported by NSF Grant DBI-1455636 to Boston University, Alan Strahler Principal Investigator. Information for researchers interested in joining the network is available on the TLSRCN web site, tlsrcn.bu.edu. The image below shows a stand of Himalayan

  6. Interplant coordination, supply chain integration, and operational performance of a plant in a manufacturing network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Cheng; Chaudhuri, Atanu; Farooq, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationships at the level of plant in a manufacturing network, labelled as networked plant in the paper, between (1) inter-plant coordination and operational performance, (2) supply chain integration (SCI) and operational performance......, and (3) inter-plant coordination and SCI. Design/methodology/approach This paper is developed based on the data obtained from the sixth version of International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS VI). Specifically, this paper uses a subset of the IMSS VI data set from the 606 plants that identified...... themselves as one of the plants in a manufacturing network. Findings This paper finds that external integration is significantly related to operational performance of networked plant, whereas internal integration is not. As an enabler for external integration, the influence of internal integration...

  7. Coordination of baseload power plant group control with static reactive power compensator control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Szczerba

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power sources in power system nodes: generators and static reactive power compensators, are controlled by control systems. Generators – by generator node group controllers, compensators – by voltage controllers. The paper presents issues of these control systems’ coordination and proposals for its implementation.

  8. Influence of topology in the evolution of coordination in complex networks under information diffusion constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirathna, Dharshana; Piraveenan, Mahendra; Harré, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of the topological structure of social systems on the evolution of coordination in them. We simulate a coordination game ("Stag-hunt") on four well-known classes of complex networks commonly used to model social systems, namely scale-free, small-world, random and hierarchical-modular, as well as on the well-mixed model. Our particular focus is on understanding the impact of information diffusion on coordination, and how this impact varies according to the topology of the social system. We demonstrate that while time-lags and noise in the information about relative payoffs affect the emergence of coordination in all social systems, some topologies are markedly more resilient than others to these effects. We also show that, while non-coordination may be a better strategy in a society where people do not have information about the payoffs of others, coordination will quickly emerge as the better strategy when people get this information about others, even with noise and time lags. Societies with the so-called small-world structure are most conducive to the emergence of coordination, despite limitations in information propagation, while societies with scale-free topologies are most sensitive to noise and time-lags in information diffusion. Surprisingly, in all topologies, it is not the highest connected people (hubs), but the slightly less connected people (provincial hubs) who first adopt coordination. Our findings confirm that the evolution of coordination in social systems depends heavily on the underlying social network structure.

  9. Assembly effect of groups in online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.; Wong, K. Y.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the popularity and growth of online social networks, security in these networks becomes a critical problem. Previous works have proved that a virus can spread effectively in social networks. In this paper, groups in social networks are studied. We notice that groups on social network services sites can assemble people with similar characteristics, which may promote virus propagation in these networks. After our analysis, it is found that the use of groups can shorten the distance among users, and hence it would cause faster virus spread. We propose a virus propagation model and simulate it in a group network to show the assembly effect of groups. Our result shows that even with only one random attack, a virus can still spread rapidly, and the direct contact among group members is the reason for fast spreading.

  10. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel’ perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive–interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives

  11. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  12. Coordination of glucose and glutamine utilization by an expanded Myc network

    OpenAIRE

    Kaadige, Mohan R; Elgort, Marc G; Ayer, Donald E

    2010-01-01

    Glucose and glutamine are the most abundant circulating nutrients and support the growth and proliferation of all cells, in particular rapidly growing and dividing cancer cells. Several recent studies implicate an expanded Myc network in how cells sense and utilize both glucose and glutamine. These studies reveal an unappreciated coordination between glycolysis and glutaminolysis, potentially providing new targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

  13. Generation of symmetry coordinates for crystals using multiplier representations of the space groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1978-01-01

    Symmetry coordinates play an important role in the normal-mode calculations of crystals. It is therefore of great importance to have a general method, which may be applied for any crystal at any wave vector, to generate these. The multiplier representations of the space groups as given by Kovalev...... and the projection-operator technique provide a basis for such a method. The method is illustrated for the nonsymmorphic D36 space group, and the theoretical background for the representations of space groups in general is reviewed and illustrated on the example above. It is desirable to perform the projection...... of symmetry coordinates in such a way that they may be used for as many wave vectors as possible. We discuss how to achieve this goal. The detailed illustrations should make it simple to apply the theory in any other case....

  14. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardoni, Davide; Amin, Hayder; Di Marco, Stefano; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Nieus, Thierry

    2017-07-01

    Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs), interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities) that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  15. Recurrently connected and localized neuronal communities initiate coordinated spontaneous activity in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Lonardoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing neuronal systems intrinsically generate coordinated spontaneous activity that propagates by involving a large number of synchronously firing neurons. In vivo, waves of spikes transiently characterize the activity of developing brain circuits and are fundamental for activity-dependent circuit formation. In vitro, coordinated spontaneous spiking activity, or network bursts (NBs, interleaved within periods of asynchronous spikes emerge during the development of 2D and 3D neuronal cultures. Several studies have investigated this type of activity and its dynamics, but how a neuronal system generates these coordinated events remains unclear. Here, we investigate at a cellular level the generation of network bursts in spontaneously active neuronal cultures by exploiting high-resolution multielectrode array recordings and computational network modelling. Our analysis reveals that NBs are generated in specialized regions of the network (functional neuronal communities that feature neuronal links with high cross-correlation peak values, sub-millisecond lags and that share very similar structural connectivity motifs providing recurrent interactions. We show that the particular properties of these local structures enable locally amplifying spontaneous asynchronous spikes and that this mechanism can lead to the initiation of NBs. Through the analysis of simulated and experimental data, we also show that AMPA currents drive the coordinated activity, while NMDA and GABA currents are only involved in shaping the dynamics of NBs. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of functional neuronal communities with recurrent local connections allows a neuronal system to generate spontaneous coordinated spiking activity events. As suggested by the rules used for implementing our computational model, such functional communities might naturally emerge during network development by following simple constraints on distance-based connectivity.

  16. Optimal Multiuser Zero Forcing with Per-Antenna Power Constraints for Network MIMO Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviani Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a multicell multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO coordinated downlink transmission, also known as network MIMO, under per-antenna power constraints. We investigate a simple multiuser zero-forcing (ZF linear precoding technique known as block diagonalization (BD for network MIMO. The optimal form of BD with per-antenna power constraints is proposed. It involves a novel approach of optimizing the precoding matrices over the entire null space of other users' transmissions. An iterative gradient descent method is derived by solving the dual of the throughput maximization problem, which finds the optimal precoding matrices globally and efficiently. The comprehensive simulations illustrate several network MIMO coordination advantages when the optimal BD scheme is used. Its achievable throughput is compared with the capacity region obtained through the recently established duality concept under per-antenna power constraints.

  17. Consensus or Deadlock? Consequences of Simple Behavioral Rules for Coordination in Group Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Helen F; Correll, Nikolaus; Breed, Michael D; Flaxman, Samuel

    Coordinated collective behaviors often emerge from simple rules governing the interactions of individuals in groups. We model mechanisms of coordination among ants during cooperative transport, a challenging task that requires a consensus on travel direction. Our goal is to determine whether groups following simple behavioral rules can reach a consensus using minimal information. Using deterministic and stochastic models, we investigate behavioral factors that affect coordination. We define and investigate three types of behavioral rules governing individual behavior that differ in the information available: individuals either 1) have no information, 2) can measure transport success, or 3) measure success while also knowing whether they are aligned with the majority. We find that groups break deadlocks only if individuals more readily give up when they are going against the majority, corresponding to rule type 3 -such groups are "informed." These behavioral rules succeed through positive and negative feedbacks that are implemented in our model via a single mechanism: individuals only need to measure the relative group sizes to make effective decisions. We also find that groups reach consensus more quickly if they have either a shared bias, high sensitivity to group behavior, or finely tuned persistence. Each of these is a potential adaptation for efficient cooperative transport. This flexibility makes the behavioral rules in the informed case relatively robust to deficiencies in the individuals' capabilities. While inspired by ants, our results are generalizable to other collective decisions with deadlocks, and demonstrate that groups of behaviorally simple individuals with no memory and extremely limited information can break symmetry and reach a consensus in a decision between two equal options.

  18. Intersection Group Dynamic Subdivision and Coordination at Intraregional Boundaries in Sudden Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciyun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at the traffic flow agglomeration effect characteristics and rapid evacuation requirement in sudden disaster; operation time of intraregional boundaries traffic signal coordination was presented firstly. Then intraregional boundaries intersection group dynamic subdivision and consolidation method based on relative similarity degree and similarity coefficient of adjacent intersections was put forward. As to make the traffic control strategy adapt to traffic condition of different intraregional boundaries intersection groups, this paper proposes an intraregional boundaries traffic signal coordination and optimization technology based on organic computing theory. Finally, this paper uses Delphi 7.0, MapX, and Oracle developing a software package, combined with Paramics V6 Simulator to validate the methods of this paper. The result shows that it can obviously improve disaster affected regional traffic signal control efficiency which reduces average traffic delay by 30–35%, decreases vehicle queue by more than 20% and reduces evacuation time more than 13.06%.

  19. Social network diagnostics: a tool for monitoring group interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Sabina B; Barkin, Shari L; Valente, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    Many behavioral interventions designed to improve health outcomes are delivered in group settings. To date, however, group interventions have not been evaluated to determine if the groups generate interaction among members and how changes in group interaction may affect program outcomes at the individual or group level. This article presents a model and practical tool for monitoring how social ties and social structure are changing within the group during program implementation. The approach is based on social network analysis and has two phases: collecting network measurements at strategic intervention points to determine if group dynamics are evolving in ways anticipated by the intervention, and providing the results back to the group leader to guide implementation next steps. This process aims to initially increase network connectivity and ultimately accelerate the diffusion of desirable behaviors through the new network. This article presents the Social Network Diagnostic Tool and, as proof of concept, pilot data collected during the formative phase of a childhood obesity intervention. The number of reported advice partners and discussion partners increased during program implementation. Density, the number of ties among people in the network expressed as a percentage of all possible ties, increased from 0.082 to 0.182 (p 0.05) in the discussion network. The observed two-fold increase in network density represents a significant shift in advice partners over the intervention period. Using the Social Network Tool to empirically guide program activities of an obesity intervention was feasible.

  20. Tuning of Nafion® by HKUST-1 as coordination network to enhance proton conductivity for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Talukdar, Krishan; Choi, Sang-June

    2016-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks can be intentionally coordinated to achieve improved proton conductivity because they have highly ordered structures and modular nature that serve as a scaffold to anchor acidic groups and develop efficient proton transfer pathways for fuel cell application. Using the concept of a coordination network, the conductivity of Nafion® was tuned by the incorporation of HKUST-1. It has CuII-paddle wheel type nodes and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate struts, feature accessible sites that provides an improved protonic channel depending on the water content. In spite of the fact that HKUST-1 is neutral, coordinated water molecules are contributed adequately acidic by CuII to supply protons to enhance proton conductivity. Water molecules play a vital part in transfer of proton as conducting media and serve as triggers to change proton conductivity through reforming hydrogen bonding networks by water adsorption/desorption process. Increased ion exchange capacity and proton conductivity with lower water uptake of the H3PO4-doped material, and improved thermal stability (as confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis) were achieved. The structure of HKUST-1 was confirmed via field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, while the porosity and adsorption desorption capacity were characterized by porosity analysis.

  1. ROLES OF INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES IN AN EMERGING COUNTRY: CONTROL AND COORDINATION IN FAMILY BUSINESS GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Ataay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maman (1999 proposed that, in countries in which business groups are dominant forms for organizing economic activities, the interlocking directorate is a managerial tool that can be prioritized to control and coordinate activities of their affiliated firms within the same groups and align their business objectives. This organizational connection appears to be an intentional strategy on the part of the groups‟ headquarters. In order to study the interlocking ties in Turkish family business groups (FBG, this study focused on interlocking directorates among listed firms in Turkey. The findings of preliminary study reveal that almost all of the interlocking ties were within the business groups (BG in our sample. This is the result of assignment of familyaffiliated and/or professional inside directors to the various boards of companies in the BG. We also found that compare to vertical ties; business groups are using more horizontal interlocking connections to bond their affiliated companies together.

  2. Coordination Protocols for a Reliable Sensor, Actuator, and Device Network (SADN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Ozaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensor, actuator, and device network (SADN is composed of three types of nodes, which are sensor, actuator, and actuation device nodes. Sensor nodes and actuator nodes are interconnected in wireless networks as discussed in wireless sensor and actuator networks (WSANs. Actuator nodes and device nodes are interconnected in types of networks, i.e. wireless and wired network. Sensor nodes sense an physical event and send sensed values of the event to actuator nodes. An actuator node makes a decision on proper actions on receipt of sensed values and then issue the action requests to the device nodes. A device node really acts to the physical world. For example, moves a robot arms by performing the action on receipt of the action request. Messages may be lost and nodes may be faulty. Especially, messages are lost due to noise and collision in a wireless network. We propose a fully redundant model for an SADN where each of sensor, actuator, and device functions is replicated in multiple nodes and each of sensor-actuator and actuator-device communication is realized in many-to-many type of communication protocols. Even if some number of nodes are faulty, the other nodes can perform requested tasks. Here, each sensor node sends sensed values to multiple actuator nodes and each actuator node receives sensed values from multiple sensor nodes. While multiple actuator nodes communicate with multiple replica nodes of a device. Even if messages are lost and some number of nodes are faulty, device nodes can surely receive action requests required for sensed values and the actions are performed. In this paper, we discuss a type of semi-passive coordination (SPC protocol of multiple actuator nodes for multiple sensor nodes. We discuss a type of active coordination protocol for multiple actuator nodes and multiple actuation device nodes. We evaluate the SPC protocol for the sensor-actuator coordination in terms of the number of messages exchanged among

  3. Research collaboration in groups and networks: differences across academic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Reymert, Ingvild

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a macro-picture of collaboration in research groups and networks across all academic fields in Norwegian research universities, and to examine the relative importance of membership in groups and networks for individual publication output. To our knowledge, this is a new approach, which may provide valuable information on collaborative patterns in a particular national system, but of clear relevance to other national university systems. At the system level, conducting research in groups and networks are equally important, but there are large differences between academic fields. The research group is clearly most important in the field of medicine and health, while undertaking research in an international network is most important in the natural sciences. Membership in a research group and active participation in international networks are likely to enhance publication productivity and the quality of research.

  4. Blackboard Rules for Coordinating Context-aware Applications in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Jacquet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to improvements in wireless communication technologies and increasing computing power in hand-held devices, mobile ad hoc networks are becoming an ever-more present reality. Coordination languages are expected to become important means in supporting this type of interaction. To this extent we argue the interest of the Bach coordination language as a middleware that can handle and react to context changes as well as cope with unpredictable physical interruptions that occur in opportunistic network connections. More concretely, our proposal is based on blackboard rules that model declaratively the actions to be taken once the blackboard content reaches a predefined state, but also that manage the engagement and disengagement of hosts and transient sharing of blackboards. The idea of reactiveness has already been introduced in previous work, but as will be appreciated by the reader, this article presents a new perspective, more focused on a declarative setting.

  5. Enhanced Inter-cell Interference Coordination for Heterogeneous Networks in LTE-Advanced: A Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lindbom, Lars; Krishnamurthy, Sandeep; Yao, Chunhai; Miki, Nobuhiko; Chandrasekhar, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous networks (het-nets) - comprising of conventional macrocell base stations overlaid with femtocells, picocells and wireless relays - offer cellular operators burgeoning traffic demands through cell-splitting gains obtained by bringing users closer to their access points. However, the often random and unplanned location of these access points can cause severe near-far problems, typically solved by coordinating base-station transmissions to minimize interference. Towards this direction, the 3rd generation partnership project Long Term Evolution-Advanced (3GPP-LTE or Rel-10) standard introduces time-domain inter-cell interference coordination (ICIC) for facilitating a seamless deployment of a het-net overlay. This article surveys the key features encompassing the physical layer, network layer and back-hauling aspects of time-domain ICIC in Rel-10.

  6. Performance analysis of coordination strategies in two-tier Heterogeneous Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Boukhedimi, Ikram

    2016-08-11

    Large scale multi-tier Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) are expected to ensure a consistent quality of service (QoS) in 5G systems. Such networks consist of a macro base station (BS) equipped with a large number of antennas and a dense overlay of small cells. The small cells could be deployed within the same coverage of the macro-cell BS, thereby causing high levels of inter-cell interference. In this regard, coordinated beamforming techniques are considered as a viable solution to counteract the arising interference. The goal of this work is to analyze the efficiency of coordinated beamforming techniques in mitigating both intra-cell and inter-cell interference. In particular, we consider the downlink of a Time-division duplexing (TDD) massive multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) tier-HetNet and analyze different beamforming schemes together with different degrees of coordination between the BSs. We exploit random matrix theory tools in order to provide, in explicit form, deterministic equivalents for the average achievable rates in the macro-cell and the micro-cells. We prove that our theoretical derivations allow us to draw some conclusions regarding the role played by coordination strategies in reducing the inter-cell interference. These findings are finally validated by a selection of some numerical results. © 2016 IEEE.

  7. Coordinate transformation and matrix measure approach for synchronization of complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jonq; Liang, Yu-Hao

    2009-09-01

    Global synchronization in complex networks has attracted considerable interest in various fields. There are mainly two analytical approaches for studying such time-varying networks. The first approach is Lyapunov function-based methods. For such an approach, the connected-graph-stability (CGS) method arguably gives the best results. Nevertheless, CGS is limited to the networks with cooperative couplings. The matrix measure approach (MMA) proposed by Chen, although having a wider range of applications in the network topologies than that of CGS, works for smaller numbers of nodes in most network topologies. The approach also has a limitation with networks having partial-state coupling. Other than giving yet another MMA, we introduce a new and, in some cases, optimal coordinate transformation to study such networks. Our approach fixes all the drawbacks of CGS and MMA. In addition, by merely checking the structure of the vector field of the individual oscillator, we shall be able to determine if the system is globally synchronized. In summary, our results can be applied to rather general time-varying networks with a large number of nodes.

  8. Sparse cliques trump scale-free networks in coordination and competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianetto, David A.; Heydari, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Cooperative behavior, a natural, pervasive and yet puzzling phenomenon, can be significantly enhanced by networks. Many studies have shown how global network characteristics affect cooperation; however, it is difficult to understand how this occurs based on global factors alone, low-level network building blocks, or motifs are necessary. In this work, we systematically alter the structure of scale-free and clique networks and show, through a stochastic evolutionary game theory model, that cooperation on cliques increases linearly with community motif count. We further show that, for reactive stochastic strategies, network modularity improves cooperation in the anti-coordination Snowdrift game and the Prisoner’s Dilemma game but not in the Stag Hunt coordination game. We also confirm the negative effect of the scale-free graph on cooperation when effective payoffs are used. On the flip side, clique graphs are highly cooperative across social environments. Adding cycles to the acyclic scale-free graph increases cooperation when multiple games are considered; however, cycles have the opposite effect on how forgiving agents are when playing the Prisoner’s Dilemma game.

  9. Modeling and Error Compensation of Robotic Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machines Using BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanbin Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM is a specific robotic structural instrument, which uses D-H method for the purpose of kinematic modeling and error compensation. However, it is difficult for the existing error compensation models to describe various factors, which affects the accuracy of AACMM. In this paper, a modeling and error compensation method for AACMM is proposed based on BP Neural Networks. According to the available measurements, the poses of the AACMM are used as the input, and the coordinates of the probe are used as the output of neural network. To avoid tedious training and improve the training efficiency and prediction accuracy, a data acquisition strategy is developed according to the actual measurement behavior in the joint space. A neural network model is proposed and analyzed by using the data generated via Monte-Carlo method in simulations. The structure and parameter settings of neural network are optimized to improve the prediction accuracy and training speed. Experimental studies have been conducted to verify the proposed algorithm with neural network compensation, which shows that 97% error of the AACMM can be eliminated after compensation. These experimental results have revealed the effectiveness of the proposed modeling and compensation method for AACMM.

  10. COORDINATION IN MULTILEVEL NETWORK-CENTRIC CONTROL SYSTEMS OF REGIONAL SECURITY: APPROACH AND FORMAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Masloboev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with development of methods and tools for mathematical and computer modeling of the multilevel network-centric control systems of regional security. This research is carried out under development strategy implementation of the Arctic zone of the Russian Federation and national safeguarding for the period before 2020 in the Murmansk region territory. Creation of unified interdepartmental multilevel computer-aided system is proposed intended for decision-making information support and socio-economic security monitoring of the Arctic regions of Russia. The distinctive features of the investigated system class are openness, self-organization, decentralization of management functions and decision-making, weak hierarchy in the decision-making circuit and goal generation capability inside itself. Research techniques include functional-target approach, mathematical apparatus of multilevel hierarchical system theory and principles of network-centric control of distributed systems with pro-active components and variable structure. The work considers network-centric management local decisions coordination problem-solving within the multilevel distributed systems intended for information support of regional security. The coordination problem-solving approach and problem formalization in the multilevel network-centric control systems of regional security have been proposed based on developed multilevel recurrent hierarchical model of regional socio-economic system complex security. The model provides coordination of regional security indexes, optimized by the different elements of multilevel control systems, subject to decentralized decision-making. The model specificity consists in application of functional-target technology and mathematical apparatus of multilevel hierarchical system theory for coordination procedures implementation of the network-centric management local decisions. The work-out and research results can find further

  11. Molecular Tectonics: Design of Enantiopure Luminescent Heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) Coordination Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chaojie; Guenet, Aurélie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-11-02

    With the aim of combining luminescence and chirality in heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) coordination networks, synthetic strategies for the formation of new Ir(III)-based chiral metallatectons ([Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]), both as a racemic mixture of Δ and Λ enantiomers (rac-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]) and as enantiopure complexes (Δ-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6] and Λ-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]), were developed. The final compounds were characterized both in solution and in the crystalline phase. Notably, their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and their photophysical properties in solution and in the solid state were investigated. Combination of the cationic linear metallatecton with Cd(2+) iodide salt ([CdI3](-)), behaving as an anionic two-connecting node, leads to the formation of 1D chiral and neutral heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) luminescent coordination networks both as a racemic mixture and as enantiomerically pure infinite architectures. The latter have been structurally studied in the solid state by X-ray diffraction both on single crystals and on microcrystalline powders. The infinite coordination networks display phosphorescence in the solid state at ca. 600 nm upon excitation at 400 nm.

  12. [Networks, disease management programs, GP coordinator: analysis of recent ambulatory reforms in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Ligia

    2011-01-01

    Strengthening the role of the general practitioner in the conduction and coordination of specialized, inpatient and social care to ensure the continuity is a trend observed in recent health reforms in European countries. In Germany, from the second half of the 1990s, driven by economic pressures, a specific legislation and initiatives of the providers themselves have developed new organizational structures and care models for the purpose of the integration of the health care system and the coordination of health care in the form of: physicians networks, practitioner coordinator model, diseases management programs and integrated care. From a literature review, document analysis, visits to services and interviews with key informants, this paper analyzes the dynamics of these organizational changes in the German outpatient sector. The mechanisms of integration and coordination proposed are examined, and the potential impacts on the efficiency and quality of new organizational arrangements are discussed. Also it is analyzed the reasons and interests involved that point out the obstacles to the implementation. It was observed the process of an incremental reform with a tendency of diversification of the healthcare panorama in Germany with the presence of integrated models of care and strengthening the role of general practitioners in the coordination of patient care.

  13. Crystal chemistry of uranyl carboxylate coordination networks obtained in the presence of organic amine molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Ionut; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry [Unite de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide (UCCS) - UMR CNRS 8181, Universite de Lille Nord de France, USTL-ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2014-03-15

    Three uranyl isophthalates (1,3-bdc) and two uranyl pyromellitates (btec) of coordination-polymer type were hydrothermally synthesized (200 C for 24 h) in the presence of different amine-based molecules [1,3-diaminopropane (dap) or dimethylamine (dma) originating from the in situ decomposition of N,N-dimethylformamide]. (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)(1,3-bdc).H{sub 2}O (1) is composed of inorganic tetranuclear cores, which are linked to each other through the isophthalato ligand to generate infinite neutral ribbons, which are intercalated by free H{sub 2}O molecules. The compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)(1,3-bdc){sub 2}.0.5H{sub 2}dap.1.5H{sub 2}O (2) and UO{sub 2}(1,3-bdc){sub 1.5}.0.5H{sub 2}dap.2H{sub 2}O (3) consist of discrete uranyl-centered hexagonal bipyramids connected to each other by a ditopic linker to form a single-layer network for 2 or a double-layer network for 3. The protonated diamine molecules are located between the uranyl-organic sheets and balance the negative charge of the layered sub-networks. The phase (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}O(btec).2Hdma.H{sub 2}O (4) presents a 2D structure built up from tetranuclear units, which consist of two central sevenfold coordinated uranium centers and two peripheral eightfold coordinated uranium centers. The connection of the resulting tetramers through the pyromellitate molecules generates an anionic layerlike structure, in which the protonated dimethylammonium species are inserted. The compound UO{sub 2}(btec).2Hdma (5) is also a lamellar coordination polymer, which contains isolated eightfold coordinated uranium cations linked through pyromellitate molecules and intercalated by protonated dimethylammonium species. In both phases 4 and 5, the btec linker has non-bonded carboxyl oxygen atoms, which preferentially interact with the protonated amine molecules through a hydrogen-bond network. The different illustrations show the structural diversity of uranyl-organic coordination polymers with organic

  14. Bio-Optical sensors on Argo Floats. Reports of the international ocean-colour coordinating group

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernard, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available . Minimum Requirements for an Operational Ocean-Colour Sensor for the Open Ocean (1998). 2. Status and Plans for Satellite Ocean-Colour Missions: Considerations for Com- plementary Missions (1999). 3. Remote Sensing of Ocean Colour in Coastal, and Other... by the International Ocean-Colour Coordinating Group, P.O. Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B2Y 4A2, Canada. ISSN: 1098-6030 ©IOCCG 2011 Printed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), European Commission Contents Executive Summary 1 1 Introduction: The Development of Bio...

  15. A core stability group program for children with developmental coordination disorder: 3 clinical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra; Bell, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This series of case reports documents the response of 3 children with developmental coordination disorder to a group intervention program. The 3 children, 9-11 years old, who participated in the 6-week group exercise program, illustrate the heterogeneity of this population. Two group sessions per week and a home program included a core stability program, fitness activities, and task-specific intervention based on child-chosen goals. The effect of the program on motor skills, self-perceived adequacy for physical activity and balance, strength, and core stability activities was examined. Each child improved in 1 or more areas of motor skill, self-efficacy for physical activity, and core stability outcome measures. Possible reasons for the range of outcomes are discussed. Physical activity promotion in this population has the potential to improve the quality of life and reduce health risks associated with sedentary lifestyles.

  16. Coordinated scheduling for the downlink of cloud radio-access networks

    KAUST Repository

    Douik, Ahmed S.

    2015-09-11

    This paper addresses the coordinated scheduling problem in cloud-enabled networks. Consider the downlink of a cloud-radio access network (CRAN), where the cloud is only responsible for the scheduling policy and the synchronization of the transmit frames across the connected base-stations (BS). The transmitted frame of every BS consists of several time/frequency blocks, called power-zones (PZ), maintained at fixed transmit power. The paper considers the problem of scheduling users to PZs and BSs in a coordinated fashion across the network, by maximizing a network-wide utility under the practical constraint that each user cannot be served by more than one base-station, but can be served by one or more power-zones within each base-station frame. The paper solves the problem using a graph theoretical approach by introducing the scheduling graph in which each vertex represents an association of users, PZs and BSs. The problem is formulated as a maximum weight clique, in which the weight of each vertex is the benefit of the association represented by that vertex. The paper further presents heuristic algorithms with low computational complexity. Simulation results show the performance of the proposed algorithms and suggest that the heuristics perform near optimal in low shadowing environments. © 2015 IEEE.

  17. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Design Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Setting Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Methods Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Main outcome measures Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Results Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders’ activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with

  18. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders' activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with patient needs and brought the leaders closer to frontline stakeholders

  19. Integrated Multimedia Based Intelligent Group Decision Support System for Electrical Power Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Saxena

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Power Network in recent time requires an intelligent, virtual environment based decision process for the coordination of all its individual elements and the interrelated tasks. Its ultimate goal is to achieve maximum productivity and efficiency through the efficient and effective application of generation, transmission, distribution, pricing and regulatory systems. However, the complexity of electrical power network and the presence of conflicting multiple goals and objectives postulated by various groups emphasized the need of an intelligent group decision support system approach in this field. In this paper, an Integrated Multimedia based Intelligent Group Decision Support System (IM1GDSS is presented, and its main components are analyzed and discussed. In particular attention is focused on the Data Base, Model Base, Central Black Board (CBB and Multicriteria Futuristic Decision Process (MFDP module. The model base interacts with Electrical Power Network Load Forecasting and Planning (EPNLFP Module; Resource Optimization, Modeling and Simulation (ROMAS Module; Electrical Power Network Control and Evaluation Process (EPNCAEP Module, and MFDP Module through CBB for strategic planning, management control, operational planning and transaction processing. The richness of multimedia channels adds a totally new dimension in a group decision making for Electrical Power Network. The proposed IMIGDSS is a user friendly, highly interactive group decision making system, based on efficient intelligent and multimedia communication support for group discussions, retrieval of content and multi criteria decision analysis.

  20. Modern International Research Groups: Networks and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehi, Linda

    2009-05-01

    In a globalized economy, education and research are becoming increasing international in content and context. Academic and research institutions worldwide try to internationalize their programs by setting formal or informal collaborations. An education that is enhanced by international experiences leads to mobility of the science and technology workforce. Existing academic cultures and research structures are at odds with efforts to internationalize education. For the past 20-30 years, the US has recognized the need to improve the abroad experience of our scientists and technologists: however progress has been slow. Despite a number of both federally and privately supported programs, efforts to scale up the numbers of participants have not been satisfactory. The exchange is imbalanced as more foreign scientists and researchers move to the US than the other way around. There are a number of issues that contribute to this imbalance but we could consider the US academic career system, as defined by its policies and practices, as a barrier to internationalizing the early career faculty experience. Strict curricula, pre-tenure policies and financial commitments discourage students, post doctoral fellows and pre-tenure faculty from taking international leaves to participate in research abroad experiences. Specifically, achieving an international experience requires funding that is not provided by the universities. Furthermore, intellectual property requirements and constraints in pre-tenure probationary periods may discourage students and faculty from collaborations with peers across the Atlantic or Pacific or across the American continent. Environments that support early career networking are not available. This presentation will discuss the increasing need for international collaborations and will explore the need for additional programs, more integration, better conditions and improved infrastructures that can encourage and support mobility of scientists. In addition

  1. Coordinated Precoding for D2D Communications Underlay Uplink MIMO Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the coordinated precoding problem for device-to-device (D2D communications underlay multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO cellular networks. The system model considered here constitutes multiple D2D user pairs attempting to share the uplink radio resources of a cellular network. We first formulate the coordinated precoding problem for the D2D user pairs as a sum-rate maximization (SRM problem, which is subject to a total interference power constraint imposed to protect the base station (BS and individual transmit power budgets available for each D2D user pair. Since the formulated SRM problem is nonconvex in general, we reformulate it as a difference convex- (DC- type programming problem, which can be iteratively solved by employing the famous successive convex approximation (SCA method. Moreover, a proximal-point-based regularization approach is also pursued here to ensure the convergence of the proposed algorithm. Interestingly, the centralized precoding algorithm can also lend itself to a distributed implementation. By introducing a price-based interference management mechanism, we reformulate the coordinated precoding problem as a Stackelberg game. Then, a distributed precoding algorithm is developed based on the concept of Stackelberg equilibrium (SE. Finally, numerical simulations are also provided to demonstrate the proposed algorithms. Results show that our algorithms can converge fast to a satisfactory solution with guaranteed convergence.

  2. The oncogene c-Myc coordinates regulation of metabolic networks to enable rapid cell cycle entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Hockenbery, David M

    2008-04-15

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is rapidly activated by serum and regulates genes involved in metabolism and cell cycle progression. This gene is thereby uniquely poised to coordinate both the metabolic and cell cycle regulatory events required for cell cycle entry. However, this function of Myc has not been evaluated. Using a rat fibroblast model of isogenic cell lines, myc(-/-), myc(+/-), myc(+/+) and myc(-/-) cells with an inducible c-myc transgene (mycER), we show that the Myc protein programs cells to utilize both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to drive cell cycle progression. We demonstrate this coordinate regulation of metabolic networks is essential, as specific inhibitors of these pathways block Myc-induced proliferation. Metabolic events temporally correlated with cell cycle entry include increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial function, pyruvate and lactate production, and ATP generation. Treatment of normal cells with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation recapitulates the myc(-/-) phenotype, resulting in impaired cell cycle entry and reduced metabolism. Combined with a kinetic expression profiling analysis of genes linked to mitochondrial function, our study indicates that Myc's ability to coordinately regulate the mitochondrial metabolic network transcriptome is required for rapid cell cycle entry. This function of Myc may underlie the pervasive presence of Myc in many human cancers.

  3. Insight into Group 4 Metallocenium-Mediated Olefin Polymerization Reaction Coordinates Using a Metadynamics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Alessandro; Fragalà, Ignazio L; Marks, Tobin J

    2013-08-13

    We report here the first application of the computationally efficient metadynamics approach for analyzing single-site olefin polymerization mechanisms. The mechanism of group 4 metallocenium catalysis for ethylene homopolymerization is investigated by modeling the ethylene insertion step at the cationic (η(5)-C5H5)Zr(CH3)2(+) center using molecular dynamics simulations within the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework. In particular, the metadynamics formalism is adopted to enable theoretical characterization of covalent bond forming/breaking processes using molecular dynamics ab initio tools. Analysis of the ethylene insertion step free energy surface indicates a slightly exoergic process (-3.2 kcal/mol) with a barrier of 8.6 kcal/mol, in good agreement with conventional ab initio static calculations. Analysis of the structural and dynamic aspects of the simulated reaction coordinate reveals a preferred olefin configuration which aligns parallel to the Zr-CH3 vector in concert with insertion and a slightly bent conformation of the product n-propyl chain to avoid nonbonded repulsion between methylene groups. It is found that the unsaturated/electrophilic CpZr(CH3)2(+) center drives the insertion step, thus promoting the formation of the Zr-alkyl bond. The metadynamics analysis uniquely encompasses all energetically possible reaction coordinates, thus providing a more detailed mechanistic picture. These results demonstrate the potential of metadynamics in the conformational and geometrical analysis of transition metal-centered homogeneous catalytic processes.

  4. Spontaneous formation of dynamical groups in an adaptive networked system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghui; Guan, Shuguang; Lai, C.-H.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, we investigate a model of an adaptive networked dynamical system, where the coupling strengths among phase oscillators coevolve with the phase states. It is shown that in this model the oscillators can spontaneously differentiate into two dynamical groups after a long time evolution. Within each group, the oscillators have similar phases, while oscillators in different groups have approximately opposite phases. The network gradually converts from the initial random structure with a uniform distribution of connection strengths into a modular structure that is characterized by strong intra-connections and weak inter-connections. Furthermore, the connection strengths follow a power-law distribution, which is a natural consequence of the coevolution of the network and the dynamics. Interestingly, it is found that if the inter-connections are weaker than a certain threshold, the two dynamical groups will almost decouple and evolve independently. These results are helpful in further understanding the empirical observations in many social and biological networks.

  5. [Regional coordination of paediatric oncological care in northwestern Lower Saxony, Germany--network funded by health insurance companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H L; Blanke, J-G; Bonse, B; Bosse, H; Erkel, J; Gitmans, R; Kolb, R; Krull, F; Langlitz, J; Liebner, T; Löning, L; Mokross, C; Niekrens, C; Schüler, D; Wessel, V; Wosnitza, A P

    2010-11-01

    The cure rates in pediatric oncology have been substantially improved due to standardized treatment strategies and centralization of therapy. Close clinical and hematological monitoring is mandatory for patients between periods of chemotherapy for early detection and treatment of therapy-related complications such as infections. This results in frequent and time-consuming outpatient examinations for the patient and family at the oncological center in order to evaluate clinical condition and hematological findings. In widespread regions such as the Weser-Ems area in northwest Lower Saxony, Germany, the long distances between patients' home and the oncological center lead to higher risks and impairment of quality of life (QoL) for the patients and their families. Accordingly, in 2001 pediatric hospitals and practices, patient care services and patients' support groups in Weser-Ems founded a network (Verbund PädOnko Weser-Ems). The "Verbund PädOnko" aims at coordinated, high-quality regional outpatient patient treatment in order to reduce risks of long-distance transports to reach the oncological center. Since 2005 a newly established mobile care team realized 1 443 home visits covering a total of 150 300 km. Since 2007 the network has been funded by health insurance organisations. Internal and external benchmarking was performed showing that the rate of short term inpatient treatments were reduced. Treatment quality was assured and the QoL of the patients and their families was improved through the work of the network. The "Verbund PädOnko Weser-Ems" network represents a promising prototype model for the regional coordination of outpatient treatment and care of patients with rare diseases in wide spread areas. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. A Novel CAN Tree Coordinate Routing in Content-Addressable Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongtao Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel approach to improve coordination routing while minimizing the maintenance overhead during nodes churn. It bases on “CAN Tree Routing for Content- Addressable Network” 1 which is a solution for peer-to-peer routing. We concentrated on coordinate routing in this paper. The key idea of our approach is a recursion process to calculate target zone code and search in CAN tree 1. Because the hops are via long links in CAN, it enhances routing flexibility and robustness against failures. Nodes automatically adapt routing table to cope with network change. The routing complexity is , which is much better than a uniform greedy routing, while each node maintains two long links in average.

  7. Optimal coordinated voltage control in active distribution networks using backtracking search algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengku Hashim, Tengku Juhana; Mohamed, Azah

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in distributed generation (DG) in recent years has led to a number of generators connected to a distribution system. The integration of DGs in a distribution system has resulted in a network known as active distribution network due to the existence of bidirectional power flow in the system. Voltage rise issue is one of the predominantly important technical issues to be addressed when DGs exist in an active distribution network. This paper presents the application of the backtracking search algorithm (BSA), which is relatively new optimisation technique to determine the optimal settings of coordinated voltage control in a distribution system. The coordinated voltage control considers power factor, on-load tap-changer and generation curtailment control to manage voltage rise issue. A multi-objective function is formulated to minimise total losses and voltage deviation in a distribution system. The proposed BSA is compared with that of particle swarm optimisation (PSO) so as to evaluate its effectiveness in determining the optimal settings of power factor, tap-changer and percentage active power generation to be curtailed. The load flow algorithm from MATPOWER is integrated in the MATLAB environment to solve the multi-objective optimisation problem. Both the BSA and PSO optimisation techniques have been tested on a radial 13-bus distribution system and the results show that the BSA performs better than PSO by providing better fitness value and convergence rate.

  8. Coordinated reactive power management in power networks with wind turbines and FACTS devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaris, Hortensia, E-mail: hamaris@ing.uc3m.e [University Carlos III of Madrid, Electrical Engineering Department, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Alonso, Monica, E-mail: moalonso@ing.uc3m.e [University Carlos III of Madrid, Electrical Engineering Department, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} Coordinated reactive power management among variable speed wind farms and static var compensator to improve the voltage stability in the network. {yields} Optimization formulation including the reactive power capability from double-fed induction generators (from the induction machine and the grid side converter). {yields} Application of genetic algorithm in power networks with wind farms. -- Abstract: Reactive power management is a critical issue when dealing with the planning and operation of power networks with high wind energy penetration. This paper is intended to introduce a coordinated Reactive Power Planning strategy among Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) variable speed wind turbines and Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) devices. According to this strategy, the reactive power capability from DFIG wind turbines is obtained and the limitations on deliverable power are deduced for each operation point. Furthermore, instead of using the reactive power limit as it is traditionally done, the reactive power injection from Static Var Compensator (SVC) is related to the existing physical limits of the control variables. The optimization strategy is based on genetic algorithms and includes directly in its formulation both the reactive power capability from wind turbines and the reactive power injection from SVC units. An existing 140-bus power system is used to validate the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Entrepreneurial networking differences: An ethnic in-group and out-group analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Urban

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Researching entrepreneurship using a network perspective is important, as social networks are assets for small business owners struggling to survive in competitive markets.Research purpose: The research question of this study has focused on what we can learn about entrepreneurial networking, considering that there is an under-explored and unarticulated set of networking principles and practices which have not been previously analysed in terms of a multiethnic country context.Motivation for the study: Often the lack of network use is reported as a feature of entrepreneurs, who have less opportunity to utilise formal social capital features. Social networks provided by extended family, community-based or organisational relationships are often theorised to supplement the effects of education, experience and financial capital.Research design, approach and method: Based on hypothesised differences in networking ties, network assistance and support relationships, a survey was used to collect data on quantitative measures. Descriptive statistics were calculated and differential tests were conducted to test the hypotheses.Main findings: Results indicate that entrepreneurial networking is largely independent on group composition. Generally at least some aspects of networking are generic and as a consequence, a more integrated view of networking can be adopted.Practical/managerial implications: The practical value of the present study points to several areas of interest to entrepreneurs, policy makers and educators, through demonstrating the multifaceted nature of entrepreneurial networks for different groups and their explanatory potential in understanding networking.Contribution/value-add: Despite the importance of entrepreneurial networking, little empirical or theoretical research has examined the dynamics of networking in a developing country context such as South Africa, which has lower than expected total entrepreneurship activity.

  10. An Update on the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements and Its Upcoming Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archinal, B. A.; IAU WG on CartCartographic Coordinates; Rotational Elements

    2017-06-01

    Update on the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements, the services it provides to the planetary community, and the projected changes for and status of its next (“2015”) triennial report.

  11. Evolving dynamics of trading behavior based on coordination game in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yue-tang; Xu, Lu; Li, Jin-sheng

    2016-05-01

    This work concerns the modeling of evolvement of trading behavior in stock markets. Based on the assumption of the investors' limited rationality, the evolution mechanism of trading behavior is modeled according to the investment strategy of coordination game in network, that investors are prone to imitate their neighbors' activity through comprehensive analysis on the risk dominance degree of certain investment behavior, the network topology of their relationship and its heterogeneity. We investigate by mean-field analysis and extensive simulations the evolution of investors' trading behavior in various typical networks under different risk dominance degree of investment behavior. Our results indicate that the evolution of investors' behavior is affected by the network structure of stock market and the effect of risk dominance degree of investment behavior; the stability of equilibrium states of investors' behavior dynamics is directly related with the risk dominance degree of some behavior; connectivity and heterogeneity of the network plays an important role in the evolution of the investment behavior in stock market.

  12. Coordinated Voltage Control of Distributed PV Inverters for Voltage Regulation in Low Voltage Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nainar, Karthikeyan; Pokhrel, Basanta Raj; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews and analyzes the existing voltage control methods of distributed solar PV inverters to improve the voltage regulation and thereby the hosting capacity of a low-voltage distribution network. A novel coordinated voltage control method is proposed based on voltage sensitivity...... analysis, which is simple for computation and requires moderate automation and communication infrastructure. The proposed method is suitable for a hierarchical control structure where a supervisory controller has the provision to adapt the settings of local PV inverter controllers for overall system...

  13. Patterns of cooperation: fairness and coordination in networks of interacting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Anne-Ly; Rudolf, Lars; Gross, Thilo

    2010-06-01

    We study the self-assembly of a complex network of collaborations among self-interested agents. The agents can maintain different levels of cooperation with different partners. Further, they continuously, selectively and independently adapt the amount of resources allocated to each of their collaborations in order to maximize the obtained payoff. We show analytically that the system approaches a state in which the agents make identical investments, and links produce identical benefits. Despite this high degree of social coordination, some agents manage to secure privileged topological positions in the network, enabling them to extract high payoffs. Our analytical investigations provide a rationale for the emergence of unidirectional non-reciprocal collaborations and different responses to the withdrawal of a partner from an interaction that have been reported in the psychological literature.

  14. Toward coordination polymers based on fine-tunable group 13 organometallic phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justyniak, Iwona; Bury, Wojciech; Prochowicz, Daniel; Wójcik, Katarzyna; Zachara, Janusz; Lewiński, Janusz

    2014-07-21

    A family of group 13 organometallic macrocyclic phthalates [(MMe2)2(μ-O2C)2-1,2-C6H4]2 (where M = Al (1), Ga (2), In (3)) is prepared, and the reactivity of these homologous carboxylates toward various monodentate Lewis bases is investigated. The studies provide the first structurally characterized methylindium [{(Me2In)(μ-O2C)2-1,2-C6H4}{Me2In(THF)}]n (4) and methylaluminum [{(Me2Al)(μ-O2C)2-1,2-C6H4}{Me2Al(py-Me)}]n (5) 1D coordination polymers stabilized by dicarboxylate ligands as a result of disruption of the parent tetranuclear macrocyclic structural motifs in 3 and 1 by the incoming donor ligands. The molecular and crystal structures of the reported compounds are examined by spectroscopic studies and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  15. Assembling supramolecular networks by halogen bonding in coordination polymers driven by 5-bromonicotinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Jin-Zhong, E-mail: gujzh@lzu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu, Jiang [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Kirillov, Alexander M. [Centro de Química Estrutural, Complexo I, Instituto Superior Técnico, The University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Lv, Dong-Yu; Tang, Yu; Wu, Jin-Cai [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Chemistry and Resources Utilization of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-01

    A series of six coordination compounds ([Zn(5-Brnic){sub 2}]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), [Cd(5-Brnic){sub 2}]{sub n} (2), [Co(5-Brnic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (3), [Zn(5-Brnic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}biim)]{sub n} (4), ([Cd(5-Brnic){sub 2}(phen)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (5), and [Pb(5-Brnic){sub 2}(phen)] (6) have been generated by the hydrothermal method from the metal(II) nitrates, 5-bromonicotinic acid (5-BrnicH), and an optional ancillary 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 2,2′-biimidazole (H{sub 2}biim) ligand. All the products 1–6 have been characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal, powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Their 5-bromonicotinate-driven structures vary from the 3D metal-organic framework with the seh-3,5-P21/c topology (in 2) and the 2D interdigitated layers with the sql topology (in 1 and 3), to the 1D chains (in 4 and 5) and the 0D discrete monomers (in 6). The 5-bromonicotinate moiety acts as a versatile building block and its tethered bromine atom plays a key role in reinforcing and extending the structures into diverse 3D supramolecular networks via the various halogen bonding Br⋯O, Br⋯Br, and Br⋯π interactions, as well as the N–H⋯O and C–H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The obtained results demonstrate a useful guideline toward engineering the supramolecular architectures in the coordination network assembly under the influence of various halogen bonding interactions. The luminescent (for 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6) and magnetic (for 3) properties have also been studied and discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: Six coordination compounds driven by 5-bromonicotinic acid have been generated and structurally characterized, revealing diverse metal-organic networks that are further reinforced and extended via various halogen bonding interactions. - Highlights: • 5-Bromonicotinic acid is a versatile ligand for Zn, Cd, Co and Pb derivatives. • Careful selection of co-ligands and metals resulted in different network

  16. The network researchers' network: A social network analysis of the IMP Group 1985-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C. M.; Ziang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    ). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...... components in some detail. The egonets of three of the original 'founding fathers' are examined in detail, and we draw comparisons as to how their publishing strategies vary. Finally, the paper draws some more general conclusions as to the insights that SNA can bring to those working within business...

  17. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  18. A Method for Group Extraction in Complex Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bródka, Piotr; Musial, Katarzyna; Kazienko, Przemysław

    The extraction of social groups from social networks existing among employees in the company, its customers or users of various computer systems became one of the research areas of growing importance. Once we have discovered the groups, we can utilise them, in different kinds of recommender systems or in the analysis of the team structure and communication within a given population.

  19. Meteorological Support Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG) Instrumentation, Data Format, and Networks Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James; Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of instrumentation discussed at the Meteorological Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG), a reference for data formats currently used by members of the group, a summary of proposed formats for future use by the group, an overview of the data networks of the group's members. This document will be updated as new systems are introduced, old systems are retired, and when the MSICWG community necessitates a change to the formats. The MSICWG consists of personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the United States Air Force (USAF) 45th Space Wing and Weather Squadron. The purpose of the group is to coordinate the distribution of weather related data to support NASA space launch related activities.

  20. Dynamical networks of influence in small group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaïd, Mehdi; Noriega Campero, Alejandro; Almaatouq, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    In many domains of life, business and management, numerous problems are addressed by small groups of individuals engaged in face-to-face discussions. While research in social psychology has a long history of studying the determinants of small group performances, the internal dynamics that govern a group discussion are not yet well understood. Here, we rely on computational methods based on network analyses and opinion dynamics to describe how individuals influence each other during a group discussion. We consider the situation in which a small group of three individuals engages in a discussion to solve an estimation task. We propose a model describing how group members gradually influence each other and revise their judgments over the course of the discussion. The main component of the model is an influence network-a weighted, directed graph that determines the extent to which individuals influence each other during the discussion. In simulations, we first study the optimal structure of the influence network that yields the best group performances. Then, we implement a social learning process by which individuals adapt to the past performance of their peers, thereby affecting the structure of the influence network in the long run. We explore the mechanisms underlying the emergence of efficient or maladaptive networks and show that the influence network can converge towards the optimal one, but only when individuals exhibit a social discounting bias by downgrading the relative performances of their peers. Finally, we find a late-speaker effect, whereby individuals who speak later in the discussion are perceived more positively in the long run and are thus more influential. The numerous predictions of the model can serve as a basis for future experiments, and this work opens research on small group discussion to computational social sciences.

  1. Combination Adaptive Traffic Algorithm and Coordinated Sleeping in Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Udin Harun Al Rasyid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor network (WSN uses a battery as its primary power source, so that WSN will be limited to battery power for long operations. The WSN should be able to save the energy consumption in order to operate in a long time.WSN has the potential to be the future of wireless communications solutions. WSN are small but has a variety of functions that can help human life. WSN has the wide variety of sensors and can communicate quickly making it easier for people to obtain information accurately and quickly. In this study, we combine adaptive traffic algorithms and coordinated sleeping as power‐efficient WSN solution. We compared the performance of our proposed ideas combination adaptive traffic and coordinated sleeping algorithm with non‐adaptive scheme. From the simulation results, our proposed idea has good‐quality data transmission and more efficient in energy consumption, but it has higher delay than that of non‐adaptive scheme. Keywords:WSN,adaptive traffic,coordinated sleeping,beacon order,superframe order.

  2. WHOLE BRAIN GROUP NETWORK ANALYSIS USING NETWORK BIAS AND VARIANCE PARAMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Hans, Arne; Scherrer, Benoit; Peters, Jurriaan M; Warfield, Simon K

    2012-05-01

    The disruption of normal function and connectivity of neural circuits is common across many diseases and disorders of the brain. This disruptive effect can be studied and analyzed using the brain's complex functional and structural connectivity network. Complex network measures from the field of graph theory have been used for this purpose in the literature. In this paper we have introduced a new approach for analyzing the brain connectivity network. In our approach the true connectivity network and each subject's bias and variance are estimated using a population of patients and healthy controls. These parameters can then be used to compare two groups of brain networks. We have used this approach for the comparison of the resting state functional MRI network of pediatric Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) patients and healthy subjects. We have shown that a significant difference between the two groups can be found. For validation, we have compared our findings with three well known complex network measures.

  3. Planes coordinates transformation between PSAD56 to SIRGAS using a Multilayer Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierra, Alfonso; Romero, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Prior any satellite technology developments, the geodetic networks of a country were realized from a topocentric datum, and hence the respective cartography was performed. With availability of Global Navigation Satellite Systems-GNSS, cartography needs to be updated and referenced to a geocentric datum to be compatible with this technology. Cartography in Ecuador has been performed using the PSAD56 (Provisional South American Datum 1956) systems, nevertheless it's necessary to have inside the system SIRGAS (SIstema de Referencia Geocéntrico para las AmericaS). This transformation between PSAD56 to SIRGAS use seven transformation parameters calculated with the method Helmert. These parameters, in case of Ecuador are compatible for scales of 1:25 000 or less, that does not satisfy the requirements on applications for major scales. In this study, the technique of neural networks is demonstrated as an alternative for improving the processing of UTM planes coordinates E, N (East, North) from PSAD56 to SIRGAS. Therefore, from the coordinates E, N, of the two systems, four transformation parameters were calculated (two of translation, one of rotation, and one scale difference) using the technique bidimensional transformation. Additionally, the same coordinates were used to training Multilayer Artificial Neural Network -MANN, in which the inputs are the coordinates E, N in PSAD56 and output are the coordinates E, N in SIRGAS. Both the two-dimensional transformation and ANN were used as control points to determine the differences between the mentioned methods. The results imply that, the coordinates transformation obtained with the artificial neural network multilayer trained have been improving the results that the bidimensional transformation, and compatible to scales 1:5000. Dostęp do nowoczesnych technologii, w tym GNSS umożliwiły dokładniejsze zdefi niowanie systemów odniesień przestrzennych wykorzystywanych m.in. w defi niowaniu krajowych układów odniesień i

  4. Coordinated single-phase control scheme for voltage unbalance reduction in low voltage network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullaguram, Deepak; Mishra, Sukumar; Senroy, Nilanjan

    2017-08-13

    Low voltage (LV) distribution systems are typically unbalanced in nature due to unbalanced loading and unsymmetrical line configuration. This situation is further aggravated by single-phase power injections. A coordinated control scheme is proposed for single-phase sources, to reduce voltage unbalance. A consensus-based coordination is achieved using a multi-agent system, where each agent estimates the averaged global voltage and current magnitudes of individual phases in the LV network. These estimated values are used to modify the reference power of individual single-phase sources, to ensure system-wide balanced voltages and proper power sharing among sources connected to the same phase. Further, the high X / R ratio of the filter, used in the inverter of the single-phase source, enables control of reactive power, to minimize voltage unbalance locally. The proposed scheme is validated by simulating a LV distribution network with multiple single-phase sources subjected to various perturbations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy management: flexibility, risk and optimization'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R.; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  6. Reconstruction of social group networks from friendship networks using a tag-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yuan-Pan; You, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2016-12-01

    Social group is a type of mesoscopic structure that connects human individuals in microscopic level and the global structure of society. In this paper, we propose a tag-based model considering that social groups expand along the edge that connects two neighbors with a similar tag of interest. The model runs on a real-world friendship network, and its simulation results show that various properties of simulated group network can well fit the empirical analysis on real-world social groups, indicating that the model catches the major mechanism driving the evolution of social groups and successfully reconstructs the social group network from a friendship network and throws light on digging of relationships between social functional organizations.

  7. Fostering Cross-site Coordination through Awareness : An investigation of state-of-the-practice through a focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Šmite, Darja; Dingsoyr, Torgeir

    2012-01-01

    Awareness and shared knowledge are important ingredients of successful coordination in software engineering projects, and especially when team members are distributed. Although various coordination mechanisms and knowledge sharing recommendations for cross-site collaboration have been proposed, spreading awareness among distributed team members in a global software project has proven to be challenging in practice. In this paper we discuss our findings from conducting three focus groups on kno...

  8. TEST BEAM COORDINATION: Major upgrade of the ATLAS Test Beam network infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    Di Girolamo, B; Pasqualucci, E

    Based on the positive experience gained last year by the Muon group with the adoption of a completely isolated private network for the data acquisition, already last year for the 2002 Combined Pixel-Tilecal-Muon Test Beam, we adopted the private network solution. The main advantage of the isolation from the common CERN network infrastructure is the complete independence from possible problems that could affect the network in the area, intended to serve many other users, and the possibility to have a completely independent management of the IP addresses assignment. Moreover the presence of a firewall in the private network allows a better protection against possible external hackers, allowing users to transparently access the external word. A Fast Ethernet network has been set up as a control network. It relies on a backbone 24-port Fast Ethernet switch on which, in a tree structure, are connected several smaller switches dedicated to each sub-detector. In this way each sub-detector produces its own traffic...

  9. Experimental determination of group flux control coefficients in metabolic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, T.W.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Stephanopoulos, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-04-20

    Grouping of reactions around key metabolite branch points can facilitate the study of metabolic control of complex metabolic networks. This top-down Metabolic Control Analysis is exemplified through the introduction of group control coefficients whose magnitudes provide a measure of the relative impact of each reaction group on the overall network flux, as well as on the overall network stability, following enzymatic amplification. In this article, the authors demonstrate the application of previously developed theory to the determination of group flux control coefficients. Experimental data for the changes in metabolic fluxes obtained in response to the introduction of six different environmental perturbations are used to determine the group flux control coefficients for three reaction groups formed around the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate branch point. The consistency of the obtained group flux control coefficient estimates is systematically analyzed to ensure that all necessary conditions are satisfied. The magnitudes of the determined control coefficients suggest that the control of lysine production flux in Corynebacterium glutamicum cells at a growth base state resides within the lysine biosynthetic pathway that begins with the PEP/PYR carboxylation anaplorotic pathway.

  10. GGOS working group on ground networks and communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, M.; Altamimi, Z.; Beck, N.; Forsberg, R.; Gurtner, W.; Kenyon, S.; Behrend, D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Ma, C.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2005-01-01

    Activities of this Working Group include the investigation of the status quo and the development of a plan for full network integration to support improvements in terrestrial reference frame establishment and maintenance, Earth orientation and gravity field monitoring, precision orbit determination, and other geodetic and gravimetric applications required for the long-term observation of global change. This integration process includes the development of a network of fundamental stations with as many co-located techniques as possible, with precisely determined intersystem vectors. This network would exploit the strengths of each technique and minimize the weaknesses where possible. This paper discusses the organization of the working group, the work done to date, and future tasks.

  11. Realization of Negative Group Delay Network Using Defected Microstrip Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girdhari Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A design of negative group delay (NGD networks using a U-shaped defected microstrip structure (DMS and lumped elements is presented in this paper. The signal attenuation characteristics of DMS were utilized to get NGD time. The group delay (GD time and signal attenuation of the proposed networks are controlled by an external resistor connected across the DMS slot. For experimental validation, a single-stage and cascaded two-stage NGD networks were designed and fabricated. From experimental results, the GD of -8.24±1.1 ns with the maximum insertion loss of 37.84 dB was obtained over bandwidth of 40 MHz.

  12. Prototyping and Simulation of Robot Group Intelligence using Kohonen Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijun; Mirdamadi, Reza; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent agents such as robots can form ad hoc networks and replace human being in many dangerous scenarios such as a complicated disaster relief site. This project prototypes and builds a computer simulator to simulate robot kinetics, unsupervised learning using Kohonen networks, as well as group intelligence when an ad hoc network is formed. Each robot is modeled using an object with a simple set of attributes and methods that define its internal states and possible actions it may take under certain circumstances. As the result, simple, reliable, and affordable robots can be deployed to form the network. The simulator simulates a group of robots as an unsupervised learning unit and tests the learning results under scenarios with different complexities. The simulation results show that a group of robots could demonstrate highly collaborative behavior on a complex terrain. This study could potentially provide a software simulation platform for testing individual and group capability of robots before the design process and manufacturing of robots. Therefore, results of the project have the potential to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of robot design and building.

  13. The emergence of groups in the evolution of friendship networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeggelink, Evelien P.H.; Stokman, Frans N.; Bunt, Gerhard G. van der

    1996-01-01

    Friendship networks usually show a certain degree of segmentation: subgroups of friends. The explanation of the emergence of such groups from initially dyadic pair friendships is a difficult but important problem. In this paper we attempt to provide a first contribution to the explanation of

  14. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2013-09-10

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  15. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2012-12-04

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  16. Group Centric Networking: Large Scale Over the Air Testing of Group Centric Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Under this model, the amount of wireless traffic will skyrocket, and a single WiFi access point may This work is sponsored by the Defense Advanced...nonzero TTL it will rebroadcast that message. The protocol uses duplicate detection to try to limit the number of packets transmitted, which works ...Android phones are Samsung Galaxy S4 running Cyanogenmod 10.2. For the network, we use 802.11ac WiFi running in the 5GHz band and using a transmit power

  17. Peptide-bond modification for metal coordination: peptides containing two hydroxamate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yunpeng; Liu, Min; Kao, Jeff L-K; Marshall, Garland R

    2003-01-01

    Peptide-bond modification via N-hydroxylation has been explored as a strategy for metal coordination to induce conformational rigidity and orient side chains for specific molecular recognition. N-Hydroxyamides were prepared by reacting N-benzyloxyamino acid esters or amides with Fmoc-AA-Cl/AgCN (Fmoc: 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl; AA: amino acid) in toluene or Fmoc-AA/HATU/DIEA in DMF (HATU: O-(7-azabenzotriazol-lyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate; DIEA: N,N-diisopropylethylamine; DMF: N,N-dimethylformamide), followed by deblocking of benzyl protecting groups. Novel linear and cyclic N,N'-dihydroxypeptides were efficiently assembled using Fmoc chemistry in solution and/or on a solid support. As screened by electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS), high iron-binding selectivity and affinity were attainable. Compounds having a spacer of two alpha-amino acids between the amino acids bearing the two hydroxamates, i.e., a spacer of 8 atoms, generated 1:1 iron complex species in the gas phase. Moreover, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), uv/vis, and (1)H-NMR analyses provided direct evidence for complex formations in solution. Significantly, the representative compound cyclo(Leu-Psi[CON(OH)]-Phe-Ala-Pro)(2) (P8) may serve as a robust metal-binding scaffold in construction of a metal-binding library for versatile metal-mediated molecular recognition. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Innovation networks to stimulate public and private sector collaboration for advisory services innovation and coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, K.; Brazendale, R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: An innovation network, called the Pasture Improvement Leadership Group (PILG), was formed to improve the quality and consistency of advice provided to dairy farmers in New Zealand, after they expressed dissatisfaction with their pastures. The aim of this paper is to better understand the

  19. Atuação dos coordenadores de grupos de saúde na rede docente assistencial Actuación de los coordinadores de grupos de salud en la red docente asistencial Actions of health group coordinators within the teaching/care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane de Medeiros dos Santos

    2010-02-01

    unidades básicas de salud. Se procedió a la observación participante para iniciar el trabajo de campo. Los relatos fueron analizados por medio de la técnica de análisis del discurso de tipo enunciativo-pragmático. ANÁLISIS DE LOS RESULTADOS: Las formas de actuación de los coordinadores congruentes al modelo preventista fueron: opresiva, pedagógica bancaria, biologicista e higienista, prescriptiva de conductas y culpabilizadora, infantilizadora, reductora de las problemáticas colectivas, desfavorecedora del setting grupal, además de utilización de soliloquio. Las formas de actuación consonantes al modelo de la nueva promoción fueron: facilitadora de la libre expresión y autonomía, comunicadora empática, construccionista, acogedora, utilizó el escuchar activamente, además de promover la superación de la violencia y alienación. CONCLUSIONES: Los coordinadores actuaron primordialmente por medio del modelo preventista y sin utilizar recursos técnicos y teóricos alusivos a la metodología grupal en el área de la salud. Las actuaciones identificadas en los modelos preventista y la nueva promoción de la salud desvelan características que se fundamentan, respectivamente, en las éticas de la – opresión/subordinación y; – en la cooperación /aceptación de los usuarios como libres y responsables por sus escogencias y consecuencias.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the model for actions by health promotion group coordinators, in primary healthcare units with links to professional training. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES: A qualitative study was carried out in the municipality of Florianópolis, Southern Brazil, in 2001. Four groups were evaluated, over a total of 24 sessions at primary healthcare units. Participant observation was performed to start the fieldwork. The reports were analyzed by means of the technique of enunciative-pragmatic discourse analysis. ANALYSIS OF RESULTS: The types of action among the coordinators that were congruent with the preventive model

  20. Modelling animal group fission using social network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Maire, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion). This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems.

  1. Modelling animal group fission using social network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Sueur

    Full Text Available Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion. This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems.

  2. Modelling Animal Group Fission Using Social Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Maire, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion). This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems. PMID:24831471

  3. Performance Analysis of enhanced Inter-cell Interference Coordination in LTE-Advanced Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yuanye; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) for Long Term Evolution (LTE)- Advanced with co-channel deployment of both macro and pico is analyzed. The use of pico-cell Range Extension (RE) and time domain eICIC (TDM muting) is combined. The performance is evaluated...... in the downlink by means of extensive system level simulations that follow the 3GPP guidelines. The overall network performance is analyzed for different number of pico-eNBs, transmit power levels, User Equipment (UE) distributions, and packet schedulers. Recommended settings of the RE offset and TDM muting ratio...... in different scenarios are identified. The presented performance results and findings can serve as input to guidelines for co-channel deployment of macro and pico-eNBs with eICIC....

  4. Coordinated Voltage Control of Distributed PV Inverters for Voltage Regulation in Low Voltage Distribution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nainar, Karthikeyan; Pokhrel, Basanta Raj; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews and analyzes the existing voltage control methods of distributed solar PV inverters to improve the voltage regulation and thereby the hosting capacity of a low-voltage distribution network. A novel coordinated voltage control method is proposed based on voltage sensitivity...... optimization. The proposed method is used to calculate the voltage bands and droop settings of PV inverters at each node by the supervisory controller. The local controller of each PV inverter implements the volt/var control and if necessary, the active power curtailment as per the received settings and based...... on measured local voltages. The advantage of the proposed method is that the calculated reactive power and active power droop settings enable fair contribution of the PV inverters at each node to the voltage regulation. Simulation studies are conducted using DigSilent Power factory software on a simplified...

  5. Bi–Mn mixed metal organic oxide: A novel 3d-6p mixed metal coordination network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Fa-Nian, E-mail: fshi@ua.pt [School of Science, Shenyang University of Technology, 110870 Shenyang (China); Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rosa Silva, Ana [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bian, Liang [Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China)

    2015-05-15

    A new terminology of metal organic oxide (MOO) was given a definition as a type of coordination polymers which possess the feature of inorganic connectivity between metals and the direct bonded atoms and show 1D, 2D or 3D inorganic sub-networks. One such compound was shown as an example. A 3d-6p (Mn–Bi. Named MOOMnBi) mixed metals coordination network has been synthesized via hydrothermal method. The new compound with the molecular formula of [MnBi{sub 2}O(1,3,5-BTC){sub 2}]{sub n} (1,3,5-BTC stands for benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) was characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction technique that revealed a very interesting 3-dimensional (3D) framework with Bi{sub 4}O{sub 2}(COO){sub 12} clusters which are further connected to Mn(COO){sub 6} fragments into a 2D MOO. The topology study indicates an unprecedented topological type with the net point group of (4{sup 13}.6{sup 2})(4{sup 13}.6{sup 8})(4{sup 16}.6{sup 5})(4{sup 18}.6{sup 10})(4{sup 22}.6{sup 14})(4{sup 3}) corresponding to 3,6,7,7,8,9-c hexa-nodal net. MOOMnBi shows catalytic activity in the synthesis of (E)-α,β-unsaturated ketones. - Graphical abstract: This metal organic framework (MOF) is the essence of a 2D metal organic oxide (MOO). - Highlights: • New concept of metal organic oxide (MOO) was defined and made difference from metal organic framework. • New MOO of MOOMnBi was synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Crystal structure of MOOMnBi was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. • The catalytic activity of MOOMnBi was studied showing reusable after 2 cycles.

  6. Evaluation of Coordination of Emergency Response Team through the Social Network Analysis. Case Study: Oil and Gas Refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadfam, Iraj; Bastani, Susan; Esaghi, Mahbobeh; Golmohamadi, Rostam; Saee, Ali

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cohesions status of the coordination within response teams in the emergency response team (ERT) in a refinery. For this study, cohesion indicators of social network analysis (SNA; density, degree centrality, reciprocity, and transitivity) were utilized to examine the coordination of the response teams as a whole network. The ERT of this research, which was a case study, included seven teams consisting of 152 members. The required data were collected through structured interviews and were analyzed using the UCINET 6.0 Social Network Analysis Program. The results reported a relatively low number of triple connections, poor coordination with key members, and a high level of mutual relations in the network with low density, all implying that there were low cohesions of coordination in the ERT. The results showed that SNA provided a quantitative and logical approach for the examination of the coordination status among response teams and it also provided a main opportunity for managers and planners to have a clear understanding of the presented status. The research concluded that fundamental efforts were needed to improve the presented situations.

  7. Assembling supramolecular networks by halogen bonding in coordination polymers driven by 5-bromonicotinic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin-Zhong; Wu, Jiang; Kirillov, Alexander M.; Lv, Dong-Yu; Tang, Yu; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2014-05-01

    A series of six coordination compounds {[Zn(5-Brnic)2]·1.5H2O}n (1), [Cd(5-Brnic)2]n (2), [Co(5-Brnic)2(H2O)2]n (3), [Zn(5-Brnic)2(H2biim)]n (4), {[Cd(5-Brnic)2(phen)]·H2O}n (5), and [Pb(5-Brnic)2(phen)] (6) have been generated by the hydrothermal method from the metal(II) nitrates, 5-bromonicotinic acid (5-BrnicH), and an optional ancillary 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 2,2‧-biimidazole (H2biim) ligand. All the products 1-6 have been characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal, powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Their 5-bromonicotinate-driven structures vary from the 3D metal-organic framework with the seh-3,5-P21/c topology (in 2) and the 2D interdigitated layers with the sql topology (in 1 and 3), to the 1D chains (in 4 and 5) and the 0D discrete monomers (in 6). The 5-bromonicotinate moiety acts as a versatile building block and its tethered bromine atom plays a key role in reinforcing and extending the structures into diverse 3D supramolecular networks via the various halogen bonding Br⋯O, Br⋯Br, and Br⋯π interactions, as well as the N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The obtained results demonstrate a useful guideline toward engineering the supramolecular architectures in the coordination network assembly under the influence of various halogen bonding interactions. The luminescent (for 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6) and magnetic (for 3) properties have also been studied and discussed in detail.

  8. Determinants and outcomes of decision-making, group coordination and social interactions during a foraging experiment in a wild primate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart W Pyritz

    Full Text Available Social animals have to coordinate joint movements to maintain group cohesion, but the latter is often compromised by diverging individual interests. A widespread behavioral mechanism to achieve coordination relies on shared or unshared consensus decision-making. If consensus costs are high, group fission represents an alternative tactic. Exploring determinants and outcomes of spontaneous group decisions and coordination of free-ranging animals is methodologically challenging. We therefore conducted a foraging experiment with a group of wild redfronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons to study decision outcomes, coordination of movements, individual foraging benefits and social interactions in response to the presentation of drinking platforms with varying baiting patterns. Behavioral observations were complemented with data from recordings of motion detector cameras installed at the platforms. The animal's behavior in the experimental conditions was compared to natural group movements. We could not determine the type of consensus decision-making because the group visited platforms randomly. The group fissioned during 23.3% of platform visits, and fissioning resulted in more individuals drinking simultaneously. As under natural conditions, adult females initiated most group movements, but overtaking by individuals of different age and sex classes occurred in 67% of movements to platforms, compared to only 18% during other movements. As a result, individual resource intake at the platforms did not depend on departure position, age or sex, but on arrival order. Aggression at the platforms did not affect resource intake, presumably due to low supplanting rates. Our findings highlight the diversity of coordination processes and related consequences for individual foraging benefits in a primate group living under natural conditions.

  9. Sport psychology group consultation using social networking web sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Frederick; Shipherd, Amber M; Gershgoren, Lael; Filho, Edson Medeiros; Basevitch, Itay

    2012-08-01

    A social networking Web site, Facebook, was used to deliver long-term sport psychology consultation services to student-athletes (i.e., soccer players) in 30- to 60-min weekly sessions. Additional short-term team building, group cohesion, communication, anger management, injury rehabilitation, mental toughness, commitment, and leadership workshops were provided. Cohesion and overall relationships between both the student-athletes and the sport psychology consultants benefited from this process. Social networking Web sites offer a practical way of providing sport psychology consulting services that does not require use of major resources. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Strategy selection in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shaolin; Feng, Shasha; Wang, Pei; Chen, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary game theory provides an appropriate tool for investigating the competition and diffusion of behavioral traits in biological or social populations. A core challenge in evolutionary game theory is the strategy selection problem: Given two strategies, which one is favored by the population? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends not only on the payoff functions of strategies but also on the interaction structure of the population. Group interactions are one of the fundamental interactive modes within populations. This work aims to investigate the strategy selection problem in evolutionary game dynamics on group interaction networks. In detail, the strategy selection conditions are obtained for some typical networks with group interactions. Furthermore, the obtained conditions are applied to investigate selection between cooperation and defection in populations. The conditions for evolution of cooperation are derived for both the public goods game and volunteer's dilemma game. Numerical experiments validate the above analytical results.

  11. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Jose A; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-19

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce.

  12. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Jose A.; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce. PMID:25598347

  13. On the Impact of using Public Network Communication Infrastructure for Voltage Control Coordination in Smart Grid Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahid, Kamal; Petersen, Lennart; Iov, Florin

    2017-01-01

    The high penetration of renewable generation (ReGen) plants in the electric supply necessitates online voltage control support and coordination of ReGen plants in the distribution grid. This imposes a high responsibility on the communication network infrastructure in order to ensure a resilient...... voltage controlled distribution system. A cost effective way to connect the ReGen plants to the control center is to consider the existing public network infrastructure. This paper, therefore, illustrates the impact of using the existing public network communication infrastructure for online voltage...... control support and coordination of ReGen plants in medium voltage distribution systems. Further, by using an exemplary benchmark grid area in Denmark as a base case that includes flexible ReGen plants, we introduce several test cases and evaluate network performance in terms of latencies in the signals...

  14. Analysis on the dynamic error for optoelectronic scanning coordinate measurement network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shendong; Yang, Linghui; Lin, Jiarui; Guo, Siyang; Ren, Yongjie

    2018-01-01

    Large-scale dynamic three-dimension coordinate measurement technique is eagerly demanded in equipment manufacturing. Noted for advantages of high accuracy, scale expandability and multitask parallel measurement, optoelectronic scanning measurement network has got close attention. It is widely used in large components jointing, spacecraft rendezvous and docking simulation, digital shipbuilding and automated guided vehicle navigation. At present, most research about optoelectronic scanning measurement network is focused on static measurement capacity and research about dynamic accuracy is insufficient. Limited by the measurement principle, the dynamic error is non-negligible and restricts the application. The workshop measurement and positioning system is a representative which can realize dynamic measurement function in theory. In this paper we conduct deep research on dynamic error resources and divide them two parts: phase error and synchronization error. Dynamic error model is constructed. Based on the theory above, simulation about dynamic error is carried out. Dynamic error is quantized and the rule of volatility and periodicity has been found. Dynamic error characteristics are shown in detail. The research result lays foundation for further accuracy improvement.

  15. Low-Complexity Scheduling and Power Adaptation for Coordinated Cloud-Radio Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Douik, Ahmed

    2017-07-17

    In practical wireless systems, the successful implementation of resource allocation techniques strongly depends on the algorithmic complexity. Consider a cloud-radio access network (CRAN), where the central cloud is responsible for scheduling devices to the frames’ radio resources blocks (RRBs) of the single-antenna base-stations (BSs), adjusting the transmit power levels, and for synchronizing the transmit frames across the connected BSs. Previous studies show that the jointly coordinated scheduling and power control problem in the considered CRAN can be solved using an approach that scales exponentially with the number of BSs, devices, and RRBs, which makes the practical implementation infeasible for reasonably sized networks. This paper instead proposes a low-complexity solution to the problem, under the constraints that each device cannot be served by more than one BS but can be served by multiple RRBs within each BS frame, and under the practical assumption that the channel is constant during the duration of each frame. The paper utilizes graph-theoretical based techniques and shows that constructing a single power control graph is sufficient to obtain the optimal solution with a complexity that is independent of the number of RRBs. Simulation results reveal the optimality of the proposed solution for slow-varying channels, and show that the solution performs near-optimal for highly correlated channels.

  16. Coordinated Scheduling and Power Control in Cloud-Radio Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Douik, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the joint coordinated scheduling and power control problem in cloud-enabled networks. Consider the downlink of a cloud-radio access network (CRAN), where the cloud is only responsible for the scheduling policy, power control, and synchronization of the transmit frames across the single-antenna base-stations (BS). The transmit frame consists of several time/frequency blocks, called power-zones (PZ). The paper considers the problem of scheduling users to PZs and determining their power levels (PL), by maximizing the weighted sum-rate under the practical constraints that each user cannot be served by more than one base-station, but can be served by one or more power-zones within each base-station frame. The paper solves the problem using a graph theoretical approach by introducing the joint scheduling and power control graph formed by several clusters, where each is formed by a set of vertices, representing the possible association of users, BSs, and PLs for one specific PZ. The problem is, then, formulated as a maximumweight clique problem, in which the weight of each vertex is the sum of the benefits of the individual associations belonging to that vertex. Simulation results suggest that the proposed crosslayer scheme provides appreciable performance improvement as compared to schemes from recent literature.

  17. Understanding crowd-powered search groups: a social network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingpeng; Wang, Fei-Yue; Zeng, Daniel; Wang, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Crowd-powered search is a new form of search and problem solving scheme that involves collaboration among a potentially large number of voluntary Web users. Human flesh search (HFS), a particular form of crowd-powered search originated in China, has seen tremendous growth since its inception in 2001. HFS presents a valuable test-bed for scientists to validate existing and new theories in social computing, sociology, behavioral sciences, and so forth. In this research, we construct an aggregated HFS group, consisting of the participants and their relationships in a comprehensive set of identified HFS episodes. We study the topological properties and the evolution of the aggregated network and different sub-groups in the network. We also identify the key HFS participants according to a variety of measures. We found that, as compared with other online social networks, HFS participant network shares the power-law degree distribution and small-world property, but with a looser and more distributed organizational structure, leading to the diversity, decentralization, and independence of HFS participants. In addition, the HFS group has been becoming increasingly decentralized. The comparisons of different HFS sub-groups reveal that HFS participants collaborated more often when they conducted the searches in local platforms or the searches requiring a certain level of professional knowledge background. On the contrary, HFS participants did not collaborate much when they performed the search task in national platforms or the searches with general topics that did not require specific information and learning. We also observed that the key HFS information contributors, carriers, and transmitters came from different groups of HFS participants.

  18. Understanding crowd-powered search groups: a social network perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingpeng Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crowd-powered search is a new form of search and problem solving scheme that involves collaboration among a potentially large number of voluntary Web users. Human flesh search (HFS, a particular form of crowd-powered search originated in China, has seen tremendous growth since its inception in 2001. HFS presents a valuable test-bed for scientists to validate existing and new theories in social computing, sociology, behavioral sciences, and so forth. METHODOLOGY: In this research, we construct an aggregated HFS group, consisting of the participants and their relationships in a comprehensive set of identified HFS episodes. We study the topological properties and the evolution of the aggregated network and different sub-groups in the network. We also identify the key HFS participants according to a variety of measures. CONCLUSIONS: We found that, as compared with other online social networks, HFS participant network shares the power-law degree distribution and small-world property, but with a looser and more distributed organizational structure, leading to the diversity, decentralization, and independence of HFS participants. In addition, the HFS group has been becoming increasingly decentralized. The comparisons of different HFS sub-groups reveal that HFS participants collaborated more often when they conducted the searches in local platforms or the searches requiring a certain level of professional knowledge background. On the contrary, HFS participants did not collaborate much when they performed the search task in national platforms or the searches with general topics that did not require specific information and learning. We also observed that the key HFS information contributors, carriers, and transmitters came from different groups of HFS participants.

  19. Tuning of Nafion{sup ®} by HKUST-1 as coordination network to enhance proton conductivity for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Jin, E-mail: zammanbo814@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Research Institute of Advanced Energy Technology (Korea, Republic of); Talukdar, Krishan, E-mail: krishantu@yahoo.com; Choi, Sang-June, E-mail: sjchoi@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, Department of Environmental Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Metal-organic frameworks can be intentionally coordinated to achieve improved proton conductivity because they have highly ordered structures and modular nature that serve as a scaffold to anchor acidic groups and develop efficient proton transfer pathways for fuel cell application. Using the concept of a coordination network, the conductivity of Nafion{sup ®} was tuned by the incorporation of HKUST-1. It has Cu{sup II}–paddle wheel type nodes and 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate struts, feature accessible sites that provides an improved protonic channel depending on the water content. In spite of the fact that HKUST-1 is neutral, coordinated water molecules are contributed adequately acidic by Cu{sup II} to supply protons to enhance proton conductivity. Water molecules play a vital part in transfer of proton as conducting media and serve as triggers to change proton conductivity through reforming hydrogen bonding networks by water adsorption/desorption process. Increased ion exchange capacity and proton conductivity with lower water uptake of the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-doped material, and improved thermal stability (as confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis) were achieved. The structure of HKUST-1 was confirmed via field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, while the porosity and adsorption desorption capacity were characterized by porosity analysis. Graphical abstract: The H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-doped HKUST-1/Nafion® composite membrane is demonstrated to be a promising material based on its proton conductivity. HKUST-1 has an average particle diameter of around 15–20 µm. The proton conductivity, IEC values, and the thermal stability of the 2.5 wt% HKUST-1/Nafion® composite membrane suggest that HKUST-1 may be a promising candidate as a proton-conductive material in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane due to its reasonable proton passageway, favorable surface area, lower water uptake with the higher IEC, and proton conductivity of the H

  20. A gene network that coordinates preplacodal competence and neural crest specification in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Neha; Kwon, Hye-Joo; Riley, Bruce B

    2013-01-01

    Preplacodal ectoderm (PPE) and neural crest (NC) are specified at the interface of neural and nonneural ectoderm and together contribute to the peripheral nervous system in all vertebrates. Bmp activates early steps for both fates during late blastula stage. Low Bmp activates expression of transcription factors Tfap2a and Tfap2c in the lateral neural plate, thereby specifying neural crest fate. Elevated Bmp establishes preplacodal competence throughout the ventral ectoderm by coinducing Tfap2a, Tfap2c, Foxi1 and Gata3. PPE specification occurs later at the end of gastrulation and requires complete attenuation of Bmp, yet expression of PPE competence factors continues well past gastrulation. Here we show that competence factors positively regulate each other's expression during gastrulation, forming a self-sustaining network that operates independently of Bmp. Misexpression of Tfap2a in embryos blocked for Bmp from late blastula stage can restore development of both PPE and NC. However, Tfap2a alone is not sufficient to activate any other competence factors nor does it rescue individual placodes. On the other hand, misexpression of any two competence factors in Bmp-blocked embryos can activate the entire transcription factor network and support the development of NC, PPE and some individual placodes. We also show that while these factors are partially redundant with respect to PPE specification, they later provide non-redundant functions needed for development of specific placodes. Thus, we have identified a gene regulatory network that coordinates development of NC, PPE and individual placodes in zebrafish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a Coordinated National Soil Moisture Network: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, J. M.; Quiring, S. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Baker, B.; Cosgrove, B.; Escobar, V. M.; Strobel, M.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture data is critical for accurate drought prediction, flood forecasting, climate modeling, prediction of crop yields and water budgeting. However, soil moisture data are collected by many agencies and organizations in the United States using a variety of instruments and methods for varying applications. These data are often distributed and represented in disparate formats, posing significant challenges for use. In recognition of these challenges, the President's Climate Action Plan articulated the need for a coordinated national soil moisture network. In response to this action plan, a team led by the National Integrated Drought Information System has begun to develop a framework for this network and has instituted a proof-of-concept pilot study. This pilot is located in the south-central plains of the US, and will serve as a reference architecture for the requisite data systems and inform the design of the national network. The pilot comprises both in-situ and modeled soil moisture datasets (historical and real-time) and will serve the following use cases: operational drought monitoring, experimental land surface modeling, and operational hydrological modeling. The pilot will be implemented using a distributed network design in order to serve dispersed data in real-time directly from data providers. Standard service protocols will be used to enable future integration with external clients. The pilot network will additionally contain a catalog of data sets and web service endpoints, which will be used to broker web service calls. A mediation and aggregation service will then intelligently request, compile, and transform the distributed datasets from their native formats into a standardized output. This mediation framework allows data to be hosted and maintained locally by the data owners while simplifying access through a single service interface. These data services will then be used to create visualizations, for example, views of the current soil

  2. Impact of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation on effective connectivity in a neural network of phantom sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, Alexander N; Adamchic, Ilya; Hauptmann, Christian; Tass, Peter A

    2013-08-15

    Chronic subjective tinnitus is an auditory phantom phenomenon characterized by abnormal neuronal synchrony in the central auditory system. As recently shown in a proof of concept clinical trial, acoustic coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation causes a significant relief of tinnitus symptoms combined with a significant decrease of pathological oscillatory activity in a network comprising auditory and non-auditory brain areas. The objective of the present study was to analyze whether CR therapy caused an alteration of the effective connectivity in a tinnitus related network of localized EEG brain sources. To determine which connections matter, in a first step, we considered a larger network of brain sources previously associated with tinnitus. To that network we applied a data-driven approach, combining empirical mode decomposition and partial directed coherence analysis, in patients with bilateral tinnitus before and after 12 weeks of CR therapy as well as in healthy controls. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, we focused on the good responders, classified by a reliable-change-index (RCI). Prior to CR therapy and compared to the healthy controls, the good responders showed a significantly increased connectivity between the left primary cortex auditory cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex in the gamma and delta bands together with a significantly decreased effective connectivity between the right primary auditory cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the alpha band. Intriguingly, after 12 weeks of CR therapy most of the pathological interactions were gone, so that the connectivity patterns of good responders and healthy controls became statistically indistinguishable. In addition, we used dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to examine the types of interactions which were altered by CR therapy. Our DCM results show that CR therapy specifically counteracted the imbalance of excitation and inhibition. CR significantly weakened the excitatory connection

  3. Characterising informal groups of knowledge transfer with social network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Maria Sallan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most prominent areas in the two last decades of intangible assets research has been, doubtlessly, the issues related to the creation and exploitation of organizational knowledge. But organizational knowledge is a complex process indeed, where multiple levels of analysis coexist. This fact is the origin of several methodological problems in organizational knowledge research. The aim of this paper is adapting the social network analysis techniques to the task of detecting groups of individuals in organizations, and to asses the role of individuals in these groups. This assessment is undertaken using data representative of the relationships between individuals in organizations. The procedure has been applied to a social network of faculty working in the same college.

  4. Graduation Report : Directional relay coordination in ungrounded medium voltage networks using a real-time digital simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The thesis describes a comprehensive protection relay coordination study in ungrounded 10 kV distribution networks. Until now, single phase-toground faults (also: earth-faults) were never interrupted because resulting fault currents were relatively small. Since the earth-fault current amplitude is

  5. Distribution of networks generating and coordinating locomotor activity in the neonatal rat spinal cord in vitro: a lesion study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, O; Kiehn, O

    1996-01-01

    , these pathways were distributed along the lumbar enlargement. Both lateral and ventral funiculi were sufficient to coordinate activity in the rostral and caudal regions. We conclude that the networks organizing locomotor-related activity in the spinal cord of the newborn rat are distributed....

  6. Three-dimensional tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination network based on a 1,3-alternate calix[4]arene derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ji; Ju, Hui Yeong; Park, Ki Min [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Moon, ASuk Hee [Dept. of Food and Nutrition, Kyungnam College of Inform ation and Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Jin [Div. of cience Education, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Polynuclear coordination polymers can exhibit more intriguing network topologies and better functionalities than those of common complexes because they have metal-cluster nodes for the construction of multidimensional frameworks and the potential applications induced by collaborative activities between metal ions. New tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination polymer 1 based on 1,3-alternate calix arene derivative (H{sub 4} CTA) with four carboxyl pendant arms has been synthesized by the solvo thermal reaction at 110 .deg. C for 2 days. Compound 1 shows a 3-D framework consisting of tetranuclear Cd(II) cluster core as a metal-cluster node and 1,3-alternate H{sub 4}CTA as a multidentate linker. The coordination polymer 1 displays intense blue emission, implying that this tetranuclear Cd(II) coordination polymer could be a suitable material in the area of luminescence research.

  7. Hybrid Scheduling/Signal-Level Coordination in the Downlink of Multi-Cloud Radio-Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Douik, Ahmed

    2016-03-28

    In the context of resource allocation in cloud- radio access networks, recent studies assume either signal-level or scheduling-level coordination. This paper, instead, considers a hybrid level of coordination for the scheduling problem in the downlink of a multi-cloud radio- access network, so as to benefit from both scheduling policies. Consider a multi-cloud radio access network, where each cloud is connected to several base-stations (BSs) via high capacity links, and therefore allows joint signal processing between them. Across the multiple clouds, however, only scheduling-level coordination is permitted, as it requires a lower level of backhaul communication. The frame structure of every BS is composed of various time/frequency blocks, called power- zones (PZs), and kept at fixed power level. The paper addresses the problem of maximizing a network-wide utility by associating users to clouds and scheduling them to the PZs, under the practical constraints that each user is scheduled, at most, to a single cloud, but possibly to many BSs within the cloud, and can be served by one or more distinct PZs within the BSs\\' frame. The paper solves the problem using graph theory techniques by constructing the conflict graph. The scheduling problem is, then, shown to be equivalent to a maximum- weight independent set problem in the constructed graph, in which each vertex symbolizes an association of cloud, user, BS and PZ, with a weight representing the utility of that association. Simulation results suggest that the proposed hybrid scheduling strategy provides appreciable gain as compared to the scheduling-level coordinated networks, with a negligible degradation to signal-level coordination.

  8. Grades Degrade Group Coordination: Deteriorated Interactions and Performance in a Cooperative Motor Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Anne-Sophie; Toma, Claudia; Guidotti, Sofia; Oberlé, Dominique; Butera, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    At school, pupils often cooperate on common projects and must coordinate their different individual actions. However, grades are pervasively used even in cooperative situations, which make the pupils' differences in achievement and their relative rank salient and may reduce their inclination to work constructively with others. Thus, we…

  9. Analyzing Group Coordination when Solving Geometry Problems with Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, Diler

    2013-01-01

    In CSCL research, collaborative activity is conceptualized along various yet intertwined dimensions. When functioning within these multiple dimensions, participants make use of several resources, which can be social or content-related (and sometimes temporal) in nature. It is the effective coordination of these resources that appears to…

  10. Applying Hybrid PSO to Optimize Directional Overcurrent Relay Coordination in Variable Network Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ta Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In power systems, determining the values of time dial setting (TDS and the plug setting (PS for directional overcurrent relays (DOCRs is an extremely constrained optimization problem that has been previously described and solved as a nonlinear programming problem. Optimization coordination problems of near-end faults and far-end faults occurring simultaneously in circuits with various topologies, including fixed and variable network topologies, are considered in this study. The aim of this study was to apply the Nelder-Mead (NM simplex search method and particle swarm optimization (PSO to solve this optimization problem. The proposed NM-PSO method has the advantage of NM algorithm, with a quicker movement toward optimal solution, as well as the advantage of PSO algorithm in the ability to obtain globally optimal solution. Neither a conventional PSO nor the proposed NM-PSO method is capable of dealing with constrained optimization problems. Therefore, we use the gradient-based repair method embedded in a conventional PSO and the proposed NM-PSO. This study used an IEEE 8-bus test system as a case study to compare the convergence performance of the proposed NM-PSO method and a conventional PSO approach. The results demonstrate that a robust and optimal solution can be obtained efficiently by implementing the proposal.

  11. Photocontrol of Magnetism above 77 K in Nanoscaled Heterostructures of Cyanometallate Coordination Networks: Mechanism and Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Mark W.

    2015-03-01

    Using nanometer-sized heterostructures of cyanometallate coordination networks, specifially core@shell nanoparticles of CoFe@CrCr-PBA (PBA = Prussian blue analogues), irradiation by white light at 80 K modifies the magnetic response, and these changes remain intact and persist without continued irradiation to nominally 125 K. Preliminary pressure studies indicate the photoinduced changes can be maintained up to 200 K, the transition temperature of the ferromagnetic CrCr-PBA component. The effect, which we first reported up to 70 K, arises from thermally induced interface strain, which is relaxed by irradiation of the photactive consituent, CoFe-PBA. The ferromagnetic domains in the strained interface region are affected and generate the persistent changes of the magnetism. Our understanding of this photo-magnetostructural mechanism enabled us to extend the phenomenon to include photoactive spin-crossover systems and other ferromagnetic PBAs. The potential path to higher temperatures will be sketched. Presentation is coauthored with Daniel R. Talham, UF Chemistry, and supported by the NSF via DMR-1405439 (DRT), DMR-1202033 (MWM), and DMR-1157490 (NHMFL), and by the UF Division of Sponsored Research.

  12. Global Volcano Model: progress towards an international co-ordinated network for volcanic hazard and risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, Susan

    2013-04-01

    GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. GVM is a network that aims to co-ordinate and integrate the efforts of the international volcanology community. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM. Activities currently include: design and development of databases of volcano data, volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards; establishment of methodologies for analysis of the data (e.g. hazard and exposure indices) to inform risk assessment; development of complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM acts through establishing task forces to deliver explicit deliverables in finite periods of time. GVM has a task force to deliver a global assessment of volcanic risk for UN ISDR, a task force for indices, and a task force for volcano deformation from satellite observations. GVM is organising a Volcano Best Practices workshop in 2013. A recent product of GVM is a global database on large magnitude explosive eruptions. There is ongoing work to develop databases on debris avalanches, lava dome hazards and ash hazard. GVM aims to develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences.

  13. The coordinating role of IQGAP1 in the regulation of local, endosome-specific actin networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward B. Samson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IQGAP1 is a large, multi-domain scaffold that helps orchestrate cell signaling and cytoskeletal mechanics by controlling interactions among a spectrum of receptors, signaling intermediates, and cytoskeletal proteins. While this coordination is known to impact cell morphology, motility, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic, among other functions, the spatiotemporal properties and regulatory mechanisms of IQGAP1 have not been fully resolved. Herein, we describe a series of super-resolution and live-cell imaging analyses that identified a role for IQGAP1 in the regulation of an actin cytoskeletal shell surrounding a novel membranous compartment that localizes selectively to the basal cortex of polarized epithelial cells (MCF-10A. We also show that IQGAP1 appears to both stabilize the actin coating and constrain its growth. Loss of compartmental IQGAP1 initiates a disassembly mechanism involving rapid and unconstrained actin polymerization around the compartment and dispersal of its vesicle contents. Together, these findings suggest IQGAP1 achieves this control by harnessing both stabilizing and antagonistic interactions with actin. They also demonstrate the utility of these compartments for image-based investigations of the spatial and temporal dynamics of IQGAP1 within endosome-specific actin networks.

  14. The coordinating role of IQGAP1 in the regulation of local, endosome-specific actin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Edward B; Tsao, David S; Zimak, Jan; McLaughlin, R Tyler; Trenton, Nicholaus J; Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S; Schweikhard, Volker; Diehl, Michael R

    2017-06-15

    IQGAP1 is a large, multi-domain scaffold that helps orchestrate cell signaling and cytoskeletal mechanics by controlling interactions among a spectrum of receptors, signaling intermediates, and cytoskeletal proteins. While this coordination is known to impact cell morphology, motility, cell adhesion, and vesicular traffic, among other functions, the spatiotemporal properties and regulatory mechanisms of IQGAP1 have not been fully resolved. Herein, we describe a series of super-resolution and live-cell imaging analyses that identified a role for IQGAP1 in the regulation of an actin cytoskeletal shell surrounding a novel membranous compartment that localizes selectively to the basal cortex of polarized epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We also show that IQGAP1 appears to both stabilize the actin coating and constrain its growth. Loss of compartmental IQGAP1 initiates a disassembly mechanism involving rapid and unconstrained actin polymerization around the compartment and dispersal of its vesicle contents. Together, these findings suggest IQGAP1 achieves this control by harnessing both stabilizing and antagonistic interactions with actin. They also demonstrate the utility of these compartments for image-based investigations of the spatial and temporal dynamics of IQGAP1 within endosome-specific actin networks. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC): Using innovative tools and services to support worldwide space weather scientific communities and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A. M.; Bakshi, S.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Evans, R. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Lee, H.; MacNeice, P. J.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Mullinix, R. E.; Ngwira, C. M.; Patel, K.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) was established to enhance basic solar terrestrial research and to aid in the development of models for specifying and forecasting conditions in the space environment. In achieving this goal, CCMC has developed and provides a set of innovative tools varying from: Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) web -based dissemination system for space weather information, Runs-On-Request System providing access to unique collection of state-of-the-art solar and space physics models (unmatched anywhere in the world), Advanced Online Visualization and Analysis tools for more accurate interpretation of model results, Standard Data formats for Simulation Data downloads, and recently Mobile apps (iPhone/Android) to view space weather data anywhere to the scientific community. The number of runs requested and the number of resulting scientific publications and presentations from the research community has not only been an indication of the broad scientific usage of the CCMC and effective participation by space scientists and researchers, but also guarantees active collaboration and coordination amongst the space weather research community. Arising from the course of CCMC activities, CCMC also supports community-wide model validation challenges and research focus group projects for a broad range of programs such as the multi-agency National Space Weather Program, NSF's CEDAR (Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions), GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) and Shine (Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment) programs. In addition to performing research and model development, CCMC also supports space science education by hosting summer students through local universities; through the provision of simulations in support of classroom programs such as Heliophysics Summer School (with student research contest) and CCMC Workshops; training next generation of junior scientists in space weather forecasting; and educating

  16. Index of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and associated publications available in the Coordination and Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza, B.G.

    1991-02-01

    This publication was created by the Coordination and Information Center (CIC) to provide a readily available research tool for use by researchers interested in a specific area covered in the holdings of the CIC Archives. The Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) was formed and functioned in agreement with Planning Directive NVO-76 (July 29, 1970 and revised January 1, 1974, (CIC-165845 and CIC-16439) respectively) to coordinate the ecological and other environmental programs necessary to support the continued nuclear testing activities; and to provide a mechanism to effectively comply with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, Executive Order 11514, and AEC Manual Chapter 0510.'' The publication contains only citations to documents currently available at the CIC. It represents a significant portion of the principal research findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group.

  17. Community based research network: opportunities for coordination of care, public health surveillance, and farmworker research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon P; Heyer, Nicholas; Shipp, Eva M; Ryder, E Roberta; Hendrikson, Edward; Socias, Christina M; Del Junco, Deborah J; Valerio, Melissa; Partida, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    The lack of aggregated longitudinal health data on farmworkers has severely limited opportunities to conduct research to improve their health status. To correct this problem, we have created the infrastructure necessary to develop and maintain a national Research Data Repository of migrant and seasonal farmworker patients and other community members receiving medical care from Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs). Project specific research databases can be easily extracted from this repository. The Community Based Research Network (CBRN) has securely imported and merged electronic health records (EHRs) data from five geographically dispersed C/MHCs. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our data aggregation methodologies, we also conducted a small pilot study using clinical, laboratory and demographic data from the CBRN Data Repository from two initial C/MHCs to evaluate HbA1c management. Overall, there were 67,878 total patients (2,858 farmworkers) that were seen by two C/MHCs from January to August 2013. A total of 94,189 encounters were captured and all could be linked to a unique patient. HbA1c values decreased as the number of tests or intensity of testing increased. This project will inform the foundation for an expanding collection of C/MHC data for use by clinicians for medical care coordination, by clinics to assess quality of care, by public health agencies for surveillance, and by researchers under Institutional Review Board (IRB) oversight to advance understanding of the needs and capacity of the migrant and seasonal farmworker population and the health centers that serve them. Approved researchers can request data that constitute a Limited Data Set from the CBRN Data Repository to establish a specific research database for their project.

  18. Supply Chain Management Or Adaptive Business Network? – Coordination Versus Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilies Liviu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available You are not the only company capable to create value for your clients. For making valuable products, for performing high standard services, one company is no longer enough in this new informational era, in this new needs era. Better business performing means now to satisfy more complex needs quicker than ever. Could one company face this challenge alone? Is there another way? Collaboration may be the answer. Maybe the most well-known term when it comes to collaboration between companies is Supply Chain. Why Supply Chain, why Supply Chain Management (SCM? This article presents the answers to these questions, but also presents different approaches regarding SCM: the logistics approach regarding supply chain management, the strategic approach, the new entrepreneurial approach, supply chain as a win-win game. New paradigms regarding collaboration appeared regarding business collaboration: Adaptive Business Network (ABN. Do these new concepts imply the dead of SCM? Or are them only a new wave in SCM terminology and business orientation? Our conclusion is that these new approach is a normal change in business: businesses are made by people and people don’t like to be conducted (managed. The old-fashioned SCM was based on a coordinator versus several obedients relation. It is absolutely normal to dream at freedom and to be not very efficient while you have to play after somebody else rules. ABN is in the other side of human relations and also business relations – it insists on partnering. Everybody is a part of a chain which has as its main goal customer satisfaction, has the right to make proposals, to negotiate, and to be a winner. Of course, ABN appearance does not involve SCM disappearance, but change in how some chains are managed, in how some chains function. We shall see for the future if an organization with several brains is more successful.

  19. Hybrid metal-coordinate transient networks: using bio-inspired building blocks to engineer the mechanical properties of physical hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindy, Scott; Barrett, Devin; Messersmith, Phillip; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    2014-03-01

    Recently, metal-coordinate complex crosslinks have been suggested to contribute to the self-healing properties of mussel byssi. Two specific amino acid derivatives - 3,4 dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa) and histidine (his) - are known to form coordinate complexes with trivalent and divalent ions (respectively) in aqueous solutions. We show here that, by functionalizing poly(ethylene glycol) polymers with dopa and his we are (1) able to characterize the fundamental kinetics and energetics of each specific metal-ligand pair using small amplitude oscillatory shear rheology and (2) create hybrid networks using various mixtures of metals and ligands. From this information, we can design gels with specific target mechanical properties by tailoring the amounts and types of metal-ligand crosslinks present in the gel network, resulting in the ability to engineer the mechanical relaxation spectrum. This work provides basic understanding necessary to intelligently design materials which incorporate metal-ligand crosslinks in more complex architectures.

  20. Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) for Large-Scale Science Applications (COMMON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokkarane, Vinod [University of Massachusetts

    2013-09-01

    We intend to implement a Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) Framework for Large-scale Science Applications. In the COMMON project, specific problems to be addressed include 1) anycast/multicast/manycast request provisioning, 2) deployable OSCARS enhancements, 3) multi-layer, multi-domain quality of service (QoS), and 4) multi-layer, multidomain path survivability. In what follows, we outline the progress in the above categories (Year 1, 2, and 3 deliverables).

  1. Post-synthetic transformation of a Zn(ii) polyhedral coordination network into a new supramolecular isomer of HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Wojtas, Lukasz; Ma, Shengqian; Zaworotko, Michael J; Zhang, Zhenjie

    2017-08-03

    A Zn-based porphyrin containing metal-organic material (porphMOM-1) was transformed into a novel Cu-based porphyrin-encapsulating metal-organic material (porph@HKUST-1-β) via a one-pot post-synthetic modification (PSM) process involving both metal ion exchange and linker installation of trimesic acid. HKUST-1-β is the first example of yao topology and is to our knowledge the first supramolecular isomer of the archetypal coordination network HKUST-1.

  2. Group Centric Networking: Addressing Information Sharing Requirements at the Tactical Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-10

    tion well with fixed infrastructure and stable links where routes are maintained to enable all-to-all unicast connections. While cellular networks...each collaborative group can tune the network for its tolerances. C. Dynamic Network Adaptation In traditional IP networks, routing parameters such as...enables dynamic network adaptation on a per-group basis, giving greater fidelity in tactical mission planning. D. Group ID Mapping In GCN, interest

  3. Transportation network development in a liberalized power system, a coordination problem with production; Le developpement du reseau de transport dans un systeme electrique liberalise, un probleme de coordination avec la production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rious, V

    2007-10-15

    This thesis analyses how the long term coordination between generation and transmission is organised in a liberalized power system. It relies on a modular analysis framework that allows us to separate the coordination mechanisms into distinct modules. The governance structure of the power network completes this analysis framework. In a rationale of institutional complementarity, this governance structure impacts the way the TSOs effectively implement the power flow management. The proactive behaviour of the TSO for the coordination of generation and transmission can be explained in two ways. Firstly, the network investment can be the only effective process of long term coordination between generation and transmission. Secondly, when forecasting network investment, the TSO can prepare the accommodation of the fast-built generation units and detect the potential failures of locational incentive signals. (author)

  4. 75 FR 49528 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (“NMG”) Excluding the Multimedia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG'') Excluding the Multimedia Applications Division Including On- Site Leased Workers of Synergy Services..., applicable to workers of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG''), excluding...

  5. Homochiral and heterochiral coordination polymers and networks of silver(I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Tara J; Puddephatt, Richard J

    2006-01-23

    The self-assembly of racemic and enantiopure binaphthylbis(amidopyridyl) ligands 1,1'-C(20)H(12){NHC(O)-4-C(5)H(4)N}(2), 1, and 1,1'-C(20)H(12){NHC(O)-3-C(5)H(4)N}(2), 2, with silver(I) salts (AgX; X = CF(3)CO(2), CF(3)SO(3), NO(3)) to form extended metal-containing arrays is described. It is shown that the self-assembly with racemic ligands can lead to homochiral or heterochiral polymers, through self-recognition or self-discrimination of the ligand units. The primary polymeric materials adopt helical conformations (secondary structure), and they undergo further self-assembly to form sheets or networks (tertiary structure). These secondary and tertiary structures are controlled through secondary bonding interactions between pairs of silver(I) centers, between silver cations and counteranions, or through hydrogen bonding involving amide NH groups. The self-assembly of the enantiopure ligand R-1 with silver trifluoroacetate gave a remarkable three-dimensional chiral, knitted network composed of polymer chains in four different supramolecular isomeric forms.

  6. Brain networks supporting perceptual grouping and contour selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor eVolberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system groups local elements into global objects seemingly without effort. Using a contour integration task and EEG source level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that perceptual grouping requires a top-down selection, rather than a passive pooling, of neural information that codes local elements in the visual image. The participants were presented visual displays with or without a hidden contour. Two tasks were performed: a central luminance-change detection task and a peripheral contour detection task. Only in the contour-detection task could we find differential brain activity between contour and non-contour conditions, within a distributed brain network including parietal, lateral occipital and primary visual areas. Contour processing was associated with an inflow of information from lateral occipital into primary visual regions, as revealed from the slope of phase differences between source level oscillations within these areas. The findings suggest that contour integration results from a selection of neural information from lower visual areas, and that this selection is driven by the lateral occipital cortex.

  7. Coordinated control strategy for hybrid wind farms with DFIG-based and PMSG-based wind farms during network unbalance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Jun; Liu, Ruikuo; Zhou, Te

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the coordinated control strategy for a hybrid wind farm with doubly fed induction generator (DFIG)-based and direct-driven permanent-magnet synchronous generator (PMSG)-based wind farms during network unbalance. The negative-sequence current output capabilities of DFIG...... and PMSG systems under unbalanced grid voltage condition are described. Furthermore, by considering both the negative-sequence current capabilities and requirements of different control targets for each control unit, the controllable operating regions of DFIG and PMSG systems are investigated. According...... grid voltage unbalance conditions. Finally, the proposed coordinated control strategy is validated by the simulation results of a 30-MW-DFIG-based wind farm and a 30-MW-PMSG-based wind farm under different operation conditions and experimental results on a laboratory-scale experimental rig under severe...

  8. A Group Motor Skills Program for Children with Coordination Difficulties: Effect on Fundamental Movement Skills and Physical Activity Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Staples, Kerri L

    2016-01-01

    Children with coordination difficulties are at risk of low levels of physical activity (PA) participation. This intervention examined the effects of a multidisciplinary program that emphasized parent participation on motor skill performance and PA. Ten boys (5-7 years) completed a group program consisting of conditioning exercises and activities designed to address child-selected goals. Motor proficiency and PA participation were assessed before and after the program using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2) and triaxial accelerometers, respectively. Rating scales captured child and parent perceptions of performance for each child's goals. TGMD-2 subtest raw scores, age equivalent and percentile scores improved, along with parent ratings of their child's performance. Six children reported skill improvements. On average, moderate to vigorous PA improved by 10 min per day although these gains were not significant. Time spent in sedentary activities was unchanged. None of the children met the Canadian PA and sedentary behaviour guidelines. The results support effectiveness of a group program to improve gross motor performance and levels of PA in children with coordination difficulties. Gains in both of these domains also have the potential to impact quality of life and reduce health risks associated with inactivity.

  9. Social networking in online support groups for health: how online social networking benefits patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of online support groups (OSGs) have embraced the features of social networking. So far, little is known about how patients use and benefit from these features. By implementing the uses-and-gratifications framework, the author conducted an online survey with current users of OSGs to examine associations among motivation, use of specific features of OSG, and support outcomes. Findings suggest that OSG users make selective use of varied features depending on their needs, and that perceptions of receiving emotional and informational support are associated more with the use of some features than others. For example, those with strong motivation for social interaction use diverse features of OSG and make one-to-one connections with other users by friending. In contrast, those with strong motivation for information seeking limit their use primarily to discussion boards. Results also show that online social networking features, such as friending and sharing of personal stories on blogs, are helpful in satisfying the need for emotional support. The present study sheds light on online social networking features in the context of health-related OSGs and provides practical lessons on how to improve the capacity of OSGs to serve the needs of their users.

  10. Coordination in urban water supply networks using distributed model predictive control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leirens, S.; Zamora, C.; Negenborn, R.R.; De Schutter, B.

    2010-01-01

    Urban water supply networks are large-scale systems that transport potable water over vast geographical areas to millions of consumers. A safe and efficient operation of these networks is crucial, as without it living in today’s cities would be impossible. To achieve an adequate operation, these

  11. Evolution of opinions on social networks in the presence of competing committed groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xie, Jierui; Emenheiser, Jeffrey; Kirby, Matthew; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    .... Using a model of pairwise social influence, we study how the presence of such groups within social networks affects the outcome and the speed of evolution of the overall opinion on the network...

  12. The Organization of Collective Group Movements in Wild Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus: Social Structure Drives Processes of Group Coordination in Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Seltmann

    Full Text Available Social animals have to coordinate activities and collective movements to benefit from the advantages of group living. Animals in large groups maintain cohesion by self-organization processes whereas in smaller groups consensus decisions can be reached. Where consensus decisions are relevant leadership may emerge. Variation in the organization of collective movements has been linked to variation in female social tolerance among macaque species ranging from despotic to egalitarian. Here we investigated the processes underlying group movements in a wild macaque species characterized by a degree of social tolerance intermediate to previously studied congeneric species. We focused on processes before, during and after the departure of the first individual. To this end, we observed one group of wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus in the Middle Atlas, Morocco using all-occurrence behaviour sampling of 199 collective movements. We found that initiators of a collective movement usually chose the direction in which more individuals displayed pre-departure behavior. Dominant individuals contributed to group movements more than subordinates, especially juveniles, measured as frequencies of successful initiations and pre-departure behaviour. Joining was determined by affiliative relationships and the number of individuals that already joined the movement (mimetism. Thus, in our study group partially shared consensus decisions mediated by selective mimetism seemed to be prevalent, overall supporting the suggestion that a species' social style affects the organization of group movements. As only the most tolerant species show equally shared consensus decisions whereas in others the decision is partially shared with a bias to dominant individuals the type of consensus decisions seems to follow a stepwise relation. Joining order may also follow a stepwise, however opposite, relationship, because dominance only determined joining in highly despotic, but not in

  13. Embedding an institution-wide capacity building opportunity around transition pedagogy: First Year Teaching and Learning Network Coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Clark

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A First Year Teaching and Learning Network was established in a regional university with a strong focus on distance education for a very diverse student cohort.  The purpose of the Network, which consisted of a Coordinator in each of nine schools, was to support staff teaching students transitioning into tertiary education. The paper explores the theoretical bases of the structure, its current method of operation, its impact so far, and future plans. The development of the Network illustrates how a university can consciously embed opportunities for staff to take ownership of transition pedagogy and thus encourage widespread capacity building amongst their peers. The experiences of the Network in its first two years provide a case study of how institutional support for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, in particular scholarship around capacity building, can be used as a mechanism to promote both staff and student engagement with transition pedagogy resulting in a shift from a second generation approach towards a third generation approach to transition.

  14. Investment coordination in network industries. The case of electricity grid and electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeffler, Felix [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Energiewirtschaftliches Inst.; Max-Planck-Institute for Research on Collective Goods, Bonn (Germany); Wambach, Achim [Cologne Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics

    2013-06-15

    Liberalization of network industries frequently separates the network from the other parts of the industry. This is important in particular for the elec- tricity industry where private firms invest into generation facilities, while network investments usually are controlled by regulators. We discuss two regulatory regimes. First, the regulator can only decide on the network extension. Second, she can additionally use a ''capacity market'' with payments contingent on private generation investment. For the first case, we find that even absent asymmetric information, a lack of regulatory commitment can cause inefficiently high or inefficiently low investments. For the second case, we develop a standard handicap auction which implements the first best under asymmetric information, if there are no shadow costs of public funds. With shadow costs, no simple mechanism can implement the second best outcome.

  15. Ant colony optimization algorithm for signal coordination of oversaturated traffic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Traffic congestion is a daily and growing problem of the modern era in mostly all major cities in the world. : Increasing traffic demand strains the existing transportation system, leading to oversaturated network : conditions, especially at peak hou...

  16. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel J.; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling. PMID:25944828

  17. Tuning structural topologies of five photoluminescent Cd(II) coordination polymers through modifying the substitute group of organic ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhu, Baoyong; Xu, Guilan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Five new Cd(II) coordination polymers based on mixed 5-position substituted 1,3-benzenedicarboxylate ligands (R=NO2/OH/CH3) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (L1)or 1,4-bis(1-imidazol-yl) -2,5- dimethyl benzene (L2), namely [Cd(5-NO2-ip)(L1)·H2O] (1), [Cd(5-OH-ip)(L1)]n (2), [Cd(5-NO2-ip) (L1)0.5(H2O)2]n (3), {[Cd(5-NO2-ip)(L2)0.5(H2O)]·H2O} (4), [Cd(5-CH3-ip)(L2)(H2O)2]n (5), have been synthesized hydrothermally and structurally characterized. With different substituted groups in the organic ligands, five compounds exhibit five distinct framework structures. By changing the pH value, compound 1 with 2-fold interpenetrating (4,4)-layer structure and compound 3 with three-dimensional diamond-type framework are obtained, respectively, from the assembly of Cd(NO3)2·4H2O, 5-NO2-ip and L1 ligand. The replacement of 5-NO2-ip with 5-OH-ip leads to a compound 2 which features a doubly pillared layered structure with pcu topology. Compounds 4 and 5 are constructed from L2 ligand with 5-NO2-ip or 5-CH3-ip, respectively. Compound 4 has non-interpenetrating (4,4) layer, while compound 5 shows unusual 2D->3D polycatenation of bilayers. The results reveal a new approach toward tuning structural topologies of coordination polymers through modifying the substitute groups in organic ligands. Furthermore, the photoluminescent properties of compounds 1-5 have been studied in the solid state at room temperature.

  18. Empirical Studies on the Network of Social Groups: The Case of Tencent QQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Pu; Lü, Linyuan; Yeung, Chi Ho

    2015-01-01

    Participation in social groups are important but the collective behaviors of human as a group are difficult to analyze due to the difficulties to quantify ordinary social relation, group membership, and to collect a comprehensive dataset. Such difficulties can be circumvented by analyzing online social networks. In this paper, we analyze a comprehensive dataset released from Tencent QQ, an instant messenger with the highest market share in China. Specifically, we analyze three derivative networks involving groups and their members-the hypergraph of groups, the network of groups and the user network-to reveal social interactions at microscopic and mesoscopic level. Our results uncover interesting behaviors on the growth of user groups, the interactions between groups, and their relationship with member age and gender. These findings lead to insights which are difficult to obtain in social networks based on personal contacts.

  19. Turning Groups Inside Out: A Social Network Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienties, Bart; Tempelaar, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Most research related to learning in groups focuses on the unit of the group and/or its group members. However, students may benefit from crossing the boundaries of their own group, as students in different groups may provide access to new, non-redundant knowledge and opportunities for learning.

  20. Coordinated system services from offshore wind power plants connected through HVDC networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, Lorenzo; Glasdam, Jakob; Hesselbæk, Bo

    2014-01-01

    control and communication delays of OWPPs, and their influence on the successful delivery of the targeted services. Furthermore, it is shown that as an HVDC network increases in size from the point-to-point, the handling of onshore short circuits calls for the proper combination of DC chopper(s) and fast......, its combination with OWPPs, against a conventional power station of comparable size. Consequently it will be pointed out what features will be critical for TSOs when partially or completely replacing conventional units with HVDC stations connected to neighbouring systems and/or OWPPs.......This paper presents an overview of power system services in networks involving multiple onshore power systems, a voltage sourced converter (VSC) based high voltage direct current (HVDC) offshore network and an offshore wind power plant (OWPP). A comprehensive list of services regarding onshore...

  1. Group-Level Symptom Networks in Depression Reply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Borsboom, Denny; Schoevers, Robert A.

    In Reply In our publication in JAMA Psychiatry,1 we reported that the structure of symptom networks is related to the course of depression. Our findings are based on a between-patients design. Although we agree with Bos and Wanders that this has implications for the interpretation of our results, we

  2. Signed directed social network analysis applied to group conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Quan; Skillicorn, David; Walther, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Real-world social networks contain relationships of multiple different types, but this richness is often ignored in graph-theoretic modelling. We show how two recently developed spectral embedding techniques, for directed graphs (relationships are asymmetric) and for signed graphs (relationships...

  3. Collaborative Network Evolution: The Los Angeles Terrorism Early Warning Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    overly dependent on the ad hoc ‘ sneaker net’ of personal relations among known colleagues.12 An effective network linking federal, state and local...personal affinities, or ascribed status of members who participate regularly in collective activities. At the same time, the particular patterning of

  4. African Network Operators Group (AfNOG) Training Workshops and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    What does it mean to "have fiber" or developing a common understanding and terminology. Download PDF. Studies. Supporting learning and research : content opportunities for academic and research libraries / networks in Africa; presentation at AFREN 3, Rabat, 2008. Download PDF. Studies. Broadband infrastructure in ...

  5. Statistical Network Analysis for Functional MRI: Mean Networks and Group Comparisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric E Ginestet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparing networks in neuroscience is hard, because the topological properties of a given network are necessarily dependent on the number of edges of that network. This problem arises in the analysis of both weighted and unweighted networks. The term density is often used in this context, in order to refer to the mean edge weight of a weighted network, or to the number of edges in an unweighted one. Comparing families of networks is therefore statistically difficult because differences in topology are necessarily associated with differences in density. In this review paper, we consider this problem from two different perspectives, which include (i the construction of summary networks, such as how to compute and visualize the mean network from a sample of network-valued data points; and (ii how to test for topological differences, when two families of networks also exhibit significant differences in density. In the first instance, we show that the issue of summarizing a family of networks can be conducted by either adopting a mass-univariate approach, which produces a statistical parametric network (SPN, or by directly computing the mean network, provided that a metric has been specified on the space of all networks with a given number of nodes. In the second part of this review, we then highlight the inherent problems associated with the comparison of topological functions of families of networks that differ in density. In particular, we show that a wide range of topological summaries, such as global efficiency and network modularity are highly sensitive to differences in density. Moreover, these problems are not restricted to unweighted metrics, as we demonstrate that the same issues remain present when considering the weighted versions of these metrics. We conclude by encouraging caution, when reporting such statistical comparisons, and by emphasizing the importance of constructing summary networks.

  6. When network governance is needed to control IT-applications used in coordination and innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. de Graaf; Dr. Hugo Velthuijsen

    2010-01-01

    IT-based networking trends such as the rise of social media, crowd sourcing, open innovation, and cloud computing enable a profoundly different way of working and collaborating that challenges significantly traditional approaches of companies towards governance, i.e. the mechanisms a company employs

  7. Aperiodic linear networked control considering variable channel delays: application to robots coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Carlos; Espinosa, Felipe; Santiso, Enrique; Mazo, Manuel

    2015-05-27

    One of the main challenges in wireless cyber-physical systems is to reduce the load of the communication channel while preserving the control performance. In this way, communication resources are liberated for other applications sharing the channel bandwidth. The main contribution of this work is the design of a remote control solution based on an aperiodic and adaptive triggering mechanism considering the current network delay of multiple robotics units. Working with the actual network delay instead of the maximum one leads to abandoning this conservative assumption, since the triggering condition is fixed depending on the current state of the network. This way, the controller manages the usage of the wireless channel in order to reduce the channel delay and to improve the availability of the communication resources. The communication standard under study is the widespread IEEE 802.11g, whose channel delay is clearly uncertain. First, the adaptive self-triggered control is validated through the TrueTime simulation tool configured for the mentioned WiFi standard. Implementation results applying the aperiodic linear control laws on four P3-DX robots are also included. Both of them demonstrate the advantage of this solution in terms of network accessing and control performance with respect to periodic and non-adaptive self-triggered alternatives.

  8. Aperiodic Linear Networked Control Considering Variable Channel Delays: Application to Robots Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Santos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in wireless cyber-physical systems is to reduce the load of the communication channel while preserving the control performance. In this way, communication resources are liberated for other applications sharing the channel bandwidth. The main contribution of this work is the design of a remote control solution based on an aperiodic and adaptive triggering mechanism considering the current network delay of multiple robotics units. Working with the actual network delay instead of the maximum one leads to abandoning this conservative assumption, since the triggering condition is fixed depending on the current state of the network. This way, the controller manages the usage of the wireless channel in order to reduce the channel delay and to improve the availability of the communication resources. The communication standard under study is the widespread IEEE 802.11g, whose channel delay is clearly uncertain. First, the adaptive self-triggered control is validated through the TrueTime simulation tool configured for the mentioned WiFi standard. Implementation results applying the aperiodic linear control laws on four P3-DX robots are also included. Both of them demonstrate the advantage of this solution in terms of network accessing and control performance with respect to periodic and non-adaptive self-triggered alternatives.

  9. Pipe replacement in a water supply network: coordinated versus uncoordinated replacement and budget effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van D.; Hendrix, E.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Operators of underground water supply networks are challenged with pipe replacement
    decisions, because pipes are subject to increased failure rates as they age and financial resources
    are often limited.We study the optimal replacement time and optimal number of pipe replacements
    such

  10. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons coordinate hippocampal network dynamics required for memory consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognjanovski, Nicolette; Schaeffer, Samantha; Wu, Jiaxing; Mofakham, Sima; Maruyama, Daniel; Zochowski, Michal; Aton, Sara J.

    2017-04-01

    Activity in hippocampal area CA1 is essential for consolidating episodic memories, but it is unclear how CA1 activity patterns drive memory formation. We find that in the hours following single-trial contextual fear conditioning (CFC), fast-spiking interneurons (which typically express parvalbumin (PV)) show greater firing coherence with CA1 network oscillations. Post-CFC inhibition of PV+ interneurons blocks fear memory consolidation. This effect is associated with loss of two network changes associated with normal consolidation: (1) augmented sleep-associated delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-12 Hz) and ripple (150-250 Hz) oscillations; and (2) stabilization of CA1 neurons' functional connectivity patterns. Rhythmic activation of PV+ interneurons increases CA1 network coherence and leads to a sustained increase in the strength and stability of functional connections between neurons. Our results suggest that immediately following learning, PV+ interneurons drive CA1 oscillations and reactivation of CA1 ensembles, which directly promotes network plasticity and long-term memory formation.

  11. Aperiodic Linear Networked Control Considering Variable Channel Delays: Application to Robots Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Carlos; Espinosa, Felipe; Santiso, Enrique; Mazo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in wireless cyber-physical systems is to reduce the load of the communication channel while preserving the control performance. In this way, communication resources are liberated for other applications sharing the channel bandwidth. The main contribution of this work is the design of a remote control solution based on an aperiodic and adaptive triggering mechanism considering the current network delay of multiple robotics units. Working with the actual network delay instead of the maximum one leads to abandoning this conservative assumption, since the triggering condition is fixed depending on the current state of the network. This way, the controller manages the usage of the wireless channel in order to reduce the channel delay and to improve the availability of the communication resources. The communication standard under study is the widespread IEEE 802.11g, whose channel delay is clearly uncertain. First, the adaptive self-triggered control is validated through the TrueTime simulation tool configured for the mentioned WiFi standard. Implementation results applying the aperiodic linear control laws on four P3-DX robots are also included. Both of them demonstrate the advantage of this solution in terms of network accessing and control performance with respect to periodic and non-adaptive self-triggered alternatives. PMID:26024415

  12. Coordination of Regenerative Relays and Direct Users in Wireless Cellular Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thai, Chan; Popovski, Petar

    2011-01-01

    The area of wireless cooperation/relaying has recently been significantly enriched by the ideas of wireless network coding (NC), which bring substantial gains in spectral efficiency. These gains have mainly been demonstrated in scenarios with two-way relaying. Inspired by the ideas of wireless NC...

  13. The use of H-bonding to increase the dimensionality of coordination networks of Cu(I) and Cu(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, David B.; Hanton, Lyall R.; Spicer, Mark D.

    2006-08-01

    Two two-dimensional coordination networks were prepared by the reaction of a bent bridging ligand, bis(4-pyridyl)amine ( bpa), with CuI and CuCl 2. Both networks were formed by bpa ligands bridging between Cu 2I 2 dimers or six-coordinate trans CuCl 2 moieties. The networks were isotopological and displayed (4, 4) topology with nodes based on the midpoint of the Cu 2I 2 dimer or the Cu(II) ion, respectively. Reaction of a monoprotonated bpa ligand with CuSO 4 resulted in the formation of a neutral discrete complex. H-bonding networks were formed in all three cases. The two coordination polymers were both extended to give related three-dimensional networks with the resulting CuI H-bonded network displaying twofold interpenetration. The discrete neutral complex formed a two-dimensional H-bonded network and when further H-bonding to H 2O solvent molecules was considered, a highly complex three-dimensional network resulted with five different nodes of four different connectivities.

  14. Comparing multilayer brain networks between groups: Introducing graph metrics and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandke, Kanad; Meier, Jil; Brookes, Matthew J; O'Dea, Reuben D; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stam, Cornelis J; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas

    2017-11-11

    There is an increasing awareness of the advantages of multi-modal neuroimaging. Networks obtained from different modalities are usually treated in isolation, which is however contradictory to accumulating evidence that these networks show non-trivial interdependencies. Even networks obtained from a single modality, such as frequency-band specific functional networks measured from magnetoencephalography (MEG) are often treated independently. Here, we discuss how a multilayer network framework allows for integration of multiple networks into a single network description and how graph metrics can be applied to quantify multilayer network organisation for group comparison. We analyse how well-known biases for single layer networks, such as effects of group differences in link density and/or average connectivity, influence multilayer networks, and we compare four schemes that aim to correct for such biases: the minimum spanning tree (MST), effective graph resistance cost minimisation, efficiency cost optimisation (ECO) and a normalisation scheme based on singular value decomposition (SVD). These schemes can be applied to the layers independently or to the multilayer network as a whole. For correction applied to whole multilayer networks, only the SVD showed sufficient bias correction. For correction applied to individual layers, three schemes (ECO, MST, SVD) could correct for biases. By using generative models as well as empirical MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, we further demonstrated that all schemes were sensitive to identify network topology when the original networks were perturbed. In conclusion, uncorrected multilayer network analysis leads to biases. These biases may differ between centres and studies and could consequently lead to unreproducible results in a similar manner as for single layer networks. We therefore recommend using correction schemes prior to multilayer network analysis for group comparisons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  15. Modeling the Role of Networks and Individual Differences in Inter-Group Violence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isakov, Alexander; Holcomb, Amelia; Glowacki, Luke; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    .... Most research has neglected the role of within-group effects in social networks in contributing to between-group violence and focused instead on the precursors and consequences of violence, or on the...

  16. Real-Time Analysis of an Active Distribution Network - Coordinated Frequency Control for Islanding Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Seung-Tae

    and require a transition from today’s passive distribution networks to future active distribution networks (ADNs) which utilizes ad-vanced operation and control strategies in order to improve power supply reliability, and realize the potential of DG to provide system support. The presence of DERs within...... to the islanding operation and reliable operation of the islanded sys-tem. The goal of this Ph.D project is to develop effective frequency control strategies for the islanding operation of ADNs. The developed control strategies are comprised of a primary frequency control scenario with a battery energy storage...... regulation performance is highly improved with fuzzy logic control (FLC) when the system enters into islanding operation. Lastly, an intelligent multi-agent based secondary frequency control strategy for the islanding operation of ADN is proposed. A complete software-in-the-loop (SIL) simula-tion is carried...

  17. Coordinated system services from offshore wind power plants connected through HVDC networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeni, L.; Glasdam, Jakob Bærholm; Hesselbæk, B.

    2014-01-01

    system, or an OWPP, or both. Moreover, the implementation of power oscillation damping (POD) and HVDC voltage control into an OWPP controller is proposed, discussing the main challenges related to their efficient design. Dynamic control challenges are assessed, in particular in relation to the inherent......, its combination with OWPPs, against a conventional power station of comparable size. Consequently it will be pointed out what features will be critical for TSOs when partially or completely replacing conventional units with HVDC stations connected to neighbouring systems and/or OWPPs.......This paper presents an overview of power system services in networks involving multiple onshore power systems, a voltage sourced converter (VSC) based high voltage direct current (HVDC) offshore network and an offshore wind power plant (OWPP). A comprehensive list of services regarding onshore...

  18. Networking the seceder model: Group formation in social and economic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grönlund, A

    2004-01-01

    The seceder model illustrates how the desire to be different than the average can lead to formation of groups in a population. We turn the original, agent based, seceder model into a model of network evolution. We find that the structural characteristics our model closely matches empirical social networks. Statistics for the dynamics of group formation are also given. Extensions of the model to networks of companies are also discussed.

  19. Networking the seceder model: Group formation in social and economic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Andreas; Holme, Petter

    2004-09-01

    The seceder model illustrates how the desire to be different from the average can lead to formation of groups in a population. We turn the original, agent based, seceder model into a model of network evolution. We find that the structural characteristics of our model closely match empirical social networks. Statistics for the dynamics of group formation are also given. Extensions of the model to networks of companies are also discussed.

  20. COORDINATION IN MULTILEVEL NETWORK-CENTRIC CONTROL SYSTEMS OF REGIONAL SECURITY: APPROACH AND FORMAL MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Masloboev; V. A. Putilov; A. V. Sioutine

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with development of methods and tools for mathematical and computer modeling of the multilevel network-centric control systems of regional security. This research is carried out under development strategy implementation of the Arctic zone of the Russian Federation and national safeguarding for the period before 2020 in the Murmansk region territory. Creation of unified interdepartmental multilevel computer-aided system is proposed intended for decision-making information suppo...

  1. Combining social and genetic networks to study HIV transmission in mixing risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Prosperi, M.C.F.; Belleman, R.G.; Di Giambenedetto, S.; Fabbiani, M.; De Luca, A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of HIV transmission networks is important for understanding and preventing the spread of the virus and drug resistant variants. Mixing risk groups is important in network analysis of HIV in order to assess the role of transmission between risk groups in the HIV epidemic. Most of the

  2. Complex coordination of cell plasticity by a PGC-1α-controlled transcriptional network in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eKupr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle cells exhibit an enormous plastic capacity in order to adapt to external stimuli. Even though our overall understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic changes in skeletal muscle cells remains poor, several factors involved in the regulation and coordination of relevant transcriptional programs have been identified in recent years. For example, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α is a central regulatory nexus in the adaptation of muscle to endurance training. Intriguingly, PGC-1α integrates numerous signaling pathways and translates their activity into various transcriptional programs. This selectivity is in part controlled by differential expression of PGC-1α variants and post-translational modifications of the PGC-1α protein. PGC-1α-controlled activation of transcriptional networks subsequently enables a spatio-temporal specification and hence allows a complex coordination of changes in metabolic and contractile properties, protein synthesis and degradation rates and other features of trained muscle. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of PGC-1α-regulated skeletal muscle cell plasticity in health and disease.

  3. Innovation, imitation, and problem-solving in a networked group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Thomas N; Goldstone, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    We implemented a problem-solving task in which groups of participants simultaneously played a simple innovation game in a complex problem space, with score feedback provided after each of a number of rounds. Each participant in a group was allowed to view and imitate the guesses of others during the game. The results showed the use of social learning strategies previously studied in other species, and demonstrated benefits of social learning and nonlinear effects of group size on strategy and performance. Rather than simply encouraging conformity, groups provided information to each individual about the distribution of useful innovations in the problem space. Imitation facilitated innovation rather than displacing it, because the former allowed good solutions to be propagated and preserved for further cumulative innovations in the group. Participants generally improved their solutions through the use of fairly conservative strategies, such as changing only a small portion of one's solution at a time, and tending to imitate solutions similar to one's own. Changes in these strategies over time had the effect of making solutions increasingly entrenched, both at individual and group levels. These results showed evidence of nonlinear dynamics in the decentralization of innovation, the emergence of group phenomena from complex interactions of individual efforts, stigmergy in the use of social information, and dynamic tradeoffs between exploration and exploitation of solutions. These results also support the idea that innovation and creativity can be recognized at the group level even when group members are generally cautious and imitative.

  4. Group Policy Reference Systems and Network Attack Center (SNAC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rice, David

    2001-01-01

    .... This manual is not a how-to guide for using Group Policy in a secure configuration, but more a map to help the reader locate specific policies within the Group Policy Snap-in for a given Active Directory container...

  5. Engineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James C. Liao

    2012-05-22

    This project is a collaboration with F. R. Tabita of Ohio State. Our major goal is to understand the factors and regulatory mechanisms that influence hydrogen production. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Our part of the project was to develop a modeling technique to investigate the metabolic network in connection to hydrogen production and regulation. Organisms must balance the pathways that generate and consume reducing power in order to maintain redox homeostasis to achieve growth. Maintaining this homeostasis in the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria is a complex feat with many avenues that can lead to balance, as these organisms possess versatile metabolic capabilities including anoxygenic photosynthesis, aerobic or anaerobic respiration, and fermentation. Growth is achieved by using H{sub 2} as an electron donor and CO{sub 2} as a carbon source during photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic growth, where CO{sub 2} is fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Photoheterotrophic growth can also occur when alternative organic carbon compounds are utilized as both the carbon source and electron donor. Regardless of the growth mode, excess reducing equivalents generated as a result of oxidative processes, must be transferred to terminal electron acceptors, thus insuring that redox homeostasis is maintained in the cell. Possible terminal acceptors include O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, organic carbon, or various oxyanions. Cells possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the activity of the pathways which supply energy, such as photosynthesis, and those that consume energy, such as CO{sub 2} assimilation or N{sub 2} fixation. The major route for CO{sub 2} assimilation is the CBB

  6. Performance analysis of channel assignment schemes for coordinated cognitive WLAN networks

    OpenAIRE

    Churchman Barata, Mathew William

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays local wireless networks are very used by an elevated number of people and its use continues rising. This provokes an increase of the interference and as consequence, congestion in the non-licensed band of 2.4GHz, caused by the increase of users in a given zone and thus, the limitation of channels offered by this band. As a solution to this problem, in this project it is studied the possibility of using additional channels from licensed bands used for other radio-communications servic...

  7. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A. L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    The 21st meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 20 to 24 April 2015 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 36 scientists from 15 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, and actions agreed by the participants, as well as recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  8. Estimation and Coordination of Sequence Patterns for Frequency Hopping Dynamic Spectrum Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Interconnection (OSI) framework model ( ISO /IEC 7498-1); however, to limit the external influences of each layer, only the Network, Link, and Physical layer are...N49 Data Throughput 700 750 800 850 900 950 1000 1050 1100 1150 −2000 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 baseline Average Drop due to Retry, 49...700 750 800 850 900 950 1000 1050 1100 1150 −2000 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 Priority-Unique Average Drop due to Retry, 49 Nodes

  9. Non-redundant functional groups of chemokines operate in a coordinate manner during the inflammatory response in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Lloyd, C; Kapsenberg, M L; Gonzalo, J A; Coyle, A J

    2000-10-01

    The understanding of the relative contribution of particular chemokines to the selective accumulation of leukocyte subsets to an organ site during an inflammatory response is made difficult by the simultaneous presence of multiple chemokines with partially overlapping functions at the inflammatory site. The study of several chemokine pathways (expression and function) during the development of a mouse model of allergic airway disease (AAD) has revealed differential expression regulation with distinct cellular sources for individual chemokines with functional bias for the recruitment/localization of regulatory and/or effector leukocyte subsets. In the present review, we propose that distinct functional groups of chemokines co-operate to generate the complete inflammatory response in the lung during AAD. We will also extend these concepts to the specific recruitment of a key cellular subset such as T helper type 2 (Th2) lymphocytes. We propose that the long term recruitment of antigen-specific Th2 cells to target organs, such as airways during chronic lung inflammation, is the result the sequential involvement of several chemotactic axes. Specifically, the CCR3/eotaxin and the CCR4/MDC pathway act in a coordinated co-operative manner, with the CCR3/eotaxin pathway being critical in the acute/early stages of a response, followed by the CCR4/MDC pathway, which ultimately dominates in the recruitment of antigen-specific Th2 cells. Other chemokines/receptors participate in this process possibly by amplifying/priming the Th2 recruitment response.

  10. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. A Systems Biology Approach to the Coordination of Defensive and Offensive Molecular Mechanisms in the Innate and Adaptive Host-Pathogen Interaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chou; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Infected zebrafish coordinates defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms in response to Candida albicans infections, and invasive C. albicans coordinates corresponding molecular mechanisms to interact with the host. However, knowledge of the ensuing infection-activated signaling networks in both host and pathogen and their interspecific crosstalk during the innate and adaptive phases of the infection processes remains incomplete. In the present study, dynamic network modeling, protein interaction databases, and dual transcriptome data from zebrafish and C. albicans during infection were used to infer infection-activated host-pathogen dynamic interaction networks. The consideration of host-pathogen dynamic interaction systems as innate and adaptive loops and subsequent comparisons of inferred innate and adaptive networks indicated previously unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways and suggested roles of immunological memory in the coordination of host defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms to achieve specific and powerful defense against pathogens. Moreover, pathogens enhance intraspecific crosstalk and abrogate host apoptosis to accommodate enhanced host defense mechanisms during the adaptive phase. Accordingly, links between physiological phenomena and changes in the coordination of defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms highlight the importance of host-pathogen molecular interaction networks, and consequent inferences of the host-pathogen relationship could be translated into biomedical applications.

  12. Tensor Networks for Lattice Gauge Theories with Continuous Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tagliacozzo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how to formulate lattice gauge theories in the tensor-network language. In this way, we obtain both a consistent-truncation scheme of the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories and a tensor-network variational ansatz for gauge-invariant states that can be used in actual numerical computations. Our construction is also applied to the simplest realization of the quantum link models or gauge magnets and provides a clear way to understand their microscopic relation with the Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theories. We also introduce a new set of gauge-invariant operators that modify continuously Rokhsar-Kivelson wave functions and can be used to extend the phase diagrams of known models. As an example, we characterize the transition between the deconfined phase of the Z_{2} lattice gauge theory and the Rokhsar-Kivelson point of the U(1 gauge magnet in 2D in terms of entanglement entropy. The topological entropy serves as an order parameter for the transition but not the Schmidt gap.

  13. Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabita, F. Robert [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-30

    In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available “unrestrained” organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

  14. Secure Group Formation Protocol for a Medical Sensor Network Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Designing security mechanisms such as privacy and access control for medical sensor networks is a challenging task; as such systems may be operated very frequently, at a quick pace, and at times in emergency situations. Understandably, clinicians hold extra unproductive tasks in low regard......, and experience from user workshops and observations of clinicians at work on a hospital ward show that if the security mechanisms are not well designed, the technology is either rejected altogether, or they are circumvented leaving the system wide open to attacks. Our work targets the problem of designing...... wireless sensors to be both secure and usable by exploring different solutions on a fully functional prototype platform. In this paper, we present an Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC) based protocol, which offers fully secure sensor set-up in a few seconds on standard (Telos) hardware. We evaluate...

  15. Secure and Efficient Key Coordination Algorithm for Line Topology Network Maintenance for Use in Maritime Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgenaidi, Walid; Newe, Thomas; O'Connell, Eoin; Toal, Daniel; Dooly, Gerard

    2016-12-21

    There has been a significant increase in the proliferation and implementation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in different disciplines, including the monitoring of maritime environments, healthcare systems, and industrial sectors. It has now become critical to address the security issues of data communication while considering sensor node constraints. There are many proposed schemes, including the scheme being proposed in this paper, to ensure that there is a high level of security in WSNs. This paper presents a symmetric security scheme for a maritime coastal environment monitoring WSN. The scheme provides security for travelling packets via individually encrypted links between authenticated neighbors, thus avoiding a reiteration of a global rekeying process. Furthermore, this scheme proposes a dynamic update key based on a trusted node configuration, called a leader node, which works as a trusted third party. The technique has been implemented in real time on a Waspmote test bed sensor platform and the results from both field testing and indoor bench testing environments are discussed in this paper.

  16. Secure and Efficient Key Coordination Algorithm for Line Topology Network Maintenance for Use in Maritime Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Elgenaidi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a significant increase in the proliferation and implementation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs in different disciplines, including the monitoring of maritime environments, healthcare systems, and industrial sectors. It has now become critical to address the security issues of data communication while considering sensor node constraints. There are many proposed schemes, including the scheme being proposed in this paper, to ensure that there is a high level of security in WSNs. This paper presents a symmetric security scheme for a maritime coastal environment monitoring WSN. The scheme provides security for travelling packets via individually encrypted links between authenticated neighbors, thus avoiding a reiteration of a global rekeying process. Furthermore, this scheme proposes a dynamic update key based on a trusted node configuration, called a leader node, which works as a trusted third party. The technique has been implemented in real time on a Waspmote test bed sensor platform and the results from both field testing and indoor bench testing environments are discussed in this paper.

  17. We Are All Here! : Multiple Groups on a Social Network Site

    OpenAIRE

    Lampinen, Airi

    2008-01-01

    Social network sites are gaining ground with a huge pace. This study takes a group perspective on the phenomenon, investigating the significance of groups on an internationally well-known social network site, Facebook. The consequences of the co-presence of multiple groups with which an individual identifies and the mechanisms that individuals use to cope with the situation are investigated. The study is positioned in the tradition of social identity approach. Special attention is allocated t...

  18. What Online Networks Offer: Online Network Compositions and Online Learning Experiences of Three Ethnic Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluijze, Susanne Elisabeth; de Haan, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074405624; Ünlüsoy, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322909309

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examines ethno-cultural diversity in youth ́s narratives regarding their online learning experiences while also investigating how these narratives can be understood from the analysis of their online network structure and composition. Based on ego-network data of 79 respondents

  19. An integrated solution for secure group communication in wide-area networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chevassut, Olivier [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsudik, Gene [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Many distributed applications require a secure reliable group communication system to provide coordination among the application components. This paper describes a secure group layer (SGL) which bundles a reliable group communication system, a group authorization and access control mechanism, and a group key agreement protocol to provide a comprehensive and practical secure group communication platform. SGL also encapsulates the standard message security services (i.e, confidentiality, authenticity and integrity). A number of challenging issues encountered in the design of SGL are brought to light and experimental results obtained with a prototype implementation are discussed.

  20. Designing networked learning for innovation in teacher learning groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Emmy; Wopereis, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    This study searches for guidelines to facilitate teacher-learning groups (TLGs) that aim to create sustainable knowledge (i.e., knowledge-creating TLGs). The ‘Dimensions of Social Learning (DSL) Framework’ is applied as a starting point to analyse the groups’ social configuration. The study explores

  1. The Effects of Social Network Centrality on Group Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    unnecessary corporate policies (Nicholson & Miljus, 1972 ), inadequate or confusing job descriptions (Good, 1988) or incompatible work demands from...producing undesirable social outputs such as inter-group conflict and stereotypes (Coser, 1956; see Pruitt & Rubin, 1986 for review; Simmel, 1955; Tajfel

  2. Group comparison of spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Montine, Thomas J; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    right insula, an area implicated in network shifting and associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease, was more highly correlated with both these networks in Parkinson's disease than in controls. In Parkinson's disease, increased correlation of the insula with the default mode network was related to lower attentional accuracy. We demonstrated that in an omnibus sense, correlations among network kernels describe biological impact of pathophysiological processes (through correlation with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers) and clinical status (by classification of patient group). At a greater level of detail, we demonstrate aberrant involvement of the insula in the default mode network and the frontal frontoparietal task control network kernel. Network kernel analysis holds promise as a sensitive method for detecting biologically and clinical relevant changes to specific networks that support cognition and are impaired in Parkinson's disease. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A Velocity-Level Bi-Criteria Optimization Scheme for Coordinated Path Tracking of Dual Robot Manipulators Using Recurrent Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Yongsheng; Liao, Bolin; Zhang, Zhijun; Ding, Lei; Jin, Long

    2017-01-01

    A dual-robot system is a robotic device composed of two robot arms. To eliminate the joint-angle drift and prevent the occurrence of high joint velocity, a velocity-level bi-criteria optimization scheme, which includes two criteria (i.e., the minimum velocity norm and the repetitive motion), is proposed and investigated for coordinated path tracking of dual robot manipulators. Specifically, to realize the coordinated path tracking of dual robot manipulators, two subschemes are first presented for the left and right robot manipulators. After that, such two subschemes are reformulated as two general quadratic programs (QPs), which can be formulated as one unified QP. A recurrent neural network (RNN) is thus presented to solve effectively the unified QP problem. At last, computer simulation results based on a dual three-link planar manipulator further validate the feasibility and the efficacy of the velocity-level optimization scheme for coordinated path tracking using the recurrent neural network.

  4. Two isostructural 3D lanthanide coordination networks (Ln = Gd(3+), Dy(3+)) with squashed cuboid-type nanoscopic cages showing significant cryogenic magnetic refrigeration and slow magnetic relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Soumava; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Adhikary, Amit; Konar, Sanjit

    2014-04-21

    Two isostructural lanthanide-based 3D coordination networks [Ln = Gd(3+) (1), Dy(3+)(2)] with densely packed distorted cuboid nanoscopic cages are reported for the first time. Magnetic characterization reveals that complex 1 shows a significant cryogenic magnetocaloric effect (-ΔSm = 44 J kg(-1) K(-1)), whereas 2 shows slow relaxation of magnetization.

  5. Social networks improve leaderless group navigation by facilitating long-distance communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai W. F. BODE, A. Jamie WOOD, Daniel W. FRANKS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Group navigation is of great importance for many animals, such as migrating flocks of birds or shoals of fish. One theory states that group membership can improve navigational accuracy compared to limited or less accurate individual navigational ability in groups without leaders (“Many-wrongs principle”. Here, we simulate leaderless group navigation that includes social connections as preferential interactions between individuals. Our results suggest that underlying social networks can reduce navigational errors of groups and increase group cohesion. We use network summary statistics, in particular network motifs, to study which characteristics of networks lead to these improvements. It is networks in which preferences between individuals are not clustered, but spread evenly across the group that are advantageous in group navigation by effectively enhancing long-distance information exchange within groups. We suggest that our work predicts a base-line for the type of social structure we might expect to find in group-living animals that navigate without leaders [Current Zoology 58 (2: 329-341, 2012].

  6. Evolution of opinions on social networks in the presence of competing committed groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jierui; Emenheiser, Jeffrey; Kirby, Matthew; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw K; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    Public opinion is often affected by the presence of committed groups of individuals dedicated to competing points of view. Using a model of pairwise social influence, we study how the presence of such groups within social networks affects the outcome and the speed of evolution of the overall opinion on the network. Earlier work indicated that a single committed group within a dense social network can cause the entire network to quickly adopt the group's opinion (in times scaling logarithmically with the network size), so long as the committed group constitutes more than about 10% of the population (with the findings being qualitatively similar for sparse networks as well). Here we study the more general case of opinion evolution when two groups committed to distinct, competing opinions A and B, and constituting fractions pA and pB of the total population respectively, are present in the network. We show for stylized social networks (including Erdös-Rényi random graphs and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks) that the phase diagram of this system in parameter space (pA,pB) consists of two regions, one where two stable steady-states coexist, and the remaining where only a single stable steady-state exists. These two regions are separated by two fold-bifurcation (spinodal) lines which meet tangentially and terminate at a cusp (critical point). We provide further insights to the phase diagram and to the nature of the underlying phase transitions by investigating the model on infinite (mean-field limit), finite complete graphs and finite sparse networks. For the latter case, we also derive the scaling exponent associated with the exponential growth of switching times as a function of the distance from the critical point.

  7. Social Network Influence on Online Behavioral Choices: Exploring Group Formation on Social Network Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, KH; Stefanone, MA; Barnett, GA

    2014-01-01

    Social media communication is characterized by reduced anonymity and off-to-online social interactions. These characteristics require scholars to revisit social influence mechanisms online. The current study builds on social influence literature to explore social network and gender effects on online behavior. Findings from a quasi-experiment suggest that both network-related variables and gender are significantly associated with online behavior. Perceived social environment, measured by perso...

  8. An investigation of interference coordination in heterogeneous network for LTE-Advanced systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. K.; Ismail, A. F.; H, Aisha-Hassan A.; Abdullah, Khaizuran; Ramli, H. A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The novel "femtocell" in Heterogeneous Network (HetNet) for LTE-Advanced (LTE-A) set-up will allow Malaysian wireless telecommunication operators (Maxis, Celcom, Digi, U-Mobile, P1, YTL and etc2.) to extend connectivity coverage where access would otherwise be limited or unavailable, particularly indoors of large building complexes. A femtocell is a small-sized cellular base station that encompasses all the functionality of a typical station. It therefore allows a simpler and self-contained deployment including private residences. For the Malaysian service providers, the main attractions of femtocell usage are the improvements to both coverage and capacity. The operators can provide a better service to end-users in turn reduce much of the agitations and complaints. There will be opportunity for new services at reduced cost. In addition, the operator not only benefits from the improved capacity and coverage but also can reduce both capital expenditure and operating expense i.e. alternative to brand new base station or macrocell installation. Interference is a key issue associated with femtocell development. There are a large number of issues associated with interference all of which need to be investigated, identified, quantified and solved. This is to ensure that the deployment of any femtocells will take place successfully. Among the most critical challenges in femtocell deployment is the interference between femtocell-to-macrocell and femtocell-to-femtocell in HetNets. In this paper, all proposed methods and algorithms will be investigated in the OFDMA femtocell system considering HetNet scenarios for LTE-A.

  9. Network Approach to Autistic Traits : Group and Subgroup Analyses of ADOS Item Scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, George M.; Montazeri, Farhad; de Bildt, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    A network conceptualization might contribute to understanding the occurrence and interacting nature of behavioral traits in the autism realm. Networks were constructed based on correlations of item scores of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule for Modules 1, 2 and 3 obtained for a group of

  10. Energy Research and Development Administration Ad Hoc Computer Networking Group: experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.

    1975-03-19

    The Ad Hoc Computer Networking Group was established to investigate the potential advantages and costs of newer forms of remote resource sharing and computer networking. The areas of research and investigation that are within the scope of the ERDA CNG are described. (GHT)

  11. Network Approach to Autistic Traits: Group and Subgroup Analyses of ADOS Item Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George M.; Montazeri, Farhad; de Bildt, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    A network conceptualization might contribute to understanding the occurrence and interacting nature of behavioral traits in the autism realm. Networks were constructed based on correlations of item scores of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule for Modules 1, 2 and 3 obtained for a group of 477 Dutch individuals with developmental disorders.…

  12. Effects of a Group Intervention on the Career Network Ties of Finnish Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokisaari, Markku; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The authors evaluated how a group-based career intervention affected career network ties among Finnish adolescents as they made educational choices and prepared for their transition to secondary education. They examined the career-related network ties of 868 students during their last year in comprehensive school (junior high school) in a…

  13. Relative stability of core groups in pollination networks in a biodiversity hotspot over four years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Fang

    Full Text Available Plants and their pollinators form pollination networks integral to the evolution and persistence of species in communities. Previous studies suggest that pollination network structure remains nested while network composition is highly dynamic. However, little is known about temporal variation in the structure and function of plant-pollinator networks, especially in species-rich communities where the strength of pollinator competition is predicted to be high. Here we quantify temporal variation of pollination networks over four consecutive years in an alpine meadow in the Hengduan Mountains biodiversity hotspot in China. We found that ranked positions and idiosyncratic temperatures of both plants and pollinators were more conservative between consecutive years than in non-consecutive years. Although network compositions exhibited high turnover, generalized core groups--decomposed by a k-core algorithm--were much more stable than peripheral groups. Given the high rate of turnover observed, we suggest that identical plants and pollinators that persist for at least two successive years sustain pollination services at the community level. Our data do not support theoretical predictions of a high proportion of specialized links within species-rich communities. Plants were relatively specialized, exhibiting less variability in pollinator composition at pollinator functional group level than at the species level. Both specialized and generalized plants experienced narrow variation in functional pollinator groups. The dynamic nature of pollination networks in the alpine meadow demonstrates the potential for networks to mitigate the effects of fluctuations in species composition in a high biodiversity area.

  14. Relative stability of core groups in pollination networks in a biodiversity hotspot over four years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiang; Huang, Shuang-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Plants and their pollinators form pollination networks integral to the evolution and persistence of species in communities. Previous studies suggest that pollination network structure remains nested while network composition is highly dynamic. However, little is known about temporal variation in the structure and function of plant-pollinator networks, especially in species-rich communities where the strength of pollinator competition is predicted to be high. Here we quantify temporal variation of pollination networks over four consecutive years in an alpine meadow in the Hengduan Mountains biodiversity hotspot in China. We found that ranked positions and idiosyncratic temperatures of both plants and pollinators were more conservative between consecutive years than in non-consecutive years. Although network compositions exhibited high turnover, generalized core groups--decomposed by a k-core algorithm--were much more stable than peripheral groups. Given the high rate of turnover observed, we suggest that identical plants and pollinators that persist for at least two successive years sustain pollination services at the community level. Our data do not support theoretical predictions of a high proportion of specialized links within species-rich communities. Plants were relatively specialized, exhibiting less variability in pollinator composition at pollinator functional group level than at the species level. Both specialized and generalized plants experienced narrow variation in functional pollinator groups. The dynamic nature of pollination networks in the alpine meadow demonstrates the potential for networks to mitigate the effects of fluctuations in species composition in a high biodiversity area.

  15. Network evaluation: principles, structures and outcomes of the German working group of Health Promoting Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Christiane; Milz, Simone; Meier, Sabine

    2010-03-01

    With more than 60 participating universities, the German working group of Health Promoting Universities (German HPU network) is the largest and most active network of universities as healthy settings. This study aims at evaluating processes and effects of the German HPU network and at supporting the future development of the network. The evaluation was based on the multi faceted network assessment instrument developed by Broesskamp-Stone (7). We used a document analysis, two expert interviews and a survey among members (n = 33) to collect relevant data for the assessment. The analysis showed that the visions of the network can be regarded as fulfilled in most aspects. The members of the network received network support through trustful and mutual relationships. The network ranked high on general network principles like implementation of mutual relationships, sharing of information, risks and resources, equal access to resources, responsibility and consensus orientation. However, a high degree of centralization was found as a negative indicator. Other critical aspects of the network's structures and processes have been the regional predominance of universities from the northern and middle part of Germany, the low representation of students in the network, and the low proportion of members that could successfully implement health promotion into the guiding principles of their university. Overall, the evaluation has shown that the network has worked effectively, has developed meaningful processes and structures and has formulated practical guidelines. Since its 12 years of existence the German HPU network has been able to adapt and to adequately respond to changing contextual conditions regarding health promotion at universities in Germany. The network should develop strategies to counteract the critical aspects and detected imbalances in order to further increase its impact on universities as healthy settings.

  16. International Assistance for Low-Emission Development Planning: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Inventory of Activities and Tools--Preliminary Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, S.; Benioff, R.

    2011-05-01

    The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) is a voluntary network of international practitioners supporting low-emission planning in developing countries. The network seeks to improve quality of support through sharing project information, tools, best practices and lessons, and by fostering harmonized assistance. CLEAN has developed an inventory to track and analyze international technical support and tools for low-carbon planning activities in developing countries. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the inventory to help identify trends in assistance activities and tools available to support developing countries with low-emission planning.

  17. New sugar-based gelators with an amino group, the gelatin ability of which is remarkably reinforced by the hydrogen bond and the metal coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amanokura, Natsuki; Kanekiyo, Yasumasa; Shinkai, Seiji; Reinhoudt, David

    1999-01-01

    Three sugar-integrated gelators bearing a p-aminophenyl group which are expected to exert a hydrogen-bonding effect and a metal coordination effect on the gelation ability were synthesised. -D-Galactose-based 2b was only soluble or precipitated and -D-glucose-based 4b gelated only two of 15 solvents

  18. Multiple-membership multiple-classification models for social network and group dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranmer, Mark; Steel, David; Browne, William J

    2014-02-01

    The social network literature on network dependences has largely ignored other sources of dependence, such as the school that a student attends, or the area in which an individual lives. The multilevel modelling literature on school and area dependences has, in turn, largely ignored social networks. To bridge this divide, a multiple-membership multiple-classification modelling approach for jointly investigating social network and group dependences is presented. This allows social network and group dependences on individual responses to be investigated and compared. The approach is used to analyse a subsample of the Adolescent Health Study data set from the USA, where the response variable of interest is individual level educational attainment, and the three individual level covariates are sex, ethnic group and age. Individual, network, school and area dependences are accounted for in the analysis. The network dependences can be accounted for by including the network as a classification in the model, using various network configurations, such as ego-nets and cliques. The results suggest that ignoring the network affects the estimates of variation for the classifications that are included in the random part of the model (school, area and individual), as well as having some influence on the point estimates and standard errors of the estimates of regression coefficients for covariates in the fixed part of the model. From a substantive perspective, this approach provides a flexible and practical way of investigating variation in an individual level response due to social network dependences, and estimating the share of variation of an individual response for network, school and area classifications.

  19. [Report of the third meeting of the coordinators of the regional MRP networks in Germany on 15 and 16 December 2011 at the Robert Koch Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, M

    2012-11-01

    Since 2004 the Robert Koch-Institute has supported the formation of regional networks for prevention of the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant pathogens (MRSA/MRP, EpiBull 5/2005)). The third meeting of the coordinators of the regional MRP networks in Germany took place on 15 and 16 December 2011. A total of 60 representatives of the Public Health Services from 12 states participated. It must be emphasized that in the meantime many successfully established networks are active and not all coordinators of existing networks could participate merely due to the organizational format. Interested parties can obtain a good overview via a link to the corresponding internet homepage of each state under http://www.rki.de → Infektionsschutz → Krankenhaushygiene → Regionale Netzwerke. In summary it was clear that the number and the activity of regional MRP networks in Germany have further increased. The networks can synergistically benefit from important experiences through the different individual focal points of each network and a corresponding exchange of ideas.

  20. Genetic Networks Required to Coordinate Chromosome Replication by DNA Polymerases α, δ, and ε in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubarry, Marion; Lawless, Conor; Banks, A Peter; Cockell, Simon; Lydall, David

    2015-08-21

    Three major DNA polymerases replicate the linear eukaryotic chromosomes. DNA polymerase α-primase (Pol α) and DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) replicate the lagging-strand and Pol α and DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) the leading-strand. To identify factors affecting coordination of DNA replication, we have performed genome-wide quantitative fitness analyses of budding yeast cells containing defective polymerases. We combined temperature-sensitive mutations affecting the three replicative polymerases, Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε with genome-wide collections of null and reduced function mutations. We identify large numbers of genetic interactions that inform about the roles that specific genes play to help Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε function. Surprisingly, the overlap between the genetic networks affecting the three DNA polymerases does not represent the majority of the genetic interactions identified. Instead our data support a model for division of labor between the different DNA polymerases during DNA replication. For example, our genetic interaction data are consistent with biochemical data showing that Pol ε is more important to the Pre-Loading complex than either Pol α or Pol δ. We also observed distinct patterns of genetic interactions between leading- and lagging-strand DNA polymerases, with particular genes being important for coupling proliferating cell nuclear antigen loading/unloading (Ctf18, Elg1) with nucleosome assembly (chromatin assembly factor 1, histone regulatory HIR complex). Overall our data reveal specialized genetic networks that affect different aspects of leading- and lagging-strand DNA replication. To help others to engage with these data we have generated two novel, interactive visualization tools, DIXY and Profilyzer. Copyright © 2015 Dubarry et al.

  1. Patient informed governance of distributed research networks: results and discussion from six patient focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Laura A; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Kim, Katherine K

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how to govern emerging distributed research networks is essential to their success. Distributed research networks aggregate patient medical data from many institutions leaving data within the local provider security system. While much is known about patients' views on secondary medical research, little is known about their views on governance of research networks. We conducted six focus groups with patients from three medical centers across the U.S. to understand their perspectives on privacy, consent, and ethical concerns of sharing their data as part of research networks. Participants positively endorsed sharing their health data with these networks believing that doing so could advance healthcare knowledge. However, patients expressed several concerns regarding security and broader ethical issues such as commercialism, public benefit, and social responsibility. We suggest that network governance guidelines move beyond strict technical requirements and address wider socio-ethical concerns by fully including patients in governance processes.

  2. Reassessing supplier reputation in international trade coordination – a German and Australian perspective of global organic food networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernzen, Amelie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainties are especially high among importing firms and for products with sensitive and ‘critical’ quality characteristics in a societal context, such as food. While much recent literature on this issue has focused on the implementation of standards and certification systems, I argue that reputation also plays an important role for trading firms in mitigating uncertainties across large distances. Reputation may or may not reflect reality and is based on public (e.g. media and networked (from individuals information. This article draws on Convention Theory in a case study based on qualitative interviews among organic food importers to Germany and Australia. I first show that the degree of their public exposure implies specific risks and strongly influences importers’ coordination strategy. I then go on to examine how, in these firms’ supplier relations and risk management, not only the reputation of (potential suppliers counts, but also the reputation of supplier countries and institutional systems such as standards and certification bodies. Intensive involvement and first-hand experience with certifiers and suppliers in exporting countries can, in some cases, cause firms to challenge their existing beliefs. I conclude that a good reputation is still essential for (improving market access, even when basic prerequisites such as legally mandatory certification are fulfilled.

  3. Connectome-scale group-wise consistent resting-state network analysis in autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the organizational architecture of human brain function and its alteration patterns in diseased brains such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD patients are of great interests. In-vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI offers a unique window to investigate the mechanism of brain function and to identify functional network components of the human brain. Previously, we have shown that multiple concurrent functional networks can be derived from fMRI signals using whole-brain sparse representation. Yet it is still an open question to derive group-wise consistent networks featured in ASD patients and controls. Here we proposed an effective volumetric network descriptor, named connectivity map, to compactly describe spatial patterns of brain network maps and implemented a fast framework in Apache Spark environment that can effectively identify group-wise consistent networks in big fMRI dataset. Our experiment results identified 144 group-wisely common intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs shared between ASD patients and healthy control subjects, where some ICNs are substantially different between the two groups. Moreover, further analysis on the functional connectivity and spatial overlap between these 144 common ICNs reveals connectomics signatures characterizing ASD patients and controls. In particular, the computing time of our Spark-enabled functional connectomics framework is significantly reduced from 240 hours (C++ code, single core to 20 hours, exhibiting a great potential to handle fMRI big data in the future.

  4. Four Novel Zn (II Coordination Polymers Based on 4′-Ferrocenyl-3,2′:6′,3′′-Terpyridine: Engineering a Switch from 1D Helical Polymer Chain to 2D Network by Coordination Anion Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufei Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Four novel ZnII coordination polymers, [(ZnCl22(L2]n (1, [(ZnBr22(L2]n (2, and [(ZnI22(L2]n (3 and {[Zn(SCN2]1.5(L3}n (4, have been synthesized based on 4′-ferrocenyl-3,2′:6′,3′′-terpyridine with ZnII ions and different coordination anions under similar ambient conditions. Their structures have been confirmed using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, showing that complexes 1–3 are one-dimensional (1D double-stranded metal ion helical polymer chains and complex 4 is of a two-dimensional (2D network. The structural transformations of them from a 1D polymer chain to a 2D network under the influence of the coordination anions has been systematic investigated. Furthermore, the optical band gaps have been measured by optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, revealing that the ligand and the complexes should have semiconductor properties.

  5. Context-based user grouping for multi-casting in heterogeneous radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannweiler, C.; Klein, A.; Schneider, J.; Schotten, H. D.

    2011-08-01

    Along with the rise of sophisticated smartphones and smart spaces, the availability of both static and dynamic context information has steadily been increasing in recent years. Due to the popularity of social networks, these data are complemented by profile information about individual users. Making use of this information by classifying users in wireless networks enables targeted content and advertisement delivery as well as optimizing network resources, in particular bandwidth utilization, by facilitating group-based multi-casting. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a web service for advanced user classification based on user, network, and environmental context information. The service employs simple and advanced clustering algorithms for forming classes of users. Available service functionalities include group formation, context-aware adaptation, and deletion as well as the exposure of group characteristics. Moreover, the results of a performance evaluation, where the service has been integrated in a simulator modeling user behavior in heterogeneous wireless systems, are presented.

  6. Group-based strategy diffusion in multiplex networks with weighted values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianyong; Jiang, J. C.; Xiang, Leijun

    2017-03-01

    The information diffusion of multiplex social networks has received increasing interests in recent years. Actually, the multiplex networks are made of many communities, and it should be gotten more attention for the influences of community level diffusion, besides of individual level interactions. In view of this, this work explores strategy interactions and diffusion processes in multiplex networks with weighted values from a new perspective. Two different groups consisting of some agents with different influential strength are firstly built in each layer network, the authority and non-authority groups. The strategy interactions between different groups in intralayer and interlayer networks are performed to explore community level diffusion, by playing two classical strategy games, Prisoner's Dilemma and Snowdrift Game. The impact forces from the different groups and the reactive forces from individual agents are simultaneously taken into account in intralayer and interlayer interactions. This paper reveals and explains the evolutions of cooperation diffusion and the influences of interlayer interaction tight degrees in multiplex networks with weighted values. Some thresholds of critical parameters of interaction degrees and games parameters settings are also discussed in group-based strategy diffusion.

  7. Alignment of global supply networks based on strategic groups of supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos G. Moraitakis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: From a supply chain perspective, often big differences exist between global raw material suppliers’ approaches to supply their respective local markets. The progressing complexity of large centrally managed global supply networks and their often-unknown upstream ramifications increase the likelihood of undetected bottlenecks and inefficiencies. It is therefore necessary to develop an approach to strategically master the upstream complexity of such networks from a holistic supply chain perspective in order to align regional competitive priorities and supply chain structures. The objective of this research is hence to develop an approach for the supply-chain-based alignment of complex global supply networks. Method: We review existing literature from the fields of supply chain and network management, strategic sourcing, and strategic management. Based on the literature review and theoretical and practical considerations we deduce a conceptual approach to consider upstream supply chain structures in supply network alignment initiatives. Results: On the basis of these considerations and current empirical literature we transfer strategic group theory to the supply network management context. The proposed approach introduces strategic groups of supply chains as a segmentation criterion for complex global supply networks which enables the network-wide alignment of competitive priorities. Conclusion: Supply-chain-based segmentation of global supply network structures can effectively reduce the complexity, firms face when aiming to strategically align their supply chains on a holistic level. The results of this research are applicable for certain types of global supply networks and can be used for network alignment and strategy development. The approach can furthermore generate insights useable for negotiation support with suppliers.

  8. Fe-TPP coordination network with metalloporphyrinic neutral radicals and face-to-face and edge-to-face π-π stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo-Marijuan, Arkaitz; Barandika, Gotzone; Bazán, Begoña; Urtiaga, Miren Karmele; Lezama, Luis; Arriortua, María Isabel

    2013-07-15

    Compound ([FeTPPbipy](•))n (TPP = meso-tetraphenylporphyrin and bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine) is the first example of a Fe-TPP-bipy coordination network, and it consists of 1D polymers packed through face-to-face and edge-to-face π-π interactions. The compound has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, IR, Mössbauer, UV-visible, and EPR spectroscopies, thermogravimetry, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and quantum-mechanical density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations. The chemical formula for this compound can be confusing because it is compatible with Fe(II) and TPP(2-) anions. However, the spectroscopic and magnetic properties of this compound are consistent with the presence of low-spin Fe(III) ions and [FeTPPbipy](•) neutral radicals. These radicals are proposed to be formed by the reduction of metalloporphyrin, and the quantum-mechanical calculations are consistent with the fact that the acquired electrons are located on the phenyl groups of TPP.

  9. Group 10 Metal Benzene-1,2-dithiolate Derivatives in the Synthesis of Coordination Polymers Containing Potassium Countercations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Oscar; Delgado, Esther; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Hernández, Diego; Hernández, Elisa; Martín, Avelino; Martínez, José I; Zamora, Félix

    2017-10-02

    The use of theoretical calculations has allowed us to predict the coordination behavior of dithiolene [M(SC6H4S)2]2- (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) entities, giving rise to the first organometallic polymers {[K2(μ-H2O)2][Ni(SC6H4S)2]}n and {[K2(μ-H2O)2(thf)]2[K2(μ-H2O)2(thf)2][Pd3(SC6H4S)6]}n by one-pot reactions of the corresponding d10 metal salts, 1,2-benzenedithiolene, and KOH. The polymers are based on σ,π interactions between potassium atoms and [M(SC6H4S)2]2- (M = Ni, Pd) entities. In contrast, only σ interactions are observed when the analogous platinum derivative is used instead, yielding the coordination polymer {[K2(μ-thf)2][Pt(SC6H4S)2]}n.

  10. On cooperative and efficient overlay network evolution based on a group selection pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Akihiro; Wang, Yufeng

    2010-04-01

    In overlay networks, the interplay between network structure and dynamics remains largely unexplored. In this paper, we study dynamic coevolution between individual rational strategies (cooperative or defect) and the overlay network structure, that is, the interaction between peer's local rational behaviors and the emergence of the whole network structure. We propose an evolutionary game theory (EGT)-based overlay topology evolution scheme to drive a given overlay into the small-world structure (high global network efficiency and average clustering coefficient). Our contributions are the following threefold: From the viewpoint of peers' local interactions, we explicitly consider the peer's rational behavior and introduce a link-formation game to characterize the social dilemma of forming links in an overlay network. Furthermore, in the evolutionary link-formation phase, we adopt a simple economic process: Each peer keeps one link to a cooperative neighbor in its neighborhood, which can slightly speed up the convergence of cooperation and increase network efficiency; from the viewpoint of the whole network structure, our simulation results show that the EGT-based scheme can drive an arbitrary overlay network into a fully cooperative and efficient small-world structure. Moreover, we compare our scheme with a search-based economic model of network formation and illustrate that our scheme can achieve the experimental and analytical results in the latter model. In addition, we also graphically illustrate the final overlay network structure; finally, based on the group selection model and evolutionary set theory, we theoretically obtain the approximate threshold of cost and draw the conclusion that the small value of the average degree and the large number of the total peers in an overlay network facilitate the evolution of cooperation.

  11. Transformational leadership and group interaction as climate antecedents: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Dov; Tenne-Gazit, Orly

    2008-07-01

    In order to test the social mechanisms through which organizational climate emerges, this article introduces a model that combines transformational leadership and social interaction as antecedents of climate strength (i.e., the degree of within-unit agreement about climate perceptions). Despite their longstanding status as primary variables, both antecedents have received limited empirical research. The sample consisted of 45 platoons of infantry soldiers from 5 different brigades, using safety climate as the exemplar. Results indicate a partially mediated model between transformational leadership and climate strength, with density of group communication network as the mediating variable. In addition, the results showed independent effects for group centralization of the communication and friendship networks, which exerted incremental effects on climate strength over transformational leadership. Whereas centralization of the communication network was found to be negatively related to climate strength, centralization of the friendship network was positively related to it. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  12. Multi-Service Group Key Management for High Speed Wireless Mobile Multicast Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trust T. Mapoka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently there is a high demand from the Internet Service Providers to transmit multimedia services over high speed wireless networks. These networks are characterized by high mobility receivers which perform frequent handoffs across homogenous and heterogeneous access networks while maintaining seamless connectivity to the multimedia services. In order to ensure secure delivery of multimedia services to legitimate group members, the conventional cluster based group key management (GKM schemes for securing group communication over wireless mobile multicast networks have been proposed. However, they lack efficiency in rekeying the group key in the presence of high mobility users which concurrently subscribe to multiple multicast services that co-exist in the same network. This paper proposes an efficient multi-service group key management scheme (SMGKM suitable for high mobility users which perform frequent handoffs while participating seamlessly in multiple multicast services. The users are expected to drop subscriptions after multiple cluster visits hence inducing huge key management overhead due to rekeying the previously visited cluster keys. The already proposed multi-service SMGKM system with completely decentralised authentication and key management functions is adopted to meet the demands for high mobility environment with the same level of security. Through comparisons with existing GKM schemes and simulations, SMGKM shows resource economy in terms of reduced communication and less storage overheads in a high speed environment with multiple visits.

  13. Alkali metal cation (K+, Cs+) induced dissolution/reorganization of porous metal carboxylate coordination networks in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Yun; Ding, Miao-Tzu; Wen, Yuh-Sheng; Liu, Yen-Hsiang; Lu, Kuang-Lieh

    2009-01-01

    Porous metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) {A(2)[M(3)(btec)(2)(H(2)O)(4)]}(n) (1, A=K, M=Co; 2, A=K, M=Ni; 3, A=Cs, M=Co; and 4, A=Cs, M=Ni; btec=benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylate) with nearly identical structural features were hydrothermally prepared. These compounds adopt (4,8)-connected scu nets but exhibit subtle differences in the topology of the final three-dimensional architectures. Compound 1 has a regular net with the largest solvent void (21.1 %), while the nets of the other three (2-4) are slightly distorted from a regular shape and have malformed pores with smaller solvent voids (5.4-11.4 %). Likely, the different supramolecular environments among 1-4 subtly depend on the eight-connected binodal cubical vertices/four-connected square-planar connectivity between the trimetallic clusters and the btec ligands. Cobalt species 3 dissolved in an aqueous solution of KCl, and then reorganized to form 1 at ambient temperature. Interestingly, under similar conditions, 1 dissolved and then was regenerated to give the same structure. Nickel species 2 and 4 also underwent a dissolution/reorganization process in an aqueous solution of KCl to afford new metal-carboxylate product {K(2)[Ni(3)(btec)(2)(H(2)O)(4)]}(n) (2'). This compound forms a (4,8)-connected scu net with regular pores, which is isostructural and isomorphous with 1, and is a supramolecular isomer of 2. Similarly, in an aqueous solution of CsCl, 1-4 were converted to 1D zigzag chain structures {Cs(2)[M(btec)(H(2)O)(4)]}(n) (5, M=Co; 6, M=Ni) that enlarged to hydrogen-bonded 3D porous supramolecular networks. Remarkable, reversible alkali metal cation induced structural transformations between 1 and 5 occurred via dissolution/reorganization processes. Thermogravimetric analyses showed that these metal-carboxylate species have high thermal stability (T>300 degrees C).

  14. Transcriptional interference networks coordinate the expression of functionally-related genes clustered in the same genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt eBoldogkoi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is essential for normal functioning of biological systems in every form of life. Gene expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcription, especially at the phase of initiation. Non-coding RNAs are one of the major players at every level of genetic regulation, including the control of chromatin organisation, transcription, various post-transcriptional processes and translation. In this study, the Transcriptional Interference Network (TIN hypothesis was put forward in an attempt to explain the global expression of antisense RNAs and the overall occurrence of tandem gene clusters in the genomes of various biological systems ranging from viruses to mammalian cells. The TIN hypothesis suggests the existence of a novel layer of genetic regulation, based on the interactions between the transcriptional machineries of neighbouring genes at their overlapping regions, which are assumed to play a fundamental role in coordinating gene expression within a cluster of functionally-linked genes. It is claimed that the transcriptional overlaps between adjacent genes are much more widespread in genomes than is thought today. The Waterfall model of the TIN hypothesis postulates a unidirectional effect of upstream genes on the transcription of downstream genes within a cluster of tandemly-arrayed genes, while the Seesaw model proposes a mutual interdependence of gene expression between the oppositely-oriented genes. The TIN represents an auto-regulatory system with an exquisitely timed and highly synchronised cascade of gene expression in functionally-linked genes located in close physical proximity to each other. In this study, we focused on herpesviruses. The reason for this lies in the compressed nature of viral genes, which allows a tight regulation and an easier investigation of the transcriptional interactions between genes. However, I believe that the same or similar principles can be applied to cellular

  15. A coordinate-invariant model for deforming geodetic networks: understanding rank deficiencies, non-estimability of parameters, and the effect of the choice of minimal constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzinikos, Miltiadis; Dermanis, Athanasios

    2017-04-01

    By considering a deformable geodetic network, deforming in a linear-in-time mode, according to a coordinate-invariant model, it becomes possible to get an insight into the rank deficiency of the stacking procedure, which is the standard method for estimating initial station coordinates and constant velocities, from coordinate time series. Comparing any two out of the infinitely many least squares estimates of stacking unknowns (initial station coordinates, velocity components and transformation parameters for the reference system in each data epoch), it is proven that the two solutions differ only by a linear-in-time trend in the transformation parameters. These pass over to the initial coordinates (the constant term) and to the velocity estimates (the time coefficient part). While the difference in initial coordinates is equivalent to a change of the reference system at the initial epoch, the differences in velocity components do not comply with those predicted by the same change of reference system for all epochs. Consequently, the different velocity component estimates, obtained by introducing different sets of minimal constraints, correspond to physically different station velocities, which are therefore non-estimable quantities. The theoretical findings are numerically verified for a global, a regional and a local network, by obtaining solutions based on four different types of minimal constraints, three usual algebraic ones (inner or partial inner) and the lately introduced kinematic constraints. Finally, by resorting to the basic ideas of Felix Tisserand, it is explained why the station velocities are non-estimable quantities in a very natural way. The problem of the optimal choice of minimal constraints and, hence, of the corresponding spatio-temporal reference system is shortly discussed.

  16. Emergent leadership structures in informal groups: A dynamic, cognitively informed network model

    OpenAIRE

    Carnabuci, Gianluca; Emery, Cecile; Brinberg, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper advances novel theory and evidence on the emergence of informal leadership networks in groups that feature no formally designated leaders or authority hierarchies. Integrating insights from relational schema and network theory, we develop and empirically test a 3-step process model. The model’s first hypothesis is that people use a “linear-ordering schema” to process information about leadership relations. Taking this hypothesis as a premise, the second hypothesis argues that whene...

  17. Educational network comparative analysis of small groups: Short- and long-term communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, D. B.; Zvereva, O. M.; Nazarova, Yu. Yu.; Chepurov, E. G.; Kokovin, A. V.; Ranyuk, S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The present study is devoted to the discussion of small group communication network structures. These communications were observed in student groups, where actors were united with a regular educational activity. The comparative analysis was carried out for networks of short-term (1 hour) and long-term (4 weeks) communications, it was based on seven structural parameters, and consisted of two stages. At the first stage, differences between the network graphs were examined, and the random corresponding Bernoulli graphs were built. At the second stage, revealed differences were compared. Calculations were performed using UCINET software framework. It was found out that networks of long-term and short-term communications are quite different: the structure of a short-term communication network is close to a random one, whereas the most of long-term communication network parameters differ from the corresponding random ones by more than 30%. This difference can be explained by strong "noisiness" of a short-term communication network, and the lack of social in it.

  18. Heuristic Scheme for Home Circuit Grouping andWavelength Assignment in LOBS-HC Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ximin; Yi, Bo; Tang, Wan; Li, Jingcong

    2014-09-01

    Grouping the Home Circuits (HCs) with the same source is a critical issue of Labeled Optical Burst Switching with Home Circuit (LOBS-HC). To maximize the wavelength utilization in LOBS-HC ring networks, an HC grouping and wavelength assignment scheme, called Longest Path Matching and Graph Coloring (LPMGC), is proposed. LPMGC consists of two phases: grouping and wavelength assignment. First, a heuristic algorithm, named Longest Path Matching (LPM), is proposed to group the HCs according to the longest common path matching between HCs and to make each group as large as possible. And then, Graph Coloring (GC) is introduced to assign wavelengths for HC groups. The numerical results show that the proposed scheme performances better than Complementary HC Assignment (CHA) and some other heuristics in both unidirectional and bidirectional LOBS-HC ring networks in terms of wavelength utilization.

  19. Data base on physical observations of near-Earth asteroids and establishment of a network to coordinate observations of newly discovered near-Earth asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Campins, H.

    1990-01-01

    This program consists of two tasks: (1) development of a data base of physical observations of near-earth asteroids and establishment of a network to coordinate observations of newly discovered earth-approaching asteroids; and (2) a simulation of the surface of low-activity comets. Significant progress was made on task one and, and task two was completed during the period covered by this progress report.

  20. Reliability of functioning and reserves of system, controlling movements with different coordination structure of special health group girl students in physical education process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryimakov A.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study reliability of functioning and reserves of system, controlling movements with different coordination structure of special health group girl students (low health level in physical education process. Material: in the research special health group girl students (n=136, age 17-19 participated. They were divided into 2 groups - control and experimental. The program, directed to increase reliability and reserves of system controlling movements, was realized. It was based on physical exercises of complicated coordination with novelty elements, which were fulfilled under musical accompaniment. The research continued one academic year. Results: in girl students with health problems we registered higher differential thresholds, when reproducing local movements in complicated conditions. They used visual and hearing feedback channels for informing brain’s programming areas about made mistakes. They were worse teachable in training accurate movements. These girl students have less expressed compensation reserves under impact of hindering factors and interferences. It can be interpreted as non-specific crisscross negative response to motor functional system in case of health problems. All these determine reduction of reserve potentials of motor control system. Conclusions: The main reserve potentials’ criteria of control over different coordination structure movements are: quickness of passing to program mechanism of fine movements’ regulation in stable conditions of functioning; power and effectiveness of compensatory reactions, ensuring interference immunity of system, controlling movements under interfering factors; reliability of maintaining movements’ qualitative parameters in optimal range under interfering factors; reduction of sensor interconnections in stable functioning conditions.

  1. Exploratory Case Studies of the Role of the Community School Coordinator: Developing the School Social Network in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Verna Dean

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory case study examines the role of the community school coordinator (CSC) in the community school model in two urban elementary schools. It seeks to understand how the role and responsibilities of a community school coordinator supports fostering relationships with parents, teachers, students and the community (i.e. building the…

  2. Two-round contributory group key exchange protocol for wireless network environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tsu-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the popularity of group-oriented applications, secure group communication has recently received much attention from cryptographic researchers. A group key exchange (GKE protocol allows that participants cooperatively establish a group key that is used to encrypt and decrypt transmitted messages. Hence, GKE protocols can be used to provide secure group communication over a public network channel. However, most of the previously proposed GKE protocols deployed in wired networks are not fully suitable for wireless network environments with low-power computing devices. Subsequently, several GKE protocols suitable for mobile or wireless networks have been proposed. In this article, we will propose a more efficient group key exchange protocol with dynamic joining and leaving. Under the decision Diffie-Hellman (DDH, the computation Diffie-Hellman (CDH, and the hash function assumptions, we demonstrate that the proposed protocol is secure against passive attack and provides forward/backward secrecy for dynamic member joining/leaving. As compared with the recently proposed GKE protocols, our protocol provides better performance in terms of computational cost, round number, and communication cost.

  3. Time development in the early history of social networks: link stabilization, group dynamics, and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian G

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the time development of empirical networks usually investigate late stages where lasting connections have already stabilized. Empirical data on early network history are rare but needed for a better understanding of how social network topology develops in real life. Studying students who are beginning their studies at a university with no or few prior connections to each other offers a unique opportunity to investigate the formation and early development of link patterns and community structure in social networks. During a nine week introductory physics course, first year physics students were asked to identify those with whom they communicated about problem solving in physics during the preceding week. We use these students' self reports to produce time dependent student interaction networks. We investigate these networks to elucidate possible effects of different student attributes in early network formation. Changes in the weekly number of links show that while roughly half of all links change from week to week, students also reestablish a growing number of links as they progress through their first weeks of study. Using the Infomap community detection algorithm, we show that the networks exhibit community structure, and we use non-network student attributes, such as gender and end-of-course grade to characterize communities during their formation. Specifically, we develop a segregation measure and show that students structure themselves according to gender and pre-organized sections (in which students engage in problem solving and laboratory work), but not according to end-of-coure grade. Alluvial diagrams of consecutive weeks' communities show that while student movement between groups are erratic in the beginning of their studies, they stabilize somewhat towards the end of the course. Taken together, the analyses imply that student interaction networks stabilize quickly and that students establish collaborations based on who is immediately

  4. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  5. Modeling the Role of Networks and Individual Differences in Inter-Group Violence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Isakov

    Full Text Available There is significant heterogeneity within and between populations in their propensity to engage in conflict. Most research has neglected the role of within-group effects in social networks in contributing to between-group violence and focused instead on the precursors and consequences of violence, or on the role of between-group ties. Here, we explore the role of individual variation and of network structure within a population in promoting and inhibiting group violence towards other populations. Motivated by ethnographic observations of collective behavior in a small-scale society, we describe a model with differentiated roles for individuals embedded within friendship networks. Using a simple model based on voting-like dynamics, we explore several strategies for influencing group-level behavior. When we consider changing population level attitude changes and introducing control nodes separately, we find that a particularly effective control strategy relies on exploiting network degree. We also suggest refinements to our model such as tracking fine-grained information spread dynamics that can lead to further enrichment in using evolutionary game theory models for sociological phenomena.

  6. The Global Oscillation Network Group site survey. 1: Data collection and analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Frank; Fischer, George; Grier, Jennifer; Leibacher, John W.; Jones, Harrison B.; Jones, Patricia P.; Kupke, Renate; Stebbins, Robin T.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Project is planning to place a set of instruments around the world to observe solar oscillations as continuously as possible for at least three years. The Project has now chosen the sites that will comprise the network. This paper describes the methods of data collection and analysis that were used to make this decision. Solar irradiance data were collected with a one-minute cadence at fifteen sites around the world and analyzed to produce statistics of cloud cover, atmospheric extinction, and transparency power spectra at the individual sites. Nearly 200 reasonable six-site networks were assembled from the individual stations, and a set of statistical measures of the performance of the networks was analyzed using a principal component analysis. An accompanying paper presents the results of the survey.

  7. Understanding Online Health Groups for Depression: Social Network and Linguistic Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronghua; Zhang, Qingpeng

    2016-03-10

    Mental health problems have become increasingly prevalent in the past decade. With the advance of Web 2.0 technologies, social media present a novel platform for Web users to form online health groups. Members of online health groups discuss health-related issues and mutually help one another by anonymously revealing their mental conditions, sharing personal experiences, exchanging health information, and providing suggestions and support. The conversations in online health groups contain valuable information to facilitate the understanding of their mutual help behaviors and their mental health problems. We aimed to characterize the conversations in a major online health group for major depressive disorder (MDD) patients in a popular Chinese social media platform. In particular, we intended to explain how Web users discuss depression-related issues from the perspective of the social networks and linguistic patterns revealed by the members' conversations. Social network analysis and linguistic analysis were employed to characterize the social structure and linguistic patterns, respectively. Furthermore, we integrated both perspectives to exploit the hidden relations between them. We found an intensive use of self-focus words and negative affect words. In general, group members used a higher proportion of negative affect words than positive affect words. The social network of the MDD group for depression possessed small-world and scale-free properties, with a much higher reciprocity ratio and clustering coefficient value as compared to the networks of other social media platforms and classic network models. We observed a number of interesting relationships, either strong correlations or convergent trends, between the topological properties and linguistic properties of the MDD group members. (1) The MDD group members have the characteristics of self-preoccupation and negative thought content, according to Beck's cognitive theory of depression; (2) the social structure

  8. Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP) as group therapy for children living with motor coordination difficulties: An integrated literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Leanne; Wilson, Jessie; Williams, Gary

    2017-04-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) demonstrate limited participation in daily occupations which negatively impacts their physical and psycho-social wellbeing. The CO-OP approach is strongly supported within the literature as an effective treatment for DCD when delivered as a one-on-one therapy. Group interventions have proven to be effective in increasing self-esteem, decreasing feelings of isolation and are a cost effective way of delivering therapy. The purpose of this review was to explore the evidence for the use of the CO-OP approach in a group format for children with motor coordination difficulties. Searches of CINAHL, MEDLINE, Scopus, Proquest, PsycINFO, ERIC and OTDBase, were conducted from 2000 through until September 30, 2015. Articles included were in English, peer reviewed articles, followed principals of CO-OP and were delivered through a group therapy approach. All articles were critically reviewed and thematically analysed. 192 studies were retrieved with a final number of six articles included in the review. Six themes were highlighted: achieving a new level of perceived competence; feeling a sense of belonging; children learning how the condition affected them and strategies to overcome these challenges; careful formation of intervention groups; the value of following the CO-OP protocols; and the significance of parental involvement. The findings of this review suggest that the CO-OP approach, when administered in a group format, has the potential to benefit children living with motor coordination difficulties in both physical and psycho-social domains. More research is required to confirm these findings and contribute to evidence-based practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  9. The role of bridging organizations in environmental management: examining social networks in working groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Kowalski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The linkage of diverse sets of actors and knowledge systems across management levels and institutional boundaries often poses one of the greatest challenges in adaptive management of natural resources. Bridging organizations can facilitate interactions among actors in management settings by lowering the transaction costs of collaboration. The Center for Ocean Solutions (COS is an example of a bridging organization that is focused on linking actors within the ocean sciences and governance arena through the use of working groups. This research examines how network connections between group members affect working group functionality and, more specifically, whether cohesive network structures allow groups to more effectively achieve their goals and objectives. A mixed-methods approach, incorporating both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis methods, is employed to understand the structural characteristics of COS working groups. The study finds that cohesive network structures are not associated with increased working group functionality. Strong, centralized leadership is a better predictor of working group success in achieving goals and objectives.

  10. Asynchronous Group Key Distribution on top of the CC2420 Security Mechanisms for Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg

    2009-01-01

    scheme with no time synchronization requirements. The scheme decreases the number of key updates by providing them on an as needed basis according to the amount of network traffic. We evaluate the CC2420 radio security mechanism and show how to use it as a basis to implement secure group communication......A sensor network is a network consisting of small, inexpensive, low-powered sensor nodes that communicate to complete a common task. Sensor nodes are characterized by having limited communication and computation capabilities, energy, and storage. They often are deployed in hostile environments...... creating a demand for encryption and authentication of the messages sent between them. Due to severe resource constraints on the sensor nodes, efficient key distribution schemes and secure communication protocols with low overhead are desired. In this paper we present an asynchronous group key distribution...

  11. Default-Mode Network Activity Identified by Group Independent Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Conghui; Zhuang, Jie; Peng, Danling; Yu, Guoliang; Yang, Yanhui

    Default-mode network activity refers to some regional increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during baseline than cognitive tasks. Recent functional imaging studies have found co-activation in a distributed network of cortical regions, including ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PPC) that characterize the default mode of human brain. In this study, general linear model and group independent component analysis (ICA) were utilized to analyze the fMRI data obtained from two language tasks. Both methods yielded similar, but not identical results and detected a resting deactivation network at some midline regions including anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Particularly, the group ICA method segregated functional elements into two separate maps and identified ventral cingulate component and fronto-parietal component. These results suggest that these two components might be linked to different mental function during "resting" baseline.

  12. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bo Kim,1,2 Michelle A Lucatorto,3 Kara Hawthorne,4 Janis Hersh,5 Raquel Myers,6 A Rani Elwy,1,7 Glenn D Graham81Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial VA Hospital, Bedford, 2Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Office of Nursing Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, 4Chief Business Office, Purchased Care, Washington, DC, 5New England Veterans Engineering Resource Center, Boston, MA, 6SJ Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 7Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 8Specialty Care Services (10P4E, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP and the primary care provider (PCP is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1 what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2 how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts

  13. [Modern networks : Topics in the working group "Bladder cancer research" of the GeSRU Academics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, S; Kalogirou, C; Roghmann, F; Seitz, A-K; Vallo, S; Wezel, F; Worst, T; Nawroth, R

    2017-02-01

    In January 2015, the research group "bladder cancer research" was founded as part of the GeSRU Academics research initiative. A general challenge to work successfully in a novel network structure is to identify common scientific topics and technical expertise in the group. Thus, one of the first tasks was to learn about current research projects from members within the group in order to address a project that suits the group's expertise. The following review summarizes three different directions that are key projects in Urologic Departments at German Universities that will be the basis to start fruitful collaborations.

  14. Investigating Patterns of Participation in an Online Support Group for Problem Drinking: a Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanoski, Karen; van Mierlo, Trevor; Cunningham, John

    2016-08-22

    This study contributes to emerging literature on online health networks by modeling communication patterns between members of a moderated online support group for problem drinking. Using social network analysis, we described members' patterns of joint participation in threads, parsing out the role of site moderators, and explored differences in member characteristics by network position. Posts made to the online support group of Alcohol Help Centre during 2013 were structured as a two-mode network of members (n = 205) connected via threads (n = 506). Metrics included degree centrality, clique membership, and tie strength. The network consisted of one component and no cliques of members, although most made few posts and a small number communicated only with the site's moderators. Highly active members were older and tended to have started posting prior to 2013. The distribution of members across threads varied from threads containing posts by one member to others that connected multiple members. Moderators accounted for sizable proportions of the connectivity between both members and threads. After 5 years of operation, the AHC online support group appears to be fairly cohesive and stable, in the sense that there were no isolated subnetworks comprised of specific types of members or devoted to specific topics. Participation and connectedness at the member-level was varied, however, and tended to be low on average. The moderators were among the most central in the network, although there were also members who emerged as central and dedicated contributors to the online discussions across topics. Study findings highlight a number of areas for consideration by online support group developers and managers.

  15. Group Authentication Scheme for Neighbourhood Area Networks (NANs in Smart Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Alohali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A Neighbourhood Area Network is a functional component of the Smart Grid that interconnects the end user domain with the Energy Services Provider (ESP domain. It forms the “edge” of the provider network, interconnecting homes instrumented with Smart Meters (SM with the ESP. The SM is a dual interface, wireless communication device through which information is transacted across the user (a home and ESP domains. The security risk to the ESP increases since the components within the home, interconnected to the ESP via the SM, are not managed by the ESP. Secure operation of the SM is a necessary requirement. The SM should be resilient to attacks, which might be targeted either directly or via the network in the home. This paper presents and discusses a security scheme for groups of SMs in a Neighbourhood Area Network that enable entire groups to authenticate themselves, rather than one at a time. The results show that a significant improvement in terms of resilience against node capture attacks, replay attacks, confidentiality, authentication for groups of SMs in a NAN that enable entire groups to authenticate themselves, rather than one at a time.

  16. The facilitation of groups and networks: capabilities to shape creative cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2003-01-01

    The facilitator, defined as a process guide of creative cooperation, is becoming more and more in focus to assist groups,teams and networks to meet these challenges. The author defines and exemplifies different levels of creative coorperation. Core capabilities of facilitation are defined...

  17. The African American Student Network: An Informal Networking Group as a Therapeutic Intervention for Black College Students on a Predominantly White Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier-Reed, Tabitha

    2013-01-01

    Informal support networks as opposed to formal mental health counseling may represent a culture-specific, indigenous style of coping for Black college students. Using the African American Student Network (or as students refer to it AFAM), this article comments on the potential of an informal networking group as a culturally sensitive therapeutic…

  18. Effects of Exercise Intervention on Event-Related Potential and Task Performance Indices of Attention Networks in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tseng, Yu-Ting

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated whether 10-week soccer training can benefit the inhibitory control and neuroelectric indices in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Fifty-one children were divided into groups of typically developing (TD, n = 21), DCD-training (n = 16), and DCD non-training (n=14) individuals using the for Children test,…

  19. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  20. Innovation Networks to Stimulate Public and Private Sector Collaboration for Advisory Services Innovation and Coordination: The Case of Pasture Performance Issues in the New Zealand Dairy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijswijk, K.; Brazendale, R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: An innovation network, called the Pasture Improvement Leadership Group (PILG), was formed to improve the quality and consistency of advice provided to dairy farmers in New Zealand, after they expressed dissatisfaction with their pastures. The aim of this paper is to better understand the challenges of forming and maintaining networks to…

  1. Evolution of opinions on social networks in the presence of competing committed groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Sameet; Xie, Jierui; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Emenheiser, Jeff; Kirby, Matt; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2012-02-01

    Using a model of pairwise social influence, the binary agreement model (Xie et. al, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011130 (2011)), we study how the presence of two groups of individuals committed to competing opinions, affect the steady-state opinion of influencable individuals on a social network. We assume that two groups committed to distinct opinions A and B, and constituting fractions pA, pB of the total population respectively, are present in the network. We show using mean-field theory that the phase diagram of this system in parameter space (pA,pB) consists of two regions, one where two stable steady-states coexist, and the remaining where only a single stable steady-state exists. For finite networks (complete graphs, Erdos-R'enyi networks and Barab'asi-Albert networks), these two regions are separated by two first order transition lines which terminate and meet tangentially at pA= pB 0.1623, which constitutes a second-order transition point. Finally, we quantify how the exponentially large switching times between steady states in the co-existence region depend on the distance from the second-order transition point for equal committed fractions.

  2. Efficient traffic grooming with dynamic ONU grouping for multiple-OLT-based access network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shizong; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng; Wang, Hongxiang

    2015-12-01

    Fast bandwidth growth urges large-scale high-density access scenarios, where the multiple Passive Optical Networking (PON) system clustered deployment can be adopted as an appropriate solution to fulfill the huge bandwidth demands, especially for a future 5G mobile network. However, the lack of interaction between different optical line terminals (OLTs) results in part of the bandwidth resources waste. To increase the bandwidth efficiency, as well as reduce bandwidth pressure at the edge of a network, we propose a centralized flexible PON architecture based on Time- and Wavelength-Division Multiplexing PON (TWDM PON). It can provide flexible affiliation for optical network units (ONUs) and different OLTs to support access network traffic localization. Specifically, a dynamic ONU grouping algorithm (DGA) is provided to obtain the minimal OLT outbound traffic. Simulation results show that DGA obtains an average 25.23% traffic gain increment under different OLT numbers within a small ONU number situation, and the traffic gain will increase dramatically with the increment of the ONU number. As the DGA can be deployed easily as an application running above the centralized control plane, the proposed architecture can be helpful to improve the network efficiency for future traffic-intensive access scenarios.

  3. Structure and Heme-Independent Peroxidase Activity of a Fully-Coordinated Mononuclear Mn(II) Complex with a Schiff-Base Tripodal Ligand Containing Three Imidazole Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Shuranjan; Lee, Hong In [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Do Hyun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lah, Myoung Soo [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    New complex [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sub 2}[Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sub 2}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 5}·3H{sub 2}O, where H{sub 3}L is tris{2-(4-imidazolyl)methyliminoethyl} amine (imtren), has been prepared by reacting manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate with the imtren ligand in methanol. X-ray crystallographic study revealed that the imtren ligand hexadentately binds to Mn(II) ion through the three Schiff-base imine N atoms and three imidazole N atoms with a distorted octahedral geometry, and the apical tertiary amine N atom of the ligand pseudo-coordinates to Mn(II), forming overall a pseudo-seven coordination environment. The hydrogen-bonds between imidazole and imidazolate of [Mn(II)H{sub 1.5}L]{sup 0.5+} complex ions are extended to build a 2D puckered network with trigonal voids. [Mn(II)H{sub 3}L]{sup 2+} complex ions constitutes another extended 2D puckered layer without hydrogen bonds. Two layers are wedged each other to constitute overall stack of the crystal. Peroxidase activity of complex 1 was examined by observing the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of complex 1. Generation of ABTS{sup +·} was observed by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies, indicating that the complex 1, a fully-coordinated mononuclear Mn(II) complex with nitrogen-only ligand, has a heme-independent peroxidase activity.

  4. An Efficient Causal Group Communication Protocol for Free Scale Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory Evropeytsev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In peer-to-peer (P2P overlay networks, a group of n (≥2 peer processes have to cooperate with each other. Each peer sends messages to every peer and receives messages from every peer in a group. In group communications, each message sent by a peer is required to be causally delivered to every peer. Most of the protocols designed to ensure causal message order are designed for networks with a plain architecture. These protocols can be adapted to use in free scale and hierarchical topologies; however, the amount of control information is O(n, where n is the number of peers in the system. Some protocols are designed for a free scale or hierarchical networks, but in general they force the whole system to accomplish the same order viewed by a super peer. In this paper, we present a protocol that is specifically designed to work with a free scale peer-to-peer network. By using the information about the network’s architecture and by representing message dependencies on a bit level, the proposed protocol ensures causal message ordering without enforcing super peers order. The designed protocol is simulated and compared with the Immediate Dependency Relation and the Dependency Sequences protocols to show its lower overhead.

  5. Systems Approach to Studying Animal Sociality: Individual Position versus Group Organization in Dynamic Social Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Karlo; Ng, Kah Loon; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2010-01-01

    Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against) social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively) fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness. PMID:21203425

  6. Can a core outcome set improve the quality of systematic reviews? – a survey of the Co-ordinating Editors of Cochrane review groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkham Jamie J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Missing outcome data or the inconsistent reporting of outcome data in clinical research can affect the quality of evidence within a systematic review. A potential solution is an agreed standardized set of outcomes known as a core outcome set (COS to be measured in all studies for a specific condition. We investigated the amount of missing patient data for primary outcomes in Cochrane systematic reviews, and surveyed the Co-ordinating Editors of Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs on issues related to the standardization of outcomes in their CRG’s reviews. These groups are responsible for the more than 7,000 protocols and full versions of Cochrane Reviews that are currently available, and the several hundred new reviews published each year, presenting the world’s largest collection of standardized systematic reviews in health care. Methods Using an unselected cohort of Cochrane Reviews, we calculated and presented the percentage of missing patient data for the primary outcome measure chosen for each review published by each CRG. We also surveyed the CRG Co-ordinating Editors to see what their policies are with regards to outcome selection and outcomes to include in the Summary of Finding (SoF tables in their Cochrane Reviews. They were also asked to list the main advantages and challenges of standardizing outcomes across all reviews within their CRG. Results In one fifth of the 283 reviews in the sample, more than 50% of the patient data for the primary outcome was missing. Responses to the survey were received from 90% of Co-ordinating Editors. Thirty-six percent of CRGs have a centralized policy regarding which outcomes to include in the SoF table and 73% of Co-ordinating Editors thought that a COS for effectiveness trials should be used routinely for a SoF table. Conclusions The reliability of systematic reviews, in particular meta-analyses they contain, can be improved if more attention is paid to missing outcome data. The

  7. Impact of Ethnic Group on Human Emotion Recognition Using Backpropagation Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil M. Hewahi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We claim that knowing the ethnic group of human would increase the accuracy of the emotion recognition. This is due to the difference between the face appearances and expressions of
    various ethnic groups. To test our claim, we developed an approach based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN using backpropgation algorithm to recognize the human emotion through facial expressions. Our approach has been tested by using MSDEF dataset, and we found that, there is a positive effect on the accuracy of the recognition of emotion if we consider the ethnic group as input factor while building the recognition model. We achieved 8% improvement rate.

  8. Exploring perceptions of healthcare professionals in the implementation of a new professional role of clinical telehealth coordinator within a university integrated healthcare network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Carine; Desrochers, Johanne; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Richer, Marie-Claire

    2010-06-01

    As telehealth networks develop across Canada, new professional roles start to emerge. A university healthcare center part of an integrated health network has identified the need to introduce a clinical coordinator for specialized telehealth programs. However, very little is found in the current literature about the description or core competencies that such a professional should possess as well as the ways to implement this role. The objective of this study was to explore how healthcare professionals (HCPs) involved in a specialized teleoncology program perceive a new clinical telehealth coordinator (CTC) role within a university integrated healthcare network (UIHN) in a metropolitan area in Québec, Canada. A descriptive qualitative design was used and a purposive sample of nine HCPs, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists who were members of a UIHN teleoncology committee, was recruited. The HCPs identified that the CTC was a multifaceted role. The core competencies identified by the HCPs included knowledge, expertise, and experience. Participants identified three key factors in the implementation of this role, namely, the structural support, having a common language, and making the implementation of this role relevant. The results suggest that this CTC role may be more complex than originally expected and that the diverse competencies suggest an expanded nature to this role. This has important implications for administrative strategies when addressing the key factors in the implementation of this role.

  9. Transforming Concepts Into Clinical Trials and Creating a Multisite Network: The Leadership and Operations Center of the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Heather R; Harris, Anthony; Arias, Rebekka M; Chambers, Henry F Chip; Fowler, Vance G

    2017-03-15

    The Leadership and Operations Center (LOC) is responsible for facilitating, coordinating, and implementing the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) scientific agenda by engaging thought leaders; soliciting research proposals; and developing the processes, tools, and infrastructure required to operationalize studies and create and sustain the ARLG network. These efforts are ongoing as new projects are developed and the network expands and grows to address the ever-changing priorities in antibacterial resistance. This article describes the innovations, accomplishments, and opportunities of the LOC since the inception of the ARLG in 2013. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Quantification of SLIT-ROBO transcripts in hepatocellular carcinoma reveals two groups of genes with coordinate expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konu Ozlen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLIT-ROBO families of proteins mediate axon pathfinding and their expression is not solely confined to nervous system. Aberrant expression of SLIT-ROBO genes was repeatedly shown in a wide variety of cancers, yet data about their collective behavior in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is missing. Hence, we quantified SLIT-ROBO transcripts in HCC cell lines, and in normal and tumor tissues from liver. Methods Expression of SLIT-ROBO family members was quantified by real-time qRT-PCR in 14 HCC cell lines, 8 normal and 35 tumor tissues from the liver. ANOVA and Pearson's correlation analyses were performed in R environment, and different clinicopathological subgroups were pairwise compared in Minitab. Gene expression matrices of cell lines and tissues were analyzed by Mantel's association test. Results Genewise hierarchical clustering revealed two subgroups with coordinate expression pattern in both the HCC cell lines and tissues: ROBO1, ROBO2, SLIT1 in one cluster, and ROBO4, SLIT2, SLIT3 in the other, respectively. Moreover, SLIT-ROBO expression predicted AFP-dependent subgrouping of HCC cell lines, but not that of liver tissues. ROBO1 and ROBO2 were significantly up-regulated, whereas SLIT3 was significantly down-regulated in cell lines with high-AFP background. When compared to normal liver tissue, ROBO1 was found to be significantly overexpressed, while ROBO4 was down-regulated in HCC. We also observed that ROBO1 and SLIT2 differentiated histopathological subgroups of liver tissues depending on both tumor staging and differentiation status. However, ROBO4 could discriminate poorly differentiated HCC from other subgroups. Conclusion The present study is the first in comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of SLIT-ROBO family gene expression in HCC, and suggests that the expression of SLIT-ROBO genes is regulated in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our results implicate that SLIT-ROBO transcription profile is bi-modular in nature, and

  11. Quantification of SLIT-ROBO transcripts in hepatocellular carcinoma reveals two groups of genes with coordinate expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Mehmet Ender; Konu, Ozlen; Yagci, Tamer

    2008-12-29

    SLIT-ROBO families of proteins mediate axon pathfinding and their expression is not solely confined to nervous system. Aberrant expression of SLIT-ROBO genes was repeatedly shown in a wide variety of cancers, yet data about their collective behavior in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is missing. Hence, we quantified SLIT-ROBO transcripts in HCC cell lines, and in normal and tumor tissues from liver. Expression of SLIT-ROBO family members was quantified by real-time qRT-PCR in 14 HCC cell lines, 8 normal and 35 tumor tissues from the liver. ANOVA and Pearson's correlation analyses were performed in R environment, and different clinicopathological subgroups were pairwise compared in Minitab. Gene expression matrices of cell lines and tissues were analyzed by Mantel's association test. Genewise hierarchical clustering revealed two subgroups with coordinate expression pattern in both the HCC cell lines and tissues: ROBO1, ROBO2, SLIT1 in one cluster, and ROBO4, SLIT2, SLIT3 in the other, respectively. Moreover, SLIT-ROBO expression predicted AFP-dependent subgrouping of HCC cell lines, but not that of liver tissues. ROBO1 and ROBO2 were significantly up-regulated, whereas SLIT3 was significantly down-regulated in cell lines with high-AFP background. When compared to normal liver tissue, ROBO1 was found to be significantly overexpressed, while ROBO4 was down-regulated in HCC. We also observed that ROBO1 and SLIT2 differentiated histopathological subgroups of liver tissues depending on both tumor staging and differentiation status. However, ROBO4 could discriminate poorly differentiated HCC from other subgroups. The present study is the first in comprehensive and quantitative evaluation of SLIT-ROBO family gene expression in HCC, and suggests that the expression of SLIT-ROBO genes is regulated in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our results implicate that SLIT-ROBO transcription profile is bi-modular in nature, and that each module shows intrinsic variability. We also provide

  12. High-Quality Ultra-Compact Grid Layout of Grouped Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoghourdjian, Vahan; Dwyer, Tim; Gange, Graeme; Kieffer, Steve; Klein, Karsten; Marriott, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Prior research into network layout has focused on fast heuristic techniques for layout of large networks, or complex multi-stage pipelines for higher quality layout of small graphs. Improvements to these pipeline techniques, especially for orthogonal-style layout, are difficult and practical results have been slight in recent years. Yet, as discussed in this paper, there remain significant issues in the quality of the layouts produced by these techniques, even for quite small networks. This is especially true when layout with additional grouping constraints is required. The first contribution of this paper is to investigate an ultra-compact, grid-like network layout aesthetic that is motivated by the grid arrangements that are used almost universally by designers in typographical layout. Since the time when these heuristic and pipeline-based graph-layout methods were conceived, generic technologies (MIP, CP and SAT) for solving combinatorial and mixed-integer optimization problems have improved massively. The second contribution of this paper is to reassess whether these techniques can be used for high-quality layout of small graphs. While they are fast enough for graphs of up to 50 nodes we found these methods do not scale up. Our third contribution is a large-neighborhood search meta-heuristic approach that is scalable to larger networks.

  13. Cooperative Networks: Altruism, Group Solidarity, Reciprocity, and Sanctioning in Ugandan Producer Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarri, Delia

    2015-09-01

    Repeated interaction and social networks are commonly considered viable solutions to collective action problems. This article identifies and systematically measures four general mechanisms--that is, generalized altruism, group solidarity, reciprocity, and the threat of sanctioning--and tests which of them brings about cooperation in the context of Ugandan producer organizations. Using an innovative methodological framework that combines "lab-in-the-field" experiments with survey interviews and complete social networks data, the article goes beyond the assessment of a relationship between social networks and collective outcomes to study the mechanisms that favor cooperative behavior. The article first establishes a positive relationship between position in the network structure and propensity to cooperate in the producer organization and then uses farmers' behavior in dictator and public goods games to test different mechanisms that may account for such a relationship. Results show that cooperation is induced by patterns of reciprocity that emerge through repeated interaction rather than other-regarding preferences like altruism or group solidarity.

  14. New patterns in human biogeography revealed by networks of contacts between linguistic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A; Bock Axelsen, Jacob; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-03-07

    Human languages differ broadly in abundance and are distributed highly unevenly on the Earth. In many qualitative and quantitative aspects, they strongly resemble biodiversity distributions. An intriguing and previously unexplored issue is the architecture of the neighbouring relationships between human linguistic groups. Here we construct and characterize these networks of contacts and show that they represent a new kind of spatial network with uncommon structural properties. Remarkably, language networks share a meaningful property with food webs: both are quasi-interval graphs. In food webs, intervality is linked to the existence of a niche space of low dimensionality; in language networks, we show that the unique relevant variable is the area occupied by the speakers of a language. By means of a range model analogous to niche models in ecology, we show that a geometric restriction of perimeter covering by neighbouring linguistic domains explains the structural patterns observed. Our findings may be of interest in the development of models for language dynamics or regarding the propagation of cultural innovations. In relation to species distribution, they pose the question of whether the spatial features of species ranges share architecture, and eventually generating mechanism, with the distribution of human linguistic groups. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. The Power of Cooperation in International Paleoclimate Science: Examples from the PAGES 2k Network and the Ocean2k Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Past Global Changes (PAGES) project of IGBP and Future Earth supports research to understand the Earth's past environment to improve future climate predictions and inform strategies for sustainability. Within this framework, the PAGES 2k Network was established to provide a focus on the past 2000 years, a period that encompasses Medieval Climate Anomaly warming, Little Ice Age cooling, and recent anthropogenically-forced climate change. The results of these studies are used for testing earth system models, and for understanding decadal- to centennial-scale variability, which is needed for long-term planning. International coordination and cooperation among the nine regional Working Groups that make up the 2k Network has been critical to the success of PAGES 2k. The collaborative approach is moving toward scientific achievements across the regional groups, including: (i) the development of a community-driven open-access proxy climate database; (ii) integration of multi-resolution proxy records; (iii) development of multivariate climate reconstructions; and (iv) a leap forward in the spatial resolution of paleoclimate reconstructions. The last addition to the 2k Network, the Ocean2k Working Group has further innovated the collaborative approach by: (1) creating an open, receptive environment to discuss ideas exclusively in the virtual space; (2) employing an array of real-time collaborative software tools to enable communication, group document writing, and data analysis; (3) consolidating executive leadership teams to oversee project development and manage grassroots-style volunteer pools; and (4) embracing the value-added role that international and interdisciplinary science can play in advancing paleoclimate hypotheses critical to understanding future change. Ongoing efforts for the PAGES 2k Network are focused on developing new standards for data quality control and archiving. These tasks will provide the foundation for new and continuing "trans-regional" 2k

  16. Evaluation of Coordination of Emergency Response Team through the Social Network Analysis. Case Study: Oil and Gas Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Mohammadfam

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that SNA provided a quantitative and logical approach for the examination of the coordination status among response teams and it also provided a main opportunity for managers and planners to have a clear understanding of the presented status. The research concluded that fundamental efforts were needed to improve the presented situations.

  17. A Group Neighborhood Average Clock Synchronization Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Ma, Shiwei; Ma, Maode

    2014-01-01

    Clock synchronization is a very important issue for the applications of wireless sensor networks. The sensors need to keep a strict clock so that users can know exactly what happens in the monitoring area at the same time. This paper proposes a novel internal distributed clock synchronization solution using group neighborhood average. Each sensor node collects the offset and skew rate of the neighbors. Group averaging of offset and skew rate value are calculated instead of conventional point-to-point averaging method. The sensor node then returns compensated value back to the neighbors. The propagation delay is considered and compensated. The analytical analysis of offset and skew compensation is presented. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the protocol and reveal that the protocol allows sensor networks to quickly establish a consensus clock and maintain a small deviation from the consensus clock. PMID:25120163

  18. A Group Vehicular Mobility Model for Routing Protocol Analysis in Mobile Ad Hoc Network

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Shrirang Ambaji; Rao, G Raghavendra

    2010-01-01

    Performance of routing protocols in mobile ad-hoc networks is greatly affected by the dynamic nature of nodes, route failures, wireless channels with variable bandwidth and scalability issues. A mobility model imitates the real world movement of mobile nodes and is central component to simulation based studies. In this paper we consider mobility nodes which mimic the vehicular motion of nodes like Manhattan mobility model and City Section mobility model. We also propose a new Group Vehicular ...

  19. Aperiodic dynamics in a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan A.; Grindrod, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Adaptive network models, in which node states and network topology coevolve, arise naturally in models of social dynamics that incorporate homophily and social influence. Homophily relates the similarity between pairs of nodes' states to their network coupling strength, whilst social influence causes coupled nodes' states to convergence. In this paper we propose a deterministic adaptive network model of attitude formation in social groups that includes these effects, and in which the attitudinal dynamics are represented by an activato-inhibitor process. We illustrate that consensus, corresponding to all nodes adopting the same attitudinal state and being fully connected, may destabilise via Turing instability, giving rise to aperiodic dynamics with sensitive dependence on initial conditions. These aperiodic dynamics correspond to the formation and dissolution of sub-groups that adopt contrasting attitudes. We discuss our findings in the context of cultural polarisation phenomena. Social influence. This reflects the fact that people tend to modify their behaviour and attitudes in response to the opinions of others [22-26]. We model social influence via diffusion: agents adjust their state according to a weighted sum (dictated by the evolving network) of the differences between their state and the states of their neighbours. Homophily. This relates the similarity of individuals' states to their frequency and strength of interaction [27]. Thus in our model, homophily drives the evolution of the weighted ‘social' network. A precise formulation of our model is given in Section 2. Social influence and homophily underpin models of social dynamics [21], which cover a wide range of sociological phenomena, including the diffusion of innovations [28-32], complex contagions [33-36], collective action [37-39], opinion dynamics [19,20,40,10,11,13,15,41,16], the emergence of social norms [42-44], group stability [45], social differentiation [46] and, of particular relevance

  20. A network-level explanation for the differences in HIV prevalence in South Africa's racial groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris; Dlamini, Sipho; Boulle, Andrew; White, Richard G; Badri, Motasim

    2009-09-01

    Analyses of individual-level risk factors have not been able to adequately explain why HIV has spread so extensively in southern Africa and why this has occurred especially within certain racial or ethnic groups. Using data from a longitudinal study of a representative sample of adolescents aged 14-22 living in Cape Town, South Africa, this article presents evidence of how differences in individual-level risk factors as well as sexual network structures between different racial or ethnic groups may help explain the differential spread of HIV in South Africa. Particular emphasis is placed on how levels of partner concurrency, respondent concurrency, mutual concurrency, serial concurrency and numbers of sexual partners and an average early age of sexual debut combine in different ways in the different racial or ethnic groups to create networks of sexual partnerships that differ in the density of their interconnections and hence potential for HIV spread. These network-level differences offer a potential explanation for the observed generalised HIV epidemic seen among the population of black South Africans.

  1. Social management of laboratory rhesus macaques housed in large groups using a network approach: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Brenda; Beisner, Brianne; Hannibal, Darcy

    2017-12-07

    Biomedical facilities across the nation and worldwide aim to develop cost-effective methods for the reproductive management of macaque breeding groups, typically by housing macaques in large, multi-male multi-female social groups that provide monkey subjects for research as well as appropriate socialization for their psychological well-being. One of the most difficult problems in managing socially housed macaques is their propensity for deleterious aggression. From a management perspective, deleterious aggression (as opposed to less intense aggression that serves to regulate social relationships) is undoubtedly the most problematic behavior observed in group-housed macaques, which can readily escalate to the degree that it causes social instability, increases serious physical trauma leading to group dissolution, and reduces psychological well-being. Thus for both welfare and other management reasons, aggression among rhesus macaques at primate centers and facilities needs to be addressed with a more proactive approach.Management strategies need to be instituted that maximize social housing while also reducing problematic social aggression due to instability using efficacious methods for detection and prevention in the most cost effective manner. Herein we review a new proactive approach using social network analysis to assess and predict deleterious aggression in macaque groups. We discovered three major pathways leading to instability, such as unusually high rates and severity of trauma and social relocations.These pathways are linked either directly or indirectly to network structure in rhesus macaque societies. We define these pathways according to the key intrinsic and extrinsic variables (e.g., demographic, genetic or social factors) that influence network and behavioral measures of stability (see Fig. 1). They are: (1) presence of natal males, (2) matrilineal genetic fragmentation, and (3) the power structure and conflict policing behavior supported by this

  2. On Couple-Group Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Communication and Input Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-hao Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the couple-group consensus problems of the multiagent networks with the influence of communication and input time delays. Based on the frequency-domain theory, some algebraic criteria are addressed analytically. From the results, it is found that the input time delays and the coupling strengths between agents of the systems play a crucial role in reaching group consensus. The convergence of the system is independent of the communication delays, but it will affect the convergence rate of the system. Finally, several simulated examples are provided to verify the validity and correctness of our theoretical results.

  3. Energy-Efficient Region Shift Scheme to Support Mobile Sink Group in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Yongbin; Kim, Kyong Hoon; Aldwairi, Monther; Kim, Ki-Il

    2017-12-30

    Mobile sink groups play crucial roles to perform their own missions in many wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. In order to support mobility of such sink groups, it is important to design a mechanism for effective discovery of the group in motion. However, earlier studies obtain group region information by periodic query. For that reason, the mechanism leads to significant signaling overhead due to frequent flooding for the query regardless of the group movement. Furthermore, the mechanism worsens the problem by the flooding in the whole expected area. To deal with this problem, we propose a novel mobile sink group support scheme with low communication cost, called Region-Shift-based Mobile Geocasting Protocol (RSMGP). In this study, we utilize the group mobility feature for which members of a group have joint motion patterns. Thus, we could trace group movement by shifting the region as much as partial members move out of the previous region. Furthermore, the region acquisition is only performed at the moment by just deviated members without collaboration of all members. Experimental results validate the improved signaling overhead of our study compared to the previous studies.

  4. Distributed Group-Based Mobility Management Scheme in Wireless Body Area Networks

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    Moneeb Gohar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For group-based mobility management in 6LoWPAN-based wireless body area networks (WBAN, some schemes using the Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIP have been proposed. However, the existing PMIP-based mobility schemes tend to induce large registration delay and handover delay. To overcome such limitations, we propose a new distributed group-based mobility management scheme, in which the Local Mobility Anchor (LMA function is implemented by each Mobile Access Gateway (MAG and the handover operation is performed between two neighboring MAGs without the help of LMA. Besides, each MAG maintains the information of the group of mobile sensors and aggregates the Authentication-Authorization-Accounting (AAA query messages for a group of mobile sensors as a “single” message to decrease the control overhead. By numerical analysis, it is shown that the proposed scheme can reduce the registration and handover delays, compared to the existing PMIP-based mobility schemes.

  5. Model Selection and Hypothesis Testing for Large-Scale Network Models with Overlapping Groups

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    Tiago P. Peixoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effort to understand network systems in increasing detail has resulted in a diversity of methods designed to extract their large-scale structure from data. Unfortunately, many of these methods yield diverging descriptions of the same network, making both the comparison and understanding of their results a difficult challenge. A possible solution to this outstanding issue is to shift the focus away from ad hoc methods and move towards more principled approaches based on statistical inference of generative models. As a result, we face instead the more well-defined task of selecting between competing generative processes, which can be done under a unified probabilistic framework. Here, we consider the comparison between a variety of generative models including features such as degree correction, where nodes with arbitrary degrees can belong to the same group, and community overlap, where nodes are allowed to belong to more than one group. Because such model variants possess an increasing number of parameters, they become prone to overfitting. In this work, we present a method of model selection based on the minimum description length criterion and posterior odds ratios that is capable of fully accounting for the increased degrees of freedom of the larger models and selects the best one according to the statistical evidence available in the data. In applying this method to many empirical unweighted networks from different fields, we observe that community overlap is very often not supported by statistical evidence and is selected as a better model only for a minority of them. On the other hand, we find that degree correction tends to be almost universally favored by the available data, implying that intrinsic node proprieties (as opposed to group properties are often an essential ingredient of network formation.

  6. The Care management Information system for the home Care Network (SI GESCAD): support for care coordination and continuity of care in the Brazilian Unified health system (SUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Maria Raquel Gomes Maia; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Vasconcelos Filho, José Eurico; Silva, Kênia Lara; Gamarski, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The present article describes the development of the initial version of the Brazilian Care Management Information System for the Home Care Network (SI GESCAD). This system was created to enhance comprehensive care, care coordination and the continuity of care provided to the patients, family and caretakers of the Home Care (HC) program. We also present a reflection on the contributions, limitations and possibilities of the SI GESCAD within the scope of the Home Care Network of the Brazilian Unified Health System (RAS-AD). This was a study on technology production based on a multi-method protocol. It discussed software engineering and human-computer interaction (HCI) based on user-centered design, as well as evolutionary and interactive software process (prototyping and spiral). A functional prototype of the GESCAD was finalized, which allowed for the management of HC to take into consideration the patient's social context, family and caretakers. The system also proved to help in the management of activities of daily living (ADLs), clinical care and the monitoring of variables associated with type 2 HC. The SI GESCAD allowed for a more horizontal work process for HC teams at the RAS-AD/SUS level of care, with positive repercussions on care coordination and continuity of care.

  7. Electric Vehicle Charging and Discharging Coordination on Distribution Network Using Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization and Fuzzy Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed a optimal strategy for coordinated operation of electric vehicles (EVs charging and discharging with wind-thermal system. By aggregating a large number of EVs, the huge total battery capacity is sufficient to stabilize the disturbance of the transmission grid. Hence, a dynamic environmental dispatch model which coordinates a cluster of charging and discharging controllable EV units with wind farms and thermal plants is proposed. A multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO algorithm and a fuzzy decision maker are put forward for the simultaneous optimization of grid operating cost, CO2 emissions, wind curtailment, and EV users’ cost. Simulations are done in a 30 node system containing three traditional thermal plants, two carbon capture and storage (CCS thermal plants, two wind farms, and six EV aggregations. Contrast of strategies under different EV charging/discharging price is also discussed. The results are presented to prove the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  8. Changes of Personal Network Composition and Inter-Group Ties from 1987 to 2005 in Hungary

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    VARGA V., Attila

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents the changes and stability of assortative mixing, and inter-group ties in Hungary from 1987 to 2005. The demographic categories under investigation are age, sex, and education. The analysis has a special focus on the rearrangement of the context of tie formation, and the inequality of receiving choices into personal networks along social categories. The most substantial change during the period, is the strong decrease in gender homophily, and some strengthening of intergenerationalties. Both of these findings are in line with the observation that personal networks are recruited more often among the members of the nuclear-family. This latter phenomenon is probably due to the shrinking network size. However, this set of finding is prone to the methodological criticism formulated in the US context, that these observations are in fact the result of the interviewer effect. Finally, the study found stable patterns of educational network prestige, and describes the changes of social capital attached to categories of gender and age.

  9. Mechanisms of Winner-Take-All and Group Selection in Neuronal Spiking Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    A major function of central nervous systems is to discriminate different categories or types of sensory input. Neuronal networks accomplish such tasks by learning different sensory maps at several stages of neural hierarchy, such that different neurons fire selectively to reflect different internal or external patterns and states. The exact mechanisms of such map formation processes in the brain are not completely understood. Here we study the mechanism by which a simple recurrent/reentrant neuronal network accomplish group selection and discrimination to different inputs in order to generate sensory maps. We describe the conditions and mechanism of transition from a rhythmic epileptic state (in which all neurons fire synchronized and indiscriminately to any input) to a winner-take-all state in which only a subset of neurons fire for a specific input. We prove an analytic condition under which a stable bump solution and a winner-take-all state can emerge from the local recurrent excitation-inhibition interactions in a three-layer spiking network with distinct excitatory and inhibitory populations, and demonstrate the importance of surround inhibitory connection topology on the stability of dynamic patterns in spiking neural network.

  10. Neural coordination can be enhanced by occasional interruption of normal firing patterns: a self-optimizing spiking neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Alexander; Froese, Tom; Ikegami, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The state space of a conventional Hopfield network typically exhibits many different attractors of which only a small subset satisfies constraints between neurons in a globally optimal fashion. It has recently been demonstrated that combining Hebbian learning with occasional alterations of normal neural states avoids this problem by means of self-organized enlargement of the best basins of attraction. However, so far it is not clear to what extent this process of self-optimization is also operative in real brains. Here we demonstrate that it can be transferred to more biologically plausible neural networks by implementing a self-optimizing spiking neural network model. In addition, by using this spiking neural network to emulate a Hopfield network with Hebbian learning, we attempt to make a connection between rate-based and temporal coding based neural systems. Although further work is required to make this model more realistic, it already suggests that the efficacy of the self-optimizing process is independent from the simplifying assumptions of a conventional Hopfield network. We also discuss natural and cultural processes that could be responsible for occasional alteration of neural firing patterns in actual brains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Working Group 3: Operations Analysis for Systems of System within a Networked C2 Context: Introduction, Purpose, and Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objective 1: Understand the impact of the application of traditional operational research techniques to networked C2 systems. • Objective 2: Develop...discussion would be in the Host Layer ( Application , Presentation, Session, Transport) to describe behavior; however, the impact of lower layers will be...CredentialEmployee(EmployeeID) DisableRemoteSystem(systemID) RideShare (Share/Match, Dynamic Route/Schedule, ServiceCoordination) ManageFleet(AVL/CAD, Planning

  12. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  13. Synthesis and Structure of a New Copper(II) Coordination Polymer Alternately Bridged by Oxamido and Carboxylate Groups: Evaluation of DNA/BSA Binding and Cytotoxic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Ting; Zheng, Kang; Li, Yan-Tuan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cui-Wei

    2015-08-01

    A new one-dimensional (1D) copper(II) coordination polymer {[Cu2 (dmaepox)(dabt)](NO3) · 0.5 H2 O}n , where H3 dmaepox and dabt denote N-benzoato-N'-(3-methylaminopropyl)oxamide and 2,2'-diamino-4,4'-bithiazole, respectively, was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and other methods. The crystal structure analysis revealed that the two copper(II) ions are bridged alternately by cis-oxamido and carboxylato groups to form a 1-D coordination polymer with the corresponding Cu · · · Cu separations of 5.1946(19) and 5.038(2) Å. There is a three-dimensional supramolecular structure constructed by hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions in the crystal. The reactivity towards herring sperm DNA (HS-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) indicated that the copper(II) polymer can interact with the DNA in the mode of intercalation, and bind to BSA responsible for quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by the static quenching mechanism. The in vitro cytotoxicity suggested that the copper(II) polymer exhibits cytotoxic effects against the selected tumor cell lines. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Novel Pruning Algorithm for Smoothing Feedforward Neural Networks Based on Group Lasso Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Chen; Yang, Xifeng; Zurada, Jacek M

    2017-09-26

    In this paper, we propose four new variants of the backpropagation algorithm to improve the generalization ability for feedforward neural networks. The basic idea of these methods stems from the Group Lasso concept which deals with the variable selection problem at the group level. There are two main drawbacks when the Group Lasso penalty has been directly employed during network training. They are numerical oscillations and theoretical challenges in computing the gradients at the origin. To overcome these obstacles, smoothing functions have then been introduced by approximating the Group Lasso penalty. Numerical experiments for classification and regression problems demonstrate that the proposed algorithms perform better than the other three classical penalization methods, Weight Decay, Weight Elimination, and Approximate Smoother, on both generalization and pruning efficiency. In addition, detailed simulations based on a specific data set have been performed to compare with some other common pruning strategies, which verify the advantages of the proposed algorithm. The pruning abilities of the proposed strategy have been investigated in detail for a relatively large data set, MNIST, in terms of various smoothing approximation cases.

  15. Network-based group variable selection for detecting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL

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    Zhang Xuegong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL aims to identify the genetic loci associated with the expression level of genes. Penalized regression with a proper penalty is suitable for the high-dimensional biological data. Its performance should be enhanced when we incorporate biological knowledge of gene expression network and linkage disequilibrium (LD structure between loci in high-noise background. Results We propose a network-based group variable selection (NGVS method for QTL detection. Our method simultaneously maps highly correlated expression traits sharing the same biological function to marker sets formed by LD. By grouping markers, complex joint activity of multiple SNPs can be considered and the dimensionality of eQTL problem is reduced dramatically. In order to demonstrate the power and flexibility of our method, we used it to analyze two simulations and a mouse obesity and diabetes dataset. We considered the gene co-expression network, grouped markers into marker sets and treated the additive and dominant effect of each locus as a group: as a consequence, we were able to replicate results previously obtained on the mouse linkage dataset. Furthermore, we observed several possible sex-dependent loci and interactions of multiple SNPs. Conclusions The proposed NGVS method is appropriate for problems with high-dimensional data and high-noise background. On eQTL problem it outperforms the classical Lasso method, which does not consider biological knowledge. Introduction of proper gene expression and loci correlation information makes detecting causal markers more accurate. With reasonable model settings, NGVS can lead to novel biological findings.

  16. Lipid carbonyl groups terminate the hydrogen bond network of membrane-bound water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Sulpizi, Marialore; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2015-11-19

    We present a combined experimental sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations study to clarify the structure and orientation of water at zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid and amine N-oxide (AO) surfactant monolayers. Simulated O-H stretch SFG spectra of water show good agreement with the experimental data. The SFG response at the PC interface exhibits positive peaks, whereas both negative and positive bands are present for the similar zwitterionic AO interface. The positive peaks at the water/PC interface are attributed to water interacting with the lipid carbonyl groups, which act as efficient hydrogen bond acceptors. This allows the water hydrogen bond network to reach, with its (up-oriented) O-H groups, into the headgroup of the lipid, a mechanism not available for water underneath the AO surfactant. This highlights the role of the lipid carbonyl group in the interfacial water structure at the membrane interface, namely, stabilizing the water hydrogen bond network.

  17. Atypical within- and between-hemisphere motor network functional connections in children with developmental coordination disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. McLeod

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental coordination disorder (DCD and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are highly comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders; however, the neural mechanisms of this comorbidity are poorly understood. Previous research has demonstrated that children with DCD and ADHD have altered brain region communication, particularly within the motor network. The structure and function of the motor network in a typically developing brain exhibits hemispheric dominance. It is plausible that functional deficits observed in children with DCD and ADHD are associated with neurodevelopmental alterations in within- and between-hemisphere motor network functional connection strength that disrupt this hemispheric dominance. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine functional connections of the left and right primary and sensory motor (SM1 cortices in children with DCD, ADHD and DCD + ADHD, relative to typically developing children. Our findings revealed that children with DCD, ADHD and DCD + ADHD exhibit atypical within- and between-hemisphere functional connection strength between SM1 and regions of the basal ganglia, as well as the cerebellum. Our findings further support the assertion that development of atypical motor network connections represents common and distinct neural mechanisms underlying DCD and ADHD. In children with DCD and DCD + ADHD (but not ADHD, a significant correlation was observed between clinical assessment of motor function and the strength of functional connections between right SM1 and anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, and regions involved in visuospatial processing. This latter finding suggests that behavioral phenotypes associated with atypical motor network development differ between individuals with DCD and those with ADHD.

  18. Impact of group delay ripples of chirped fiber grating on optical beamforming networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zheng, Xiaoping; Yu, Xianbin; Zhang, Hanyi; Guo, Yili; Zhou, Bingkun

    2008-02-18

    The impact of group delay ripples of chirped fiber gratings (CFG) on the performance of optical beamforming networks (OBFN) is investigated. The paper theoretically analyzes the quantified relations among the amplitude and period of CFG, the optical angle frequency interval at the inter-element arrays and the beampointing shift. The wavelength instability of the optical source is also investigated. This instability-induced phase jitter of RF signal has been verified experimentally. The theoretical models are proposed to analyze the performance of CFG-based OBFN systems.

  19. Political Parties and Interest Groups Members' Patterns of Social Network Site Usage in Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elira Turdubaeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kyrgyzstan, with a high level of political participation and an avant-garde position regarding internet access in Central Asia, broadband and social media penetration in the population, is a critical case for studying social network sites (SNSs in relation to political participation. This study analyzes the practices and attitudes of SNS users in Kyrgyzstan. Two types of users – members of political parties and members of interest organizations – are interviewed in focus groups about their practices and attitudes towards political content in the social network site Facebook. The findings indicate that, to some extent, the political engagement is indeed occurring within the Facebook environment, suggesting that the popular social networking sites (SNSs are an avenue for young people to express and share their political views. Facebook allowed users to share their political beliefs, support specific candidates, and interact with others on political issues. Participants’ perceptions regarding the appropriateness of political activity on Facebook, as well as the specific types of political activities they engaged in and witnessed within the site, were also explored.

  20. The partnership of patient advocacy groups and clinical investigators in the rare diseases clinical research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Peter A; Manion, Michele; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Groft, Stephen; Jinnah, H A; Robertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2016-05-18

    Among the unique features of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) Program is the requirement for each Consortium to include patient advocacy groups (PAGs) as research partners. This development has transformed the work of the RDCRN and is a model for collaborative research. This article outlines the roles patients and PAGs play in the RDCRN and reports on the PAGs' impact on the Network's success. Principal Investigators from the 17 RDCRN Consortia and 28 representatives from 76 PAGs affiliated with these Consortia were contacted by email to provide feedback via an online RDCRN survey. Impact was measured in the key areas of 1) Research logistics; 2) Outreach and communication; and 3) Funding and in-kind support. Rating choices were: 1-very negative, 2-somewhat negative, 3-no impact, 4-somewhat positive, and 5-very positive. Twenty-seven of the PAGs (96 %) disseminate information about the RDCRN within the patient community. The Consortium Principal Investigators also reported high levels of PAG involvement. Sixteen (94 %) Consortium Principal Investigators and 25 PAGs (89 %) reported PAGs participation in protocol review, study design, Consortium conference calls, attending Consortium meetings, or helping with patient recruitment. PAGs are actively involved in shaping Consortia's research agendas, help ensure the feasibility and success of research protocols by assisting with study design and patient recruitment, and support training programs. This extensive PAG-Investigator partnership in the RDCRN has had a strongly positive impact on the success of the Network.

  1. Group I Intron Internal Guide Sequence Binding Strength as a Component of Ribozyme Network Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Elizabeth Satterwhite

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Origins-of-life research requires searching for a plausible transition from simple chemicals to larger macromolecules that can both hold information and catalyze their own production. We have previously shown that some group I intron ribozymes possess the ability to help synthesize other ribozyme genotypes by recombination reactions in small networks in an autocatalytic fashion. By simplifying these recombination reactions, using fluorescent anisotropy, we quantified the thermodynamic binding strength between two nucleotides of two group I intron RNA fragments for all 16 possible genotype combinations. We provide evidence that the binding strength (KD between the 3-nucleotide internal guide sequence (IGS of one ribozyme and its complement in another is correlated to the catalytic ability of the ribozyme. This work demonstrates that one can begin to deconstruct the thermodynamic basis of information in prebiotic RNA systems.

  2. Rigorous Biogenetic Network for a Group of Indole Alkaloids Derived from Strictosidine

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    László F. Szabó

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Strictosidine, the precursor of more than 2,500 indole alkaloids, was isolated from four species of three plant families. By searching the Dictionary of Natural Products on DVD it was found that about 150 indole alkaloids were obtained from the same species (coalkaloids, which is a direct proof of their common origin. On the base of their threedimensional structure, taxonomic properties and standard reaction mechanisms an extended network was established which involved the four fundamental skeletons, the three types of carbon framework in the secologanin subunit and all major groups of indole alkaloids derived from secologanin and tryptamine (except a few minor groups, in which only less then 10 alkaloids were known. The system was extended to the heterodimer indole alkaloids and the quinoindole alkaloids as well.

  3. The development and feasibility of an online aphasia group intervention and networking program - TeleGAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Rachelle; Theodoros, Deborah; Hill, Anne J; Russell, Trevor

    2017-09-04

    Aphasia group therapy offers many benefits, however people with aphasia report difficulty accessing groups and speech-language pathologists are faced with many challenges in providing aphasia group therapy. Telerehabilitation may offer an alternative service delivery option. An online aphasia group therapy program - Telerehabilitation Group Aphasia Intervention and Networking (TeleGAIN) - has been developed according to the guidelines of the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for complex interventions. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of TeleGAIN and the results of a pilot trial to determine feasibility and acceptability. The development of TeleGAIN was informed through literature reviews in relevant topic areas, consideration of expert opinion and application of the social cognitive theory. TeleGAIN was then modelled through a feasibility pilot trial with four people with aphasia. TeleGAIN appeared to be feasible and acceptable to participants and able to be implemented as planned. Participant satisfaction with treatment was high and results suggested some potential for improvements in language functioning and communication-related quality of life. TeleGAIN appeared to be feasible and acceptable, however the study highlighted issues related to technology, clinical implementation and participant-specific factors that should be addressed prior to a larger trial.

  4. Group scheduling based on control-packet batch processing in optical burst switched networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chi; Li, Zhengbin; He, Yongqi; Xu, Anshi

    2007-11-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is proposed as a high-speed, flexible, and transparent technology. It is thought to be the best way to adapt the bursty IP traffic over optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks. OBS technology facilitates the efficient integration of both IP and WDM. It provides statistical multiplexing gains and avoids long end to end setup time of traditional virtual circuit configuration. However, there are still a lot of challenges, one of which is burst contention. Owing to the fact that random access memory like buffering is not available in the optical domain at present, there exists a real possibility that bursts may contend with one another at a switching node. Many contention resolutions are proposed. The major contention resolutions in literature are wavelength conversion, fiber delay lines, and deflecting routing. In this paper, a new data burst scheduling scheme, called group scheduling based on control-packet batch processing (GSCBP) was proposed to reduce burst contention. Like transmission control protocol, GSCBP has a batch processing window. Control packets which located in the batch processing window are batch processed. A heuristic scheduling algorithm arranges the relevant bursts' route based on the processing result and the network resource. A new node architecture supporting group scheduling was presented. The GSCBP algorithm is combined with wavelength converter and/or fiber delay lines which is shared by some data channels. Meanwhile, an extended open shortest path first (E-OSPF) routing strategy was proposed for OBS. Both GSCBP and E-OSPF are introduced into 14-node national science foundation network by means of simulations. The ETE delay, burst blocking probability, as well as burst dropping probability were attained. Results show that the GSBCP lead to the higher-priority traffic drop rate decrease one order of magnitude, if drop rate and ETE delay of lower priority traffic is sacrificed.

  5. Weighted Association Rule Mining for Item Groups with Different Properties and Risk Assessment for Networked Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungja; Ceong, Heetaek; Won, Yonggwan

    In market-basket analysis, weighted association rule (WAR) discovery can mine the rules that include more beneficial information by reflecting item importance for special products. In the point-of-sale database, each transaction is composed of items with similar properties, and item weights are pre-defined and fixed by a factor such as the profit. However, when items are divided into more than one group and the item importance must be measured independently for each group, traditional weighted association rule discovery cannot be used. To solve this problem, we propose a new weighted association rule mining methodology. The items should be first divided into subgroups according to their properties, and the item importance, i.e. item weight, is defined or calculated only with the items included in the subgroup. Then, transaction weight is measured by appropriately summing the item weights from each subgroup, and the weighted support is computed as the fraction of the transaction weights that contains the candidate items relative to the weight of all transactions. As an example, our proposed methodology is applied to assess the vulnerability to threats of computer systems that provide networked services. Our algorithm provides both quantitative risk-level values and qualitative risk rules for the security assessment of networked computer systems using WAR discovery. Also, it can be widely used for new applications with many data sets in which the data items are distinctly separated.

  6. Use of social networking sites: Facebook group as a learning management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abul Kalam Siddike

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social networking sites (SNSs are becoming popular day by day in academia as well as in business organizations around the world. Facebook as the largest and fastest networking sites, is one of the important SNSs that can play an important role in different academic disciplines. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of SNSs by the undergraduate students of International Islamic University of Malaysia (IIUM. The specific objectives are: (i to explore the frequency of using SNSs by the undergraduates; (ii to identify the purpose of using SNSs; (iii to examine the perceptions of undergraduates for using SNSs as an academic tool; and (iv finally, to propose Facebook group as a learning management system (LMS of IIUM. A structured survey questionnaire was distributed among 500 undergraduate students of IIUM and 351 responses were received. The results report that Facebook and Google+ are preferred SNSs. Sharing information with friends, getting connected with people for different level, making new friends, and passing time are the main reasons for using SNSs. This study also proposes a six-step procedure for using Facebook group as a LMS.

  7. Social factors shaping the formation of a multi-stakeholder trails network group for the Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Robinson; Steven Selin; Chad Pierskalla

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results and management implications of a longitudinal research study examining the social factors affecting the formation of a trails network advisory group for the Monongahela National Forest (MNF) in West Virginia. A collaborative process of creating an MNF trails network with input from local users and stakeholders has been largely...

  8. Criminal groups and transnational illegal markets : A more detailed examination on the basis of Social Network Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, Gerben; Bernasco, Wim

    In the study of organised crime, the traditional view of criminal groups as centrally controlled organisations has been replaced by the notion of criminal networks. However, little use has been made of concepts and theories of social networks that have developed in other social sciences. This paper

  9. 76 FR 28499 - Data Fortress Systems Group Ltd., Digital Youth Network Corp., Fantom Technologies, Inc., and KIK...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... COMMISSION Data Fortress Systems Group Ltd., Digital Youth Network Corp., Fantom Technologies, Inc., and KIK Technology International, Inc., Order of Suspension of Trading May 12, 2011. It appears to the Securities and... accurate information concerning the securities of Digital Youth Network Corp. because it has not filed any...

  10. Lanthanide-organic coordination frameworks showing new 5-connected network topology and 3D ordered array of single-molecular magnet behavior in the Dy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Sañudo, E Carolina; Jiménez, Erika; Fang, Shao-Ming; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2014-07-07

    Five isostructural lanthanide-organic coordination frameworks with a unique 3-D 5-connected (4(7).6(3))(4(3).6(5).8(2)) network, namely, [Ln(phen)(L)]n (Ln = Dy for 1, Gd for 2, Ho for 3, Er for 4, and Tb for 5), have been prepared based on bridging 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid (H3L) and chelating 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) coligand. Significantly, the Dy(III) complex 1 is an organized array of single-molecular magnets (SMMs), with frequency-dependent out-of-phase ac susceptibility signals and magnetization hysteresis at 4 K. Further analysis of the magnetic results can reveal that the SMM behavior of 1 should arise from the smaller ferromagnetic interaction between the Dy(III) ions. Complex 1 was also characterized by X-ray absorption spectra, which give the clear X-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal.

  11. Effectiveness of a Timing and Coordination Group Exercise Program to Improve Mobility in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Jennifer S; Perera, Subashan; Gilmore, Sandra; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Brodine, Deborah; Nadkarni, Neelesh K; Ricci, Edmund

    2017-10-01

    Timing and coordination exercises may be an important addition to community-based health promotion exercise programs to improve walking in older adults. To compare the effectiveness of the On the Move group exercise program, which focuses on the timing and coordination of movement, with a seated strength, endurance, and flexibility program (usual care) at improving function, disability, and walking ability of older adults. Cluster-randomized, single-blind intervention trial. Thirty-two independent living facilities, senior apartment buildings, and senior community centers were randomized to On the Move (16 sites; 152 participants) or usual care (16 sites; 146 participants). Participants were 65 years or older, able to ambulate independently with a gait speed of at least 0.60 m/s, able to follow 2-step commands, and were medically stable. Exercise classes were 50 minutes, twice a week for 12 weeks and had 10 or fewer participants per class. On the Move consisted of warm-up, timing and coordination (stepping and walking patterns), strengthening, and stretching exercises. The usual-care program consisted of warm-up, strength, endurance, and stretching exercises. The primary outcomes were self-report of function and disability (Late Life Function and Disability Instrument) and mobility (6-minute walk distance and gait speed) assessed by blinded individuals. Participants (mean [SD] age, 80.0 [8.1] years) were mostly female (251 [84.2%]) and white (249 [83.6%]) and had a mean (SD) of 2.8 (1.4) chronic conditions. Intervention groups were similar on baseline characteristics. Postintervention, 142 (93.4%) participants in On the Move and 139 (95.2%) participants in usual care completed testing. On the Move had greater mean (SD) improvements than the usual-care group in gait speed (0.05 [0.13] vs -0.01 [0.11] m/s; adjusted difference = 0.05 [0.02] m/s; P = .002) and 6-minute walk distance (20.6 [57.1] vs 4.1 [55.6] m; adjusted difference = 16.7 [7.4] m; P

  12. Care coordination in bone health screening between individual behaviors and health care services among Korean-American women across three age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Shin Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated continuous care is important to prevent and treat brittle bone status in the aging process; however, minority groups often have limited access to health services. The purpose of this study was to identify the care coordination among women’s perceptions about their bone health, information from health care providers, and the results of Bone Mineral Density (BMD tests across three age groups. The study was a cross-sectional comparative design. A total of 63 Korean American women completed both the assessment of BMD of the femoral neck and an interview survey. One’s own risks of osteoporosis, screening behaviors, and health care providers’ advice were analyzed according to three age (pre-, peri-, and post-menopausal groups, BMD levels, and health insurance coverage. Overall, health insurance coverage and having a primary health care provider of Korean American women were 59.0% and 32.0%, respectively; 61.9% had lower than normal BMD levels, which were significantly increased by advanced age. Individual awareness of risks of osteoporosis and screening behaviors were significantly higher in peri-menopausal than in pre- and post-menopausal groups, but no differences were found in health care providers’ information. The awareness and care providers’ information by BMD level or health insurance did not differ. The findings show a discrepancy between individual perceptions and behaviors and health care providers’ recommendations regard to bone health. Health behaviors should be guided by professional health care providers. The women in the post-menopausal stage need to be educated about the high risk of osteoporosis and its management.

  13. Group Sex Events and HIV/STI Risk in an Urban Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Samuel R.; Bolyard, Melissa; Khan, Maria; Maslow, Carey; Sandoval, Milagros; Mateu-Gelabert, Pedro; Krauss, Beatrice; Aral, Sevgi O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe: a. the prevalence and individual and network characteristics of group sex events (GSE) and GSE attendees; and b. HIV/STI discordance among respondents who said they went to a GSE together. Methods and Design In a sociometric network study of risk partners (defined as sexual partners, persons with whom respondents attended a GSE, or drug-injection partners) in Brooklyn, NY, we recruited a high-risk sample of 465 adults. Respondents reported on GSE attendance, the characteristics of GSEs, and their own and others’ behaviors at GSEs. Sera and urines were collected and STI prevalence was assayed. Results Of the 465 participants, 36% had attended a GSE in the last year, 26% had sex during the most recent of these GSEs, and 13% had unprotected sex there. Certain subgroups (hard drug users, men who have sex with men, women who have sex with women, and sex workers) were more likely to attend and more likely to engage in risk behaviors at these events. Among 90 GSE dyads in which at least one partner named the other as someone with whom they attended a GSE in the previous three months, STI/HIV discordance was common (HSV-2: 45% of dyads, HIV: 12% of dyads, Chlamydia: 21% of dyads). Many GSEs had 10 or more participants, and multiple partnerships at GSEs were common. High attendance rates at GSEs among members of large networks may increase community vulnerability to STI/HIV, particularly since network data show that almost all members of a large sociometric risk network either had sex with a GSE attendee or had sex with someone who had sex with a GSE attended. Conclusions Self-reported GSE attendance and participation was common among this high-risk sample. STI/HIV discordance among GSE attendees was high, highlighting the potential transmission risk associated with GSEs. Research on sexual behaviors should incorporate measures of GSE behaviors as standard research protocol. Interventions should be developed to reduce transmission at GSEs. PMID

  14. Coordinating Center: Molecular and Cellular Findings of Screen-Detected Lesions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Screen?Detected Lesions ? Coordinating Center and Data Management Group will provide support for the participating studies responding to RFA CA14?10. The coordinating center supports three main domains: network coordination, statistical support and computational analysis and protocol development and database support. Support for communication is provided through an interactive web portal, management of conference calls, and meeting support. |

  15. Optimizing Electric Vehicle Coordination Over a Heterogeneous Mesh Network in a Scaled-Down Smart Grid Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Lévesque, Martin; Maier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    , smart grid (SG) is still at the developmental stage to address those issues. In this regard, a smart grid testbed (SGT) is desirable to develop, analyze, and demonstrate various novel SG solutions, namely demand response, real-time pricing, and congestion management. In this paper, a novel SGT...... is developed in a laboratory by scaling a 250 kVA, 0.4 kV real low-voltage distribution feeder down to 1 kVA, 0.22 kV. Information and communication technology is integrated in the scaled-down network to establish real-time monitoring and control. The novelty of the developed testbed is demonstrated...

  16. Novel flexible frameworks of porous cobalt(II) coordination polymers that show selective guest adsorption based on the switching of hydrogen-bond pairs of amide groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Susumu; Kondo, Mitsuru; Fukui, Kôichi; Kitaura, Ryo; Chang, Ho-Chol; Mizutani, Tadashi

    2002-08-16

    Four porous crystalline coordination polymers with two-dimensional frameworks of a double-edged axe-shaped motif, [[Co(NCS)(2)(3-pia)(2)] x 2 EtOH.11 H(2)O](n) (1 a), [[Co(NCS)(2)(3-pia)(2)] x 4 Me(2)CO](n) (3 a), [[Co(NCS)(2)(3-pia)(2)] x 4T HF](n) (3 b) and [[Co(NCS)(2)(3-pna)(2)](n)] (5), have been synthesized by the reaction of cobalt(II) thiocyanate with N-(3-pyridyl)isonicotinamide (3-pia) or N-(3-pyridyl)nicotinamide (3-pna). X-ray crystallographic characterization reveals that adjacent layers are stacked such that channels are created, except in 5. The channels form a hydrogen-bonded interior for guest molecules; in practice, 1 a contains ethanol and water molecules as guests in the channels with hydrogen bonds, whereas 3 b (3 a) contains tetrahydrofuran (acetone) molecules. In 1 a, the "double-edged axe-shaped" motifs in adjacent sheets are not located over the top of each other, while the motifs in 3 b stack so perfectly as to overlap each other in an edge-to-edge fashion. This subtle change in the three-dimensional framework is associated with the template effect of the guests. Compound 5 has no guest molecules and, therefore, the amide groups in one sheet are used for hydrogen-bonding links with adjacent sheets. Removal of the guest molecules from 1 a and 3 b (3 a) causes a structural conversion accompanied by a color change. Pink 1 a cannot retain its original framework and changes into a blue amorphous compound. On the other hand, the framework of pink 3 b (3 a) is transformed to a new crystalline framework of violet 4. Interestingly, 4 reverts to the original pink crystals of 3 b (3 a) when it is exposed to THF (or acetone) vapor. Spectroscopic measurements (visible, EPR, and IR) provide a clue to the crystal-to-crystal transformation; on removal of the guests, the amide groups are used to form the beta sheet-type hydrogen bonding between the sheets, and thus the framework withstands significant stress on removal of guest molecules. This mechanism is

  17. Jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine coordinates metabolic networks required for anthesis and floral attractant emission in wild tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Michael; Hartl, Markus; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives (jasmonates [JAs]) play central roles in floral development and maturation. The binding of jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) to the F-box of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) is required for many JA-dependent physiological responses, but its role in anthesis and pollinator attraction traits remains largely unexplored. Here, we used the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, which develops sympetalous flowers with complex pollination biology, to examine the coordinating function of JA homeostasis in the distinct metabolic processes that underlie flower maturation, opening, and advertisement to pollinators. From combined transcriptomic, targeted metabolic, and allometric analyses of transgenic N. attenuata plants for which signaling deficiencies were complemented with methyl jasmonate, JA-Ile, and its functional homolog, coronatine (COR), we demonstrate that (1) JA-Ile/COR-based signaling regulates corolla limb opening and a JA-negative feedback loop; (2) production of floral volatiles (night emissions of benzylacetone) and nectar requires JA-Ile/COR perception through COI1; and (3) limb expansion involves JA-Ile-induced changes in limb fresh mass and carbohydrate metabolism. These findings demonstrate a master regulatory function of the JA-Ile/COI1 duet for the main function of a sympetalous corolla, that of advertising for and rewarding pollinator services. Flower opening, by contrast, requires JA-Ile signaling-dependent changes in primary metabolism, which are not compromised in the COI1-silenced RNA interference line used in this study. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Unravelling the size distribution of social groups with information theory in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, A.; Villuendas, D.; Vesperinas, C.; Abad, M.; Plastino, A.

    2010-07-01

    The minimization of Fisher’s information (MFI) approach of Frieden et al. [Phys. Rev. E 60, 48 (1999)] is applied to the study of size distributions in social groups on the basis of a recently established analogy between scale invariant systems and classical gases [Phys. A 389, 490 (2010)]. Going beyond the ideal gas scenario is seen to be tantamount to simulating the interactions taking place, for a competitive cluster growth process, in a scale-free ideal network - a non-correlated network with a connection-degree’s distribution that mimics the scale-free ideal gas density distribution. We use a scaling rule that allows one to classify the final cluster-size distributions using only one parameter that we call the competitiveness, which can be seen as a measure of the strength of the interactions. We find that both empirical city-size distributions and electoral results can be thus reproduced and classified according to this competitiveness-parameter, that also allow us to infer the maximum number of stable social relationships that one person can maintain, known as the Dunbar number, together with its standard deviation. We discuss the importance of this number in connection with the empirical phenomenon known as “six-degrees of separation”. Finally, we show that scaled city-size distributions of large countries follow, in general, the same universal distribution.

  19. HIGH: A Hexagon-based Intelligent Grouping Approach in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN, C.-S.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a random deployment or uniform deployment strategy, sensor nodes are scattered randomly or uniformly in the sensing field, respectively. Hence, the coverage ratio cannot be guaranteed. The coverage ratio of uniform deployment, in general, is larger than that of the random deployment strategy. However, a random deployment or uniform deployment strategy may cause unbalanced traffic pattern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Therefore, cluster heads (CHs around the sink have larger loads than those farther away from the sink. That is, CHs close to the sink exhaust their energy earlier. In order to overcome the above problem, we propose a Hexagon-based Intelligent Grouping approacH in WSNs (called HIGH. The coverage, energy consumption and data routing issues are well investigated and taken into consideration in the proposed HIGH scheme. The simulation results validate our theoretical analysis and show that the proposed HIGH scheme achieves a satisfactory coverage ratio, balances the energy consumption among sensor nodes, and extends network lifetime significantly.

  20. The Children's Oncology Group Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN): case catchment in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Jessica R B; Spector, Logan G; Krailo, Mark D; Reaman, Gregory H; Linabery, Amy M; Poynter, Jenny N; Stork, Susan K; Adamson, Peter C; Ross, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    The Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) was established within the Children's Oncology Group (COG) in July 2008 to provide a centralized pediatric cancer research registry for investigators conducting approved etiologic and survivorship studies. The authors conducted an ecological analysis to characterize CCRN catchment at >200 COG institutions by demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and geographic location to determine whether the CCRN can serve as a population-based registry for childhood cancer. During 2009 to 2011, 18,580 US children newly diagnosed with cancer were registered in the CCRN. These observed cases were compared with age-specific, sex-specific, and race/ethnicity-specific expected numbers calculated from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer incidence rates and 2010 US Census data. Overall, 42% of children (18,580 observed/44,267 expected) who were diagnosed with cancer at age Cancer Society.

  1. Use of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles for enhanced interlibrary loan, part II: Network application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, V M; Dell, E Y

    1993-07-01

    The Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force of the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) accepted the charge of maximizing use of the advanced features of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. A pilot project was initiated to address the task force's recommendation to the HSLC Board that all nonrush interlibrary loan (ILL) documents be transmitted to participants within forty-eight hours of request receipt. This paper describes the project, which tests a network application for unattended, overnight transmission of documents. In determining whether this technology could be used as the primary medium for ILL of photocopies, the following criteria were used: the percentage of ILL requests filled by telefacsimile; the speed, quality, and reliability of service; and the impact of telefacsimile on document delivery costs. The article discusses the project history, optimal use of equipment features for library applications, full-scale implementation, and operational issues that affect ILL policy.

  2. Simplified Antenna Group Determination of RS Overhead Reduced Massive MIMO for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Moo Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO systems can be applied to support numerous internet of things (IoT devices using its excessive amount of transmitter (TX antennas. However, one of the big obstacles for the realization of the massive MIMO system is the overhead of reference signal (RS, because the number of RS is proportional to the number of TX antennas and/or related user equipments (UEs. It has been already reported that antenna group-based RS overhead reduction can be very effective to the efficient operation of massive MIMO, but the method of deciding the number of antennas needed in each group is at question. In this paper, we propose a simplified determination scheme of the number of antennas needed in each group for RS overhead reduced massive MIMO to support many IoT devices. Supporting many distributed IoT devices is a framework to configure wireless sensor networks. Our contribution can be divided into two parts. First, we derive simple closed-form approximations of the achievable spectral efficiency (SE by using zero-forcing (ZF and matched filtering (MF precoding for the RS overhead reduced massive MIMO systems with channel estimation error. The closed-form approximations include a channel error factor that can be adjusted according to the method of the channel estimation. Second, based on the closed-form approximation, we present an efficient algorithm determining the number of antennas needed in each group for the group-based RS overhead reduction scheme. The algorithm depends on the exact inverse functions of the derived closed-form approximations of SE. It is verified with theoretical analysis and simulation that the proposed algorithm works well, and thus can be used as an important tool for massive MIMO systems to support many distributed IoT devices.

  3. Supporting patients self-managing respiratory health: a qualitative study on the impact of the Breathe Easy voluntary group network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Ferhana; Merritt, Rowena

    2018-01-01

    Self-management strategies are designed to improve lung and respiratory health through structured self-management plans with regular practitioner reviews. Strategies have not, however, focused upon how patient support groups and advocacy networks can help with the management of these conditions; therefore, it is unknown what impact they may have on patient self-management. A qualitative study was designed to help understand what impact the British Lung Foundation's Breathe Easy (BE) groups have on patients managing their lung and respiratory conditions. A semistructured telephone interview schedule was developed to study the network. Topics covered included: perceptions about the BE groups; current referrals systems and integration pathways; benefits of attending the BE groups; and integration of the BE groups into the respiratory pathway. Key themes explored included: shared patient experience and peer support; patient self-management and self-education; attendance of healthcare professionals; and the impact of integrating BE groups into the respiratory pathway. BE networks were shown to support self-care initiatives for people attending the groups, and members expressed a social and educational benefit. BE networks were working with the local National Health Service to become an integral part of the respiratory pathway, yet there was evidence of resistance from the health service in incorporating the networks.

  4. The curvature coordinate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almegaard, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a concept for a curvature coordinate system on regular curved surfaces from which faceted surfaces with plane quadrangular facets can be designed. The lines of curvature are used as parametric lines for the curvature coordinate system on the surface. A new conjugate set of lines......, called middle curvature lines, is introduced. These lines define the curvature coordinate system. Using the curvature coordinate system, the surface can be conformally mapped on the plane. In this mapping, elliptic sections are mapped as circles, and hyperbolic sections are mapped as equilateral...... hyperbolas. This means that when a plane orthogonal system of curves for which the vertices in a mesh always lie on a circle is mapped on a surface with positive Gaussian curvature using inverse mapping, and the mapped vertices are connected by straight lines, this network will form a faceted surface...

  5. Assessing coastal wetland vulnerability to sea-level rise along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast: Gaps and opportunities for developing a coordinated regional sampling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J; Griffith, Kereen T; Larriviere, Jack C; Feher, Laura C; Cahoon, Donald R; Enwright, Nicholas M; Oster, David A; Tirpak, John M; Woodrey, Mark S; Collini, Renee C; Baustian, Joseph J; Breithaupt, Joshua L; Cherry, Julia A; Conrad, Jeremy R; Cormier, Nicole; Coronado-Molina, Carlos A; Donoghue, Joseph F; Graham, Sean A; Harper, Jennifer W; Hester, Mark W; Howard, Rebecca J; Krauss, Ken W; Kroes, Daniel E; Lane, Robert R; McKee, Karen L; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Middleton, Beth A; Moon, Jena A; Piazza, Sarai C; Rankin, Nicole M; Sklar, Fred H; Steyer, Greg D; Swanson, Kathleen M; Swarzenski, Christopher M; Vervaeke, William C; Willis, Jonathan M; Wilson, K Van

    2017-01-01

    to transform a broadly disseminated and unplanned collection of SET-MH stations into a coordinated and strategic regional network. This regional network would provide data for predicting and preparing for the responses of coastal wetlands to accelerated sea-level rise and other aspects of global change.

  6. Assessing coastal wetland vulnerability to sea-level rise along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast: Gaps and opportunities for developing a coordinated regional sampling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Osland

    analyses can be used to transform a broadly disseminated and unplanned collection of SET-MH stations into a coordinated and strategic regional network. This regional network would provide data for predicting and preparing for the responses of coastal wetlands to accelerated sea-level rise and other aspects of global change.

  7. Assessing coastal wetland vulnerability to sea-level rise along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast: Gaps and opportunities for developing a coordinated regional sampling network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Griffith, Kereen T.; Larriviere, Jack C.; Feher, Laura C.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; Oster, David A.; Tirpak, John M.; Woodrey, Mark S.; Collini, Renee C.; Baustian, Joseph J.; Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Cherry, Julia A; Conrad, Jeremy R.; Cormier, Nicole; Coronado-Molina, Carlos A.; Donoghue, Joseph F.; Graham, Sean A.; Harper, Jennifer W.; Hester, Mark W.; Howard, Rebecca J.; Krauss, Ken W.; Kroes, Daniel; Lane, Robert R.; Mckee, Karen L.; Mendelssohn, Irving A.; Middleton, Beth A.; Moon, Jena A.; Piazza, Sarai; Rankin, Nicole M.; Sklar, Fred H.; Steyer, Gregory D.; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Vervaeke, William; Willis, Jonathan M; Van Wilson, K.

    2017-01-01

    used to transform a broadly disseminated and unplanned collection of SET-MH stations into a coordinated and strategic regional network. This regional network would provide data for predicting and preparing for the responses of coastal wetlands to accelerated sea-level rise and other aspects of global change.

  8. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... and non-Federal participants with interest in high performance research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG...

  9. 78 FR 7464 - Large Scale Networking (LSN) ; Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN) ; Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG). Public Comments: The government seeks individual input; attendees...

  10. An International Strategy for Human Exploration of the Moon: The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurini, Kathleen C.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Junichiro, Kawaguchi; Piedboeuf, Jean-Claude; Schade, Britta; Lorenzoni, Andrea; Curtis, Jeremy; Hae-Dong, Kim

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) was established in response to The Global Exploration Strategy: The Framework for Coordination developed by fourteen space agencies and released in May 2007. Several ISECG participating space agencies have been studying concepts for human exploration of the moon that allow individual and collective goals and objectives to be met. This 18 month study activity culminated with the development of the ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration. The reference architecture is a series of elements delivered over time in a flexible and evolvable campaign. This paper will describe the reference architecture and how it will inform near-term and long-term programmatic planning within interested agencies. The reference architecture is intended to serve as a global point of departure conceptual architecture that enables individual agency investments in technology development and demonstration, International Space Station research and technology demonstration, terrestrial analog studies, and robotic precursor missions to contribute towards the eventual implementation of a human lunar exploration scenario which reflects the concepts and priorities established to date. It also serves to create opportunities for partnerships that will support evolution of this concept and its eventual realization. The ISECG Reference Architecture for Human Lunar Exploration (commonly referred to as the lunar gPoD) reflects the agency commitments to finding an effective balance between conducting important scientific investigations of and from the moon, as well as demonstrating and mastering the technologies and capabilities to send humans farther into the Solar System. The lunar gPoD begins with a robust robotic precursor phase that demonstrates technologies and capabilities considered important for the success of the campaign. Robotic missions will inform the human missions and buy down risks. Human exploration will start

  11. Developing a coordinated school health approach to child obesity prevention in rural Appalachia: results of focus groups with teachers, parents, and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetzina, Karen E; Dalton, William T; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Azzazy, Nora; Vonwerssowetz, Katrina M; Givens, Connie; Stern, Harold P

    2009-01-01

    High prevalence rates of obesity, particularly among those residing in US rural areas, and associated physical and psychosocial health consequences, direct attention to the need for effective prevention programs. The current study describes an initial step in developing a school-based obesity prevention program in rural Appalachia, USA. The program, modeled on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coordinated School Health (CSH) Program, includes a community-based participatory research approach to addressing the health needs specific to this region. Focus groups with teachers, parents, and 4th grade students were used to understand perceptions and school policy related to nutrition, physical activity, and the role of the school in obesity prevention. Results revealed that these community stakeholders were concerned about the problem of child obesity and supported the idea of their school doing more to improve the diet and physical activity of its students. Specifically, all groups thought that foods and drinks consumed by students at school should be healthier and that they should have more opportunities for physical activity. However, they cited limitations of the school environment, academic pressures, and lack of parental support as potential barriers to making such changes. Parents were most concerned that their children were not getting enough to eat and they and the teachers were not in favor of BMI screening at the school. Parents were in favor of increasing physical activity during school and thought that parent volunteers should help students select foods in the cafeteria. Students cited examples of how diet and physical activity affect their health and school performance, and thought that they should have more physical education time and recess. The data collected in the current study contributed to the limited knowledge base regarding rural populations as well as identified strengths and potential barriers to assist with the development of a

  12. Software for hyperspectral, joint photographic experts group (.JPG), portable network graphics (.PNG) and tagged image file format (.TIFF) segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, L. S.; Rodrigo, B. P.; Lucio, A. de C. Jorge

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a system developed by an application of a neural network Multilayer Perceptron for drone acquired agricultural image segmentation. This application allows a supervised user training the classes that will posteriorly be interpreted by neural network. These classes will be generated manually with pre-selected attributes in the application. After the attribute selection a segmentation process is made to allow the relevant information extraction for different types of images, RGB or Hyperspectral. The application allows extracting the geographical coordinates from the image metadata, geo referencing all pixels on the image. In spite of excessive memory consume on hyperspectral images regions of interest, is possible to perform segmentation, using bands chosen by user that can be combined in different ways to obtain different results.

  13. Quantum coordinated multi-point communication based on entanglement swapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Gang; Shang, Tao; Liu, Jian-wei

    2017-05-01

    In a quantum network, adjacent nodes can communicate with each other point to point by using pre-shared Einsten-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs, and furthermore remote nodes can establish entanglement channels by using quantum routing among intermediate nodes. However, with the rapid development of quantum networks, the demand of various message transmission among nodes inevitably emerges. In order to realize this goal and extend quantum networks, we propose a quantum coordinated multi-point communication scheme based on entanglement swapping. The scheme takes full advantage of EPR pairs between adjacent nodes and performs multi-party entanglement swapping to transmit messages. Considering various demands of communication, all nodes work cooperatively to realize different message transmission modes, including one to many, many to one and one to some. Scheme analysis shows that the proposed scheme can flexibly organize a coordinated group and efficiently use EPR resources, while it meets basic security requirement under the condition of coordinated communication.

  14. Central Role of the PPARγ Gene Network in Coordinating Beef Cattle Intramuscular Adipogenesis in Response to Weaning Age and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisá, Sonia J.; Shike, Daniel W.; Faulkner, Dan B.; Meteer, William T.; Keisler, Duane; Loor, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Adipogenic/lipogenic transcriptional networks regulating intramuscular fat deposition (IMF) in response to weaning age and dietary starch level were studied. The longissimus muscle (LM) of beef steers on an early weaning (141 days age) plus high-starch diet (EWS) or a normal weaning (NW, 222 days age) plus starch creep-feed diet (CFS) was biopsied at 0 (EW), 25, 50, 96 (NW), 167, and 222 (pre-slaughter) days. Expression patterns of 35 target genes were studied. From NW through slaughter, all steers received the same high-starch diet. In EWS steers the expression of PPARG, other adipogenic (CEBPA, ZFP423) and lipogenic (THRSP, SREBF1, INSIG1) activators, and several enzymes (FASN, SCD, ELOVL6, PCK1, DGAT2) that participate in the process of IMF increased gradually to a peak between 96 and 167 days on treatment. Steers in NW did not achieve similar expression levels even by 222 days on treatment, suggesting a blunted response even when fed a high-starch diet after weaning. High-starch feeding at an early age (EWS) triggers precocious and sustained adipogenesis, resulting in greater marbling. PMID:24516329

  15. Exponential Arithmetic Based Self-Healing Group Key Distribution Scheme with Backward Secrecy under the Resource-Constrained Wireless Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua; Zheng, Yandong; Zhang, Xiyong; Li, Zhoujun

    2016-04-28

    In resource-constrained wireless networks, resources such as storage space and communication bandwidth are limited. To guarantee secure communication in resource-constrained wireless networks, group keys should be distributed to users. The self-healing group key distribution (SGKD) scheme is a promising cryptographic tool, which can be used to distribute and update the group key for the secure group communication over unreliable wireless networks. Among all known SGKD schemes, exponential arithmetic based SGKD (E-SGKD) schemes reduce the storage overhead to constant, thus is suitable for the the resource-constrained wireless networks. In this paper, we provide a new mechanism to achieve E-SGKD schemes with backward secrecy. We first propose a basic E-SGKD scheme based on a known polynomial-based SGKD, where it has optimal storage overhead while having no backward secrecy. To obtain the backward secrecy and reduce the communication overhead, we introduce a novel approach for message broadcasting and self-healing. Compared with other E-SGKD schemes, our new E-SGKD scheme has the optimal storage overhead, high communication efficiency and satisfactory security. The simulation results in Zigbee-based networks show that the proposed scheme is suitable for the resource-restrained wireless networks. Finally, we show the application of our proposed scheme.

  16. Social Network Analysis as an Analytic Tool for Task Group Research: A Case Study of an Interdisciplinary Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Naorah C.

    2017-01-01

    Group counselors commonly collaborate in interdisciplinary settings in health care, substance abuse, and juvenile justice. Social network analysis is a methodology rarely used in counseling research yet has potential to examine task group dynamics in new ways. This case study explores the scholarly relationships among 36 members of an…

  17. Enterprise Coordination on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Petrie

    2011-01-01

    Enterprises are now connected internally and externally to other Enterprises via the Internet in ways that are increasingly difficult to manage, especially as these interconnections become more dynamic. Current methods of coordinating the effects of change as they propagate through these networks of connections are not likely to scale. What is needed is a new paradigm for how the Internet supports such coordination. Indeed, the Internet should and could provide fundamental coordination functi...

  18. Group independent component analysis reveals consistent resting-state networks across multiple sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sharon; Ross, Thomas J; Zhan, Wang; Myers, Carol S; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Heishman, Stephen J; Stein, Elliot A; Yang, Yihong

    2008-11-06

    Group independent component analysis (gICA) was performed on resting-state data from 14 healthy subjects scanned on 5 fMRI scan sessions across 16 days. The data were reduced and aggregated in 3 steps using Principal Components Analysis (PCA, within scan, within session and across session) and subjected to gICA procedures. The amount of reduction was estimated by an improved method that utilizes a first-order autoregressive fitting technique to the PCA spectrum. Analyses were performed using all sessions in order to maximize sensitivity and alleviate the problem of component identification across session. Across-session consistency was examined by three methods, all using back-reconstruction of the single-session or single-subject/session maps from the grand (5-session) maps. The gICA analysis produced 55 spatially independent maps. Obvious artifactual maps were eliminated and the remainder were grouped based upon physiological recognizability. Biologically relevant component maps were found, including sensory, motor and a 'default-mode' map. All analysis methods showed that components were remarkably consistent across session. Critically, the components with the most obvious physiological relevance were the most consistent. The consistency of these maps suggests that, at least over a period of several weeks, these networks would be useful to follow longitudinal treatment-related manipulations.

  19. Group composition and network structure in school classes : a multilevel application of the p* model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Miranda J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the structure of social networks of students within school classes and examines differences in network structure between classes. In order to examine the network structure within school classes, we focused in particular on the principle of homophily, i.e. the tendency that

  20. Supramolecular Coordination Networks of s- and f-Block Metals Featuring the 1,8-Naphthalimide Tecton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Andrew Paul

    Sensorless speed detection of an induction motor is an attractive area for researchers to enhance the reliability of the system and to reduce the cost of the components. This paper presents a simple method of estimating a rotational speed by utilizing an artificial neural network (ANN) that would be fed by a set of stator current frequencies that contain some saliency harmonics. This approach allows operators to detect the speed in induction motors such an approach also provides reliability, low cost, and simplicity. First, the proposed method is based on converting the stator current signals to the frequency domain and then applying a tracking algorithm to the stator current spectrum in order to detect frequency peaks. Secondly, the ANN has to be trained by the detected peaks; the training data must be from very precise data to provide an accurate rotor speed. Moreover, the desired output of the training is the speed, which is measured by a tachometer simultaneously with the stator current signal. The databases were collected at many different speeds from two different types of AC induction motors, wound rotor and squirrel cage. They were trained and tested, so when the difference between the desired speed value and the ANN output value reached the wanted accuracy, the system does not need to use the tachometer anymore. Eventually, the experimental results show that in an optimal ANN design, the speed of the wound rotor induction motor was estimated accurately, where the testing average error was 1 RPM. The proposed method has not succeeded to predict the rotor speed of the squirrel cage induction motor precisely, where the smallest testing­average error that was achieved was 5 RPM.

  1. The Children’s Oncology Group Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Jessica R. B.; Spector, Logan G.; Krailo, Mark D.; Reaman, Gregory H.; Linabery, Amy M.; Poynter, Jenny N.; Stork, Susan K.; Adamson, Peter C.; Ross, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) was established within the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) in July 2008 to provide a centralized pediatric cancer research registry for investigators conducting approved etiologic and survivorship studies. The authors conducted an ecological analysis to characterize CCRN catchment at >200 COG institutions by demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and geographic location to determine whether the CCRN can serve as a population-based registry for childhood cancer. METHODS During 2009 to 2011, 18,580 US children newly diagnosed with cancer were registered in the CCRN. These observed cases were compared with age-specific, sex-specific, and race/ethnicity-specific expected numbers calculated from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer incidence rates and 2010 US Census data. RESULTS Overall, 42% of children (18,580 observed/44,267 expected) who were diagnosed with cancer at age <20 years were registered in the CCRN, including 45%, 57%, 51%, 44%, and 24% of those diagnosed at birth, ages 1 to 4 years, ages 5 to 9 years, ages 10 to 14 years, and ages 15 to 19 years, respectively. Some malignancies were better represented in the CCRN (leukemia, 59%; renal tumors, 67%) than others (retinoblastoma, 34%). There was little evidence of differences by sex or race/ethnicity, although rates in nonwhites were somewhat lower than rates in whites. CONCLUSIONS Given the low observed-to-expected ratio, it will be important to identify challenges and barriers to registration to improve case ascertainment, especially for rarer diagnoses and older age groups; however, it is encouraging that some diagnoses in younger children are fairly representative of the population. Overall, the CCRN is providing centralized, real-time access to cases for research and could be used as a model for other national cooperative groups. PMID:24889136

  2. Networks in disasters: Multidisciplinary communication and coordination in response and recovery to the 2010 Haiti Earthquake (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdoo, B. G.; Augenstein, J.; Comfort, L.; Huggins, L.; Krenitsky, N.; Scheinert, S.; Serrant, T.; Siciliano, M.; Stebbins, S.; Sweeney, P.; University Of Pittsburgh Haiti Reconnaissance Team

    2010-12-01

    response and recovery phases. Our team consists of experts in natural hazards, public health, shelter and infrastructure, education, and security. We are performing a network analysis based on the content of news and situation reports in media and from UN and aid agencies, field reports by academics and organizations like EERI, and discussions with agencies in Haiti. During three trips to Haiti, we have documented what information was being collected by key stakeholders including government, United Nations, non-governmental organizations, and both domestic and international educational institutions. Insights gained from this analysis of disaster response and recovery operations are invaluable in informing the next state of risk reduction, the transition to a sustainable recovery in a damaged region.

  3. Aggression, grooming and group-level cooperation in white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus): insights from social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofoot, Margaret C; Rubenstein, Daniel I; Maiya, Arun S; Berger-Wolf, Tanya Y

    2011-08-01

    The form of animal social systems depends on the nature of agonistic and affiliative interactions. Social network theory provides tools for characterizing social structure that go beyond simple dyadic interactions and consider the group as a whole. We show three groups of capuchin monkeys from Barro Colorado Island, Panama, where there are strong connections between key aspects of aggression, grooming, and proximity networks, and, at least among females, those who incur risk to defend their group have particular "social personalities." Although there is no significant correlation for any of the network measures between giving and receiving aggression, suggesting that dominance relationships do not follow a simple hierarchy, strong correlations emerge for many measures between the aggression and grooming networks. At the local, but not global, scale, receiving aggression and giving grooming are strongly linked in all groups. Proximity shows no correlation with aggression at either the local or the global scale, suggesting that individuals neither seek out nor avoid aggressors. Yet, grooming has a global but not local connection to proximity. Extensive groomers who tend to direct their efforts at other extensive groomers also spend time in close proximity to many other individuals. These results indicate the important role that prosociality plays in shaping female social relationships. We also show that females who receive the least aggression, and thus pay low costs for group living, are most likely to participate in group defense. No consistent "social personality" traits characterize the males who invest in group defense. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Using social networking to understand social networks: analysis of a mobile phone closed user group used by a Ghanaian health team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaonga, Nadi Nina; Labrique, Alain; Mechael, Patricia; Akosah, Eric; Ohemeng-Dapaah, Seth; Sakyi Baah, Joseph; Kodie, Richmond; Kanter, Andrew S; Levine, Orin

    2013-04-03

    The network structure of an organization influences how well or poorly an organization communicates and manages its resources. In the Millennium Villages Project site in Bonsaaso, Ghana, a mobile phone closed user group has been introduced for use by the Bonsaaso Millennium Villages Project Health Team and other key individuals. No assessment on the benefits or barriers of the use of the closed user group had been carried out. The purpose of this research was to make the case for the use of social network analysis methods to be applied in health systems research--specifically related to mobile health. This study used mobile phone voice records of, conducted interviews with, and reviewed call journals kept by a mobile phone closed user group consisting of the Bonsaaso Millennium Villages Project Health Team. Social network analysis methodology complemented by a qualitative component was used. Monthly voice data of the closed user group from Airtel Bharti Ghana were analyzed using UCINET and visual depictions of the network were created using NetDraw. Interviews and call journals kept by informants were analyzed using NVivo. The methodology was successful in helping identify effective organizational structure. Members of the Health Management Team were the more central players in the network, rather than the Community Health Nurses (who might have been expected to be central). Social network analysis methodology can be used to determine the most productive structure for an organization or team, identify gaps in communication, identify key actors with greatest influence, and more. In conclusion, this methodology can be a useful analytical tool, especially in the context of mobile health, health services, and operational and managerial research.

  5. TESS Follow-up Observing Program (TFOP) Working Group:A Mission-led Effort to Coordinate Community Resources to Confirm TESS Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen; Quinn, Samuel N.; Latham, David W.; Christiansen, Jessie; Ciardi, David; Dragomir, Diana; Crossfield, Ian; Seager, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will observe most of the sky over a period of two years. Observations will be conducted in 26 sectors of sky coverage and each sector will be observed for ~27 days. Data from each sector is expected to produce hundreds of transiting planet candidates (PCs) per month and thousands over the two year nominal mission. The TFOP Working Group (WG) is a mission-led effort organized to efficiently provide follow-up observations to confirm candidates as planets or reject them as false positives. The primary goal of the TFOP WG is to facilitate achievement of the Level One Science Requirement to measure masses for 50 transiting planets smaller than 4 Earth radii. Secondary goals are to serve any science coming out of TESS and to foster communication and coordination both within the TESS Science Team and with the community at large. The TFOP WG is organized as five Sub Groups (SGs). SG1 will provide seeing-limited imaging to measure blending within a candidate's aperture and time-series photometry to identify false positives and in some cases to improve ephemerides, light curves, and/or transit time variation (TTV) measurements. SG2 will provide reconnaissance spectroscopy to identify astrophysical false positives and to contribute to improved host star parameters. SG3 will provide high-resolution imaging with adaptive optics, speckle imaging, and lucky imaging to detect nearby objects. SG4 will provide precise radial velocities to derive orbits of planet(s) and measure their mass(es) relative to the host star. SG5 will provide space-based photometry to confirm and/or improve the TESS photometric ephemerides, and will also provide improved light curves for transit events or TTV measurements. We describe the TFOP WG observing and planet confirmation process, the five SGs that comprise the TFOP WG, ExoFOP-TESS and other web-based tools being developed to support TFOP WG observers, other advantages of joining the TFOP WG, the TFOP

  6. Pressure to drink but not to smoke: disentangling selection and socialization in adolescent peer networks and peer groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuru, Noona; Burk, William J; Laursen, Brett; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-12-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants identified three school friends and described their alcohol and tobacco use on two occasions one year apart. Actor-based models simultaneously examined changes in peer network ties and changes in individual behaviors for all participants within each school. Multi-level analyses examined changes in individual behaviors for adolescents entering new peer groups and adolescents in stable peer groups, both of which were embedded within the school-based peer networks. Similar results emerged from both analytic methods: Selection and socialization contributed to similarity of alcohol use, but only selection was a factor in tobacco use. Copyright © 2010 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Coordination and donation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, J; Lorente, M

    2006-01-01

    The progressive incorporation of organ transplants as a therapeutic resource resulted in organisational adaptation and overall transplant management, leading to the emergence of the figure of the transplant coordinator in the mid-1980s. In Spain, the National Organisation of Transplants (Organización Nacional de Transplantes - ONT) was created, establishing a system - called the "Spanish model" - based on a network of coordinators at three levels: national, the autonomous community and the hospital. This organisational structure is a point of reference at the world level. The prevalence of the Intensive Medicine specialisation amongst hospital transplant coordinators is remarkable. The majority of organs proceed from brain-dead patients with beating hearts and this requires the infrastructure offered by intensive care units. The functions of the coordinator can be summarised in guaranteeing a synchrony of all the elements and teams that come together in an organisational chain that has come to be called the "process of donation". Schematically, the crucial points that the hospital coordinator develops are the following: - Detection of the potential donor. - Maintenance of the donor. - Diagnosis of brain death. - Family consent. - Preparation of the hospital logistics. - Helping the relatives. - Direct involvement in the Program of Guarantee of Quality. - Person of reference in any activity related to the transplant. It would be desirable to achieve the creation of transplant coordination teams, with univocal messages, professionalism and a permanent input of the so-called "human factor", which is so necessary and also so close to the transplant world.

  8. Elevator Group Supervisory Control System Using Genetic Network Programming with Macro Nodes and Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Yu, Lu; Mabu, Shingo; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Markon, Sandor

    Elevator Group Supervisory Control System (EGSCS) is a very large scale stochastic dynamic optimization problem. Due to its vast state space, significant uncertainty and numerous resource constraints such as finite car capacities and registered hall/car calls, it is hard to manage EGSCS using conventional control methods. Recently, many solutions for EGSCS using Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies have been reported. Genetic Network Programming (GNP), which is proposed as a new evolutionary computation method several years ago, is also proved to be efficient when applied to EGSCS problem. In this paper, we propose an extended algorithm for EGSCS by introducing Reinforcement Learning (RL) into GNP framework, and an improvement of the EGSCS' performances is expected since the efficiency of GNP with RL has been clarified in some other studies like tile-world problem. Simulation tests using traffic flows in a typical office building have been made, and the results show an actual improvement of the EGSCS' performances comparing to the algorithms using original GNP and conventional control methods. Furthermore, as a further study, an importance weight optimization algorithm is employed based on GNP with RL and its efficiency is also verified with the better performances.

  9. Health Social Networks as Online Life Support Groups for Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Edhelmira Lima, E-mail: edhyly@ic.uff.br; Loques, Orlando Filho [Instituto de Computação - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco [Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    The number of patients who use the internet in search for information that might improve their health conditions has increased. Among them, those looking for virtual environments to share experiences, doubts, opinions, and emotions, and to foster relationships aimed at giving and getting support stand out. Therefore, there is an increasing need to assess how those environments can affect the patients' health. This study was aimed at identifying scientific studies on the proliferation and impact of virtual communities, known as health social networks or online support groups, directed to cardiovascular diseases, which might be useful to patients with certain conditions, providing them with information and emotional support. A systematic review of the literature was conducted with articles published from 2007 to 2012, related to cardiovascular diseases and collected from the following databases: PubMed; Association for Computing Machinery(ACM); and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Four articles meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The results were interesting and relevant from the health viewpoint, identifying therapeutic benefits, such as provision of emotional support, greater compliance to treatment, and information sharing on diseases and on life experiences.

  10. Griffiths singularities in the random quantum Ising antiferromagnet: A tree tensor network renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ping; Kao, Ying-Jer; Chen, Pochung; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising chain in both transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields is one of the paradigmatic models of a quantum phase transition. The antiferromagnetic system exhibits a zero-temperature critical line separating an antiferromagnetic phase and a paramagnetic phase; the critical line connects an integrable quantum critical point at zero longitudinal field and a classical first-order transition point at zero transverse field. Using a strong-disorder renormalization group method formulated as a tree tensor network, we study the zero-temperature phase of the quantum Ising chain with bond randomness. We introduce a new matrix product operator representation of high-order moments, which provides an efficient and accurate tool for determining quantum phase transitions via the Binder cumulant of the order parameter. Our results demonstrate an infinite-randomness quantum critical point in zero longitudinal field accompanied by pronounced quantum Griffiths singularities, arising from rare ordered regions with anomalously slow fluctuations inside the paramagnetic phase. The strong Griffiths effects are signaled by a large dynamical exponent z >1 , which characterizes a power-law density of low-energy states of the localized rare regions and becomes infinite at the quantum critical point. Upon application of a longitudinal field, the quantum phase transition between the paramagnetic phase and the antiferromagnetic phase is completely destroyed. Furthermore, quantum Griffiths effects are suppressed, showing z <1 , when the dynamics of the rare regions is hampered by the longitudinal field.

  11. Context-based user grouping for multi-casting in heterogeneous radio networks

    OpenAIRE

    C. Mannweiler; Klein, A; J. Schneider; H. D. Schotten

    2011-01-01

    Along with the rise of sophisticated smartphones and smart spaces, the availability of both static and dynamic context information has steadily been increasing in recent years. Due to the popularity of social networks, these data are complemented by profile information about individual users. Making use of this information by classifying users in wireless networks enables targeted content and advertisement delivery as well as optimizing network resources, in particular bandw...

  12. Group Centric Networking: A New Approach for Wireless Multi-Hop Networking to Enable the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-22

    connectivity and reli- ability. 1. INTRODUCTION Despite decades of e↵ort, multi-hop wireless networks have not succeeded in fulfilling their once...nary 5G standards organizations have already begun putting forth ideas for designing future wireless systems, This work is sponsored by Defense...P. Marsch, M. Maternia, O. Queseth, M. Schellmann, H. Schotten, H. Taoka et al., “Scenarios for 5g mobile and wireless communications: the vision of

  13. Positive and Negative Aspects of Using Social Networks in Higher Education: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Ömer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have become popular among students and faculties, especially for all young population. SNSs are a relatively new technology, and little research has been conducted on the beliefs of the teacher candidates about using Social Network as an instructional tool. The study was conducted to find out for what purposes…

  14. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators; Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.

    2009-03-23

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators holds biennial meetings under the auspices of the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS).

  15. Coordinating the Chain of Utterances: An Analysis of Communicative Flow and Turn Taking in an Interpreted Group Dialogue for Deaf-Blind Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Sigrid Slettebakk; Raanes, Eli

    2013-01-01

    This article explains how interpreters for deaf-blind people coordinate and express turn-taking signals in an interpreted dialogue. Empirical materials are derived from a video-ethnographic study of an interpreted-mediated board meeting with five deaf-blind participants. The results show that the interpreters provide access to visual and auditory…

  16. Cluster imaging of multi-brain networks (CIMBN: a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian eDuan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Studying the neural basis of human social interactions is a key topic in the field of social neuroscience. Brain imaging studies in this field usually focus on the neural correlates of the social interactions between two participants. However, as the participant number further increases, even by a small amount, great difficulties raise. One challenge is how to concurrently scan all the interacting brains with high ecological validity, especially for a large number of participants. The other challenge is how to effectively model the complex group interaction behaviors emerging from the intricate neural information exchange among a group of socially organized people. Confronting these challenges, we propose a new approach called Cluster Imaging of Multi-brain Networks (CIMBN. CIMBN consists of two parts. The first part is a cluster imaging technique with high ecological validity based on multiple functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS systems. Using this technique, we can easily extend the simultaneous imaging capacity of social neuroscience studies up to dozens of participants. The second part of CIMBN is a multi-brain network (MBN modeling method based on graph theory. By taking each brain as a network node and the relationship between any two brains as a network edge, one can construct a network model for a group of interacting brains. The emergent group social behaviors can then be studied using the network’s properties, such as its topological structure and information exchange efficiency. Although there is still much work to do, as a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains, CIMBN can provide new insights into the neural correlates of group social interactions, and advance social neuroscience and social psychology.

  17. Pressure to drink but not to smoke: Disentangling selection and socialization in adolescent peer networks and peer groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiuru, N.; Burk, W.J.; Laursen, B.; Salmela-Aro, K.; Nurmi, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants

  18. Pressure to Drink but Not to Smoke: Disentangling Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Peer Networks and Peer Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuru, Noona; Burk, William J.; Laursen, Brett; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined the relative influence of selection and socialization on alcohol and tobacco use in adolescent peer networks and peer groups. The sample included 1419 Finnish secondary education students (690 males and 729 females, mean age 16 years at the outset) from nine schools. Participants identified three school friends and described…

  19. "You Have to Hold Your Own": Investigating the Social Networks of a Diverse Group of Disenfranchised Urban Male Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Jennifer; Happel, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic case study investigates social networks and forms of social capital accessed by a group of five urban male youth (ages 15-19), from diverse racial backgrounds, who were disenfranchised economically. We refer to the youth as "disenfranchised" because they were disconnected from forms of institutional support, especially…

  20. Burning through organizational boundaries? Examining inter-organizational communication networks in policy-mandated collaborative bushfire planning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel F. Brummel; Kristen C. Nelson; Pamela J. Jakes

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration can enhance cooperation across geographic and organizational scales, effectively "burning through" those boundaries. Using structured social network analysis (SNA) and qualitative in-depth interviews, this study examined three collaborative bushfire planning groups in New South Wales, Australia and asked: How does participation in policy-...

  1. The index case is not enough: Variation among individuals, groups and social networks modify bacterial transmission dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Carl N; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Ziemba, Michael J; Kothamasu, Krishna S; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2017-07-10

    The traits of the index case of an infectious disease outbreak, and the circumstances for their aetiology, potentially influence the trajectory of transmission dynamics. However, these dynamics likely also depend on the traits of the individuals with whom the index case interacts. We used the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola to test how the traits of the index case, group phenotypic composition and group size interact to facilitate the transmission of a GFP-labelled cuticular bacterium. We also compared bacterial transmission across experimentally generated "daisy-chain" vs. "star" networks of social interactions. Finally, we compared social network structure across groups of different sizes. Groups of 10 spiders experienced more bacterial transmission events compared to groups of 30 spiders, regardless of groups' behavioural composition. Groups containing only one bold spider experienced the lowest levels of bacterial transmission regardless of group size. We found no evidence for the traits of the index case influencing any transmission dynamics. In a second experiment, bacteria were transmitted to more individuals in experimentally induced star networks than in daisy-chains, on which transmission never exceeded three steps. In both experimental network types, transmission success depended jointly on the behavioural traits of the interacting individuals; however, the behavioural traits of the index case were only important for transmission on star networks. Larger social groups exhibited lower interaction density (i.e. had a low ratio of observed to possible connections) and were more modular, i.e. they had more connections between nodes within a subgroup and fewer connections across subgroups. Thus, larger groups may restrict transmission by forming fewer interactions and by isolating subgroups that interacted with the index case. These findings suggest that accounting for the traits of single exposed hosts has less power in predicting transmission dynamics

  2. GPP Webinar: Solar Utilization in Higher Education Networking & Information Sharing Group: Financing Issues Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation from a Solar Utilization in Higher Education Networking and Information webinar covers financing and project economics issues related to solar project development in the higher education sector.

  3. Lipid Head Group Charge and Fatty Acid Configuration Dictate Liposome Mobility in Neurofilament Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, F.; Chaudhary, Himanshu; Janmey, P.; Claessens, Mireille Maria Anna Elisabeth; Lieleg, O.

    Intermediate filaments constitute a class of biopolymers whose function is still poorly understood. One example for such intermediate filaments is given by neurofilaments, large macromolecules that fill the axon of neurons. Here, reconstituted networks of purified porcine neurofilaments are studied

  4. Lithofacies identification using multiple adaptive resonance theory neural networks and group decision expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H.-C.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Chen, H.-C.; Rocky, Durrans S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithofacies identification supplies qualitative information about rocks. Lithofacies represent rock textures and are important components of hydrocarbon reservoir description. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly and different geologists may provide different interpretations. In this paper, we present a low-cost intelligent system consisting of three adaptive resonance theory neural networks and a rule-based expert system to consistently and objectively identify lithofacies from well-log data. The input data are altered into different forms representing different perspectives of observation of lithofacies. Each form of input is processed by a different adaptive resonance theory neural network. Among these three adaptive resonance theory neural networks, one neural network processes the raw continuous data, another processes categorial data, and the third processes fuzzy-set data. Outputs from these three networks are then combined by the expert system using fuzzy inference to determine to which facies the input data should be assigned. Rules are prioritized to emphasize the importance of firing order. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural networks, the adaptability of fuzzy logic, and the expertise of geologists to infer facies of the rocks. This approach is applied to the Appleton Field, an oil field located in Escambia County, Alabama. The hybrid intelligence system predicts lithofacies identity from log data with 87.6% accuracy. This prediction is more accurate than those of single adaptive resonance theory networks, 79.3%, 68.0% and 66.0%, using raw, fuzzy-set, and categorical data, respectively, and by an error-backpropagation neural network, 57.3%. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Designing for Inter-Organizational Coordination in Indonesia’s Maritime Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Indonesia uses geospatial analysis to determine the gravity of the maritime issues. These incidents then can be grouped into clusters to identify the types...of gravity for the network in accordance with its role as the coordinator to ensure the network is running well. However, a very different picture...civilization. In L. C. Freeman (Ed.), Centrality in social Networks conceptual clarification (pp. 1). Bethlehem : Department of Social Relations. Corteville

  6. Social structure of a semi-free ranging group of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx: a social network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Bret

    Full Text Available The difficulty involved in following mandrills in the wild means that very little is known about social structure in this species. Most studies initially considered mandrill groups to be an aggregation of one-male/multifemale units, with males occupying central positions in a structure similar to those observed in the majority of baboon species. However, a recent study hypothesized that mandrills form stable groups with only two or three permanent males, and that females occupy more central positions than males within these groups. We used social network analysis methods to examine how a semi-free ranging group of 19 mandrills is structured. We recorded all dyads of individuals that were in contact as a measure of association. The betweenness and the eigenvector centrality for each individual were calculated and correlated to kinship, age and dominance. Finally, we performed a resilience analysis by simulating the removal of individuals displaying the highest betweenness and eigenvector centrality values. We found that related dyads were more frequently associated than unrelated dyads. Moreover, our results showed that the cumulative distribution of individual betweenness and eigenvector centrality followed a power function, which is characteristic of scale-free networks. This property showed that some group members, mostly females, occupied a highly central position. Finally, the resilience analysis showed that the removal of the two most central females split the network into small subgroups and increased the network diameter. Critically, this study confirms that females appear to occupy more central positions than males in mandrill groups. Consequently, these females appear to be crucial for group cohesion and probably play a pivotal role in this species.

  7. Social structure of a semi-free ranging group of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret, Céline; Sueur, Cédric; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Verrier, Delphine; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The difficulty involved in following mandrills in the wild means that very little is known about social structure in this species. Most studies initially considered mandrill groups to be an aggregation of one-male/multifemale units, with males occupying central positions in a structure similar to those observed in the majority of baboon species. However, a recent study hypothesized that mandrills form stable groups with only two or three permanent males, and that females occupy more central positions than males within these groups. We used social network analysis methods to examine how a semi-free ranging group of 19 mandrills is structured. We recorded all dyads of individuals that were in contact as a measure of association. The betweenness and the eigenvector centrality for each individual were calculated and correlated to kinship, age and dominance. Finally, we performed a resilience analysis by simulating the removal of individuals displaying the highest betweenness and eigenvector centrality values. We found that related dyads were more frequently associated than unrelated dyads. Moreover, our results showed that the cumulative distribution of individual betweenness and eigenvector centrality followed a power function, which is characteristic of scale-free networks. This property showed that some group members, mostly females, occupied a highly central position. Finally, the resilience analysis showed that the removal of the two most central females split the network into small subgroups and increased the network diameter. Critically, this study confirms that females appear to occupy more central positions than males in mandrill groups. Consequently, these females appear to be crucial for group cohesion and probably play a pivotal role in this species.

  8. Social Structure of a Semi-Free Ranging Group of Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx): A Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret, Céline; Sueur, Cédric; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Verrier, Delphine; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The difficulty involved in following mandrills in the wild means that very little is known about social structure in this species. Most studies initially considered mandrill groups to be an aggregation of one-male/multifemale units, with males occupying central positions in a structure similar to those observed in the majority of baboon species. However, a recent study hypothesized that mandrills form stable groups with only two or three permanent males, and that females occupy more central positions than males within these groups. We used social network analysis methods to examine how a semi-free ranging group of 19 mandrills is structured. We recorded all dyads of individuals that were in contact as a measure of association. The betweenness and the eigenvector centrality for each individual were calculated and correlated to kinship, age and dominance. Finally, we performed a resilience analysis by simulating the removal of individuals displaying the highest betweenness and eigenvector centrality values. We found that related dyads were more frequently associated than unrelated dyads. Moreover, our results showed that the cumulative distribution of individual betweenness and eigenvector centrality followed a power function, which is characteristic of scale-free networks. This property showed that some group members, mostly females, occupied a highly central position. Finally, the resilience analysis showed that the removal of the two most central females split the network into small subgroups and increased the network diameter. Critically, this study confirms that females appear to occupy more central positions than males in mandrill groups. Consequently, these females appear to be crucial for group cohesion and probably play a pivotal role in this species. PMID:24340074

  9. Coordination of the ɛ-NH 2 group of the lysyl residue in the CuTyrLys · 3H 2O single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomska, Barbara; Głowiak, Tadeusz; Kubiak, Maria

    1994-07-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of the violet compound ( L-tyrosyl- L-lysine)Cu II · 3H 2O has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The coordination mode of the peptide is the same as previously reported for the blue (LysTyr)Cu II · 2H 2O complex. However, the Cuα-NH 2 bond distance in the violet complex is significantly shorter than that in the blue complex (1.991(7)Å and 2.045(8) Å respectively). The coordination number is four, not five, since there is no apically bound water molecule in the CuTyrLys complex and the aromatic ring is situated close to the basal complex plane. The considerable differences in the stereochemistry of the discussed complexes are responsible for the difference in the d—d transition energy (605 nm and 560 nm respectively).

  10. Prediction of survival after radical cystectomy for invasive bladder carcinoma: risk group stratification, nomograms or artificial neural networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Mekresh, Mohsen; Akl, Ahmed; Mosbah, Ahmed; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed; Abol-Enein, Hassan; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2009-08-01

    We compared 3 predictive models for survival after radical cystectomy, risk group stratification, nomogram and artificial neural networks, in terms of their accuracy, performance and level of complexity. Between 1996 and 2002, 1,133 patients were treated with single stage radical cystectomy as monotherapy for invasive bladder cancer. A randomly selected 776 cases (70%) were used as a reference series. The remaining 357 cases (test series) were used for external validation. Survival estimates were analyzed using univariate and then multivariate appraisal. The results of multivariate analysis were used for risk group stratification and construction of a nomogram, whereas all studied variables were entered directly into the artificial neural networks. Overall 5-year disease-free survival was 64.5% with no statistical difference between the reference and test series. Comparisons of the 3 predictive models revealed that artificial neural networks outperformed the other 2 models in terms of the value of the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive values. In this study artificial neural networks outperformed the risk group stratification model and nomogram construction in predicting patient 5-year survival probability, and in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Decentralized Group Sparse Beamforming for Multi-Cloud Radio Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Dhifallah, Oussama Najeeb

    2015-12-06

    Recent studies on cloud-radio access networks (CRANs) assume the availability of a single processor (cloud) capable of managing the entire network performance; inter-cloud interference is treated as background noise. This paper considers the more practical scenario of the downlink of a CRAN formed by multiple clouds, where each cloud is connected to a cluster of multiple-antenna base stations (BSs) via high-capacity wireline backhaul links. The network is composed of several disjoint BSs\\' clusters, each serving a pre-known set of single-antenna users. To account for both inter- cloud and intra-cloud interference, the paper considers the problem of minimizing the total network power consumption subject to quality of service constraints, by jointly determining the set of active BSs connected to each cloud and the beamforming vectors of every user across the network. The paper solves the problem using Lagrangian duality theory through a dual decomposition approach, which decouples the problem into multiple and independent subproblems, the solution of which depends on the dual optimization problem. The solution then proceeds in updating the dual variables and the active set of BSs at each cloud iteratively. The proposed approach leads to a distributed implementation across the multiple clouds through a reasonable exchange of information between adjacent clouds. The paper further proposes a centralized solution to the problem. Simulation results suggest that the proposed algorithms significantly outperform the conventional per-cloud update solution, especially at high signal-to-interference-plus- noise ratio (SINR) target.

  12. Older adolescents' motivations for social network site use: the influence of gender, group identity, and collective self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Valerie

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed motives for social network site (SNS) use, group belonging, collective self-esteem, and gender effects among older adolescents. Communication with peer group members was the most important motivation for SNS use. Participants high in positive collective self-esteem were strongly motivated to communicate with peer group via SNS. Females were more likely to report high positive collective self-esteem, greater overall use, and SNS use to communicate with peers. Females also posted higher means for group-in-self, passing time, and entertainment. Negative collective self-esteem correlated with social compensation, suggesting that those who felt negatively about their social group used SNS as an alternative to communicating with other group members. Males were more likely than females to report negative collective self-esteem and SNS use for social compensation and social identity gratifications.

  13. Structures and dynamics of transnational cooperation networks: evidence based on Local Action Groups in the Veneto Region, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pisani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper assesses the structures and dynamics of transnational cooperation projects promoted by Local Action Groups (LAGs in different periods (from LEADER II to LEADER Axis using Social Network Analysis (SNA in a specific case study: the Veneto Region in Italy. The classical indexes of SNA have been critically examined, and the paper also presents innovative indexes that can capture the peculiarity of transnational cooperation: disaggregated densities of the network and transnational centrality of the node. These indexes are useful in order to quantify how transnational a network actually is, and to measure the power-information that each actor (LAG can acquire through its transnational contacts. The methodology can become a tool for Managing Authorities to implement new forms of evaluation of transnational cooperation of LAGs.

  14. Hybrid materials of lanthanide centers/functionalized 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone/silicon-oxygen network/polymeric chain: coordination bonded assembly, physical characterization, and photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiao-Fei; Yan, Bing

    2009-06-01

    2-Thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) was grafted onto the coupling agent 3-(triethoxysilyl)-propyl isocyanate (TEPIC) through a hydrogen transfer addition reaction to construct the multifunctional bridge precursor. Other kinds of polymeric precursors (PVPD, PMAA, and PVPDMAA) were synthesized through the addition polymerization reactions using the monomer 4-vinylpyridine and methacrylic acid as the raw materials. The lanthanide compound was then assembled by the coordination effect between precursors and europium ions with the carbonyl, carboxyl groups, or nitrogen atoms. At last, we have utilized the first precursor hydrolyzed with the tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) via the sol-gel copolycondensation process to obtain three kinds of final hybrid polymers. The photoluminescence and microstructural, thermal, and mechanical properties were characterized and the results reveal that the hybrid materials imbedded into the single polymer (PVPD and PMAA) show more efficient intramolecular energy transfer between the europium ion and the modified ligand TTA-Si, bringing the excellent characteristic emission of europium ion. The different configuration of the polymeric precursor introduces a vital different appearance in the microstructure, and the hybrid material with PVPD shows the highest luminescence quantum efficiency and longest lifetime.

  15. 13. SNPTEE: Brazilian seminar on electric power production and transmission. Group 11: overvoltage, insulation coordination and interferences (GSI); 13. SNPTEE: Seminario nacional de producao e transmissao de energia eletrica. Grupo 11: sobretensoes, coordenacao de isolamento e interferencias (GSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This book collects the works presented during the 13{sup th} national seminar on electric power generation and transmission which took place in Camboriu, Santa Catarina State - South Brazil, in 1995. The Group 11 discussed over voltages, insulation coordination and interferences giving special emphasis to: electric power systems design, operation, controlling and optimization; as well as automation and safety systems. The existing situation in Brazil is presented and discussed as well as future trends and perspectives. Several case studies are presented

  16. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  17. Global investigation of composition and interaction networks in gut microbiomes of individuals belonging to diverse geographies and age-groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Deepak; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mande, Sharmila S

    2016-01-01

    Factors like ethnicity, diet and age of an individual have been hypothesized to play a role in determining the makeup of gut microbiome. In order to investigate the gut microbiome structure as well as the inter-microbial associations present therein, we have performed a comprehensive global comparative profiling of the structure (composition, relative heterogeneity and diversity) and the inter-microbial networks in the gut microbiomes of 399 individuals of eight different nationalities. The study identified certain geography-specific trends with respect to composition, intra-group heterogeneity and diversity of the gut microbiomes. Interestingly, the gut microbial association/mutual-exlusion networks were observed to exhibit several cross-geography trends. It was seen that though the composition of gut microbiomes of the American and European individuals were similar, there were distinct patterns in their microbial interaction networks. Amongst European gut-microbiomes, the co-occurrence network obtained for the Danish population was observed to be most dense. Distinct patterns were also observed within Chinese, Japanese and Indian datasets. While performing an age-wise comparison, it was observed that the microbial interactions increased with the age of individuals. Furthermore, certain bacterial groups were identified to be present only in the older age groups. The trends observed in gut microbial networks could be due to the inherent differences in the diet of individuals belonging to different nationalities. For example, the higher number of microbial associations in the Danish population as compared to the Spanish population, may be attributed to the evenly distributed diet of the later. This is in line with previously reported findings which indicate an increase in functional interdependency of microbes in individuals with higher nutritional status. To summarise, the present study identifies geography and age specific patterns in the composition as well as

  18. Social Networking and Pedagogical Variations: An Integrated Approach for Effective Interpersonal and Group Communications Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim

    2012-01-01

    Electronic communication and social networking are effective and useful tools in the process of teaching and learning and have increasingly improved the quality of students' learning outcomes in higher education in recent years. The system encourages and supports students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities and…

  19. Hierarchical Spectral Consensus Clustering for Group Analysis of Functional Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Alp; Bolaños, Marcos; Bernat, Edward; Aviyente, Selin

    2015-09-01

    A central question in cognitive neuroscience is how cognitive functions depend on the integration of specialized widely distributed brain regions. In recent years, graph theoretical methods have been used to characterize the structure of the brain functional connectivity. In order to understand the organization of functional connectivity networks, it is important to determine the community structure underlying these complex networks. Moreover, the study of brain functional networks is confounded by the fact that most neurophysiological studies consists of data collected from multiple subjects; thus, it is important to identify communities representative of all subjects. Typically, this problem is addressed by averaging the data across subjects which omits the variability across subjects or using voting methods, which requires a priori knowledge of cluster labels. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical consensus spectral clustering approach to address these problems. Furthermore, new information-theoretic criteria are introduced for selecting the optimal community structure. The proposed framework is applied to electroencephalogram data collected during a study of error-related negativity to better understand the community structure of functional networks involved in the cognitive control.

  20. Capturing Uncertainty Information and Categorical Characteristics for Network Payload Grouping in Protocol Reverse Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhen Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a promising tool to recover the specifications of unknown protocols, protocol reverse engineering has drawn more and more attention in research over the last decade. It is a critical task of protocol reverse engineering to extract the protocol keywords from network trace. Since the messages of different types have different sets of protocol keywords, it is an effective method to improve the accuracy of protocol keyword extraction by clustering the network payload of unknown traffic into clusters and analyzing each clusters to extract the protocol keywords. Although the classic algorithms such as K-means and EM can be used for network payload clustering, the quality of resultant traffic clusters was far from satisfactory when these algorithms are applied to cluster application layer traffic with categorical attributes. In this paper, we propose a novel method to improve the accuracy of protocol reverse engineering by applying a rough set-based technique for clustering the application layer traffic. This technique analyze multidimension uncertain information in multiple categorical attributes based on rough sets theory to cluster network payload, and apply the Minimum Description Length criteria to determine the optimal number of clusters. The experiments show that our method outperforms the existing algorithms and improves the results of protocol keyword extraction.

  1. Employees’ participation in electronic networks of practice within a corporate group: perceived benefits and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Lukosch, S.; van Splunter, S.; Brazier, F.M.T.; Hamedi, M.; van Beers, C.

    This paper explores benefits and costs of knowledge exchange perceived by individuals in connected electronic networks of practice (ENoP) in a corporate setting. The results of 25 semi-structured interviews show 9 perceived benefits and 5 perceived costs to be of importance for knowledge exchange.

  2. Employees’ participation in electronic networks of practice within a corporate group: perceived benefits and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Lukosch, S.G.; van Splunter, S.; Brazier, F.M.; Hamedi, Mohsen; van Beers, C.P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores benefits and costs of knowledge exchange perceived by individuals in connected electronic networks of practice (ENoP) in a corporate setting. The results of 25 semi-structured interviews show 9 perceived benefits and 5 perceived costs to be of importance for knowledge exchange.

  3. Portable Operating Systems for Network Computers: Distributed Operating Systems Support for Group Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-31

    Modula-2 MICROS/ MICRONET " (5) William S. Holmes, May 1983, "Version and Source Code Support Environment" (6) Michael J. Palumbo. May 1983, "Stand...Dist. Comp. Sys., Denver, CO, May 1985, 386- 393. 7. A. van Tilborg and L. D. Wittie, "Operating Systems for the Micronet Network Computer", IEEE Micro

  4. Culture, Role and Group Work: A Social Network Analysis Perspective on an Online Collaborative Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Karen; Mather, Richard; Dalrymple, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the patterns of network dynamics within a multicultural online collaborative learning environment. It analyses the interaction of participants (both students and facilitators) within a discussion board that was established as part of a 3-month online collaborative course. The study employs longitudinal probabilistic social…

  5. Why Are Some Ethnic Groups More Violent than Others? The Role of Friendship Network's Ethnic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabold, Susann; Baier, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Ethnic differences in violent behavior can be found in official crime statistics, as well as in surveys on juvenile delinquency. To explain these differences, research mainly focuses on factors like parental violence, violence legitimizing norms of masculinity, or socio-economic status. Little research has examined the role of friendship network's…

  6. Can a Social Networking Site Support Afterschool Group Learning of Mandarin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Crook, Charles; O'Malley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Schools are often encouraged to facilitate extra-curricular learning within their own premises. This study addresses the potential of social networking sites (SNS) for supporting such out-of-class study. Given concerns that learning on these sites may happen at a surface level, we adopted self-determination theory for designing a social networking…

  7. Study on Reverse Reconstruction Method of Vehicle Group Situation in Urban Road Network Based on Driver-Vehicle Feature Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyuan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle group situation is the status and situation of dynamic permutation which is composed of target vehicle and neighboring traffic entities. It is a concept which is frequently involved in the research of traffic flow theory, especially the active vehicle security. Studying vehicle group situation in depth is of great significance for traffic safety. Three-lane condition was taken as an example; the characteristics of target vehicle and its neighboring vehicles were synthetically considered to restructure the vehicle group situation in this paper. The Gamma distribution theory was used to identify the vehicle group situation when target vehicle arrived at the end of the study area. From the perspective of driver-vehicle feature evolution, the reverse reconstruction method of vehicle group situation in the urban road network was proposed. Results of actual driving, virtual driving, and simulation experiments showed that the model established in this paper was reasonable and feasible.

  8. Designing a Self-contained Group Area Network for Ubiquitous Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nian-Shing Chen; Kinshuk; Chun-Wang Wei; Stephen JH Yang

    2008-01-01

    .... The GroupNet concept proposed in our study is more focus on how to design a mobile learning management system which can better support mobile learning for a small group of learners with effective...

  9. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-05

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara K.; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Farber, Gregory K.; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D.; Burns, Kristin M.; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C.; Chung, Wendy K.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Gaynor, William J.; Gaies, Michael G.; Go, Alan S.; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R.; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a Working Group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease (CHD) research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of CHD data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in CHD, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the Working Group. PMID:27045129

  11. CCITT Study Group XVIII Work Program 1981-1984; (Integrated Services Digital Network)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    new transmission media including optical fibre, coaxial and radio systems will be used as appropriate. 10. Customer/network signalling Digital accese...Subscriber Line implemented using very wide bandwidth transmission media (such as fiber optic links) the possibility of the inclusion of video bandwidth...kind of noise does not present a great infuence on subjective osessments, while it is more important, for the overall noise object-ve =easurenent

  12. Machine-Type-Communication (MTC) Device Grouping Algorithm for Congestion Avoidance of MTC Oriented LTE Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang-Ryul; Park, Aesoon; Lee, Sungwon

    Machine-Type-Communication (MTC) is a new paradigm in mobile wireless network domains such as Mobile WiMAX (IEEE 802.16e) and 3GPP LTE (3rd Generation Partnership Project Long Term Evolution). We explain the background for MTC environments, and its key issues. Then we focus on the uplink traffic aggressiveness characteristics in major applications such as Smart Grid. Then, we propose a new congestion avoidance algorithm to reduce the congestion of the uplink intensive applications.

  13. A Topic Space Oriented User Group Discovering Scheme in Social Network: A Trust Chain Based Interest Measuring Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, user group has become an effective platform for information sharing and communicating among users in social network sites. In present work, we propose a single topic user group discovering scheme, which includes three phases: topic impact evaluation, interest degree measurement, and trust chain based discovering, to enable selecting influential topic and discovering users into a topic oriented group. Our main works include (1 an overview of proposed scheme and its related definitions; (2 topic space construction method based on topic relatedness clustering and its impact (influence degree and popularity degree evaluation; (3 a trust chain model to take user relation network topological information into account with a strength classification perspective; (4 an interest degree (user explicit and implicit interest degree evaluation method based on trust chain among users; and (5 a topic space oriented user group discovering method to group core users according to their explicit interest degrees and to predict ordinary users under implicit interest and user trust chain. Finally, experimental results are given to explain effectiveness and feasibility of our scheme.

  14. ICA-fNORM: Spatial Normalization of fMRI Data Using Intrinsic Group-ICA Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Siddharth; Michael, Andrew M.; Cahill, Nathan D.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Baum, Stefi A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-01-01

    A common pre-processing challenge associated with group level fMRI analysis is spatial registration of multiple subjects to a standard space. Spatial normalization, using a reference image such as the Montreal Neurological Institute brain template, is the most common technique currently in use to achieve spatial congruence across multiple subjects. This method corrects for global shape differences preserving regional asymmetries, but does not account for functional differences. We propose a novel approach to co-register task-based fMRI data using resting state group-ICA networks. We posit that these intrinsic networks (INs) can provide to the spatial normalization process with important information about how each individual’s brain is organized functionally. The algorithm is initiated by the extraction of single subject representations of INs using group level independent component analysis (ICA) on resting state fMRI data. In this proof-of-concept work two of the robust, commonly identified, networks are chosen as functional templates. As an estimation step, the relevant INs are utilized to derive a set of normalization parameters for each subject. Finally, the normalization parameters are applied individually to a different set of fMRI data acquired while the subjects performed an auditory oddball task. These normalization parameters, although derived using rest data, generalize successfully to data obtained with a cognitive paradigm for each subject. The improvement in results is verified using two widely applied fMRI analysis methods: the general linear model and ICA. Resulting activation patterns from each analysis method show significant improvements in terms of detection sensitivity and statistical significance at the group level. The results presented in this article provide initial evidence to show that common functional domains from the resting state brain may be used to improve the group statistics of task-fMRI data. PMID:22110427

  15. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  16. Environments of galaxies in groups within the supercluster-void network

    OpenAIRE

    Lietzen, Heidi; Tempel, Elmo; Heinämäki, Pekka; Nurmi, Pasi; Einasto, Maret; Saar, Enn

    2012-01-01

    Majority of all galaxies reside in groups of less than 50 member galaxies. These groups are distributed in various large-scale environments from voids to superclusters. Evolution of galaxies is affected by the environment in which they reside. Our aim is to study the effects that the local group scale and the supercluster scale environment have on galaxies. We use a luminosity-density field to determine density of the large-scale environment of galaxies in groups of various richness. We calcu...

  17. BLIG: A New Approach for Sensor Identification, Grouping,and Authorisation in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2007-01-01

    BLIG (Blinking Led Indicated Grouping) for easy deployment of BSNs on patients in critical situations, including mechanisms for uniquely identifying and grouping sensor nodes belonging to a patient in a secure and trusted way. This approach has been designed in close cooperation with users, and easy...

  18. Connecting, interacting and supporting : Social capital, peer network and cognitive perspectives on small group teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jasperina

    2017-01-01

    No mass lectures anymore but small-group teaching; this is the current trend in higher education and the way universities hope to attract future students. Students get to know each other easily when they collaborate in small groups. The question arises whether dividing a cohort of students in small

  19. Hierarchical Group Based Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement for Machine Type Communication in LTE and Future 5G Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probidita Roychoudhury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the exponential growth in the volume of wireless data communication among heterogeneous devices ranging from smart phones to tiny sensors across a wide range of applications, 3GPP LTE-A has standardized Machine Type Communication (MTC which allows communication between entities without any human intervention. The future 5G cellular networks also envisage massive deployment of MTC Devices (MTCDs which will increase the total number of connected devices hundredfold. This poses a huge challenge to the traditional cellular system processes, especially the traditional Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement (AKA mechanism currently used in LTE systems, as the signaling load caused by the increasingly large number of devices may have an adverse effect on the regular Human to Human (H2H traffic. A solution in the literature has been the use of group based architecture which, while addressing the authentication traffic, has their share of issues. This paper introduces Hierarchical Group based Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement (HGMAKA protocol to address those issues and also enables the small cell heterogeneous architecture in line with 5G networks to support MTC services. The aggregate Message Authentication Code based approach has been shown to be lightweight and significantly efficient in terms of resource usage compared to the existing protocols, while being robust to authentication message failures, and scalable to heterogeneous network architectures.

  20. Metallogels from Coordination Complexes, Organometallic, and Coordination Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastidar, Parthasarathi; Ganguly, Sumi; Sarkar, Koushik

    2016-09-20

    A supramolecular gel results from the immobilization of solvent molecules on a 3D network of gelator molecules stabilized by various supramolecular interactions that include hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking, van der Waals interactions, and halogen bonding. In a metallogel, a metal is a part of the gel network as a coordinated metal ion (in a discrete coordination complex), as a cross-linking metal node with a multitopic ligand (in coordination polymer), and as metal nanoparticles adhered to the gel network. Although the field is relatively new, research into metallogels has experienced a considerable upsurge owing to its fundamental importance in supramolecular chemistry and various potential applications. This focus review aims to provide an insight into the development of designing metallogelators. Because of the limited scope, discussions are confined to examples pertaining to metallogelators derived from discrete coordination complexes, organometallic gelators, and coordination polymers. This review is expected to enlighten readers on the current development of designing metallogelators of the abovementioned class of molecules. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Markov stochasticity coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-01-01

    Markov dynamics constitute one of the most fundamental models of random motion between the states of a system of interest. Markov dynamics have diverse applications in many fields of science and engineering, and are particularly applicable in the context of random motion in networks. In this paper we present a two-dimensional gauging method of the randomness of Markov dynamics. The method-termed Markov Stochasticity Coordinates-is established, discussed, and exemplified. Also, the method is tweaked to quantify the stochasticity of the first-passage-times of Markov dynamics, and the socioeconomic equality and mobility in human societies.

  2. Electrochemically Smart Bimetallic Materials Featuring Group 11 Metals: In-situ Conductive Network Generation and Its Impact on Cell Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Esther [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Our results for this program “Electrochemically smart bimetallic materials featuring Group 11 metals: in-situ conductive matrix generation and its impact on battery capacity, power and reversibility” have been highly successful: 1) we demonstrated material structures which generated in-situ conductive networks through electrochemical activation with increases in conductivity up to 10,000 fold, 2) we pioneered in situ analytical methodology to map the cathodes at several stages of discharge through the use of Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to elucidate the kinetic dependence of the conductive network formation, and 3) we successfully designed synthetic methodology for direct control of material properties including crystallite size and surface area which showed significant impact on electrochemical behavior.

  3. Patient-Centred Coordinated Care in Times of Emerging Diseases and Epidemics. Contribution of the IMIA Working Group on Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, E; Cummings, E; Dexheimer, J W; Gong, Y; Kennebeck, S; Kushniruk, A; Kuziemsky, C; Saranto, K; Weber, J; Takeda, H

    2015-08-13

    In this paper the researchers describe how existing health information technologies (HIT) can be repurposed and new technologies can be innovated to provide patient-centered care to individuals affected by new and emerging diseases. The researchers conducted a focused review of the published literature describing how HIT can be used to support safe, patient-centred, coordinated care to patients who are affected by Ebola (an emerging disease). New and emerging diseases present opportunities for repurposing existing technologies and for stimulating the development of new HIT innovation. Innovative technologies may be developed such as new software used for tracking patients during new or emerging disease outbreaks or by repurposing and extending existing technologies so they can be used to support patients, families and health professionals who may have been exposed to a disease. The paper describes the development of new technologies and the repurposing and extension of existing ones (such as electronic health records) using the most recent outbreak of Ebola as an example.

  4. Standardized Automated CO2/H2O Flux Systems for Individual Research Groups and Flux Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, George; Begashaw, Israel; Fratini, Gerardo; Griessbaum, Frank; Kathilankal, James; Xu, Liukang; Franz, Daniela; Joseph, Everette; Larmanou, Eric; Miller, Scott; Papale, Dario; Sabbatini, Simone; Sachs, Torsten; Sakai, Ricardo; McDermitt, Dayle

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, spatial and temporal flux data coverage improved significantly, and on multiple scales, from a single station to continental networks, due to standardization, automation, and management of data collection, and better handling of the extensive amounts of generated data. With more stations and networks, larger data flows from each station, and smaller operating budgets, modern tools are required to effectively and efficiently handle the entire process. Such tools are needed to maximize time dedicated to authoring publications and answering research questions, and to minimize time and expenses spent on data acquisition, processing, and quality control. Thus, these tools should produce standardized verifiable datasets and provide a way to cross-share the standardized data with external collaborators to leverage available funding, promote data analyses and publications. LI-COR gas analyzers are widely used in past and present flux networks such as AmeriFlux, ICOS, AsiaFlux, OzFlux, NEON, CarboEurope, and FluxNet-Canada, etc. These analyzers have gone through several major improvements over the past 30 years. However, in 2016, a three-prong development was completed to create an automated flux system which can accept multiple sonic anemometer and datalogger models, compute final and complete fluxes on-site, merge final fluxes with supporting weather soil and radiation data, monitor station outputs and send automated alerts to researchers, and allow secure sharing and cross-sharing of the station and data access. Two types of these research systems were developed: open-path (LI-7500RS) and enclosed-path (LI-7200RS). Key developments included: • Improvement of gas analyzer performance • Standardization and automation of final flux calculations onsite, and in real-time • Seamless integration with latest site management and data sharing tools In terms of the gas analyzer performance, the RS analyzers are based on established LI-7500/A and LI-7200

  5. Focus Group Evaluation of the LIVE Network-An Audio Music Program to Promote ART Adherence Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; Baumann, Maya; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Logwood, Steven J

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of 3 focus groups conducted to assess the utility, appeal, and feasibility of the LIVE Network (LN), a 70-minute audio music program developed to educate and motivate HIV-infected persons to adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and self-manage medication-related side effects. Participants included 15 African American, 2 caucasian, and 1 race unknown HIV-infected persons who had been taking ART for at least 6 months. In general, the LN was well liked, relevant, educational, and motivational. It empowered and motivated participants to be responsible for their adherence self-care. One of the more surprising findings was how freely focus group participants shared the program with family and friends as a means of education and also as a means of disclosure. Moreover, the positive reception of the LN by individuals outside of the focus groups, especially children and adolescents, speaks well for the potential broad appeal of this type of program.

  6. A Fusion Architecture for Tracking a Group of People Using a Distributed Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    electrostatic, micro- RADAR , etc., are used to detect people and animals [3], [4], in this paper we consider PIR, seismic, and ultrasonic sensors. Each one of...consisting of multiple modalities to track a group of people walking along trails in open areas. The UGS system we used consists of ultrasonic ...seismic and passive infrared (PIR) sensors. Estimating the size of the group is done by counting the number of targets using ultrasonic sensors

  7. The neural network associated with lexical-semantic knowledge about social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piretti, Luca; Carnaghi, Andrea; Campanella, Fabio; Ambron, Elisabetta; Skrap, Miran; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2015-09-01

    A person can be appraised as an individual or as a member of a social group. In the present study we tested whether the knowledge about social groups is represented independently of the living and non-living things. Patients with frontal and temporal lobe tumors involving either the left or the right hemisphere performed three tasks--picture naming, word-to-picture matching and picture sorting--tapping the lexical semantic knowledge of living things, non-living things and social groups. Both behavioral and voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) analyses suggested that social groups might be represented differently from other categories. VLSM analysis carried out on naming errors revealed that left-lateralized lesions in the inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala, insula and basal ganglia were associated with the lexical-semantic processing of social groups. These findings indicate that the social group representation may rely on areas associated with affective processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Privacy and Security Research Group workshop on network and distributed system security: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: NREN Security Issues: Policies and Technologies; Layer Wars: Protect the Internet with Network Layer Security; Electronic Commission Management; Workflow 2000 - Electronic Document Authorization in Practice; Security Issues of a UNIX PEM Implementation; Implementing Privacy Enhanced Mail on VMS; Distributed Public Key Certificate Management; Protecting the Integrity of Privacy-enhanced Electronic Mail; Practical Authorization in Large Heterogeneous Distributed Systems; Security Issues in the Truffles File System; Issues surrounding the use of Cryptographic Algorithms and Smart Card Applications; Smart Card Augmentation of Kerberos; and An Overview of the Advanced Smart Card Access Control System. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Design of an Experiment to Investigate ISR Coordination and Information Presentation Strategies in an Expeditionary Strike Group: Combined A2C2 and CMD-21 Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchins, Susan G; Weil, Shawn; Kleinman, David L; Hocevar, Susan P; Kemple, William G; Pfeiffer, Karl; Kennedy, Doug; Oonk, Heather; Averett, Gene; Entin, Elliot

    2007-01-01

    .... The formation of Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESGs) is one example of the transformational vision provided in the Naval Operating Concept wherein an ESG provides a flexible force package, capable of tailoring itself to a wide variety of mission sets...

  10. All-optical and digital non-linear compensation algorithms in flex-coherent grouped and un-grouped contiguous spectrum based networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Rameez

    2016-01-01

    We have evaluated that in-line non-linear compensation schemes decrease the complexity of digital backward propagation and enhance the transmission performance of 40/112/224 Gbit/s mixed line rate network. Multiple bit rates, i.e. 40/112/224 Gbit/s and modulation formats (i.e. DP-QPSK and DP-16QAM......) are transmitted over 1280 km of Large $$\\hbox {A}_{eff}$$ A e f f Pure-Silica core fiber. Both grouped and un-grouped spectral allocation schemes are investigated. Optical add-drop multiplexers are used to drop the required wavelength for signal processing in the transmission link. Moreover, hybrid mid-link...... spectral inversion and in-line non-linear compensation methods are also analyzed. This gives us enhanced system performance and DBP step-size of 400 km in WDM 224 Gbit/s DP-16QAM system, significantly reducing the complexity of digital backward propagation....

  11. The U.S culture collection network lays the foundation for progress in preservation of valuable microbial resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. McCluskey; A. Alvarez; R. Bennett; D. Bokati; K. Boundy-Mills; D. D. Brown; C. T. Bull; M. Coffey; T. Dreaden; C. Duke; G. Dye; E. Ehmke; K. Eversole; K. Fenstermacher; D. Geiser; Jessie A. Glaeser; S. Greene; L. Gribble; M. P. Griffith; K. Hanser; R. Humber; B. W. Johnson; A. Kermode; M. Krichevsky; M. Laudon; J. Leach; J. Leslie; M. May; U. Melcher; D. Nobles; N. R. Fonseca; S. Robinson; M. Ryan; J. Scott; C. Silflow; A. Vidaver; K. M. Webb; J. E. Wertz; S. Yentsch; S. Zehr

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Culture Collection Network was formed in 2012 by a group of culture collection scientists and stakeholders in order to continue the progress established previously through efforts of an ad hoc group. The network is supported by a Research Coordination Network grant from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and has the goals of promoting interaction among...

  12. The U.S.Culture Collection Network lays the foundation for progress in preservation of valuable microbial resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin McCluskey; Anne Alvarez; Rick Bennett; Deepak Bokati; Kyria Boundy-Mills; Daniel Brown; Carolee T. Bull; Michael Coffey; Tyler Dreaden; Clifford Duke; Greg Dye; Erin Ehmke; Kellye Eversole; Kristi Fenstermacher; David Geiser; Jessie A. Glaeser; Stephanie Greene; Lisa Gribble; M. Patrick Griffith; Kathryn Hanser; Richard Humber; Barbara W. Johnson; Anthony Kermode; Micah Krichevsky; Matt Laudon; Jan Leach; John Leslie; Meghan May; Ulrich Melcher; David Nobles; Natalia Risso Fonseca; Sara Robinson; Matthew Ryan; James Scott; Carolyn Silflow; Anne Vidaver; Kimberly M. Webb; John E. Wertz; Sara Yentsch; Sarah Zehr

    2016-01-01

    The U. S. Culture Collection Network was formed in 2012 by a group of culture collection scientists and stakeholders in order to continue the progress established previously through efforts of an ad hock group.  The network is supported by a Research Coordination Network grant from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and has the goals of promoting interaction...

  13. A Practical Application Combining Wireless Sensor Networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexing Zhong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Internet of Things (IoT has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC, is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE installed in the driver’s operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS. Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things.

  14. A practical application combining wireless sensor networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-07-30

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things.

  15. Understanding Group/Party Affiliation Using Social Networks and Agent-Based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of group affiliation and group dispersion is a concept that is most often studied in order for political candidates to better understand the most efficient way to conduct their campaigns. While political campaigning in the United States is a very hot topic that most politicians analyze and study, the concept of group/party affiliation presents its own area of study that producers very interesting results. One tool for examining party affiliation on a large scale is agent-based modeling (ABM), a paradigm in the modeling and simulation (M&S) field perfectly suited for aggregating individual behaviors to observe large swaths of a population. For this study agent based modeling was used in order to look at a community of agents and determine what factors can affect the group/party affiliation patterns that are present. In the agent-based model that was used for this experiment many factors were present but two main factors were used to determine the results. The results of this study show that it is possible to use agent-based modeling to explore group/party affiliation and construct a model that can mimic real world events. More importantly, the model in the study allows for the results found in a smaller community to be translated into larger experiments to determine if the results will remain present on a much larger scale.

  16. Being immersed in social networking environment: Facebook groups, uses and gratifications, and social outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Namsu; Kee, Kerk F; Valenzuela, Sebastián

    2009-12-01

    A Web survey of 1,715 college students was conducted to examine Facebook Groups users' gratifications and the relationship between users' gratifications and their political and civic participation offline. A factor analysis revealed four primary needs for participating in groups within Facebook: socializing, entertainment, self-status seeking, and information. These gratifications vary depending on user demographics such as gender, hometown, and year in school. The analysis of the relationship between users' needs and civic and political participation indicated that, as predicted, informational uses were more correlated to civic and political action than to recreational uses.

  17. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK BASED METHOD OF ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS` FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE BY THE GROUP OF EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha V. Zastelo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the method of the integral assessment of the level of students` foreign language communicative competence by the group of experts through the complex test in a foreign language is considered. The use of mathematical methods and modern specialized software during complex testing of students significantly improves the expert methods, particularly in the direction of increasing the reliability of the assessment. Capitalizing analytical software environment realizes the simulation of non-linear generalizations based on artificial neural networks, which increases the accuracy of the estimate and allows further efficient use of the competent experts` experience gained in the model.

  18. E pluribus unum: using group model building with many interdependent organizations to create integrated health-care networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Angèle; Akkermans, Henk; Franx, Arie

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reports on an action research case study of integrated obstetric care in the Netherlands. Efficient and patient-friendly patient flows through integrated care networks are of major societal importance. How to design and develop such interorganizational patient flows is still a nascent research area, especially when dealing with a large number (n>3) of stakeholders. We have shown that a modification of an existing method to support interorganizational collaboration by system dynamics-based group model building (GMB) (the Renga method, Akkermans, 2001) may be effective in achieving such collaboration.

  19. Quality of hub-and-spoke networks; the effects of time-table co-ordination on waiting time and rescheduling time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, M.R.E.; Rietveld, P.

    2001-01-01

    Low frequencies of aircraft may have substantial negative effects on scheduling costs and waiting costs at hub airports. Appropriate timetabling of carriers will reduce these costs. In this paper we propose a measure for the quality of the co-ordination of timetables by carriers in hub airports. An

  20. Spin-crossover coordination nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatron, Florence; Catala, Laure; Rivière, Eric; Gloter, Alexandre; Stéphan, Odile; Mallah, Talal

    2008-08-04

    Spin-crossover coordination nanoparticles of the cyanide-bridged three-dimensional network Fe(pyrazine){Pt(CN) 4} were prepared at three different sizes using a microemulsion. The 14 nm particles present a transition centered around 265 K with a hysteresis of 6 K.