WorldWideScience

Sample records for networked writing classrooms

  1. Integrating Social Networking Tools into ESL Writing Classroom: Strengths and Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Melor Md; Salehi, Hadi; Chenzi, Chen

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of world and technology, English learning has become more important. Teachers frequently use teacher-centered pedagogy that leads to lack of interaction with students. This paper aims to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of integrating social networking tools into ESL writing classroom and discuss the ways to…

  2. Process Writing and the Internet: Blogs and Ning Networks in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Isabela Villas

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the product approach to writing, which is based on studying and replicating textual models, the process approach involves multiple and repeated steps that compel the writer to closely consider the topic, language, purpose for writing, and social reality of an audience. In addition to discussing the benefits of the process approach…

  3. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  4. The Context of Classroom Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Les

    1986-01-01

    Asserts that the main goal of writing instruction is to help students attain the competence necessary for academic discourse and the most effective way to do this is to teach the basic strategies for uncovering the rules that govern discourse in any particular context.(SRT)

  5. Writing Classroom as A&P Parking Lot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirc, Geoffrey

    1993-01-01

    Calls for a new urbanism in composition studies. Attempts to reconfigure the landscape of the writing classroom around the very notion of landscape, to reposition the architectonics of college writing more strictly according to architecture. (RS)

  6. Writing and reading in a multicultural classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Gitte Holten

    2007-01-01

    linguistic minority. The few students with a Danish origin all come from backgrounds with a limited tradition for reading fiction. Another aim of the study was to investigate a possible relation between the students? conception of learning and of reading and interpreting literary texts in the subject...... of Danish literature in order to give teachers broader insight into the underlying factors in a multicultural classroom with regard to writing and reading on the one hand and conceptions of learning on the other.......The study investigates how interpretive reading skills and literary understanding may be enhanced through initial narrative writing tasks. In the class in question the majority of students are children of migrant workers in Denmark. The class in question belongs to what is called an ethnic...

  7. Collaborative Writing in the Business Writing Classroom: An Ethical Dilemma for the Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Dennis H.

    1990-01-01

    Maintains that business writing students need to be prepared for the collaborative work and writing they will face in the workplace. Explores ethical problems with the collaborative approach in the classroom. Describes practical solutions to those problems. (SR)

  8. Professional Writing in the English Classroom: Professional Writing--What You Already Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Jonathan; Zuidema, Leah

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the first installment of "Professional Writing in the English Classroom." The authors begin by answering the obvious question: What is professional writing? It isn't remedial writing, and it involves much more than writing memos, business letters, and resumes (although it certainly includes those genres). Professional writing…

  9. The Social Network Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunus, Peter

    Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

  10. Classroom EFL Writing: The Alignment-Oriented Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiyan, Miao; Rilong, Liu

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the alignment-oriented approach in classroom EFL writing. Based on a review of the characteristics of the written language and comparison between the product-focused approach and the process-focused approach, the paper proposes a practical classroom procedure as to how to teach EFL writing. A follow-up empirical study is…

  11. Baddies in the Classroom: Media Education and Narrative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    When teachers allow students to write stories that include elements of popular media, we must ask what to do with these media elements once they have entered the classroom. This article relates findings from a classroom study focusing on children's media-based story writing. The study looks at children as producers of new media texts and describes…

  12. Student Perception of Writing in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Kathleen J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines factors that shape four student's perceptions of writing tasks in their science classroom. This qualitative retrospective interview study focuses on four students concurrently enrolled in honors English and honors biology. This research employs a phenomenological perspective on writing, examining whether the writing strategies…

  13. Classroom Writing Tasks and Students' Analytic Text-Based Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Lindsay Clare; Correnti, Richard; Wang, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards emphasize students writing analytically in response to texts. Questions remain about the nature of instruction that develops students' text-based writing skills. In the present study, we examined the role that writing task quality plays in students' mastery of analytic text-based writing. Text-based writing tasks…

  14. Partnering with Parents in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurcher, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    Writing is a complex act that requires students' concentrated time and effort to master--time and effort that teachers strain to find in a crowded curriculum. Despite this struggle to prioritize writing, students in the 21st century need writing skills to participate in the workplace, academia, economy, and democracy. If writing skills really are…

  15. Death in the Classroom: Writing about Love and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    In "Death in the Classroom", Jeffrey Berman writes about Love and Loss, the course that he designed and taught two years after his wife's death, in which he explored with his students the literature of bereavement. Berman, building on his previous courses that emphasized self-disclosing writing, shows how his students wrote about their…

  16. "Fire Your Proofreader!" Grammar Correction in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Keun

    2008-01-01

    This article critically reviews the usefulness of grammar correction in second language writing instruction through the eyes of five second-language writers. It first examines the validity of four teaching principles that appear to influence how writing instructors approach error correction in classrooms and concludes with discussions as to why…

  17. Teaching Writing in Canadian Middle Grades Classrooms: A National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelly Stagg; McClay, Jill Kedersha; Main, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the results of interview research examining writing instruction and assessment practices in 216 Grades 4-8 classrooms across the 10 Canadian provinces and 2 (of 3) territories. Researchers found that participating teachers scheduled daily time for writing, either in language arts classes or through integrating writing…

  18. Raising Critical Consciousness via Creative Writing in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillar, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses a method to promote raising critical consciousness in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom via creative writing activities by having students write journals and/or personal letters from the perspective of individuals from outside groups that have been marginalized or vilified in the students' dominant culture.…

  19. Using Translation Exercises in the Communicative EFL Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Young

    2011-01-01

    Implementing process pedagogy in an L2 writing classroom has its own limits for students with low English proficiency. Although L1 writers commonly benefit from writing multiple drafts, most of the low English level Korean college students in my English composition class did not benefit from the revisions. This article introduces an innovative…

  20. Effective Second Language Writing. TESOL Classroom Practice Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Susan, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The classroom practices discussed in "Effective Second Language Writing" reflect various trends and methodologies; however, the underlying theme in this volume of the Classroom Practice Series is the need for clear and meaningful communication between ESL writers and their readers. While approaches differ, two core beliefs are constant: ESL…

  1. Time, Space, and Text in the Elementary School Digital Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathy A.; Exley, Beryl

    2014-01-01

    Theorists of multiliteracies, social semiotics, and the New Literacy Studies have drawn attention to the potential changing nature of writing and literacy in the context of networked communications. This article reports findings from a design-based research project in Year 4 classrooms (students aged 8.5-10 years) in a low socioeconomic status…

  2. Turning classroom environments into centers of writing

    OpenAIRE

    Mott, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Asking a student to write a paper without the opportunity to TALK about the writing beforehand is like asking members of an orchestra to perform a concert without any instruments. Writing Centers exist to TALK to writers. Individualized writing consultations invite students to think critically about their ideas, to become agents of their own writing and to learn what it’s like to have a conversation about their work in progress. But what if your school has no Writing Center? Providing a le...

  3. MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS IN THE INDONESIAN EFL WRITING CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yustinus Calvin Gai mali

    2015-04-01

    Abstract Despite the essence of motivation as one of primary determinants for students’ learning achievement, issues of factors influencing students’ motivation in learning a particular subject, particularly English as a Foreign Language (EFL writing with regard to Indonesian university students, have not been discussed sufficiently. The study reported in this paper aims to explore motivational factors perceived by Indonesian university students in their EFL writing classroom. The participants of the study were 19 freshmen at Creative Writing Class F within the English Language Education Study Program, Faculty of Language and Literature, Satya Wacana Christian University (ED-SWCU, academic year 2014/2015. Data was collected through reflective journals in which the participants wrote their reflections dealing with the issues. The data analysis appeared to prove that positive teacher’s performance, inspiring classmates, motivational parents, and positive classroom atmosphere were primary factors influencing the students’ learning motivation in their classroom. Finally, the present study would seem to indicate the importance of constructive collaboration among teachers, students, and parents in determining the students’ learning motivation and academic achievement in their EFL writing classroom. Keywords: motivation, motivational factors, EFL writing, Creative Writing class

  4. Student perception of writing in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Kathleen J.

    This study examines factors that shape four student's perceptions of writing tasks in their science classroom. This qualitative retrospective interview study focuses on four students concurrently enrolled in honors English and honors biology. This research employs a phenomenological perspective on writing, examining whether the writing strategies students acquire in the Language Arts classroom manifest in the content areas. I also adopt Bandura's theoretical perspective on self-efficacy as well as Hillock's notion of writing as inquiry and meaning making. This study concludes that students need ample opportunity to generate content and language that will help reveal a purpose and genre for writing tasks in the content areas. Although all four students approached the writing tasks differently in this study, the tasks set before them were opportunities for replication rather than inquiry Through the case studies of four students as well as current research on content writing, this project works to inform all content area teachers about student perceptions of writing in the content areas.

  5. A Writing Teacher in the Physics Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Pittendrigh, Adele S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a series of writing exercises specifically designed to improve students' comprehension of physics. Students are given a RAFT which defines their role, audience, format, and task. Format for writing essays focuses on key ideas, general ideas, specific cases, and additional insights. (JM)

  6. Baddies in the classroom: media education and narrative writing

    OpenAIRE

    Willett, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    When teachers allow pupils to write stories that include elements of popular media, we must ask what to do with media once it has entered the classroom. This article relates findings from a classroom study which focuses on children’s media-based story writing. The study looks at children as producers of new media texts and describes their activities as a form of ‘media education’. The research shows that through their production of media-based stories, children are reflecting on their consump...

  7. Punk Power in the First-Year Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    One, Optimism

    2005-01-01

    This essay frames the connections between punk principles and writing theory in order to re-form what the author emphasizes in his own composition classroom, in particular the do-it-yourself ethic, a sense of passion and fearlessness, the agency to attack institutions, and the seeking of pleasure. (Contains 1 note.)

  8. Roland Barthes and Decomposing/Deterritorializing the Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Joan L.

    Roland Barthes points out in his pedagogical essays that, although students have been filled with horror stories of professorial expectations, at the same time they have expectations of their own. Barthes' points should be considered as a way of examining the classroom space and common writing teaching practices and opening them up to different…

  9. Learners' Motivation and Identity in the Vietnamese EFL Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly Thi

    2007-01-01

    The study reported in this paper explores issues of motivation and learners' identity in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) writing classroom in Vietnam from the perspectives of the learners. It was conducted with thirty English-major students at a university in central Vietnam. While relevant literature appears to place much emphasis on…

  10. Meaningful Literacy: Writing Poetry in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of meaningful literacy and offers a classroom methodology--poetry writing--that manifests this approach to ESL/EFL literacy instruction. The paper is divided into three sections. The first deals with the concept of meaningful literacy learning in second and foreign language pedagogy; the second summarizes empirical…

  11. Blending Web 2.0 Technologies with Developing of Writing Skills in ESL Classroom: Some Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Talal Mashrah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the educational field has adopted a new route for improving and increasing the way we learn languages, particularly English language, through using social networking services such as; Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other technologies in writing skills. In this respect, this paper discusses how ESL classroom can apply the social networking services or Web 2.0. Technologies effectively to promote learners' writing skills. The paper first details research studies about the characteristics of two social networking, Blogs and Wikis, to show the importance of implementing Web 2.0 technologies in writing skills. Then the benefits of applying social networking services as an essential approach for teaching and learning writing skills in L2 are presented. Paper also discusses the counter –argument, as opposite perspectives, that applying social networking websites is not always considered as a proper method to improve writing skills due to many reasons which may lead decreasing learners' level of English or make them far behind because of their difficulties they face when they use these technologies

  12. A Constrained Vision of the Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Louise Wetherbee

    1992-01-01

    Proposes that writing teachers and administrators think, first, in terms of the truly political realities--the situated interconnections of interests, accidents, luck, and consequences--that constrain our abilities to realize utopian goals and, second, in terms of ethical constraints to which they are willing to be bound by. (RS)

  13. ICT in the Writing Classroom: The Pros and the Cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareq Boudjadar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Being one of the four language skills, writing poses its own challenges for EFL learners. Over time, educators have suggested different methods to cure some of these challenges faced by students. In the 21st century, we suppose that technology should be part of the solutions to be introduced. The potential of technology in teaching writing is able to yield positive results compared to pen-and-paper writing. From drafting to publishing, technology eases the matter a lot. However, technology seems to have some shortcomings that may hinder both teachers and learners from achieving favourable results. This paper is about weighing some advantages and disadvantages of introducing ICT in the writing classroom.

  14. Learning to write in science: A study of English language learners' writing experience in sixth-grade science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang

    Writing is a predictor of academic achievement and is essential for student success in content area learning. Despite its importance, many students, including English language learners (ELLs), struggle with writing. There is thus a need to study students' writing experience in content area classrooms. Informed by systemic functional linguistics, this study examined 11 ELL students' writing experience in two sixth grade science classrooms in a southeastern state of the United States, including what they wrote, how they wrote, and why they wrote in the way they did. The written products produced by these students over one semester were collected. Also collected were teacher interviews, field notes from classroom observations, and classroom artifacts. Student writing samples were first categorized into extended and nonextended writing categories, and each extended essay was then analyzed with respect to its schematic structure and grammatical features. Teacher interviews and classroom observation notes were analyzed thematically to identify teacher expectations, beliefs, and practices regarding writing instruction for ELLs. It was found that the sixth-grade ELLs engaged in mostly non-extended writing in the science classroom, with extended writing (defined as writing a paragraph or longer) constituting roughly 11% of all writing assignments. Linguistic analysis of extended writing shows that the students (a) conveyed information through nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbial groups and prepositional phrases; (b) constructed interpersonal context through choices of mood, modality, and verb tense; and (c) structured text through thematic choices and conjunctions. The appropriateness of these lexicogrammatical choices for particular writing tasks was related to the students' English language proficiency levels. The linguistic analysis also uncovered several grammatical problems in the students' writing, including a limited range of word choices, inappropriate use of mood

  15. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners’ writing performance. PMID:24578591

  16. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Cynthia S; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners' writing performance.

  17. Evaluating Writing in Prison Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hopwood Clive

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of Writers in Prison Network (WIPN) has revealedan innovative and well managed programme which is able to respondeffectively to the challenges of operating within the prison environment. Importantly, the evaluation has identified a significant impact on the development of prisoners' human and social capital which is an essential component of desistance from offending. The full evaluationreport will provide a more detailed assessment of the work of WIPN,and an additional focus o...

  18. Represent, Representin', Representation: The Efficacy of Hybrid Text in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrary, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The article explores the use of hybrid linguistic texts in the writing classroom, both as articles of study and possible models of composition. Standard English linguistic supremacy prevents many students from using their full range of linguistic knowledge. The inclusion of hybrid texts in the writing classroom might help students, in particular…

  19. The Effect of Creative Drama Method on Pre-Service Classroom Teachers' Writing Skills and Attitudes towards Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the effect of the creative drama method on pre-service classroom teachers' writing skills and attitudes towards writing. Additionally, the views of the pre-service teachers concerning the creative drama method were also investigated in the study. The participants of the study were 24 pre-service teachers studying…

  20. Networks and Project Work: Alternative Pedagogies for Writing with Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Describes three main uses of computers for writing as a social activity: networking, telecommunications, and project work. Examines advantages and disadvantages of teaching writing on a network. Argues that reports in the literature and the example of an English as a foreign language writing class show that project work shares most of the…

  1. Journal Writing for Improved Learning and Classroom Relationships in Public Schools: Applications for Disadvantaged Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Isom, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This review is an exploration into whether classroom methods similar to those applied by K-12 teachers are valid for adults and can be successfully applied to classrooms for disadvantaged adults: specifically, journal writing as a tool for improving learning and classroom relationships. The literature dispels the myth that teaching adults differs…

  2. Implementing wiki as a writing platform in a 10th grade EFL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hauff, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Literacy studies This thesis aims to investigate how to use the online writing platform Wikispace in the English classroom and whether implementing wiki writing can have an effect on pupils’ motivation for writing and their writing skills. Technology is rapidly becoming a natural part of everyday life, and statistics show that pupils in lower secondary school use internet on a daily basis, it can therefore be argued that schools should take advantage of the possibilit...

  3. Implementing wiki as a writing platform in a 10th grade EFL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Hauff, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate how to use the online writing platform Wikispace in the English classroom and whether implementing wiki writing can have an effect on pupils’ motivation for writing and their writing skills. Technology is rapidly becoming a natural part of everyday life, and statistics show that pupils in lower secondary school use internet on a daily basis, it can therefore be argued that schools should take advantage of the possibilities that are available with technology ...

  4. A Flipped Writing Classroom: Effects on EFL Learners’ Argumentative Essays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Soltanpour

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature, flipped teaching is a relatively new pedagogical approach in which the typical activities of classroom lectures followed by homework in common teaching practice are reversed in order, and most often integrated or supplemented with some types of instructional materials, such as instructional videos or PowerPoint files. This experimental study, using a pre-test-treatment-posttest-delayed posttest design, was aimed at investigating the effect of flipped instruction on Iranian EFL learners’ quality of argumentative essays. The participants were 55 students, who were assigned to two groups: the flipped classroom (FC and the traditional classroom (TC. Each group received 3 sessions of treatment. First, whether there was any significant difference between the FC and TC in the overall quality of the essays was investigated. The FC group significantly outperformed the TC one. Then, whether the difference between the groups varied over time was explored, and it was revealed that the FC was still significantly superior over the TC. Next, whether there would be any significant change in the FC in the long run was examined, and no significant change was seen. The promising results found in FC group can be attributed to not only the flipped instruction but also the process of actively engaging the learners in their learning in addition to incorporating different techniques, such as the video screencasting, collaborative writing, as well as in-class teacher-learner interaction and negotiation because it is argued that the crucial point in flipped instruction is how teachers best use in-class-time with students.

  5. Students with Learning Disabilities in an Inclusive Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Patricia; Fu, Danling

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case study on two fourth grade students with learning disabilities in two different writing situations: writing for test preparation and writing for digital stories. The students' writing behaviors, processes, and products in these two settings are contrasted. The differences in the students' writing experiences suggest…

  6. Research for the Classroom: The Power of Reflective Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Structured opportunities for reflective writing allow students to polish their writings and to reflect actively on their written creations, while encouraging clearer and more honest writing products. In addition, the use of reflective writing can transform students as they begin to incorporate metacognition, or thinking about their thinking, into…

  7. Use of Blog to Improve English Writing in the Chinese Tertiary EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qi-yuan

    2013-01-01

    According to the constructivism learning theory, blog may act as a useful tool for improving writing capability. For this purpose, the present article attempts to explore the potential of blog for improving English writing in the Chinese tertiary EFL classrooms. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in a Chinese university to compare the…

  8. The Quality of Recent Studies in Content-Area Writing in Secondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Diane M.; McTigue, Erin M.; Scott, Chyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    Situated within the historical and current state of writing and adolescent literacy research, we conducted a systematic literature review in which we screened 2,871 articles to determine the prevalent themes in current research on writing tasks in content-area classrooms. Each of the 37 final studies was evaluated and coded using seven…

  9. Exploring the Effectiveness of an Online Writing Workspace to Support Literacy in a Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin-Menter, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to analyze the writing experiences of eighth-grade students in three social studies classrooms while using a Web 2.0 online writing workspace. Participants included one social studies teacher and 69 eighth-grade students in a selective admission public high school. Furthermore, three of the eighth-grade…

  10. Talking about Information Literacy: The Mediating Role of Discourse in a College Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Wendy; Rogers, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of an observational study of information literacy instruction in a college writing course. Using a sociocultural approach, the study explores how classroom discourse can influence the ways in which students conceive of information literacy and the process of research and writing. We found that a discourse that…

  11. Ways of Knowing: Implications of Writing Curriculum in an Early Childhood Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Cara Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Early childhood writing curriculums typically focus on skills and encouraging interest. What children are asked to write is rarely closely examined. Through a self-study of my first and second grade classroom, in this paper I look at the implications of genre when teaching young children. I first identify some of the problems of a popular personal…

  12. What's Going On?: Challenges and Opportunities for Social Media Use in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vie, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on a national study of writing instructors regarding the inclusion of social media in their teaching. The results from this study indicate the field's burgeoning interest in social media in the writing classroom: as technological tool, as content for analysis, as a composing space, and much more. These findings suggest the…

  13. Peer Interaction and Writing Development in a Social Studies High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Peer review can be a valuable tool in the writing development of high school sophomores. Specifically, this research study explores the use of peer review to improve writing skills and to build content knowledge in a social studies high school classroom through the use of peer interaction. The problem in social studies high school instruction is…

  14. Teaching and Writing Popular Fiction: Horror, Adventure, Mystery and Romance in the American Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Karen M.

    This book, intended for teachers who want to expand their secondary-level writing curricula, examines the possibilities for using popular fiction in the classroom to encourage reading and to teach writing skills. Chapters include discussions of the genre approach, the horror story, the adventure story, the mystery story, the popular love story,…

  15. Classroom Activities and Engagement for Children with Reading and Writing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, Margareta Sandstrom; Wennerstrom, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    A multiple case study is reported aiming at comparing the degree of taking part and being engaged in classroom activities for children with and without reading and writing difficulties. Observations are made of 23 pupils with reading and writing difficulties (seven with a diagnosis of dyslexia), and 23 pupils in a control group; the observations…

  16. Supporting the Argumentative Writing of Students in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Yvonne C.; Filimon, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The number of English language learners (ELLs) mainstreamed into regular classrooms continues to increase. Curricular writing standards required by the Common Core State Standards require students to write essays analytically in response to text(s). Many English Language Arts (ELA) teachers may worry about effectively delivering essay writing…

  17. The effect of enhanced lexical retrieval on second language writing : A classroom experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellings, P; de Glopper, Kees; van Gelderen, A.

    Lexical retrieval is an essential subprocess in language production, and its efficiency is crucial for writing. To improve writing quality in a second language, we developed an experimental, computerized training for improving fluency of lexical retrieval in a classroom setting, applying techniques

  18. The effect of enhanced lexical retrieval on second language writing: a classroom experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellings, P.; van Gelderen, A.; de Glopper, K.

    2004-01-01

    Lexical retrieval is an essential subprocess in language production, and its efficiency is crucial for writing. To improve writing quality in a second language, we developed an experimental, computerized training for improving fluency of lexical retrieval in a classroom setting, applying techniques

  19. Composing Science: A Facilitator's Guide to Writing in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Leslie Atkins; Jaxon, Kim; Salter, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Offering expertise in the teaching of writing (Kim Jaxon) and the teaching of science (Leslie Atkins Elliott and Irene Salter), this book will help instructors create classrooms in which students use writing to learn and think scientifically. The authors provide concrete approaches for engaging students in practices that mirror the work that…

  20. Do Peer Reviews Help Improve Student Writing Abilities in an EFL High School Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have reported the benefits of peer reviews in English as a second language (ESL) and English as a foreign language (EFL) writing classrooms. However, there has been little empirical research on whether such peer reviews improve students' writing abilities. The current study investigated the effects of peer review on the development…

  1. Classroom Teachers' Feelings and Experiences in Teaching Early Reading and Writing: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to reveal classroom teachers' feelings and experiences in teaching early reading and writing. Phenomenological research design was applied in the qualitative research methodology of the study. The participants of the study were 15 classroom teachers working in different cities. The data were collected through…

  2. A New Sort of Writing: E-Mail in the E-nglish Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blase, Dean Woodring

    2000-01-01

    Describes a project which used email to link the author's English classroom with classrooms in three other states so that students could discuss Zora Neale Hurston's novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Discusses email as a distinct genre of writing with rules, characteristics, and even an aesthetic of its own. Offers a student-generated list…

  3. TEACHING WRITING SKILL ON RECOUNT TEXT BASED ON BRAINSTORMING IN THE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaimi Suhaimi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this article is to explain how to teach recount text in the classroom. The ability to write is one of the skills that should be taught in schools. Reality shows that there are many students who have problems in writing. The problems could be some students have limited ideas in writing. Furthermore, almost all of the students thought writing was boring, so they are not interested in writing. Then, writing is a difficult thing because they have to think about the selection of tenses and vocabulary correctly in a sentence. Considing facts, the author is interested in the theme of teaching the recount text-based brainstorming as one effective way to improve students' understanding in writing recount text. Brainstorming can increase students, creativity and to generate a lot of ideas in a short time, by extending the viewpoint of any aspects or thought . Keyword: writing, recount text, brainstorming

  4. Student Views Based A Proposal for First Reading and Writing Teaching Course of Classroom Teaching Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail YILDIRIM

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading and writing teaching is very important for a person’s life. Reading and writing teaching begins in the first class of primary education and it is delivered by classroom teachers. Classroom teachers get prepared for teaching with the “first reading and writing teaching course” given in their undergraduate education. As the content of the course is analyzed, first reading and writing teaching has three theoretical credit hours per week. It is indicated that exercises should be included in the content of the course, however, the exercises stay in the university environment and a real reading and writing exercise cannot be realized. Based on this fact, the purpose of this study is to state that reading and writing teaching course should not be theoretical, contrarily, it should be exercises based. The study conducts an action research to achieve this purpose. Descriptive method is used in the research to establish the current status. In this research, to determine the factors which affect the success of methodology in the content of first reading and writing teaching course of classroom teaching departments, one of the qualitative research methods, a semistructured interview technique is applied. Reading and writing teaching is realized in Tokat city, central district by using voice based sentence method on 40 adults who knew neither reading nor writing. The population of the research is composed of 40 junior students of classroom teaching department who taught reading and writing to 40 adults and 30 students who were enrolled to theoretical reading and writing teaching course. Students, who participated in the first reading and writing teaching exercise, indicate that they feel more comfortable about reading and writing teaching, from now on, they know what to do, and they assert that applied reading and writing teaching is more useful. Those students who are enrolled to theoretical first reading and writing course state that they

  5. Direct ink writing of microvascular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Willie

    Nature is replete with examples of embedded microvascular systems that enable efficient fluid flow and distribution for autonomic healing, cooling, and energy harvesting. The ability to incorporate microvascular networks in functional materials systems is therefore both scientifically and technologically important. In this PhD thesis, the direct-write assembly of planar and 3D biomimetic microvascular networks within polymer and hydrogel matrices is demonstrated. In addition, the influence of network design of fluid transport efficiency is characterized. Planar microvascular networks composed of periodic lattices of uniformal microchannels and hierarchical, branching architectures are constructed by direct-write assembly of a fugitive organic ink. Several advancements are required to facilitate their patterning, including pressure valving, dual ink printing, and dynamic pressure variation to allow tunable control of ink deposition. The hydraulic conductance is measured using a high pressure flow meter as a function of network design. For a constant vascular volume and areal coverage, 2- and 4-generation branched architectures that obey Murray's Law exhibited the highest hydraulic conductivity. These experimental observations are in good agreement with predictions made by analytic models. 3D microvascular networks are fabricated by omnidirectional printing a fugitive organic ink into a photopolymerizable hydrogel matrix that is capped with fluid filler of nearly identical composition. Using this approach, 3D networks of arbitrary design can be patterned. After ink deposition is complete, the matrix and fluid filler are chemically cross-linked via UV irradiation, and the ink is removed by liquefication. Aqueous solutions composed of a triblock copolymer of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-polypropylene oxide (PPO)-PEO constitute the materials system of choice due to their thermal- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Specifically, the fugitive ink consists of a 23 w

  6. Writing with Computers in ESL Classroom: Enhancing ESL Learners' Motivation, Confidence and Writing Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Marham Jupri

    2013-01-01

    Researcher's observation on his ESL class indicates the main issues concerning the writing skills: learners' low motivation to write, minimum interaction in writing, and poor writing skills. These limitations have led them to be less confidence to write in English. This article discusses how computers can be used for the purpose of increasing…

  7. Improving Student Writing: Methods You Can Use in Science and Engineering Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, S. J.; Bright, K.

    2013-12-01

    Many educators in the fields of science and engineering assure their students that writing is an important and necessary part of their work. According to David Lindsay, in Scientific Writing=Thinking in Words, 99% of scientists agree that writing is an integral part of their jobs. However, only 5% of those same scientists have ever had formal instruction in scientific writing, and those who are also educators may then feel unconfident in teaching this skill to their students (2). Additionally, making time for writing instruction in courses that are already full of technical content can cause it to be hastily and/or peremptorily included. These situations may be some of the contributing factors to the prevailing attitude of frustration that pervades the conversation about writing in science and engineering classrooms. This presentation provides a summary of past, present, and ongoing Writing Center research on effective writing tutoring in order to give science and engineering educators integrated approaches for working with student writers in their disciplines. From creating assignments, providing instruction, guiding revisions, facilitating peer review, and using assessments, we offer a comprehensive approach to getting your students motivated to improve their writing. Our new research study focuses on developing student writing resources and support in science and engineering institutions, with the goal of utilizing cross-disciplinary knowledge that can be used by the various constituencies responsible for improving the effectiveness of writing among student engineers and scientists. We will will draw upon recent findings in the study of the rhetoric and compositional pedagogy and apply them to the specific needs of the science and engineering classroom. The fields of communication, journalism, social sciences, rhetoric, technical writing, and philosophy of science have begun to integrate these findings into classroom practice, and we will show how these can also

  8. CONFERENCING APPROACH IN PROMOTING WRITING ABILITIY: A CLASSROOM ACTION RESEARCH STUDY ON LANGUAGE CREATIVE WRITING IN INDONESIAN LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatat Hartati

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent days there is a growing interest in the study of creative writing. A number of approaches for teaching creative writing have also been investigated.  However, studies investigating creative writing particularly for primary school students are hardly to find. The aim of the present research is to figure out how conferencing approach is applied to teach poetry writing and to find out the impact of this approach to the students’ writing skills. The study used a classroom action research with 30 sixth-grade students as the participants. To ensure the present approach effectively improves the learning achievement, the study used three cycles of teaching steps, including classical, group, and individual. Various media and sources to support the learning activities were also used. The results of the study show that there is a significant improvement in students’ writing skills, in which the average score of the third cycle was twice higher than that of the first cycle. This suggests that conferencing instruction had been successful in improving students’ writing skills. The process of interaction, both among students and between students and the teachers, were also emphasized. In addition, the teachers gained an experience of assesing poetry writing analytically using four aspects: creative idea, diction, information, and imagination.

  9. Writing in Early Childhood Classrooms: Guidance for Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerde, Hope K.; Bingham, Gary E.; Wasik, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Writing is a critical emergent literacy skill that lays the foundation for children's later literacy skills and reading achievement. Recent work indicates that many early childhood programs offer children materials and tools for engaging in writing activities but teachers rarely are seen modeling writing for children or scaffolding children's…

  10. Seeking New Worlds: The Study of Writing beyond Our Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bronwyn T.

    2010-01-01

    As new ways of creating and interpreting texts complicate ideas of how and why writing happens, the field of rhetoric and composition needs to be more conscious of how our institutional responsibilities and scholarly attention to college writing has limited its vision of writing and literacy. It is time to move beyond consolidating our identity as…

  11. Writing Conferences in a Second Language Writing Classroom: Instructor and Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliborska, Veronika; You, Yunjung

    2016-01-01

    Teacher-student writing conferences are considered a valuable teaching method in composition courses, used mostly with the purpose of discussing students' progress in their writing. This article presents an exploratory study on student and instructor expectations and perceptions of writing conferences in a semester-long writing course for…

  12. Anxiety over EFL speaking and writing: A view from language classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gkonou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The assumption that foreign language learners experience a high level of anxiety mainly when faced with speaking activities implies that research should focus on those learners prone to anxiety over that skill. Despite not being widely investigated, foreign language writing anxiety also seems to be a concern for a large number of students. Drawing on questionnaire findings, the study reported in this article examined the nature of, and the connection between the English language classroom speaking and writing anxiety of 128 Greek EFL learners in private language school settings. Speaking anxiety was operationalised by Horwitz, Horwitz, and Copeʼs (1986 Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale, and writing anxiety was measured by Gungle and Taylorʼs (1989 ESL version of the Daly and Millerʼs (1975 Writing Apprehension Test. Interconstruct and intraconstruct associations between the two instruments were examined through principal components analysis with varimax rotation and correlations check. A significant and high correlation was found between classroom anxiety and speaking anxiety, thus indicating that the English language classroom context is a source of speaking anxiety. Writing anxiety was found to load primarily on items relating to attitudes towards writing in English followed by self-derogation for the process and fear of negative evaluation by the teachers and/or by fellow students. On the basis of the findings, suggestions are made concerning the reassessment of the influence that writing anxiety exerts on classroom performance and the adoption of teaching techniques that promote topic-centred process writing.

  13. The Cortical Network for Braille Writing in the Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likova, Lora T; Tyler, Christopher W; Cacciamani, Laura; Mineff, Kristyo; Nicholas, Spero

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental forms of high-order cognition, such as reading and writing, are usually studied in the context of one modality - vision. People without sight, however, use the kinesthetic-based Braille writing, and haptic-based Braille reading. We asked whether the cognitive and motor control mechanisms underlying writing and reading are modality-specific or supramodal. While a number of previous functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies have investigated the brain network for Braille reading in the blind, such studies on Braille writing are lacking. Consequently, no comparative network analysis of Braille writing vs. reading exists. Here, we report the first study of Braille writing, and a comparison of the brain organization for Braille writing vs Braille reading. FMRI was conducted in a Siemens 3T Trio scanner. Our custom MRI-compatible drawing/writing lectern was further modified to provide for Braille reading and writing. Each of five paragraphs of novel Braille text describing objects, faces and navigation sequences was read, then reproduced twice by Braille writing from memory, then read a second time. During Braille reading, the haptic-sensing of the Braille letters strongly activated not only the early visual area V1 and V2, but some highly specialized areas, such as the classical visual grapheme area and the Exner motor grapheme area. Braille-writing-from-memory, engaged a significantly more extensive network in dorsal motor, somatosensory/kinesthetic, dorsal parietal and prefrontal cortex. However, in contrast to the largely extended V1 activation in drawing-from-memory in the blind after training (Likova, 2012), Braille writing from memory generated focal activation restricted to the most foveal part of V1, presumably reflecting topographically the focal demands of such a "pin-pricking" task.

  14. Peer-Review Writing Workshops in College Courses: Students’ Perspectives about Online and Classroom Based Workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin B. Jensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peer-review workshops are commonly used in writing courses as a way for students to give their peers feedback as well as help their own writing. Most of the research on peer-review workshops focuses on workshops held in traditional in-person courses, with less research on peer-review workshops held online. Students in a freshman writing course experienced both a classroom based writing workshop and an online workshop and then took a survey about their experiences. The majority of the students preferred the online writing workshop because of the convenience of the workshop and being able to post anonymous reviews. Students whom preferred the traditional in-person writing workshop liked being able to talk with their peers about their papers. This research article focuses on the students’ responses and experiences with traditional and online peer-reviews.

  15. Problems with Peer Response of Writing-as-a-Process Approach in an EFL Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Utami Widiati

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the result of reflection on personal experience in teaching writing using the process approach at the Department of English, State University of Malang, Indonesia. It firstly describes the current practice of teaching writing courses at the Department. Following this, ESL writing literature is explored to show how process approaches have been accepted in ESL composition. Then, the paper discusses some problems in teaching writing at the Department using the approach, referring m...

  16. Problems with Peer Response of Writing-as-a-Process Approach in an EFL Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Widiati, Utami

    2002-01-01

    This paper is the result of reflection on personal experience in teaching writing using the process approach at the Department of English, State University of Malang, Indonesia. It firstly describes the current practice of teaching writing courses at the Department. Following this, ESL writing literature is explored to show how process approaches have been accepted in ESL composition. Then, the paper discusses some problems in teaching writing at the Department using the approach, referring m...

  17. Funding Music: Guidelines for Grant Writing in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2016-01-01

    With music education's continued unstable role within the school system, music educators are actively seeking external funding to support and augment their programs. However, there are many challenges involved with grant writing including understanding where to find potential funders, writing the proposal, developing a budget, and including an…

  18. Power and Identity in the Creative Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Anna, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book remaps theories and practices for teaching creative writing at university and college level. This collection critiques well-established approaches for teaching creative writing in all genres and builds a comprehensive and adaptable pedagogy based on issues of authority, power, and identity. A long-needed reflection, this book shapes…

  19. Exploring Classroom Microblogs to Improve Writing of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janie S.; Rice, Margaret L.

    2017-01-01

    Many of today's adolescents are constantly engaging with information through texting, watching videos, listening to music, and even writing papers. Learning to interact properly with information through writing presents a challenge for the students because they are employing all of these applications at once and believe that they are multitasking…

  20. Exploring Culturally Sustaining Writing Pedagogy in Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Rebecca; Vaughan, Andrea; Machado, Emily

    2017-01-01

    We examine how culturally sustaining pedagogy that fosters linguistic and cultural pluralism might be taken up in writing instruction. Using data collected through semistructured interviews with nine urban elementary and middle school writing teachers, we document teachers' conceptualizations and enactments of culturally sustaining writing…

  1. EFL Teachers' Attempts at Feedback Innovation in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy; Mak, Pauline; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    To date, research on feedback in second language (L2) writing has primarily focused on feedback per se, with little attention paid to the teachers' professional development with regard to feedback in writing. This study aims to explore the ways in which two secondary teachers in Hong Kong attempted to implement feedback innovation in their writing…

  2. On Adopting a Cognitive Orientation in EFL Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2007-01-01

    The present paper underscores the importance of the cognitive orientation of EFL students in their success in writing courses. A few suggestions are made as to how EFL teachers can put their students on the right cognitive path in their writings.

  3. An Extensive Reading Strategy to Promote Online Writing for Elementary Students in the 1:1 Digital Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong; Yang, Xian Min; He, Ke Kang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the digital classroom has made it possible to combine extensive reading with online writing, yet research and development in this area are lacking. This study explores the impact of online writing after extensive reading in a classroom setting in China where there was one computer for each student (a 1:1 digital…

  4. What Do Students Learn from a Classroom Experiment: Not Much, Unless They Write a Report on It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Edward; Stepanova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The authors ask whether writing a report on a classroom experiment increases a student's performance in an end-of-course test. To answer this question, the authors analyzed data from a first-year undergraduate course based on classroom experiments and found that writing a report has a large positive benefit. They conclude, therefore, that it is…

  5. Talking about information literacy: the mediating roleof discourse in a college writing classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Holliday, W.; Rogers, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of an observational study of information literacy instruction in a college writing course. Using a sociocultural approach, the study explores how classroom discourse can influence the ways in which students conceive of information literacy and the process of research and writing. We found that a discourse that emphasized finding sources more than learning about might limit students engagement with information and the process of inquiry. This article conclude...

  6. Writing Wounded: Trauma, Testimony, and Critical Witness in Literacy Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutro, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of acknowledging the "hard stuff" of life in literacy classrooms. She considers how difficult experiences--exposed wounds and the "exposing" of wounds--function in literacy classrooms. She is particularly interested in how such experiences, as they enter the public spaces of schools and…

  7. Utilising Social Networking Sites to Improve Writing: A Case Study with Chinese Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikneswaran, Thulasi; Krish, Pramela

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement of technology, writing in English is no longer confined to the classroom as nowadays students are exposed to various forms of writing on the Internet. Specifically with Generation Y in mind, online writing is a new method that needs to be implemented to enhance Malaysian students' writing skills. This article aims at…

  8. Writing in the elementary science classroom: Teacher beliefs and practices within a narrowing curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Angela K.

    The narrowed curriculum continues to be challenging for science education as teachers strive to impart content that is on the high-stakes assessments. This Qualitative multiple-case study investigated four experienced, elementary classroom teachers' use of writing in science. It was designed to provide insight into teaching beliefs and practices of how teachers use writing in science opportunities within a narrowing curriculum. Triangulation was achieved through teacher interviews, classroom observations, and document analysis. Three major findings were evident through careful examination of data which is representative of the teacher participants within this study: 1.) Writing is combined with dialogue, multiple applications, activity and audience, 2.) Writing is used as an assessment and as a means to enhance learning, 3.) Writing is prioritized in science with differing schedule approaches. Although these are the major findings there were exceptions that were unique to each individual participant. The findings of this study can inform pre-service, novice and experienced classroom teachers on how to interconnect the two subject areas of writing and science to promote enhancement of learning. By gaining this information, it could diminish the global achievement gap in science.

  9. Interactive Story Writing in the Classroom: Using Computer Games

    OpenAIRE

    Schaeffer, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Computer games offer a new medium for creative writing – immersive stories where the "reader" is an active participant in the story. These stories are rich in visual and audio texture. Decisions made by the reader influence how the story unfolds (possibly even changing the outcome). In contrast to traditional pen-and-paper story writing, where the author is expected to specify everything textually, in interactive stories the "writer" uses computer tools to create visual representations of a v...

  10. In Their Own Words: Understanding Student Conceptions of Writing through Their Spontaneous Metaphors in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Tamar; Wagner, Tili

    2006-01-01

    This article explores student views on writing as shown by the metaphors they use when asked to reflect on their own writing-to-learn tasks in the science classroom. The study examines the metaphors and metaphoric themes of 97 eighth grade students, discusses how they compare to important theories on writing to learn, and explores how student…

  11. Practices and Challenges of Writing Instruction in K-2 Classrooms: A Case Study of Five Primary Grade Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Byran B.; Wimmer, Jennifer J.; Wilcox, Brad; Morrison, Timothy G.; Harward, Stan; Peterson, Nancy; Simmerman, Sue; Pierce, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Given the interrelated role of writing and the development of early literacy skills, recommendations have been made to increase instructional writing experiences in K-2 classrooms. In an effort to increase the amount of writing in the primary grades that leads to later literacy success, it is important that teachers engage in instructional…

  12. Critical Writing : Exploring the Needs of Students in a Writing Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ben, Lehtinen

    2008-01-01

    This research project investigated Japanese students' secondary school L1/L2 writing experience and how this experience helped or hindered their transfer to a tertiary writing program. The study was completed in 2006 and involved a total of 308 first year students at Kanda University of International Studies (KUIS) in Chiba Prefecture. The project's objective was to provide a `snapshot' of student experience which would influence the design of a more student-centered writing curriculum create...

  13. Peer-editing Practice in the Writing Classroom: Benefits and Drawbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Rosnida Md. Deni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Small scale studies have shown that peer-editing is beneficial to students as it increases their awareness of the complex process of writing, it improves their knowledge of and skills in writing and helps them become more autonomous in learning. Teachers too may benefit from peer-editing as this practice discloses invaluable information on students’ writing weaknesses and strengths: and teachers’ teaching effectiveness. This is a small scale study conducted on fifteen first-year degree students majoring in Tourism to view the usefulness of peer-editing practice in enhancing their writing skills. Retrospective notes were taken to record students’ receptiveness and reaction towards peer editing practice: students writing samples and peer- editing questionnaires were analyzed to view students’ revisions and comments; and an open— ended questionnaire was distributed to identify students perceptions of peer—editing practice in the writing classroom. Analysis of data gathered revealed that peer-editing practice benefitted both the teacher and most of her students as it exposed important information that could improve her teaching of writing and her students’ writing practices. Data analysis also. however, discloses that peer-editing practice may have adverse effects on students’ motivation and improvement in writing if they are not deployed properly.

  14. Writing in the Elementary Science Classroom: Teacher Beliefs and Practices within a Narrowing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Angela K.

    2014-01-01

    The narrowed curriculum continues to be challenging for science education as teachers strive to impart content that is on the high-stakes assessments. This Qualitative multiple-case study investigated four experienced, elementary classroom teachers' use of writing in science. It was designed to provide insight into teaching beliefs and practices…

  15. Writing Superheroes: Contemporary Childhood, Popular Culture, and Classroom Literacy. Language and Literacy Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    Based on an ethnographic study in an urban classroom of 7- to 9-year olds, this book examines how young school children use popular culture, especially superhero stories, in the unofficial peer social world and in the official school literary curriculum. In one sense, the book is about children "writing superheroes"--about children…

  16. Children Writing Ethnography: Children's Perspectives and Nomadic Thinking in Researching School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohti, Riikka

    2016-01-01

    This article makes a connection between narrative ethnography, childhood studies and new materialist theories in studying children's perspective on school. It presents "children writing ethnography" as an approach based on complexity and involving participatory research. The question of "what is happening in the classroom" is…

  17. A Critical Select Bibliography of Literature on Internationalizing the Technical and Business Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Pamela E.

    1997-01-01

    States that teachers in business/technical writing classrooms are unsure of why they should internationalize their curriculum, despite increases in international business, in the number of workers employed by overseas businesses, and ethnically and culturally diverse populations within the United States. Provides a 33-item critical annotated…

  18. Memory, Literacy, and Invention: Reimagining the Canon of Memory for the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kathleen J.

    2004-01-01

    This article challenges the assumption that the canon of memory means memorization and transcription, and, as a result, has little relevance for the writing classroom. An examination of the canon's historical legacy and its relationships to literacy and invention open a space for redefining the canon of memory as "rememoried knowing." In brief,…

  19. Using Portfolio to Assess Rural Young Learners' Writing Skills in English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad Noor Abdul; Yusoff, Nurahimah Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at discussing the benefits of portfolio assessment in assessing students' writing skills. The study explores the use of authentic assessment in the classroom. Eleven primary school children from Year 4 in a rural school in Sabah participated in this study. Data were collected by observing them during the English Language lessons…

  20. Etched Impressions: Student Writing as Engaged Pedagogy in the Graduate Sport Management Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veri, Maria J.; Barton, Kenny; Burgee, David; Davis, James A., Jr.; Eaton, Pamela; Frazier, Cathy; Gray, Stevie; Halsey, Christine; Thurman, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates the pedagogical value of employing student narrative writing assignments in the graduate sport management classroom and advocates for cultural studies and critical pedagogy approaches to teaching sport management. The article considers students' autobiographical narratives within a theoretical framework of cultural…

  1. Pedagogical "In Loco Parentis": Reflecting on Power and Parental Authority in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podis, JoAnne; Podis, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    In higher education, issues of "in loco parentis" have been most often discussed in connection with campus administrative policies. College writing teachers need to reflect, however, on the ways they conceivably exercise parental authority in their own classrooms, through such models as the Stern Father and the Nurturing Mother. (Contains 26…

  2. Language Identities in Students' Writings about Group Work in Their Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I explore language identities and processes of negotiation concerning parts of these identities as seen by a group of students from a bilingual mathematics classroom. A collection of 10 students' individual writings on the questions "What language do you use during group work in your mathematics class and why?" is…

  3. Facilitating Real-Time Observation of, and Peer Discussion and Feedback about, Practice in Writing Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Judy M.; Hawe, Eleanor

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates conditions designed to optimize learning where professionals utilize the expertise and support of one another. It describes a research--practice collaboration to enhance teacher knowledge and practice through peer observation of, and feedback about, classroom practice in writing. A collaboratively designed observation…

  4. Adapting the CEFR for the Classroom Assessment of Young Learners' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselgreen, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This article concerns the contribution that feedback makes to valid classroom assessment of the writing of young learners (YLs), defined here as approximately 9-13 years old. It shows that a scale of descriptors adapted from the "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" (CEFR; Council of Europe, 2001) can play a central role…

  5. Critical Thinking through Writing: Expressing Scientific Thought and Process in a Deaf Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez, Leslie

    Within Deaf classrooms there is often a disconnect between academic areas and writing curriculums that develop in both common and academic language, where often classrooms focus solely on writing as a skill rather than as a method for producing language through an academic area. This work focuses on the development of academic language in ASL and English print of science. The curriculum is written to be implemented as a bilingual academic curriculum to support Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in various self contained classroom settings. Lessons are conducted in three Units, A B and C. Unit A focuses on research, thought and writing of preparatory materials in small groups. Unit B is comprised of procedural lessons on conducting x experiments and the evaluation of those experiments through mathematics. Unit C is a group of lessons that ties together Units A and B through writing and peer teaching as a method of concluding the work and presenting information in an effective manner. The success of the project was evaluated on the basis of student work, rubrics, and final works from the students. The results showed promise in aspects of Critical Thinking, writing development, and expression of new concepts in both ASL and English.

  6. Writing Instruction in Elementary Classrooms: Why Teachers Engage or Do Not Engage Students in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harward, Stan; Peterson, Nancy; Korth, Byran; Wimmer, Jennifer; Wilcox, Brad; Morrison, Timothy G.; Black, Sharon; Simmerman, Sue; Pierce, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored reasons K-6 teachers did or did not engage students regularly in writing. Interviews with 14 teachers, classified as high, transitional, and low implementers of writing instruction, revealed three themes: hindrances and helps, beliefs concerning practice, and preparation and professional development. Both high and…

  7. Exploring the Use of Journal Writing in Mathematics Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhairina Suhaimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on secondary mathematics lessons that integrated journal writing with the use of the writing-to-learn pedagogical strategy. Investigations were conducted on the influence of journal writing on Year 10 secondary students’ mathematical performance. It is an action research study that comprised of two cycles and involved 35 students from two classes in a secondary school in Brunei Darussalam. The analyses of the data were extracted from the students’ pre- and post-test scores and their journal entries. The findings revealed that even though the students’ journal entry score was high, this does not necessarily imply improvements in their mathematical performance. Furthermore, other factors such as classwork and homework given during and after the lessons may have also contributed to the students’ mathematical achievements.

  8. Methodologies for Effective Writing Instruction in EFL and ESL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahrooqi, Rahma, Ed.; Thakur, Vijay Singh; Roscoe, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Educators continue to strive for advanced teaching methods to bridge the gap between native and non-native English speaking students. Lessons on written forms of communication continue to be a challenge recognized by educators who wish to improve student comprehension and overall ability to write clearly and expressively. "Methodologies for…

  9. Digital Stories: Bringing Multimodal Texts to the Spanish Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoz, Ana; Elola, Idoia

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability and growing use of digital story software for authoring and instructional purposes, little is known about learners' perceptions on its integration in the foreign language writing class. Following both a social semiotics approach and activity theory, this study focuses on six advanced Spanish learners' perceptions about the…

  10. Building Problem Forums: On Troubleshooting in the Professional Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vealey, Kyle P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "problem forums" in undergraduate professional writing courses as a technique for facilitating and sustaining learning from increasingly complex, messy, and wicked problems that are characteristic of 21st-century work. Problem forums are designed to scaffold project team discussions of rhetorical,…

  11. Turnitin and Peer Review in ESL Academic Writing Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrong; Li, Mimi

    2018-01-01

    Despite the benefits of peer review, there are still challenges that need to be addressed to make it more effective for L2 students. With the development of technology, computer-mediated peer review has captured increasing attention from L2 writing researchers and instructors. While Turnitin is known for its use in detecting plagiarism, its newly…

  12. Social Media and Classroom Writing: Participation, Interaction, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, the number of one-to-one laptop programs in U.S. schools has steadily increased. Though technology advocates believe that such programs can assist student writing, there has been little systematic evidence for this claim, and even less focused on the benefits of specific technology use by diverse learners. This dissertation…

  13. Journalogue: Voicing Student Challenges in Writing through a Classroom Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Suneeta

    2017-01-01

    This study qualitatively analyzes the challenges presented by international undergraduate students in a freshman composition course at a large Midwestern university in the US. 15 students were divided into five groups, of three members each, with varying proficiency levels in writing. They were asked to submit reflections as journal/blog posts, on…

  14. Google Docs as a Tool for Collaborative Writing in the Middle School Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Fan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: In this study, the authors examine how an online word processing tool can be used to encourage participation among students of different language back-grounds, including English Language Learners. To be exact, the paper discusses whether student participation in anonymous collaborative writing via Google Docs can lead to more successful products in a linguistically diverse eighth-grade English Language Arts classroom. Background: English Language Learners (ELLs make up a considerable portion of elementary and secondary public school students, as language and ethnic diversity has become the norm in the United States. The research literature finds that ELLs are statistically behind their monolingual peers on such key language and academic development indicators as writing. Educators and researchers then turn to collaborative writing with the assistance of online technology. Although it is shown in literature to be a worthwhile endeavor for students of all ages and ability levels, no studies have investigated the differences it makes, namely, in comparison to traditional face-to-face collaboration in the classroom, and to anonymous online collaboration in the virtual space. Methodology: Through face-to-face, online, and anonymous writing activities, a rubric, and a survey, this quantitative study asks if anonymous collaborative writing, com-pared to other modalities, equalizes participation among students of varying language fluencies, and if anonymous collaborative writing, compared to other modalities, affect student comfort levels. Contribution: This builds on research of online collaborative writing tools and suggests that using such tools (Google Docs in particular is beneficial, especially for students who are building their language abilities. The study further reveals varied degree of success and student comfort level in participating writing tasks in three modalities. Findings: We ascertain that students of varying language

  15. Classrooms as ‘safe houses’? The ethical and emotional implications of digital storytelling in a university writing classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian D Stewart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of a digital storytelling praxis within a higher education classroom located outside of Metro Detroit in the United States. Drawing on Zembylas’s (2006, 2008 scholarship on emotion in the production of knowledge and the teacher’s role, adjacent to literature surrounding personal writing and safe houses for learning, an investigation of student perceptions of digital storytelling within a writing classroom took place during the 2016 and 2017 academic years. Data highlights the students’ interest for the emotionally-driven course content digital storytelling encourages, as it taught students how to insert genre conventions into their own writing. Digital storytelling, according to the students, also supplied a means for students to develop relationships with their peers as many students felt isolated on this largely commuter campus. Students additionally viewed the curriculum as promoting ‘real world’ skills they could transfer outside of the classroom and into their lives. However, to craft digital stories, data revealed how students turned toward sharing personal (and or traumatic narratives. This can be problematic in terms of emotional safety if students are made to feel they must leverage emotions for grades and are then forced to broadcast their digital stories in a public forum. To lessen these concerns, strategies for implementing digital storytelling into the curriculum are provided. Lastly, the author concludes that educating students within a Trump presidency requires a different pedagogical approach. Assignments such as digital storytelling that merge the scholarly and the personal, alongside nurturing empathy, open dialogue, and building relationships might offer a direction forward.

  16. THE FLIPPED WRITING CLASSROOM IN TURKISH EFL CONTEXT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON A NEW MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    EKMEKCI, Emrah

    2017-01-01

    Flipped learning, one of the most popular and conspicuous instructional models of recent time, can be considered as a pedagogical approach in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Flipped learning transforms classrooms into interactive and dynamic places where the teacher guides the students and facilitates their learning. The current study explores the impact of flipped instruction on students’ foreign language writing skill which is often perceived as bor...

  17. Anxiety over EFL speaking and writing: A view from language classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Gkonou

    2011-01-01

    The assumption that foreign language learners experience a high level of anxiety mainly when faced with speaking activities implies that research should focus on those learners prone to anxiety over that skill. Despite not being widely investigated, foreign language writing anxiety also seems to be a concern for a large number of students. Drawing on questionnaire findings, the study reported in this article examined the nature of, and the connection between the English language classroom spe...

  18. Between-Classroom Differences in Peer Network Features and Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadzora, Kathleen; Gest, Scott D.; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this poster is to examine whether differences in the structural features of classroom peer networks (tight-knittedness, hierarchy, salience norms) are associated with differences in how individual students perceive the classroom environment (relational support from teachers and peers) and express achievement-related beliefs…

  19. Second Language Writing Anxiety, Computer Anxiety, and Performance in a Classroom versus a Web-Based Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracopoulos, Effie; Pichette, François

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of writing anxiety and computer anxiety on language learning for 45 ESL adult learners enrolled in an English grammar and writing course. Two sections of the course were offered in a traditional classroom setting whereas two others were given in a hybrid form that involved distance learning. Contrary to previous…

  20. Writing in the Music Classroom: Educators Can--And Should--Encourage Their Students to Give Music a Written Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dee

    2009-01-01

    Writing in a music classroom may seem counterintuitive, but most researchers consider writing to be an effective instructional strategy for teaching and reinforcing reading skills, and so administrators frequently ask music teachers to include it in their classes. In this article, the author explores ways to initiate written responses to music and…

  1. Beyond strategies: teacher beliefs and writing instruction in two primary inclusion classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth A Wiebe

    2006-01-01

    Links between teachers' pedagogical beliefs and teaching practices were investigated with respect to process writing instruction. Participants included 5 teachers, 44 general education students, and 23 special education students in 2 elementary multi-age inclusion classrooms. Findings suggested that, although the teachers shared similar views on inclusion and were convinced of the uniqueness of their respective instructional approaches, they nuanced their writing instruction to conform to their implicit theories about teaching, learning, and disability. One set of teachers believed that the writing "breakdowns" of students with disabilities required a structural approach-sequenced, individualized, phonics-based instruction targeting individual performance levels. Another set of teachers advocated a relational approach, wherein students with disabilities are "protected" and "empowered" in learning communities characterized by shared activities, student choice, and interpersonal communication.

  2. Exploring Peer Revision as a Strategy in the ESL Writing Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attan Anie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the issues affecting the efficacy of peer revision in the writing classroom is that of the knowledge of peer reviewers. Do peer reviewers have sufficient knowledge of content and language to critique the works of their peer writers? Do they provide feedback on content as much as they do for language? Proponents of social constructivism posit that learners learn best when they are involved in exploring, discovering and transforming their ideas and those of their peers through interaction, negotiation and collaboration. In the writing classroom, student writers and reviewers are given the opportunity to build meaning based on their own experiences. This study examined the types of comments made by Malay ESL peer reviewers and their perceived usefulness towards improving peer writers’ composition. Comments on peer writing were collected from ten upper secondary school peer reviewers for equal number of peer writers through reviewer feedback form, peer conferencing session, reviewer field notes and writers’ multiple drafts. Findings of the study show that peer reviewers were able to provide revisions in both areas of content and language. Additionally, the strategies used to providing feedback on content included alteration and reordering, clarification and suggestion, as well as praise and criticism. Overall peer revision has a positive impact on writing and this has implications for teaching and learning, more so for teachers who are overburdened with marking.

  3. The Closed World of the Writing Classroom: Student Subjectivities as Created by, and Breaking out of, Bounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Jeffrey

    This paper discusses the emergent perspective in composition studies that sees discourse forms as producing material effects and writing classrooms and programs as part of an apparatus for producing subjective forms, which individual students are then induced to inhabit. The paper suggests that the closed circuit of the classroom is overdetermined…

  4. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is, as evident from the normal meaning of the English word, a correspondence which associates to each mem ..... write it as a product of 3-cycles and go through the above analysis to actually arrive at a sequence of sliding moves which reaches the starting position. CLASSROOM. Look at the cycles. 0"1 = (1,2,. ,n,2n,. 2. 2. 1.

  5. THE FLIPPED WRITING CLASSROOM IN TURKISH EFL CONTEXT: A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON A NEW MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah EKMEKCI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Flipped learning, one of the most popular and conspicuous instructional models of recent time, can be considered as a pedagogical approach in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Flipped learning transforms classrooms into interactive and dynamic places where the teacher guides the students and facilitates their learning. The current study explores the impact of flipped instruction on students’ foreign language writing skill which is often perceived as boring, complex and difficult by English as a Foreign Language (EFL learners. The study compares flipped and traditional face-to-face writing classes on the basis of writing performances. Employing a pre- and post-test true experimental design with a control group, the study is based on a mixed-method research. The experimental group consisting of 23 English Language Teaching (ELT students attending preparatory class were instructed for fifteen weeks through Flipped Writing Class Model while the control group comprising 20 ELT preparatory class students followed traditional face-to-face lecture-based writing class. Independent and paired samples t-tests were carried out for the analyses of the data gathered through the pre-and post-tests. The results indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between the experimental and control groups in terms of their writing performances based on the employed rubric. It was found that the students in the experimental group outperformed the students in the control group after the treatment process. The results of the study also revealed that the great majority of the students in the experimental group held positive attitudes towards Flipped Writing Class Model.

  6. "Our Zoo to You": The Link between Zoo Animals in the Classroom and Science and Literacy Concepts in First-Grade Journal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kathleen; Trainin, Guy; Laughridge, Virginia; Brooks, David; Wickless, Mimi

    2011-01-01

    This study examined first-grade students' journal writing to determine how placing live zoo animals in classrooms for science education links to students' emergent and early writing. Students were asked to write journal entries during the daily language arts period. Although no direct instruction in informational text writing was offered, teachers…

  7. Using Facebook-Based e-Portfolio in ESL Writing Classrooms: Impact and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrot, Jessie S.

    2016-01-01

    In English as a second language (ESL) writing pedagogy, much attention has been given to electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) assessment via social networking sites. However, little is known about how Facebook can be used as an e-portfolio platform. Hence, this paper describes the impact of Facebook-based e-portfolio on ESL students' writing…

  8. Children’s Democratic Experiences in a Collective Writing Process – Analysing Classroom Interaction in Terms of Deliberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hultin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is twofold: firstly, it aims to explore the interactional conditions in terms of democratic qualities constituted in collective writing in a primary school classroom; and secondly, it aims to examine whether a set of deliberative criteria is fruitful as an analytical tool when studying classroom interaction. Theoretically, I turn to New Literacy Studies for understanding the writing classroom as a literacy practice and the actual (collective writing as literacy events. The study has an ethnographic approach in which classroom observations were conducted during a collective writing process involving six nine-year-old children and their teacher. The observations included, two lessons, divided into 3 hours, which were observed, videotaped, and transcribed. The teacher had planned for a strict interactional or didactical order during the collective writing in which the children were to respond individually. However, the children responded in a different manner by starting a vivid dialogue in which they negotiated both the form and the content of the story. The analysis shows some deliberative qualities in this classroom interaction, while some other qualities were not evident. Furthermore, the analysis showed that the set of deliberative criteria was useful in visualizing both existing deliberative qualities in the interaction and the potential for developing such qualities.

  9. Student Appropriation of Writing Lessons through Hybrid Composing Practices: Direct, Diffuse, and Indirect Use of Teacher-Offered Writing Tools in an ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranker, Jason

    2009-01-01

    This is a qualitative case study (conducted in an urban, public school classroom in the United States) of the collaborative composing processes of two groups of first-grade students designated as English Language Learners (ELLs) as they wrote in a writing workshop context. I focused on a specific type of the students' hybrid composing practices:…

  10. Reflective Blogfolios in the Language Classroom: Impact on EFL Tertiary Students’ Argumentative Writing Skills and Ways of Knowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Abdullah Mahmoud Ismial

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The emerging paradigm shift in educational contexts from walled classroom environments to virtual, hybrid, blended, and lately personal learning environments has brought about vast changes in the foreign language classroom practices.  Numerous calls  for experimenting with new instructional treatments to enhance students' language performance in these new learning environments have been voiced by researchers and language educators in different settings. The current study aimed at investigating the impact of using reflective blogfolios in teaching argumentation to EFL tertiary students on their argumentative essay writing skills and ways of knowing. As well, the study investigated the relationship between student's ways of knowing and their argumentative writing capabilities. The participants of the study were fifty one EFL tertiary students in the Emirati context. Two assessment instruments were used, including a ways-of-knowing scale and a rubric for tapping EFL students' argumentative writing skills. Results of the study indicated that using reflective blogfolios in the foreign language classroom brought about significant changes in EFL tertiary students' argumentative writing skills and their ways of knowing. Results of the study also indicated that connected ways of knowing were better predictors of EFL tertiary students' argumentative writing performance than separate ways of knowing. Details of the instructional intervention, the assessment instruments, results of the study, implications for foreign language instruction in virtual learning environments, and suggestions for further research are discussed. Keywords: Reflective blogfolios, argumentative writing skills, ways of knowing

  11. Classroom Teacher Candidates' Metaphoric Perceptions Regarding the Concepts of Reading and Writing: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozenc, Emine Gül; Ozenc, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine and compare candidate classroom teachers' metaphoric perceptions about reading and writing. The study was conducted with teacher candidates who were studying at Ömer Halisdemir University's Department of Elementary Education in Nigde/Turkey during 2016-2017 academic year. A total of 266 1st, 2nd, 3rd and…

  12. Flipping the History Classroom with an Embedded Writing Consultant: Synthesizing Inverted and WAC Paradigms in a University History Survey Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    "Flipping" the Classroom techniques and the use of Embedded Writing Consultants (EWC) in institutions of higher education have been the subject of scholarly research in recent years. However, it appears that no studies have examined the simultaneous use of both "tools" in an introductory History course at the university level.…

  13. Rethinking Process-Based Writing Approaches in the ESOL Middle School Classroom: Developing Linguistic Fluency via Hybrid Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anjali

    2012-01-01

    This article calls for a rethinking of pure process-based approaches in the teaching of second language writers in the middle school classroom. The author provides evidence from a detailed case study of the writing of a Korean middle school student in a U.S. school setting to make a case for rethinking the efficacy of classic process-based…

  14. Assessment as Learning: Examining a Cycle of Teaching, Learning, and Assessment of Writing in the Portfolio-Based Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ricky

    2016-01-01

    Assessment for learning has been extensively researched in the past two decades. However, its applications as a means of classroom-based assessment, especially for promoting teaching and learning of writing, have been underrepresented in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) portfolio settings. This paper aims to critically review the extent to…

  15. Making Sense of Power Relations in a Malaysian English-as-a-Second-Language Academic Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The role of power in an English-as-a-second-language classroom has yet to be fully explored by an action research practitioner, especially in a Malaysian higher education setting. This study aims to contribute to this gap by working within an academic literacies perspective to teaching academic writing, which propagates the understanding of…

  16. Bringing Writing Research into the Classroom : The effectiveness of Tekster, a newly developed writing program for elementary students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.P.; Bouwer, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch Inspectorate for Education established that the quality of elementary students’ writing is below the desired level, and that the teaching of writing must be improved. The aim of this PhD research was therefore to improve writing education in upper elementary grades by developing an

  17. Enhancing Classroom Effectiveness through Social Networking Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurthakoti, Raghu; Boostrom, Robert E., Jr.; Summey, John H.; Campbell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the usefulness of social networking Web sites such as Ning.com as a communication tool in marketing courses, a study was designed with special concern for social network use in comparison to Blackboard. Students from multiple marketing courses were surveyed. Assessments of Ning.com and Blackboard were performed both to understand how…

  18. Third and Fourth Grade Teacher's Classroom Practices in Writing: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindle, Mary; Graham, Steve; Harris, Karen R.; Hebert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A random sample of teachers in grades 3 and 4 (N = 157) from across the United States were surveyed about their use of evidence-based writing practices, preparation to teach writing, and beliefs about writing. Teachers' beliefs included their efficacy to teach writing, their orientations to teach writing, their attitude about teaching writing, and…

  19. ERRORS AND CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK IN WRITING: IMPLICATIONS TO OUR CLASSROOM PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Corazon Saturnina A Castro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Error correction is one of the most contentious and misunderstood issues in both foreign and second language teaching. Despite varying positions on the effectiveness of error correction or the lack of it, corrective feedback remains an institution in the writing classes. Given this context, this action research endeavors to survey prevalent attitudes of teachers and students toward corrective feedback and examine their implications to classroom practices.  This paper poses the major problem:  How do teachers’ perspectives on corrective feedback match the students’ views and expectations about error treatment in their writing? Professors of the University of the Philippines who teach composition classes and over a hundred students enrolled in their classes were surveyed.  Results showed that there are differing perceptions of teachers and students regarding corrective feedback. These oppositions must be addressed as they have implications to current pedagogical practices which include constructing and establishing appropriate lesson goals, using alternative corrective strategies, teaching grammar points in class even in the tertiary level, and further understanding the learning process.

  20. Journal Writing: A Means of Professional Development in ESL Classroom at Undergraduate Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Samrajya Lakshmi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The duty of the Teacher of English is not merely teaching English texts but he/she should help the students in enhancing various other skills like communicative, analytical, logical and soft skills. To compete with the growing demands on the English teachers, timely orientation towards professionalism is of dire importance. For over three decades now, it has been found that methodology, training and concept alone will not make a teacher competent enough to train the students at college level to meet the students’ requirements. In this fast changing global scenario, no other processes excepting reflective practice, which is highly exploratory is the best and could serve the ever growing needs of the English language learners and teachers by integrating both theory and practice. This paper focuses on the potential of journal writing as a reflective professional development tool, which is purely a personal low-tech way of incorporating reflective practice in day-to-day classroom teaching by individual teachers. My attempt through this paper is to advertise the use of journal writing not only to the experienced but also to the novice teacher to make his/her class effective.

  1. Children's Agreement on Classroom Social Networks: Cross-Level Predictors in Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Neal, Jennifer Watling; Sahu, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Informed by research on interpersonal perception, peer relationships, and classroom climate, this study examines predictors of children's agreement with classmates on their classroom social networks. Social network data, peer nominations of positive behavior, and classroom observations were collected from 418 second-grade to fourth-grade children…

  2. Corporate Social Networks Applied in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo de Juan-Jordán

    2016-10-01

    This study also tries to propose some guidelines and best practices obtained as a result of the experience of use and the adoption of social networks in class in order to improve the learning process and innovate in the methodology applied to education.

  3. If Maslow Taught Writing: A Way to Look at Motivation in the Composition Classroom. Writing Teachers at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ada; Boone, Beth

    Intended for use by teachers at both the college and the secondary school level, this booklet describes a method of getting students to write using the motivation theories developed by the psychologist Abraham Maslow. The first chapter of the booklet reviews Maslow's basic principles as they apply to the teaching of writing, but includes a…

  4. From University to Classrooms: A Preservice Teachers' Writing Portfolio Program and Its Impact on Instruction in Teaching Strategies for Writing Portfolios in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintz, William; Shake, Mary

    2005-01-01

    This article reports findings from an action research project investigating the impact creating writing portfolios has on preservice teachers' understanding of writing portfolio assessment. Participants included 92 preservice teachers enrolled across four different sections of an introductory literacy class. Data sources included: preservice…

  5. Writing Web Logs in the ESL Classroom: A Study of Student Perceptions and the Technology Acceptance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah Boon Yih

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The web log is an exceptionally valuable tool for the teaching of second language writing, particularly written communication skills (Johnson, 2004; Wu, 2005. More and more international educators have applied this easy-to-use technology to classroom instruction and language learning (Campbell, 2003; Johnson, 2004. However, what is largely unknown is Malaysian students’ reaction to writing web logs in English as a Second Language (ESL classrooms. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the perception of writing web logs among Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM HM115 diploma students who took the BEL311 English course in their third semester based on the three Technology Acceptance Model (TAM variables. Specifically, the study sought to identify whether the two TAM determinants,Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU and Perceived Usefulness (PU, affected the students’ behavioural intention (BI to use web logs for specific writing tasks. This study employed Davis’s TAM (1989 and its questionnaire-based measurement instrument and three hypotheses were formulated based on the objectives of the study. The pilot test’s result confirmed the reliability of the modified TAM-based questionnaire. The findings showed that students accept writing web logs as a classroom activity since they perceived online journals to be more useful rather than easy to use.Additionally, the findings revealed that TAM can be used to diagnose and interpret the attitude of new technology users and most importantly, PEOU, PU, and BI were positively and highly correlated at a significant level. These results did not reject the three proposed hypotheses.

  6. Writing Intensive Undergraduate Field Camp and Education: Expanding the Classroom and Preparing Students for the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, M. T.; McGehee, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    There has always been a strong perception within the geoscience community that a capstone field course was the pinnacle of an undergraduate geoscience degree. Such a course draws from the student's accumulated knowledge base, using information from multiple sub-disciplines to solve "real-world" problems. Since 2006, there has been a 92% increase in students attending field camps (Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2014 - AGI). But, the number of field camps has significantly declined. In 1995, 35% of geoscience departments offered a summer field course but by 2006 that number had dropped to 15% (Status Report on Geoscience Summer Field Camps - AGI) and since 2009, the number of field camps listed in the Geology.com directory has dropped from 100 to about 75. This decline is despite the fact that 88% of industry professionals believe fieldwork should "be an integral and required part of undergraduate programs" (Petcovic, et al., 2014). In 2012, in order to meet the growing needs of industry and better prepare our students, Texas A&M University-Kingsville developed an in-house, unique set of field courses that expand the limits of the classroom. We have two required courses. One is similar to a traditional field camp except that it contains a writing intensive component. The six-credit course runs for seven weeks. Prior to camp, students are required to write an introduction (geologic history section) on the study area. We spend two weeks in the field, mapping daily (Big Bend National Park), and then return to Kingsville. Students then have two weeks to finish a fully referenced paper, including their edited introduction, methods, observations, interpretations, discussion and conclusions and once complete, they begin the introduction for the next area. This is another two-week field session, in central Texas. After this, we return the first paper which has been edited for content by geoscience faculty and for grammar by an English instructor. Students spend the next

  7. Writing affects the brain network of reading in Chinese: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fan; Vu, Marianne; Chan, Derek Ho Lung; Lawrence, Jason M; Harris, Lindsay N; Guan, Qun; Xu, Yi; Perfetti, Charles A

    2013-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that learning to write Chinese characters influences the brain's reading network for characters. Students from a college Chinese class learned 30 characters in a character-writing condition and 30 characters in a pinyin-writing condition. After learning, functional magnetic resonance imaging collected during passive viewing showed different networks for reading Chinese characters and English words, suggesting accommodation to the demands of the new writing system through short-term learning. Beyond these expected differences, we found specific effects of character writing in greater activation (relative to pinyin writing) in bilateral superior parietal lobules and bilateral lingual gyri in both a lexical decision and an implicit writing task. These findings suggest that character writing establishes a higher quality representation of the visual-spatial structure of the character and its orthography. We found a greater involvement of bilateral sensori-motor cortex (SMC) for character-writing trained characters than pinyin-writing trained characters in the lexical decision task, suggesting that learning by doing invokes greater interaction with sensori-motor information during character recognition. Furthermore, we found a correlation of recognition accuracy with activation in right superior parietal lobule, right lingual gyrus, and left SMC, suggesting that these areas support the facilitative effect character writing has on reading. Finally, consistent with previous behavioral studies, we found character-writing training facilitates connections with semantics by producing greater activation in bilateral middle temporal gyri, whereas pinyin-writing training facilitates connections with phonology by producing greater activation in right inferior frontal gyrus. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Theoretically Speaking: An Examination of Four Theories and How They Support Writing in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Tracey S.

    2017-01-01

    Writing is complex, and the more researchers understand the cognitive processes and engagement for writing, the more complex the relationships between cognition and producing writing appear. Writing theory is constantly shifting from a focus on mechanics and form to a focus on creativity and sociability. This literature review analyzes four…

  9. Using the Process Approach to Teach Writing in 6 Hong Kong Primary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Belinda

    2006-01-01

    Background: In most primary schools in Hong Kong, a product-oriented approach is used in teaching writing. The process approach to writing has been seen as an improvement over the traditional methods of writing instruction in recent years. However, the effectiveness of using the process approach to teach writing is still inconclusive. It is…

  10. The Process Genre Writing Approach; An Alternative Option for the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Emma

    2017-01-01

    "Writing involves knowledge about the language, the context in which writing happens and skills in using language. Writing development happens by drawing out the learners' potential and providing input to which learners respond" (Badger & White, 2000.) Taking this in to account, the Process Genre Approach in writing classes can be…

  11. The Application of Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) Techniques in a Systems Analysis & Design Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    To more effectively meet the expectations of industry for entry-level IT employees, a case is made for the inclusion of writing throughout the Computer Information Systems (CIS) curriculum. "Writing Across the Curriculum" ("WAC") principles are explained, and it is opined that both Writing to Learn (WTL) and Writing in the…

  12. Exploring the Reading-Writing Connection: A Yearlong Classroom-Based Experimental Study of Middle School Students Developing Literacy in a New Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhee; Schallert, Diane L.

    2016-01-01

    A yearlong classroom-based intervention was designed to explore the reading-writing connection in second-language literacy by examining whether the development of reading improves writing and vice versa. Middle school learners of English as a foreign language (N = 300) in South Korea were assigned to three treatments that involved extensive…

  13. The Teacher’s Work in Classroom: teaching to read and to write

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília de Oliveira Micotti

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the alphabetization as pertaining to school work is a sufficiently complex situation. Education has been criticized, frequently; it is attributed to the student’s low performances in reading and writing. The teacher’s formation is also questioned by not being adjusted to the educational reality of the country. On the practice, we observe the shock of new pedagogical proposals - principally of the cycling curricular structure and the constructivism - with the practical ones that have been predominated for long time in the education system. The pedagogical proposals interpretations aren’t uniforms in teaching work; they vary with the schools and the classrooms. Many times, the constructivism is confused with old methods. As current education is affected by proposals of complex pedagogical changes, the understanding of what occurs with the alphabetization can be facilitated by the distinction between the practices entailed to the diverse theoretical conceptions. The study of the alphabetization didactics can help to the development of this process for allowing identifying the transpositions of the diverse theoretical conceptions to the school work. In this article, we present a general vision of the methodological boardings and the didactics practices that corresponds to them. For this, we revisit the alphabetization methods, the pedagogical proposal elaborated by Paulo Freire for the adults’ alphabetization.

  14. The use of social network Facebook in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Moura Domingues

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study arises from a questioning made by a student of the 6th grade of the elementary school in class. As we know, the information and communication technologies (TIC are increasingly presents in our lives, including in the classroom. To sustain our arguments, in face of the presented situation, we will use Pretto e Assis (2008 to reference about the digital culture, Recuerdo (2014 that address on the social network Facebook e Pretto (2010 about the collaborative networks.  This work has the following structure, digital culture, social network Facebook, teacher's posture on the above subject, why his astonishment and how this tool can help in planning their teaching, beyond considerations.

  15. The Role of Networked Learning in Academics' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Sharon; Tusting, Karin; Hamilton, Mary

    2017-01-01

    This article explores academics' writing practices, focusing on the ways in which they use digital platforms in their processes of collaborative learning. It draws on interview data from a research project that has involved working closely with academics across different disciplines and institutions to explore their writing practices,…

  16. Seeing Eye to Eye: Predicting Teacher-Student Agreement on Classroom Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Cappella, Elise; Wagner, Caroline; Atkins, Marc S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the association between classroom characteristics and teacher-student agreement in perceptions of students’ classroom peer networks. Social network, peer nomination, and observational data were collected from a sample of second through fourth grade teachers (N=33) and students (N=669) in 33 classrooms across five high poverty urban schools. Results demonstrate that variation in teacher-student agreement on the structure of students’ peer networks can be explained, in part, by developmental factors and classroom characteristics. Developmental increases in network density partially mediated the positive relationship between grade level and teacher-student agreement. Larger class sizes and higher levels of normative aggressive behavior resulted in lower levels of teacher-student agreement. Teachers’ levels of classroom organization had mixed influences, with behavior management negatively predicting agreement, and productivity positively predicting agreement. These results underscore the importance of the classroom context in shaping teacher and student perceptions of peer networks. PMID:21666768

  17. On Righting Writing: Classroom Practices in Teaching English 1975-1976. Thirteenth Report of the Committee on Classroom Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Ouida H., Ed.

    The 34 articles in this publication focus on the improvement of writing instruction and range from brief statements to discussions of courses. Contents are divided into the following six categories: getting the writer started finding a subject; developing a point of view; sharpening technique; writing to clarify values; and exploring writing…

  18. An interactional ethnographic study of the construction of literate practices of science and writing in a university science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Nuno Afonso De Freitas Lopes De

    An interactional ethnographic study informed by a sociocultural perspective was conducted to examine how a professor and students discursively and interactionally shaped the basis for engaging in the work of a community of geologists. Specifically, the study examined the role the Question of the Day, an interactive writing activity in the lecture, in affording students opportunities for learning the literate practices of science and how to incorporate them in thinking critically. A writing-intensive, introductory oceanography course given in the Geological Sciences Department was chosen because the professor designed it to emphasize writing in the discipline and science literacy within a science inquiry framework. The study was conducted in two phases: a pilot in 2002 and the current study in the Spring Quarter of 2003. Grounded in the view that members in a classroom construct a culture, this study explored the daily construction of the literate practices of science and writing. This view of classrooms was informed by four bodies of research: interactional ethnography, sociolinguistics sociology of science and Writing In the Disciplines. Through participant observation, data were collected in the lecture and laboratory settings in the form of field notes, video, interviews, and artifacts to explore issues of science literacy in discourse, social action, and writing. Examination of participation in the Question of the Day interactive writing activity revealed that it played a key role in initiating and supporting a view of science and inquiry. As the activity permitted collaboration, it encouraged students to engage in the social process to critically explore a discourse of science and key practices with and through their writing. In daily interaction, participants were shown to take up social positions as scientist and engage in science inquiry to explore theory, examine data, and articulately reformulate knowledge in making oral and written scientific arguments

  19. Alternatives for Monitoring and Limiting Network Access to Students in Network-Connected Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeroth, Kevin; Zhang, Hangjin

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of laptop computers and network technology, many classrooms are now being equipped with Internet connections, either through wired connections or wireless infrastructure. Internet access provides students an additional source from which to obtain course-related information. However, constant access to the Internet can be a…

  20. The role of networked learning in academics’ writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon McCulloch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores academics’ writing practices, focusing on the ways in which they use digital platforms in their processes of collaborative learning. It draws on interview data from a research project that has involved working closely with academics across different disciplines and institutions to explore their writing practices, understanding academic literacies as situated social practices. The article outlines the characteristics of academics’ ongoing professional learning, demonstrating the importance of collaborations on specific projects in generating learning in relation to using digital platforms and for sharing and collaborating on scholarly writing. A very wide range of digital platforms have been identified by these academics, enabling new kinds of collaboration across time and space on writing and research; but challenges around online learning are also identified, particularly the dangers of engaging in learning in public, the pressures of ‘always-on’-ness and the different values systems around publishing in different forums.

  1. Triangulating Teacher Perception, Classroom Observations, and Student Work to Evaluate Secondary Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Daphne Carr; Rupley, William H.; Nichols, Janet Alys; Nichols, William Dee; Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2018-01-01

    Current professional development efforts in writing at the secondary level have not resulted in student improvement on large-scale writing assessments. To maximize funding resources and instructional time, school leaders need a way to determine professional development content for writing teachers that aligns with specific student outcomes. The…

  2. Success with ELLs: We Are All Writers! Building Second Language Writing Skills in the ELA Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2012-01-01

    Writing effectively in a second language can be one of the most challenging tasks second language learners must undertake and master. English teachers are in a good position to implement the types of supports that can move ELLs toward success in academic writing by providing exposure to and practice with different genres of academic writing,…

  3. Using Simulation to Teach Project Management in the Professional Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Tim

    2010-01-01

    It hardly bears noting that when writing instructors teach professional writing they focus on helping students learn to analyze complex communication scenarios, conduct careful research to support their position, and to responsibly and succinctly apply the process of writing any number of supporting documents. Developing these skills are essential…

  4. The Influence of Peer Group Response: Building a Teacher and Student Expertise in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Stephanie; Cawkwell, Gail

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand students in the middle and upper school achieve better results in reading than they do in writing. This claim is evident in national assessment data reporting on students' literacy achievement. Research findings also state that teachers report a lack of confidence when teaching writing. Drawing on the National Writing Project developed…

  5. A Computational Investigation of Cohesion and Lexical Network Density in L2 Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Clarence

    2012-01-01

    This study used a new computational linguistics tool, the Coh-Metrix, to investigate and measure the differences in cohesion and lexical network density between native speaker and non-native speaker writing, as well as to investigate L2 proficiency level differences in cohesion and lexical network density. This study analyzed data from three…

  6. Social Environments, Writing Support Networks, and Academic Writing: A Study of First Year International Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglen, Daniel Justin

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation is an inquiry into the social experiences of first year international graduate students, and how those social experiences inform their academic writing development. Drawing from the sociocognitive perspective (Atkinson, 2002; Lantolf, 2000), this study recognizes that the university is social in nature, and language learning…

  7. Writing, Not Fighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernit, Susan

    1981-01-01

    A personal account of teaching creative writing to elementary school students, with information on what the teacher learned about teaching, what classroom techniques she used, and how the students reacted to creative writing and writing for publication. (RL)

  8. Opening Up in the Classroom: Effects of Expressive Writing on Graduate School Entrance Exam Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Frattaroli, J; Thomas, M.; Lyubomirsky, S

    2011-01-01

    Our study sought to determine whether experimental disclosure could improve exam performance and psychological health in students taking a graduate school entrance exam. Students preparing for the GRE, MCAT, LSAT, or PCAT were randomly assigned to write expressively about their upcoming exam or to a neutral writing condition. Participants completed measures of depressive symptoms and test anxiety before and after writing, and exam scores were collected. The experimental disclosure group had s...

  9. The Social Networks of Children With and Without Disabilities in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Justice, Laura; Sawyer, Brook

    2017-09-01

    Interaction with peers is an important contributor to young children's social and cognitive development. Yet, little is known about the nature of social networks within preschool inclusive classrooms. The current study applied a social network analysis to characterize children's peer interactions in inclusive classrooms and their relations with children's disability status. The participants were 485 preschoolers from 64 early childhood special education (ECSE) inclusive classrooms. Results from teachers' report of children's social networks showed that children with disabilities formed smaller play networks compared to their typically developing peers in the classroom, but no evidence indicated that children with disabilities engaged in more conflict networks than their counterparts. Children's play and conflict networks were segregated by children's disability status.

  10. Igneous and metamorphic petrology in the field: a problem-based, writing-intensive alternative to traditional classroom petrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBari, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Geology Department at Western Washington University (~100 geology majors) offers field and classroom versions of its undergraduate petrology course. This is a one-quarter course (igneous and metamorphic petrology) with mineralogy as a prerequisite. The field version of the course is offered during the three weeks prior to fall quarter and the classroom version is offered in spring quarter. We take 15-20 students around the state of Washington, camping at different outcrop sites where students integrate observational skills, petrologic knowledge, and writing. Petrogenetic associations in various tectonic settings provide the theme of the course. We compare ophiolites vs. arc sequences (volcanic, plutonic, and metamorphic rocks), S- vs. I-type granitoids (plutonic rocks and associated metamorphic rocks), Barrovian vs. Buchan vs. subduction zone metamorphism of different protoliths, and flood-basalt vs. active-arc volcanism. Some basics are covered in the first day at WWU, followed by 17 days of field instruction. Lecture is integrated with outcrop study in the field. For example, students will listen to a lecture about magma differentiation processes as they examine cumulate rocks in the Mt. Stuart batholith, and a lecture about metamorphic facies as they study blueschist facies rocks in the San Juan Islands. Students study multiple outcrops around a site for 1-4 days. They then use their observations (sketches and written descriptions of mineral assemblages, rock types, rock textures, etc.) and analysis techniques (e.g. geochemical data plotting, metamorphic protolith analysis) to write papers in which the data are interpreted in terms of a larger tectonic problem. In advance of the writing process, students use group discussion techniques such as whiteboarding to share their observational evidence and explore interpretations. Student evaluations indicate that despite the intense pace of the course, they enjoy it more. Students also feel that they retain more

  11. "She Puts Clues in Our Head:" Interactive and Independent Writing Instruction in a First Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Tammie L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a first grade teacher's instruction during interactive and independent writing times as she taught and prompted her students how to go about spelling unfamiliar words and employ various writing strategies while they were composing. I used a qualitative approach to data collection and analysis. Results of…

  12. Understanding and Improving the Use of Writing Portfolios in One French Immersion Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christine L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the use of writing portfolios in improving the accuracy of French immersion students' written French. It emerged from regularly observed notable and repeated errors in many of the author's students' writing (entitled fossilized errors due their resistance to correction). This study reaffirms that students of French…

  13. Conceptualizing College Writing Readiness for the 21st Century: A Tale of Two Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relles, Stefani R.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study is to develop an equity-minded theory of college writing readiness. An estimated third of incoming students are academically underprepared for college writing. The majority of these students will not earn a baccalaureate. Because rigorous pre-college preparation is a chief indicator of postsecondary achievement, improving…

  14. Reading, Writing, and Learning English in an American High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Commercial publishers have shaped reading and writing instruction in American schools through their interpretations of state-developed reading and writing standards and standards-aligned materials, which teachers then implement in English classes, including those serving multilingual learners. This paper uses microethnographic discourse analysis…

  15. On The Importance of A Socio-Culturally Designed Teaching Model in an EFL Writing Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh Abdollahzadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a means of articulating ideas, arousing feelings, persuading and convincing other people, but the procedure of writing has become arduous and labyrinthine for Iranian EFL learners. The educational system in Iran is structure-based and it ignores the communicative role of writing, so students' performance in writing wouldn’t be desirable. To tackle the mentioned problem, the present paper develops a scaffolding environment to maximize students writing dexterities through the application of various scaffolding means coined by Tharp and Gallimore (1988 during the stages of Seow's process model. The purpose was to determine the procedure of teacher guidance in a process- oriented situation and trace the scaffolding means which had a pre-eminent role in enhancing students' writing proficiency by observing the class and conducting an interview. To this end, 15 female students within the age range of 15-18 studying in Be’sat Language Institute in Salmas, Iran participated in this study. The results elucidated that students could benefit from the established situation in different ways during the accomplishment of their writing tasks. At the end, the study provided some pedagogical implications for teachers in terms of teaching writing.

  16. Peer-Editing Practice in the Writing Classroom: Benefits and Drawbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deni, Ann Rosnida Md.; Zainal, Zainor Izat

    2011-01-01

    Small scale studies have shown that peer-editing is beneficial to students as it increases their awareness of the complex process of writing, it improves their knowledge of and skills in writing and helps them become more autonomous in learning. Teachers too may benefit from peer-editing as this practice discloses invaluable information on…

  17. The Father Speaks, the Mother Talks Back: Revisionist, Rebellious Models for the Creative Writing Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie; Brown, Robert

    The "writing workshop" approach to teaching creative writing, virtually unchallenged throughout the United States, has recently come under fire. Two schools of thought, while agreeing that the traditional workshop needs a thorough overhaul, differ in approaches to that overhaul. One approach, using the theories of Harold Bloom, argues…

  18. Differentiating Writing Instruction: Meeting the Diverse Needs of Authors in a Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Mary

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines a rational for responsive, differentiated writing instruction that targets students' identified needs with respect to various dimensions of the writing process. Discussed is a cycle that requires ongoing assessment, instructional decision-making, responsive, differentiated instruction, guided practice, and assessment.…

  19. Motivation and Connection: Teaching Reading (and Writing) in the Composition Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Teaching reading in terms of its connections to writing can motivate students to read and increase the likelihood that they find success in both activities. It can lead students to value reading as an integral aspect of learning to write. It can help students develop their understanding of writerly strategies and techniques. Drawing on qualitative…

  20. Working Smarter, Not Working Harder: Revisiting Teacher Feedback in the L2 Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2011-01-01

    Although second language (L2) teachers spend a significant amount of time marking students' writing, many of them feel that their efforts do not pay off. While students want teachers to give them feedback on their writing and value teacher feedback, they might experience feelings of frustration and confusion once they receive it. What is amiss in…

  1. Enhancing Critical Reflection and Writing Skills in the HBSE Classroom and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Diane R.

    2012-01-01

    Human Behavior in the Social Environment (HBSE) is an ideal location in which graduate social work students can enhance their critical reflection and writing skills while integrating social work theories with practice, research, and policy. A writing-intensive, learner-centered model using specific strategies is described via a framework of…

  2. Writing with peer response using genre knowledge : a classroom intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of writing with peer response using genre knowledge of 6th grade students. Meta-studies (Hillocks 1984; Graham & Perin, 2007) indicated that peer response is effective for writing. However, these studies did not focus on what makes peer response working. In

  3. Opening up in the classroom: effects of expressive writing on graduate school entrance exam performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattaroli, Joanne; Thomas, Michael; Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2011-06-01

    Our study sought to determine whether experimental disclosure could improve exam performance and psychological health in students taking a graduate school entrance exam. Students preparing for the GRE, MCAT, LSAT, or PCAT were randomly assigned to write expressively about their upcoming exam or to a neutral writing condition. Participants completed measures of depressive symptoms and test anxiety before and after writing, and exam scores were collected. The experimental disclosure group had significantly higher test scores and significantly lower pre-exam depressive symptoms than the neutral writing group. Although benefits for depressive symptoms were found in expressive writers regardless of exam type, the advantage of expressive writing for test performance was only observed in students taking the MCAT or LSAT.

  4. Researching into a MOOC Embedded Flipped Classroom Model for College English Reading and Writing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinying, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    There is obvious pressure for higher education institutions to undergo transformation now in China. Reflecting this, the computer and information technology give rise to the development of a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) embedded flipped classroom. Flipped classroom approaches replace the traditional transmissive teaching with engaging…

  5. Altered brain network measures in patients with primary writing tremor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenka, Abhishek; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan Ramakant [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Panda, Rajanikant; Saini, Jitender; Bharath, Rose Dawn [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2017-10-15

    Primary writing tremor (PWT) is a rare task-specific tremor, which occurs only while writing or while adopting the hand in the writing position. The basic pathophysiology of PWT has not been fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the alterations in the resting state functional brain connectivity, if any, in patients with PWT using graph theory-based analysis. This prospective case-control study included 10 patients with PWT and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI in a 3-Tesla scanner. Several parameters of small-world functional connectivity were compared between patients and healthy controls by using graph theory-based analysis. There were no significant differences in age, handedness (all right handed), gender distribution (all were males), and MMSE scores between the patients and controls. The mean age at presentation of tremor in the patient group was 51.7 ± 8.6 years, and the mean duration of tremor was 3.5 ± 1.9 years. Graph theory-based analysis revealed that patients with PWT had significantly lower clustering coefficient and higher path length compared to healthy controls suggesting alterations in small-world architecture of the brain. The clustering coefficients were lower in PWT patients in left and right medial cerebellum, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Patients with PWT have significantly altered small-world brain connectivity in bilateral medial cerebellum, right DLPFC, and left PPC. Further studies with larger sample size are required to confirm our results. (orig.)

  6. Patterns of Discursive Interactions in Primary Classrooms: An Application of Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Consuelo; Mazzoni, Elvis; Molinari, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether social network analysis (SNA) is a useful method for identifying different discursive patterns in everyday classroom activities. The material analysed came from 20 teacher-led lessons that were video-recorded in small-size classes in Italian public primary schools. SNA was used to measure classroom relations…

  7. Google Docs as a Tool for Collaborative Writing in the Middle School Classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yanan Fan; Megan P Woodrich

    2017-01-01

    .... To be exact, the paper discusses whether student participation in anonymous collaborative writing via Google Docs can lead to more successful products in a linguistically diverse eighth-grade English...

  8. Finding Basic Writing's Place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan-Rabideau, Mary P.; Brossell, Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Posits that basic writing serves a vital function by providing writing support for at-risk students and serves the needs of a growing student population that universities accept yet feel needs additional writing instruction. Concludes that the basic writing classroom is the most effective educational support for at-risk students and their writing.…

  9. Leveraging the Methodological Affordances of Facebook: Social Networking Strategies in Longitudinal Writing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Jenna Pack; Kimme Hea, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    While composition studies researchers have examined the ways social media are impacting our lives inside and outside of the classroom, less attention has been given to the ways in which social media--specifically Social Network Sites (SNSs)--may enhance our own research methods and methodologies by helping to combat research participant attrition…

  10. Classroom Teacher Candidates' Perceptions of Teacher Self-Efficacy in Developing Students' Reading, Writing and Verbal Skills: Scale Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbulat, Ayse Nur Kutluca

    2017-01-01

    This work uses exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to study Verbal Skills Development Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale (VSDTS), Reading Skills Development Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale (RSDTS) and Writing Skills Development Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale (WSDTS) developed to identify classroom teacher candidates' perceptions of teacher…

  11. Teacher Conceptions of Integrated STEM Education and How They Are Reflected in Integrated STEM Curriculum Writing and Classroom Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Elizabeth A.

    There has been a nation-wide push for an increase in the use of integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States. With this shift in epistemological, pedagogical, and curricular content, there is a need to develop an understanding as to what integrated STEM education is, particularly among practitioners. In this dissertation, inservice science teacher conceptions of integrated STEM education were investigated to help understand what these conceptions are and how these conceptions influence curriculum writing and implementation of integrated STEM curricula in classrooms. Teacher conceptions and their influences were investigated through three separate but interrelated studies. First, K-12 inservice science teachers' conceptions of integrated STEM were investigated through the analysis of their sketched models of integrated STEM education. How these models changed throughout an intensive, three-week professional development was also explored. The goal of this first study was to identify conceptual models of integrated STEM education held by inservice science teachers and to understand how these conceptions might change over the course of a professional development. Second, photo elicitation interviews (PEIs) and curricular analysis were used to provide rich descriptions of the conceptual models of integrated STEM education held by inservice science teachers, determine what components of STEM inservice science teachers found fundamental to integrating STEM in the classroom based on their conceptions, and explore how teachers' conceptions of STEM were used in their development of integrated STEM curricula. The goal of this second study was to better understand inservice science teachers' conceptual models of integrated STEM and explore how these models were realized in the teachers' curriculum writing. Third, a multiple-case study was conducted with three teachers to investigate how the conceptual models held by

  12. Sampling an Inner DJ with Hip Hop Hopes: (ReWriting Immigrant Identities for English Language Learners in Classroom Third Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Habana Hafner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores theoretical and pedagogical implications of hip hop culture in (renegotiating identity for immigrant English Language Learners (ELLs in secondary writing classrooms. Analysis focuses on how spoken and written language and discourse shape the production of third spaces in ways that (renegotiate immigrant student identity in the ELL writing classroom. The theoretical framework draws on constructs of social space to reconsider the production of third space in an intermediate ELL writing classroom designed around developing academic and critical literacy grounded in the lived experiences of oppression of immigrant youth. Methods of ethnography and critical discourse analysis of critical spatial events and classroom texts center on a focal immigration unit in which students compose and share immigration narratives. Findings from ethnographic case study of one immigrant Latino male who aspires to become a hip hop DJ illustrate how hip hop discourses frame the chronotope of immigration and represent a classroom third space that promotes academic and critical literacy. This study draws implications for hip hop culture as valuable to curriculum and instruction rooted in the lived spaces of immigrant youth experience and for critical reflective practice for educators.

  13. Critical Reflection of an Iranian EFL Classroom: Effective Ploys in Narrative Paragraph Writing Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mohammad Jafari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a qualitative study that investigated critical reflection in the hope that effective learning is objectified. It is the fruit of rumination on how critical reflection approach would affect learners’ performance in narrative writing. The idea for this paper arose when the researchers consistently utilized ploys effective for five EFL students’ learning of narrative writing in critical reflection process in an institute. Later, these ploys were categorized in three themes under three categories in teaching narrative writing. Data were gathered via students’ reflective writings. Gathered data were interpreted in the real setting by small scale grounded theory analysis. The final upshot demonstrated the criticality of students’ thoughts in their paper. The findings reveal the significance of optimal rapport and intimacy in which participants move ahead from mechanical learning to more cooperative approach in language learning with thorough reflection in their narrations for effective learning to take place. Keywords: Critical Reflection, Narrative Paragraph Writing, Effective Learning, Ploys, Improvisation, Reverse Position, Social Camaraderie

  14. Effective Writing Content Conferences in a Sixth Grade Classroom: A Cross-Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Paul H.; Morrison, Timothy G.; Wilcox, Brad; Cutri, Ramona

    2017-01-01

    Conferencing gives teachers and students opportunities to discuss student writing and provide feedback in individual settings. Practitioner guides offer suggestions on how conferences can be conducted, but little is known about what types of interactions occur. Two case studies, including a cross-case analysis, were conducted to describe key…

  15. Material Realities in the Basic Writing Classroom: Intersections of Discovery for Young Women Reading "Persepolis 2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan Naomi

    2008-01-01

    This essay focuses on how young women students in a first-year, first-quarter basic reading and writing course wrote about their connections to the process of identity development as portrayed in the graphic novel "Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return" by Marjane Satrapi. While the circumstances of becoming a student in a required…

  16. Collaboration, Competition and Violence in Eighth-Grade Students' Classroom Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shelley; Ladky, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Examines gender features in eighth-grade students' writing in terms of the relationships among characters and the use of violence, comparing the analyses to perspectives offered by the students in small group conversations. Finds evidence of competitive relationships within sports and romance stories, as well as elements of violence and metaphors…

  17. Anxiety over EFL Speaking and Writing: A View from Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkonou, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The assumption that foreign language learners experience a high level of anxiety mainly when faced with speaking activities implies that research should focus on those learners prone to anxiety over that skill. Despite not being widely investigated, foreign language writing anxiety also seems to be a concern for a large number of students. Drawing…

  18. An Urban Secondary School Case Study of Disciplinary Writing in Tracked Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Kristen Campbell

    2015-01-01

    This yearlong ethnographic case study investigated higher and lower track adolescents' experiences with core content-area (social studies, science, and math) writing in one urban working-class district. Teacher, student, and administrator interviews; field notes; and students' written work comprised the data set. The findings from this…

  19. "How They Really Talk": Two Students' Perspectives on Digital Literacies in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amicucci, Ann N.

    2014-01-01

    This article responds to the need for more student voices in digital literacies research by discussing the results of interviews with two college students concerning the roles that their non-academic digital literacy practices can play in first-year college writing courses. The author reviews recent literature that has indicated that value of…

  20. Arguing for Democracy: A Multimodal Approach to Argumentative Writing Instruction in the Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingler, Matt

    2017-01-01

    Democratic societies require a citizenry skilled in argumentation. At present, the written argument maintains primacy among communicative modes. Because of its cognitive demands, written argumentation is often difficult to teach. A multimodal approach to writing instruction carries the potential to assist struggling learners. This article outlines…

  1. An Instructional Model for Teaching Proof Writing in the Number Theory Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabel, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    I discuss an instructional model that I have used in my number theory classes. Facets of the model include using small group work and whole class discussion, having students generate examples and counterexamples, and giving students the opportunity to write proofs and make conjectures in class. The model is designed to actively engage students in…

  2. The PEA Strategy: One Teacher's Approach to Integrating Writing in the Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielaff, Christopher K.; Washburn, Erin K.

    2015-01-01

    With the adoption of the "Common Core State Standards" many social studies teachers are faced with the task of very intentionally integrating writing instruction into their content curriculum. While this task may be daunting, there are research-based instructional frameworks to help teachers implement strategies to support student…

  3. Writing Assignments in Disguise: Lessons Learned Using Video Projects in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, P.; Courtney, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study describes the instructional approach of using student-created video documentaries as projects in an undergraduate non-science majors' Energy Perspectives science course. Four years of teaching this course provided many reflective teaching moments from which we have enhanced our instructional approach to teaching students how to construct a quality Ken Burn's style science video. Fundamental to a good video documentary is the story told via a narrative which involves significant writing, editing and rewriting. Many students primarily associate a video documentary with visual imagery and do not realize the importance of writing in the production of the video. Required components of the student-created video include: 1) select a topic, 2) conduct research, 3) write an outline, 4) write a narrative, 5) construct a project storyboard, 6) shoot or acquire video and photos (from legal sources), 7) record the narrative, 8) construct the video documentary, 9) edit and 10) finalize the project. Two knowledge survey instruments (administered pre- and post) were used for assessment purposes. One survey focused on the skills necessary to research and produce video documentaries and the second survey assessed students' content knowledge acquired from each documentary. This talk will focus on the components necessary for video documentaries and the instructional lessons learned over the years. Additionally, results from both surveys and student reflections of the video project will be shared.

  4. Peer/Teacher-Assessment Using Criteria in the EFL Classroom for Developing Students' L2 Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the difference between peer- and teacher-assessment and to identify and explore the components in given criteria that students find easy or difficult when writing essays. One hundred and four essays and a survey were collected from 26 students at a Korean university in Seoul. The essays were analyzed to…

  5. Writing in the L2 Classroom: Issues in Research and Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchon, Rosa M., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Articles in this special issue include the following: "Learning to Write in a Second Language: Two Decades of Research" (Alister Cumming); "Some Steps Towards a Socio-Cognitive Interpretation of Second Language Composition Processes" (Julio Delarios Roca, Liz Murphy Liz); "Trends in the Conceptualizations of Second Language Composing Strategies: A…

  6. Negotiating Ideologies about Teaching Writing in a High School English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Amy; Myers, Joy; Hester, Madison

    2014-01-01

    More research needs to examine how novice teachers successfully negotiate multiple ideologies with others in ways that allow them to construct preferred teaching identities. This qualitative study addressed that need by investigating how one high school English teacher negotiated contradictory ideologies related to writing instruction at her…

  7. Responsive Classroom Ecologies: Supporting Student Inquiry and Rhetorical Awareness in College Writing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankens, Adrienne

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation describes and analyzes the work of a semester-long teacher research study of inquiry-based and reflective teaching and learning strategies and their impact on students' preparation for future learning. I explore relevant scholarship on knowledge transfer, classroom ecologies, and student agency to set the stage for a discussion…

  8. Tech Writing, Meet "Tomb Raider": Video and Computer Games in the Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vie, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the common genre of the usability study in technical communication courses and proposes the incorporation of computer and video games to ensure a rhetorical focus to this genre. As games are both entertaining and educational, their use in the technical communication classroom provides a new perspective on multimodal…

  9. Inclusion as an Instructional Approach: Fostering Inclusive Writing Communities in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Preschool students with disabilities engage in social interaction with peers less often than children developing typically in inclusive classrooms. This research explores how divergent theories of literacy learning, those inherent in the structure of special education and those promoted by scholars interested in emergent literacy learning, impact…

  10. The Flipped Writing Classroom in Turkish EFL Context: A Comparative Study on a New Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Emrah

    2017-01-01

    Flipped learning, one of the most popular and conspicuous instructional models of recent time, can be considered as a pedagogical approach in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Flipped learning transforms classrooms into interactive and dynamic places where the teacher guides the students and facilitates…

  11. Classroom Peer Relationships and Behavioral Engagement in Elementary School: The Role of Social Network Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Kim, Ha Yeon; Neal, Jennifer W.; Jackson, Daisy R.

    2014-01-01

    Applying social capital and systems theories of social processes, we examine the role of the classroom peer context in the behavioral engagement of low-income students (N = 80) in urban elementary school classrooms (N = 22). Systematic child observations were conducted to assess behavioral engagement among second to fifth graders in the fall and spring of the same school year. Classroom observations, teacher and child questionnaires, and social network data were collected in the fall. Confirming prior research, results from multilevel models indicate that students with more behavioral difficulties or less academic motivation in the fall were less behaviorally engaged in the spring. Extending prior research, classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties—social network equity—had more behaviorally engaged students in the spring, especially in classrooms with higher levels of observed organization (i.e., effective management of behavior, time, and attention). Moreover, social network equity attenuated the negative relation between student behavioral difficulties and behavioral engagement, suggesting that students with behavioral difficulties were less disengaged in classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties. Findings illuminate the need to consider classroom peer contexts in future research and intervention focused on the behavioral engagement of students in urban elementary schools. PMID:24081319

  12. Classroom peer relationships and behavioral engagement in elementary school: the role of social network equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Kim, Ha Yeon; Neal, Jennifer W; Jackson, Daisy R

    2013-12-01

    Applying social capital and systems theories of social processes, we examine the role of the classroom peer context in the behavioral engagement of low-income students (N = 80) in urban elementary school classrooms (N = 22). Systematic child observations were conducted to assess behavioral engagement among second to fifth graders in the fall and spring of the same school year. Classroom observations, teacher and child questionnaires, and social network data were collected in the fall. Confirming prior research, results from multilevel models indicate that students with more behavioral difficulties or less academic motivation in the fall were less behaviorally engaged in the spring. Extending prior research, classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties-social network equity-had more behaviorally engaged students in the spring, especially in classrooms with higher levels of observed organization (i.e., effective management of behavior, time, and attention). Moreover, social network equity attenuated the negative relation between student behavioral difficulties and behavioral engagement, suggesting that students with behavioral difficulties were less disengaged in classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties. Findings illuminate the need to consider classroom peer contexts in future research and intervention focused on the behavioral engagement of students in urban elementary schools.

  13. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. 378. RESONANCE │ April 2012. Classroom. In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom ... or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal ..... In the present investigation, a question may arise as to what will be ...

  14. Peer Relations and Access to Capital in the Mathematics Classroom: A Bourdieusian Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Sophina; Williams, Julian; Black, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore the structure of social capital in peer networks and its relation to the unequal access of educational resources within mathematics classrooms. We hypothesise that learners can gain access to mathematics through friendship networks which provide more or less help from peers that might sustain (or curtail)…

  15. Putting Students at the Centre of Classroom L2 Writing Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2016-01-01

    In many educational contexts, L2 writing assessment tends to emphasize its summative functions (i.e., assessment of learning--AoL) more than its formative potential (i.e., assessment for--AfL). While the teacher plays a dominant role in AoL, central to AfL is the role of the students, alongside that of the teacher and peers. A student-centred…

  16. ENHANCING WRITING SKILL THROUGH WRITING PROCESS APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-01-01

    The study is aimed at developing the implementation of Writing Process Approach (WPA) to enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. The study employed Classroom Action Research. The subjects of the study were 15 university students enrolled in the writing class. The data were gained from writing task, observation and field notes. The findings show that the implementation of WPA with the proper model procedures developed can enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. Before the strategy ...

  17. ATD and CoP in a framework for investigating social networks in physics classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The article presents a tool for analysing transcribed and annotated video recordings. The tool relies on a network representation of the data, where the nodes derive from categories of activities. Following a summary of the observed learning situation, it is suggested how anthropological theory o...... of the didactical (ATD) and communities of practice (CoP) can be incorporated in the network representation in order to investigate student discussion networks in physics classrooms....

  18. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invitt responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching ...

  19. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  20. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with th,em, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally ti forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    group that was not yet exposed to this learning environment. Although the ... environment [15]. The Green Classroom. The 'Green classroom' is an environmental education program that wants to address knowledge, skills and attitude at the same time. ..... programme on children´s perception of biodiversity, The Journal.

  2. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom. In this section of Resonance, we in'Vite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or in'Vite .... boron-10 which demonstrated that some very beautiful work done by a. Caltech group headed by T Lauritsen and W A Fowler was wrong.

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or botlt. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  4. Access, engagement, networks, and norms: Dimensions of social capital at work in a first grade classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler-Robock, Stephanie

    Social capital refers to access and use of resources available through one's networks to solve problems, and the norms that reflect inclusive or exclusive access to those networks and resources. Research has found positive relationships between social capital, academic achievement, and attainment. Studies, however, have generally examined social capital through factors that occur outside the classroom; students who have social capital, acquired through their family and community relationships, seem to be more successful academically. Limited research has explored what if any factors within the classroom might impact the production, and nature of social capital, or its workings in a classroom. The purpose of this study was to explore the workings and nature of classroom social capital, including its possible relationships to engagement and cognition among 5 student participants. Using methods of qualitative data collection, mixed methods were used to analyze information resources, participants' networking, student work, and classroom discourse. Eight interdependent networking factors and 3 overarching patterns of norms were discovered. The networking factors reflected the structure, content, processes, purposes, and acceptability of participants' networking. The norms, also working interdependently, appeared to promote or inhibit among other things, engagement in networking, help seeking, access, sharing, and intertextual use of diverse, often complex sources of information. Through interaction of the 8 factors and 3 overarching norms, ongoing outcomes of networking appeared to include the creation of bridging (inclusive) and bonding (exclusive) forms of social capital, and depth of scientific conceptual understanding, in this case, about birds. Bridging social capital appeared related to willingness to engage in strong and weak tie networking, help seeking, intertextuality, and possibly to mastery goal orientation for all participants, regardless of reading level

  5. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Normal-Hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiyuan; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks are built in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students' exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences.

  6. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Students and Normal-Hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiyuan; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks are built in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students' exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences. PMID:27920733

  7. Exploring Classroom Community: A Social Network Study of Reacting to the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jeff; Engar, Ann

    2016-01-01

    In this exploratory social network study, we examined how student relationships evolved during three month-long Reacting to the Past (RTTP) role-playing games in a lower division honors course at a large US public university. Our purpose was to explore how RTTP games--and collaborative learning approaches more generally--impact classroom community…

  8. Social Networks and Workplace Risk: Classroom Scenarios from a U.S. and EU Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Perry; Mansfield, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    The explosion of social networks and the growing concern over privacy in the digital age--both in the United States and Europe--have provided an opportunity to introduce students to the legal risks of using social media in the workplace. This article builds on the authors' classroom experiences and provides social media scenarios and projects that…

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal ... published this paper as a short communication in the Cambridge and Dublin Mathematical Journal, in February 1854. Ray Optics and Mathematical Preliminaries.

  10. Exploration of optical classroom teaching by network platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zheng; Ma, Kun

    2017-08-01

    The investigation shows that the difficulties students encounter in the course of optics are mainly due to the abstraction of the content of the optical course, and the problem that the description of the physical phenomenon and process is difficult to show in the classroom teaching. We consider to integrate information technology with classroom teaching. Teachers can set up course websites and create more teaching resources, such as videos of experimental processes, design of simulated optical paths, mock demonstration of optical phenomena, and so on. Teachers can use the courseware to link the resources of the website platform, and display the related resources to the students. After class, students are also able to learn through the website, which is helpful to their study.

  11. The linguistics of social networking: A study of writing conventions on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Pérez-Sabater

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scholarly research on computer-mediated communication discourse has mainly centred upon the linguistic characteristics of emails, focusing on the formal and informal features and the orality involved in this form of communication. This paper presents a new insight into the study of computer-mediated communication (CMC by analysing a fairly recent genre of computer-mediated communication, comments posted on the new social networking websites. The research undertaken examines the comments published on the official Facebook sites of some universities to observe the level of formality/informality of online communication in English. The distinction between online writings by native and non-native speakers of English has been considered as well. The study focuses on the formulae of etiquette and protocol used for salutation, opening, pre-closing and closing as an indicator of the degree of orality and informality in online writing. Data reveal that, in the specific context of the university, the use of Facebook is not conventionalised, as the comments posted on Facebook present important stylistic variations. Moreover, in most instances non-native speakers of English display more formal traits than native speakers when communicating electronically on social networking sites in the academic world.

  12. Individual Self-Monitoring & Peer-Monitoring in One Classroom in Writing Activities: Who Is at Disadvantage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toofan, Zohreh Zare

    2014-01-01

    Writing is an important experience through which we are able to share ideas, arouse feelings, persuade and convince other people (white & Arndt, 1991). It is important to view writing not solely as the product of an individual, but as a cognitive, social and cultural act. Writing is an act that takes place within a context, that accomplishes a…

  13. Producing an Online Undergraduate Literary Magazine: A Guide to Using Problem-Based Learning in the Writing and Publishing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichetti, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    This article will illustrate how a problem-based learning (PBL) course (Savery, 2006) can be used in a writing program as a vehicle for both creative and preprofessional learning. English 420: Writing, Publishing, and Editing is offered every fall, and its counterpart, English 423: Writing, Publishing, and Editing is offered each spring. The…

  14. 'can i get your Email': Gender, Networking and Social Capital in AN Undergraduate Bioengineering Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Shelley K.

    Based on observations and interviews, this article explores how female and male biomedical engineering students network and generate social capital (who one knows) in an undergraduate classroom. Stark differences were observed between female and male students and their interactions with a series of guest lecturers. Although women engineering students may be differentially affected by how they raise their social capital, this study does not suggest that women engineering students are wholly incapable of raising their social capital. Rather, a disconnect occurs between the student population receiving information about networking and women students acting on informal and spontaneous opportunities as they arise. Institutional and departmental support (i.e., internship programs and discussion in the classroom and at orientation) appears to favor those who rely on more formal means of networking.

  15. Reflections on a dialogic pedagogy inspired by the writings of Bakhtin: an account of the experience of two professors working together in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Lima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The practice of a dialogic pedagogy inspired by the writings of Bakhtin is increasingly popular in different parts of the world. This article is an account produced in the spirit of such pedagogy. Two professors (one from Brazil, the other from the United States, both members of an international dialogic pedagogy study group, write together to discuss the work they developed in partnership under this educational paradigm when teaching a course on “Diversity in secondary education” in the School of Education of the College of Education and Human Development of the University of Delaware, USA. After presenting brief introductory information on who they are, how they met and how they happened to work together, the two scholars present classroom interaction data followed by reflections on to what extent certain forms of classroom interaction they identified in the data promote or inhibit the practice of a truly Bakhtinian Dialogic Pedagogy. In other words, what the readers will find in this article is not a traditional empirical study, but a telling case of two educators learning from one another about what counts as dialogic in the classroom, while at the same time using the aforementioned course as an anchor for multiple discussions.

  16. Writing Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Asdal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Nordic Journal of Science and Technology Studies is interested in how nature, in different versions and forms, is invited into our studies, analyses, and stories. How is it that we “write nature”? How is it that we provide space for, and actually describe the actors, agents, or surroundings, in our stories and analyses? The articles in the issue each deal with different understandings of both the practices of writing and the introduction of various natures into these. In this introduction to the issue the editors engage with actor-network theory as a material semiotic resource for writing nature. We propose to foreground actor-network theory as a writing tool, at the expense of actor-network theory as a distinct vocabulary. In doing this and pointing out the semiotic origins to material-semiotics we also want to problematize a clear-cut material approach to writing nature.

  17. The Writing Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Kelly Gallagher writes that "wide swaths of students are not developing their writing skills--skills we know to be foundational to their literate lives." In this article, he explains how school districts can go about developing students' writing skills in all content-area classrooms. He highlights five reasons why students should write…

  18. Aggression Norms in the Classroom Social Network: Contexts of Aggressive Behavior and Social Preference in Middle Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daisy R; Cappella, Elise; Neal, Jennifer Watling

    2015-12-01

    In a cross-sectional sample of African-American 2nd-4th grade students (N = 681), we examine the moderating effects of classroom overt and relational aggression norms on peers' social acceptance of classmates who exhibit overt and relational aggression in urban schools. Extending theory and research on classroom norms, we integrate social network data to adjust aggression norms based on children's direct and indirect connections in the classroom. Results of multilevel models indicate that network-based classroom aggression norms moderated relations between children's aggressive behavior and their social preference. Specifically, children benefited socially when their form of aggressive behavior fit with what was normative in the classroom social context. The moderating effect of classroom aggression norms was stronger for the association between overt aggression and social preference than relational aggression and social preference. Relationally aggressive youth were socially preferred by peers regardless of the classroom norm, although this positive association was magnified in classrooms with higher levels of relational aggression. Future research focused on aggression norms within classroom social networks are discussed and implications for school prevention efforts are considered.

  19. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    tum associated with such an apparently simple purely oscillatory 1D harmonic lattice system. The classroom exercise will conclude with a sug- gestion for the possibility that the 'Concrete' case may well correspond to that of hard nanopar- ticulate crystallites embedded in a 1D elastic con- tinuum, e.g., a spider dragline silk, ...

  20. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM relate, for comparison, a school experience. There is an experi- ment in textbooks about measuring the percentage of oxygen in air. What the textbook prescribes is this: take a bowl with a little water, light a candle at the centre and then place an inverted glass over it. Soon the flame gets extinguished and ...

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. A W Joshil,. Umapati Pattar2 and F I Surve3. lDepartment of Physics ... Introduction. Diffraction from a plane grating is a familiar topic in undergraduate optics. Students study the theory in the classroom where they derive the ...

  2. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related ... sented the statement of the experimental problem of the. InternationalPhysics Olympiad'98 (IPhO). ... The justification of this model comes from electromagnetic theory. In conducting materials, the ...

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    CLASSROOM. 655. RESONANCE | July 2016. References. [1]. C Alsina, R B Nelsen, Icons of Mathematics, The Mathematical Asso- ciation of America, Washington, DC, 2011. [2]. W Dunham, Journey through Genius, Penguin Books, 1991. which contradicts (2). So t = 0, i.e., 4r2. = a2. + b2 . Hence AB. 2. + AC. 2. = a2. + b2.

  4. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, ... weekends at the Bangalore. Association for Science Educa- tion, Jawaharlal Nehru Plan- etarium, Bangalore. Keywords. Planetary motion,.

  5. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  6. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues ... then the business is subject to a stiff penalty of d per kg of shortage by the government if the business gets caught. (with probability p) in random checking; a meaningful value of d will be ...

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ite image of the Mercury. Transit, taken by Domin- ique Derrick, Belgium, on the 7th of May 2003. (repro- duced with permission). CLASSROOM scale in our understanding of the Universe - the Astronomical. Unit, or the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Historically, the transits of Venus were the first opportunity.

  8. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. Figure 3. An antibubble undergoing breakup, note the expanding circular hole at the bottom. Figure 4. An antibubble trapped in a vortex flow, just prior to breakup. of the antibubble into two smaller antibubbles (see Figure 4), an observation which is worthy of theoretical investigation. In the following video ...

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    61. RESONANCE │ January 2011. CLASSROOM. Investigation of Structures Similarity of. Organic Substances. Keywords. Structures similarity, Tanimoto coefficient, Euclidean distance, fingerprints (bit-string represen- tations). Ajay Kumar. Guru Tegh Bahadur Institute of. Technology. G–8 Area, Rajouri Garden. New Delhi ...

  10. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Sheep Distribution Problem Through Egyptian Fractions.

  11. Reflections on Teaching in a Computerized Classroom: Knowledge, Power and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Lynn; Uber, Nancy

    A study focused on teachers who have worked in computerized, networked writing classrooms at Purdue University (Indiana) for several year. Each of the subjects was a teaching assistant in the Purdue English Department, and the courses involved were upper division technical writing courses. Three theoretical approaches underpinned the study:…

  12. Using LinkedIn in the Marketing Classroom: Exploratory Insights and Recommendations for Teaching Social Media/Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, Denny E.; McCorkle, Yuhua Li

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid growth of social networking and media comes their consideration for use in the marketing classroom. Social networking skills are becoming essential for personal branding (e.g., networking, self-marketing) and corporate/product branding (e.g., marketing communication). This paper addresses the use of LinkedIn (i.e., an online…

  13. Adolescents' Engagement in Ethnic Harassment: Prejudiced Beliefs in Social Networks and Classroom Ethnic Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi; Sun, Shuyan; Korol, Liliia; Özdemir, Metin; Stattin, Håkan

    2018-01-02

    Research on ethnic victimization to date has done little to identify the reasons why adolescents victimize their peers due to their ethnic background. To address this limitation, we examined: (1) the extent to which prejudiced attitudes within adolescents' close and larger social networks determine their engagement in ethnic harassment, and (2) the extent to which classroom ethnic diversity plays a role in any such link. Our sample included 902 Swedish adolescents (M age  = 14.40, SD = .95; 50.3% girls). We found that Swedish adolescents who held negative attitudes toward immigrants or who were surrounded by prejudiced peers were more likely to be involved in ethnic harassment, particularly in classrooms with high ethnic diversity. Adolescents in classrooms with a high anti-immigrant climate were more likely to harass their immigrant peers. These findings suggest that prejudiced beliefs in youth social networks put young people at risk of engaging in ethnic harassment, particularly in ethnically diverse classrooms.

  14. Measuring Teacher Knowledge of Classroom Social Networks: Convergent and Predictive Validity in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madill, Rebecca A.; Gest, Scott D.; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    This study contributes to a growing body of literature focused on the role of the teacher's "invisible hand" in managing students social relationships. The authors focus on one specific aspect of attunement, teachers' social network knowledge, which they conceptualize as the completeness and accuracy of the teacher's social network…

  15. Selection patterns, gender and friendship aim in classroom networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baerveldt, Chris; Van de Bunt, Gerhard G.; Vermande, Marjolijn M.

    2014-01-01

    The social networks of students, and the underlying processes of selection, can have strong effects on their psychological and academic adjustment. The effects of gender, friendship aim (intimacy or social activities) and the combination of gender and friendship aim on selection patterns (student’s

  16. #SocialNetworks: Making Nonfiction Trend in Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lunetta; Scott, Kelly; Simone, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Students must be proficient readers of nonfiction texts to be successful in school and life. Since engaging students in this genre can be challenging, this article focuses on how students can respond digitally and socially to nonfiction through the use of free, secure social networks. Not only can students become more engaged in learning when…

  17. Teaching Practices and Peer Network Features in Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Scott D.; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The long-term goal of this program of research is to clarify how teachers may influence features of peer networks that, in turn, may affect students' perceptions of social support, achievement-related beliefs and academic achievement. As a first step in this process, in this study the authors focus on identifying teaching practices that are…

  18. Chinese Writing of Deaf or Hard-of-hearing Students and Normal-hearing Peers from Complex Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyuan Jin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals usually face a greater challenge to learn to write than their normal-hearing counterparts, because sign language is the primary communicative skills for many deaf people. The current body of research only covers the detailed linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students. Due to the limitations of traditional research methods focusing on microscopic linguistic features, a holistic characterization of the writing linguistic features of these language users is lacking. This study attempts to fill this gap by adopting the methodology of linguistic complex networks. Two syntactic dependency networks in order to compare the macroscopic linguistic features of deaf or hard-of-hearing students and those of their normal-hearing peers. One is transformed from a treebank of writing produced by Chinese deaf or hard-of-hearing students, and the other from a treebank of writing produced by their Chinese normal-hearing counterparts. Two major findings are obtained through comparison of the statistical features of the two networks. On the one hand, both linguistic networks display small-world and scale-free network structures, but the network of the normal-hearing students’ exhibits a more power-law-like degree distribution. Relevant network measures show significant differences between the two linguistic networks. On the other hand, deaf or hard-of-hearing students tend to have a lower language proficiency level in both syntactic and lexical aspects. The rigid use of function words and a lower vocabulary richness of the deaf or hard-of-hearing students may partially account for the observed differences.

  19. Classrooms as

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also supplied a means for students to develop relationships with their peers as ... promoting 'real world' skills they could transfer outside of the classroom and into their lives. ... Keywords: digital storytelling, classrooms as safe houses, personal writing, ...... British Journal of Educational Technology, DOI: 10.1111/bjet.12540.

  20. Creative Reading/Creative Writing: What Do They Write about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Marjorie

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that classroom writing reflect topics that teenagers write about privately, such as powerful events, dreams, or rejected love. Includes a sample student essay on the Challenger disaster. (ARH)

  1. "WriteNow": The Power of Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quate, Stephanie

    1991-01-01

    Describes the beginning and growth of "WriteNow," a school publication which provides a forum for all classroom writing (from creative writing to a well-crafted physics essay) by students of all levels (from basic to honors). (SR)

  2. Exploring Classroom Community: A Social Network Study of Reacting to the Past

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff Webb; Ann Engar

    2016-01-01

    In this exploratory social network study, we examined how student relationships evolved during three month-long Reacting to the Past (RTTP) role-playing games in a lower division honors course at a large US public university. Our purpose was to explore how RTTP games—and collaborative learning approaches more generally—impact classroom community in college courses. We found that both acquaintance and friendship ties between students increased dramatically during the game, eliminating student ...

  3. Porque a escribir se aprende escribiendo. Una propuesta para el aula de ELE / Writing for learning to write. A proposal for the Spanish language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Ángeles Díez Coronado

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La escritura es una de las destrezas que el estudiante de una L2 debe manejar. En las aulas normalmente su enseñanza pasa por el conocimiento de gramática y se vincula a él hasta el punto de sugerirse los ejercicios de escritura casi completamente en relación con la morfología o sintaxis estudiada. Esta metodología no prepara para la producción escrita; afianza la gramática, pero deja de lado la formación para producir textos creativos. Lo que se propone en este artículo, tras una breve contextualización, son una serie de ejercicios que resultan útiles para desarrollar la capacidad de la escritura en alumnos de L2 con cierta base. Abstract: Writing is one of the skills that students of a L2 have to know. Normally, it is in relation with grammar, and the writing exercises are useful for acquiring morphology or syntax. But this methodology does not prepare for the creative writing. In this article, after a brief contextualization, are proposed a series of exercises that are useful for developing the writing skill between students of a L2, when they are not beginners.

  4. More Than Just Chinese Food...A Collection of Writings by Adult ESL Learners and Three Approaches to Teaching and Writing in the ESL Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Pauline; And Others

    This book consists of a collection of stories written by adults who attend a bilingual ESL (English as a Second Language) program co-sponsored by the Toronto Board of Education and Chinese Information and Community Services. All the writings deal with Chinese culture but the book may be used by people of diverse backgrounds and of varying levels…

  5. Writing, Religious Faith, and Rooted Cosmopolitan Dialogue: Portraits of Two American Evangelical Men in a Public School English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwik, Mary M.; McKenzie, Cori

    2015-01-01

    Some literacy scholars have embraced rooted cosmopolitanism as a framework for educating in today's globalized and pluralistic world, where communicating across difference is an important individual and societal good. But how is the "cosmopolitan turn" in writing complicated by considering the religiosity of writing teachers and student…

  6. Writing Classroom as Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirc, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author traces the life of Andy Warhol, an American artist. Warhol, who became ill with a nervous condition, had spend most of his childhood in a bed littered with comic books, paper dolls, coloring books, a camera, cap gun, and his Charlie McCarthy doll. Warhol was the only Pop artist who was not a professionally, academically…

  7. Exploring Classroom Community: A Social Network Study of Reacting to the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Webb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this exploratory social network study, we examined how student relationships evolved during three month-long Reacting to the Past (RTTP role-playing games in a lower division honors course at a large US public university. Our purpose was to explore how RTTP games—and collaborative learning approaches more generally—impact classroom community in college courses. We found that both acquaintance and friendship ties between students increased dramatically during the game, eliminating student isolation without tending to create new cliques. These added ties made acquaintance and friendship networks simultaneously denser and more inclusive than they were before the game. We conclude by advancing a hypothesis about the network effects of intensive peer interaction. Collaborative learning approaches like RTTP, we suggest, produce high-density networks with limited clustering because structured peer interactions cut across existing or naturally occurring clique boundaries.

  8. Reflective Blogfolios in the Language Classroom: Impact on EFL Tertiary Students' Argumentative Writing Skills and Ways of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Abdullah Mahmoud Ismial

    2016-01-01

    The emerging paradigm shift in educational contexts from walled classroom environments to virtual, hybrid, blended, and lately personal learning environments has brought about vast changes in the foreign language classroom practices. Numerous calls for experimenting with new instructional treatments to enhance students' language performance in…

  9. Read Two Books and Write Me in the Morning! Bibliotherapy for Social Emotional Intervention in the Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maich, Kimberly; Kean, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This article explains a practical strategy for dealing with social emotional problems in the inclusive classroom environment. The potential need for bibliotherapy is introduced by discussing how role boundaries of teachers are changing and how teachers may take on a range of roles in their classrooms. An example of a social emotional scenario…

  10. A THINK-ALOUD PROTOCOLS AS A COGNITIVE STRATEGY TO INCREASE STUDENTS’ WRITING NARRATIVE SKILL AT EFL CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwo Trapsilo -

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold: its first aim was to know whether any differences of think-aloud potocols to develop writing narrative skill; second, to know whether which one is more effective to develop students’ writing narrative skill by using think-aloud protocols and traditional method.Students randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group. Treatment had three stages. In Stage 1, students were asked to write about a topic. InStage 2, students in the experimental group studied a model essay about that writing task and they hadthink-aloud protocol about those aspects of language that they noticed in the model essays. However inthe control group, students studied model essays for themselves and they did not have think-aloud part. InStage 3, students were asked to rewrite the writing task. The students in the experimental group showed that they got higher score in writing narrative by using think-aloud protocols than the control group. Furthermore, in the post test, experimental groupoutperformed the control group. The findings of the study suggest that thinking-aloud could be a goodstrategy for improving writing narrative performance.

  11. The Effect of Network Connected Classroom Guidance Application on 8th Grade Primary School Students Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Doğan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available 1 Bu makale “4. International Computer And Instructional Technologies Symposium”’da sözlü bildiri olarak sunulmuştur.This study examined the effectiveness of application of networking classroom career guidance, on elementary school students' career development levels. In the study, career development levels were measured by the scale of Career Development Scale for Childhood (CDSC. This research conducted in on 120 students in the 8th grades. In this study, the control group with pretest, posttest experimental design was used. Students have taken part in experimental group (female:12, male:15 and control group (female:15; male:10. These students have been selected randomly among 120 students from students of 8th elementary school. Thereafter, networking classroom guidance application has been applied to experiment group in five sessions. Within the same times, traditional classroom career guidance was conducted without networking and computer aided. t test for independent groups analysis, between the control group pre-test and post-test scores did not differ significantly. However, in the experimental group, after application networking classroom guidance eight sub-dimensions: interest / research, knowledge, interest, self-concept, key figures and plan levels significantly was increased. İn locus of control and time perspective levels has not increased significantly than students’ of control group students. The total score was significantly increased after networking classroom guidance in experiment group.

  12. An ESL Audio-Script Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla

    2012-01-01

    The roles of dialogue, collaborative writing, and authentic communication have been explored as effective strategies in second language writing classrooms. In this article, the stages of an innovative, multi-skill writing method, which embeds students' personal voices into the writing process, are explored. A 10-step ESL Audio Script Writing Model…

  13. Individual Self-monitoring &Peer-monitoring In One Classroom in Writing Activities: Who Is at Disadvantage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zare Toofan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Writing is an important experience through which we are able to share ideas, arouse feelings, persuade and convince other people (white & Arndt, 1991. It is important to view writing not solely as the product of an individual, but as a cognitive, social and cultural act. Writing is an act that takes place within a context, that accomplishes a particular purpose and that is appropriately shaped for its intended audience (Hamplyones & Condon, 1989. Here, the present research considers the significance effects of two important independent variables self-monitoring and peer-monitoring in writing activities on Iranian EFL learners. In this research it was supposed to study new effects of two Meta cognitive strategies self-monitoring and peer-monitoring on 173 male and female learners' writing activities whose age ranged between the age 16-27, and they had a composing description writing paragraph as pre & post test in the same conditions. Although many studies have been conducted on the effects of self-monitoring with a variety of students across a variety of settings (Amato-Zech, Hoff, & Doepke, 2006 Cooper et al., 2007, Dunlap, Dunlap, Koegel, & Koegel 1991. But goal of this study was to increase the participant’s on-task behavior in self & peer-monitoring (E. Johnson, 2007, Self &Peer-monitoring added. Although both of them were useful for providing challengeable students, and became useful for prosocial life, but self-monitoring helped them to become awareness of their weaknesses and strengths to increase positive way of the quality and quantity of their learning in written task, and peer-monitoring occurred when the students achieved recognition level to evaluate the other peers' behavior, and it was obviously understood that it needed more training time to arrive at the level of recognition of each others' behavior.

  14. The effects of the science writing heuristic (SWH) approach versus traditional instruction on yearly critical thinking gain scores in grade 5-8 classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ching-mei

    Critical Thinking has been identified in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) as skills needed to prepare students for advanced education and the future workforce. In science education, argument-based inquiry (ABI) has been proposed as one way to improve critical thinking. The purpose of the current study was to examine the possible effects of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach, an immersion argument-based inquiry approach to learning science, on students' critical thinking skills. Guided by a question-claims-evidence structure, students who participated in SWH approach were required to negotiate meaning and construct arguments using writing as a tool throughout the scientific investigation process. Students in the control groups learned science in traditional classroom settings. Data from five data sets that included 4417 students were analyzed cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Yearly critical thinking gain scores, as measured by Form X of Cornell Critical Thinking Test, were compared for students who experienced the SWH approach versus students who experienced traditional instruction in both elementary (5th grade) and secondary schools (6th-8th grades). Analyses of yearly gain scores for data sets that represented a single year of implementation yielded statistically significant differences favoring SWH over traditional instruction in all instances and statistically significant interactions between gender and grade level in most instances. The interactions revealed that females had higher gain scores than males at lower grade levels but the reverse was true at higher grade levels. Analyses from data sets that included two years of implementation revealed higher overall gains for SWH instruction than for traditional instruction but most of those gains were achieved during the first year of implementation. Implications of these results for teaching critical thinking skills in science classrooms are

  15. Literature as a Network: Creative-Writing Scholarship in Literary Magazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Harriett E.

    2014-01-01

    With the increase in undergraduate and graduate programs for creative writing at institutions of higher education in North America, literary journals and magazines now serve as leading scholarly publishing outlets and research resources for creative-writing faculty and students. This study analyzes ten years of citations from nineteen leading…

  16. Toward a Humanizing Pedagogy: Leveling the Cultural and Linguistic Capital in a Fifth-Grade Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisselsberger, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students in the United States has created a priority for examining the perspectives, dispositions, and attitudes that best support these learners' writing. This study explores the link between a teacher's developing pedagogical language knowledge and humanizing practices and her…

  17. The Use of a Cognitive Strategy to Support Argument-Based Writing in a Ninth Grade Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Erin; Sielaff, Christopher; Golden, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of teaching a planning strategy for planning argument-based written responses on the writing performance of ninth grade students in the context of social studies. The Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) model was used as an instructional framework to teach the planning strategy. Pre- and posttest writing…

  18. Reading, Writing, and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Vicki A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how secondary-school content-area teachers can improve student comprehension of text material by incorporating reading and writing strategies into their classroom instruction. Illustrates relationships among reading, writing, and understanding. Suggests framework for staff-development program. (Contains 14 references.) (PKP)

  19. A New Look at Genre and Authenticity: Making Sense of Reading and Writing Science News in High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnen, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the importance of the genre and authenticity as teachers sought to bring science journalism to the high school science classroom. Undertaken as part of the National Science Foundation-funded grant "Science Literacy through Science Journalism (SciJourn)," this work was conducted as a series of smaller…

  20. Can the Integration of Field and Classroom-Based Learning Enhance Writing? The Life on Our Shore Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graham; Churchill, Helen; Grassam, Matthew; Scott, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to evaluate the benefits to children of integrated classroom and field-based learning. In this article, we describe a case study that involves children in the production of a field guide: an authentic task which integrates learner autonomy and open enquiry with field work, information and communication technologies (ICT) and…

  1. Classroom Network Technology as a Support for Systemic Mathematics Reform: The Effects of TI MathForward on Student Achievement in a Large, Diverse District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William; Singleton, Corinne; Roschelle, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Low-cost, portable classroom network technologies have shown great promise in recent years for improving teaching and learning in mathematics. This paper explores the impacts on student learning in mathematics when a program to introduce network technologies into mathematics classrooms is integrated into a systemic reform initiative at the…

  2. The Teaching of EFL Writing in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyanti

    2016-01-01

    Writing is one of the most important aspects in English language acquisition. Teaching writing has its own challenges since there are some steps and requirements that teachers should prepare to undertake in the classroom. This article is aimed to discuss teaching and learning writing in the classroom based on theoretical conceptualisation. In…

  3. The Use of an Educational Social Networking Site for English Language Learning beyond the Classroom in a Japanese University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    This study describes an attempt of using an educational social networking platform, which is called Edmodo, for English language learning outside classrooms at tertiary level. Considering the notion of communicative competence, the instructor incorporated Edmodo into his English classes as a project which is a formal assignment. In the project,…

  4. Social Network Analysis of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Predictors of Fragmentation and Connectivity in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ariana; Locke, Jill; Kretzmann, Mark; Kasari, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Although children with autism spectrum disorder are frequently included in mainstream classrooms, it is not known how their social networks change compared to typically developing children and whether the factors predictive of this change may be unique. This study identified and compared predictors of social connectivity of children with and…

  5. Promoting Students' Paragraph Writing Using EDMODO: An Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naibi, Is'haq; Al-Jabri, Maryem; Al-Kalbani, Iman

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of an action research that was carried out to measure the effectiveness of integrating a social networking website "Edmodo" in students' writing performance in an EFL classroom at Arab Open University (Oman Branch). The participants were 25 students studying English in the Foundation Programme. Along with…

  6. Writing, Technology and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Amanda; Arafeh, Sousan; Smith, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Teenagers' lives are filled with writing. All teens write for school, and 93% of teens say they write for their own pleasure. Most notably, the vast majority of teens have eagerly embraced written communication with their peers as they share messages on their social network pages, in emails and instant messages online, and through fast-paced thumb…

  7. PEER FEEDBACK ON FACEBOOK: The Use of Social Networking Websites to Develop Writing Ability of Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saovapa WICHADEE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study explores how integrating a social networking website called Facebook with peer feedback in groups supports student learning, investigates the nature of feedback students received on their writing, and examines their attitudes towards the use of Facebook for peer feedback. The study involves 30 undergraduate students who participated in giving and receiving feedback on Facebook with an aim to develop their writing competence over the fundamental English course of one-semester study. Data were collected from the first and final drafts of writing assignments, written peer comments, a questionnaire and an interview. While the document analysis was the main data collection method, a questionnaire and an interview provided crucial information. The results revealed that the nature of students’ feedback focused on content more than grammatical errors. However, quantitative analyses of the peer comments and revisions to the drafts show that feedback given on Facebook had an effect on improving revised drafts. There was statistically significant improvement in the revised drafts which was linked to peer feedback. Finally, the analysis of interviews indicated positive attitude on the use of Facebook for peer feedback in the English class.

  8. Making Thinking Visible: Writing in the Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes Penn High School's writing center, a technology-supported writing classroom which began in July 1994. The Penn writing center operates as a true "center"--a place for students and teachers, technology and talk, thinking and writing to come together. Every day, more than 200 students visit the writing…

  9. Word processing as an assistive technology tool for enhancing academic outcomes of students with writing disabilities in the general classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E; Shrieber, Betty

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the use of a word processor for enhancing the academic outcomes of three students with writing disabilities in a junior high school. A single-subject ABAB design was used to compare academic output produced during class time with and without a computer equipped with a word processor. The number of spelling errors, the number of reading errors, and the number of words used per text were counted, and the overall structure and organization of text were examined across all in-class materials. The data demonstrated a clear difference between handwritten and computer phases. In traditional paper-and-pencil phases, students produced outcomes that had more spelling mistakes, more reading errors, and lower overall quality of organization and structure in comparison with the phases in which a computer equipped with a word processor was used. The results did not indicate any noticeable difference in the number of words per text. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  10. ENHANCING WRITING SKILL THROUGH WRITING PROCESS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at developing the implementation of Writing Process Approach (WPA to enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. The study employed Classroom Action Research. The subjects of the study were 15 university students enrolled in the writing class. The data were gained from writing task, observation and field notes. The findings show that the implementation of WPA with the proper model procedures developed can enhance the students’ skill in writing essay. Before the strategy was implemented, the percentage of the students achieving the score greater than or equal to C (56-70 was 40.00% (6 students of the class. However, after the strategy was implemented in Cycle I, it enhanced enough to 60.00% (9 students of the class, but this result did not meet the criteria of success set up in the study. Next, in Cycle II it increased slightly to 86.67% (13 students of the class. Thus, the enhancement of the students’ skill in writing essay can be reached but it should follow the proper model procedures of the implementation of WPA developed. Keywords: writing process approach, writing skill, essay writing

  11. Teaching Writing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaououi,Merbouh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing learners’ writing skills has been of concern for a long time in education. Students studying English in our educational institutions have been found to face problems mainly in writing, making them unable to cope with the institution’s literacy expectations. However, these students may be able to develop writing skills significantly with positive instructional attitudes towards the errors they make and awareness on the teachers’ part of learner problems. That is why they should improve classroom writing instruction to address the serious problem of students writing difficult. Teaching strategies has shown a dramatic effect on the quality of students’ writing. Strategy instruction involves explicitly and systematically teaching steps necessary to use strategies independently. The following table will explain the above ideas.

  12. The Tower of Babel and the Teaching of Grammar: Writing Instruction for a New Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Amy

    2000-01-01

    Considers the teaching of grammar and its importance in the writing classroom. Examines what grammar is; why writing instruction has moved away from grammar; differing opinions regarding grammar and writing instruction; and grammar's place in the writing classroom of the new century. Argues that grammar must be applied to students' own writing.…

  13. Writing in EFL teachers’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The national guidelines for teachers’ education in Norway state that EFL students should be able to work with two different dimensions of writing in their future classrooms. Learners are expected to develop their writing skills (learn to write, and they should use writing as a tool in the language learning process (write to learn. The teacher students should also be able to demonstrate good writing skills themselves. The guidelines do not, however, specify the kind of work students should do in order to meet these objectives. Thus, it is up to those who offer EFL courses to interpret the guidelines and decide how students’ work with writing will happen. The present article discusses the decisions that are made at thirteen institutions where English is offered as part of the integrated teacher training program for grades five to ten. My data are the requirements related to writing in local syllabuses, and the obligatory writing assignments that students have been given. The investigation shows that writing is a central element in the students’ work. However, the required writing functions primarily as a vehicle to ensure proper study progression and to provide a basis for assessment. In this way, it can be said to meet the institutions’ and the course instructors’ needs more than the students’ needs. The article calls for a pedagogy that is geared more towards helping students develop their writing skills and their ability to cater for work with writing in their future classrooms.

  14. Writing Every Day Generates Excellence: A Manual for the Teaching of Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Intended to help writing teachers create a classroom climate where real writing can be inspired, valued, and enjoyed, the WEDGE (Writing Every Day Generates Excellence) manual addresses first the problem of motivating students to communicate in writing, next, finding words and structures appropriate for clarity and eloquence, and finally, the…

  15. An Evaluation of the Difficulties Classroom Teachers Experience While Giving Primary Reading and Writing Education Within the 4+4+4 Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okay Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to ascertain the problems classroom teachers face while teaching the first reading and writing classes to first-grade pupils following the changes made in the current educational act towards 4+4+4 education system and to put forward the views of teachers concerning these problems. This research makes use of the "phenomenological" approach, one of the qualitative research methods. Determined by "criterion sampling," which is one of the purposive sampling methods, 29 classroom teachers constitute the study group of the research. The research data were collected by semi-structured interviews approach in 2013-2014 academic years, the semester of 2015-2016 academic year unstructured observations and students for reading and writing documents while the analysis of the data was made with descriptive analysis and content analysis. In accordance with the regulations in the curriculum, each question was designed to determine the problems class teachers experience while teaching first reading and writing primers and the results were evaluated and interpreted under separate categories such as drawbacks rooted in students, families/parents, teachers, school and the curriculum. According to the survey, some of the problems experienced by first-grade teachers while teaching reading and writing within the 4 + 4 + 4 Education System can be listed as follows: Student-oriented problems such as perception and compliance issues, inadequate physical development, getting bored quickly, discipline issues, low reading speed, lack of self-care skills, and the presence of different age groups in the same classroom; Curriculum-oriented problems such as the long adaptation durations, inappropriate nature of the curriculum for the development of students between 5 and 5,5 years of age, inapt textbooks, the underprepared teachers who were informed about the system at short notice, the fact that the system was imposed without taking expert opinions

  16. The Effect of Journal Writing on Students' Cognitive Critical Thinking Skills: "A Quasi-Experimental Research on an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Undergraduate Classroom in Egypt"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawy, Hanaa Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Based on writing weekly academic journals and on Bloom's (1984) taxonomy of cognitive critical thinking skills, this article reports on a quasi-experiment where journal writing was an additional task to an academic writing course. The experiment was carried out with first year university students (semester two) in one of the Egyptian private…

  17. Today's Technologies Enhance Writing in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Amy

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that including writing activities in the learning process positively impacts student achievement and leads to greater depth of student understanding. This writing is often missing in the math classroom though, when the focus is misplaced on rote procedures. In these classrooms students learn mathematical processes but have…

  18. A Guidebook for Teaching Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Gene; Smith, Marie

    This guidebook provides the classroom teacher with ideas and resources for teaching creative writing at the secondary level. For each type of writing that is discussed, instructional objectives, notes for teachers' presentations of new concepts, classroom activities, discussion questions, small-group activities, projects, individual assignments,…

  19. Using Automated Writing Evaluation to Reduce Grammar Errors in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hui-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the recent development of automated writing evaluation (AWE) technology and the growing interest in applying this technology to language classrooms, few studies have looked at the effects of using AWE on reducing grammatical errors in L2 writing. This study identified the primary English grammatical error types made by 66 Taiwanese…

  20. Classroom Teachers and Classroom Research. JALT Applied Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffee, Dale T., Ed.; Nunan, David, Ed.

    This collection of papers leads classroom language teachers through the process of developing and completing a classroom research project. Arranged in four sections, they include: "Language Teaching and Research" (David Nunan); "Where Are We Now? Trends, Teachers, and Classroom Research" (Dale T. Griffee); "First Things First: Writing the Research…

  1. What Makes Writing Good? An Essential Question for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauman, April D.; Stirling, Terry; Borthwick, Arlene

    2011-01-01

    The question of what makes writing "good" touches several important areas of classroom writing instruction: assessment and evaluation, instruction, and teacher response during one-on-one conferences. The current paper examines contemporary views of what makes writing "good," along with the classroom implications and limitations…

  2. Queering the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  3. Toward understanding writing to learn in physics: Investigating student writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Dedra

    It is received wisdom that writing in a discipline helps students learn the discipline, and millions of dollars have been committed at many universities to supporting such writing. We show that evidence for effectiveness is anecdotal, and that little data-based material informs these prejudices. This thesis begins the process of scientific study of writing in the discipline, in specific, in physics, and creates means to judge whether such writing is effective. The studies culminating in this thesis are an aggressive start to addressing these complex questions. Writing is often promoted as an activity that, when put into classrooms in specific disciplines, not only helps students learn to write in the methods of that discipline but also helps students learn content knowledge. Students at the Ohio State University are being asked to write more in introductory courses, and the Engineering schools want their students to have more writing skills for the job market. Combined with the desire of many educators to have students be able to explain the course content knowledge clearly, it would seem that writing activities would be important and useful in physics courses. However, the question of whether writing helps learning or whether students learn writing within a non-English classroom helps learning in the discipline are open to debate, and data are needed before such claims can be made. This thesis presents several studies aimed at understanding the correlation of writing and content, and tracking and characterizing student writing behaviors to see how they are impacted by writing in physics courses. It consists of four parts: summer and autumn 2005 focus on writing in introductory physics labs with and without explicit instruction, while winter and spring 2006 focus on tracking and analyzing student writing and revising behavior in Physics by Inquiry (PbI). With these related projects, we establish three main results. First, there is a need for quantitative studies of

  4. The Neural Bases of Reading: The Accommodation of the Brain's Reading Network to Writing Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perfetti, C.A.; Liu, Y.; Fiez, J.; Tan, L.H.; Cornelissen, P.; Hansen, P.; Kringelbach, M.; Pugh, K.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the highly contrastive cases of English and Chinese to examine how the neural basis of reading accommodates variability in the structure of languages. The notion of accommodation, in fact, is central to the analysis. It argues that the reading network must accommodate variation

  5. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Converting a Classroom Course to a Network Based Instruction Module

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    green, Samantha

    1997-01-01

    ...) classes into NBL modules. This thesis performs a cost effectiveness analysis on converting the two modules and discusses the intangible costs and benefits associated with converting traditional classroom courses...

  6. Thinking, Writing, Talking: A Discourse Analysis of Writing Instruction for Boys with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    This article illustrates the importance of classroom discourse and its effect on the writing of students with dyslexia; specifically, this article examines the nature of discourse that took place within the context of two writing classrooms at The Garden School (pseudonym). When teaching students with dyslexia, the teachers in this study followed…

  7. Use of a personal computer for dynamical engineering illustrations in a classroom and over an instructional TV network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, V. R.

    1983-01-01

    A personal computer has been used to illustrate physical phenomena and problem solution techniques in engineering classes. According to student evaluations, instruction of concepts was greatly improved through the use of these illustrations. This paper describes the class of phenomena that can be effectively illustrated, the techniques used to create these illustrations, and the techniques used to display the illustrations in regular classrooms and over an instructional TV network. The features of a personal computer required to apply these techniques are listed. The capabilities of some present personal computers are discussed and a forecast of the capabilities of future personal computers is presented.

  8. Writing Center Tutors Have the Luxury to Focus on Individual Student "Care Giving" as Opposed to Formal Classroom Settings That Are Less "Care" Centered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Renee A.

    2010-01-01

    Undergraduate and graduate students come to the writing center for consultations with peer tutors in order to improve their communication skills. During peer tutoring sessions (over the course of one semester) it became clear that these students were meeting with the tutors that I supervised, for more than just help with their writing. I observed…

  9. Reflections on a Dialogic Pedagogy Inspired by the Writings of Bakhtin: An Account of the Experience of Two Professors Working Together in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Anselmo; von Duyke, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The practice of a dialogic pedagogy inspired by the writings of Bakhtin is increasingly popular in different parts of the world. This article is an account produced in the spirit of such pedagogy. Two professors (one from Brazil, the other from the United States), both members of an international dialogic pedagogy study group, write together to…

  10. Increasing the Writing Performance of Urban Seniors Placed At-Risk through Goal-Setting in a Culturally Responsive and Creativity-Centered Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Brittany; Warren, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to support marginalized students require not only identifying systemic inequities, but providing a classroom infrastructure that supports the academic achievement of all students. This action research study examined the effects of implementing goal-setting strategies and emphasizing creativity in a culturally responsive classroom (CRC) on…

  11. Collaborative Writing in the Postsecondary Classroom: Online, In-Person, and Synchronous Group Work with Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schley, Sara; Stinson, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This project investigated the use of alternate methods of classroom interaction and communication to foster collaborative learning in diverse classrooms. Deaf, hard-of-hearing (DHH), and hearing students taking a graduate course in teacher education participated in lab sessions where interactions occurred via articulated speech and/or sign…

  12. The role of writing portfolios in increasing learners' confidence in writing and promoting their attitudes towards writing

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma BAYRAM

    2006-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. This study investigated the role of writing portfolios in increasing learners’ confidence in writing and possible attitude changes towards writing. The study also examined the attitudes of students and teachers towards using writing portfolios as a self-assessment tool. The study was conducted with 60 pre-intermediate level students, one experimental and two control groups, and their classroom teacher in the Preparatory School of Englis...

  13. More than words: applying the discipline of literary creative writing to the practice of reflective writing in health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines definitions and uses of reflective and creative writing in health care education classrooms and professional development settings. A review of articles related to writing in health care reveals that when teaching narrative competence is the goal, creative writing may produce the best outcomes. Ultimately, the paper describes the importance of defining literary creative writing as a distinct form of writing and recommends scholars interested in using literary creative writing to teach narrative competence study pedagogy of the field.

  14. Portfolios for New (and Experienced) Teachers of Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrell, Donna

    The portfolio approach to teaching writing brings the writing process into the classroom and enables the new teacher--and all teachers--to see writing from a new perspective, to truly be collaborators and coaches with their students. A college writing teacher uses portfolios and plays the role of evaluator as well as the responder in three courses…

  15. From Tyrannosaurus to Pokemon: Autonomy in the Teaching of Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses action research case studies of representative children and changes to classroom teaching. Notes that children were given the opportunity to: write about things that mattered to them; write as experts; hear their writing read aloud; and experience genuine response to this writing. Finds boys made most progress when given the opportunity…

  16. Using Online Media to Write Extended Persuasive Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton-Standish, Leisa

    2014-01-01

    This article examines methods of teaching students immersed in online media to write extended persuasive text. Specific examples for the writing classroom are outlined to engage students in persuasive writing through the use of online media. The persuasive writing examples are linked to the Common Core State Standards.

  17. Narrative Writing in Digital Formats: Interpreting the Impact of Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Joshua Fahey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital writing has enabled students to write for a variety of authentic audiences, both in and out of the classroom. As they consider audience, students shoulder a cognitive burden that they must juggle in addition to the task of composition. At the same time, writing provides students with opportunities to craft and express their identities. The ways that identity formation and cognitive load intersect may be particularly complex in digital, online writing environments, as students gain the ability to share and receive feedback from global and local audiences. In this counterbalanced experimental study, 86 seventh- and eighth-grade students responded to two narrative prompts. One prompt was written for the teacher and the other was written for the teacher and peers in an online forum. We examined student writing fluency, mechanical errors, academic word use, and setting. Students were found to be more likely to set narratives in private settings when writing for an audience that included peers. We discuss this finding from cognitive and sociocultural perspectives and how it might inform networked communication research.

  18. Comparing acceptance and rejection in the classroom interaction of students who stutter and their peers: A social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaensens, Stefanie; Van Waes, Sara; Struyf, Elke

    2017-06-01

    Recent work has reported adverse effects of students' stuttering on their social and emotional functioning at school. Yet, few studies have provided an in-depth examination of classroom interaction of students who stutter (SWS). The current study uses a network perspective to compare acceptance and rejection in the classroom interaction between SWS and their peers in secondary education. The sample comprised 22 SWS and 403 non-stuttering peers (22 classes) of secondary education in Flanders (Belgium). Students' nominations regarding three acceptance and three rejection criteria were combined. Social network analysis offered procedures that considered direct and indirect interaction between all classmates. We found few significant differences: SWS and their peers were distributed similarly across positive and negative status groups. Both considered and were considered by, on average, six or seven classmates as 'a friend', who they liked and could count on, and nominated or were nominated by one or two classmates as 'no friend', somebody who they disliked and could not count on. On average, SWS and their classmates also did not differ in terms of structural position in the class group (degree, closeness and betweenness), reciprocated rejection, and clique size. However, SWS do tend to be slightly more stringent or more careful in nominating peers, which led to fewer reciprocated friendships. Our results suggest that SWS are quite accepted by peers in secondary education in Flanders. Such positive peer interaction can create a supportive and encouraging climate for SWS to deal with specific challenges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Promoting Writing in Mathematics: Prospective Teachers' Experiences and Perspectives on the Process of Writing When Doing Mathematics as Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzle, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Despite a great deal of research on the benefits of writing in mathematics, writing plays a minimal role, if any, in secondary and tertiary mathematics education. In order for teachers to use writing in their classrooms, they themselves have to experience writing mathematics within the teacher education programme. The present paper reports on a…

  20. Passionate Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgström, Benedikte

    With care of writing as a method of inquiry, this paper engages in academic writing such as responsible knowledge development drawing on emotion, thought and reason. The aim of the paper is to better understand emancipatory knowledge development. Bodily experiences and responses shape academic...... writing and there are possibilities for responsible academic writing in that iterative process. I propose that academic writing can be seen as possibilities of passionate as well as passive writing....

  1. Peer Influence on Children's Reading Skills: A Social Network Analysis of Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooc, North; Kim, James S.

    2017-01-01

    Research has found that peers influence the academic achievement of children. However, the mechanisms through which peers matter remain underexplored. The present study examined the relationship between peers' reading skills and children's own reading skills among 4,215 total second- and third-graders in 294 classrooms across 41 schools. One…

  2. How to improve MEBES-III Write times by improving your MEBES-III directory management discipline, enabled by high-speed networking software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booi, Greg

    1995-12-01

    At many sites, MEBES disk files are not optimally accessed during MEBES Write because the disk directories are not optimally managed by the MEBES operator. Many people are not aware that this can add minutes or hours to MEBES Write times. This is especially important to photomask shops which are operating their MEBES' at capacity, and to shops where delivery is constrained by turnaround time. The problem is due to disk fragmentation on the MEBES disks, and the unavailability of an easy solution. Disk fragmentation can be controlled by deleting files in a certain way, keeping the MEBES disks nearly empty. This approach requires a fast enough network such that Just-In-Time file transfer does not slow production, and the incentive and discipline to keep the disks nearly empty. ABNETTM data delivery to MEBESNETTM and Write-From-LinkTM has been available for years, hosted by slower Vaxs and SUN Sparc-IIs. It is the advent of faster host computers (Vax 4000 series, SUN SPARC 20, etc.) which has created fast enough network transfer. The incentive to improve throughput is provided by running the MEBES at capacity. The paper describes the mechanism and methods of disk defragmentation, and procedures to automate the discipline.

  3. Do networking activities outside of the classroom protect students against being bullied? A field study with students in secondary school settings in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickle, Gerhard; Meurs, James A; Schoepe, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that having close relationships with fellow classmates can provide a buffer for students against bullying and the negative outcomes associated with it. But, research has not explicitly examined the potential benefits of social networking behaviors outside of the classroom for those who could be bullied. This study addresses this gap and finds that, although a bullying climate in the classroom increases overall bullying, students high on external networking activities did not experience an increase in the bullying they received when in a classroom with a high bullying climate. However, the same group of students reported the largest degree of received bulling under conditions of a low bullying climate. We discuss the implications of our results and provide directions for future research.

  4. Alternative Techniques for Teaching Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihindun arumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Writing as one of language skill is often considered very difficult. It is due to the fact that writing needs to produce and organize ideas using appropriate vocabulary, language use, paragraph organization, and mechanism. It also needs to turn the ideas into a readable text and for foreign language learners, they should also transfer ideas from their native language into target language (foreign language. It raises any problems for them to create a good text. Moreover, the situation in the class does not always supportthem in which the techniques of the teacher in teaching writing is boring and monotonous, do not give enough attention to help students explore their writing skills. So that they attend the writing class only for procedural formality.Thus, it is considered important to elaborate various techniques to build nice classroom atmosphere as well as to improve students’ writing skills.

  5. Characterizing Communication Networks in a Web-Based Classroom: Cognitive Styles and Linguistic Behavior of Self-Organizing Groups in Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellone-Smith, Pamela; Jablokow, Kathryn; Friedel, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explore the cognitive style profiles and linguistic patterns of self-organizing groups within a web-based graduate education course to determine how cognitive preferences and individual behaviors influence the patterns of information exchange and the formation of communication hierarchies in an online classroom. Network analysis…

  6. Writing Inspired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  7. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  8. Improving Grade XI Students' Writing Achievement in Analytical Exposition Through Collaborative Writing Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Sidauruk, Sri Lestari; Arifin, Tina Mariany

    2014-01-01

    This study was focused on the improvement of Grade XI students' writing achievement in analytical exposition through the application of collaborative writing strategy. The objective of this study was to find out whether collaborative writing strategy could improve Grade XI students' writing achievement in analytical exposition text. The study was conducted by using Classroom Action Research (CAR). The subjects of this study were students of Grade XI Class 2 of State Senior High School (Sekola...

  9. Teaching Writing in a Video Studio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Agnes J.

    1984-01-01

    An experienced educator describes how a video studio was turned into an effective college writing classroom. Necessary equipment, the nine-step process students utilized to produce a short television documentary, and course outcome are discussed in detail. (MBR)

  10. Writing Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    McLoughlin, Nigel F

    2013-01-01

    A Companion to Creative Writing comprehensively considers key aspects of the practice, profession and culture of \\ud creative writing in the contemporary world.\\ud The most comprehensive collection specifically relating to the practices and cultural and professional place of creative writing\\ud Covers not only the “how” of creative writing, but many more topics in and around the profession and cultural practices surrounding creative writing\\ud Features contributions from international writers...

  11. Moving Computers into the Writing Center: The Path to Least Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane; Wambeam, Cynthia A.

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that writing centers should become campus leaders in the development and use of computers for writing, and should form reciprocal partnerships that require trust, commitment, and open communication. Argues that through successful collaborative projects like computer writing classrooms and online writing labs, writing centers help to shape…

  12. "A Lifelong Classroom": Social Studies Educators' Engagement with Professional Learning Networks on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anna; McQuillan, Patrick; Littenberg-Tobias, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Growing numbers of educators are using social media platforms to connect with other educators to form professional learning networks. These networks serve as alternative sources of professional development for teachers who seek to enrich their professional growth beyond school-based programs. This study aims to add to the small but growing body of…

  13. W. C. U. MicroNet: A State Network Linking Secondary Science and Math Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Linda J.

    1984-01-01

    Western Carolina University (W.C.U.) MicroNet is designed to improve mathematics and science teaching by forming a support network for teachers. Describes: (1) the W. C. U. MicroNet system; (2) advantages of the network for students, teachers, and the university; (3) successes and problems; and (4) future endeavors. (JN)

  14. Seeing, Doing, Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rumney

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As political agendas change, the teaching of writing continues to evolve, encompassing different writing practices in an attempt to address the perceived needs for literacy in our society. This article presents the Write Here project, which aims to boost children’s social development and literacy attainment through engagement with visual art, play, and multimodal learning, delivered in both art gallery and classroom settings. The valuable knowledge gained at the end of this study was evaluated and developed further through a series of extended collaborations between professional, postgraduate and undergraduate writers, and schoolchildren and their teachers. Our findings suggest that engaging young learners with creative, playful, multimodal activities will foster their confidence and motivation to engage with the subject and, more importantly, will lead to a significant improvement in literacy attainment.

  15. Promoting writing in mathematics: prospective teachers' experiences and perspectives on the process of writing when doing mathematics as problem solving

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Kuzle

    2013-01-01

    Despite a great deal of research on the benefits of writing in mathematics, writing plays a minimal role, if any, in secondary and tertiary mathematics education. In order for teachers to use writing in their classrooms, they themselves have to experience writing mathematics within the teacher education programme. The present paper reports on a study aimed at addressing this gap. In a problem-solving seminar, preservice teachers had an opportunity to experience writing in mathematics and repo...

  16. Writing Development in Secondary/Post Secondary Language Learning: Integrating Multiple Motivating Factors, Explanatory Feedback, and Explanatory Writing Tools to Increase Competence and Confidence in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Trevina

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study discusses data-driven results of newly-developed writing tools that are objective, easy, and less time-consuming than standard classroom writing strategies; additionally, multiple motivation triggers and peer evaluation are evaluated together with these new, modernized writing tools. The results are explained separately and…

  17. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  18. Overcoming Resistance to the Writing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Gary D.; Funk, Hal D.

    1991-01-01

    Research and theory on teaching the writing process is not being widely implemented in public school classrooms. Changes such as a greater emphasis on process in college composition classes and language arts methodology courses as well as careful selection of supervising teachers, inservice programs, and revamping of writing evaluation are needed.…

  19. Topical Articles: Teaching Psychological Science through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, David G.

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of psychological science occurs face-to-face in classrooms and also through writing via op-ed essays, magazine articles, trade books, Web sites, and textbooks. I discuss the teaching of psychological science through such outlets, offer some practical suggestions for writing, and reflect on what I have found motivating, helpful, and…

  20. Writing Assessment: Emotions, Feelings, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    For my purposes, I approach writing assessment as more than just grading or responding to a set of student papers within a classroom context. Instead, I look at writing assessment as a complex act that links to teaching and learning, that affects the educational environment and students, that acknowledges the consequences of the assessment, and…

  1. Writing Together: An Arendtian Framework for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restaino, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This essay considers the long-standing challenges, in both practice and theory, to collaborative writing in the first-year classroom. I argue that Hannah Arendt's concepts of plurality and natality are useful frameworks for thinking constructively and practically about teaching argumentative writing through collaboration. I explore these…

  2. Collaborative Writing: Product, Process, and Students' Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Neomy

    2005-01-01

    Although pair and group work are commonly used in language classrooms, very few studies have investigated the nature of such collaboration when students produce a jointly written text. This study set out to investigate collaborative writing. The study was classroom based, and the participants (23) were adult ESL students completing degree courses.…

  3. Empowering Primary Writers through Daily Journal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jill; East, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating a journal writing routine into the classroom is critical to developing autonomous writers. During the course of a full year, a first-grade classroom embarked on a quest to discover the importance of creating successful writers. This study confirms the significance of implementing and establishing authentic and meaningful journal…

  4. Contextual Language Learning: Educational Potential and Use of Social Networking Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Kai; Lin, Chun-Yu; Villarreal, Daniel Steve

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the potential and use of social networking technology, specifically Facebook, to support a community of practice in an undergraduate-level classroom setting. Facebook is used as a tool with which to provide supplementary language learning materials to develop learners' English writing skills. We adopted the technology…

  5. What Role for Collaboration in Writing and Writing Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Gillian; Storch, Neomy

    2012-01-01

    Writing is generally thought of as an activity which is carried out individually, often with feedback then provided by a teacher or colleague. While the use of pair or small group work in the second language classroom in relation to oral work has been extensively studied, and its benefits well documented, there are only a few studies which have…

  6. Examining the teaching and learning of writing in elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Douillard, Kimberlee Ann

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation explores the complexities of teaching writing in elementary school. Through the use of surveys, fourth grade teachers reported on their instructional practices and described their students' writing behaviors. Surveys provided an overview of instructional practices and also served as a tool for selecting four classroom teachers for more in-depth study. With the selected teachers, interviews and classroom observations were used to examine writing instruction and to uncover the...

  7. Writing Bugs Become Reading Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Linda; Welhoelter, Dorothy

    Even young children can be encouraged to write through the use of individual communication, group discussions, and activities that involve rhythms and music. Such activities create a classroom of children who feel comfortable and happy, who share a rapport with their peers and others throughout the school building, and who feel free to express…

  8. Beliefs and Practices of Writing Instruction in Japanese Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Lucy K.; Kite, Yuriko

    2018-01-01

    Focusing on writing instruction within an era of international curricular reform, this study analysed classroom observations, educator interviews, and documents related to Japanese elementary writing instruction. A deductive approach using discourses of writing framework and an inductive approach to Japanese cultural practices uncovered beliefs…

  9. Conversations with Leaders: Principles of Effective Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbrunn, Sharon; Krause, Keegan

    2012-01-01

    Findings from research demonstrate that student writing proficiency and classroom writing instruction is a national concern (Applebee & Langer, 2006, 2009; Graham, Harris, Fink-Chorzempa, & MacArthur, 2003; Persky, Daane, & Jin, 2003). This qualitative study explored principles of effective writing instruction through the perspectives of leading…

  10. Anxiety as It Pertains to EFL Writing Ability and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali Salmani

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study conducted to find (a) the impact of anxiety on EFL learners' writing performance, and (b) the relationship between anxiety and foreign language writing ability. 137 (N = 137) EFL learners took the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS), the Oxford Placement Test (OPT), and a writing task on a…

  11. Bridging the Gap: Contextualizing Professional Ethics in Collaborative Writing Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Many business and technical writing students find classroom discussions of professional ethics interesting and enjoyable. However, when trying to incorporate the content of discussions directly into their writing practices, they often experience difficulties linking ethical concepts to writing process. This article discusses how instructors can…

  12. Writing to Learn Statistics in an Advanced Placement Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Christian Glenn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the use of writing in a statistics classroom to learn if writing provided a rich description of problem-solving processes of students as they solved problems. Through analysis of 329 written samples provided by students, it was determined that writing provided a rich description of problem-solving processes and enabled…

  13. Friends in the classroom : a comparison between two methods for the assessment of students' friendship networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijl, Sip Jan; Koster, Marloes; Hannink, Anne; Stratingh, Anna

    2011-01-01

    One of the methods used most often to assess students' friendships and friendship networks is the reciprocal nomination method. However, an often heard complaint is that this technique produces rather negative outcomes. This study compares the reciprocal nomination method with another method to

  14. The Correlation of Students' Classroom-Assigned Time Social Networking with TAKS Literacy Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Education has continued to follow a traditional teaching model which may not prepare students with needed workforce skills. Social networking has been viewed as a technology tool useful for enhancing communication at both the business and educational level. The theory of connectivism underscores the need for social group interaction to provide…

  15. Marketing Career Speed Networking: A Classroom Event to Foster Career Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, Cheryl L.; O'Connor, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a marketing career speed networking event held during class time in two sections of the consumer behavior class. The event was coordinated through a partnering effort with marketing faculty and the college's Career Center. A total of 57 students participated in the event, providing…

  16. Social Networking in an Intensive English Program Classroom: A Language Socialization Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Jonathon; Zander, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    This ongoing project seeks to investigate the impact, inside and outside of class, of instruction focused on developing learner awareness of social-networking site (SNS) use in an American Intensive English Program (IEP). With language socialization as an interpretative framework (Duff, in press; Ochs, 1988; Watson-Gegeo, 2004), the project uses a…

  17. Writing self-efficacy in nursing students: The influence of a discipline-specific writing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kim M; Harrigan, Tom; McMillan, Diana E

    2017-10-01

    To explore if writing self-efficacy improved among first-year nursing students in the context of discipline-specific writing. The relationship between writing self-efficacy, anxiety and student grades are also explored with respect to various learner characteristics such as postsecondary experience, writing history, English as a second language status and online versus classroom instruction. A one group quasi-experimental study with a time control period. Data was collected over the 2013-2014 academic year at orientation, start of writing course and end of writing course. Writing self-efficacy improved from pre- to post writing course but remained stable during the time control period. Anxiety was negatively related to writing self-efficacy but remained stable across the study period. Inexperienced students and students with less writing experience, appeared to over-inflate their self-assessed writing self-efficacy early in the programme. This study gives promising evidence that online and classroom delivery of instruction are both feasible for introducing discipline specific writing.

  18. Writing on Academic Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaxter, Loraine; Hughes, Christina; Tight, Malcolm

    1998-01-01

    The work of college faculty in the United Kingdom is conceptualized as five overlapping responsibilities (teaching, research, managing, writing, networking), and existing literature on each is reviewed. Although much is written on the teaching role, and somewhat less on managing, little of a cross-disciplinary nature has been written about…

  19. Writing toward a Scientific Identity: Shifting from Prescriptive to Reflective Writing in Undergraduate Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otfinowski, Rafael; Silva-Opps, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Analytical writing enhances retention of science learning and is integral to student-centered classrooms. Despite this, scientific writing in undergraduate programs is often presented as a series of sentence-level conventions of grammar, syntax, and citation formats, reinforcing students' perceptions of its highly prescriptive nature. The authors…

  20. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION AND METHODOLOGIES OF INNOVATION. A HEURISTIC EXPERIENCE IN THE CLASSROOM APPLYING SEMANTIC NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Corujeira Gómez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The current definition of creativity gives importance to interpersonal communication in innovation strategies, and allows us to question the profiles of professionals –innovation partners– communication skills in the practice session in which they are applied. This text shows shallow results on the application of some of their tactics with a group of students. We tested structural/procedural descriptions of hypothetical effects of communication using indicators proposed by Network Theory in terms topologies provided by the group. Without a conclusive result, we expect this paper helps to the creativity's investigation in the innovation sessions.

  1. Promoting Writing in Mathematics: Prospective Teachers’ Experiences and Perspectives on the Process of Writing When Doing Mathematics as Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Kuzle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite a great deal of research on the benefits of writing in mathematics, writing plays a minimal role, if any, in secondary and tertiary mathematics education. In order for teachers to use writing in their classrooms, they themselves have to experience writing mathematics within the teacher education programme. The present paper reports on a study aimed at addressing this gap. In a problem-solving seminar, preservice teachers had an opportunity to experience writing in mathematics and report how this affected their problem-solving processes and shaped their attitudes towards incorporating writing in their classrooms. In order to provide a more detailed description of the phenomenon, four participants were chosen based on their beliefs about mathematics. All of the participants struggled with writing their explanations. Those who used writing as a method to support metacognitive processes while exploring mathematics tended to respond positively to the writing process. The others used writing merely as a method to produce a formal document to be evaluated by the instructor. Consequently, those who viewed writing and doing mathematics as an intertwined process expressed a positive attitude towards using writing in their mathematics classroom. This was, unfortunately, not the case when writing and doing mathematics were seen as two separate processes. Implications for teacher education programmes are presented at the end of the report.

  2. Writing poetry through the eyes of science a teacher's guide to scientific literacy and poetic response

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    Gorrell, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Writing Poetry Through the Eyes of Science: A Teacher's Guide to Scientific Literacy and Poetic Response presents a unique and effective interdisciplinary approach to teaching science poems and science poetry writing in secondary English and science classrooms.

  3. Writing Away from Fear: Mina Shaughnessy and the Uses of Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael

    1980-01-01

    Responds to John Rouse's attack on Mina Shaughnessy's teaching strategies for composition instruction (see EJ 209 264). Offers personal experiences to illustrate the role of the basic writing teacher and the uses of authority in the basic writing classroom. (JT)

  4. Helping Preservice Teachers Learn to Assess Writing: Practice and Feedback in a Web-Based Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Michael S.; PytlikZillig, Lisa M.; Bruning, Roger H.

    2009-01-01

    Writing is a highly valued skill that is often neglected in the classroom; one reason is that teachers often do not receive adequate training in writing assessment and instruction. Teachers, particularly preservice teachers, need practice making detailed assessments of student writing and to build their confidence for assessing student writing,…

  5. Beyond the Pencil: Expanding the Occupational Therapists’ Role in Helping Young Children to Develop Writing Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Hope K . Gerde PhD; Tricia D. Foster MOT, OTR/L; Lori E. Skibbe PhD

    2014-01-01

    Occupational therapists (OTs) play an important role in early childhood classrooms as vital members of the educational team, particularly for young children’s writing development. Children’s emergent writing is a foundational literacy skill, which begins to develop well before they enter elementary school. However, early childhood classrooms are lacking in supports for early writing development. OTs are experts in guiding the development of early writing skills in young children and, therefor...

  6. A modern twist on the beaumont and st. Martin case: encouraging analysis and discussion in the bioethics classroom with reflective writing and concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goller, Carlos C

    2014-12-01

    Historical ethical dilemmas are a valuable tool in bioethics courses. However, garnering student interest in reading and discussing the assigned cases in the classroom can be challenging. In an effort to actively engage undergraduate and graduate students in an Ethical Issues in Biotechnology course, an activity was developed to encourage reflection on a classical ethical dilemma between a patient, St. Martin, and his employer/caretaker, Beaumont. Two different texts were used to analyze the ethical ramifications of this relationship: a chapter in a popular press book and a short perspective in a medical journal. Participants read the book chapter for homework and discussed it in class. This easy read highlights the fundamental ethical issues in the relationship between two men. Students were then provided with a second text focusing on the scientific accomplishments achieved through Beaumont's experimentation on St. Martin. A structured worksheet prompted participants to reflect on their feelings after reading each text and create a concept map depicting the dilemma. Student-generated concept maps and written reflections indicate participants were able to list the ethical issues, analyze the situation, and evaluate the information provided. This activity not only encouraged higher-level thinking and reflection, it also mirrored the course's structured approach of using concept mapping and reflection to dissect ethical dilemmas.

  7. A Modern Twist on the Beaumont and St. Martin Case: Encouraging Analysis and Discussion in the Bioethics Classroom with Reflective Writing and Concept Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos C. Goller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Historical ethical dilemmas are a valuable tool in bioethics courses. However, garnering student interest in reading and discussing the assigned cases in the classroom can be challenging. In an effort to actively engage undergraduate and graduate students in an Ethical Issues in Biotechnology course, an activity was developed to encourage reflection on a classical ethical dilemma between a patient, St. Martin, and his employer/caretaker, Beaumont. Two different texts were used to analyze the ethical ramifications of this relationship: a chapter in a popular press book and a short perspective in a medical journal. Participants read the book chapter for homework and discussed it in class. This easy read highlights the fundamental ethical issues in the relationship between two men. Students were then provided with a second text focusing on the scientific accomplishments achieved through Beaumont's experimentation on St. Martin. A structured worksheet prompted participants to reflect on their feelings after reading each text and create a concept map depicting the dilemma. Student-generated concept maps and written reflections indicate participants were able to list the ethical issues, analyze the situation, and evaluate the information provided. This activity not only encouraged higher-level thinking and reflection, it also mirrored the course's structured approach of using concept mapping and reflection to dissect ethical dilemmas.

  8. Mathematical writing

    CERN Document Server

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    This book teaches the art of writing mathematics, an essential -and difficult- skill for any mathematics student.   The book begins with an informal introduction on basic writing principles and a review of the essential dictionary for mathematics. Writing techniques are developed gradually, from the small to the large: words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, to end with short compositions. These may represent the introduction of a concept, the abstract of a presentation or the proof of a theorem. Along the way the student will learn how to establish a coherent notation, mix words and symbols effectively, write neat formulae, and structure a definition.   Some elements of logic and all common methods of proofs are featured, including various versions of induction and existence proofs. The book concludes with advice on specific aspects of thesis writing (choosing of a title, composing an abstract, compiling a bibliography) illustrated by large number of real-life examples. Many exercises are included; over 150...

  9. Telepresence teacher professional development for physics and math constructs focused on US and Thai classrooms' TC-1 slinky seismometer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livelybrooks, D.; Parris, B. A.; Cook, A.; Kant, M.; Wogan, N.; Zeryck, A.; Tulyatid, D.; Toomey, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Broader Impacts of the Cascadia Initiative, a seismic study of the Cascadia margin, and the Magnetotelluric Observations of Cascadia using a Huge Array (MOCHA) collaboration we have developed school- and museum/library-based networks of TC-1 educational seismometers. The TC-1 is constructed such that its 'guts' are visible through an transparent acrylic outer cylinder, thus it is an excellent demonstration of how fundamental physics constructs can be leveraged to design and operate a vertical-channel seismometer capable of recording signals from large earthquakes world-wide. TC-1 (aka 'slinky seismometer') networks therefore serve as the application for projects-based learning (PBL) physics and data science instruction in Oregon and Thai classrooms. The TC-1 acts as a simple harmonic oscillator, employing electromagnetic induction of a moving magnet within a wire coil. Movement of the lower magnet within an electrically conductive pipe dampens motion such that P-, S- and Surface wave phases can be identified. Further, jAmaSeis software can be configured to simultaneously show live signals from three TC-1s and has tools necessary to pick phases for earthquake signals and, thus, locate earthquake epicenters. Leveraging a long-standing collaboration between the Royal Thai Distance Learning Foundation and the University of Oregon, we developed five, 2-hour, two-way teacher professional development sessions that were transmitted live to Thai K-12 teachers and others starting mid-August, 2015. As an example, one session emphasized hands-on activities to analyze the effect of spring stiffness, inertial mass and initial displacement on the resonance frequency of a simple oscillator. Another pedagogical goal was to elucidate how math is important to understanding the analysis of seismic data, for example, how cross-correlation is useful for distinguishing between genuine earthquake signals and, say, a truck rolling by a TC-1 station. UO graduate and

  10. English Major Students’ Perceptions of Academic Writing: A Struggle between Writing to Learn and Learning to Write

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Sağlamel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available English Major Students’ Perceptions of Academic Writing: A Struggle between Writing to Learn and Learning to Write Abstract Even though writing as a language skill takes a back seat especially with reference to the natural order hypothesis, appreciation of writing in academic settings propel learners to challenge the validity of this order. It is not surprising therefore that writing deserves a higher priority in academic settings due much to its immediate practical application in a variety of academic tasks such as examination questions, essays, research reports, dissertation thesis and so on. In line with this constant practice with writing, English majoring students are quite usually subject to production of texts in the academic essay genre and desire to position themselves in academic discourse community through following the desired academic conventions. However, a considerable number of students fail to achieve the desired proficiency; cultural variations intrude into the language classrooms and differences in meaning learners attach to the writing activities are evident, which makes it necessary to explore students’ perceptions from academic writing courses. To this end, questionnaires on students’ writing efficacy were distributed to the freshman students enrolled in Academic Writing class, and interviews were carried out to have a broader understanding of the expectations from the course. Data from the questionnaire were analyzed using the SPSS and content analysis was employed to analyze the interviews.

  11. Peer Influence on Academic Performance: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Emotional Intervention Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Dawn; Zhang, Linlin; Hanish, Laura D; Miller, Cindy F; Fabes, Richard A; Martin, Carol Lynn; Kochel, Karen P; Updegraff, Kimberly A

    2016-11-01

    Longitudinal social network analysis (SNA) was used to examine how a social-emotional learning (SEL) intervention may be associated with peer socialization on academic performance. Fifth graders (N = 631; 48 % girls; 9 to 12 years) were recruited from six elementary schools. Intervention classrooms (14) received a relationship building intervention (RBI) and control classrooms (8) received elementary school as usual. At pre- and post-test, students nominated their friends, and teachers completed assessments of students' writing and math performance. The results of longitudinal SNA suggested that the RBI was associated with friend selection and peer influence within the classroom peer network. Friendship choices were significantly more diverse (i.e., less evidence of social segregation as a function of ethnicity and academic ability) in intervention compared to control classrooms, and peer influence on improved writing and math performance was observed in RBI but not control classrooms. The current findings provide initial evidence that SEL interventions may change social processes in a classroom peer network and may break down barriers of social segregation and improve academic performance.

  12. "Aerobic" Writing: A Writing Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Sally Chandler

    "Aerobic writing" is a writing center strategy designed to keep students in writing "shape." Like aerobic exercise, aerobic writing is sustained for a certain length of time and done on a regular basis at prescribed time intervals. The program requires students to write at least two times a week for approximately an hour each time. Students write,…

  13. Web-Writing 2.0: Enabling, Documenting, and Assessing Writing Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Trends in the use of the Internet in recent years, collectively coined Web 2.0, have precipitated changes in modes and uses of writing online. Blogs and social networking sites provide new opportunities and incentives for personal writing. This reading-to-write culture requires use and development of language skills. The challenge for language…

  14. The Impact of Digital Tools on Student Writing and How Writing Is Taught in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Kristen; Buchanan, Judy; Friedrich, Linda

    2013-01-01

    A survey of 2,462 Advanced Placement (AP) and National Writing Project (NWP) teachers finds that digital technologies are shaping student writing in myriad ways and have also become helpful tools for teaching writing to middle and high school students. These teachers see the internet and digital technologies such as social networking sites, cell…

  15. The writing approaches of secondary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Ellen; Smith, Jennifer; O'Ryan, Leslie

    2002-09-01

    Research with college students has supported a model of writing approaches that defines the relationship between a writer and writing task along a deep and surface process continuum (Biggs, 1988). Based on that model, Lavelle (1993) developed the Inventory of Processes in College Composition which reflects students' motives and strategies as related to writing outcomes. It is also important to define the approaches of secondary students to better understand writing processes at that level, and development in written composition. This study was designed to define the writing approaches of secondary students by factor analysing students' responses to items regarding writing beliefs and writing strategies, and to compare the secondary approaches to those of college students. A related goal was to explore the relationships of the secondary writing approaches to perceived self-regulatory efficacy for writing (Zimmerman & Bandura, 1994), writing preferences, and writing outcomes. The initial, factor analytic phase involved 398 junior level high school students (11th grade) enrolled in a mandatory language arts class at each of three large Midwestern high schools (USA). Then, 49 junior level students enrolled in two language arts classes participated as subjects in the second phase. Classroom teachers administered the Inventory of Processes in College Composition (Lavelle, 1993), which contained 72 true-or-false items regarding writing beliefs and strategies, during regular class periods. Data were factor analysed and the structure compared to that of college students. In the second phase, the new inventory, Inventory of Processes in Secondary Composition, was administered in conjunction with the Perceived Self-Regulatory Efficacy for Writing Inventory (Zimmerman & Bandura, 1994), and a writing preferences survey. A writing sample and grade in Language Arts classes were obtained and served as outcome variables. The factor structure of secondary writing reflected three

  16. Writing Naked

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mike Pride

    2013-01-01

      Pride interviews former poet laureate Donald Hall about poetry and journalism. Hall tells his writing habits now and talks a little bit about "Out the Window," which published last year in The New Yorker...

  17. Using Digital Learning Platforms to Extend the Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzotti, Jonathan M.; McCool, Lynn B.

    2016-01-01

    Although digital environments already play a vital role in the flipped classroom model, this research project shows that in university writing classrooms, innovative content design and delivery systems can extend the walls of the classroom to areas beyond, in which students transfer and connect course content with the professional world. In this…

  18. The Poetry Cafe Is Open! Teaching Literary Devices of Sound in Poetry Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalcik, Beth; Certo, Janine L.

    2007-01-01

    A six-week long intervention that introduced second graders to poetry writing is described in this article, ending in a classroom "poetry cafe" culminating event. This article details the established classroom "writing workshop" structure and environment and the perceptions and observations of how students responded to the instruction. Four poetry…

  19. The Tablet Inscribed: Inclusive Writing Instruction with the iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the author's initial skepticism, a classroom set of iPads has reinforced a student-directed approach to writing instruction, while also supporting an inclusive classroom. Using the iPads, students guide their writing process with access to the learning management system, electronic information resources, and an online text editor. Students…

  20. Exploring Processes of Collaborative Creativity--The Role of Emotions in Children's Joint Creative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Eva

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a study on children's classroom-based collaborative creative writing. Based on socio-cultural theory, the central aim of the research was to contribute to current understanding of young children's creativity, and describe ways in which peer collaboration can resource, stimulate and enhance classroom-based creative writing. The…

  1. Report Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behnke, Eric

    In a short and precise way this compendium guides how to write an Engineering Report. The compendium is primarily targeting Engineering Students in thier first and second semester but it might as well be used by students at other technical bachelor educations......In a short and precise way this compendium guides how to write an Engineering Report. The compendium is primarily targeting Engineering Students in thier first and second semester but it might as well be used by students at other technical bachelor educations...

  2. Using Regulation Activities to Improve Undergraduate Collaborative Writing on Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Lim, Seongmi

    2017-01-01

    Although wikis have been widely adopted to support collaborative writing in undergraduate classrooms, educators remain concerned about the level of student participation. Using regulation theories to design interventions in the form of activities, we examined their effects on collaborative writing on wikis. Results demonstrate that with the…

  3. In-Service Teachers' Perspectives on Adolescent ELL Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, Amanda K.; Heny, Natasha A.; Andrei, Elena

    2016-01-01

    As writing has assumed increasing importance in discussions of pedagogy for diverse classrooms, attention to the contexts in which secondary teachers develop and implement writing instruction for adolescent English language learners (ELLs) is of great importance. Drawing on ecological language learning theories and situated teacher learning theory…

  4. Writing Prompts: Generating Engagement, Critical Thinking and Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Sandi Van

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on a pedagogical and instructional approach to engaging students in the classroom with the specific activity of a writing prompt, which utilizes a short video about current events and trends coupled with writing and discussion. This strategy allows active student learning in which the students engage, develop critical thinking…

  5. Deconstruction for Reconstruction as a Way to Better Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufarej, Selene Zocchio; Abrahamsohn, Maureen Alison

    Deconstruction for reconstruction is a classroom teaching technique designed to help students improve writing skills. The objective is to write natural expanded sentences that fit in a cohesive paragraph. The technique evolved from observation of many intermediate and upper-intermediate students of English as a Second Language for whom writing…

  6. Troubling Discourse: Basic Writing and Computer-Mediated Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonaitis, Leigh A.

    2012-01-01

    Through an examination of literature in the fields of Basic Writing and developmental education, this essay provides some historical perspective and examines the prevalent discourses on the use of computer-mediated technologies in the basic writing classroom. The author uses Bertram Bruce's (1997) framework of various "stances" on…

  7. Crafting Creative Nonfiction: From Close Reading to Close Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollins, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    A process writing project in a third-grade classroom explored the idea of using nonfiction mentor texts to assist students in writing their own creative informational texts about animals. By looking at author craft and structure during close reading activities with nonfiction Twin Texts, students were taught how to emulate these techniques in…

  8. "The Shadow of Hate": An Exercise in Writing an Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Notes an often-ignored important step in opinion writing: gathering facts and data to use in supporting arguments. Presents specific 50-60 minute classroom activities to help create a unit for students. Includes a lesson plan for three days, tips for writing a good editorial, and an article by Cat Kasko entitled "Forgiveness is a beautiful thing."…

  9. Rhizomatics: Following the Roots in Writing and Research Heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Internet-based technologies have created the opportunity for many students to view writing and research as an everyday activity. While many students use these kinds of technologies on a daily basis in and outside of the classroom, not many writing pedagogies reflect this shift or capitalize on how beginner writers use them to effectively…

  10. Technology and Secondary Writing: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Matthew U.; Margarella, Erin E.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports a review of the literature that focused on relationship between writing instruction and technology in the secondary classroom since the passing of the No Child Left Behind Act over the past two decades. Based on the search, six themes have emerged across the fields of writing instruction and assessment. Within writing…

  11. Photography and Writing: Alternative Ways of Learning for ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Helen Lepp

    2012-01-01

    To writing, painting, drawing, and photography as artistic media, the author would like to add teaching as a creative endeavor as well. Especially in a classroom where English is not the first language for many students, the writing teacher needs to be creative with assignments and activities that address nontraditional ways of learning. Her…

  12. Journal Writing: Support for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahsl, Allison J.; McAndrews, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    Writing can be a powerful tool for thinking and learning. Journaling is one form of writing that is a commonly used learning tool in many classrooms. Children use journals to record personal experiences, explore reactions and interpretations to reading and videos, or record, analyze, or enhance information about literature or other subject areas.…

  13. Urban Revival and College Writing: Writing to Promote Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Chirico

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Service-learning classes, because they emphasize the creation of product that has value outside the confines of the college classroom, offer students an experience in professional formation, a practice that may prove anathema to the ethos of “service.” The desire to counteract this individualistic attitude has led instructors to promulgate an activist agenda within their classrooms, teaching students to critique hierarchical power structures, redress social inequities, or challenge lines of societal exclusion. And yet, such practitioners repeatedly acknowledge the difficulty of this instructional aim and attest to the students’ inability to envision themselves as advocates for societal change. I hold that this objective of transforming students into activists based on the experience of service-learning classes may not be feasible due the economic dynamic of a college classroom, where students pay tuition for their education and engage in work that is assessed and evaluated. Consequently, rather than create service-learning projects around theoretical positions of dissent and critique, I have designed a service-learning class on the topic of urban revitalization that involves students in promotional and collaborative partnerships with non-profit organizations in town. In other words, by tapping into a pragmatic, national movement such as urban renewal, I have aimed to raise the students’ awareness of how they might become agents of change and how their particular skill set of writing could be of service to the community. Drawing upon my experiences with students in a Business and Professional Writing class, I discuss specific readings and writing assignments in this article, chiefly the writing products that were commissioned by different non-profit groups in town. The discussion examines some of the theoretical implications behind reinforcing college students’ awareness of civic commitment while developing their written and rhetorical

  14. Predicting Pre-Service Classroom Teachers' Civil Servant Recruitment Examination's Educational Sciences Test Scores Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Metin

    2015-01-01

    This study predicts the number of correct answers given by pre-service classroom teachers in Civil Servant Recruitment Examination's (CSRE) educational sciences test based on their high school grade point averages, university entrance scores, and grades (mid-term and final exams) from their undergraduate educational courses. This study was…

  15. Creating a Literate Classroom Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrella, Jeanne Berthelot

    A literate classroom environment immerses a student in a rich, stimulating, interactive, and purposeful print and language environment which is designed to provide for success in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and the needs of individuals responsible for their own learning in a natural, non-competitive, non-threatening, risk-taking…

  16. Writing on Multiple Journeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Robbins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In their beautifully researched study and critical edition, Nellie Arnott’s Writings on Angola, 1905–1913: Missionary Narratives Linking Africa and America (Parlor Press, authors Sarah Robbins and Ann Ellis Pullen examine in fine detail the historical record of the transnational network of literary work produced by Arnott. Tracing her legacy in the study’s third chapter, “Writing on Multiple Journeys,” the authors argue on behalf of Arnott’s capacity to create authority and celebrity as well as a sense of community among her distant readers, underscoring the powerful and influential role that missionary women’s writing (mimicking to some extent the popular genre of travel writing played in shaping attitudes at home, not only with regard to race, but also in relation to women’s roles, place, and purpose. Robbins and Pullen display a conscientious resolve not to obscure the inherent contradictions in Arnott’s changing perspectives as they offer a historical narrative based on Arnott’s public and private texts, which also reveal the “consistent inconsistency” in her attitudes and beliefs. Details of and insights into educational practices in missionary schools, including the observation that mothers in the US appreciated the fact that their middle-class Christian children were sharing curriculum with Umbundu children in Angola, invite interesting conclusions about the transnational, transgenerational, and gendered effects of women’s work in the missionary world.

  17. Play as a Method of Engaging Students in Developmental Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mageehon, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on using creative play in the developmental writing classroom to enhance student engagement. Theories that support the use of play in the classroom are briefly described. Several teaching techniques are shared, including developing metaphors as part of teaching a grammar unit, acting out readings from novels, and using poetry…

  18. Using Blogging Software to Provide Additional Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Lin B.; Todd, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers sometimes struggle trying to find time during the typical school day to provide the writing instruction students need to be successful. This study examined 29 fifth through twelfth grade classroom teachers' survey responses about their perception of the effectiveness of using an online blogging tool, Kidblog, to plan and provide…

  19. ENHANCING WRITING ABILITY THROUGH IDEA LISTING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zaini Miftah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at developing the Idea Listing Technique (ILT to enhance the students‟ writing ability. The Classroom Action Research was applied in this study. The subjects of the study were 31 students, the students taking the course of Writing II, of the third semester of English Department of one State Islamic College at Palangka Raya, Indonesia, in the 2012/2013 academic year. The findings show that the implementation of ILT can enhance the students‟ ability in writing expository paragraph. It is indicated by the enhancements of the percentage of the students achieving the score greater than or equal to C (60-69, and of the percentage of their involvement in the writing activities during the implementation of ILT in Cycle I and II. Thus, the enhancement of the students‟ ability in writing expository paragraph can be reached but it should follow the appropriate procedures of the implementation of ILT having been developed.

  20. Enhancing Writing Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Students with Learning Disabilities Improves Their Writing Processes and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caso, Ana Maria; Garcia, Jesus Nicasio; Diez, Carmen; Robledo, Patricia; Alvarez, Maria Lourdes

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The use of self efficacy has been suggested as an effective classroom intervention procedure. The present research examined the use of self-efficacy training on the writing of Spanish elementary student with learning disabilities. Objectives: We present a research study focused on the improvement of the writing product and the…

  1. Fostering Writing and Critical Thinking through Dialogue Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    Much like the regular physical exercise, having a regular writing workout is necessary for learners of English language. Dialogue journals provide the perfect means for this. Dialogue journal in an English classroom is an informal written conversation between the students and the teacher; in fact it can motivate a learner to write more in English. The language in a dialogue journal is closer to speech than to academic writing, so it promotes authentic, informal and lively conversation between...

  2. Writing Irataba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pharao Hansen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    participated in the collaborative writing of the article on Irataba or Yara tav, who was an important leader of the Mohave people of California and Arizona in the late 19th century. This process brought representational dilemmas to the fore in the negotiation between the inadequacies of historical...

  3. Reflective Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel Jørgensen, Andriette

    2016-01-01

    a contribution to the discussions about the role of reflection in design work and in learning situations at large. By engaging with the dialogic reflection, which is one of the four essential types of reflection, (the three others being descriptive writing, descriptive reflection and critical reflection...

  4. Revision Hope: Writing Disruption in Composition Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Uses Roland Barthes's metaphor of the "punctum" to explore the transformative potential of disruptions. Argues that writing teachers have been trained to read disruption in texts and classrooms as "evidence of poor taste or failed pedagogy," but that disruptions delay closure and thereby create spaces wherein theories and…

  5. Translanguaging in the Writing of Emergent Multilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramba, Lydiah Kananu

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of an empirical study that investigated the writing practices in a multilingual, rural, fourth-grade classroom in Kenya. The study was undergirded by Bakhtin's heteroglossia. Analysis of texts indicated that these emergent multilinguals used multiple semiotic resources to maximize the chances of meeting the…

  6. Fostering Writing and Critical Thinking through Dialogue Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Bhushan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Much like the regular physical exercise, having a regular writing workout is necessary for learners of English language. Dialogue journals provide the perfect means for this. Dialogue journal in an English classroom is an informal written conversation between the students and the teacher; in fact it can motivate a learner to write more in English. The language in a dialogue journal is closer to speech than to academic writing, so it promotes authentic, informal and lively conversation between the writers. As our learners need frequent opportunities to practice speaking English freely without fear of being corrected, in order to achieve oral fluency; similarly they need the chance to write freely without inhibition to promote fluency in writing. Often it is in the act of writing a response that actual learning takes place and this is how critical thinking develops. In fact, dialogue journal is the place where students explore their thinking before classroom discussion. It enables speaking and writing, referencing each other. The main objective of using dialogue journals in the English language classroom is to give students more time and opportunities for writing so that they can experience the pleasure of communication through the written word and at the same time become better writers and thinkers in English. With this background, the aim of this paper is to discuss the role of dialogue journals in developing the skills of writing and critical thinking of English language learners.

  7. The discourse of collaborative creative writing: Peer collaboration as a context for mutual inspiration

    OpenAIRE

    Vass, Eva; Littleton, Karen; Miell, Dorothy; Jones, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on socio-cultural theory, this paper focuses on children's classroom-based collaborative creative writing. The central aim of the reported research was to contribute to our understanding of young children's creativity, and describe ways in which peer collaboration can resource, stimulate and enhance classroom-based creative writing activities. The study drew on longitudinal observations of ongoing activities in Year 3 and Year 4 classrooms (children aged 7–9) in England. Selected pair...

  8. A Feasibility Study of Task-Based Teaching of College English Writing in Chinese EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Linying

    2012-01-01

    In this study the author draws on Jane Willis' TBL framework and examines its effects on the improvement of EFL learners' writing competence when such a framework is applied to college writing classrooms in Chinese EFL settings, and thus tentatively explores the feasibility of the task-based approach to the teaching of EFL writing. Results of this…

  9. Poetry and World War II: Creating Community through Content-Area Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Elizabeth E. G.; Nixon, Jenna

    2009-01-01

    Two educators and a classroom of fifth grade students integrated poetry writing into social studies curriculum focusing on World War II. Several strategies and approaches to writing poetry are highlighted including list poems, writing from photographs and artifacts, and two voice poems. The study culminated in a poetry reading and the creation of…

  10. The Writing Workshop: Working through the Hard Parts (And They're All Hard Parts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Katie Wood

    Designed to be a practical, comprehensive, and illuminating guide for both new and experienced teachers, this book confronts the challenges of the writing workshop head-on, with chapters on all aspects of the writing workshop, including: day-to-day instruction, classroom management, the development of writing identities, and the tone of workshop…

  11. Changes in Teachers' Beliefs after a Professional Development Project for Teaching Writing: Two Chinese Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lin Sophie

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of research has found that teachers' beliefs directly influence their classroom practices and teaching outcomes. While numerous studies in second/foreign language writing have examined the effectiveness of different innovative approaches on students' learning to write, there is a paucity of research on writing teachers' beliefs about…

  12. Student Perceptions of Writing Projects in a University Differential-Equations Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latulippe, Christine; Latulippe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study surveyed 102 differential-equations students in order to investigate how students participating in writing projects in university-level mathematics courses perceive the benefits of writing in the mathematics classroom. Based on previous literature on writing in mathematics, students were asked specifically about the benefits…

  13. Constructed Knowing: Promoting Cognitive Growth in Freshman Writers through Journal-Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, Toni-Lee

    1992-01-01

    Investigates reasons to utilize student journal writing in composition classrooms. Presents current research in psychology and epistemology providing insight into the value of journal writing. Shows through numerous student journal excerpts how journal writing helps students progress in their intellectual development. (HB)

  14. Autores Bilingues/Bilingual Authors: Writing within Dual Cultural and Linguistic Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the writing development of English language learners (ELLs) in a fourth-grade bilingual classroom in Northern California. The purpose of this study was to explore the linguistic and cultural resources the students used to inform their writing and determine to what extent, if any, these resources influenced their writing. The…

  15. Journaling and the Improvement of Writing Skills for Incoming College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, Jim D.

    2013-01-01

    Journaling is an effective tool for the development of writing skills and creative thinking; however, research has not revealed how it improves writing skills in the college classroom. The majority of the studies related to journaling are elementary school studies, which do not provide statistics on how journaling can improve writing skills for…

  16. Using Writing-to-Learn Science Strategies to Improve Year 11 Students' Understandings of Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian; Yang, Olivia Eun-mi; Bruxvoort, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    This study researched the use of writing-to-learn strategies within a high-school (Year 11) chemistry classroom. The writing task itself asked the students to write a business letter to a younger audience of middle-school (Year 7) students. A mixed-method design was used for the study, incorporating pre/post- testing with semi-structured…

  17. "Why Am I Paraphrasing?": Undergraduate ESL Writers' Engagement with Source-Based Academic Writing and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvela, Alan; Du, Qian

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common and vital areas of coverage in second language (L2) writing instruction is writing from sources, that is, the process of reading source text material and transferring content from that reading to writing. Research as well as everyday practice in the classroom has long shown that working with source texts is one of the most…

  18. Discouraging Students’ Academic Dishonesty in Flipped Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Nino Widiasmoro Dewati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Flipped Classroom presents teaching process at home through videos, handouts and listening passages before the class session. While in-class time is mostly devoted for questions and answers session, exercises, projects and discussion. The reason flipped classroom is needed for teachers in this era, simply because at the time students do the assignments inside the classroom, teachers would have the opportunities to observe students’ interaction, activities, improvement and even to solve students’ problem such as academic dishonesty. Thus, the question would be: to what extent is the urgency of implementing flipped classroom as one solution to discourage students’ academic dishonesty in writing classes? The study is conducted by employing Action Research. The findings confirm that performing Flipped Classroom is essential in order to discourage students’ academic dishonesty while assisting the teacher to observe students’ development in writing classes. DOI: https://doi.org/10.24071/llt.2017.200103

  19. Radical Feminism and the Subject of Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jacqueline

    The radical feminists of the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as their online counterparts today, offer provocative examples of networked textuality, a discourse dependent on the constant and visible contextualization of self and writing within the discourses of hegemony. Given its potential use for liberatory writing pedagogies, it seems…

  20. Improving the 5th Formers’ Continuous Writing Skills through the Creative Writing Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohana Ram Murugiah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a complex task. The development of students’ writing skill depends on the teacher’s teaching strategy and also the materials used in the writing lesson. In the present study, the effectiveness of a creative writing module was examined that was designed to improve the writing skill of a group of excellent students. It was added with explicit teaching strategies. The selected group of students were students who were in the excellent group but lacked creativity and vocabulary in their writing. The creative writing module was designed to help these students. Students’ improvement was observed through observation in the classrooms during the lessons and through writing task as well as interviews. Two observations were made. One was before the creative writing project was started and another after the completion of the entire task of the module. The interview was carried out to learn about the students’ perception of the module and how do they find the module has helped them.  The result of the research showed that students have shown a great level of improvement in their writing skills. The outcome of this present study could be useful to assist language instructors in helping proficient learners to undergo a more effective second language learning experience.

  1. The Writing Consultation: Developing Academic Writing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rowena; Thow, Morag; Moore, Sarah; Murphy, Maura

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and analyses a specific mechanism, the writing consultation, designed to help academics to prioritise, reconceptualise and improve their writing practices. It makes the case for its potential to stimulate consideration of writing practices and motivations, a possible precondition for creating time for writing in academic…

  2. The Use of a Write-Pair-Square Strategy to Improve The Students’ Active Participation in Writing Descriptive Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Arni Siti Margiyanti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many problems faced by students in participating in the classroom and writing a text. This study discussed the use of write-pair-square strategy to improve the students’ active participation in writing descriptive text. The objectives of the study are to find out the implementation of write-pair-square in teaching descriptive text and to investigate the improvement of students’ participation and writing achievement after being taught by using write-pair-square strategy. The research focused on teaching of descriptive text by using write-pair-square as the strategy. The subjects are SMA Kesatrian 2 Semarang students. This study used Classroom Action Research that was carried out through a pre-test, first and second cycle activities. The result showed that the students’ progress of participation improved. The average score of pre-test was 11.27, post-test 1 was 20.13, and post-test 2 was 30.24. It also showed that students’ mastering descriptive improved. The average achievement of students’ pretest was63.27, First cycle test was70.23and post test was 77.66. According to this study, I conclude that teaching descriptive text by using write-pair-square as the strategy is helpful for students. It is recommended for English teachers to use Write-pair-square as the strategy for students’ improvement of their writing skill.

  3. Difficulties Encountered by Students in Learning the Productive Skills in EFL Classroom and the Relationship between Speaking and Writing: Case of First Year LMD Students at Abou Bekr-Belkaid

    OpenAIRE

    Belhabib, Imane

    2015-01-01

    Language plays a vital role in the development of human ability since it is the major means to communicate effectively in a target situation. When teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL), the learners need to master the four language skills: Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing in order to achieve a high level of abilities in producing and receiving the target language in its oral or written forms. Students encounter difficulties in speaking and writing as productive skills and they...

  4. Teaching on Chinese Writing in Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Feng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Combination of practice teaching Chinese as a foreign language in BINUS University, this article takes the Chinese writing teaching as an example, and analyses “as the student core, as the fun concept” writing modes. Firstly, serious explain: increasing the vitality of classroom teaching, using multimedia methods to make students get interested in; Secondly, article practice: making the written expression be the basis and revealing true feelings as commander, constantly pursue the aesthetic article; Thirdly, feedback and communion: using Facebook, Binusmaya, Binusblog, Chinese newspapers and other channels of interaction to communicate between teachers and students. Through the three steps, we could select the theme which students loved, create a relaxed atmosphere in the writing class, and then the students will be pleasure of writing gradually. 

  5. The Effectiveness of Collaborative Writing Strategy (CWS in Writing Lesson Regarded to The Students’ Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiky Soraya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at finding out what appropriate methods to be usedin writing lesson seen from the students’ creativity especially for studentswho have high creativityand low creativity. This study used quasi experimental research. The population of the research was the eighth grade of a Junior High School in Wonosari in the academic year of 2013/2014. The sampling technique used was cluster random sampling. The sample in this study was 64 students covering 32 students of E as experimental class and 32 students of C as control class. The data or the students’ writing scores were analyzed in terms of their frequency distribution, normality, homogeneity, then ANOVA and Tuckey tests to test the research hypotheses. Based on the result, the research findings are: CWS is more effective than MWS in writing lesson; the high creativity students produced better writing rather than the low creativity student; and the interaction of teaching methods and the students’ creativity is existing in this writing lesson. In short, Collaborative Writing Strategy (CWS is effective to teach writing for the eighth grade of a Junior High School in Wonosari, Gunungkidul. Then, the research result implies that it is better for the teachers to apply CWS in teaching and learning process of writing, to improve the students’ writing achievement, CWS needs to be used in the classroom activities, then future research can conduct the similar research with different sample and different students’ condition.

  6. STUDENT TEAMS-ACHIEVEMENT DIVISION TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ WRITING SKILL

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Wahyuni

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring writing skill needs a lot of practices, and to produce a piece of writing needs a long process; hence, the appropriate method of the teaching and learning is very important to help students master writing skill. This article aims at reporting a research on the implementation of Student Teams-Achievement Division (STAD) as an alternative teaching method to improve students’ writing skill. Through Classroom Action Research design, the researcher did the research at fourth semester stu...

  7. Teaching Memoir in the Elementary School Classroom: A Genre Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Tara

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how one teacher implemented a memoir genre study in her sixth grade classroom using a writing workshop approach. It begins by outlining the author's philosophy and rationale for teaching writing in this manner. This is followed by a discussion of how one could organize one's classroom for a memoir genre study. Several…

  8. Improving Writing Instruction through Professional Development and Professional Learning Communities (PLC'S): A Case Study of Six Teachers at A Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marculitis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Writing skills are crucial for student success in school. Students are assessed on their ability to write well using both lower (grammar, sentence structure) and higher (writing to respond to literature, demonstrate understanding of a topic) order skills. Writing is also important beyond the classrooms, as many jobs require the use of strong…

  9. Networking into Academic Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschauer, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Examines the experiences of three instructors in Hawaii who have attempted to integrate online communication into their academic writing courses. Emphasizes that the underlying assumptions of what academic writing constitutes are fundamental in influencing how teachers integrate technology in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  10. Write for Your Life: Developing Digital Literacies and Writing Pedagogy in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Shartriya; Foley, Brian; Moguel, David; Barnard, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The need for the effective development of digital literacies pervades every aspect of instruction in contemporary classrooms. As a result, teacher candidates must be equipped to draw upon a variety of literacies in order to tap into the complex social worlds of their future pupils. The Write for Your Life Project was designed to strengthen…

  11. Writing Shapes Thinking: Investigative Study of Preservice Teachers Reading, Writing to Learn, and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Bernice; Lewis, Katie D.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher Preparation Programs must work towards not only preparing preservice teachers to have knowledge of classroom pedagogy but also must expand preservice teachers understanding of content knowledge as well as to develop higher-order thinking which includes thinking critically. This mixed methods study examined how writing shapes thinking and…

  12. Writing from Within: A Guide to Creativity and Life Story Writing. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selling, Bernard

    Based on the idea that telling personal life stories can be a voyage of self discovery, freeing up images and memories that have long remained hidden, this book explains techniques to help individuals learn to write vivid autobiographical stories and life narratives. Whether used at home, in a classroom, or in a therapy environment, the techniques…

  13. Power of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Power of Writing Request Permissions The Power of Writing June 26, 2014 · Amber Bauer, ASCO staff I ... entries while on the go. Think about making writing a part of your daily routine. Maybe you ...

  14. Writing a Condolence Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grief at Work Working Through Grief About Us Writing a Condolence Note By Helen Fitzgerald, CT Focusing ... to write an anniversary or birthday greeting. But writing a condolence note is something altogether different because, ...

  15. Ideation in mathematical writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers idea generation during the mathematical writing process. Two contrasting explanations of the creative potential in connection to writing is presented; writing as a process of setting and obtaining rhetorical goals and writing as a process of discovery. These views...... are then related to two empirically found categories of functions that writing serves researchers in the field of mathematics, concluding that both views contributes to understanding the creative potential in relation to mathematical writing....

  16. USING COLLABORATIVE WRITING IN TEACHING WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative writing strategy is a kind of writing that involves a number of persons. This strategy has a number of advantages as well disadvantages. For the advantages; promotes; 1 social skills development; 2 stress reduction and time-saving benefits; 3 motivational effects; 4 improvement in the content of their writing; and 5 gains in grammatical and structural proficiency. Then, the disadvantages deal with; 1 increases stress; 2 logistical problems; 3 target language usage; 4 a conflict with personal learning style; and 5 issues of fairness. This writing also provides an example how to use collaborative writing in teaching cause/effect essay by presenting the teaching procedures starting from pre-writing until post-writing. Finally, the writer also provides rubrics that can be used by the teachers in assessing their students writing.

  17. Scaffolding Advanced Writing through Writing Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Salehpour

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mastering writing has always proved an almost insurmountable barrier to EFL learners. In an attempt to alleviate problems advanced EFL learners have with writing, this study aimed at investigating the effect of scaffolded instruction through writing frames constructed from extended prefabricated lexical bundles. 40 female advanced English students, selected out of a population of 65, were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. The participants of both groups were assigned a writing pre-test prior to any instruction, and a writing post-test following the twenty-session scaffolded instruction in both groups. The results revealed that the participants in the experimental group outperformed their counterparts in the control group as a result of the writing frames they were provided with. Overall, it is concluded that scaffolded instruction through writing frames can be a useful means of helping advanced students to improve their writing quality.

  18. Sınıf Öğretmeni Adaylarının İlkokuma ve Yazma Öğretimi Dersine İlişkin Tutumlarının Değerlendirilmesi An Assessment Of Prospective Classroom Teachers’ Attitudes Toward Teaching Primary Reading And Writing Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri GÖMLEKSİZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of teaching primary reading and writing is to help studentsgain basic skills of reading. These are the cognitive skills such asunderstanding, thinking and decision making. Classroom teachers havegreat responsibility to help the students gain these skills effectively.Training competent prospective classroom teachers, who will teachprimary reading and writing in the future, will play important role torealize effective teaching of primary reading and writing. In this context,positive attitudes of prospective classroom teachers toward teachingprimary reading and writing will make them more successful in theprocess of teaching primary reading and writing in the future. The aimof this study is to determine prospective classroom teachers’ attitudestoward Teaching Primary Reading and Writing course. We aimed to seeif students’’ attitudes toward Teaching Primary Reading and Writingcourse differed in terms of gender and university variables. Theresearch group consisted of third grade students enrolled at ClassroomTeaching Program of seven different universities. Data were collectedthrough Teaching Primary Reading and Writing Course Scale developedby Arslan ve Aytaç (2010. The five-point Likert-style scale included 19items. Mean score, standard deviation, independent samples t test,variance analysis, Kruskal-Wallis H, Scheffe and Mann Whitney U testswere utilized to analyze the data. With the study, it was determined thatstudents’ attitudes differed in willingness and necessity subscales infavor of females but no statistically significant difference was found interms of interest subscale between male and female students.Statistically significant differences were observed among the attitudescores of the students toward Teaching Primary Reading and Writingcourse in terms of willingness, interest and necessity subscales relatedto university variable. Based on the research results, somerecommendations are offered for the students to develop

  19. Selected writings

    CERN Document Server

    Galilei, Galileo

    2012-01-01

    'Philosophy is written in this great book which is continually open before our eyes - I mean the universe...' Galileo's astronomical discoveries changed the way we look at the world, and our place in the universe. Threatened by the Inquisition for daring to contradict the literal truth of the Bible, Galileo ignited a scientific revolution when he asserted that the Earth moves. This generous selection from his writings contains all the essential texts for a reader to appreciate his lasting significance. Mark Davie's new translation renders Galileo's vigorous Italian prose into clear modern English, while William R. Shea's version of the Latin Sidereal Message makes accessible the book that created a sensation in 1610 with its account of Galileo's observations using the newly invented telescope. All Galileo's contributions to the debate on science and religion are included, as well as key documents from his trial before the Inquisition in 1633. A lively introduction and clear notes give an overview of Galileo's...

  20. Learning to Write with Interactive Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cheri

    2018-01-01

    Interactive writing is a process-oriented instructional approach designed to make the composing and encoding processes of writing overt and explicit for young students who are learning to write. It is particularly suitable for students who struggle with literacy learning. This article describes one first-grade teacher's use of interactive writing…

  1. Social Network Misuse in the Classroom and Its Impact on Male Student Motivation in UAE Tertiary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan A. Alkaabi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data obtained from focus groups conducted to investigate male students’ experiences in higher education in the United Arab Emirates. Among the issues discussed by students was the impact of social networks addiction on student motivation and this paper focuses on that issue. Thirteen focus groups were conducted with 83 English as a Foreign Language male students at four government campuses including United Arab Emirates University at Al Ain Campus, Higher College of Technology at Ras Al-Khaima Campus, and two campuses (Abu Dhabi and Dubai of Zayed University. Students access social network sites for both educational and non-educational aspects. Students spoke about their experiences and how social network addiction influenced their academic motivation to study. The resulting themes from the focus groups show that social network addiction has had an impact on student class performance and in some cases led to class failure. Recommendation for better class management and intervention programs are suggested to policy makers and instructors to foster a better student learning experience.

  2. Supporting Teachers in Designing CSCL Activities: A Case Study of Principle-Based Pedagogical Patterns in Networked Second Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yun; Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the identification and use of principle-based pedagogical patterns to help teachers to translate design principles into actionable teaching activities, and to scaffold student learning with sufficient flexibility and creativity. A set of pedagogical patterns for networked Second language (L2) learning, categorized and…

  3. Evidence of system: A network model case-study of seventh grade science assessment practices from classrooms to the state test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piety, Philip John

    With science education in the United States entering a period of greater accountability, this study investigated how student learning in science was assessed by educators within one state, asking what systemic assessment approaches existed and how the information from them was used. Conducted during the 20o6-2007 school year, this research developed and piloted a network-model case study design that included teachers, principals, administrators, and the state test development process, as well as several state-level professional associations. The data analyzed included observations, interviews, surveys, and both public and private documents. Some data were secondary. This design produced an empirical depiction of practice with a web of related cases. The network model expands on the hierarchical (nested) models often assumed in the growing literature on how information is used in educational contexts by showing multiple ways in which individuals are related through organizational structures. Seven case study teachers, each employing assessment methods largely unique and invisible to others in their schools, illustrate one set of assessment practices. The only alternative to classroom assessments that could be documented was the annual state accountability test. These two assessment species were neither tightly coupled nor distinct. Some teachers were partners in developing state test instruments, and in some cases the annual test could be seen as a school management resource. Boundary practices---activities where these two systems connected---were opportunities to identify challenges to policy implementation in science education. The challenges include standards, cognition, vocabulary, and classroom equipment. The boundary practices, along with the web of connections, provide the outlines of potential (and often unrealized) synergistic relationships. This model shows diverse indigenous practices and adaptations by actors responding to pressures of change and

  4. How to Teach Poetry Writing: Workshops for Ages 8-13. Developing Creative Literacy, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Now in a fully revised and extended second edition, "How to Teach Poetry Writing: Workshops for Ages 8-13" is a practical and activity based resource of writing workshops to help you teach poetry in the primary classroom. Designed to help build writing, speaking and listening skills, this book contains a wide selection of workshops exemplifying a…

  5. The Role of Information Literacy Competence and Higher Order Thinking Skills to Develop Academic Writing in Science and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, B. Kranthi

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses a study organized to develop academic writing skills in undergraduate students pursuing engineering courses. The target group consisted of 30 students pursuing a Bachelor of Technology in their third year. The classroom observations regarding teaching writing revealed that writing proficiency for most of the students was at…

  6. To Give Is Better Than to Receive: The Benefits of Peer Review to the Reviewer's Own Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kristi; Baker, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Although peer review has been shown to be beneficial in many writing classrooms, the benefits of peer review to the reviewer, or the student giving feedback, has not been thoroughly investigated in second-language writing research. The purpose of this study is to determine which is more beneficial to improving student writing: giving or receiving…

  7. Teaching Children to Write: A Meta-analysis of Writing Intervention Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Koster

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that in the Netherlands, as in other countries, a majority of students do not attain the desired level of writing skills at the end of elementary school. Time devoted to writing is limited, and only a minority of schools succeed in effectively teaching writing. An improvement in the way writing is taught in elementary school is clearly required. In order to identify effective instructional practices we conducted a meta-analysis of writing intervention studies aimed at grade 4 to 6 in a regular school setting. Average effect sizes were calculated for ten intervention categories: strategy instruction, text structure instruction, pre-writing activities, peer assistance, grammar instruction, feedback, evaluation, process approach, goal setting, and revision. Five of these categories yielded statistically significant results. Pairwise comparison of these categories revealed that goal setting (ES = 2.03 is the most effective intervention to improve students’ writing performance, followed by strategy instruction (ES = .96, text structure instruction (ES = .76, peer assistance (ES = .59, and feedback (ES = .88 respectively. Further research is needed to examine how these interventions can be implemented effectively in classrooms to improve elementary students’ writing performance.

  8. Psychometric evaluation of the Writing-To-Learn Attitude Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lee A

    2004-10-01

    The Writing-To-Learn Attitude Survey (WTLAS) was developed to measure the effects of using writing-to-learn activities in the classroom, but adequate psychometric data have not been reported for the measure. Using the pretest scores from 149 basic and RN-to-BSN nursing students enrolled in a Nursing Management and Leadership course, the reliability and validity of the WTLAS were evaluated. The initial 30-item measure demonstrated acceptable reliability, but the item intercorrelations suggested revision of the subscales was appropriate. After exploratory factor analyses, the WTLAS was revised to 21 items and consists of two factors: Apprehensions about Writing Abilities and Perceived Benefits of Writing-To-Learn Activities. Both subscales possess acceptable internal consistency reliability and conceptually sound, significant correlations with a separate measure of writing apprehension. The revised WTLAS appears to have adequate psychometric properties for further use in the evaluation of students' perceptions of writing-to-learn activities.

  9. Social Networking Sites in the Classroom: Unveiling New Roles for Teachers and New Approaches to Online Course Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Pineda Hoyos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 tools in general and social networking sites in particular are very popular today in everyday life. However, their use in education has not been explored. This paper reports the findings of the implementation of a web 2.0 tool namely a social networking site as a web support for a face-to-face course. The findings show that the implementation of a web-based environment in a face-to-face course can be viewed from 5 different managerial areas: (1 logistics management, (2 information/knowledge management, (3 communication management, (4 class work extension management and (5 web-based environment easiness of accessibility. The conclusions of the study show that the implementation of the web-based environment unveils new roles for teachers and new approaches to design online or blended courses.

  10. Social Network Misuse in the Classroom and Its Impact on Male Student Motivation in UAE Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Sultan A. Alkaabi; Peter Albion; Petrea Redmond

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents data obtained from focus groups conducted to investigate male students’ experiences in higher education in the United Arab Emirates. Among the issues discussed by students was the impact of social networks addiction on student motivation and this paper focuses on that issue. Thirteen focus groups were conducted with 83 English as a Foreign Language male students at four government campuses including United Arab Emirates University at Al Ain Campus, Higher College of Techno...

  11. Classroom Management

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be...

  12. Writing Workshop in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kelly A.

    2012-01-01

    Preschoolers may be novices in the area of writing but, as this article highlights, they are indeed writers. In a year-long ethnography of preschoolers during structured writing time the teacher/researcher explored how students adapted to a writing workshop format. Students participated in daily journal writing and sharing, and weekly conference…

  13. AGI's Earth Science Week and Education Resources Network: Connecting Teachers to Geoscience Organizations and Classroom Resources that Support NGSS Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, E.; Camphire, G.; Brendan, S.; Celia, T.

    2016-12-01

    There exists a wide array of high quality resources to support K-12 teaching and motivate student interest in the geosciences. Yet, connecting teachers to those resources can be a challenge. Teachers working to implement the NGSS can benefit from accessing the wide range of existing geoscience resources, and from becoming part of supportive networks of geoscience educators, researchers, and advocates. Engaging teachers in such networks can be facilitated by providing them with information about organizations, resources, and opportunities. The American Geoscience Institute (AGI) has developed two key resources that have great value in supporting NGSS implement in these ways. Those are Earth Science Week, and the Education Resources Network in AGI's Center for Geoscience and Society. For almost twenty years, Earth Science Week, has been AGI's premier annual outreach program designed to celebrate the geosciences. Through its extensive web-based resources, as well as the physical kits of posters, DVDs, calendars and other printed materials, Earth Science Week offers an array of resources and opportunities to connect with the education-focused work of important geoscience organizations such as NASA, the National Park Service, HHMI, esri, and many others. Recently, AGI has initiated a process of tagging these and other resources to NGSS so as to facilitate their use as teachers develop their instruction. Organizing Earth Science Week around themes that are compatible with topics within NGSS contributes to the overall coherence of the diverse array of materials, while also suggesting potential foci for investigations and instructional units. More recently, AGI has launched its Center for Geoscience and Society, which is designed to engage the widest range of audiences in building geoscience awareness. As part of the Center's work, it has launched the Education Resources Network (ERN), which is an extensive searchable database of all manner of resources for geoscience

  14. Grammar in Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Ondroušková, Světlana

    2008-01-01

    The diploma thesis entitled Grammar in Writing focuses on the methods used in teaching grammar in writing, its application in practice and the consequent evaluation based on the progress of students. The theoretical part tries to explain the notion of writing as a skill, the methodology of teaching writing skills and grammar. It also introduces the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages - it explains the key competences for writing and the criteria for achieving particular level...

  15. Finding voices through writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, P

    1994-01-01

    Assisting students to find their writing "voices" is another way to emphasize writing as a professional tool for nursing. The author discusses a teaching strategy that required students to write using a variety of styles. Students wrote fables, poetry, and letters, and used other creative writing styles to illustrate their views and feelings on professional nursing issues. Creation of a class book empowered students to see versatility with writing styles can be a powerful communication tool to use with peers, clients, and society.

  16. Writing for different disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Coffin, Caroline; Hewings, Ann

    2003-01-01

    About the book: Student academic writing is at the heart of teaching and learning in higher education. Students are assessed largely by what they write, and need to learn both general academic conventions as well as disciplinary writing requirements in order to be successful in higher education.\\ud Teaching Academic Writing is a 'toolkit' designed to help higher education lecturers and tutors teach writing to their students. Containing a range of diverse teaching strategies, the book offers b...

  17. Approaches to teaching writing

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, Mary Jane; Hewings, Ann

    2003-01-01

    About the book: Student academic writing is at the heart of teaching and learning in higher education. Students are assessed largely by what they write, and need to learn both general academic conventions as well as disciplinary writing requirements in order to be successful in higher education.\\ud Teaching Academic Writing is a 'toolkit' designed to help higher education lecturers and tutors teach writing to their students. Containing a range of diverse teaching strategies, the book offers b...

  18. Abstracts Writing: a Path for Understanding Academic Text of Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Misdi, Misdi

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative study to explore the students' competence in pursuing of abstract writing among the undergraduate students of Mathematics department.The data were collected through classroom observation and self report. By applying self assignment, small group discussion, and presentation, the students' writing experiences were employed in order to discuss the weaknesses and strengths of the mathematic articles given during class discussion; whereas proof-reading, revising, and supervis...

  19. Improving Students' Writing Skill by Using Scramble Sentence Method

    OpenAIRE

    Afrizal, M

    2016-01-01

    This thesis entitled Improving Students' Writing Skill by Using Scramble Sentence Method (A Collaborative Classroom Action Research To the Second Years Students of SMP Negeri 3 Bireuen). The problems of the research are (1) Can the use of Scramble Sentence Method improve the students' writing skill to the second year students of SMP Negeri 3 Bireuen?, and (2) Can the use of Scramble Sentence Method give motivation to the students?. Based on research problems, the purposes of the research are ...

  20. The Implementation of Constructivism in Writing Analytical Exposition Text

    OpenAIRE

    Feriyanti, Dessy; Apriliaswati, Rahayu; Sumarni

    2015-01-01

    This study was a classroom action research (CAR) to improve students' writing ability on analytical exposition text in senior high school students. In this study, constructivism was implemented as a strategy to help student in writing analytical exposition. Constructivism consists of orientation, elicitation, restructuring idea, application of idea and review. The techniques of data collecting in this research were observation and written test. Data was analyzed by using scoring profile. The ...

  1. HOW AUTHENTIC SHOULD A LEARNING CONTEXT BE? USING REAL AND SIMULATED PROFILES IN A CLASSROOM INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE SAFETY ON SOCIAL NETWORK SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Vanderhoven

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rise of social network sites (SNSs, there is an increasing need for safety education within the current cyber society. To this end, a variety of educational materials have been developed to prepare children to be vigilant when interacting on such sites. However, little is known about the critical design aspects necessary to make these materials effective. In this study, we build on the results of two previous studies, in which we found that general instructional principles drawn from constructivism, such as collaborative learning, are not always appropriate to teach children how to behave safely online. This study therefore focuses on the importance of authentic learning and active learning as critical design features. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in secondary schools in order to compare the impact of two classroom interventions about the risks on SNSs. As part of the intervention, students were presented scaffolds towards different risks related to an SNS-profile through a series of questions. In the control condition, these questions concerned a simulated SNS-profile on paper containing signs of many risks. In the experimental condition, students had to answer the same questions about their own SNS-profile on a computer. It was hypothesized that the simulated profile would not be experienced as realistic, and that students would have difficulties identifying with it. On the other hand, teenagers were expected to be able to recognize more risks on the simulated ‘worst-case scenario’ profile than on their own profile, which would facilitate the scaffolding process in the control condition. The results of the study mostly confirmed these hypotheses. Furthermore, the question arose as to whether the intervention based on the student’s own realistic profile was educationally more valuable than the intervention based on the simulated profile, but no such added value was found. On the contrary, the scaffolding questions

  2. Flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Tobias Kidde; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver Flipped Classroom som et didaktisk princip, der kan være med til at organisere og tilrettelægge en undervisning, med fokus på forskellige læringsformer. Det handler om at forstå Flipped Classroom som en opdeling i 2 faser og 3 led, som samlet set skaber en didaktisk organisering....

  3. Improving Student's Writing through Portfolio Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Widayati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at improving student's writing in terms of content, organization, and language use through the implementation of portfolio assessment. This classroom action research is descriptive qualitative in nature and was conducted in only one cycle consisting of four stages of activities. Twenty-six students taking Writing II course were taken as the subject and the main data was the paragraphs the students wrote throughout the semester. The instruments of data collection include rubric, self-reflection sheet, field notes, and questionnaire. The results show that portfolio assessment has increased the quality of students' writing as indicated by the difference between the scores they achieved for the pre-test and post-test, and by the rise of scores they achieved for the three paragraphs the students selected to be included in the portfolio

  4. Self writing, world's writings: a clinical look toward writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Silveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This work is a mapping done from the meetings of people (teenagers and psychology students with their own writing. Be on your personal history or his work. The record of these meetings is done here with some theoretical tools with which we think can be a glimpse of contemporary clinical psychology written about these processes. A look that differs and deviates toward new ways of thinking about writing, especially, beyond representation. With concepts like body, ethos and self-authorship, we think these ways of thinking in contemporary writing. This can become a living space, a temporary abode for the storms of life, where it is possible the invention of the subject itself. A place of seclusion where the subject can take care of themselves (write yourself to recuperate after getting embarking on writing (authorship of the world.  

  5. LGBT Students in the College Composition Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrow, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the concerns of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in college writing classrooms. The researcher interviewed 37 college students and 11 faculty members from a variety of different types of colleges and universities. LGBT students stated concerns about their overall campus experiences, safety, and identity.…

  6. Applying Social Psychological Concepts Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Jessica L.; Wichman, Aaron L.

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates a writing assignment in which social psychology students gathered examples from outside the classroom (e.g., cartoons, movies) and analyzed them with course material. Compared to a control group, students who completed the assignment learned that it was easier to apply social psychology to the real world. A follow-up survey…

  7. Creating a Classroom Where Readers Flourish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donalyn

    2012-01-01

    Numerous research studies prove that wide reading improves children's comprehension, background knowledge, vocabulary, fluency, and writing. The author, a sixth-grade language arts teacher, describes the classroom conditions and instructional practices that encourage wide reading and increase her students' reading motivation such as choice in…

  8. Using Smartphones to Supplement Classroom Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Supplementing classroom reading with smartphones can develop better vocabulary knowledge, comprehension, technology skills, and writing. This article connects smartphones to reading complex, informational text and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The author suggests that smartphones motivate, scaffold comprehension, and invite…

  9. Library Databases as Unexamined Classroom Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faix, Allison

    2014-01-01

    In their 1994 article, "The Politics of the Interface: Power and its Exercise in Electronic Contact Zones," compositionists Cynthia Selfe and Richard Selfe give examples of how certain features of word processing software and other programs used in writing classrooms (including their icons, clip art, interfaces, and file structures) can…

  10. USING COLLABORATIVE WRITING IN TEACHING WRITING

    OpenAIRE

    Sukirman

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative writing strategy is a kind of writing that involves a number of persons. This strategy has a number of advantages as well disadvantages. For the advantages; promotes; 1) social skills development; 2) stress reduction and time-saving benefits; 3) motivational effects; 4) improvement in the content of their writing; and 5) gains in grammatical and structural proficiency. Then, the disadvantages deal with; 1) increases stress; 2) logistical problems; 3) target language usage; 4) a ...

  11. Writing and University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Cecilia Andrade Calderón

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reports on the exploratory-descriptive investigation carried out to explain the writing behavior of the students of the Universidad Colegio Mayor of Cundinamarca. To this effect, it refers to the results of the project that are based on the state of the art of writing in higher education; it is supported by various conceptualizations about its technique throughout time, orality and writing at the University, the act of writing, and references about specific didactics. Furthermore, the article proposes theoretical approaches concerned with the process of writing, such as constructivism, meaningful learning, metacognition, social practices of language and new writing tendencies in information media. Through all this, the article present a profile of the University students on the level of writing and it evaluates their editing skills and the level of writing productiveness. This allows offering an academic proposal with possible guidelines for the institution to strengthen writing ability in their students.

  12. Classroom social climate

    OpenAIRE

    Sivevska, Despina

    2015-01-01

    One of the important factors which effects the educational process is the climate that reigns in the school. School climate is defined as the sum of all the circumstances in which the educational process is realized, as a network of relationships which exist between participants in the educational process. Social climate is part of school climate created in the classroom through general atmosphere in school, in the manner that overall work organization in a school functions and the way tea...

  13. COMIC STRIPS:A STUDY ON THE TEACHING OF WRITING NARRATIVE TEXTS TO INDONESIAN EFL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fika Megawati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Comic strips are proposed in the teaching of writing not only because of their appealing forms, but also due to their salient features as media to present content, organization and grammatical aspects of narrative texts. This study investigates the implementation of comic strips in teaching writing through a collaborative classroom action research at MAN Bangil. The procedures included planning, implementing, observing, and reflecting. The results show that teaching writing using comic strips through Process-Genre Based Approach (PGBA could successfully improve students’ ability in writing. The findings also reveal that comic strips’ effective implementation requires proper stories as well as sufficient teacher’s guidance during the writing process.

  14. An investigation of the extent to which writing activities are used in mathematics classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinson, Kevan

    1992-06-01

    The benefits that may be obtained by using writing activities in mathematics lessons have received considerable attention during the past decade. Journal articles have identified, listed and discussed a number of writing activities found useful in the mathematics classroom. The use of writing in mathematics has been found to help both students and teachers. The research reported here investigates the extent to which writing activities are being used in Australian mathematics classes. Two hundred and twenty-six teachers of mathematics in 57 high schools, drawn from four states, responded to a survey concerning the use of writing in mathematics classrooms. The findings of the survey suggest that writing is rarely used as a strategy for teaching mathematics and when it is used its effectiveness is limited.

  15. Peer Feedback in Anonymous Peer Review in an EFL Writing Class in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a process of peer feedback through anonymous peer review in an EFL writing class. Numerous studies have reported on the benefits of peer review (PR) in the ESL/EFL writing classroom. However, the literature also identifies social issues that can negatively affect the outcome of face-to-face PR. In this…

  16. Using Technology to Support Expository Reading and Writing in Science Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelongo, Jose A.; Herter, Roberta J.

    2010-01-01

    Students struggle with the transition from learning to read narrative text in the early grades to reading expository text in the science classroom in the upper grades as they begin reading and writing to gain information. Science teachers can adapt their teaching materials to develop students' reading comprehension and recall by writing summaries…

  17. Writing in Schools with Computers: What Does It Take to Make It Happen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a study of how a sample of secondary students in West Australian schools used computers for school-based writing tasks. The students used computers extensively when writing at home but not in English classrooms where, despite computers being available, their use was minimal. The English teachers did not capitalise on the…

  18. Showcasing Modeling Strategies in the ESOL Writing Class: Blending Rhetorical Fluency with Grammatical Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anjali

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues for an overt innovational shift in praxis, as well as classroom configuration in the ESOL writing class by calling for a move away from the current foci on process-based pedagogies for newcomer populations, to an explicit teaching of modeling strategies with concomitant practice opportunities provided in the ESOL writing class.…

  19. A New Rendition of an Old Classic: The Young Writers Program as a Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalas, Laura; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The Young Writers Program (YWP) is the latest writing workshop to be developed for the classroom. It challenges students to choose a topic and write a novel-length piece based on that topic, without worrying about spelling or grammar. While the foundation of this philosophy is solid, the support and structure of the Young Writers Program website…

  20. Promoting the Audience Awareness of EFL Writing in Chinese Communicative Context: A Case Study of "Notice"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping, Li

    2016-01-01

    It is a heated discussion among researchers of foreign-language teaching on how to enhance the audience awareness through the design, organization and implementation of classroom teaching of EFL writing, which is crucial for effective writing both in mother and in foreign language. And it is widely acknowledged that the cultivation of social…

  1. The Rhetoric of Space in the Design of Academic Writing Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Amanda Nicole Metz

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation explores the rhetoric of space as it relates to academic computer writing locations--specifically, computer labs, computer classrooms, and writing centers. Using observation, surveys, interviews, and textual analysis, the author discusses seven rhetorical principles of design for these spaces, including designing for specific…

  2. Digital Writing Practices: A Close Look at One Grade Three Author

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervin, Lisa; Mantei, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the digital writing practices of a Grade Three primary school student as he used an iPad to plan, produce and share digital texts. The case study acknowledges that writing is undergoing a period of great change in many classrooms and works to show how a student author has interpreted and produced digital texts with new…

  3. Drawing Their Way into Writing: Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students Finding Voice through Mini-Novelas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Stephanie; Herrera, Socorro G.

    2014-01-01

    Writing can be a difficult task for many students in today's classrooms; however, for students who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD), writing can be especially difficult. These students often are in the process of developing their facility with the English language, and they possess cultural backgrounds that differ from those of…

  4. Comic Strips: A Study on the Teaching of Writing Narrative Texts to Indonesian EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Fika; Anugerahwati, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Comic strips are proposed in the teaching of writing not only because of their appealing forms, but also due to their salient features as media to present content, organization and grammatical aspects of narrative texts. This study investigates the implementation of comic strips in teaching writing through a collaborative classroom action research…

  5. The Task-Based Teaching of Writing to Big Classes in Chinese EFL Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai-yan, Miao

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how to teach English writing to big classes in China from the task-based perspective. Based on a comparison between the traditional 3Ps approach and the tasked-based approach, the paper proposes a practical linear procedure as to how to teach English writing in the task-based classroom to big classes. An empirical study is…

  6. Effective Strategies for Improving Writing Skills of Elementary English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jenny; Feng, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Reaching proficient levels of literacy is a universal goal for all children in the elementary classroom. This objective is especially challenging for English language learners particularly in the domain of writing. Writing has been identified as one of the most essential skills because the world has become so text-oriented. Due to this change,…

  7. Blogging a Journal: Changing Students' Writing Skills and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming Huei; Li, Ji-Jhen; Hung, Po Yi; Huang, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of blogging as an approach to journal writing in the EFL writing classroom by means of a 16-week comparative experiment involving two groups of EFL college students. The experimental group (EG) was required to blog daily while the control group (CG) was asked to do so using traditional pen-and-paper methods.…

  8. Xavier's Take on Authentic Writing: Structuring Choices for Expression and Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behizadeh, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Because authenticity in education is a subjective judgment regarding the meaningfulness of an activity, a need exists to co-investigate with students classroom factors increasing authenticity of writing. In this case study, one 8th grade student's needs for authentic writing are explored in detail. Xavier's take on authentic writing…

  9. How Color Coding Formulaic Writing Enhances Organization: A Qualitative Approach for Measuring Student Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geigle, Bryce A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and present the status of student synthesis with color coded formula writing for grade level six through twelve, and to make recommendations for educators to teach writing structure through a color coded formula system in order to increase classroom engagement and lower students' affect. The thesis first…

  10. The Discourse of Collaborative Creative Writing: Peer Collaboration as a Context for Mutual Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Eva; Littleton, Karen; Miell, Dorothy; Jones, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on socio-cultural theory, this paper focuses on children's classroom-based collaborative creative writing. The central aim of the reported research was to contribute to our understanding of young children's creativity, and describe ways in which peer collaboration can resource, stimulate and enhance classroom-based creative writing…

  11. Powerful Students, Powerful Words: Writing and Learning in a Poetry Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Angela

    2011-01-01

    A poetry workshop can present opportunities to integrate students' knowledge and perspectives in classroom contexts, encouraging the use of language for expression, communication, learning and even empowerment. This paper describes how adolescent students respond to a poetry workshop in an English classroom centred on teaching writing that is…

  12. Network Collaboration with UNIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Wm. Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses networking as a collaboration tool in the teaching of technical writing. Argues that some degree of collaboration is innate to all writing, that word processing already facilitates that collaboration, and that networking is the next enhancement to the collaborative process. (RS)

  13. Writing Research Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Shafer, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Clear writing makes manuscripts easier to understand. Clear writing enhances research reports, increasing clinical adoption and scientific impact. We discuss styles and organization to help junior investigators present their findings and avoid common errors.

  14. Writing on the Door.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy-Toole, Kym

    1992-01-01

    Relates how reading some bathroom graffiti became a literacy incident that sparked awareness of the risk of writing, the importance of purpose and audience, and meaningful engagement with writing. (SR)

  15. Classroom Characteristics and Student Friendship Cliques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, Maureen T.; Smith, Stevens S.

    This paper examines the effects of classroom characteristics on the friendship cliques of preadolescent students. It is argued that structural and organizational features of a classroom constrain the interaction patterns of students in such a way as to affect the probability of dyadic friendship relationships and the network of social ties that…

  16. Teaching Practices and Elementary Classroom Peer Ecologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Scott D.; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers and students in 39 1st, 3rd and 5th grade classrooms participated in a study of teaching practices and classroom peer networks. Teachers reported on their attitudes towards aggression and withdrawal, provided rationales for their seating arrangements, and were observed on patterns of emotional and instructional support and classroom…

  17. Writing and University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Cecilia Andrade Calderón

    2009-01-01

    The article reports on the exploratory-descriptive investigation carried out to explain the writing behavior of the students of the Universidad Colegio Mayor of Cundinamarca. To this effect, it refers to the results of the project that are based on the state of the art of writing in higher education; it is supported by various conceptualizations about its technique throughout time, orality and writing at the University, the act of writing, and references about specific didactics. Furthermore,...

  18. Self writing, world's writings: a clinical look toward writing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marilia Silveira; Lígia Hecker Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    ...) with their own writing. Be on your personal history or his work. The record of these meetings is done here with some theoretical tools with which we think can be a glimpse of contemporary clinical psychology written about these processes...

  19. The Writing Mathematician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Popular culture casts mathematics and writing as opposites--a false dichotomy, which can be harmful for our discipline of mathematics education. Positioning writing outside the domain of the mathematician's abilities and cultivated skill set can create doubt in the mathematician wishing to write--not that one cannot be both writer and…

  20. Writing and Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Magasic, Coleen

    2012-01-01

    Writing activities are a sure way to assess and enhance students' science literacy. Sometimes the author's students use technical writing to communicate their lab experiences, just as practicing scientists do. Other times, they use creative writing to make connections to the topics they're learning. This article describes both types of writing…