WorldWideScience

Sample records for networked solar radiation

  1. A Model for Hourly Solar Radiation Data Generation from Daily Solar Radiation Data Using a Generalized Regression Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Khatib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for predicting hourly solar radiation data using daily solar radiation averages. The proposed model is a generalized regression artificial neural network. This model has three inputs, namely, mean daily solar radiation, hour angle, and sunset hour angle. The output layer has one node which is mean hourly solar radiation. The training and development of the proposed model are done using MATLAB and 43800 records of hourly global solar radiation. The results show that the proposed model has better prediction accuracy compared to some empirical and statistical models. Two error statistics are used in this research to evaluate the proposed model, namely, mean absolute percentage error and root mean square error. These values for the proposed model are 11.8% and −3.1%, respectively. Finally, the proposed model shows better ability in overcoming the sophistic nature of the solar radiation data.

  2. Solar radiation data sources, applications, and network design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    A prerequisite to considering solar energy projects is to determine the requirements for information about solar radiation to apply to possible projects. This report offers techniques to help the reader specify requirements in terms of solar radiation data and information currently available, describes the past and present programs to record and present information to be used for most requirements, presents courses of action to help the user meet his needs for information, lists sources of solar radiation data and presents the problems, costs, benefits and responsibilities of programs to acquire additional solar radiation data. Extensive background information is provided about solar radiation data and its use. Specialized information about recording, collecting, processing, storing and disseminating solar radiation data is given. Several Appendices are included which provide reference material for special situations.

  3. Prediction of Global Solar Radiation in India Using Artificial Neural Network

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    Rajiv Gupta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global warming and decreasing fossil fuel reserves has necessitated the use of renewable energy resources like solar energy in India. To maximize return on a solar farm, it had to be set up at a place with high solar radiation. The solar radiation values are available only for a small number of places and must be interpolated for the rest. This paper utilizes Artificial Neural Network in interpolation, by obtaining a function with input as combinations of 7 geographical and meteorological parameters affecting radiation, and output as global solar radiation. Data considered was of past 9 years for 13 Indian cities. Low error values and high coefficient of determination values thus obtained, verified that the results were accurate in terms of the original solar radiation data known. Thus, artificial neural network can be used to interpolate the solar radiation for the places of interest depending on the availability of the data.

  4. Solar Radiation Measurement Using Raspberry Pi and Its Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

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    Priya Selvanathan Shanmuga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of solar energy as the best alternative to traditional energy sources has led to an extensive study on the measurement and prediction of solar radiation. Devices such as pyranometer, pyrrheliometer, global UV radiometer are used for the measurement of solar radiation. The solar radiation measuring instruments available at Innovation Center, MIT Manipal were integrated with a Raspberry Pi to allow remote access to the data through the university Local Area Network. The connections of the data loggers and the Raspberry Pi were enclosed in a plastic box to prevent damage from the rainfall and humidity in Manipal. The solar radiation data was used to validate an Artificial Neural Network model which was developed using various meterological data from 2011-2015.

  5. Supervised artificial neural network-based method for conversion of solar radiation data (case study: Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidi, Maamar; Hanini, Salah; Rezrazi, Ahmed; Yaiche, Mohamed Redha; El Hadj, Abdallah Abdallah; Chellali, Farouk

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a backpropagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) model is used as an alternative approach to predict solar radiation on tilted surfaces (SRT) using a number of variables involved in physical process. These variables are namely the latitude of the site, mean temperature and relative humidity, Linke turbidity factor and Angstrom coefficient, extraterrestrial solar radiation, solar radiation data measured on horizontal surfaces (SRH), and solar zenith angle. Experimental solar radiation data from 13 stations spread all over Algeria around the year (2004) were used for training/validation and testing the artificial neural networks (ANNs), and one station was used to make the interpolation of the designed ANN. The ANN model was trained, validated, and tested using 60, 20, and 20 % of all data, respectively. The configuration 8-35-1 (8 inputs, 35 hidden, and 1 output neurons) presented an excellent agreement between the prediction and the experimental data during the test stage with determination coefficient of 0.99 and root meat squared error of 5.75 Wh/m2, considering a three-layer feedforward backpropagation neural network with Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm, a hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer function at the hidden and the output layer, respectively. This novel model could be used by researchers or scientists to design high-efficiency solar devices that are usually tilted at an optimum angle to increase the solar incident on the surface.

  6. Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) quality control of solar radiation data on the Gangneung-Wonju National University radiation station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Kim, Bu-Yo; Lee, Kyu-Tae

    2017-02-01

    Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) radiation station has been collecting data on global, direct, and diffuse solar radiation since 2011. We conducted a quality control (QC) assessment of GWNU data collected between 2012 and 2014, using procedures outlined by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The QC process involved the comparison of observations, the correction of observational equipment, the examination of physically possible limits, and the comparative testing of observations and model calculations. Furthermore, we performed a shading check of the observational environment around the GWNU solar station. For each solar radiation element (observed every minute), we performed a QC check and investigated any flagged problems. 98.31% of the data were classified as good quality, while the remaining 1.69% were flagged as bad quality based on the shading check and comparison tests. We then compared the good-quality data to the global solar radiation data observed at the Gangwon Regional Office of Meteorology (GROM). After performing this comparison, the determination coefficient (R2; 0.98) and standard deviation (SD; 0.92 MJ m-2) increased compared to those computed before the QC check (0.97 and 1.09 MJ m-2). Even considering the geographical differences and weather effects between the two stations, these results are statistically significant. However, we also confirmed that the quality of the GROM data deteriorated in relation to weather conditions because of poor maintenance. Hence, we conclude that good-quality observational data rely on the maintenance of both observational equipment and the surrounding environment under optimal conditions.

  7. SHORT-TERM SOLAR RADIATION FORECASTING BY USING AN ITERATIVE COMBINATION OF WAVELET ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

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    Julio Cesar Royer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The information provided by accurate forecasts of solar energy time series are considered essential for performing an appropriate prediction of the electrical power that will be available in an electric system, as pointed out in Zhou et al. (2011. However, since the underlying data are highly non-stationary, it follows that to produce their accurate predictions is a very difficult assignment. In order to accomplish it, this paper proposes an iterative Combination of Wavelet Artificial Neural Networks (CWANN which is aimed to produce short-term solar radiation time series forecasting. Basically, the CWANN method can be split into three stages: at first one, a decomposition of level p, defined in terms of a wavelet basis, of a given solar radiation time series is performed, generating r+1 Wavelet Components (WC; at second one, these r+1 WCs are individually modeled by the k different ANNs, where k>5, and the 5 best forecasts of each WC are combined by means of another ANN, producing the combined forecasts of WC; and, at third one, the combined forecasts WC are simply added, generating the forecasts of the underlying solar radiation data. An iterative algorithm is proposed for iteratively searching for the optimal values for the CWANN parameters, as we will see. In order to evaluate it, ten real solar radiation time series of Brazilian system were modeled here. In all statistical results, the CWANN method has achieved remarkable greater forecasting performances when compared with a traditional ANN (described in Section 2.1.

  8. Solar radiation and precipitable water modeling for Turkey using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şenkal, Ozan

    2015-08-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) method was applied for modeling and prediction of mean precipitable water and solar radiation in a given location and given date (month), given altitude, temperature, pressure and humidity in Turkey (26-45ºE and 36-42ºN) during the period of 2000-2002. Resilient Propagation (RP) learning algorithms and logistic sigmoid transfer function were used in the network. To train the network, meteorological measurements taken by the Turkish State Meteorological Service (TSMS) and Wyoming University for the period from 2000 to 2002 from five stations distributed in Turkey were used as training data. Data from years (2000 and 2001) were used for training, while the year 2002 was used for testing and validating the model. The RP algorithm were first used for determination of the precipitable water and subsequently, computation of the solar radiation, in these stations Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) between the estimated and measured values for monthly mean daily sum for precipitable water and solar radiation values have been found as 0.0062 gr/cm2 and 0.0603 MJ/m2 (training cities), 0.5652 gr/cm2 and 3.2810 MJ/m2 (testing cities), respectively.

  9. A neural network based intelligent predictive sensor for cloudiness, solar radiation and air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Pedro M; Gomes, João M; Martins, Igor A C; Ruano, António E

    2012-11-12

    Accurate measurements of global solar radiation and atmospheric temperature,as well as the availability of the predictions of their evolution over time, are important for different areas of applications, such as agriculture, renewable energy and energy management, or thermal comfort in buildings. For this reason, an intelligent, light-weight and portable sensor was developed, using artificial neural network models as the time-series predictor mechanisms. These have been identified with the aid of a procedure based on the multi-objective genetic algorithm. As cloudiness is the most significant factor affecting the solar radiation reaching a particular location on the Earth surface, it has great impact on the performance of predictive solar radiation models for that location. This work also represents one step towards the improvement of such models by using ground-to-sky hemispherical colour digital images as a means to estimate cloudiness by the fraction of visible sky corresponding to clouds and to clear sky. The implementation of predictive models in the prototype has been validated and the system is able to function reliably, providing measurements and four-hour forecasts of cloudiness, solar radiation and air temperature.

  10. A Neural Network Based Intelligent Predictive Sensor for Cloudiness, Solar Radiation and Air Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Pedro M.; Gomes, João M.; Martins, Igor A. C.; Ruano, António E.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurements of global solar radiation and atmospheric temperature, as well as the availability of the predictions of their evolution over time, are important for different areas of applications, such as agriculture, renewable energy and energy management, or thermal comfort in buildings. For this reason, an intelligent, light-weight and portable sensor was developed, using artificial neural network models as the time-series predictor mechanisms. These have been identified with the aid of a procedure based on the multi-objective genetic algorithm. As cloudiness is the most significant factor affecting the solar radiation reaching a particular location on the Earth surface, it has great impact on the performance of predictive solar radiation models for that location. This work also represents one step towards the improvement of such models by using ground-to-sky hemispherical colour digital images as a means to estimate cloudiness by the fraction of visible sky corresponding to clouds and to clear sky. The implementation of predictive models in the prototype has been validated and the system is able to function reliably, providing measurements and four-hour forecasts of cloudiness, solar radiation and air temperature. PMID:23202230

  11. Evaluation and prediction of solar radiation for energy management based on neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshina, O. V.; Van Tai, Dinh

    2017-08-01

    Currently, there is a high rate of distribution of renewable energy sources and distributed power generation based on intelligent networks; therefore, meteorological forecasts are particularly useful for planning and managing the energy system in order to increase its overall efficiency and productivity. The application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in the field of photovoltaic energy is presented in this article. Implemented in this study, two periodically repeating dynamic ANS, that are the concentration of the time delay of a neural network (CTDNN) and the non-linear autoregression of a network with exogenous inputs of the NAEI, are used in the development of a model for estimating and daily forecasting of solar radiation. ANN show good productivity, as reliable and accurate models of daily solar radiation are obtained. This allows to successfully predict the photovoltaic output power for this installation. The potential of the proposed method for controlling the energy of the electrical network is shown using the example of the application of the NAEI network for predicting the electric load.

  12. A Neural Network Based Intelligent Predictive Sensor for Cloudiness, Solar Radiation and Air Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. Ferreira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of global solar radiation and atmospheric temperature,as well as the availability of the predictions of their evolution over time, are importantfor different areas of applications, such as agriculture, renewable energy and energymanagement, or thermal comfort in buildings. For this reason, an intelligent, light-weightand portable sensor was developed, using artificial neural network models as the time-seriespredictor mechanisms. These have been identified with the aid of a procedure based on themulti-objective genetic algorithm. As cloudiness is the most significant factor affecting thesolar radiation reaching a particular location on the Earth surface, it has great impact on theperformance of predictive solar radiation models for that location. This work also representsone step towards the improvement of such models by using ground-to-sky hemisphericalcolour digital images as a means to estimate cloudiness by the fraction of visible skycorresponding to clouds and to clear sky. The implementation of predictive models inthe prototype has been validated and the system is able to function reliably, providingmeasurements and four-hour forecasts of cloudiness, solar radiation and air temperature.

  13. Determination of daily solar ultraviolet radiation using statistical models and artificial neural networks

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    F. J. Barbero

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different methodologies are used to develop two models for estimating daily solar UV radiation. The first is based on traditional statistical techniques whereas the second is based on artificial neural network methods. Both models use daily solar global broadband radiation as the only measured input. The statistical model is derived from a relationship between the daily UV and the global clearness indices but modulated by the relative optical air mass. The inputs to the neural network model were determined from a large number of radiometric and atmospheric parameters using the automatic relevance determination method, although only the daily solar global irradiation, daily global clearness index and relative optical air mass were shown to be the optimal input variables. Both statistical and neural network models were developed using data measured at Almería (Spain, a semiarid and coastal climate, and tested against data from Table Mountain (Golden, CO, USA, a mountainous and dry environment. Results show that the statistical model performs adequately in both sites for all weather conditions, especially when only snow-free days at Golden were considered (RMSE=4.6%, MBE= –0.1%. The neural network based model provides the best overall estimates in the site where it has been trained, but presents an inadequate performance for the Golden site when snow-covered days are included (RMSE=6.5%, MBE= –3.0%. This result confirms that the neural network model does not adequately respond on those ranges of the input parameters which were not used for its development.

  14. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK AND WAVELET DECOMPOSITION IN THE FORECAST OF GLOBAL HORIZONTAL SOLAR RADIATION

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    Luiz Albino Teixeira Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method (denoted by WD-ANN that combines the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and the Wavelet Decomposition (WD to generate short-term global horizontal solar radiation forecasting, which is an essential information for evaluating the electrical power generated from the conversion of solar energy into electrical energy. The WD-ANN method consists of two basic steps: firstly, it is performed the decomposition of level p of the time series of interest, generating p + 1 wavelet orthonormal components; secondly, the p + 1 wavelet orthonormal components (generated in the step 1 are inserted simultaneously into an ANN in order to generate short-term forecasting. The results showed that the proposed method (WD-ANN improved substantially the performance over the (traditional ANN method.

  15. Calibration of GOES-derived solar radiation data using a distributed network of surface measurements in Florida, USA

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    Sumner, David M.; Pathak, Chandra S.; Mecikalski, John R.; Paech, Simon J.; Wu, Qinglong; Sangoyomi, Taiye; Babcock, Roger W.; Walton, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data are critically important for the estimation of evapotranspiration. Analysis of visible-channel data derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) using radiative transfer modeling has been used to produce spatially- and temporally-distributed datasets of solar radiation. An extensive network of (pyranometer) surface measurements of solar radiation in the State of Florida has allowed refined calibration of a GOES-derived daily integrated radiation data product. This refinement of radiation data allowed for corrections of satellite sensor drift, satellite generational change, and consideration of the highly-variable cloudy conditions that are typical of Florida. To aid in calibration of a GOES-derived radiation product, solar radiation data for the period 1995–2004 from 58 field stations that are located throughout the State were compiled. The GOES radiation product was calibrated by way of a three-step process: 1) comparison with ground-based pyranometer measurements on clear reference days, 2) correcting for a bias related to cloud cover, and 3) deriving month-by-month bias correction factors. Pre-calibration results indicated good model performance, with a station-averaged model error of 2.2 MJ m–2 day–1 (13 percent). Calibration reduced errors to 1.7 MJ m–2 day–1 (10 percent) and also removed time- and cloudiness-related biases. The final dataset has been used to produce Statewide evapotranspiration estimates.

  16. Daily global solar radiation modelling using multi-layer perceptron neural networks in semi-arid region

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    Mawloud GUERMOUI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of Daily Global Solar Radiation (DGSR has been a major goal for solar energy application. However, solar radiation measurements are not a simple task for several reasons. In the cases where data are not available, it is very common the use of computational models to estimate the missing data, which are based mainly of the search for relationships between weather variables, such as temperature, humidity, sunshine duration, etc. In this respect, the present study focuses on the development of artificial neural network (ANN model for estimation of daily global solar radiation on horizontal surface in Ghardaia city (South Algeria. In this analysis back-propagation algorithm is applied. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine duration was used as climatic inputs parameters, while the daily global solar radiation (DGSR was the only output of the ANN. We have evaluated Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP models to estimate DGSR using three year of measurement (2005-2008. It was found that MLP-model based on sunshine duration and mean air temperature give accurate results in term of Mean Absolute Bias Error, Root Mean Square Error, Relative Square Error and Correlation Coefficient. The obtained values of these indicators are 0.67 MJ/m², 1.28 MJ/m², 6.12%and 98.18%, respectively which shows that MLP is highly qualified for DGSR estimation in semi-arid climates.

  17. Temperature based daily incoming solar radiation modeling based on gene expression programming, neuro-fuzzy and neural network computing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeras, G.; López, J. J.; Kisi, O.; Shiri, J.

    2012-04-01

    The correct observation/estimation of surface incoming solar radiation (RS) is very important for many agricultural, meteorological and hydrological related applications. While most weather stations are provided with sensors for air temperature detection, the presence of sensors necessary for the detection of solar radiation is not so habitual and the data quality provided by them is sometimes poor. In these cases it is necessary to estimate this variable. Temperature based modeling procedures are reported in this study for estimating daily incoming solar radiation by using Gene Expression Programming (GEP) for the first time, and other artificial intelligence models such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). Traditional temperature based solar radiation equations were also included in this study and compared with artificial intelligence based approaches. Root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) RMSE-based skill score (SSRMSE), MAE-based skill score (SSMAE) and r2 criterion of Nash and Sutcliffe criteria were used to assess the models' performances. An ANN (a four-input multilayer perceptron with ten neurons in the hidden layer) presented the best performance among the studied models (2.93 MJ m-2 d-1 of RMSE). A four-input ANFIS model revealed as an interesting alternative to ANNs (3.14 MJ m-2 d-1 of RMSE). Very limited number of studies has been done on estimation of solar radiation based on ANFIS, and the present one demonstrated the ability of ANFIS to model solar radiation based on temperatures and extraterrestrial radiation. By the way this study demonstrated, for the first time, the ability of GEP models to model solar radiation based on daily atmospheric variables. Despite the accuracy of GEP models was slightly lower than the ANFIS and ANN models the genetic programming models (i.e., GEP) are superior to other artificial intelligence models in giving a simple explicit equation for the

  18. Air Temperature Error Correction Based on Solar Radiation in an Economical Meteorological Wireless Sensor Network

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    Xingming Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Air temperature (AT is an extremely vital factor in meteorology, agriculture, military, etc., being used for the prediction of weather disasters, such as drought, flood, frost, etc. Many efforts have been made to monitor the temperature of the atmosphere, like automatic weather stations (AWS. Nevertheless, due to the high cost of specialized AT sensors, they cannot be deployed within a large spatial density. A novel method named the meteorology wireless sensor network relying on a sensing node has been proposed for the purpose of reducing the cost of AT monitoring. However, the temperature sensor on the sensing node can be easily influenced by environmental factors. Previous research has confirmed that there is a close relation between AT and solar radiation (SR. Therefore, this paper presents a method to decrease the error of sensed AT, taking SR into consideration. In this work, we analyzed all of the collected data of AT and SR in May 2014 and found the numerical correspondence between AT error (ATE and SR. This corresponding relation was used to calculate real-time ATE according to real-time SR and to correct the error of AT in other months.

  19. Air Temperature Error Correction Based on Solar Radiation in an Economical Meteorological Wireless Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingming; Yan, Shuangshuang; Wang, Baowei; Xia, Li; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-07-24

    Air temperature (AT) is an extremely vital factor in meteorology, agriculture, military, etc., being used for the prediction of weather disasters, such as drought, flood, frost, etc. Many efforts have been made to monitor the temperature of the atmosphere, like automatic weather stations (AWS). Nevertheless, due to the high cost of specialized AT sensors, they cannot be deployed within a large spatial density. A novel method named the meteorology wireless sensor network relying on a sensing node has been proposed for the purpose of reducing the cost of AT monitoring. However, the temperature sensor on the sensing node can be easily influenced by environmental factors. Previous research has confirmed that there is a close relation between AT and solar radiation (SR). Therefore, this paper presents a method to decrease the error of sensed AT, taking SR into consideration. In this work, we analyzed all of the collected data of AT and SR in May 2014 and found the numerical correspondence between AT error (ATE) and SR. This corresponding relation was used to calculate real-time ATE according to real-time SR and to correct the error of AT in other months.

  20. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  1. Learning Processes to Predict the Hourly Global, Direct, and Diffuse Solar Irradiance from Daily Global Radiation with Artificial Neural Networks

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    Hanae Loutfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three different topologies of feed forward neural network (FFNN models for generating global, direct, and diffuse hourly solar irradiance in the city of Fez (Morocco. Results from this analysis are crucial for the conception of any solar energy system. Especially, for the concentrating ones, as direct component is seldom measured. For the three models, the main input was the daily global irradiation with other radiometric and meteorological parameters. Three years of hourly data were available for this study. For each solar component’s prediction, different combinations of inputs as well as different numbers of hidden neurons were considered. To evaluate these models, the regression coefficient (R2 and normalized root mean square error (nRMSE were used. The test of these models over unseen data showed a good accuracy and proved their generalization capability (nRMSE = 13.1%, 9.5%, and 8.05% and R = 0.98, 0.98, and 0.99 for hourly global, hourly direct, and daily direct radiation, respectively. Different comparison analyses confirmed that (FFNN models surpass other methods of estimation. As such, the proposed models showed a good ability to generate different solar components from daily global radiation which is registered in most radiometric stations.

  2. Estimation of monthly global solar radiation in the eastern Mediterranean region in Turkey by using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, Muhittin; Yakut, Emre

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was used to estimate monthly average global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for selected 5 locations in Mediterranean region for period of 18 years (1993-2010). Meteorological and geographical data were taken from Turkish State Meteorological Service. The ANN architecture designed is a feed-forward back-propagation model with one-hidden layer containing 21 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid as the transfer function and one output layer utilized a linear transfer function (purelin). The training algorithm used in ANN model was the Levenberg Marquand back propagation algorith (trainlm). Results obtained from ANN model were compared with measured meteorological values by using statistical methods. A correlation coefficient of 97.97 ( 98%) was obtained with root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.852 MJ/m2, mean square error (MSE) of 0.725 MJ/m2, mean absolute bias error (MABE) 10.659MJ/m2, and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 4.8%. Results show good agreement between the estimated and measured values of global solar radiation. We suggest that the developed ANN model can be used to predict solar radiation another location and conditions.

  3. Estimation of monthly global solar radiation in the eastern Mediterranean region in Turkey by using artificial neural networks

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    Sahan Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN model was used to estimate monthly average global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for selected 5 locations in Mediterranean region for period of 18 years (1993-2010. Meteorological and geographical data were taken from Turkish State Meteorological Service. The ANN architecture designed is a feed-forward back-propagation model with one-hidden layer containing 21 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid as the transfer function and one output layer utilized a linear transfer function (purelin. The training algorithm used in ANN model was the Levenberg Marquand back propagation algorith (trainlm. Results obtained from ANN model were compared with measured meteorological values by using statistical methods. A correlation coefficient of 97.97 (~98% was obtained with root mean square error (RMSE of 0.852 MJ/m2, mean square error (MSE of 0.725 MJ/m2, mean absolute bias error (MABE 10.659MJ/m2, and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of 4.8%. Results show good agreement between the estimated and measured values of global solar radiation. We suggest that the developed ANN model can be used to predict solar radiation another location and conditions.

  4. Neural network radiative transfer solvers for the generation of high resolution solar irradiance spectra parameterized by cloud and aerosol parameters

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    Taylor, M.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Kazadzis, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kiranoudis, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a neural network (NN) model for instantaneous and accurate estimation of solar radiation spectra and budgets geared toward satellite cloud data using a ≈2.4 M record, high-spectral resolution look up table (LUT) generated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Two NN solvers, one for clear sky conditions dominated by aerosol and one for cloudy skies, were trained on a normally-distributed and multiparametric subset of the LUT that spans a very broad class of atmospheric and meteorological conditions as inputs with corresponding high resolution solar irradiance target spectra as outputs. The NN solvers were tested by feeding them with a large (10 K record) ;off-grid; random subset of the LUT spanning the training data space, and then comparing simulated outputs with target values provided by the LUT. The NN solvers demonstrated a capability to interpolate accurately over the entire multiparametric space. Once trained, the NN solvers allow for high-speed estimation of solar radiation spectra with high spectral resolution (1 nm) and for a quantification of the effect of aerosol and cloud optical parameters on the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The cloudy sky NN solver was applied to high spatial resolution (54 K pixel) cloud data extracted from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation 3 (MSG3) satellite and demonstrated that coherent maps of spectrally-integrated global horizontal irradiance at this resolution can be produced on the order of 1 min.

  5. Influence of the solar radiation on the WI-FI networks performance in the 5 ghz band (802.11a)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Orlando Chávez

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental intention of this investigation was the analysis of the influence of the solar radiation on the Wi-Fi networks performance that operate in the 5 GHz band (802.11a), with the purpose of determining to what extent the incident solar radiation affects the performance of these networks in terms of throughput and the percentage of lost packages. For the data collection of performance a test Wi-Fi network was designed and implemented operating in the 5 GHz band formed in Ad-Hoc mode...

  6. Modification of the SUNFLUX solar radiation scheme with a new aerosol parameterization and its validation using observation network data

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongjian; Sun, Zhi'an; Shi, Guoping; Liu, Jingmiao; Li, Jiandong

    2017-11-01

    SUNFLUX is a fast parameterization scheme for determination of the solar radiation at the Earth's surface. In this paper, SUNFLUX is further modified in the treatment of aerosols. A new aerosol parameterization scheme is developed for five aerosol species. Observational data from Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations are used to evaluate the accuracy of the original and modified SUNFLUX schemes. General meteorological data are available at SURFRAD stations, but not at BSRN stations. Therefore, the total precipitable water content and aerosol data are obtained from AERONET stations. Fourteen stations are selected from both BSRN and AERONET. Cloud fraction data from MODIS are further used to screen the cloud. Ten-year average aerosol mixing ratios simulated by the CAM-chem system are used to calculate the fractions of aerosol optical depth for each aerosol species, and these fractions are further used to convert the observed total aerosol optical depth into the components of individual species for use in the evaluations. The proper treatment of multiple aerosol types in the model is discussed. The evaluation results using SUNFLUX with the new aerosol scheme, in terms of the BSRN dataset, are better than those using the original aerosol scheme under clear-sky conditions. However, the results using the SURFRAD dataset are slightly worse, attributable to the differences in the input water vapor and aerosol optical depth. Sensitivity tests are conducted to investigate the error response of the SUNFLUX scheme to the errors in the input variables.

  7. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Solar radiation observation stations updated to 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, E.A.; Cristina, J.R.; Williams, B.B.

    1979-04-01

    The type of sensing and recording equipment for 420 stations in the US are listed alphabetically by states. The stations are divided according to whether or not they are in the basic National Weather Service, NOAA, network. Reports of summarized solar radiation data are listed in an appendix. (MHR)

  9. Solar and infrared radiation measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vignola, Frank; Michalsky, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The rather specialized field of solar and infrared radiation measurement has become more and more important in the face of growing demands by the renewable energy and climate change research communities for data that are more accurate and have increased temporal and spatial resolution. Updating decades of acquired knowledge in the field, Solar and Infrared Radiation Measurements details the strengths and weaknesses of instruments used to conduct such solar and infrared radiation measurements. Topics covered include: Radiometer design and performance Equipment calibration, installation, operati

  10. Solar Training Network and Solar Ready Vets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalstrom, Tenley Ann

    2016-09-14

    In 2016, the White House announced the Solar Ready Vets program, funded under DOE's SunShot initiative would be administered by The Solar Foundation to connect transitioning military personnel to solar training and employment as they separate from service. This presentation is geared to informing and recruiting employer partners for the Solar Ready Vets program, and the Solar Training Network. It describes the programs, and the benefits to employers that choose to connect to the programs.

  11. Solar radiation absorbing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  12. Models of diffuse solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, John; Ridley, Barbara [Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Brown, Bruce [Department of Statistics and Applied Probability, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117546 (Singapore)

    2008-04-15

    For some locations both global and diffuse solar radiation are measured. However, for many locations, only global is measured, or inferred from satellite data. For modelling solar energy applications, the amount of radiation on a tilted surface is needed. Since only the direct component on a tilted surface can be calculated from trigonometry, we need to have diffuse on the horizontal available. There are regression relationships for estimating the diffuse on a tilted surface from diffuse on the horizontal. Models for estimating the diffuse radiation on the horizontal from horizontal global that have been developed in Europe or North America have proved to be inadequate for Australia [Spencer JW. A comparison of methods for estimating hourly diffuse solar radiation from global solar radiation. Sol Energy 1982; 29(1): 19-32]. Boland et al. [Modelling the diffuse fraction of global solar radiation on a horizontal surface. Environmetrics 2001; 12: 103-16] developed a validated model for Australian conditions. We detail our recent advances in developing the theoretical framework for the approach reported therein, particularly the use of the logistic function instead of piecewise linear or simple nonlinear functions. Additionally, we have also constructed a method, using quadratic programming, for identifying values that are likely to be erroneous. This allows us to eliminate outliers in diffuse radiation values, the data most prone to errors in measurement. (author)

  13. An auto-calibration procedure for empirical solar radiation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojanowski, J.S.; Donatelli, Marcello; Skidmore, A.K.; Vrieling, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar radiation data are an important input for estimating evapotranspiration and modelling crop growth. Direct measurement of solar radiation is now carried out in most European countries, but the network of measuring stations is too sparse for reliable interpolation of measured values. Instead of

  14. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend mostly on variations in the size of the snow crystals on the surface. Firstly, a radiative transfer model is developed and adapted in order to study the propagation of solar radiation through an at...

  15. Wetlands Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J. M.; Myers, D. A.; Anderson, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    The application of remote sensing methods to estimate evapotranspiration has the advantage of good spatial resolution and excellent spatial coverage, but may have the disadvantage of infrequent sampling and considerable expense. The GOES satellites provide enhanced temporal resolution with hourly estimates of solar radiation and have a spatial resolution that is significantly better than that available from most ground-based pyranometer networks. As solar radiation is the primary forcing variable in wetland evapotranspiration, the opportunity to apply GOES satellite data to wetland hydrologic analyses is great. An accuracy assessment of the remote sensing product is important and the subsequent validation of the evapotranspiration estimates are a critical step for the use of this product. A wetland field experiment was conducted in the Paynes Prairie Preserve, North Central Florida during a growing season characterized by significant convective activity. Evapotranspiration and other surface energy balance components of a wet prairie community dominated by Panicum hemitomon (maiden cane), Ptilimnium capillaceum (mock bishop's weed), and Eupatorium capillifolium (dog fennel) were investigated. Incoming solar radiation derived from GOES-8 satellite observations, in combination with local meteorological measurements, were used to model evapotranspiration from a wetland. The satellite solar radiation, derived net radiation and estimated evapotranspiration estimates were compared to measured data at 30-min intervals and daily times scales.

  16. Estimation of global solar radiation using solar PV and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solar energy is the prime energy source of hydrologic parameter such as evapotranspiration and aerodynamic parameter like wind. Knowledge of daily global solar radiation is important to estimate all solar energy related parameters. In this study, mean daily global solar radiation at Haramaya University (HU) and Dire ...

  17. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  18. SORCE: Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert; Rottman, Gary; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Understanding the Sun's influence on the Earth; How the Sun affect Earth's climate; By how much does the Sun's radiation very; Understanding Solar irradiance; History of Solar irradiance observations; The SORCE mission; How do the SORCE instruments measure solar radiation; Total irradiance monitor (TIM); Spectral irradiance monitor (SIM); Solar stellar irradiance comparison experiment (SOLSTICE); XUV photometer system (XPS).

  19. Comparison of Regression and Neural Networks Models to Estimate Solar Radiation Comparación de Regresión y Modelos de Redes Neuronales para Estimar la Radiación Solar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Bocco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The incident solar radiation on soil is an important variable used in agricultural applications; it is also relevant in hydrology, meteorology and soil physics, among others. To estimate this variable, empirical models have been developed using several parameters and, recently, prognostic and prediction models based on artificial intelligence techniques such as neural networks. The aim of this work was to develop linear models and neural networks, multilayer perceptron, to estimate daily global solar radiation and compare their efficiency in its application to a region of the Province of Salta, Argentina. Relative sunshine duration, maximum and minimum temperature, rainfall, binary rainfall and extraterrestrial solar radiation data for the period 1996-2002, were used. All data were supplied by Experimental Station Salta, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA, Argentina. For both, neural networks models and linear regressions, three alternative combinations of meteorological parameters were considered. Good results with both prediction methods were obtained, with root mean square error (RMSE values between 1.99 and 1.66 MJ m-2 d-1 for linear regressions and neural networks, and coefficients of correlation (r² between 0.88 and 0.92, respectively. Even though neural networks and linear regression models can be used to predict the daily global solar radiation appropriately, neural networks produced better estimates.La radiación solar incidente en el suelo es una variable importante usada en aplicaciones agronómicas, además es relevante en hidrología, meteorología y física del suelo, entre otros. Para estimarla se han desarrollado modelos empíricos que utilizan distintos parámetros meteorológicos y, recientemente, modelos de pronóstico y predicción basados en técnicas de inteligencia artificial tales como redes neuronales. El objetivo de este trabajo fue desarrollar modelos lineales y de redes neuronales, del tipo perceptr

  20. Some solar radiation ratios and their interpretations with regards to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ratios of some radiation fluxes such as global (total) solar radiation, H, direct solar radiation, Hb, diffuse solar radiation, Hd, and extraterrestrial radiation, Ho were proposed to define radiation coefficients related to radiation transfer in the atmosphere and solar radiation measurement on the ground surface. The irradiative ...

  1. Emhanced pond efficiency through solar radiation | Agunwamba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of enhanced solar radiation on the performance of waste stabilization pond (WSP) was investigated in this study. The analysis was performed with data collected from four pilot ponds operated in parallel; one without enhanced solar radiation and the rest with solar irradiation. The latter gave higher efficiency.

  2. Solar radiation and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Brekke, Pål; Dahlback, Arne; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Reichrath, Jörg; Moan, Kristin; Holick, Michael F.; Grant, William B.; Moan, Johan

    2011-06-01

    The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

  3. Solar radiation and human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Moan, Kristin; Moan, Johan [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, N-0310 Oslo (Norway); Brekke, Paal [Norwegian Space Centre, PO Box 113, Skoeyen, N-0212 Oslo (Norway); Dahlback, Arne [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund University, PO Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Reichrath, Joerg [Klinik fuer Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie, Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, D-66421 Homburg/Saar (Germany); Holick, Michael F [Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Nutrition and Diabetes, Vitamin D, Skin and Bone Research Laboratory, Boston University Medical Center, 85 E. Newton St., M-1013, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Grant, William B, E-mail: asta.juzeniene@rr-research.no, E-mail: kmoan@hotmail.com, E-mail: paal.brekke@spacecentre.no, E-mail: arne.dahlback@fys.uio.no, E-mail: j.e.moan@fys.uio.no, E-mail: stefan.andersson-engels@fysik.lth.se, E-mail: joerg.reichrath@uks.eu, E-mail: mfholick@bu.edu, E-mail: wbgrant@infionline.net [Sunlight, Nutrition and Health Research Center (SUNARC), PO Box 641603, San Francisco, CA 94164-1603 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Sun has played a major role in the development of life on Earth. In Western culture, people are warned against Sun exposure because of its adverse effects: erythema, photoimmunosuppression, photoageing, photocarcinogenesis, cataracts and photokeratitis. However, Sun exposure is also beneficial, since moderate doses give beneficial physiological effects: vitamin D synthesis, reduction of blood pressure and mental health. Shortage of Sun exposure may be even more dangerous to human health than excessive exposure. Avoiding Sun exposure leads to vitamin D deficiency which is associated not only with rickets and osteomalacia, but also with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, influenza, many types of cancer and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Solar radiation induces nitric oxide release in tissue and immediate pigment darkening which certainly play important roles, although these are still unknown. Action spectra relevant for health are described. We will also review what is known about spectral and intensity variations of terrestrial solar radiation as well as its penetration through the atmosphere and into human skin and tissue.

  4. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  5. The Solar Flare Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheibi, Akbar; Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the characteristics of the solar flare complex network. The limited predictability, nonlinearity, and self-organized criticality of the flares allow us to study systems of flares in the field of the complex systems. Both the occurrence time and the location of flares detected from 2006 January 1 to 2016 July 21 are used to design the growing flares network. The solar surface is divided into cells with equal areas. The cells, which include flares, are considered nodes of the network. The related links are equivalent to sympathetic flaring. The extracted features demonstrate that the network of flares follows quantitative measures of complexity. The power-law nature of the connectivity distribution with a degree exponent greater than three reveals that flares form a scale-free and small-world network. A large value for the clustering coefficient, a small characteristic path length, and a slow change of the diameter are all characteristics of the flares network. We show that the degree correlation of the flares network has the characteristics of a disassortative network. About 11% of the large energetic flares (M and X types in GOES classification) that occurred in the network hubs cover 3% of the solar surface.

  6. Comparison of Artificial Neural Networks and GIS Based Solar Analysis for Solar Potential Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakoǧlu, Berkant; Usta, Ziya; Cömert, Çetin; Gökalp, Ertan

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, estimation of solar potential plays an important role in planning process for sustainable cities. The use of solar panels, which produces electricity directly from the sun, has become popular in accordance with developing technologies. Since the use of solar panels enables the users to decrease costs and increase yields, the use of solar panels will be more popular in the future. Production of electricity is not convenient for all circumstances. Shading effects, massive clouds and rainy weather are some factors that directly affect the production of electricity from solar energy. Hence, before the installation of solar panels, it is crucial to conduct spatial analysis and estimate the solar potential of the place that the solar panel will be installed. There are several approaches to determine the solar potential. Examination of the applications in the literature reveals that the applications conducted for determining the solar potential are divided into two main categories. Solar potential is estimated either by using artificial neural network approach in which statistical parameters such as the duration of sun shine, number of clear days, solar radiation etc. are used, or by spatial analysis conducted in GIS approaches in which spatial parameters such as, latitude, longitude, slope, aspect etc. are used. In the literature, there are several studies that use both approaches but the literature lacks of a study related to the comparison of these approaches. In this study, Karadeniz Technical University campus has been selected as study area. Monthly average values of the number of clear sky days, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, sunshine duration and solar radiation parameters obtained for the years between 2005 and 2015 will be used to perform artificial neural network analysis to estimate the solar potential of the study area. The solar potential will also be estimated by using GIS-based solar analysis modules. The results of

  7. Solar radiation data manual for buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W.; Wilcox, S.

    1995-09-01

    Architects and engineers use solar resource information to help design passive solar and daylighting features for buildings. Solar resource information includes data on how much solar radiation and illuminance are available for different window orientations, and how they vary. This manual provides solar radiation and illuminance values for a horizontal window and four vertical windows (facing north, east, south, and west) for 239 stations in the United States and its territories. The solar radiation values are monthly and yearly averages for the period of 1961--1990. Included are values showing the solar radiation incident on the window and the amount transmitted into the living space, with and without exterior shading of the window. Illuminance values are presented r average dismal profiles for 4 months of the year. In addition to the solar radiation and illuminance data, this manual contains tables listing climatic condition such as average temperature, average daily minimum and maximum temperature, record minimum and maxi mum temperature, average heating and cooling degree days, average humidity ratio, average wind speed, an average clearness index. The solar radiation, illuminance, and climatic data a presented in tables. Data for each station are presented on a single page, and the pages are arranged alphabetically by the state or territory two-letter abbreviation. Within a state or territory, the pages are arranged alp betically by city or island.

  8. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  9. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R G; Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Prediction of monthly mean daily global solar radiation using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, a multilayer feed forward (MLFF) neural network based on back propagation algorithm was developed, trained, and tested to predict monthly mean daily global radiation in Tamil Nadu, India. Various geographical, solar and meteorological parameters of three different locations with diverse climatic conditions ...

  11. Prediction of monthly mean daily global solar radiation using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, a multilayer feed forward (MLFF) neural network based on back propagation algorithm was developed, trained, and tested to predict monthly mean daily global radiation in Tamil Nadu,. India. Various geographical, solar and meteorological parameters of three different locations with diverse climatic conditions ...

  12. Availability of solar radiation and standards for solar access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casabianca, G.A.; Evans, J.M. [Research Centre Habitat and Energy, Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseno y Urbanismo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Capital Federal (Argentina)

    1997-12-31

    In southern Argentina, a region between latitudes 38 deg C and 55 deg C S, the heating demand in the residential sector is high while the availability of solar radiation is limited. A new proposal for solar access standards has been developed, taking into account the climatic conditions of each location, the effective availability of solar radiation and the direct sunlight requirements. This study analyses the climatic conditions for the Patagonia, relating heating demand and solar radiation availability in different sites, and presents the development of new sunlight standards that respond to these regional conditions. As a result of this study, the new Argentine standard TRAM 11.603 includes new conditions to protect solar access and provide design recommendations. (orig.) 4 refs.

  13. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  14. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Manajit; Habte, Aron; Lopez, Anthony; Xie, Yu; Molling, Christine; Gueymard, Christian

    2017-03-13

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB), including sensing, measurement and forecasting, and discusses observations that are needed for research and product development.

  15. Solar radiation alert system : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The Solar Radiation Alert (SRA) system continuously evaluates measurements of high-energy protons made by instruments on GOES satellites. If the measurements indicate a substantial elevation of effective dose rates at aircraft flight altitudes, the C...

  16. The influence of the solar radiation model on the calcutated solar radiation from a horizontal surface to a tilted surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Lund, Hans; Furbo, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Measured solar radiation data are most commonly available as total solar radiation on a horizontal surface. When using solar radiation measured on horizontal to calculate the solar radiation on tilted surfaces and thereby the thermal performance of different applications such as buildings and solar...... in the calculation. The weather data are measured at the solar radiation measurement station, SMS at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. In this study the weather data are combined with solar collector calculations based on solar collector test carried out at Solar Energy...... Center, SEC, Denmark. With measured solar radiation on horizontal and the different solar radiation processing models the total radiation is calculated on differently tilted and oriented surfaces and compared with the measured solar radiation on the different surfaces. Further, the impact on the yearly...

  17. Radiation From Solar Activity | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic storms from the sun can send extreme bursts of ionizing radiation and magnetic energy toward Earth. Some of this energy is in the form ionizing radiation and some of the energy is magnetic energy.

  18. Solar radiation at Parsons, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Patric; Stanley Caruso

    1978-01-01

    Twelve years of solar radiation data, measured with a Kipp-Zonen pyranometer, were recorded near Parsons, West Virginia. The data agree well with calculated values of potential and average radiation for the vicinity and are applicable to the central Appalachian region.

  19. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  20. Orbiter radiator panel solar focusing test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, H. R.; Rankin, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Test data are presented which define the area around the Orbiter radiator panels for which the solar reflections are concentrated to one-sun or more. The concave shape of the panels and their specular silver/Teflon coating causes focusing of the reflected solar energy which could have adverse heating effects on equipment or astronaut extravehicular activity (EVA) in the vicinity of the radiator panels. A room ambient test method was utilized with a one-tenth scale model of the radiator panels.

  1. Models for prediction of global solar radiation on horizontal surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The estimation of global solar radiation continues to play a fundamental role in solar engineering systems and applications. This paper compares various models for estimating the average monthly global solar radiation on horizontal surface for Akure, Nigeria, using solar radiation and sunshine duration data covering years ...

  2. models for prediction of global solar radiation on horizontal surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-12

    Oct 12, 2016 ... The estimation of global solar radiation continues to play a fundamental role in solar engineering systems and applications. This paper compares various models for estimating the average monthly global solar radiation on horizontal surface for Akure, Nigeria, using solar radiation and sunshine duration ...

  3. Solar Position Algorithm for Solar Radiation Applications (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, I.; Andreas, A.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a step-by-step procedure for implementing an algorithm to calculate the solar zenith and azimuth angles in the period from the year -2000 to 6000, with uncertainties of ?0.0003/. It is written in a step-by-step format to simplify otherwise complicated steps, with a focus on the sun instead of the planets and stars in general. The algorithm is written in such a way to accommodate solar radiation applications.

  4. Obliquity Modulation of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a basic principle of orbital resonance, we have identified a huge deficit of solar radiation induced by the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity as possibly the causal mechanism for ice age glaciation. Including this modulation effect on solar radiation, we have performed model simulations of climate change for the past 2 million years. Simulation results show that: (1) For the past 1 million years, temperature fluctuation cycles were dominated by a 100-Kyr period due to amplitude-frequency resonance effect of the obliquity; (2) From 2 to 1 million years ago, the amplitude-frequency interactions. of the obliquity were so weak that they were not able to stimulate a resonance effect on solar radiation; (3) Amplitude and frequency modulation analysis on solar radiation provides a series of resonance in the incoming solar radiation which may shift the glaciation cycles from 41-Kyr to 100-Kyr about 0.9 million years ago. These results are in good agreement with the marine and continental paleoclimate records. Thus, the proposed climate response to the combined amplitude and frequency modulation of the Earth's obliquity may be the key to understanding the glaciation puzzles in paleoclimatology.

  5. Normal Incident Solar Radiation Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were originally downloaded from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) web site http://www.nrel.gov/gis/data_solar.html in units of...

  6. Solar Radiation on Mars: Tracking Photovoltaic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Joseph; Flood, Dennis J.; Crutchik, Marcos

    1994-01-01

    A photovoltaic power source for surface-based operation on Mars can offer many advantages. Detailed information on solar radiation characteristics on Mars and the insolation on various types of collector surfaces are necessary for effective design of future planned photovoltaic systems. In this article we have presented analytical expressions for solar radiation calculation and solar radiation data for single axis (of various types) and two axis tracking surfaces and compared the insulation to horizontal and inclined surfaces. For clear skies (low atmospheric dust load) tracking surfaces resulted in higher insolation than stationary surfaces, whereas for highly dusty atmospheres, the difference is small. The insolation on the different types of stationary and tracking surfaces depend on latitude, season and optical depth of the atmosphere, and the duration of system operation. These insolations have to be compared for each mission.

  7. Distributed solar radiation fast dynamic measurement for PV cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xuefen; Yang, Yi; Cui, Jian; Du, Xingjing; Zheng, Tao; Sardar, Muhammad Sohail

    2017-10-01

    To study the operating characteristics about PV cells, attention must be given to the dynamic behavior of the solar radiation. The dynamic behaviors of annual, monthly, daily and hourly averages of solar radiation have been studied in detail. But faster dynamic behaviors of solar radiation need more researches. The solar radiation random fluctuations in minute-long or second-long range, which lead to alternating radiation and cool down/warm up PV cell frequently, decrease conversion efficiency. Fast dynamic processes of solar radiation are mainly relevant to stochastic moving of clouds. Even in clear sky condition, the solar irradiations show a certain degree of fast variation. To evaluate operating characteristics of PV cells under fast dynamic irradiation, a solar radiation measuring array (SRMA) based on large active area photodiode, LoRa spread spectrum communication and nanoWatt MCU is proposed. This cross photodiodes structure tracks fast stochastic moving of clouds. To compensate response time of pyranometer and reduce system cost, the terminal nodes with low-cost fast-responded large active area photodiode are placed besides positions of tested PV cells. A central node, consists with pyranometer, large active area photodiode, wind detector and host computer, is placed in the center of the central topologies coordinate to scale temporal envelope of solar irradiation and get calibration information between pyranometer and large active area photodiodes. In our SRMA system, the terminal nodes are designed based on Microchip's nanoWatt XLP PIC16F1947. FDS-100 is adopted for large active area photodiode in terminal nodes and host computer. The output current and voltage of each PV cell are monitored by I/V measurement. AS62-T27/SX1278 LoRa communication modules are used for communicating between terminal nodes and host computer. Because the LoRa LPWAN (Low Power Wide Area Network) specification provides seamless interoperability among Smart Things without the

  8. A solar radiation database for Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Alejandra; Falvey, Mark; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Chile hosts some of the sunniest places on earth, which has led to a growing solar energy industry in recent years. However, the lack of high resolution measurements of solar irradiance becomes a critical obstacle for both financing and design of solar installations. Besides the Atacama Desert, Chile displays a large array of "solar climates" due to large latitude and altitude variations, and so provides a useful testbed for the development of solar irradiance maps. Here a new public database for surface solar irradiance over Chile is presented. This database includes hourly irradiance from 2004 to 2016 at 90 m horizontal resolution over continental Chile. Our results are based on global reanalysis data to force a radiative transfer model for clear sky solar irradiance and an empirical model based on geostationary satellite data for cloudy conditions. The results have been validated using 140 surface solar irradiance stations throughout the country. Model mean percentage error in hourly time series of global horizontal irradiance is only 0.73%, considering both clear and cloudy days. The simplicity and accuracy of the model over a wide range of solar conditions provides confidence that the model can be easily generalized to other regions of the world.

  9. Prediction of solar radiation for solar systems by using ANN models with different back propagation algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamegam Premalatha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Global solar radiation (GSR is an essential parameter for the design and operation of solar energy systems. Long-standing records of global solar radiation data are not available in many places because of the cost and maintenance of the measuring instruments. The major objective of this work is to develop an ANN model for accurately predicting solar radiation. Two ANN models with four different algorithms are considered in the present study. Meteorological data collected for the last 10 years from five different locations across India have been used to train the models. The best ANN algorithm and model are identified based on minimum mean absolute error (MAE and root mean square error (RMSE and maximum linear correlation coefficient (R. Further, the present study confirms that prediction accuracy of the ANN model depends on the complete set of data being used for training the network for the intended application. The developed ANN model has a low mean absolute percentage error (MAPE which ascertains the accuracy and suitability of the model to predict the monthly average global radiation so as to design or evaluate solar energy installations, where the meteorological data measuring facilities are not in place in India.

  10. Solar consumer assurance network briefing book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Lynda

    1980-06-01

    Background information is provided on the rationale and purpose of the Solar Consumer Assurance Network (SOLCAN) program. Mechanisms being instituted by states to meet solar consumer assurance needs are identified. Mechanisms being developed with Federal government support to encourage solar consumer assurance activities are described. The operation of the FY 80 SOLCAN effort is described. (MHR)

  11. NEW MODEL FOR SOLAR RADIATION ESTIMATION FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air temperature of monthly mean minimum temperature, maximum temperature and relative humidity obtained from Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET) were used as inputs to the ANFIS model and monthly mean global solar radiation was used as out of the model. Statistical evaluation of the model was done based on ...

  12. Handbook of Solar Radiation Data for India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 11. Handbook of Solar Radiation Data for India. Anna Mani. Classics Volume 13 Issue 11 November 2008 pp 1082-1086. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/11/1082-1086 ...

  13. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  14. Nocturnal radiation from a solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. F.; Chiang, C. W.

    1980-11-01

    As the sky temperature during the night is relatively low compared to the ambient temperature, the temperature of the absorber plate in a solar collector can be lower than the ambient temperature due to nocturnal radiation. Measurements have been made for Lennox Solar Collectors installed in a solar heating and cooling project, a same collector in Rapid City and a simple home-made collector in the laboratory. The home-made collector consists of a brass-copper plate sprayed with flat-black paint, covered with glass sheets and boxed with two inch thick styrofoam insulation. A cooling as much as 10 C in winter has been observed. It is expected to be appreciably more in summer. This suggests a potential utilization of nocturnal radiation for air conditioning. Theoretical analysis is presented.

  15. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  16. SOLAR RADIATION MAPS FOR EIIDOPIA Tesfaye Bayou and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOLAR RADIATION MAPS FOR EIIDOPIA. Tesfaye Bayou and Abebayehu Assefa. Faculty of Technology. Addis Ababa University. ABSTRACT. Estimates of solar radiation maps for Ethiopia are prepared from measured solar radiation data of 6 sites and estimates from sunshine hour records of 136 sites. The estimates for ...

  17. new model for solar radiation estimation from measured air

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    solar radiation data, the use of artificial intelligence for solar radiation ... intelligence technique for solar radiation prediction. The .... are mean values of respectively. Also n is the total number of the test data. When higher value of is obtained, it shows that the model has a better performance while RMSE with smaller value ...

  18. Turning collectors for solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about the polar axis so that the collector is directed toward the sun as the sun tracks the sky each day. It includes two heat-expansive elements and a shadow plate. In the morning a first expansive element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the second expansive element is shaded by the plate. In the afternoon the second element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the first is shaded by the plate.

  19. Space Radiation Effect on Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Jin Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High energy charged particles are trapped by geomagnetic field in the region named Van Allen Belt. These particles can move to low altitude along magnetic field and threaten even low altitude spacecraft. Space Radiation can cause equipment failures and on occasions can even destroy operations of satellites in orbit. Sun sensors aboard Science and Technology Satellite (STSAT-1 was designed to detect sun light with silicon solar cells which performance was degraded during satellite operation. In this study, we try to identify which particle contribute to the solar cell degradation with ground based radiation facilities. We measured the short circuit current after bombarding electrons and protons on the solar cells same as STSAT-1 sun sensors. Also we estimated particle flux on the STSAT-1 orbit with analyzing NOAA POES particle data. Our result clearly shows STSAT-1 solar cell degradation was caused by energetic protons which energy is about 700 keV to 1.5 MeV. Our result can be applied to estimate solar cell conditions of other satellites.

  20. Solar radiation practical modeling for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Daryl Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Written by a leading scientist with over 35 years of experience working at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Solar Radiation: Practical Modeling for Renewable Energy Applications brings together the most widely used, easily implemented concepts and models for estimating broadband and spectral solar radiation data. The author addresses various technical and practical questions about the accuracy of solar radiation measurements and modeling. While the focus is on engineering models and results, the book does review the fundamentals of solar radiation modeling and solar radiation m

  1. Solar Radiation: Models and Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Pandey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to grasp the significance of the work accomplished by the author, it is necessary to keep abreast of the present developments in this field. The research work reported in the paper is an attempt to get knowledge to assess the solar energy potential for practical and efficient utilization in India. Our work is centered on estimating realistic values of solar (global and diffuse radiation on horizontal and tilted surfaces using measured meteorological data and geographical and geometrical parameters for India.

  2. Solar ultraviolet radiation from cancer induction to cancer prevention: solar ultraviolet radiation and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J

    2015-09-01

    Although decades have elapsed, researchers still debate the benefits and hazards of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. On the one hand, humans derive most of their serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], which has potent anticancer activity, from solar UVB radiation. On the other hand, people are more aware of the risk of cancer incidence associated with harmful levels of solar UVR from daily sunlight exposure. Epidemiological data strongly implicate UV radiation exposure as a major cause of melanoma and other cancers, as UVR promotes mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This review highlights the impact of the different mutagenic effects of solar UVR, along with the cellular and carcinogenic challenges with respect to sun exposure.

  3. solaR: Solar Radiation and Photovoltaic Systems with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Perpiñan Lamigueiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The solaR package allows for reproducible research both for photovoltaics (PV systems performance and solar radiation. It includes a set of classes, methods and functions to calculate the sun geometry and the solar radiation incident on a photovoltaic generator and to simulate the performance of several applications of the photovoltaic energy. This package performs the whole calculation procedure from both daily and intradaily global horizontal irradiation to the final productivity of grid-connected PV systems and water pumping PV systems.It is designed using a set of S4 classes whose core is a group of slots with multivariate time series. The classes share a variety of methods to access the information and several visualization methods. In addition, the package provides a tool for the visual statistical analysis of the performance of a large PV plant composed of several systems.Although solaR is primarily designed for time series associated to a location defined by its latitude/longitude values and the temperature and irradiation conditions, it can be easily combined with spatial packages for space-time analysis.

  4. Digging the METEOSAT Treasure—3 Decades of Solar Surface Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Müller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar surface radiation data of high quality is essential for the appropriate monitoring and analysis of the Earth's radiation budget and the climate system. Further, they are crucial for the efficient planning and operation of solar energy systems. However, well maintained surface measurements are rare in many regions of the world and over the oceans. There, satellite derived information is the exclusive observational source. This emphasizes the important role of satellite based surface radiation data. Within this scope, the new satellite based CM-SAF SARAH (Solar surfAce RAdiation Heliosat data record is discussed as well as the retrieval method used. The SARAH data are retrieved with the sophisticated SPECMAGIC method, which is based on radiative transfer modeling. The resulting climate data of solar surface irradiance, direct irradiance (horizontal and direct normal and clear sky irradiance are covering 3 decades. The SARAH data set is validated with surface measurements of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN and of the Global Energy and Balance Archive (GEBA. Comparison with BSRN data is performed in order to estimate the accuracy and precision of the monthly and daily means of solar surface irradiance. The SARAH solar surface irradiance shows a bias of 1.3 \\(W/m^2\\ and a mean absolute bias (MAB of 5.5 \\(W/m^2\\ for monthly means. For direct irradiance the bias and MAB is 1 \\(W/m^2\\ and 8.2 \\(W/m^2\\ respectively. Thus, the uncertainty of the SARAH data is in the range of the uncertainty of ground based measurements. In order to evaluate the uncertainty of SARAH based trend analysis the time series of SARAH monthly means are compared to GEBA. It has been found that SARAH enables the analysis of trends with an uncertainty of 1 \\(W/m^2/dec\\; a remarkable good result for a satellite based climate data record. SARAH has been also compared to its legacy version, the satellite based CM-SAF MVIRI climate data record. Overall

  5. Temperature and Solar Radiation Effects on Photovoltaic Panel Power

    OpenAIRE

    Karafil, Akif; Ozbay, Harun; Kesler, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy is converted to electrical energy directly by semi-conductors materials used in Photovoltaic (PV) panels. Although, there has been great advancements in semi-conductor material technology in recent years panel efficiency is very lower. There are many factors affecting the panel efficiency such as tilt angle, shading, dust, solar radiation level, temperature and wiring losses. Among these factors, solar radiation level and temperature are more prominent. The solar radiation level ...

  6. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Light scalar fields can drive accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, scalars are obvious dark energy candidates. To make these models compatible with test of General Relativity in the solar system and fifth force searches on earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the chameleon mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local energy density. If chameleons exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on earth through their radiation pressure. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the sensitivity of an experiment to be carried out at CAST, CERN, utilizing a radiation pressure sensor currently under development at INFN, Trieste. We show that such an experiment will be sensitive to a wide range of model parameters and signifies a pioneering effort searching for chameleons in unprobed paramterspace.

  7. SUMER: Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, M. C. E.; Lemaire, P.; Marsch, E.; Poland, A. I.

    1988-01-01

    The SUMER (solar ultraviolet measurements of emitted radiation) experiment is described. It will study flows, turbulent motions, waves, temperatures and densities of the plasma in the upper atmosphere of the Sun. Structures and events associated with solar magnetic activity will be observed on various spatial and temporal scales. This will contribute to the understanding of coronal heating processes and the solar wind expansion. The instrument will take images of the Sun in EUV (extreme ultra violet) light with high resolution in space, wavelength and time. The spatial resolution and spectral resolving power of the instrument are described. Spectral shifts can be determined with subpixel accuracy. The wavelength range extends from 500 to 1600 angstroms. The integration time can be as short as one second. Line profiles, shifts and broadenings are studied. Ratios of temperature and density sensitive EUV emission lines are established.

  8. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, S.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Karuza, M.; Semertzidis, Y.K.; Upadhye, A.; Zioutas, K.

    2014-10-24

    Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and "fifth force" searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called "chameleon" mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary re...

  9. An application of the multilayer perceptron: Solar radiation maps in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hontoria, L.; Aguilera, J. [Grupo Investigacion y Desarrollo en Energia Solar y Automatica, Dpto. de Ingenieria Electronica, de Telecomunicaciones y Automatica, Escuela Politecnica Superior de Jaen, Campus de las Lagunillas, Universidad de Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Zufiria, P. [Grupo de Redes Neuronales, Dpto. de Matematica Aplicada a las Tecnologias de la Informacion, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, UPM Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-11-01

    In this work an application of a methodology to obtain solar radiation maps is presented. This methodology is based on a neural network system [Lippmann, R.P., 1987. An introduction to computing with neural nets. IEEE ASSP Magazine, 4-22] called Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) [Haykin, S., 1994. Neural Networks. A Comprehensive Foundation. Macmillan Publishing Company; Hornik, K., Stinchcombe, M., White, H., 1989. Multilayer feedforward networks are universal approximators. Neural Networks, 2(5), 359-366]. To obtain a solar radiation map it is necessary to know the solar radiation of many points spread wide across the zone of the map where it is going to be drawn. For most of the locations all over the world the records of these data (solar radiation in whatever scale, daily or hourly values) are non-existent. Only very few locations have the privilege of having good meteorological stations where records of solar radiation have being registered. But even in those locations with historical records of solar data, the quality of these solar series is not as good as it should be for most purposes. In addition, to draw solar radiation maps the number of points on the maps (real sites) that it is necessary to work with makes this problem difficult to solve. Nevertheless, with the application of the methodology proposed in this paper, this problem has been solved and solar radiation maps have been obtained for a small region of Spain: Jaen province, a southern province of Spain between parallels 38{sup o}25' N and 37{sup o}25' N, and meridians 4{sup o}10' W and 2{sup o}10' W, and for a larger region: Andalucia, the most southern region of Spain situated between parallels 38{sup o}40' N and 36{sup o}00' N, and meridians 7{sup o}30' W and 1{sup o}40' W. (author)

  10. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  11. Development and evaluation of neural network models to estimate daily solar radiation at Córdoba, Argentina Desenvolvimento e avaliação de modelos de redes neurais para estimação da irradiação solar diária em Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Bocco

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop neural network models of backpropagation type to estimate solar radiation based on extraterrestrial radiation data, daily temperature range, precipitation, cloudiness and relative sunshine duration. Data from Córdoba, Argentina, were used for development and validation. The behaviour and adjustment between values observed and estimates obtained by neural networks for different combinations of input were assessed. These estimations showed root mean square error between 3.15 and 3.88 MJ m-2 d-1 . The latter corresponds to the model that calculates radiation using only precipitation and daily temperature range. In all models, results show good adjustment to seasonal solar radiation. These results allow inferring the adequate performance and pertinence of this methodology to estimate complex phenomena, such as solar radiation.O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver modelos de redes neuronais, do tipo retropropagação, para a estimação da irradiação solar, a partir de dados de irradiação solar extraterrestre, amplitude térmica, precipitação, nebulosidade e razão de insolação. O treinamento e a validação foram realizados com dados correspondentes a Córdoba, Argentina. O comportamento e ajuste entre os valores observados e os estimados pelas redes foram avaliados para diferentes combinações das variáveis de entrada, que apresentaram valores do erro quadrático médio entre 3,15 e 3,88 MJ m-2 d-1 . Este último valor corresponde ao modelo que calcula a irradiação somente utilizando precipitação e amplitude térmica diária. Os resultados exibem em todos os modelos um ajuste apropriado ao comportamento sazonal da irradiação solar e permitem concluir a pertinência e o adequado desempenho desse método para estimar fenômenos complexos como a irradiação solar.

  12. Summary information and data sets for the HBCU Solar Measurements Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W

    1994-08-01

    Since 1985, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), has operated a solar radiation measurement network of six stations located at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the southeastern United States. NREL initiated this network to provide better regional coverage and to comply with President Reagan`s Executive Order 12320, dated September 15, 1981, directing all federal agencies to implement programs to strengthen the nation`s HBCUs. Funding for the HBCU network has been provided by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Resource Assessment Program, Photovoltaic Program, and Solar Thermal Program, and it is currently funded by the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. The objectives of the HBCU network are (1) To significantly improve the assessment of solar radiation resources in the southeastern United States; (2) To enlist the help of the HBCUs in collecting high-quality solar radiation data; (3) To encourage the distribution of solar radiation resource information and the development of solar energy applications in the Southeast; (4) To encourage the development of academic and research programs in solar energy at HBCUs.

  13. A NOVEL APPROACH FOR LONG TERM SOLAR RADIATION PREDICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Khanna

    2018-10-01

    Full Text Available With present stress, being laid on green energy worldwide, harnessing solar energy for commercial use has importance in sizing and long-term prediction of solar radiation. However, with continuous changing environment parameters, it is quite difficult for long-term prediction of solar radiation. In the past research scholars, have carried out solar prediction only for a few days, which is insufficient to exploit the radiation for sizing and harnessing the solar energy for commercial use. To overcome this gap, present work utilizes application of lifting wavelet transform along with ANFIS to predict the radiation for long duration.

  14. Shining On: A primer on solar radiation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlap, M.A.; Cook, G. [eds.; Marion, B.; Riordan, C.; Renne, D.

    1992-05-01

    This document is a primer on solar radiation data. General uses of solar energy are presented. The manner in which solar radiation data is used to aid engineers in optimizing the use of solar thermal conversion and photovoltaic conversion is discussed. Methods for acquiring and assimilating the solar radiation data are illustrated. This would include the design and use of pyranometers and pyrheliometers. Seasonal and geographical variations in solar flux reaching the earth are evaluated. Other uses of compiled data include the determination of meteorological impacts of atmospheric disturbances such as volcano eruptions.

  15. al solar radiation distribution and utilization seasons at ilorin, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-01

    Jul 1, 2014 ... solar systems require the probability of the expected number of days with global solar radiation above or below certain threshold values. In some specialized applications, the-number of consecutive days above or below a given threshold value of solar radiation is an important factor especially where.

  16. Estimation of Solar Radiation in South Eastern Nigeria | Nwokocha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of global solar radiation is of fundamental importance for all solar energy conversion systems. In this work is presented the Sayigh equation for estimating the global solar radiation, analyzing data from 1972 to 2004 in the Southeastern Nigeria using Umudike (lat. 5.29oN, long. 7.33oE) as a case study.

  17. Assessing the Performance of Global Solar Radiation Empirical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the region where solar radiation data are scarce, the next alternative method is to use solar radiation models to estimate the data needed for some applications such as simulation of crop performance and the design of solar energy conversion devices. In this paper, the validations of fifteen models for estimating monthly ...

  18. Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

    1979-11-01

    A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

  19. Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. Program overview of fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The mission of the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project is to provide essential information about the solar radiation resource to users and planners of solar technologies so that they can make informed and timely decisions concerning applications of those technologies. The project team accomplishes this by producing and disseminating relevant and reliable information about solar radiation. Topics include: Variability of solar radiation, measurements of solar radiation, spectral distribution of solar radiation, and assessment of the solar resource. FY 1993 accomplishments are detailed.

  20. al solar radiation distribution and utilization seasons at ilorin, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-02-21

    Feb 21, 2008 ... The need for storage or auxiliary heating for those times when solar radiation values fall below solar system's efficiency threshold during a solar utilization season requires that the maximum number of days or consecutive number of days for which one will require this service be known. The solar utilization ...

  1. Ultraviolet Radiation in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, M

    2006-01-01

    UV radiation is an important part in the electromagnetic spectrum since the energy of the photons is great enough to produce important chemical reactions in the atmospheres of planets and satellites of our Solar System, thereby affecting the transmission of this radiation to the ground and its physical properties. Scientists have used different techniques (balloons and rockets) to access to the information contained in this radiation, but the pioneering of this new frontier has not been free of dangers. The Sun is our main source of UV radiation and its description occupies the first two chapters of the book. The Earth is the only known location where life exists in a planetary system and therefore where the interaction of living organism with UV radiation can be tested through different epochs and on distinct species. The development of the human technology has affected the natural shield of ozone that protects complex lifeforms against damaging UV irradiation. The formation of the ozone hole and its consequ...

  2. Solar radiation in the Brazilian northeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiba, Chigueru [Federal University of Pernambuco, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    The significant increase in recent years of the number of rural electrification systems (some thousands of them do exist) using photovoltaic technology installed in the Northeast of Brazil (1,500,000 km{sup 2}, approximately 42 million people) used for illumination or water pumping, calls for an improvement on the design procedures in order to reduce the burden of capital costs per unit of generated power. Such objective can be accomplished as long as a better knowledge about the solar resource is achieved, considering how much these applications depend on it. The sources of information on solar radiation in Brazil are quite varied at both institutional and publication level. At institutional Meteorology (INMET), State Departments of Agriculture, research institute, universities and electric power generation and distribution utilities. Progress reports or scientific and technical journals are the main publishing vehicles where this information can be found. This way, data quality varies considerably, showing, spatial and temporal discontinuities, in addition to the fact that measurement instruments and physical units of registered data are not standardized. The Solarimetric Atlas of Brazil was recently published and it contains that information, which is grouped, evaluated, qualified, and presented in a standardized way. It is one of the best currently existing sources of information, and in certainly consists of almost the entirety of the existing information on the solar resource (data on solar radiation and sunshine hours) in Brazil. By using this database, simultaneous records of solar radiation (measured with pyranoghaps or pyranometers) and sunshine hours with heliographs were obtained in 35 different places in the Northeast region. Coefficients a and b were calculated for those different places using Angstrom's correlation. Using the geostatistical interpolation method known as kriging, the values of a and b were placed on contour maps, the coverage of

  3. Spectral variation of the solar radiation during an eclipse

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Koepke; Joachim Reuder; Jan Schween

    2001-01-01

    The time dependent variation of the spectral extraterrestrial solar flux is modelled for the conditions during a total eclipse. These data are used to calculate irradiance and actinic flux at the Earths surface for atmospheric conditions of August 11, 1999 at Weihenstephan. These results are compared with measurements. It is shown, that the spectral composition of solar radiation varies during the eclipse, since solar limb darkening has a spectral dependence. The solar radiation differs from ...

  4. A diagram for defined solar radiation absorbed per unit area of flat plate solar collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tekin, Y.; Altuntop, N. [Erciyes University, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering (Turkey); Cengel, Y.A. [Nevada Reno University, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, NV (United States); Cengel, Y.A. [Nevada University, Dept. Mechanical Engineering, Reno, NV (United States)

    2000-07-01

    In Erciyes University, the Solar House (28.75 m{sup 2}) is heated from the floor by using flat plate liquid solar collectors. Required solar radiation for heating and heat losses are calculated. In this work, the required calculations for Erciyes Solar House were generalized and required calculation were done to evaluate absorbed solar radiation per unit surface of the flat plate liquid collector. At the end, three generalized diagrams for nine different months are obtained using obtained numerical values. The goal of preparing diagrams is to determine absorbed solar radiation per unit surface area of flat plate liquid collector at any instant at any latitude, In this work, the diagram is explained by means of sample calculations for November. This diagram was prepared to find out absorbed solar radiation per unit area of black surface collector by means obtained equations. With this diagram, all instant solar radiation can be evaluated in 19 steps. (authors)

  5. Machine learning methods for solar radiation forecasting: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Voyant, C; Notton, G; KALOGIROU S.; M.L. Nivet; C. Paoli; Motte, F.; A. Fouilloy

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting the output power of solar systems is required for the good operation of the power grid or for the optimal management of the energy fluxes occurring into the solar system. Before forecasting the solar systems output, it is essential to focus the prediction on the solar irradiance. The global solar radiation forecasting can be performed by several methods; the two big categories are the cloud imagery combined with physical models, and the machine learning models. In this context, th...

  6. Biological Sensors for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André P. Schuch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products.

  7. Simulation of Solar Radiation Incident on Horizontal and Inclined Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Basunia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A computer model was developed to simulate the hourly, daily and monthly average of daily solar radiation on horizontal and inclined surfaces. The measured hourly and daily solar radiation was compared with simulated radiation, and favourable agreement was observed for the measured and predicted values on clear days. The measured and simulated monthly averages of total (diffuse and beam daily solar radiation were compared and a reasonable agreement was observed for a number of stations in Japan. The simulation showed that during the rice harvesting season, September to October, there is a daily average of 14.7 MJ/m2 of solar irradiation on a horizontal surface in Matsuyama, Japan. There is a similar amount of solar radiation on a horizontal surface during the major rice harvesting season, November to December, in Bangladesh. This radiation can be effectively utilized for drying rough rice and other farm crops.

  8. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, S., E-mail: sebastian.baum@cern.ch [Uppsala Universitet, Box 516, SE 75120, Uppsala (Sweden); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gèneve (Switzerland); Cantatore, G. [Università di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Institut für Kernphysik, TU-Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Karuza, M. [INFN Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Phys. Dept. and CMNST, University of Rijeka, R. Matejcic 2, Rijeka (Croatia); Semertzidis, Y.K. [Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (IBS), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Upadhye, A. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zioutas, K., E-mail: konstantin.zioutas@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Gèneve (Switzerland); University of Patras, GR 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2014-12-12

    Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and “fifth force” searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called “chameleon” mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on Earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary results from a force/pressure sensor, currently under development at INFN Trieste, to be mounted in the focal plane of one of the X-Ray telescopes of the CAST experiment at CERN. We show, that such an experiment signifies a pioneering effort probing uncharted chameleon parameter space.

  9. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baum

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and “fifth force” searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called “chameleon” mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on Earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary results from a force/pressure sensor, currently under development at INFN Trieste, to be mounted in the focal plane of one of the X-Ray telescopes of the CAST experiment at CERN. We show, that such an experiment signifies a pioneering effort probing uncharted chameleon parameter space.

  10. Solar radiation in the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Dera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The influx of solar radiation to the Baltic Sea and its penetration into its waters is described on the basis of selected results of optical and bio-optical studies in the Baltic published by various authors during the past ca 50 years. The variability in the natural irradiance of this sea is illustrated on time scales from short-term fluctuations occurring during a single day to differences in mean monthly values over a period of many years. Data on variability of the proportions between UV, VIS and IR energy in the light reaching the sea surface are also discussed.Long-term monthly mean values of the incident solar radiation flux at the surface of the Baltic Proper are given; they were obtained from meteorological and solar radiation measurements and model approximations. The transmittances of these mean monthly radiation fluxes across the surface of the Baltic are given, as are the typical energyand spectral characteristics of the underwater irradiance, its attenuation with depth in the sea and the associated euphotic zone depths, as well as typical ranges of variability of these characteristics in different Baltic basins. Some of these characteristics are illustrated by typical empirical data. These mean values are not fully representative, however, because with the sole use of classical in situ measurement methods from on board research vessels in the Baltic, it has not been possible to gather a sufficientlyrepresentative set of empirical data that would adequately reflect the variability of the optical characteristics of all the basins of this sea. The article goes on to introduce the statistical model of vertical distributions of chlorophyll a concentration in the Baltic and the bio-optical model of Baltic Case 2 waters, the use of which contribute very significantly to this description of the optical characteristics and will enable this data set to be hugely expanded to include all the Baltic basins. This opportunity is presented by the

  11. Solar radiation budget and radiative forcing due to aerosols and clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyeong; Ramanathan, V.

    2008-01-01

    This study integrates global data sets for aerosols, cloud physical properties, and shortwave radiation fluxes with a Monte Carlo Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation (MACR) model to estimate both the surface and the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) solar radiation budget as well as atmospheric column solar absorption. The study also quantifies the radiative forcing of aerosols and that of clouds. The observational input to MACR includes data from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) for aerosol optical depths, single scattering albedos, and asymmetry factors; satellite retrieved column water vapor amount; the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) total ozone amount; and cloud fraction and cloud optical depth from the Cloud and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud data. The present radiation budget estimates account for the diurnal variation in cloud properties. The model was validated against instantaneous, daily and monthly solar fluxes from the ground-based Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) network, the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) surface solar flux data, and CERES TOA measurements. The agreement between simulated and observed values are within experimental errors, for all of the cases considered here: instantaneous fluxes and monthly mean fluxes at stations around the world and TOA fluxes and cloud forcing for global annual mean and zonal mean fluxes; in addition the estimated aerosol forcing at TOA also agrees with other observationally derived estimates. Overall, such agreements suggest that global data sets of aerosols and cloud parameters released by recent satellite experiments (MISR, MODIS and CERES) meet the required accuracy to use them as input to simulate the radiative fluxes within instrumental errors. Last, the atmospheric solar absorption derived in this study should be treated as an improved estimate when compared with earlier published studies. The main source of improvement in the present estimate is the use of global distribution

  12. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, D.-P.

    Solar UV degrades dissolved organic carbon photolytically so that they can readily be taken up by bacterioplankton. On the other hand solar UV radiation inhibits bacterioplankton activity. Bacterioplankton productivity is far greater than previously thought and is comparable to phytoplankton primary productivity. According to the "microbial loop hypothesis," bacterioplankton is seen in the center of a food web, having a similar function to phytoplankton and protists. The penetration of UV and PAR into the water column can be measured. Marine waters show large temporal and regional differences in their concentrations of dissolved and particulate absorbing substances. A network of dosimeters (ELDONET) has been installed in Europe ranging from Abisko in Northern Sweden to Gran Canaria. Cyanobacteria are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen which is then made available to higher plants. The agricultural potential of cyanobacteria has been recognized as a biological fertilizer for wet soils such as in rice paddies. UV-B is known to impair processes such as growth, survival, pigmentation, motility, as well as the enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and CO 2 fixation. The marine phytoplankton represents the single most important ecosystem on our planet and produces about the same biomass as all terrestrial ecosystems taken together. It is the base of the aquatic food chain and any changes in the size and composition of phytoplankton communities will directly affect food production for humans from marine sources. Another important role of marine phytoplankton is to serve as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Recent investigations have shown a large sensitivity of most phytoplankton organisms toward solar short-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UV-B); even at ambient levels of UV-B radiation many organisms seem to be under UV stress. Because of their requirement for solar energy, the phytoplankton dwell in the top layers of the water column. In this near-surface position

  13. Precise estimation of total solar radiation on tilted surface

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajeev

    A new correction factor (CF) which depends upon the longitude and altitude of the location, has been used for the estimation of hourly and total solar radiation at different orientation and inclination for. Delhi. The estimated values of hourly solar radiation have also been compared with 15 years measured data of Delhi to ...

  14. Solar radiation maps fot Ethiopia | Bayou | Zede Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimates of solar radiation maps for Ethiopia are prepared from measured solar radiation data of 6 sites and estimates from sunshine hour records of 136 sites. The estimates for the 136 sites are determined from their sunshine hour data using the Angstrom's linear correlation for the inland regions and that of Schuepp's for ...

  15. Climate variation based on temperature and solar radiation data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Climate variation based on temperature and solar radiation data over a 29 year period in Lilongwe City, Malawi. CC Kaonga, IBM Kosamu, C Tenthani. Abstract. Economies that mainly depend on agriculture are to a large extent being negatively impacted by climate change. In this study, temperature and solar radiation data ...

  16. Best Practices of Uncertainty Estimation for the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB 1998-2015): Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-19

    It is essential to apply a traceable and standard approach to determine the uncertainty of solar resource data. Solar resource data are used for all phases of solar energy conversion projects, from the conceptual phase to routine solar power plant operation, and to determine performance guarantees of solar energy conversion systems. These guarantees are based on the available solar resource derived from a measurement station or modeled data set such as the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). Therefore, quantifying the uncertainty of these data sets provides confidence to financiers, developers, and site operators of solar energy conversion systems and ultimately reduces deployment costs. In this study, we implemented the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) 1 to quantify the overall uncertainty of the NSRDB data. First, we start with quantifying measurement uncertainty, then we determine each uncertainty statistic of the NSRDB data, and we combine them using the root-sum-of-the-squares method. The statistics were derived by comparing the NSRDB data to the seven measurement stations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Surface Radiation Budget Network, National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Central Facility, in Billings, Oklahoma. The evaluation was conducted for hourly values, daily totals, monthly mean daily totals, and annual mean monthly mean daily totals. Varying time averages assist to capture the temporal uncertainty of the specific modeled solar resource data required for each phase of a solar energy project; some phases require higher temporal resolution than others. Overall, by including the uncertainty of measurements of solar radiation made at ground stations, bias, and root mean square error, the NSRDB data demonstrated expanded uncertainty of 17 percent - 29 percent on hourly

  17. IMPACT OF SOLAR RADIATION CHANGE ON THE COLLECTOR EFFICIENTLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Proszak-Miąsik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In October 2014 in a building of Rzeszow University of Technology, a series of measurements was taken to calculate the parameters of a solar system with a flat collector, as installed on the roof of the building. The following parameters were obtained: the value of solar radiation intensity, the temperature of external air, the temperature on the collector, the temperature of water in the tank and the temperature of glycol on the supply and return lines. On the basis of the data received, charts were made to visually present how changes of solar radiation intensity affected parameters of the system. The study was conducted in autumn when the intensity of solar radiation decreases, compared with summer months. The publication aims to show that the solar system brings energy gains in periods of transition, and the instantaneous intensity of solar radiation are comparable to those in the summer.

  18. Impact of climate change on occupational exposure to solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Carlo; Borra, Massimo; Militello, Andrea; Polichetti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to solar radiation may induce both acute and long-term effects on skin and eyes. Personal exposure is very difficult to assess accurately, as it depends on environmental, organisational and individual factors. The ongoing climate change interacting with stratospheric ozone dynamics may affect occupational exposure to solar radiation. In addition, tropospheric levels of environmental pollutants interacting with solar radiation may be altered by climate dynamics, so introducing another variable affecting the overall exposure to solar radiation. Given the uncertainties regarding the direction of changes in exposure to solar radiation due to climate change, compliance of outdoor workers with protective measures and a proper health surveillance are crucial. At the same time, education and training, along with the promotion of healthier lifestyles, are of paramount importance.

  19. Correlation of total, diffuse, and direct solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyco, E. H.; Namkoong, D.

    1977-01-01

    Present requirements for realistic solar energy system evaluations necessitate a comprehensive body of solar-radition data. The data should include both diffuse and direct solar radiation as well as their total on an hourly (or shorter) basis. In general, however, only the total solar radiation values were recorded. This report presents a correlation that relates the diffuse component of an hourly total solar radiation value to the total radiation ratio of the maximum value attainable. The data used were taken at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, Massachusetts, for the period 1952. The relation - in the form of the data plots - can be used in situations in which only the hourly total radiation data are available but the diffuse component is desired.

  20. The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB): A Brief Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lopez, Anthony [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-25

    This poster presents a high-level overview of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The NSRDB uses the physics-based model (PSM), which was developed using: adapted PATMOS-X model for cloud identification and properties, REST-2 model for clear-sky conditions, and NREL's Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar Applications (FARMS) for cloudy-sky Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) solar irradiance calculations.

  1. Climatic zones of solar radiation of Galicia; Zonas climaticas de radiacion solar de Galicia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.; Izquierdo, P.; Pose, M.; Prado, M. T.; Santos, J.

    2008-07-01

    The paper shows the results of a research on the solar radiation received in Galicia that allows assigning each one of the 315 Galician municipalities to one of the Climatic Zones of solar radiation, defined in the Spanish Building Technical Code (BTC). It is proposed to complete the assignment of climatic Zones in the BTC with a new zone, named Climatic Zone 0, with the objective to differentiate the geographical areas in Galicia with less than 3.4 kWh/m{sup 2}.day of yearly daily average solar radiation. The study is completed with the realization of a map of the Climate Zones of solar radiation of Galicia. (Author)

  2. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  3. Evaluation of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB): 1998-2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Lopez, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    This paper validates the performance of the physics-based Physical Solar Model (PSM) data set in the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) to quantify the accuracy of the magnitude and the spatial and temporal variability of the solar radiation data. Achieving higher penetrations of solar energy on the electric grid and reducing integration costs requires accurate knowledge of the available solar resource. Understanding the impacts of clouds and other meteorological constituents on the solar resource and quantifying intra-/inter-hour, seasonal, and interannual variability are essential for accurately designing utility-scale solar energy projects. Solar resource information can be obtained from ground-based measurement stations and/or from modeled data sets. The availability of measurements is scarce, both temporally and spatially, because it is expensive to maintain a high-density solar radiation measurement network that collects good quality data for long periods of time. On the other hand, high temporal and spatial resolution gridded satellite data can be used to estimate surface radiation for long periods of time and is extremely useful for solar energy development. Because of the advantages of satellite-based solar resource assessment, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the PSM. The PSM produced gridded solar irradiance -- global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal irradiance (DNI), and diffuse horizontal irradiance -- for the NSRDB at a 4-km by 4-km spatial resolution and half-hourly temporal resolution covering the 18 years from 1998-2015. The NSRDB also contains additional ancillary meteorological data sets, such as temperature, relative humidity, surface pressure, dew point, and wind speed. Details of the model and data are available at https://nsrdb.nrel.gov. The results described in this paper show that the hourly-averaged satellite-derived data have a systematic (bias) error of approximately +5% for GHI and less than +10% for

  4. CLASSICS Handbook of Solar Radiation Data for India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Handbook of Solar Radiation Data for India. By Anna Mani. CHAPTER 1. Introduction. 1.1. The sun and its radiation. The electromagnetic radiation emitted by the sun covers a very large range of wave- lengths, from radiowaves through the infrared, visible and ultraviolet to X-rays and gamma rays. However, 99 per cent of ...

  5. Solar radiation is inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Francisca; Riutort, Maria C; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Camargo, Carlos A; Borzutzky, Arturo

    To explore the associations between latitude and solar radiation with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile, the country with the largest variation in solar radiation in the world. This is an ecological study, which included data on all hospital-admitted population for inflammatory bowel disease between 2001 and 2012, according to different latitudes and solar radiation exposures in Chile. The data were acquired from the national hospital discharge database from the Department of Health Statistics and Information of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Between 2001 and 2012 there were 12,869 admissions due to inflammatory bowel disease (69% ulcerative colitis, 31% Crohn's disease). Median age was 36 years (IQR: 25-51); 57% were female. The national inflammatory bowel disease admission rate was 6.52 (95% CI: 6.40-6.63) per 100,000 inhabitants with increasing rates over the 12-year period. In terms of latitude, the highest admission rates for pediatric ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as adult ulcerative colitis, were observed in the southernmost region with lowest annual solar radiation. Linear regression analysis showed that regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions in Chile (β: -.44, p = .03). Regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile; inflammatory bowel disease admissions were highest in the southernmost region with lowest solar radiation. Our results support the potential role of vitamin D deficiency on inflammatory bowel disease flares.

  6. Relationships between surface solar radiation and wheat yield in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Barrera, Sara; Rodriguez-Puebla, Concepción

    2017-04-01

    Here we examine the role of solar radiation to describe wheat-yield variability in Spain. We used Partial Least Square regression to capture the modes of surface solar radiation that drive wheat-yield variability. We will show that surface solar radiation introduces the effects of teleconnection patterns on wheat yield and also it is associated with drought and diurnal temperature range. We highlight the importance of surface solar radiation to obtain models for wheat-yield projections because it could reduce uncertainty with respect to the projections based on temperatures and precipitation variables. In addition, the significance of the model based on surface solar radiation is greater than the previous one based on drought and diurnal temperature range (Hernandez-Barrera et al., 2016). According to our results, the increase of solar radiation over Spain for 21st century could force a wheat-yield decrease (Hernandez-Barrera et al., 2017). Hernandez-Barrera S., Rodríguez-Puebla C. and Challinor A.J. 2016 Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain. Theoretical and Applied Climatology. DOI: 10.1007/s00704-016-1779-9 Hernandez-Barrera S., Rodríguez-Puebla C. 2017 Wheat yield in Spain and associated solar radiation patterns. International Journal of Climatology. DOI: 10.1002/joc.4975

  7. Complex Network for Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daei, Farhad; Safari, Hossein; Dadashi, Neda

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we developed a complex network of solar active regions (ARs) to study various local and global properties of the network. The values of the Hurst exponent (0.8-0.9) were evaluated by both the detrended fluctuation analysis and the rescaled range analysis applied on the time series of the AR numbers. The findings suggest that ARs can be considered as a system of self-organized criticality (SOC). We constructed a growing network based on locations, occurrence times, and the lifetimes of 4227 ARs recorded from 1999 January 1 to 2017 April 14. The behavior of the clustering coefficient shows that the AR network is not a random network. The logarithmic behavior of the length scale has the characteristics of a so-called small-world network. It is found that the probability distribution of the node degrees for undirected networks follows the power law with exponents of about 3.7-4.2. This indicates the scale-free nature of the AR network. The scale-free and small-world properties of the AR network confirm that the system of ARs forms a system of SOC. Our results show that the occurrence probability of flares (classified by GOES class C> 5, M, and X flares) in the position of the AR network hubs takes values greater than that obtained for other nodes.

  8. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  9. Preliminary investigation of user requirements for solar radiation data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, C.W.; Thomas, R.E.

    1976-10-29

    The intent of this study is to: (1) make a preliminary assessment of the accuracy and precision of insolation data with respect to user requirements, and (2) make a corresponding assessment of the minimum/maximum geographic network coverage. In order to make these preliminary assessments, several specific questions have been addressed. Specifically: (1) how should users of solar radiation be classified and what principal uses of the data are made by each class, (2) what temporal and spatial properties of the data network are required to adequately serve the defined uses and users of solar radiation data, (3) to what degree does the existing network and associated data fulfill the desired data system properties, and (4) what criteria should be applied in identifying and evaluating expanded network/data options. The findings and conclusions of investigation of these questions are presented.

  10. Modeling solar radiation at the Earth's surface recent advances

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data is important for a wide range of applications, e.g. in engineering, agriculture, health sector, and in many fields of the natural sciences. A few examples showing the diversity of applications may include: architecture and building design e.g. air conditioning and cooling systems; solar heating system design and use; solar power generation; weather and climate prediction models; evaporation and irrigation; calculation of water requirements for crops; monitoring plant growth and disease control; skin cancer research. Solar radiation data must be provided in a variety of f

  11. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  12. Protection from solar ultraviolet radiation by clothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailthorpe, M. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The recently published Australia/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4399: l996 `Sun Protective Clothing - Evaluation and Classification` specifies an in vitro spectrophotometric method for the measurement of the ultraviolet (WR) transmission of textiles. Ultraviolet Protection Factors (UPF) are then calculated by convolving the UVR transmission data with standard CIE erythemal response data and ARL solar irradiance data. At the present time the scope of the standard is limited to loose fitting dry clothing. Virtually every textile parameter has an influence on the UPF of the finished garment and hence on the protection afforded to skin from the harmful effects of solar UVR radiation. Textile parameters such as fibre type, the method of spinning the yarn, fabric structure, cover factor, colorant, UVR absorbers and finishing methods determine the UPF of the fabric and hence must be controlled from batch to batch. Since garments generally shrink when washed, multiple wearing and washing cycles usually cause an increase in fabric UPF. Adventitious soiling of fabrics and the absorption of certain components of domestic laundry formulations, e g fluorescent whitening agents, increase fabric UPF ratings. Garments with a high degree of elasticity, e g nylon/lycra sportswear, that are stretched on to fit, will obviously have lower UPFs when stretched than when relaxed. In general fabrics worn in a wet state provide lower protection than when worn dry. On Australia`s most extreme summer day it has been estimated that there are 30 MEDs (minimal erythemal doses) in a dawn to dusk exposure. Thus outdoor workers should be provided with UPF 30 clothing, or better. Results from recent experiments using SK-II hairless mice dressed in UPF 50 `sunsuits` have shown that the mice developed no sun induced skin cancers on the skin areas protected by the UPF 50 fabric whereas multiple tumours developed on the unprotected skin.

  13. A simple solar radiation index for wildlife habitat studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Kim A.; Gogan, Peter J.; Vore, John N.; Irby, Lynn R.

    2007-01-01

    Solar radiation is a potentially important covariate in many wildlife habitat studies, but it is typically addressed only indirectly, using problematic surrogates like aspect or hillshade. We devised a simple solar radiation index (SRI) that combines readily available information about aspect, slope, and latitude. Our SRI is proportional to the amount of extraterrestrial solar radiation theoretically striking an arbitrarily oriented surface during the hour surrounding solar noon on the equinox. Because it derives from first geometric principles and is linearly distributed, SRI offers clear advantages over aspect-based surrogates. The SRI also is superior to hillshade, which we found to be sometimes imprecise and ill-behaved. To illustrate application of our SRI, we assessed niche separation among 3 ungulate species along a single environmental axis, solar radiation, on the northern Yellowstone winter range. We detected no difference between the niches occupied by bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) and elk (Cervus elaphus; P = 0.104), but found that mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) tended to use areas receiving more solar radiation than either of the other species (P solar radiation component.

  14. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data are processed for positioning solarpanels, in order their efficiency to be maximized.

  15. Denoising solar radiation data using coiflet wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul, E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my; Janier, Josefina B., E-mail: josefinajanier@petronas.com.my; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram, E-mail: mohana.muthuvalu@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Faculty of Sciences and Information Technology, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia); Hasan, Mohammad Khatim, E-mail: khatim@ftsm.ukm.my [Jabatan Komputeran Industri, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, Jumat, E-mail: jumat@ums.edu.my [Program Matematik dengan Ekonomi, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Beg Berkunci 2073, 88999 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia); Ismail, Mohd Tahir [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM Minden, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Signal denoising and smoothing plays an important role in processing the given signal either from experiment or data collection through observations. Data collection usually was mixed between true data and some error or noise. This noise might be coming from the apparatus to measure or collect the data or human error in handling the data. Normally before the data is use for further processing purposes, the unwanted noise need to be filtered out. One of the efficient methods that can be used to filter the data is wavelet transform. Due to the fact that the received solar radiation data fluctuates according to time, there exist few unwanted oscillation namely noise and it must be filtered out before the data is used for developing mathematical model. In order to apply denoising using wavelet transform (WT), the thresholding values need to be calculated. In this paper the new thresholding approach is proposed. The coiflet2 wavelet with variation diminishing 4 is utilized for our purpose. From numerical results it can be seen clearly that, the new thresholding approach give better results as compare with existing approach namely global thresholding value.

  16. Solar radiation and its penetration in a tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Qasim, S.Z.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Abidi, S.A.H.

    The Cochin Backwater which is an estuarine area on the west coast of India receives maximum solar radiation from December to March and minimum from June to September. During the monsoon months the estuary becomes highly turbid as a result...

  17. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J

    2014-01-01

    .... We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device...

  18. Porphyrin nanorods-polymer composites for solar radiation harvesting applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mongwaketsi, NP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest in exploring porphyrin-based nanostructures for artificial solar radiation harvesting stems from their structural similarity to chlorophylls. In nature, the precise organization and orientation of the chlorophylls result in efficient...

  19. New model to estimate and evaluate the solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. El Mghouchi

    2014-12-01

    The results indicate that the proposed model can be successfully used to estimate the solar radiation during all the seasons of year for studied position and for considered day, using as input the altitude (degrees, longitude (degrees and latitude (m.

  20. Forecasting of global solar radiation using anfis and armax techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Auwal; Gaya, M. S.; Aliyu, Rakiya; Aliyu Abdulkadir, Rabi’u.; Dauda Umar, Ibrahim; Aminu Yusuf, Lukuman; Umar Ali, Mudassir; Khairi, M. T. M.

    2018-01-01

    Procurement of measuring device, maintenance cost coupled with calibration of the instrument contributed to the difficulty in forecasting of global solar radiation in underdeveloped countries. Most of the available regressional and mathematical models do not capture well the behavior of the global solar radiation. This paper presents the comparison of Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and Autoregressive Moving Average with eXogenous term (ARMAX) in forecasting global solar radiation. Full-Scale (experimental) data of Nigerian metrological agency, Sultan Abubakar III international airport Sokoto was used to validate the models. The simulation results demonstrated that the ANFIS model having achieved MAPE of 5.34% outperformed the ARMAX model. The ANFIS could be a valuable tool for forecasting the global solar radiation.

  1. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potentially high, sunburn-causing solar UV radiation levels while at school. Method. ... Some sun exposure is important for vitamin D production1 and protection ..... However, many schools schedule lunch breaks in the 2-hour period either.

  2. A new CM SAF Solar Surface Radiation Climate Data Set derived from Meteosat Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, J.; Mueller, R. W.; Pfeifroth, U.; Träger-Chatterjee, C.; Cremer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The incoming surface solar radiation has been defined as an essential climate variable by GCOS. It is mandatory to monitor this part of the earth's energy balance, and thus gain insights on the state and variability of the climate system. In addition, data sets of the surface solar radiation have received increased attention over the recent years as an important source of information for the planning of solar energy applications. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving surface solar radiation from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. While CM SAF is focusing on the generation of high-quality long-term climate data records, also operationally data is provided in short time latency within 8 weeks. Here we present SARAH (Solar Surface Radiation Dataset - Heliosat), i.e. the new CM SAF Solar Surface Radiation data set based on Meteosat satellite observations. SARAH provides instantaneous, daily- and monthly-averaged data of the effective cloud albedo (CAL), the direct normalized solar radiation (DNI) and the solar irradiance (SIS) from 1983 to 2013 for the full view of the Meteosat satellite (i.e, Europe, Africa, parts of South America, and the Atlantic ocean). The data sets are generated with a high spatial resolution of 0.05 deg allowing for detailed regional studies, and are available in netcdf-format at no cost without restrictions at www.cmsaf.eu. We provide an overview of the data sets, including a validation against reference measurements from the BSRN and GEBA surface station networks.

  3. Effects of radiation on solar cells as photovoltaic generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radovan Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing need for obtaining electrical energy through renewable energy sources such as solar energy have lead to significant technological developments in the production of the basic element of PV conversion, the solar cell. Basically, a solar cell is a p-n junction whose characteristics have a great influence on its output parameters, primarily efficiency. Defects and impurities in the basic material, especially if located within the energy gap, may be activated during its lifetime, becoming traps for optically produced electron-hole pairs and, thus, decreasing the output power of the cell. All of the said effects could be induced in many ways over a lifetime of a solar cell and are consistent with the effects that radiation produces in semiconductor devices. The aim of this paper is to investigate changes in the main characteristics of solar cells, such as efficiency, output current and power, due to the exposure of solar systems to different (hostile radiation environments.

  4. Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological parameters in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available Solar diffuse radiation data including global radiation, shortwave and longwave balances, net radiation and sunshine hours have been extensively analyzed to study the variation of diffuse radiation with turbidity and cloud discharges appearing in the form of atmospherics over the tropics. Results of surface radiation measurements at Calcutta, Poona, Delhi and Madras are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation and the monthly ratios of diffuse to global solar radiation have been examined, with a special emphasis in relation to the noise level of atmospherics at Calcutta in the very low frequency band. The results exhibit some definite seasonal changes which appear to be in close agreement with one another.

  5. Diffuse solar radiation and associated meteorological parameters in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Bhattacharya

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Solar diffuse radiation data including global radiation, shortwave and longwave balances, net radiation and sunshine hours have been extensively analyzed to study the variation of diffuse radiation with turbidity and cloud discharges appearing in the form of atmospherics over the tropics. Results of surface radiation measurements at Calcutta, Poona, Delhi and Madras are presented together with some meteorological parameters. The monthly values of diffuse radiation and the monthly ratios of diffuse to global solar radiation have been examined, with a special emphasis in relation to the noise level of atmospherics at Calcutta in the very low frequency band. The results exhibit some definite seasonal changes which appear to be in close agreement with one another.

  6. Prostate cancer incidence in Australia correlates inversely with solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Tim W; Seyfi, Doruk; Sevfi, Doruk; Khadra, Mohamed

    2011-11-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Increased sun exposure and blood levels of vitamin D have been postulated to be protective against prostate cancer. This is controversial. We investigated the relationship between prostate cancer incidence and solar radiation in non-urban Australia, and found a lower incidence in regions receiving more sunlight. In landmark ecological studies, prostate cancer mortality rates have been shown to be inversely related to ultraviolet radiation exposure. Investigators have hypothesised that ultraviolet radiation acts by increasing production of vitamin D, which inhibits prostate cancer cells in vitro. However, analyses of serum levels of vitamin D in men with prostate cancer have failed to support this hypothesis. This study has found an inverse correlation between solar radiation and prostate cancer incidence in Australia. Our population (previously unstudied) represents the third group to exhibit this correlation. Significantly, the demographics and climate of Australia differ markedly from those of previous studies conducted on men in the United Kingdom and the United States. • To ascertain if prostate cancer incidence rates correlate with solar radiation among non-urban populations of men in Australia. • Local government areas from each state and territory were selected using explicit criteria. Urban areas were excluded from analysis. • For each local government area, prostate cancer incidence rates and averaged long-term solar radiation were obtained. • The strength of the association between prostate cancer incidence and solar radiation was determined. • Among 70 local government areas of Australia, age-standardized prostate cancer incidence rates for the period 1998-2007 correlated inversely with daily solar radiation averaged over the last two decades. •  There exists an association between less solar radiation and higher prostate cancer incidence in Australia. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU

  7. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    similar studies among schoolchildren in New Zealand,11 Denmark12 and England,13 and activity was the .... The solar UV-B radiation levels at the six geographical areas followed a similar annual cycle, with maximum ... exposures by geographical location as well as potential sunburn risk by skin type. Required solar UV ...

  8. Solar radiation calculation methodology for building exterior surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Flor, Francisco Jose Sanchez; Ortiz Cebolla, Rafael; Luis Molina Felix, Jose; Alvarez Dominguez, Servando [E S. Ingenieros. Grupo de Termotecnia, Avda. de los descubrimientos, s/n 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-11-01

    The present article shows a new methodology of calculation of the direct, diffuse and reflected incident solar radiation, in all type of surfaces, either in open urban environments or inside buildings. This methodology is applicable in problems related to solar access (space heating in buildings, shadowing of open spaces), solar gains (space cooling in buildings), and daylighting. Solar radiation is the most important contribution to the surface and volumetric energy balance during the daytime. Particularly, solar radiation is the main contributor to heat gains in buildings, especially in residential buildings, where internal gains are very low. Utilization of daylight in buildings may result in significant savings in electricity consumption for lighting while creating a higher quality indoor environment. Additional energy savings may also be realized during cooling season, when reduction of internal heat gains due to electric lighting results in a corresponding reduction of cooling energy consumption. The analysis of the existing calculation methods and proposed in the scientific bibliography for the calculation of the solar radiation in problems of solar access in winter, solar gains in summer, and daylighting, takes us to the necessity of outlining a new and complete methodology. This new methodology is applicable to all these problems with a great accuracy and calculation speed. (author)

  9. estimation of global solar radiation from sunshine hours for warri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    Key words: Sunshine hours, Relative humidity, rainfall, wind speed. ... meteorological parameters. This is because it plays a very major role in the determination of global solar radiation data. It is also the parameter with the best correlation with global solar ... enables spatial interpolation thus filling in gaps left by missing or ...

  10. Auroral kilometric radiation triggered by type II solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    The previously-reported triggering of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) during type III solar radio bursts was attributed to the incoming radio waves rather than other aspects of the burst's causative solar flare. This conclusion has now been confirmed by ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations showing AKR which seems to have been triggered also by a subsequent type II solar radio burst, up to eleven hours after the flare.

  11. Variation of solar radiation under cloud free conditions at BSRN sites using CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Patricia; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the earth's energy balance is key to understanding global warming. The incoming solar radiation, and hence the energy received, is influenced by absorption and reflection processes during its travel through the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the effect of clouds on the reflection of solar radiation compared to a clear-sky situation, known as the cloud radiative effect (CRE). To assess the CRE, the clear-sky radiation is needed. However, surface observations at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations, satellite estimates from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and simulations from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) models all differ in their long term global mean clear-sky radiation. Potential reasons include deficits in the modeling of clear-sky radiation or a different clear-sky definition in models and observations. In our study we therefore quantify the unforced variation of clear-sky solar radiation using data from the pre-industrial control run of the CMIP5 models on an annual, yearly and daily scale. Daily data are particularly well suited for the investigation of physical relationships between clear-sky radiation and possible influencing variables, such as water vapor, cloud cover and temperature in order to explain the variability. Furthermore, the effect of different time scales is quantified by comparing the results of daily, monthly and annual means. Using the pre-industrial control run of the CMIP5 models for all BSRN sites, an overall annual variability in clear-sky radiation of 6.1 W/m2 between the 5th and 95th percentile was found. Extreme values reach up to 20 W/m2 in annual variability. The differences between the stations are large as well, with highest variability in desert and monsoon areas. Our findings reveal a remarkable variability in solar radiation under cloud free conditions in the CMIP5 models, which should be considered in further studies.

  12. Modified empirical Solar Radiation Pressure model for IRNSS constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaiah, K.; Manamohan, K.; Nirmala, S.; Ratnakara, S. C.

    2017-11-01

    Navigation with Indian Constellation (NAVIC) also known as Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) is India's regional navigation system designed to provide position accuracy better than 20 m over India and the region extending to 1500 km around India. The reduced dynamic precise orbit estimation is utilized to determine the orbit broadcast parameters for IRNSS constellation. The estimation is mainly affected by the parameterization of dynamic models especially Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) model which is a non-gravitational force depending on shape and attitude dynamics of the spacecraft. An empirical nine parameter solar radiation pressure model is developed for IRNSS constellation, using two-way range measurements from IRNSS C-band ranging system. The paper addresses the development of modified SRP empirical model for IRNSS (IRNSS SRP Empirical Model, ISEM). The performance of the ISEM was assessed based on overlap consistency, long term prediction, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) residuals and compared with ECOM9, ECOM5 and new-ECOM9 models developed by Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). For IRNSS Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites, ISEM has shown promising results with overlap RMS error better than 5.3 m and 3.5 m respectively. Long term orbit prediction using numerical integration has improved with error better than 80%, 26% and 7.8% in comparison to ECOM9, ECOM5 and new-ECOM9 respectively. Further, SLR based orbit determination with ISEM shows 70%, 47% and 39% improvement over 10 days orbit prediction in comparison to ECOM9, ECOM5 and new-ECOM9 respectively and also highlights the importance of wide baseline tracking network.

  13. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  14. New typical meterological years and solar radiation data manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A new solar radiation data manual and new typical meterological years (TMYs) were developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Analytic Studies Division under the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. These tasks were funded and monitored by the Photovoltaics Branch of the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The new manual and the new TMYs were derived from the 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). The new manual is entitled Solar Radiation Data Manual for Flat-Plate and Concentrating Collectors. It provides designers and engineers of solar-energy-related systems with average monthly and yearly solar radiation values for various types of collectors for 239 stations in the United States and its territories. The new TMY data sets are referred to as TMY2s. This distinguishes them from earlier TMY data sets derived from the 1952-1975 SOLMET/ERSATZ data base. This paper describes the new data manual and the new TMY2s.

  15. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  16. Assessment of integrated solar ultraviolet radiation by PM-355 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Elhadidy, M.A.; Shaahid, S.M.; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2000-06-01

    The increase in environmental solar UV radiation due to depletion of ozone layer is a recent challenge to human health (skin cancer and eye effects) in countries having clear skies. Therefore, applying integrated, passive and inexpensive techniques to assess solar UV radiation is very much essential. Measurements of environmental solar UV radiation in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia area were carried out for a period of two months in the summer period in 1996 using two techniques in parallel namely: passive nuclear track detectors and active solar UV radiometers. Some of the nuclear track detectors were mounted in different conditions such as: under shadow band, on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays. Others were mounted on perpendicular, tilted and horizontal surfaces in sunlight. All detectors were attached to a wooden background of the same thickness (0.5 cm) to eliminate interference of the heat effect of various support materials and have uniformity of the support materials. The assessment was carried out for different periods extending from two to nine weeks continuously. The investigated period covered the hottest months in Saudi Arabia (July and August) when the sky was clear of clouds. The results indicate linear correlation between alpha track diameters and the integrated exposure to solar UV as measured by the solar UV radiometer for all nuclear track detector positions and orientations. The highest slope has been observed for the detectors placed on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays and the lowest from detectors oriented under the shadow band on horizontal position (measuring the diffused UV radiation only). The results show that most of the measured UV radiation (60%) were from the diffused UV radiation. The characteristics of the upper layer of the detectors are changed after chemical etching very quickly, with increase in the exposure time to UV solar radiation at certain orientation. The results encourage the use of nuclear track

  17. Life under solar UV radiation in aquatic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, R. P.; Häder, D.-P.

    Aquatic photosynthetic organisms are exposed to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation while they harvest longer wavelength radiation for energetic reasons. Solar UV-B radiation (280 - 315 nm) affects motility and orientation in motile organisms and impairs photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, phytoplankton and macroalgae as measured by monitoring oxygen production or pulse amplitude modulated fluorescence analysis. Upon moderate UV stress most organisms respond by photoinhibition which is an active downregulation of the photosynthetic electron transport in photosystem II by degradation of UV-damaged D1 protein. Photoinhibition is readily reversible during recovery in shaded conditions. Excessive UV stress causes photodamage which is not easily reversible. Another major target is the DNA where UV-B mainly induces thymine dimers. Cyanobacteria, phytoplankton and macroalgae produce scytonemin, mycosporine-like amino acids and other UV-absorbing substances to protect themselves from short wavelength solar radiation.

  18. Flight attendant radiation dose from solar particle events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeri L; Mertens, Christopher J; Grajewski, Barbara; Luo, Lian; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Cassinelli, Rick T

    2014-08-01

    Research has suggested that work as a flight attendant may be related to increased risk for reproductive health effects. Air cabin exposures that may influence reproductive health include radiation dose from galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events. This paper describes the assessment of radiation dose accrued during solar particle events as part of a reproductive health study of flight attendants. Solar storm data were obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Weather Prediction Center list of solar proton events affecting the Earth environment to ascertain storms relevant to the two study periods (1992-1996 and 1999-2001). Radiation dose from exposure to solar energetic particles was estimated using the NAIRAS model in conjunction with galactic cosmic radiation dose calculated using the CARI-6P computer program. Seven solar particle events were determined to have potential for significant radiation exposure, two in the first study period and five in the second study period, and over-lapped with 24,807 flight segments. Absorbed (and effective) flight segment doses averaged 6.5 μGy (18 μSv) and 3.1 μGy (8.3 μSv) for the first and second study periods, respectively. Maximum doses were as high as 440 μGy (1.2 mSv) and 20 flight segments had doses greater than 190 μGy (0.5 mSv). During solar particle events, a pregnant flight attendant could potentially exceed the equivalent dose limit to the conceptus of 0.5 mSv in a month recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  19. Regional trends in surface solar radiation derived from satellite-based data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Posselt, Rebekka; Krähenmann, Stefan; Müller, Richard W.; Wild, Martin; Stöckli, Reto; Ahrens, Bodo

    2013-04-01

    The monitoring of the surface solar radiation and the detection of its variability and possible changes is highly relevant for our understanding of the climate system. Clouds and aerosols are the main contributors to the observed changes in the solar energy reaching the surface. Clouds are well observed from satellites, especially during daytime, making satellite-derived data sets of the surface radiation a potentially powerful source of information to assess the spatial structure of surface solar radiation. Surface-based observations, e.g., from the BSRN and GEBA networks, have been used to assess the temporal variability and trend of the surface radiation. Due to the limited spatial distribution of the surface stations, a generalization of the trends derived from measurements at individual stations is difficult. Satellite-derived data of the surface radiation, providing up to global coverage, are available since the 1980s allowing an analysis of the regional variability of temporal changes of the surface radiation. Here, we use surface solar radiation data generated and provided by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF, www.cmsaf.eu) based on geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites. The ability of the satellite-derived data sets to detect trends is tested and assessed by comparison with surface reference observations in Europe. It is shown that, at least for part of the available time series, the satellite data is stable and can be used to derive trend estimates. Substantial regional differences in the trend of the surface solar radiation are detected across Europe between 1994 and 2005, with strong positive trends over Central Europe (brightening) and negative trends over the Mediterranean Sea (dimming).

  20. Solar radiation pumped solid state of lasers for Solar Power Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruiyi [New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The Laser Solar Power Satellites (L-SPS) is the most promising way to overcome global energy and environmental and economical problems. The purpose was to use the favorable combination of solar radiation, modern lasers and the extremely promising phenomenon Optical Phase Conjugation (OPC). Direct conversion of solar energy to energy of a high-power laser beam has the advantage of high efficiency and precise energy transportation. In this paper, direct solar radiation pumping of the laser is compared with the pumping using the intermediate stage of the conversion of the solar radiation in electrical energy. Possible solid-state lasers that can be used in L-SPS are also discussed (including optical system and cooling system). [Spanish] Los Satelites de Energia Solar Laser (L-SPS) son la forma mas prometedora para contrarrestar los problemas globales de energia, ambientales y problemas economicos. El proposito fue el de usar la combinacion favorable de radiacion solar, laseres modernos y el fenomeno extremadamente prometedor de conjugacion de fase optica (OPC). La conversion directa de energia solar a energia de un rayo laser de alta potencia tiene la ventaja de la alta eficiencia y precision de la transportacion de la energia. En este documento la radiacion solar directa impulsada por el laser se compara con la impulsion usando el estado intermedio de conversion de la radiacion solar en energia electrica. Tambien se analizan los posibles laseres de estado solido que pueden usarse en L-SPS (incluyendo el sistema optico y el sistema de enfriamiento).

  1. Solar radiation and thermal performance of solar collectors for Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    This report describes the part of the EUDP project “EUDP 11-l, Solar Resource Assessment in Denmark”, which is carried out at Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark.......This report describes the part of the EUDP project “EUDP 11-l, Solar Resource Assessment in Denmark”, which is carried out at Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark....

  2. National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) SolarAnywhere 10 km Model Output for 1989 to 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) was produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy...

  3. Integrating Wireless Networking for Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, Jeremy; Barzilov, Alexander; Womble, Phillip; Paschal, Jon

    2006-10-01

    As wireless networking becomes more available, new applications are being developed for this technology. Our group has been studying the advantages of wireless networks of radiation detectors. With the prevalence of the IEEE 802.11 standard (``WiFi''), we have developed a wireless detector unit which is comprised of a 5 cm x 5 cm NaI(Tl) detector, amplifier and data acquisition electronics, and a WiFi transceiver. A server may communicate with the detector unit using a TCP/IP network connected to a WiFi access point. Special software on the server will perform radioactive isotope determination and estimate dose-rates. We are developing an enhanced version of the software which utilizes the receiver signal strength index (RSSI) to estimate source strengths and to create maps of radiation intensity.

  4. SRADLIB: A C Library for Solar Radiation Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balenzategui, J. L. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This document shows the result of an exhaustive study about the theoretical and numerical models available in the literature about solar radiation modelling. The purpose of this study is to develop or adapt mathematical models describing the solar radiation specifically for Spain locations as well as to create computer tools able to support the labour of researchers or engineers needing solar radiation data to solve or improve the technical or energetic performance of solar systems. As results of this study and revision, a C library (SRADLIB) is presented as a key for the compilation of the mathematical models from different authors, for the comparison among the different approaches and for its application in computer programs. Different topics related to solar radiation and its modelling are first discussed, including the assumptions and conventions adopted and describing the most accepted and used current state-of-the-art models. some typical problems in the numerical calculation of radiation values are also posed with the proposed solution. The document includes next a complete reference of the developed functions, with many examples of application and calculus. (Author) 24 refs.

  5. Effect of Antarctic solar radiation on sewage bacteria viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A

    2005-06-01

    The majority of coastal Antarctic research stations discard untreated sewage waste into the near-shore marine environment. However, Antarctic solar conditions are unique, with ozone depletion increasing the proportion of potentially damaging ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the marine environment. This study assessed the influence of Antarctic solar radiation on the viability of Escherichia coli and sewage microorganisms at Rothera Research Station, Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula. Cell viability decreased with increased exposure time and with exposure to shorter wavelengths of solar radiation. Cell survival also declined with decreasing cloud cover, solar zenith angle and ozone column depth. However, particulates in sewage increased the persistence of viable bacteria. Ultraviolet radiation doses over Rothera Point were highest during the austral summer. During this time, solar radiation may act to partially reduce the number of viable sewage-derived microorganisms in the surface seawater around Antarctic outfalls. Nevertheless, this effect is not reliable and every effort should be made to fully treat sewage before release into the Antarctic marine environment.

  6. Aeronet Solar Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  7. Surface Radiation Budget (SURFRAD) Network 1-Hour Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation measurements at SURFRAD stations cover the range of the electromagnetic spectrum that affects the earth/atmosphere system. Direct solar radiation is...

  8. EVALUATION OF OPPORTUNITIES OF SOLAR ENERGETICS ON THE BASIS OF ACCURATE GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF SOLAR RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aculinin A.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Expected quantity of a solar energy received by solar panel is estimated on the basis of accurate measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev. Optimal orientation of solar panels and apparent volume of the electric power generated by solar panels are determined.

  9. EVALUATION OF OPPORTUNITIES OF SOLAR ENERGETICS ON THE BASIS OF ACCURATE GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF SOLAR RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    Aculinin A.; Smikov V.

    2008-01-01

    Expected quantity of a solar energy received by solar panel is estimated on the basis of accurate measurements of solar radiation in Kishinev. Optimal orientation of solar panels and apparent volume of the electric power generated by solar panels are determined.

  10. A comparison of experimental and estimated data analyses of solar radiation, in Adiyaman, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Bozkurt, Ismail; Calis, Nazif; Sogukpinar, Haci

    2015-01-01

    The world's main energy source is the sun. Other energy sources are caused directly or indirectly from the sun. Turkey has a rich potential in terms of solar energy and interest in solar power systems is increasing in the rapidly evolving technology. In all of the solar energy studies needs solar radiation data but solar radiation measurements are not possible on each area. Therefore, estimation of the solar radiation by using a variety of methods are emerging importance. In this study, ...

  11. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  12. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATION OF THE INTER-NETWORK MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Chunlan; Wang, Jingxiu, E-mail: cljin@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-06-20

    The solar inter-network magnetic field is the weakest component of solar magnetism, but it contributes most of the solar surface magnetic flux. The study of its origin has been constrained by the inadequate tempospatial resolution and sensitivity of polarization observations. With dramatic advances in spatial resolution and detecting sensitivity, the solar spectropolarimetry provided by the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode in an interval from the solar minimum to maximum of cycle 24 opens an unprecedented opportunity to study the cyclic behavior of the solar inter-network magnetic field. More than 1000 Hinode magnetograms observed from 2007 January to 2014 August are selected in the study. It has been found that there is a very slight correlation between sunspot number and magnetic field at the inter-network flux spectrum. From solar minimum to maximum of cycle 24, the flux density of the solar inter-network field is invariant, at 10 ± 1 G. The observations suggest that the inter-network magnetic field does not arise from flux diffusion or flux recycling of solar active regions, thereby indicating the existence of a local small-scale dynamo. Combining the full-disk magnetograms observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager and the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager in the same period, we find that the area ratio of the inter-network region to the full disk of the Sun apparently decreases from solar minimum to maximum but always exceeds 60%, even in the phase of solar maximum.

  13. Feed network and electromagnetic radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John; Linehan, Kevin E.; Ardavan, Houshang; Schmidt-Zwiefel, Andrea Caroline

    2017-01-17

    An antenna may include a volume polarization current radiator and a feed network. The volume polarization current radiator, includes a dielectric solid (such as a dielectric strip), and a plurality of closely-spaced excitation elements (24), each excitation element (24) being configured to induce a volume polarization current distribution in the dielectric solid proximate to the excitation element when a voltage is applied to the excitation element. The feed network is coupled to the volume polarization current radiator. The feed network also includes a plurality of passive power divider elements (32) and a plurality of passive delay elements (d1-d6) coupling the first port (30) and the plurality of second ports (108, 109, 164), the plurality of power divider elements (32) and the plurality of phase delay elements (d1-d6) being configured such that a radio-frequency signal that is applied to the first port (30) experiences a progressive change of phase as it is coupled to the plurality of second ports (108, 109, 164) so as to cause the volume polarization current distribution to propagate along the dielectric solid.

  14. Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehos, M. S.; Pacheco, K. A.; Link, H. F.

    1991-12-01

    The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global horizontal ultraviolet (280 to 385 nm) and full spectrum (280 to 4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global horizontal ultraviolet to full spectrum radiation of 4 to 6 pct. that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much larger dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approx. 5 pct. at low air mass to 1 pct. at higher masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full spectrum global horizontal radiation. For the direct normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear sky model to underpredict the measured data. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct normal component throughout the year.

  15. Detection of Ionizing Radiation using Solar Blind Air Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    either PMTs or MCPs . These detectors are intrinsically solar blind and may provide much higher detection efficiency (10-25%) than CsTe/Filter PMT or MCP ...possibility of detection in full daylight. If a practical detector could be realized utilizing this detection technique it would offer the following...benefits over existing radiation detection methods: • Standoff imaging detection of ionizing radiation. Such a detector would provide information on source

  16. Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehos, M.S.; Pacheco, K.A.; Link, H.F.

    1991-12-01

    The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global-horizontal ultraviolet (280--385 nm) and full-spectrum (280--4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear-sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global-horizontal ultraviolet to full-spectrum radiation of 4%--6% that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct-normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much large dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approximately 5% at low air mass to 1% at higher at masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear-sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full-spectrum global-horizontal radiation. For the direct-normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear-sky model to underpredict the measured that. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global-horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct-normal component throughout the year. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Solar Radiation effect on the bituminous binder; Efecto de la radiacion solar sobre el ligante bituminoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadeo Rico, A.; Torres Perez, A.

    2010-07-01

    Asphalt, used as binder in road construction, becomes more brittle and harder during working life on the surface of the road pavement, conducting toward their deterioration. This is caused by the oxidation of the molecular functional groups of the asphalt molecular structure. Moreover, it is observed that ultraviolet radiation increases the oxidation process. However, the effect of solar light on the asphalt degradation has been poorly researched. The aim of this work is to study asphalt ageing caused by effect of solar radiation, by using standard test. Four commercial asphalts from different companies were selected: two with penetration number 50/70, and the other two polymer modified asphalts. From each of the asphalts forty samples were taken off and placed in four different aging conditions of temperature and radiation for a period ranging from 40 to 500 days. Ring and Ball test, and Fraass breaking Point test, were used to analyse the changes of asphalt properties after exposition to solar radiation. The results of the four analyzed asphalts showed a distinct behaviour; not only in the test temperature increase but also in the rate. Another experiment was carried out. Samples from a hot mix asphalt batch were placed under solar radiation, and were compacted by the Marshall procedure after increasing periods of time. Density and resistance to plastic flow using Marshall Apparatus were measured. Results showed an increase in the stability of samples under radiation. Both experiments show that the solar radiation is enough to cause changes in the asphalt molecular structure due to oxidation. So that, the study of the effect of the solar radiation on the asphalt properties could be a good tool to asses the performances of asphalt pavement. (Author) 26 refs.

  18. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  19. Predicting solar radiation based on available weather indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank Joseph

    Solar radiation prediction models are complex and require software that is not available for the household investor. The processing power within a normal desktop or laptop computer is sufficient to calculate similar models. This barrier to entry for the average consumer can be fixed by a model simple enough to be calculated by hand if necessary. Solar radiation modeling has been historically difficult to predict and accurate models have significant assumptions and restrictions on their use. Previous methods have been limited to linear relationships, location restrictions, or input data limits to one atmospheric condition. This research takes a novel approach by combining two techniques within the computational limits of a household computer; Clustering and Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Clustering helps limit the large observation space which restricts the use of HMMs. Instead of using continuous data, and requiring significantly increased computations, the cluster can be used as a qualitative descriptor of each observation. HMMs incorporate a level of uncertainty and take into account the indirect relationship between meteorological indicators and solar radiation. This reduces the complexity of the model enough to be simply understood and accessible to the average household investor. The solar radiation is considered to be an unobservable state that each household will be unable to measure. The high temperature and the sky coverage are already available through the local or preferred source of weather information. By using the next day's prediction for high temperature and sky coverage, the model groups the data and then predicts the most likely range of radiation. This model uses simple techniques and calculations to give a broad estimate for the solar radiation when no other universal model exists for the average household.

  20. Climate variation based on temperature and solar radiation data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ckaonga

    City, Malawi for a 29-year period (1985 to 2013) were assessed for the possibility of climate variation. In addition, the concentration of carbon ... Key words: Climate variation, solar radiation, temperature, weather. INTRODUCTION. The world's climate ..... changes and nocturnal global warming. Science 283 (5399):229-231.

  1. Evaluation of the effectiveness of solar radiation for the disinfection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of solar radiation as a disinfection agent for EPEC contaminated water. Effectiveness of SODIS was determined using viable coliform counts on VRBA medium and inactivation was determined by a reduction in growth of the organisms. The results show that it is possible ...

  2. Comparison Of Diffuse Solar Radiation Models Using Data For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurements of global solar radiation and sunshine duration data during the period from 1984 to 1999 were supplied by IITA (International Institute of Tropical Agriculture) at Onne. The data were used to establish empirical relationships that would connect the daily monthly average diffuse irradiation with both relative ...

  3. Listing of solar radiation measuring equipment and glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, E. A.; Greenbaum, S. A.; Patel, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to list and provide all available information about solar radiation measuring equipment which are being manufactured and are available on the market. The list is in tabular form and includes sensor type, response time, cost data and comments for each model. A cost code is included which shows ranges only.

  4. Evaluation of the effects of solar radiation on glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Four optical materials were exposed to simulated solar and particulate radiation in a space environment. Sapphire and fused silica experienced little change in transmittance while optical crown glass and ultra low expansion glass darkened appreciably. A complete analysis of the 500 hour simulated space exposure test was conducted. Additionally, studies were performed to aid in sample selection for a 100 hour simulated exposure test.

  5. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... including fair-skinned individuals and African albinos, and people spending extended unprotected periods outdoors are at risk of sunburn, a risk factor for skin cancer. Sunburn becomes increasingly likely during the high solar UV radiation hours around midday, and previous studies have shown that children are exposed ...

  6. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The detrimental effects of excess personal solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure include sunburn, immunosuppression and skin cancer. In South Africa, individuals with minimum natural protection from melanin, including fair-skinned individuals and African albinos, and people spending extended ...

  7. A comparison of outer electron radiation belt dropouts during solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Ogunjobi

    2017-06-06

    Jun 6, 2017 ... study identifies radiation belt electron dropouts which are ultimately triggered when solar wind stream interfaces (SI) arrived at ... (Plasmapause); indicating a combination of electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode waves as the contributing ... density known as the slot (Van-Allen 1959). Elec-.

  8. Quantifying Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Solar Radiation over the Northeast China Based on ACO-BPNN Model and Intensity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqian Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable information on the spatiotemporal dynamics of solar radiation plays a crucial role in studies relating to global climate change. In this study, a new backpropagation neural network (BPNN model optimized with an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO algorithm was developed to generate the ACO-BPNN model, which had demonstrated superior performance for simulating solar radiation compared to traditional BPNN modelling, for Northeast China. On this basis, we applied an intensity analysis to investigate the spatiotemporal variation of solar radiation from 1982 to 2010 over the study region at three levels: interval, category, and conversion. Research findings revealed that (1 the solar radiation resource in the study region increased from the 1980s to the 2000s and the average annual rate of variation from the 1980s to the 1990s was lower than that from the 1990s to the 2000s and (2 the gains and losses of solar radiation at each level were in different conditions. The poor, normal, and comparatively abundant levels were transferred to higher levels, whereas the abundant level was transferred to lower levels. We believe our findings contribute to implementing ad hoc energy management strategies to optimize the use of solar radiation resources and provide scientific suggestions for policy planning.

  9. Adaptive control of the packet transmission period with solar energy harvesting prediction in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kideok; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-04-24

    A number of research works has studied packet scheduling policies in energy scavenging wireless sensor networks, based on the predicted amount of harvested energy. Most of them aim to achieve energy neutrality, which means that an embedded system can operate perpetually while meeting application requirements. Unlike other renewable energy sources, solar energy has the feature of distinct periodicity in the amount of harvested energy over a day. Using this feature, this paper proposes a packet transmission control policy that can enhance the network performance while keeping sensor nodes alive. Furthermore, this paper suggests a novel solar energy prediction method that exploits the relation between cloudiness and solar radiation. The experimental results and analyses show that the proposed packet transmission policy outperforms others in terms of the deadline miss rate and data throughput. Furthermore, the proposed solar energy prediction method can predict more accurately than others by 6.92%.

  10. Adaptive Control of the Packet Transmission Period with Solar Energy Harvesting Prediction in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kideok Kwon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of research works has studied packet scheduling policies in energy scavenging wireless sensor networks, based on the predicted amount of harvested energy. Most of them aim to achieve energy neutrality, which means that an embedded system can operate perpetually while meeting application requirements. Unlike other renewable energy sources, solar energy has the feature of distinct periodicity in the amount of harvested energy over a day. Using this feature, this paper proposes a packet transmission control policy that can enhance the network performance while keeping sensor nodes alive. Furthermore, this paper suggests a novel solar energy prediction method that exploits the relation between cloudiness and solar radiation. The experimental results and analyses show that the proposed packet transmission policy outperforms others in terms of the deadline miss rate and data throughput. Furthermore, the proposed solar energy prediction method can predict more accurately than others by 6.92%.

  11. Assessment and comparison of methods for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.

    1995-06-01

    In the study, the different methods to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation are compared. The methods included are spectroradiometric, erythemally weighted broadband and multi-channel measurements. The comparison of the different methods is based on a literature review and assessments of optical characteristics of the spectroradiometer Optronic 742 of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and of the erythemally weighted Robertson-Berger type broadband radiometers Solar Light models 500 and 501 of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and STUK. An introduction to the sources of error in solar UV measurements, to methods for radiometric characterization of UV radiometers together with methods for error reduction are presented. Reviews on experiences from world-wide UV monitoring efforts and instrumentation as well as on the results from international UV radiometer intercomparisons are also presented. (62 refs.).

  12. Estimation of clear sky hourly global solar radiation in Iraq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jumaily, Kais J.; Al-Zuhairi, Munya F.; Mahdi, Zahraa S. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, College of Science, Al-Mustansiriyah University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2012-07-01

    The availability of hourly solar radiation data is very important for applications utilizing solar energy and for climate and environmental aspects. The aim of this work is to use a simple model for estimating hourly global solar radiation under clear sky condition in Iraq. Calculations were compared with measurements obtained from local station in Baghdad city and from Meteosat satellite data for different locations in Iraq. The statistical test methods of the mean bias error (MBE), root mean square error (RMSE) and t-test were used to evaluate the performance of the model. Results indicated that a fairly good agreement exists between calculated and measured values for all locations in Iraq. Since the model is independent of any meteorological variable, it would be of a practical use for rural areas where no meteorological data are available.

  13. Variability and trends of surface solar radiation in Europe based on CM SAF satellite data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) generates satellite-based high-quality climate data records, with a focus on the global energy and water cycle. Here, the latest releases of the CM SAF's data records of surface solar radiation, Surface Solar Radiation Data Set - Heliosat (SARAH), and CM SAF cLouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data (CLARA), are analyzed and validated with reference to ground-based measurements, e.g., provided by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), the World Radiation Data Center (WRDC) and the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). Focus is given to the trends and the variability of the surface irradiance in Europe as derived from the surface and the satellite-based data records. Both data sources show an overall increase (i.e., brightening) after the 1980s, and indicate substantial decadal variability with periods of reduced increase (or even a decrease) and periods with a comparable high increase. Also the increase shows a pronounced spatial pattern, which is also found to be consistent between the two data sources. The good correspondence between the satellite-based data records and the surface measurements highlight the potential of the satellite data to represent the variability and changes in the surface irradiance and document the dominant role of clouds over aerosol to explain its variations. Reasons for remaining differences between the satellite- and the surface-based data records (e.g., in Southern Europe) will be discussed. To test the consistency of the CM SAF solar radiation data records we also assess the decadal variability of the solar reflected radiation at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) from the CM SAF climate data record based on the MVIRI / SEVIRI measurements from 1983 to 2015. This data record complements the SARAH data record in its temporal and spatial coverage; fewer and different assumptions are used in the retrieval to generate the TOA reflected solar

  14. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex inte...

  15. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  16. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Global solar radiation estimation using sunshine duration in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almorox, J.; Hontoria, C. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Dpto. de Edafologia

    2004-06-01

    Several equations were employed to estimate global solar radiation from sunshine hours for 16 meteorological stations in Spain, using only the relative duration of sunshine. These equations included the original Angstrom-Prescott linear regression and modified functions (quadratic, third degree, logarithmic and exponential functions). Estimated values were compared with measured values in terms of the coefficient of determination, standard error of the estimate and mean absolute error. All the models fitted the data adequately and can be used to estimate global solar radiation from sunshine hours. This study finds that the third degree models performed better than the other models, but the linear model is preferred due to its greater simplicity and wider application. It is also found that seasonal partitioning does not significantly improve the estimation of global radiation. (author)

  18. Solar-terrestrial, ionospheric and natural phenomena studies using the South America VLF network (SAVNET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Kaufmann, Pierre; Gavilán, Hernan R.; Correia, Emilia; Hadano, Rubens; Schuch, Nelson J.

    2011-07-01

    The South America VLF Network (SAVNET) has been installed in April 2009, and is composed of eight tracking receivers spread over South America, in Brazil, Peru and Argentina, and the Antarctica Peninsula. SAVNET is monitoring the properties of subionospheric propagating waves that reveal changes of the electrical properties of the ionospheric diurnal D-region or nocturnal E-region. In this paper, we will show the ability of the diagnostic obtained by SAVNET to discuss the monitoring of the solar activity on short timescales related to ionization due to solar flares. The sensitivity of flare detection as a function of the solar activity level will be discussed. On longer timescales related to the solar cycle, SAVNET is also able to provide information on the solar Lyman-α radiation. Finally we show that the VLF technique is well suited to search for of seismic-electromagnetic effects, and to provide a genuine diagnostic of high-energy astrophysical phenomena.

  19. An Algorithm to Determine the Optimum Tilt Angle of a Solar Panel from Global Horizontal Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Calabrò

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an algorithm to calculate the optimum tilt angle of solar panels by means of global horizontal solar radiation data, provided from Earth-based meteorological stations. This mathematical modeling is based on the maximization of the theoretical expression of the global solar irradiation impinging on an inclined surface, with respect to the slope and orientation of the panel and to the solar hour angle. A set of transcendent equations resulted, whose solutions give the optimum tilt and orientation of a solar panel. A simulation was carried out using global horizontal solar radiation data from the European Solar Radiation Atlas and some empirical models of diffuse solar radiation. The optimum tilt angle resulted was related to latitude by a linear regression with significant correlation coefficients. The standard error of the mean values resulted increased significantly with latitude, suggesting that unreliable values can be provided at high latitudes.

  20. A two dimensional thermal network model for a photovoltaic solar wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehra, Himanshu [1-140 Avenue Windsor, Lachine, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    A two dimensional thermal network model is proposed to predict the temperature distribution for a section of photovoltaic solar wall installed in an outdoor room laboratory in Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. The photovoltaic solar wall is constructed with a pair of glass coated photovoltaic modules and a polystyrene filled plywood board as back panel. The active solar ventilation through a photovoltaic solar wall is achieved with an exhaust fan fixed in the outdoor room laboratory. The steady state thermal network nodal equations are developed for conjugate heat exchange and heat transport for a section of a photovoltaic solar wall. The matrix solution procedure is adopted for formulation of conductance and heat source matrices for obtaining numerical solution of one dimensional heat conduction and heat transport equations by performing two dimensional thermal network analyses. The temperature distribution is predicted by the model with measurement data obtained from the section of a photovoltaic solar wall. The effect of conduction heat flow and multi-node radiation heat exchange between composite surfaces is useful for predicting a ventilation rate through a solar ventilation system. (author)

  1. Tritium-powered radiation sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Marc S.; Russo, Johnny A.; Katsis, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    Isotope power supplies offer long-lived (100 years using 63Ni), low-power energy sources, enabling sensors or communications nodes for the lifetime of infrastructure. A tritium beta-source (12.5-year half-life) encapsulated in a phosphor-lined vial couples directly to a photovoltaic (PV) to generate a trickle current into an electrical load. An inexpensive design is described using commercial-of-the-shelf (COTS) components that generate 100 μWe for nextgeneration compact electronics/sensors. A matched radiation sensor has been built for long-duration missions utilizing microprocessor-controlled sleep modes, low-power electronic components, and a passive interrupt driven environmental wake-up. The low-power early-warning radiation detector network and isotope power source enables no-maintenance mission lifetimes.

  2. Solar radiation on a catenary collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchik, M.; Appelbaum, J.

    1992-01-01

    A tent-shaped structure with a flexible photovoltaic blanket acting as a catenary collector is presented. The shadow cast by one side of the collector produces a shadow on the other side of the collector. This self-shading effect is analyzed. The direct beam, the diffuse, and the albedo radiation on the collector are determined. An example is given for the insolation on the collector operating on Viking Lander 1 (VL1).

  3. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan; Michel, Bruno, E-mail: bmi@zurich.ibm.com [IBM Research - Zurich, Säumerstrasse 4, CH-8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland)

    2015-09-28

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of different solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.

  4. Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; silverman, vered; harnik, nili; Erlich, caryn

    2016-04-01

    Superposed epoch analysis of meteorological reanalysis data is used to demonstrate a significant connection between intraseasonal solar variability and temperatures in the stratosphere. Decreasing solar flux leads to a cooling of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, while increasing solar flux leads to a warming of the tropical upper stratosphere above 7hPa, after a lag of approximately six to ten days. Late winter (February-March) Arctic stratospheric temperatures also change in response to changing incoming solar flux in a manner consistent with that seen on the 11 year timescale: ten to thirty days after the start of decreasing solar flux, the polar cap warms during the easterly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation. In contrast, cooling is present after decreasing solar flux during the westerly phase of the Quasi-Biennal Oscillation (though it is less robust than the warming during the easterly phase). The estimated composite mean changes in Northern Hemisphere upper stratospheric (~ 5hPa) polar temperatures exceed 8K, and are potentially a source of intraseasonal predictability for the surface. These changes in polar temperature are consistent with the changes in wave driving entering the stratosphere. Garfinkel, C.I., V. Silverman, N. Harnik, C. Erlich, Y. Riz (2015), Stratospheric Response to Intraseasonal Changes in Incoming Solar Radiation, J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 120, 7648-7660. doi: 10.1002/2015JD023244.

  5. Habitat Design Considerations for Implementing Solar Particle Event Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mathew A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation protection is an important habitat design consideration for human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. Fortunately, radiation shelter concepts can effectively reduce astronaut exposure for the relatively low proton energies of solar particle events, enabling moderate duration missions of several months before astronaut exposure (galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event) approaches radiation exposure limits. In order to minimize habitat mass for increasingly challenging missions, design of radiation shelters must minimize dedicated, single-purpose shielding mass by leveraging the design and placement of habitat subsystems, accommodations, and consumables. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems RadWorks Storm Shelter Team has recently designed and performed radiation analysis on several low dedicated mass shelter concepts for a year-long mission. This paper describes habitat design considerations identified during the study's radiation analysis. These considerations include placement of the shelter within a habitat for improved protection, integration of human factors guidance for sizing shelters, identification of potential opportunities for habitat subsystems to compromise on individual subsystem performances for overall vehicle mass reductions, and pre-configuration of shelter components for reduced deployment times.

  6. The radiation in the atmosphere during major solar particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Simon N.; Dyer, Clive S.; Lei, Fan

    Major solar particle events can give rise to greatly enhanced radiation throughout the entire atmosphere including at aircraft altitudes. These particle events are very hard to predict and their effect on aircraft is difficult to calculate. A comprehensive model of the energetic radiation in the atmosphere has been developed based on a response matrix of the atmosphere to energetic particle incidence. This model has previously been used to determine the spectral form of several ground level neutron events including February 1956 and September/October 1989. Significant validation of the model has been possible using CREAM data flying onboard Concorde during the September/October 1989 events. Further work has been carried out for the current solar maximum, including estimates of the solar particle spectra during the July 2000, April 2001, and October 2003 events and comparisons of predicted atmospheric measurements with limited flight data. Further CREAM data have been obtained onboard commercial airlines and high altitude business jets during quiet time periods. In addition, the atmospheric radiation model, along with solar particle spectra, have been used to calculate the neutron flux and dose rates along several commercial aircraft flight paths including London to Los Angeles. The influence of rigidity cut-off suppression by geomagnetic storms is examined and shows that the received flight dose during disturbed periods can be significantly enhanced compared with quiet periods.

  7. UV Irradiance Enhancements by Scattering of Solar Radiation from Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Feister

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Scattering of solar radiation by clouds can reduce or enhance solar global irradiance compared to cloudless-sky irradiance at the Earth’s surface. Cloud effects to global irradiance can be described by Cloud Modification Factors (CMF. Depending on strength and duration, irradiance enhancements affect the energy balance of the surface and gain of solar power for electric energy generation. In the ultraviolet region, they increase the risk for damage to living organisms. Wavelength-dependent CMFs have been shown to reach 1.5 even in the UV-B region at low altitudes. Ground-based solar radiation measurements in the high Andes region at altitudes up to 5917 m a.s.l showed cloud-induced irradiance enhancements. While UV-A enhancements were explained by cloud scattering, both radiation scattering from clouds and Negative Ozone Anomalies (NOA have been discussed to have caused short-time enhancement of UV-B irradiance. Based on scenarios using published CMF and additional spectroradiometric measurements at a low-altitude site, the contribution of cloud scattering to the UV-B irradiance enhancement in the Andes region has been estimated. The range of UV index estimates converted from measured UV-B and UV-A irradiance and modeled cloudless-sky ratios UV-B/erythemal UV is compatible with an earlier estimate of an extreme UV index value of 43 derived for the high Andes.

  8. Assessment of Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation in Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rostampour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Biological effects of ultraviolet (UV radiation on the body of live organisms, have been studied by researchers in recent years. UV affects human organs such as skin, eyes and immune system, as well as animals and plants. The main natural source of UV radiation is the Sun. So, the integral observation of UV levels and their effects at ground level is important to determine the present and future environmental and health implications of the solar UV radiation. Since the amount of UVR (UV radiation has not already been measured in Hamadan, the aim of this study was to measure the amount in Hamadan city in different months of the year. Materials & Methods: This work was a cross-sectional study and has assessed the solar UVA radiation, by calibrated Hagner digital radiometer, model EC1 UV-A. The monthly quantity of solar UVR was measured in Hamadan during one year (2011-2012. Results: The maximum UVA received on the ground level was 27.3±1.09 W/m2 in Shahrivar month (Aug 23 – Sep 22 while the minimum was 11.8±1.32 W/m2 in Azar month (Nov 22 – Dec 21 . Total UVA radiation received on the ground level was 19.74±1.56 W/m2 during the period of measurment.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it seems that the annual UVA in Hamadan city exceeded the amounts recommended by the WHO and further studies are needed to measure UVB and UVC to determine the total UV radiation level in thecity. Based on these results, it is recommended to wear appropriate sunglasses and minimize sun exposure during the midday hours.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 19 (4:69-74

  9. Solar radiation data manual for flat-plate and concentrating collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlap, M.A. [ed.; Marion, W.; Wilcox, S.

    For designers and engineers of solar energy-related systems, the Solar Radiation Data Manual for Flat-Plate and Concentrating Collectors gives the solar resource available for various types of collectors for the US and its territories. The data in the manual were modeled using hourly values of direct beam and diffuse horizontal solar radiation from the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). The NSRDB contains modeled (93%) and measured (7%) global horizontal, diffuse horizontal, and direct beam solar radiation for 1961-1990.

  10. Facility Activity Inference Using Radiation Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Ramirez Aviles, Camila A. [ORNL

    2017-11-01

    We consider the problem of inferring the operational status of a reactor facility using measurements from a radiation sensor network deployed around the facility’s ventilation off-gas stack. The intensity of stack emissions decays with distance, and the sensor counts or measurements are inherently random with parameters determined by the intensity at the sensor’s location. We utilize the measurements to estimate the intensity at the stack, and use it in a one-sided Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to infer on/off status of the reactor. We demonstrate the superior performance of this method over conventional majority fusers and individual sensors using (i) test measurements from a network of 21 NaI detectors, and (ii) effluence measurements collected at the stack of a reactor facility. We also analytically establish the superior detection performance of the network over individual sensors with fixed and adaptive thresholds by utilizing the Poisson distribution of the counts. We quantify the performance improvements of the network detection over individual sensors using the packing number of the intensity space.

  11. Radiation Testing of PICA at the Solar Power Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory's Solar Power Tower was used to irradiate specimens of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), in order to evaluate whether this thermal protection system material responded differently to potential shock layer radiative heating than to convective heating. Tests were run at 50, 100 and 150 Watts per square centimeter levels of concentrated solar radiation. Experimental results are presented both from spectral measurements on 1- 10 mm thick specimens of PICA, as well as from in-depth temperature measurements on instrumented thicker test specimens. Both spectral measurements and measured in-depth temperature profiles showed that, although it is a porous, low-density material, PICA does not exhibit problematic transparency to the tested high levels of NIR radiation, for all pragmatic cm-to-inch scale thicknesses. PICA acted as a surface absorber to efficiently absorb the incident visible and near infrared incident radiation in the top 2 millimeter layer in the Solar Power Tower tests up to 150 Watts per square centimeter.

  12. Measurement of the Vertical Distribution of Reflected Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsu Aoki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a devicefor measuring the vertical distribution of the reflected radiation to the inside of a room from terrace to building.The proposed device is attached to aluminum plates that are painted matte black at intervals of 20 cm on polystyrene insulation. The surface temperature of the aluminum plate, called the SAT (sol-air temperature, is used as an indicator of the quantity of solar radiation. In order to compare terrace materials, two of the measuring devices were located facing south.Concrete tile, artificial turf, and wood chips were selected as materials to be comparedfor the surface of the terrace and were laid in front of the measuring devices. The results indicate that the SAT reflected onto a vertical plane was higher closer to the ground for all materials. Hourly fluctuations of the vertical distribution of the reflected solar radiation differed, depending on the terrace surface material. When concrete tiles of different thicknesses were compared, the temporal heating patterns varied due to differences in heat capacity. These results lead us to the conclusion that using the developed measuringdevice enables grasping the effect of vertical distribution of reflected solar radiation from a terrace.

  13. Solar radiation and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R W

    1988-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves a progressive impairment of the outer layers in the center of the retina. Experimental studies have demonstrated that bright light preferentially damages precisely the region that degenerates in AMD. The evidence that solar radiation is responsible for some of the deteriorative changes that lead to AMD is examined in this review. In the primate eye, the high-energy portion of the solar spectrum is most hazardous to retinal molecules, with damaging effects increasing as photon energy rises. This action spectrum is explicable by the quantum laws which describe the interaction of radiation with matter. High-energy visible and ultraviolet photons can produce molecular damage by a photochemical mechanism. The lesion is exacerbated by oxygen, which initiates free-radical chain reactions (photodynamic effects). Melanin exerts a protective effect against damage from sunlight. In the human retina, documented lesions from solar radiation range from the acute effects of sun-gazing to injuries resulting from prolonged periods of exposure in brightly illuminated environments. The damage occurs in the same region that degenerates in AMD. A cataractous lens and ocular melanin both protect the retina against AMD, as predicted by the radiation hypothesis. Identification of an environmental factor that evidently plays a role in the etiology of AMD provides the basis for a program of preventive medicine.

  14. Energy parameter estimation in solar powered wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Mousa, Mustafa

    2014-02-24

    The operation of solar powered wireless sensor networks is associated with numerous challenges. One of the main challenges is the high variability of solar power input and battery capacity, due to factors such as weather, humidity, dust and temperature. In this article, we propose a set of tools that can be implemented onboard high power wireless sensor networks to estimate the battery condition and capacity as well as solar power availability. These parameters are very important to optimize sensing and communications operations and maximize the reliability of the complete system. Experimental results show that the performance of typical Lithium Ion batteries severely degrades outdoors in a matter of weeks or months, and that the availability of solar energy in an urban solar powered wireless sensor network is highly variable, which underlines the need for such power and energy estimation algorithms.

  15. Costs of Residential Solar PV Plants in Distribution Grid Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Søren Bækhøj; Yang, Guangya; Ipsen, Hans Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we investigate the impact of residential solar PV plants on energy losses in distribution networks and their impact on distribution transformers lifetime. Current guidelines in Denmark states that distribution transformers should not be loaded with more than 67% solar PV power...... to avoid accelerated loss of life. If a solar PV plant causes this limit to be exceeded, the particular owner has to pay for upgrading the transformer. Distribution Network Operators also charge an annual tariff from the solar PV plants to cover the expenses to keep the grid capacity available, the so...... called “Availability Tariff”. According to the Danish Energy Regulatory Authority, the Availability Tariff must cover the exact expenses, with energy savings etc. from the solar PV plants taken into consideration. Our conclusion is that a distribution network, which represents a typical residential...

  16. Solar radiation durability framework applied to acrylic solar mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Myles P.; Gordon, Devin; Brown, Scott A.; Lin, Wei-Chun; Shell, Kara A.; Schuetz, Mark A.; Fowler, Sean; Elman, Jim; French, Roger H.

    2011-09-01

    Mirror augmented photovoltaic (MAPV) systems utilize low cost mirrors to couple more light into a photovoltaic (PV) absorber. By increasing the light absorbed, they are expected to produce less expensive electricity. As a substrate candidate for back surface reflector mirrors, two grades of PMMA have been exposed to UV stress from two sources at two intensities for two doses in an effort to see the response of materials under different states of stress and after exposure to different amounts of total stress. By developing a framework for correlating stresses, such as short wave ultraviolet radiation, with responses, such as induced absorbance and yellowing, mirror durability we have made progress in developing lifetime and degradation science using mirror durability as a case study. All of the samples showed similarities in their degradation characteristics. The UV stress acceleration factor was quantized as 10.2 in short wave ultraviolet irradiance, and 15.8 in total shortwave UV dose. The effects of UV absorbers in protecting the polymer from degradation are discussed. Further study into degradation mechanisms will elucidate the exact phenomena that contribute to these material responses to stress.

  17. Electron Radiation Effects on Candidate Solar Sail Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Hollerman, William A.; Hubbs, Whitney S.; Gray, Perry A.; Wertz, George E.; Hoppe, David T.; Nehls, Mary K.; Semmel, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once thought to be difficult or impossible, solar sailing has come out of science fiction and into the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this propulsion method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra lightweight, and radiation resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate solar sail material to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper will describe the irradiation of candidate solar sail materials to energetic electrons, in vacuum, to determine the hardness of several candidate sail materials.

  18. Leaf color is fine-tuned on the solar spectra to avoid strand direct solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Atsushi; Akitsu, Tomoko; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distributions of light absorption rates by intact leaves are notably different from the incident solar radiation spectra, for reasons that remain elusive. Incident global radiation comprises two main components; direct radiation from the direction of the sun, and diffuse radiation, which is sunlight scattered by molecules, aerosols and clouds. Both irradiance and photon flux density spectra differ between direct and diffuse radiation in their magnitude and profile. However, most research has assumed that the spectra of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) can be averaged, without considering the radiation classes. We used paired spectroradiometers to sample direct and diffuse solar radiation, and obtained relationships between the PAR spectra and the absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments and organs. As monomers in solvent, the spectral absorbance of Chl a decreased with the increased spectral irradiance (W m(-2) nm(-1)) of global PAR at noon (R(2) = 0.76), and was suitable to avoid strong spectral irradiance (λmax = 480 nm) rather than absorb photon flux density (μmol m(-2) s(-1) nm(-1)) efficiently. The spectral absorption of photosystems and the intact thallus and leaves decreased linearly with the increased spectral irradiance of direct PAR at noon (I dir-max), where the wavelength was within the 450-650 nm range (R(2) = 0.81). The higher-order structure of photosystems systematically avoided the strong spectral irradiance of I dir-max. However, when whole leaves were considered, leaf anatomical structure and light scattering in leaf tissues made the leaves grey bodies for PAR and enabled high PAR use efficiency. Terrestrial green plants are fine-tuned to spectral dynamics of incident solar radiation and PAR absorption is increased in various structural hierarchies.

  19. Power spectral density and scaling exponent of high frequency global solar radiation sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calif, Rudy; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2013-04-01

    The part of the solar power production from photovlotaïcs systems is constantly increasing in the electric grids. Solar energy converter devices such as photovoltaic cells are very sensitive to instantaneous solar radiation fluctuations. Thus rapid variation of solar radiation due to changes in the local meteorological condition can induce large amplitude fluctuations of the produced electrical power and reduce the overall efficiency of the system. When large amount of photovoltaic electricity is send into a weak or small electricity network such as island network, the electric grid security can be in jeopardy due to these power fluctuations. The integration of this energy in the electrical network remains a major challenge, due to the high variability of solar radiation in time and space. To palliate these difficulties, it is essential to identify the characteristic of these fluctuations in order to anticipate the eventuality of power shortage or power surge. The objective of this study is to present an approach based on Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to highlight the scaling properties of global solar irradiance data G(t). The scale of invariance is detected on this dataset using the Empirical Mode Decomposition in association with arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis, a generalization of (HHT) or Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA). The first step is the EMD, consists in decomposing the normalized global solar radiation data G'(t) into several Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) Ci(t) without giving an a priori basis. Consequently, the normalized original solar radiation sequence G'(t) can be written as a sum of Ci(t) with a residual rn. From all IMF modes, a joint PDF P(f,A) of locally and instantaneous frequency f and amplitude A, is estimated. To characterize the scaling behavior in amplitude-frequency space, an arbitrary-order Hilbert marginal spectrum is defined to: Iq(f) = 0 P (f,A)A dA (1) with q × 0 In case of scale

  20. Carotenoids and protection against solar UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Wilhelm; Sies, Helmut

    2002-01-01

    Upon exposure to UV light photooxidative reactions are initiated which are damaging to biomolecules and affect the integrity of cells and tissues. Photooxidative damage plays a role in pathological processes and is involved in the development of disorders affecting the skin. When skin is exposed to UV light, erythema is observed as an initial reaction. Carotenoids like beta-carotene or lycopene are efficient antioxidants scavenging singlet molecular oxygen and peroxyl radicals generated in during photooxidation. When beta-carotene was applied as such or in combination with alpha-tocopherol for 12 weeks, erythema formation induced with a solar light simulator was diminished from week 8 on. Similar effects were also achieved with a diet rich in lycopene. Ingestion of tomato paste corresponding to a dose of 16 mg lycopene/ day over 10 weeks led to increases in serum levels of lycopene and total carotenoids in skin. At week 10, erythema formation was significantly lower in the group that ingested the tomato paste as compared to the control group. No significant difference was found at week 4 of treatment. Thus, protection against UV light-induced erythema can be achieved by ingestion of a commonly consumed dietary source of lycopene. Such protective effects of carotenoids were also demonstrated in cell culture. The in-vitro data indicate that there is an optimal level of protection for each carotenoid. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Radiative Diagnostics in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; van Noort, M.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields on the surface of the Sun and stars in general imprint or modify the polarization state of the electromagnetic radiation that is leaving from the star. The inference of solar/stellar magnetic fields is performed by detecting, studying and modeling polarized light from the target star. In this review we present an overview of techniques that are used to study the atmosphere of the Sun, and particularly those that allow to infer magnetic fields. We have combined a small selection of theory on polarized radiative transfer, inversion techniques and we discuss a number of results from chromospheric inversions.

  2. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  3. Effects of solar radiation torque on satellite spin and attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia; Vilhena de Moraes, Rodolpho

    An analytical solution for the system of equations describing the rotational motion of an artificial satellite under the influence of the direct solar radiation pressure is presented. Here is considered a satellite of cylinder circular shape and the method to obtain the analytical solution is the Lagrange's method of the variation of parameters. Andoyer's vaiables are used to describe the rotational motion. The analytical solution obtained shows that, due to solar radiation, all the Andoyer's angular variables have secular and periodical variations but, the modulus of the rotational angular momentum and its projection on the z-axis of the system of principal axis of inertia vary periodically only. In order to validate the range of the analytical solution, Burlirsch-Stoer's method is used to perform a numerical integration of the system of equations of motion. Considering a hypothetical satellite, a numerical application is exhibited.

  4. Solar radiation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-11-01

    Although several studies have estimated the effects of temperature on mortality and morbidity, little is known regarding the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) attributable to solar radiation. We obtained data for all cases of OHCA and meteorological data reported between 2011 and 2014 in 3 Japanese prefectures: Hokkaido, Ibaraki, and Fukuoka. We first examined the relationship between daily solar radiation and OHCA risk for each prefecture using time-varying distributed lag non-linear models and then pooled the results in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. The attributable fractions of OHCA were calculated for low and high solar radiation, defined as solar radiation below and above the minimum morbidity solar radiation, respectively. The minimum morbidity solar radiation was defined as the specific solar radiation associated with the lowest morbidity risk. A total of 49,892 cases of OHCA occurred during the study period. The minimum morbidity solar radiation for each prefecture was the 100th percentile (72.5 MJ/m 2 ) in Hokkaido, the 83rd percentile (59.7 MJ/m 2 ) in Ibaraki, and the 70th percentile (53.8 MJ/m 2 ) in Fukuoka. Overall, 20.00% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 10.97-27.04) of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily solar radiation. The attributable fraction for low solar radiation was 19.50% (95% eCI: 10.00-26.92), whereas that for high solar radiation was 0.50% (95% eCI: -0.07-1.01). Low solar radiation was associated with a substantial attributable risk for OHCA. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should consider the solar radiation level. Large prospective studies with longitudinal collection of individual data is required to more conclusively assess the impact of solar radiation on OHCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spectral variation of the solar radiation during an eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Koepke

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The time dependent variation of the spectral extraterrestrial solar flux is modelled for the conditions during a total eclipse. These data are used to calculate irradiance and actinic flux at the Earth’s surface for atmospheric conditions of August 11, 1999 at Weihenstephan. These results are compared with measurements. It is shown, that the spectral composition of solar radiation varies during the eclipse, since solar limb darkening has a spectral dependence. The solar radiation differs from that of a hypothetical sun without limb darkening by up to 30% in the near IR at 1500 nm and 60% in the UV-B at 310 nm. As shown by a comparison of modelling and measurements, this spectral variation has to be taken into account for modelling of UV radiative quantities in the atmosphere and resulting photochemical processes. The effect of broken cloudiness on irradiance and actinic flux and its dependency on wavelength and receiver geometry is explained. Der Verlauf der spektralen extraterrestrischen solaren Strahlung wÄhrend einer Sonnenfinsternis wurde berechnet. Basierend auf diesen Daten, unter BerÜcksichtigung der atmosphÄrischen Bedingungen am 11. August 1999 in Weihenstephan, wurden Globalstrahlung und Aktinischer Fluss am Boden modelliert und mit Messwerten verglichen. Die spektrale Zusammensetzung der Strahlung Ändert sich wÄhrend einer Sonnenfinsternis, bedingt durch die wellenlÄngenabhÄngige Randverdunklung der Sonne. Im Vergleich zu einer hypothetischen Sonne ohne Randverdunklung ist die solare Strahlung im nahen IR um bis zu 30% gemindert und im UVB bei 310 nm um bis zu 60%. Diese spektralen Änderungen sollten bei der Modellierung von Strahlung, z.B. fÜr photochemische Prozesse berÜcksichtigt werden. Dies wurde durch Messung und Modellierung gezeigt. Der Einfluss von Wolken auf gemessene Werte von Globalstrahlung und Aktinischem Fluss wurde untersucht und erklÄrt.

  6. Multi-decadal trends of solar radiation reaching the surface: What is the role of aerosols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Bian, H.; Yu, H.; Qian, Y.; Wild, M.; Streets, D. G.; Stackhouse, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We present the aerosol trends in the past 3 decades (1980-2009) in different regions and assess their effects on the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening"). The regions include the major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of pollution emissions, dust and biomass burning influenced regions that have large interannual variabilities, and relatively remote regions that maybe considered as "background". We will compare the GOCART model simulated surface radiation trends with data from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA), the Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN), and the China Meteorological Administration (CMA), as well as the satellite derived products. We will use the model to attribute the surface radiation changes to aerosol amount and type under all sky and clear sky conditions and link the changes to the emission trends in major source regions.

  7. Development of a gridded surface solar radiation dataset from the Global Energy Balance Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabini, E.; Chiacchio, M.; Wild, M.

    2010-09-01

    The need for a gridded solar radiation dataset from surface observations is important for the study of long-term changes in the surface shortwave downward component of the radiation budget as well as for the assessment of modeled and satellite derived data of this radiative parameter. This will be accomplished by applying spatial statistical techniques, such as kriging and inverse distance to interpolate irregularly distributed solar radiation station data over Europe from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) onto regular grids of different spatial resolutions. The GEBA database is currently maintained at the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science ETH in Zurich, Switzerland and has been updated to 2007. Quality controlled procedures have been applied to this dataset with a measurement random error of about 5% for the monthly mean. In order to reduce additional biases introduced from a lack of stations within a particular region, we combine it with other gridded datasets, such as those derived from reanalysis and satellite remote sensing. To evaluate the interpolated gridded dataset, we validate it separately for each interpolation method by comparing co-located boxes to the original station data from GEBA as well as to the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). From this validation the usefulness of this gridded dataset will be assessed as well as its applicability for climate research.

  8. Solar radiation affects grapevine susceptibility to Plasmopara Viticola

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Dalla Marta; Valentina Di Stefano; Cerovic, Zoran G.; Giovanni Agati; Simone Orlandini

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation plays an important role in the development of some fungal diseases due to its direct action on the microorganisms and also its indirect effect on the production of specific plant compounds. This experiment examined the effect of two light environments (100% and 35% of full strength) on the polyphenolic content of grapevine leaves and quantified their relation to resistance to downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola). Leaf epidermal polyphenolic contents were non-destructively measur...

  9. Solar Radiation Data Base for Nigeria | Chineke | Discovery and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solar Radiation Data Base for Nigeria. T C Chineke, J I Aina, S S Jagtap. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v11i3.15556 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  10. Assessing surface solar radiation fluxes in CMIP5 model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Alexander; Itkin, Mikhail; Andersson, Axel; Trentmann, Jörg; Fennig, Karsten; Schröder, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Sophisticated Earth System models (ESM) are an essential research tool for better understanding the global climate system and its interactions. They are indispensable tools for providing projections about potential evolutions of the Earth climate in the future. Given the complexity of these deterministic models, it is essential to have a solid knowledge of the uncertainties of the model results in difference aspects of the models. The present paper presents results from a comprehensive study analyzing the shortwave surface radiation fluxes. State-of-the-art globals datasets of surface radiation components (surface solar radiation flux, surface albedo, surface net radiation flux) are used to benchmark results from the recent Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) in a standardized manner at the regional to global scale. Different skill score metrices are compared. All CMIP5 models are ranked according to their performance skill scores. The uncertainties from current observational records compared to uncertainties in climate model simulations are also analyzed. The results indicate that there are still large uncertainties (inconsistencies) among the different existing global surface radiation dataset which lead to rather different (relative) model rankings. In other words, the rank of a model is not only determined by the skill of the model itself, but also largely by the choice of a benchmarking (reference) dataset. As the differences resulting from the choice of different observational datasets are larger than between different models, progress in surface radiation flux simulations of climate models might depend on further progress in achieving consistent observations of surface radiation fluxes from space.

  11. Prediction of Solar Radiation on Building Rooftops: A Data-Mining Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Kodysh, Jeffrey B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Solar energy technologies offer a clean, renewable, and domestic energy source, and are essential components of a sustainable energy future. The accurate measurement of solar radiation data is essential for optimum site selection of future distributed solar power plants as well as sizing photovoltaic systems. However, solar radiation data are not readily available because measured sequences of radiation values are obtained for a few locations in a country. When the data are available, they are usually at different time periods and spatial scale. The availability of solar radiation data at hourly or daily time scale will enhance the integration of solar energy into electricity generation and promote a sustainable energy future. The ability to generate approximate solar radiation values is often the only practical way to obtain radiation data at hourly or daily time scale. As a result, several models have been developed for estimating solar radiation values based on analytical, numerical simulation, and statistical approaches. However, these models have inherent challenges. We will discuss some of those challenges in this paper. To enhance the prediction of solar radiation values, a novel approach is presented for estimating solar radiation values using support vector machine technique. The approach accounts for unique characteristics that influence solar radiation values. The preliminary results obtained offer useful insights for model enhancements.

  12. Study on Pyroelectric Harvesters Integrating Solar Radiation with Wind Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric harvesters use temperature fluctuations to generate electrical outputs. Solar radiation and waste heat are rich energy sources that can be harvested. Pyroelectric energy converters offer a novel and direct energy-conversion technology by transforming time-dependent temperatures directly into electricity. Moreover, the great challenge for pyroelectric energy harvesting lies in finding promising temperature variations or an alternating thermal loading in real situations. Hence, in this article, a novel pyroelectric harvester integrating solar radiation with wind power by the pyroelectric effect is proposed. Solar radiation is a thermal source, and wind is a dynamic potential. A disk generator is used for harvesting wind power. A mechanism is considered to convert the rotary energy of the disk generator to drive a shutter for generating temperature variations in pyroelectric cells using a planetary gear system. The optimal period of the pyroelectric cells is 35 s to harvest the stored energy, about 70 μJ, while the rotary velocity of the disk generator is about 31 RPM and the wind speed is about 1 m/s. In this state, the stored energy acquired from the pyroelectric harvester is about 75% more than that from the disk generator. Although the generated energy of the proposed pyroelectric harvester is less than that of the disk generator, the pyroelectric harvester plays a complementary role when the disk generator is inactive in situations of low wind speed.

  13. Missing Data Imputation of Solar Radiation Data under Different Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Crespo Turrado

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Global solar broadband irradiance on a planar surface is measured at weather stations by pyranometers. In the case of the present research, solar radiation values from nine meteorological stations of the MeteoGalicia real-time observational network, captured and stored every ten minutes, are considered. In this kind of record, the lack of data and/or the presence of wrong values adversely affects any time series study. Consequently, when this occurs, a data imputation process must be performed in order to replace missing data with estimated values. This paper aims to evaluate the multivariate imputation of ten-minute scale data by means of the chained equations method (MICE. This method allows the network itself to impute the missing or wrong data of a solar radiation sensor, by using either all or just a group of the measurements of the remaining sensors. Very good results have been obtained with the MICE method in comparison with other methods employed in this field such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR. The average RMSE value of the predictions for the MICE algorithm was 13.37% while that for the MLR it was 28.19%, and 31.68% for the IDW.

  14. Production of solar radiation bankable datasets from high-resolution solar irradiance derived with dynamical downscaling Numerical Weather prediction model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Charabi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A bankable solar radiation database is required for the financial viability of solar energy project. Accurate estimation of solar energy resources in a country is very important for proper siting, sizing and life cycle cost analysis of solar energy systems. During the last decade an important progress has been made to develop multiple solar irradiance database (Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI and Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI, using satellite of different resolution and sophisticated models. This paper assesses the performance of High-resolution solar irradiance derived with dynamical downscaling Numerical Weather Prediction model with, GIS topographical solar radiation model, satellite data and ground measurements, for the production of bankable solar radiation datasets. For this investigation, NWP model namely Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO is used for the dynamical downscaling of solar radiation. The obtained results increase confidence in solar radiation data base obtained from dynamical downscaled NWP model. The mean bias of dynamical downscaled NWP model is small, on the order of a few percents for GHI, and it could be ranked as a bankable datasets. Fortunately, these data are usually archived in the meteorological department and gives a good idea of the hourly, monthly, and annual incident energy. Such short time-interval data are valuable in designing and operating the solar energy facility. The advantage of the NWP model is that it can be used for solar radiation forecast since it can estimate the weather condition within the next 72–120 hours. This gives a reasonable estimation of the solar radiation that in turns can be used to forecast the electric power generation by the solar power plant.

  15. Solar Energy Prediction for Malaysia Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Khatib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solar energy prediction method using artificial neural networks (ANNs. An ANN predicts a clearness index that is used to calculate global and diffuse solar irradiations. The ANN model is based on the feed forward multilayer perception model with four inputs and one output. The inputs are latitude, longitude, day number, and sunshine ratio; the output is the clearness index. Data from 28 weather stations were used in this research, and 23 stations were used to train the network, while 5 stations were used to test the network. In addition, the measured solar irradiations from the sites were used to derive an equation to calculate the diffused solar irradiation, a function of the global solar irradiation and the clearness index. The proposed equation has reduced the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE in estimating the diffused solar irradiation compared with the conventional equation. Based on the results, the average MAPE, mean bias error and root mean square error for the predicted global solar irradiation are 5.92%, 1.46%, and 7.96%. The MAPE in estimating the diffused solar irradiation is 9.8%. A comparison with previous work was done, and the proposed approach was found to be more efficient and accurate than previous methods.

  16. Characterization of candidate solar sail materials subjected to electron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.; Hubbs, Whitney S.; Gray, Perry A.; Wertz, George E.; Hoppe, David T.; Nehls, Mary K.; Semmel, Charles L.; Albarado, Tesia L.; Hollerman, William A.

    2003-09-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion in which a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Solar sails are not limited by reaction mass and provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the light-weight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Once considered difficult or impossible, solar sailing has left the realm of science fiction for the realm of possibility. Any spacecraft using this method would need to deploy a thin sail that could be as large as many kilometers in extent. The availability of strong, ultra light-weight, and radiation-resistant materials will determine the future of solar sailing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the use of ultra light-weight materials for spacecraft propulsion. MSFC's Space Environmental Effects Team is actively characterizing candidate solar sail materials to evaluate thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to space environmental effects. This paper describes irradiation of candidate materials with energetic electrons in vacuum to determine the hardness of several candidate sail materials. [Hardness is defined as the amount of electron fluence (electrons/area) required to cause the sail material to fail.] This paper describes the testing procedure and preliminary results of this investigation. Comparisons to approximate the engineering functional lifetimes of candidate sail materials will be shown.

  17. Effect of solar radiation on severity of soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; George, Sheeja; Narváez, Dario F; Srivastava, Pratibha; Schuerger, Andrew C; Wright, David L; Marois, James J

    2012-08-01

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a damaging fungal disease of soybean (Glycine max). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how solar radiation affects SBR progress within soybean canopies. Such information can aid in developing accurate SBR prediction models. To manipulate light penetration into soybean canopies, structures of shade cloth attenuating 30, 40, and 60% sunlight were constructed over soybean plots. In each plot, weekly evaluations of severity in lower, middle, and upper canopies, and daily temperature and relative humidity were recorded. Final plant height and leaf area index were also recorded for each plot. The correlation between amount of epicuticular wax and susceptibility of leaves in the lower, middle, and upper canopies was assessed with a detached leaf assay. Final disease severity was 46 to 150% greater in the lower canopy of all plots and in the middle canopy of 40 and 60% shaded plots. While daytime temperature within the canopy of nonshaded soybean was greater than shaded soybean by 2 to 3°C, temperatures recorded throughout typical evenings and mornings of the growing season in all treatments were within the range (10 to 28.5°C) for SBR development as was relative humidity. This indicates temperature and relative humidity were not limiting factors in this experiment. Epicuticular wax and disease severity in detached leaf assays from the upper canopy had significant negative correlation (P = 0.009, R = -0.84) regardless of shade treatment. In laboratory experiments, increasing simulated total solar radiation (UVA, UVB, and PAR) from 0.15 to 11.66 MJ m(-2) increased mortality of urediniospores from 2 to 91%. Variability in disease development across canopy heights in early planted soybean may be attributed to the effects of solar radiation not only on urediniospore viability, but also on plant height, leaf area index, and epicuticular wax, which influence

  18. Slowly varying component of extreme ultraviolet solar radiation and its relation to solar radio radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. D.; Neupert, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the correlations between solar EUV line fluxes and solar radio fluxes has been carried out. A calibration for the Goddard Space Flight Center EUV spectrum is suggested. The results are used to obtain an equation for the absolute EUV flux for several lines in the 150- to 400-A region and the total flux of 81 intense lines in the region, the 2800-MHz radio flux being used as independent variable.

  19. Solar radiation as a forest management tool: a primer of principles and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard G. Halverson; James L. Smith

    1979-01-01

    Forests are products of solar radiation use. The sun also drives the hydrologic cycle on forested watersheds. Some basic concepts of climatology and solar radiation are summarized in including earth-sun relations, polar tilt, solar energy, terrestrial energy, energy balance, and local energy. An example shows how these principles can be applied in resource management....

  20. Study on Solar Radiation Models in South Korea for Improving Office Building Energy Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kee Han Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hourly global solar radiation in a weather file is one of the significant parameters for improving building energy performance analyses using simulation programs. However, most weather stations worldwide are not equipped with solar radiation sensors because they tend to be difficult to manage. In South Korea, only twenty-two out of ninety-two weather stations are equipped with sensors, and there are large areas not equipped with any sensors. Thus, solar radiation must often be calculated by reliable solar models. Hence, it is important to find a reliable model that can be applied in the wide variety of weather conditions seen in South Korea. In this study, solar radiation in the southeastern part of South Korea was calculated using three solar models: cloud-cover radiation model (CRM, Zhang and Huang model (ZHM, and meteorological radiation model (MRM. These values were then compared to measured solar radiation data. After that, the calculated solar radiation data from the three solar models were used in a building energy simulation for an office building with various window characteristics conditions, in order to identify how solar radiation differences affect building energy performance. It was found that a seasonal solar model for the area should be developed to improve building energy performance analysis.

  1. The effects of solar radiation on plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, Joslyn

    1995-01-01

    This phase of this continuing project was completed in April, 1994, using Dahlgren #855 hybrid sunflower seeds and Park Seeds #0950 non-hybrid sunflower seeds in both the control groups and the tests groups. The control groups (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) were grown under normal, un-radiated, conditions. The tests groups (1a, 2a, 3a, 4a, 5a, and 6a) were grown onboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on the STS-60 flight in February 1994. All data from this experiment (both control and test groups) will be taken and recorded in a data log and compared against each other to determine the radiation effects of solar radiation on plant germination and growth.

  2. Drift in interference filters. II - Radiation effects. [for solar instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of peak transmission drift in narrow-band interference filters have shown that there exist two mechanisms that cause drift toward shorter wavelengths. One is dependent on the thermal history of the filter and is discussed in Part 1 of this paper. The other is dependent on the exposure of the filter to radiation. For ZnS-cryolite filters of particular design, it is experimentally demonstrated that the filters are most sensitive to radiation in a 100-A band centered at approximately 3900 A. The drift rate in the focal plane of an f/20 solar image is approximately 3 A/100 hr of exposure. Further, it is also shown by model calculations that the observed radiation-induced drift is consistent with the hypothesis that the optical thickness of ZnS decreases in proportion to the radiant energy absorbed.

  3. A Practical Theory of Micro-Solar Power Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-20

    Pavan Sikka, Tim Wark, and Les Overs. Long-duration solar-powered wireless sensor networks. The Fourth IEEE workshop on Embedded Networked Sensors (EmNets...node. International Symposium on Low Power Electronics and Design (ISLPED ‘06), October 2006. [SCV+06] Pavan Sikka, Peter Corke, Philip Valencia

  4. Solar absorption estimated from surface radiation measurements and collocated satellite products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakuba, M. Z.; Wild, M.; Folini, D.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; Schaepman-Strub, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth's climate and life-relevant processes are governed by the incoming solar radiation as part of the global energy balance. Changes in the atmospheric energy budget largely affect the global climate and hydrological cycle, but the quantification of the different energy balance components is still afflicted with large uncertainties. The overall aim of the research presented here is an improved understanding of the mean state and spatio-temporal variations of the global energy balance through reducing the uncertainties in one of its components, i.e., the absorption of solar radiation within the climate system. To quantify the solar absorption at the surface and within the atmospheric column, we combine the worldwide surface radiation measurements of the Global Energy Balance archive (GEBA) and Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) with collocated satellite-inferred surface albedo and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation data (MODIS, CERES). Our analysis of the present mean state, temporal and spatial variability during the last decade (2000-2010) focuses on Europe and Asia, and will expand worldwide in a later step. We examined the quality and homogeneity of station records beyond 2000 provided by GEBA to identify a subset of station records of sufficient quality. We find the vast majority of monthly records to be suitable for our purposes. The considered GEBA sites indicate overall positive trends in Europe, and mostly negative trends over Asia during the last decade (2000-2010). To derive the surface solar absorption at the measurement sites, we intend to combine the shortwave fluxes with the collocated surface albedo from MODIS. The MODIS products include the so-called black-sky albedo (under the assumption of direct radiation only) and white-sky albedo (under diffuse isotropic conditions). The majority of GEBA sites comprises only global radiation data, which do not differentiate between direct and diffuse components. To determine solar absorption from

  5. [Comparison of three daily global solar radiation models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Ming; Fan, Wen-Yi; Zhao, Ying-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Three daily global solar radiation estimation models ( Å-P model, Thornton-Running model and model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al.) were analyzed and compared using data of 13 weather stations from 1982 to 2012 from three northeastern provinces and eastern Inner Mongolia. After cross-validation analysis, the result showed that mean absolute error (MAE) for each model was 1.71, 2.83 and 1.68 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1) respectively, showing that Å-P model and model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al. which used percentage of sunshine had an advantage over Thornton-Running model which didn't use percentage of sunshine. Model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al. played a good effect on the situation of non-sunshine, and its MAE and bias percentage were 18.5% and 33.8% smaller than those of Å-P model, respectively. High precision results could be obtained by using the simple linear model of Å-P. Å-P model, Thornton-Running model and model provided by Liu Ke-qun et al. overvalued daily global solar radiation by 12.2%, 19.2% and 9.9% respectively. MAE for each station varied little with the spatial change of location, and annual MAE decreased with the advance of years. The reason for this might be that the change of observation accuracy caused by the replacement of radiation instrument in 1993. MAEs for rainy days, non-sunshine days and warm seasons of the three models were greater than those for days without rain, sunshine days and cold seasons respectively, showing that different methods should be used for different weather conditions on estimating solar radiation with meteorological elements.

  6. Human projected area factors for detailed direct and diffuse solar radiation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubaha, K.; Fiala, D.; Toftum, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    Projected area factors for individual segments of the standing and sedentary human body were modelled for both direct and diffuse solar radiation using detailed 3D geometry and radiation models. The local projected area factors with respect to direct short-wave radiation are a function of the solar...

  7. Solar and Net Radiation for Estimating Potential Evaporation from Three Vegetation Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Amatya; R.W. Skaggs; G.W. Cheschier; G.P. Fernandez

    2000-01-01

    Solar and net radiation data are frequent/y used in estimating potential evaporation (PE) from various vegetative surfaces needed for water balance and hydrologic modeling studies. Weather parameters such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, and net radiation have been continuously monitored using automated sensors to estimate PE for...

  8. Assessment of the radiation tolerance of LaBr3 : Ce scintillators to solar proton events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, A.; Bos, A.J.J.; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E.-J.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; van Eijk, C.W.E.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R.W.; Ouspenski, V.; Quarati, F.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation effects caused by solar proton events will be a common problem for many types of sensors on missions to the inner solar system because of the long cruise phases coupled with the inverse square scaling of solar particle events. In support of the BepiColombo and Solar Orbiter missions we

  9. Spectral variations of UV-A and PAR solar radiation in estuarine waters of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Talaulikar, M.; Suresh, T.; Silveira, N.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Lotlikar, A.

    The spectral solar radiation measurements in the range 350-800 nm were carried out in the estuarine waters of Goa using hyperspectral radiometer. The results of the analysis of solar light in the spectral range of photosynthetically available...

  10. A Proposal for a Thesaurus for Web Services in Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Benoit; Menard, Lionel; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Metadata are necessary to discover, describe and exchange any type of information, resource and service at a large scale. A significant amount of effort has been made in the field of geography and environment to establish standards. Efforts still remain to address more specific domains such as renewable energies. This communication focuses on solar energy and more specifically on aspects in solar radiation that relate to geography and meteorology. A thesaurus in solar radiation is proposed for the keys elements in solar radiation namely time, space and radiation types. The importance of time-series in solar radiation is outlined and attributes of the key elements are discussed. An XML schema for encoding metadata is proposed. The exploitation of such a schema in web services is discussed. This proposal is a first attempt at establishing a thesaurus for describing data and applications in solar radiation.

  11. Neural Network on Photodegradation of Octylphenol using Natural and Artificial UV Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Jäntschi, Lorentz; Letiţia OPREAN; Dana - Melania POPA

    2011-01-01

    The present paper comes up with an experimental design meant to point out the factors interferingin octylphenol’s degradation in surface waters under solar radiation, underlining each factor’sinfluence on the process observable (concentration of p-octylphenol). Multiple linear regressionanalysis and artificial neural network (Multi-Layer Perceptron type) were applied in order to obtaina mathematical model capable to explain the action of UV-light upon synthetic solutions of OP inultra-pure wa...

  12. The Homogeneity of the Potsdam Solar Radiation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, K.

    2009-04-01

    At Meteorological Station in Potsdam (Germany) the measurement of sunshine duration started already in 1983. Later on, in 1937 the registration of global, diffuse and direct solar radiation was begun with pyranometers and a pyrheliometer. Since 1983 sunshine duration has been measured with the same method, the Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder, at the same site, while the measurements of solar radiation changed as well as in equipment, measurement methods and location. Furthermore, it was firstly necessary to supplement some missing data within the time series and secondly, it was desirable to extend the series of global radiation by regression with the sunshine duration backward to 1893. Because solar radiation, especially global radiation, is one of the most important quantities for climate research, it is necessary to investigate the homogeneity of these time series. At first the history was studied and as much as possible information about all parameters, which could influence the data, were gathered. In a second step these metadata were reviewed critically followed by a discussion about the potential effects of local factors on the homogeneity of the data. In a first step of data rehabilitation the so-called engineering correction (data levelling to WRR and SI units) were made followed by the supplementation of gaps. Finally, for every month and the year the so generated time series of measured data (1937/2008) and the complete series, prolonged by regression and measurements (1893/2008), were tested on homogeneity with the following distribution-free tests: WILCOXON (U) test, MANN-KENDALL test and progressive analysis were used for the examination of the stability of the mean and the dispersion, while with the Wald-Wolfowitz test the first order autocorrelation was checked. These non-parametric test were used, because frequently radiation data do not fulfil the assumption of a GAUSSian or normal distribution. The investigations showed, that discontinuities

  13. Preface: Solar energetic particles, solar modulation and space radiation: New opportunities in the AMS-02 Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindi, Veronica

    2017-08-01

    Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) acceleration at high energies and their propagation through the heliosphere and into the magnetosphere are not well understood and are still a matter of debate. Our understanding of solar modulation and transport of different species of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) inside the heliosphere has been significantly improved; however, a lot of work still needs to be done. GCR and SEPs pose a significant radiation risk for people and technology in space, and thus it is becoming increasingly important to understand the space radiation environment. AMS-02 will provide brand new information with unprecedented statistics about GCR and SEPs. Both GCR and heliophysics experiments will contribute to the increased understanding of acceleration physics, and transport of particles in space with improved models. This will inevitably lead to better predictions of space weather and safer operations in space.

  14. Solar Extreme UV radiation and quark nugget dark matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2017-10-01

    We advocate the idea that the surprising emission of extreme ultra violet (EUV) radiation and soft x-rays from the Sun are powered externally by incident dark matter (DM) particles. The energy and the spectral shape of this otherwise unexpected solar irradiation is estimated within the quark nugget dark matter model. This model was originally invented as a natural explanation of the observed ratio Ωdark ~ Ωvisible when the DM and visible matter densities assume the same order of magnitude values. This generic consequence of the model is a result of the common origin of both types of matter which are formed during the same QCD transition and both proportional to the same fundamental dimensional parameter ΛQCD. We also present arguments suggesting that the transient brightening-like "nanoflares" in the Sun may be related to the annihilation events which inevitably occur in the solar atmosphere within this dark matter scenario.

  15. Studies of the Solar Radiations' Influence About Geomembranes Used in Ecological Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiluta, Petre; Cofaru, Ileana Ioana; Cofaru, Nicolae Florin; Popa, Dragos Laurentiu

    2017-12-01

    The study shown in this paper presents the behavior of geomembranes used at the ecological landfills. The influences of the solar radiations has a great importance regarding the correct mounting of the geomembranes. The mathematical model developed for the determination anytime and anywhere in the world for the next values and parameters: apparent solar time, solar declination, solar altitude, solar azimuth and incidence angle, zone angle, angle of sun elevation, solar declination, solar constant, solar flux density, diffuse solar radiation, global radiation, soil albedo, total radiant flux density and relational links of these values. The results of this model was used for creations an AutoCAD subroutines useful for choosing the correct time for correct mounting anywhere of the geomembranes

  16. Solar radiation concentrators paired with multijunction photoelectric converters in ground-based solar power plants (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionova, E. A.; Ulanov, M. V.; Davidyuk, N. Yu.; Sadchikov, N. A.

    2017-04-01

    The present work is devoted to determining the conditions of the joint operation of photoelectric converter-solar concentrator pairs, which are used in solar power plants with concentrators. Three-cascade photoconverters based on A3B5 materials with different distributions of solar radiation in spectral ranges are studied. Concentrators of solar radiation are designed as the Fresnel lenses with silicon-on-glass structure. Refractive lens profile fabricated on the basis of Wacker RT604 silicone rubber is characterized by significant changes in refractive index with temperature. The effect of geometric parameters of the Fresnel lenses and their operating temperature on characteristics of solar radiation concentration in specified spectral intervals have been examined. The parameters of concentrators being paired with a photoelectric converter, which may ensure the efficient functioning of the solar power plant, have been calculated.

  17. Determination of incoming solar radiation in major tree species in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Osman Yalcin; Sevgi, Orhan; Koc, Ayhan

    2012-07-01

    Light requirements and spatial distribution of major forest tree species in Turkey hasn't been analyzed yet. Continuous surface solar radiation data, especially at mountainous-forested areas, are needed to put forward this relationship between forest tree species and solar radiation. To achieve this, GIS-based modeling of solar radiation is one of the methods used in rangelands to estimate continuous surface solar radiation. Therefore, mean monthly and annual total global solar radiation maps of whole Turkey were computed spatially using GRASS GIS software "r.sun" model under clear-sky (cloudless) conditions. 147498 pure forest stand point-based data were used in the study for calculating mean global solar radiation values of all the major forest tree species of Turkey. Beech had the lowest annual mean total global solar radiation value of 1654.87 kWh m(-2), whereas juniper had the highest value of 1928.89 kWh m(-2). The rank order of tree species according to the mean monthly and annual total global solar radiation values, using a confidence level of p solar radiation values of sites and light requirements of forest trees ranked similarly.

  18. Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis of Thermal Distribution in Arch Dams considering Solar Radiation Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzabozorg, H.; Hariri-Ardebili, M. A.; Shirkhan, M.; Seyed-Kolbadi, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation on thermal distribution in thin high arch dams is investigated. The differential equation governing thermal behavior of mass concrete in three-dimensional space is solved applying appropriate boundary conditions. Solar radiation is implemented considering the dam face direction relative to the sun, the slop relative to horizon, the region cloud cover, and the surrounding topography. It has been observed that solar radiation changes the surface temperature drastically and leads to nonuniform temperature distribution. Solar radiation effects should be considered in thermal transient analysis of thin arch dams. PMID:24695817

  19. High solar activity predictions through an artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Del-Castillo, M. G.; Ortiz-Alemán, J. C.; Couder-Castañeda, C.; Hernández-Gómez, J. J.; Solís-Santomé, A.

    The effects of high-energy particles coming from the Sun on human health as well as in the integrity of outer space electronics make the prediction of periods of high solar activity (HSA) a task of significant importance. Since periodicities in solar indexes have been identified, long-term predictions can be achieved. In this paper, we present a method based on an artificial neural network to find a pattern in some harmonics which represent such periodicities. We used data from 1973 to 2010 to train the neural network, and different historical data for its validation. We also used the neural network along with a statistical analysis of its performance with known data to predict periods of HSA with different confidence intervals according to the three-sigma rule associated with solar cycles 24-26, which we found to occur before 2040.

  20. The Energy Under Our Feet: A Study of Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, I.

    2016-12-01

    In this experiment I tested if asphalt pavement can produce enough solar heat to produce energy through a system that uses water, solar energy and heat. A setup that can conserve the water and prevent it from evaporating, as well as measuring the energy production is required to run this experiment. I have done a lot of research on this experiment and found that there are several variables that impact the results of this experiment. 1. The surface temperature compared to the air temperature 2. The Geographical location of the pavement 3. The time of the year 4. Cloud coverage for the day Overall there will be many variables I will have to keep out of the experiment such as temperature ranges, season changes and geographical location. My constant will be my location at 33.7086o North and 117.9564o West. Asphalt pavements do not reflect the sunlight and hence heat up faster than a light surface that would reflect the sunlight. This means the Asphalt absorbs the solar radiation, which increases the temperature of the air around the asphalt contributing to what is known as the urban heat island effect. This heating in turn contributes to the formation of smog and ozone products. With the population still growing this would also mean an increase in this temperature and hence an increase in smog and ozone, creating a significant health concern. Cities need to start looking at ways to cool their pavement and find ways to harvest the energy created by their streets. Installing pipes with water can provide that solution and not only reduce the heat reflected from the pavement but also harvest energy from this setup, and decrease the smog production and maintain a balance in ozone levels. As well as the asphalt needed to run the testing, a Stirling engine is required. A Stirling Engine is a highly efficient engine that can run on a variety of heat sources. Because it is highly compatible with alternative energy and renewable energy sources it could become increasingly

  1. Impact of Solar Radiation on Gene Expression in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Matallana-Surget

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms often regulate their gene expression at the level of transcription and/or translation in response to solar radiation. In this review, we present the use of both transcriptomics and proteomics to advance knowledge in the field of bacterial response to damaging radiation. Those studies pertain to diverse application areas such as fundamental microbiology, water treatment, microbial ecology and astrobiology. Even though it has been demonstrated that mRNA abundance is not always consistent with the protein regulation, we present here an exhaustive review on how bacteria regulate their gene expression at both transcription and translation levels to enable biomarkers identification and comparison of gene regulation from one bacterial species to another.

  2. Solar UV Radiation and the Origin of Life On Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, S. R.; Lanz, T.; Hubeny, I.; Gaidos, E.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have embarked on a program aimed at understanding the atmosphere of the early Earth, because of its importance as a greenhouse, radiation shield and energy source for life. Here, we give a progress report on the first phase of this program to establish the UV radiation from the early Sun. We have obtained ultraviolet spectra (STIS, FUSE, EUVE) of carefully selected nearby, young solar-type stars, which act as surrogates for the early Sun We are making detailed non-LTE analyses of the spectra and constructing models of their photospheres + chromospheres. Once validated, these models will allow us to extrapolate our theoretical spectra to other metallicities and to unobserved spectral regions.

  3. Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-07-01

    The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

  4. ANFIS, SVM and ANN soft-computing techniques to estimate daily global solar radiation in a warm sub-humid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quej, Victor H.; Almorox, Javier; Arnaldo, Javier A.; Saito, Laurel

    2017-03-01

    Daily solar radiation is an important variable in many models. In this paper, the accuracy and performance of three soft computing techniques (i.e., adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were assessed for predicting daily horizontal global solar radiation from measured meteorological variables in the Yucatán Peninsula, México. Model performance was assessed with statistical indicators such as root mean squared error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and coefficient of determination (R2). The performance assessment indicates that the SVM technique with requirements of daily maximum and minimum air temperature, extraterrestrial solar radiation and rainfall has better performance than the other techniques and may be a promising alternative to the usual approaches for predicting solar radiation.

  5. Interanual variability os solar radiation in Peninsula Iberica; Variabilidad interanual de la radiacion solar en la Peninsula Iberica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Tovar-Pescador, J.; Gamiz-Fortis, S.; Esteban-Parra, M.; Castro-Diez, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The NAO climatic phenomenon is the main responsible for the interanual cloud cover variability in Europe. We explore the relationship between the NAO and the solar radiation spatio-temporal variability in Europe during winter. Measured monthly sums of sunshine duration and short-wave downward solar flux reanalysis data have been used. Correlation analysis between the NAO index and the measured sunshine duration shows a maximum positive value (+0.75) over the Iberian Peninsula. Accordingly, solar radiation in this area undergoes an interanual variability that can reach up to 30%, with the derived consequences for a reliable solar energy resources evaluation. (Author)

  6. Direct and diffuse solar radiation components estimation based on RBF model: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz RABEHI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study, propose a new application of radial basis functions neural network for estimating direct normal radiation (DNR and diffuse solar radiation (DSR components based on different inputs parameters. The proposed methodology was validated and tested on limited data set recorded over three years (2014-2016 in a semi-arid climate in Algeria.The experimental results show that RBF-model was highly qualified for estimating DNR and DSR with high performance accuracy. The obtained statistical parameters of Normalized Root Mean Square Error (NRMSE, Determination Coefficient (R2 and Correlation Coefficient (r for DNR and DSR are: 0.030, 97.30 %, 98.60% and 0.044, 94.34%, 97.61%, respectively.

  7. Nrf2 Activation Protects against Solar-Simulated Ultraviolet Radiation in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knatko, Elena V; Ibbotson, Sally H; Zhang, Ying; Higgins, Maureen; Fahey, Jed W; Talalay, Paul; Dawe, Robert S; Ferguson, James; Huang, Jeffrey T-J; Clarke, Rosemary; Zheng, Suqing; Saito, Akira; Kalra, Sukirti; Benedict, Andrea L; Honda, Tadashi; Proby, Charlotte M; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2015-06-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 determines the ability to adapt and survive under conditions of electrophilic, oxidative, and inflammatory stress by regulating the expression of elaborate networks comprising nearly 500 genes encoding proteins with versatile cytoprotective functions. In mice, disruption of Nrf2 increases susceptibility to carcinogens and accelerates disease pathogenesis. Paradoxically, Nrf2 is upregulated in established human tumors, but whether this upregulation drives carcinogenesis is not known. Here we show that the incidence, multiplicity, and burden of solar-simulated UV radiation-mediated cutaneous tumors that form in SKH-1 hairless mice in which Nrf2 is genetically constitutively activated are lower than those that arise in their wild-type counterparts. Pharmacologic Nrf2 activation by topical biweekly applications of small (40 nmol) quantities of the potent bis(cyano enone) inducer TBE-31 has a similar protective effect against solar-simulated UV radiation in animals receiving long-term treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine. Genetic or pharmacologic Nrf2 activation lowers the expression of the pro-inflammatory factors IL6 and IL1β, and COX2 after acute exposure of mice to UV radiation. In healthy human subjects, topical applications of extracts delivering the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane reduced the degree of solar-simulated UV radiation-induced skin erythema, a quantifiable surrogate endpoint for cutaneous damage and skin cancer risk. Collectively, these data show that Nrf2 is not a driver for tumorigenesis even upon exposure to a very potent and complete carcinogen and strongly suggest that the frequent activation of Nrf2 in established human tumors is a marker of metabolic adaptation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Spatio-temporal representativeness of ground-based downward solar radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Matthias; Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris

    2017-04-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) is most directly observed with ground based pyranometer measurements. Besides measurement uncertainties, which arise from the pyranometer instrument itself, also errors attributed to the limited spatial representativeness of observations from single sites for their large-scale surrounding have to be taken into account when using such measurements for energy balance studies. In this study the spatial representativeness of 157 homogeneous European downward surface solar radiation time series from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) and the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) were examined for the period 1983-2015 by using the high resolution (0.05°) surface solar radiation data set from the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF SARAH) as a proxy for the spatiotemporal variability of SSR. By correlating deseasonalized monthly SSR time series form surface observations against single collocated satellite derived SSR time series, a mean spatial correlation pattern was calculated and validated against purely observational based patterns. Generally decreasing correlations with increasing distance from station, with high correlations (R2 = 0.7) in proximity to the observational sites (±0.5°), was found. When correlating surface observations against time series from spatially averaged satellite derived SSR data (and thereby simulating coarser and coarser grids), very high correspondence between sites and the collocated pixels has been found for pixel sizes up to several degrees. Moreover, special focus was put on the quantification of errors which arise in conjunction to spatial sampling when estimating the temporal variability and trends for a larger region from a single surface observation site. For 15-year trends on a 1° grid, errors due to spatial sampling in the order of half of the measurement uncertainty for monthly mean values were found.

  9. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  10. Evaluating solar radiation on a tilted surfaces - a study case in Timis (Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasar, C.; Prostean, O.; Prostean, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the last years the usage of solar energy has grown considerably in Romania, as well as in Europe, stimulated by various factors as government programs, green pricing policies, decreasing of photovoltaic components cost etc. Also, the rising demand of using Solar Energy Conversion Systems (SECS) is driven by the desire of individuals or companies to obtain energy from a clean renewable source. In many applications, remote consumers far from other energetic grids can use solar systems more cost-effectively than extending the grid to reach the location. Usually the solar energy is measured or forecast on horizontal surface, but in SECS there is needed the total solar radiation incident on the collector surface, that is oriented in a position that maximize the harvested energy. There are many models that convert the solar radiation from horizontal surface to a tilted surface, but they use empirical coefficients and the accuracy is influenced by different facts as geographical location or sky conditions. Such models were used considering measured values for solar radiation on horizontal plane, in the western part of Romania. Hourly values measured for global solar irradiation on the horizontal plane, diffuse solar irradiation on the horizontal plane and reflected solar irradiation by ground are used to compute the total solar radiation incident on different tilted surfaces. The calculated incident radiation is then compared with the real radiation measured on tilted surface in order to evaluate the performance of the considered conversion models.

  11. Engineering imaginaries: Anticipatory foresight for solar radiation management governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sean

    2017-02-15

    Since solar radiation management (SRM) technologies do not yet exist and capacities to model their impacts are limited, proposals for its governance are implicitly designed not around realities, but possibilities - baskets of risk and benefit that are often components of future imaginaries. This paper reports on the project Solar Radiation Management: Foresight for Governance (SRM4G), which aimed to encourage an anticipatory mode of thinking about the future of an engineered climate. Leveraging the participation of 15 scholars and practitioners heavily engaged in early conversations on SRM governance, SRM4G applied scenario construction to generate a set of alternative futures leading to 2030, each exercising different influences on the need for - and challenges associated with - development of SRM technologies. The scenarios then provided the context for the design of systems of governance with the capacity and legitimacy to respond to those challenges, and for the evaluation of the advantages and drawbacks of different options against a wide range of imaginary but plausible futures. SRM4G sought to initiate a conversation within the SRM research community on the capacity of foresight approaches to highlight the centrality of conceptions of the future to discussions of SRM's threats and opportunities, and in doing so, examined and challenged the assumptions embedded in conceptualizing SRM's aims, development and governance, and discussed the capacity of governance options to adapt to a wide range of possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple spacecraft formation reconfiguration using solar radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Kamran; Kumar, Krishna Dev

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the use of solar radiation pressure for spacecraft formation reconfiguration at the L2 Sun-Earth/Moon collinear libration point is presented. The system consisting of a leader and three follower spacecraft is considered. The leader spacecraft is assumed to be in a fixed halo trajectory and the follower spacecraft position relative to the leader satellite is controlled using two angles and area; these are varied based on a variable structure model reference adaptive control technique to achieve the desired formation reconfiguration. This approach ensures that all follower spacecraft complete the required maneuver in the same time. An intertially fixed circular trajectory, which is suitable for interferometer missions, is used in this paper. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov theory. The performance of the proposed controller is tested through numerical simulation of the governing nonlinear equations of motion and is applied for formation initialization, resizing, retargeting, and rotation. The numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control technique for spacecraft formation reconfiguration using solar radiation pressure at the L2 libration point. Furthermore, control inputs on the order of 15 degrees and 2 m2 for area change are sufficient to execute the maneuvers.

  13. Generation of hourly solar radiation for inclined surfaces using monthly mean sunshine duration in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mefti, A.; Bouroubi, M.Y. [Centre of Development of Renewable Energy, Lab. of Energy Resources, Algiers (Algeria); Adane, A. [Univ. of Science and Technology of Algiers (U.S.T.H.B.), Lab. of Image Processing and Radiation, Algiers (Algeria)

    2003-11-01

    Hourly global solar radiation flux incident on an inclined surface is evaluated in any site of Algeria using monthly mean daily sunshine duration measurements. The methodology used consists of successive transformations of solar data, respectively, based on the exponential probability distribution of daily sunshine duration, Angstrom equation, beta probability distribution of hourly global solar radiation flux, polynomial correlations of hourly direct and diffuse radiation with global solar radiation and the Klucher model. Monthly mean values of daily sunshine duration data recorded in 54 meteorological stations of Algeria and hourly solar radiation data collected in Algiers, Bechar and Tamanrasset are available for this study. Knowing the monthly mean daily sunshine duration measurements, the hourly global solar radiation data are then obtained on a tilted surface for the locations of Algiers, Tamanrasset and Bechar. The monthly mean hourly global solar radiation data estimated for Algiers are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental ones. Associated with the principal component analysis, the above method has been extended to all the other meteorological stations, and monthly mean values of hourly global solar radiation flux incident on an inclined surface have been simulated for every site of Algeria. This yields an important database useful for solar energy applications. (Author)

  14. Effects of increased solar ultraviolet radiation on materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrady, A L; Hamid, S H; Hu, X; Torikai, A

    1998-10-01

    Synthetic polymers such as plastics, as well as naturally occurring polymer materials such as wood, are extensively used in building construction and other outdoor applications where they are routinely exposed to sunlight. The UV-B content in sunlight is well known to affect adversely the mechanical properties of these materials, limiting their useful life. Presently their outdoor lifetimes depend on the use of photostabilizers in the case of plastics and on protective surface coatings in the case of wood. Any increase in the solar UV-B content due to a partial ozone depletion would therefore tend to decrease the outdoor service life of these materials. It is the synergistic effect of increased UV radiation with other factors such as the temperature that would determine the extent of such reduction in service life. The increased cost associated with such a change would be felt unevenly across the globe. Those developing countries that depend on plastics as a prime material of construction and experience high ambient temperatures are likely to be particularly affected in spite of the relatively small fractional decrease in ozone at those locations. Assessment of the damage to materials, associated with ozone depletion, requires a knowledge of the wavelength dependence as well as the dose-response characteristics of the polymer degradation processes of interest. While the recent literature includes some reliable spectral sensitivity data, little dose-response information has been reported, so it is difficult to make such assessments reliably at the present time. This is particularly true for the naturally occurring materials popularly used in construction applications. To maintain polymers at the same useful lifetime in spite of increased solar UV-B content, the amount of photostabilizers used in the formulations might be increased. This strategy assumes that conventional stabilizers will continue to be effective with the spectrally altered UV-B-enhanced solar

  15. Effects of solar radiation on the orbits of small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A modification of the Robertson (1937) equations of particle motion in the presence of solar radiation is developed which allows for partial reflection of sunlight as a result of rapid and varying particle rotations caused by interaction with the solar wind. The coefficients and forces in earlier forms of the equations are compared with those in the present equations, and secular rates of change of particle orbital elements are determined. Orbital dimensions are calculated in terms of time, probable sizes and densities of meteoric and cometary particles are estimated, and times of infall to the sun are computed for a particle moving in an almost circular orbit and a particle moving in an elliptical orbit of high eccentricity. Changes in orbital elements are also determined for particles from a long-period sun-grazing comet. The results show that the time of infall to the sun from a highly eccentric orbit is substantially shorter than from a circular orbit with a radius equal to the mean distance in the eccentric orbit. The possibility is considered that the free orbital kinetic energy of particles drawn into the sun may be the energy source for the solar corona.

  16. Impacts of Solar Radiation Management on Surface Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, L.; Nowack, P. J.; Tilmes, S.; Robock, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the impact of solar radiation management (SRM) on atmospheric O3. Using the chemistry-climate model CESM-CAM4-Chem, we compare surface O3 changes under simulations following the RCP6.0 scenario with two geoengineering scenarios in which either stratospheric aerosols (G4SSA) or a solar irradiance reduction (G4SSA-S) is used to achieve surface cooling. In the latter, the model's solar constant is reduced to attain the same negative radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as induced by the aerosols in G4SSA. Resulting surface O3 changes between the geoengineering scenarios and the RCP6.0 scenario strongly depend on the geoengineering method used. For example, global mean surface O3 changes under G4SSA and G4SSA-S show opposite signs; during the geoengineering period (2020-2069) global annual mean surface O3 concentrations under G4SSA significantly drops by 0.55 ppm relative to RCP6.0 as compared to an increase of 0.45 ppm under G4SSA-S. The surface O3 changes are consistent with tropospheric O3 budget changes. Compared with RCP6.0, stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of O3 in G4SSA and G4SSA-S is reduced by 137 Tg/yr and 31 Tg/yr, respectively, whereas the net tropospheric chemical change (production minus loss of O3) is increased in the two scenarios by 127 Tg/yr and 38 Tg/yr. The larger reduction of STE under G4SSA is mainly due to increased stratospheric O3 depletion as a result of the injected sulfate aerosols. A key tropospheric chemistry player is lower specific humidity (by 5-20%) due to the cooling effect of SRM that affects both O3 loss and production. Less water vapor in remote areas results in less O3 chemical loss, with coupled reactions contributing 90% to the overall O3 chemical loss change. Comparing G4SSA and G4SSA-S directly, we find that changes in ultraviolet (UV) radiation fluxes into the troposphere are central to the surface O3 response. Stratospheric O3 depletion in G4SSA allows more UV radiation to penetrate into the

  17. On-orbit verification of fuel-free attitude control system for spinning solar sail utilizing solar radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funase, Ryu; Shirasawa, Yoji; Mimasu, Yuya; Mori, Osamu; Tsuda, Yuichi; Saiki, Takanao; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces a new attitude control system for a solar sail, which leverages solar radiation pressure. This novel system achieves completely fuel-free and oscillation-free attitude control of a flexible spinning solar sail. This system consists of thin-film-type devices that electrically control their optical parameters such as reflectivity to generate an imbalance in the solar radiation pressure applied to the edge of the sail. By using these devices, minute and continuous control torque can be applied to the sail to realize very stable and fuel-free attitude control of the large and flexible membrane. The control system was implemented as an optional attitude control system for small solar power sail demonstrator named IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun). In-orbit attitude control experiments were conducted, and the performance of the controller was successfully verified in comparison with the ground-based analytical performance estimation.

  18. Features and causes of recent surface solar radiation dimming and brightening patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzianastassiou, N.; Papadimas, C. D.; Matsoukas, C.; Pavlakis, K.; Fotiadi, A.; Wild, M.; Vardavas, I.

    2012-04-01

    Incoming solar radiation at the Earth's surface has undergone substantial decreases/increases on decadal timescales in the second half of 20th century. More specifically, surface measurements have indicated a widespread decrease of surface solar radiation (SSR) from the 1950s to the 1980s, described as global dimming, followed by a period with either no more decrease or even an increase at various locations worldwide till the end of 1990s, namely a global brightening. These measured patterns of SSR are, in general, in line with SSR fluxes computed with radiative transfer models (RTMs) using satellite input data, while efforts are currently being made to reproduce them with regional or global climate models. The advantage of reproducing SSR dimming/brightening with RTMs is that an almost complete coverage of the globe is possible, whereas dimming/brightening patterns are obtained under both clear- and all-sky conditions. Moreover, an even more important and incomparable advantage of the use of RTMs for reproducing SSR dimming/brightening, is that it makes possible the identification of their causes in terms of specific radiative forcing agents, and the assessment and quantification of their relative contribution to GDB, which is of major importance for understanding current and future climate changes. In the present study, first an update of SSR dimming/brightening at global scale beyond 2000 is attempted using a spectral RTM along with a variety of satellite and reanalyses input data. The results are obtained at scales varying from the regional to continental/hemispherical/global, and are validated through comparisons against quality surface measurements from reference global networks such as GEBA (Global Energy Balance Archive) and BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network). An inter-hemispherical difference is revealed up to 2007, consisting in a clear dimming in the South Hemisphere (SH), against a no clear dimming/brightening signal in North Hemisphere (NH

  19. Sensitivity analysis of numerical weather prediction radiative schemes to forecast direct solar radiation over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkavilli, S. K.; Kay, M. J.; Taylor, R.; Prasad, A. A.; Troccoli, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Australian Solar Energy Forecasting System (ASEFS) project requires forecasting timeframes which range from nowcasting to long-term forecasts (minutes to two years). As concentrating solar power (CSP) plant operators are one of the key stakeholders in the national energy market, research and development enhancements for direct normal irradiance (DNI) forecasts is a major subtask. This project involves comparing different radiative scheme codes to improve day ahead DNI forecasts on the national supercomputing infrastructure running mesoscale simulations on NOAA's Weather Research & Forecast (WRF) model. ASEFS also requires aerosol data fusion for improving accurate representation of spatio-temporally variable atmospheric aerosols to reduce DNI bias error in clear sky conditions over southern Queensland & New South Wales where solar power is vulnerable to uncertainities from frequent aerosol radiative events such as bush fires and desert dust. Initial results from thirteen years of Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) deseasonalised DNI and MODIS NASA-Terra aerosol optical depth (AOD) anomalies demonstrated strong negative correlations in north and southeast Australia along with strong variability in AOD (~0.03-0.05). Radiative transfer schemes, DNI and AOD anomaly correlations will be discussed for the population and transmission grid centric regions where current and planned CSP plants dispatch electricity to capture peak prices in the market. Aerosol and solar irradiance datasets include satellite and ground based assimilations from the national BOM, regional aerosol researchers and agencies. The presentation will provide an overview of this ASEFS project task on WRF and results to date. The overall goal of this ASEFS subtask is to develop a hybrid numerical weather prediction (NWP) and statistical/machine learning multi-model ensemble strategy that meets future operational requirements of CSP plant operators.

  20. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  1. Solar radiation and cooling load calculation for radiant systems: Definition and evaluation of the Direct Solar Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Causone, Francesco; Corgnati, Stefano P.; Filippi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The study of the influence of solar radiation on the built environment is a basic issue in building physics and currently it is extremely important because glazed envelopes are widely used in contemporary architecture. In the present study, the removal of solar heat gains by radiant cooling systems...... is investigated. Particular attention is given to the portion of solar radiation converted to cooling load, without taking part in thermal absorption phenomena due to the thermal mass of the room. This specific component of the cooling load is defined as the Direct Solar Load. A simplified procedure to correctly...... calculate the magnitude of the Direct Solar Load in cooling load calculations is proposed and it is implemented with the Heat Balance method and the Radiant Time Series method. The F ratio of the solar heat gains directly converted to cooling load, in the case of a low thermal mass radiant ceiling...

  2. Development and investigation of solar collectors for conversion of solar radiation into heat and/or electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Velimir P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes work on two projects of the National Energy Efficiency Program NEEP 709300036 and NPEE 271003 titled "The model of solar collector for middle temperature conversion of solar radiation in heat" and "Development and investigation on hybrid solar collector for heat and electricity generation", respectively. This first project deals with solar collector that transfers solar radiation in heat in area of middle temperature conversion (at temperatures above 100 ºC. During entire year it can realize significant saving of electric energy used for preparation of warm water and in central and district heating. During work on the second project, two hybrid solar collectors, their installation, mathematical model, software, and experimental set-up were designed and realized. The first collector had the photovoltaic panel located above the absorber and the second collector had the panel located on the absorber. For both collectors, the results show that efficiency of fossil fuel replacement is 85%. .

  3. Convective instability of sludge storage under evaporation and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Tatyana, Lyubimova

    2014-05-01

    The sludge storages are an important part of production cycle at salt manufacturing, water supply, etc. A quality of water in the storage depends on mixing of pure water and settled sediment. One of the leading factors is thermal convection. There are two main mechanisms of the layer instability exist. First, it is instability of water due to evaporation from the free surface [1]. It cools the water from upside, increases the particles concentration and leads to the instability in the near-surface layer. Second, the sediment absorbs a solar radiation and heats the liquid from below making it unstable in the near-bottom area. We assume the initial state is the mechanical equilibrium. The water and sediment particles are motionless, the sediment forms a uniform sludge layer of thickness z0, there are no evaporation and heating by solar energy, and the temperature has a linear profile is determined by fixed upper and bottom temperatures of the layer. Taking into account the evaporation and solar radiation absorption, we obtain a non-stationary solution for the temperature using Fourier series method. The local temperature gradients increases rapidly with time, and local Rayleigh number can be estimated by thermal conduction length Lt: Raloc(z,t) = gβ(δT(z,t)/δz)L4t-/νΞ , Lt ~ √Ξt, (1) where g is gravity acceleration, β, ν and Ξ are thermal volume expansion coefficient, kinematic viscosity and thermal conductivity of the liquid, respectively. Raloc* reaches the critical value at finite time t* and water motion begins. The maximal power of solar radiation in visible band equals 230 Wt/m2 at the latitude of "Uralkalii" salt manufacturer (Berezniki, Perm Region, Russian Federation). We neglect IR and UV radiation because of its huge absorption by water [2]. The evaporation speed is found using results for shallow water reservoir [3] and meteorological data for Berezniki [4]. We get the t*~ 6 · 102 s (10 min) for the layer of 1 m depth and t*~ 2 · 103 s (40

  4. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  5. Transmission components of solar radiation in pine stands in relation to climatic and stand variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Muller

    1971-01-01

    In a new approach, transmission was studied by relating to stand biomass the ratio of incoming solar radiation beneath tree crowns to that within the atmosphere. Several assumptions were used to estimate analytically the various ways in which solar radiation penetrates through crowns of three pine species in northern California. Sunflecks accounted for much of the...

  6. SOLAR RADIATION ESTIMATION ON BUILDING ROOFS AND WEB-BASED SOLAR CADASTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Agugiaro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the estimation of solar irradiance on building roofs in complex Alpine landscapes. Very high resolution geometric models of the building roofs are generated by means of advanced automated image matching methods. Models are combined with raster and vector data sources to estimate the incoming solar radiation hitting the roofs. The methodology takes into account for atmospheric effects, site latitude and elevation, slope and aspect of the terrain as well as the effects of shadows cast by surrounding buildings, chimneys, dormers, vegetation and terrain topography. An open source software solution has been developed and applied to a study area located in a mountainous site and containing some 1250 residential, commercial and industrial buildings. The method has been validated by data collected with a pyranometer and results made available through a prototype WebGIS platform.

  7. Solar Radiation Estimation on Building Roofs and Web-Based Solar Cadastre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agugiaro, G.; Nex, F.; Remondino, F.; De Filippi, R.; Droghetti, S.; Furlanello, C.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is the estimation of solar irradiance on building roofs in complex Alpine landscapes. Very high resolution geometric models of the building roofs are generated by means of advanced automated image matching methods. Models are combined with raster and vector data sources to estimate the incoming solar radiation hitting the roofs. The methodology takes into account for atmospheric effects, site latitude and elevation, slope and aspect of the terrain as well as the effects of shadows cast by surrounding buildings, chimneys, dormers, vegetation and terrain topography. An open source software solution has been developed and applied to a study area located in a mountainous site and containing some 1250 residential, commercial and industrial buildings. The method has been validated by data collected with a pyranometer and results made available through a prototype WebGIS platform.

  8. Radiative transfer model for estimation of global solar radiation; Modelo de transferencia radiativa para la estimacion de la radiacion solar global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettazzi, A.; Sabon, C. S.; Souto, G. J. A.

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the efficiency of a radiative transfer model in estimating the annual solar global radiation has been evaluated, over different locations at Galicia, Spain, in clear sky periods. Due to its quantitative significance, special attention has been focused on the analysis of the influence of visibility over the global radiation. By comparison of both estimated and measured global solar radiation along year 2002, a typical annual visibility series was obtained over every location. These visibility values has been analysed in order to identify patterns and typical values, in order to be used to estimate the global solar radiation along a different year. Validation was done over the year 2003, obtaining an annual estimation less than 10 % different to the measured value. (Author)

  9. An assessment of radiation damage in space-based germanium detectors due to solar proton events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, Alan; Brandenburg, S.; Buis, E. -J.; Kliewiet, H.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Peacock, A.; Quarati, F.; Quirin, P.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation effects caused by solar proton events will be a common problem for many types of sensors on missions to the inner solar system because of the long cruise phases coupled with the inverse square scaling of solar particle events. As part of a study in support of the BepiColombo mission to

  10. Earth's magnetosphere and outer radiation belt under sub-Alfvénic solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles J; Huang, Chia-Lin; Winslow, Reka M; Spence, Harlan E; Schwadron, Nathan A

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind results in the formation of a collisionless bow shock 60,000-100,000 km upstream of our planet, as long as the solar wind fast magnetosonic Mach (hereafter Mach) number exceeds unity. Here, we present one of those extremely rare instances, when the solar wind Mach number reached steady values radiation belt. This study allows us to directly observe the state of the inner magnetosphere, including the radiation belts during a type of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling which is unusual for planets in our solar system but may be common for close-in extrasolar planets.

  11. Summary information and data sets for NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, 1981 - 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, W.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the solar radiation and meteorological data collected at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, from 1981 through 1991. The data collection was part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. The report includes long-term averages and monthly and annual variability for key solar radiation elements and describes the hourly data sets for 1981 through 1991. Described in the report are how the elements were measured and how the data were collected and processed into hourly values. Procedures used for quality assessment of the hourly data values are presented, and the position of the solar radiation and meteorological elements in the data sets are defined; samples of read statements are provided.

  12. On the intrinsic timescales of temporal variability in measurements of the surface solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2018-01-01

    This study is concerned with the intrinsic temporal scales of the variability in the surface solar irradiance (SSI). The data consist of decennial time series of daily means of the SSI obtained from high-quality measurements of the broadband solar radiation impinging on a horizontal plane at ground level, issued from different Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) ground stations around the world. First, embedded oscillations sorted in terms of increasing timescales of the data are extracted by empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Next, Hilbert spectral analysis is applied to obtain an amplitude-modulation-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) representation of the data. The time-varying nature of the characteristic timescales of variability, along with the variations in the signal intensity, are thus revealed. A novel, adaptive null hypothesis based on the general statistical characteristics of noise is employed in order to discriminate between the different features of the data, those that have a deterministic origin and those being realizations of various stochastic processes. The data have a significant spectral peak corresponding to the yearly variability cycle and feature quasi-stochastic high-frequency variability components, irrespective of the geographical location or of the local climate. Moreover, the amplitude of this latter feature is shown to be modulated by variations in the yearly cycle, which is indicative of nonlinear multiplicative cross-scale couplings. The study has possible implications on the modeling and the forecast of the surface solar radiation, by clearly discriminating the deterministic from the quasi-stochastic character of the data, at different local timescales.

  13. An artificial neural network based fast radiative transfer model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, a fast radiative transfer model using neural networks is proposed to simulate radiances corresponding to the wavenumbers of INSAT-3D. Realistic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles have been used for training the network. Spectral response functions of GOES-13, a satellite similar in ...

  14. Outdoor Exposure to Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Legislation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A

    2016-06-01

    The total ozone column of 265 ± 11 Dobson Units in the tropical-equatorial zones and 283 ± 16 Dobson Units in the subtropics of Brazil are among the lowest on Earth, and as a result, the prevalence of skin cancer due to solar ultraviolet radiation is among the highest. Daily erythemal doses in Brazil can be over 7,500 J m. Erythemal dose rates on cloudless days of winter and summer are typically about 0.147 W m and 0.332 W m, respectively. However, radiation enhancement events yielded by clouds have been reported with erythemal dose rates of 0.486 W m. Daily doses of the diffuse component of erythemal radiation have been determined with values of 5,053 J m and diffuse erythemal dose rates of 0.312 W m. Unfortunately, Brazilians still behave in ways that lead to overexposure to the sun. The annual personal ultraviolet radiation ambient dose among Brazilian youths can be about 5.3%. Skin cancer in Brazil is prevalent, with annual rates of 31.6% (non-melanoma) and 1.0% (melanoma). Governmental and non-governmental initiatives have been taken to increase public awareness of photoprotection behaviors. Resolution #56 by the Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária has banned tanning devices in Brazil. In addition, Projects of Law (PL), like PL 3730/2004, propose that the Sistema Único de Saúde should distribute sunscreen to members of the public, while PL 4027/2012 proposes that employers should provide outdoor workers with sunscreen during professional outdoor activities. Similar laws have already been passed in some municipalities. These are presented and discussed in this study.

  15. Sweat Rate Prediction Equations for Outdoor Exercise with Transient Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    clothing, aerobic fitness, and progressive dehydration . J Therm Biol 22: 331–342, 1997. 25. Matthew WT, Santee WR, Berglund LG. Solar Load Inputs for...code) Sweat rate prediction equations for outdoor exercise with transient solar radiation Richard R. Gonzalez,1 Samuel N. Cheuvront,2 Brett R. Ely,2...Moran DS, Hadid A, Endrusick TL, Sawka MN. Sweat rate prediction equations for outdoor exercise with transient solar radiation. J Appl Phys- iol 112

  16. Solar radiation pressure resonances in Low Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Elisa Maria; Schettino, Giulia; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to highlight the crucial role that orbital resonances associated with solar radiation pressure can have in Low Earth Orbit. We review the corresponding literature, and provide an analytical tool to estimate the maximum eccentricity which can be achieved for well-defined initial conditions. We then compare the results obtained with the simplified model with the results obtained with a more comprehensive dynamical model. The analysis has important implications both from a theoretical point of view, because it shows that the role of some resonances was underestimated in the past, and also from a practical point of view in the perspective of passive deorbiting solutions for satellites at the end-of-life.

  17. Methods to Estimate Solar Radiation Dosimetry in Coral Reefs Using Remote Sensed, Modeled, and in Situ Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar irradiance has been increasingly recognized as an important determinant of bleaching in coral reefs, but measurements of solar radiation exposure within coral reefs have been relatively limited. Solar irradiance and diffuse down welling attenuation coefficients (Kd, m-1) we...

  18. Spacecraft's Attitude Prediction: Solar Radiation Torque and the Earth's Shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, M. C.; Vilhena de Moraes, R.; Cabette, R. S.; Garcia, R. V.

    A semi-analytical approach is proposed to study the rotational motion of a spacecraft under the influence of the solar radiation torque and taking into account the influence of the Earth's shadow. The equations of motion are given in an Hamiltonian formalism and Andoyer variables are used to describe the spacecraft rotational motion. The model for the shadow function was developed by Kabelac which considers geometric and physical factors and three specific regions: shadow, penumbra and total illuminated. Special attention is focused on the influence of the orbital elements and the positioning of the Sun in the duration of the Earth's shadow and penumbra. By mapping and computing the shadow function it is possible to get the periods in which the spacecraft is illuminated and when it is in the umbra (in this case the solar radiation torque is zero). The semi-analytical process is applied to get the solution for the equations of motion, using the mapping of the shadow function. When the satellite is illuminated or it is in the penumbra, a known analytical solution is used to predict the spacecraft's attitude. Numerical simulations are presented considering different sets of orbital characteristics for the satellite and positioning of the Sun in the Ecliptic. By numerical results it is possible to observe important influence of the orbital elements on the time for crossing penumbra and shadow regions. Numerical simulations show also that the transition from the shadow region to the illumined region was attenuated when of the penumbra region is included in the dynamical problem.

  19. Datasets for radiation network algorithm development and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Berry, M. L.. [New Jersey Institute of Technology; Wu, Qishi [University of Memphis; Grieme, M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology; Brooks, Richard R [ORNL; Cordone, G. [Clemson University

    2016-01-01

    Domestic Nuclear Detection Office s (DNDO) Intelligence Radiation Sensors Systems (IRSS) program supported the development of networks of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation counters for detecting, localizing, and identifying low-level radiation sources. Under this program, a series of indoor and outdoor tests were conducted with multiple source strengths and types, different background profiles, and various types of source and detector movements. Following the tests, network algorithms were replayed in various re-constructed scenarios using sub-networks. These measurements and algorithm traces together provide a rich collection of highly valuable datasets for testing the current and next generation radiation network algorithms, including the ones (to be) developed by broader R&D communities such as distributed detection, information fusion, and sensor networks. From this multiple TeraByte IRSS database, we distilled out and packaged the first batch of canonical datasets for public release. They include measurements from ten indoor and two outdoor tests which represent increasingly challenging baseline scenarios for robustly testing radiation network algorithms.

  20. Daily tropical cyclone intensity response to solar ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, J. B.; Jagger, T. H.; Hodges, R. E.

    2010-05-01

    An inverse relationship between hurricane activity over the Caribbean and the number of sunspots has recently been identified. Here we investigate this relationship using daily observations and find support for the hypothesis that changes in ultraviolet (UV) radiation rather than changes in other concomitant solar and cosmic variations are the cause. The relationship is statistically significant after accounting for annual variation in ocean heat and the El Niño cycle. A warming response in the upper troposphere to increased solar UV forcing as measured by the Mg II index (core-to-wing ratio) decreases the atmosphere's convective available potential energy leading to a weaker cyclone. The response amplitude at a cyclone intensity of 44 m s-1 is 6.7 ± 2.56 m s-1 per 0.01 Mg II units (s.d.), which compares with 4.6 m s-1 estimated from the heat-engine theory using a temperature trend derived from observations. The increasing hurricane response sensitivity with increasing strength is found in the observations and in an application of the theory.

  1. Photocatalytic degradation of the vinasse under solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Veronice S.; Fernandes Machado, Nadia R.C. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, Bloco D-90, CEP 87020-900, Maringa, Parana (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of the photocatalytic process in the vinasse treatment using solar radiation. The degradation tests were carried out during 5 days consecutive with solar irradiation from 8:00 a.m. to 17:00 p.m. TiO{sub 2}, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2} and immobilized TiO{sub 2} in glass beads (TiO{sub 2}/beads) were used as photocatalysts. The characterization results showed that the catalysts presented distinct textural, structural and morphologic properties, conferring distinct photocatalytic behavior to them. The degradation results showed that photolysis was not efficient in the vinasse mineralization and that Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2} was the most photoactive material. TiO{sub 2}/beads presented activity higher than the suspended TiO{sub 2}, indicating a positive interaction between TiO{sub 2} and glass beads. The vinasse toxicity was evaluated using bioassays with Artemia saline and it verified significant reduction in the vinasse toxicity after photocatalytic treatment, mainly with Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}/beads. Evidencing that photocatalysis under sunlight was efficient in the vinasse treatment and that the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-TiO{sub 2} is an excellent option as photocatalyst. (author)

  2. Investigating work-related neoplasia associated with solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S; Forman, S D; McNamee, R; Wilkinson, S M; Agius, R

    2015-01-01

    Both solar and non-solar exposures associated with occupation and work tasks have been reported as skin carcinogens. In the UK, there are well-established surveillance schemes providing relevant information, including when exposures took place, occupation, location of work and dates of symptom onset and diagnosis. To add to the evidence on work-related skin neoplasia, including causal agents, geographical exposure and time lag between exposure and diagnosis. This study investigated incident case reports of occupational skin disease originating from clinical specialists in dermatology reporting to a UK-wide surveillance scheme (EPIDERM) by analysing case reports of skin neoplasia from 1996 to 2012 in terms of diagnosis, employment, suspected causal agent and symptom onset. The suspected causal agent was 'sun/sunlight/ultraviolet light' in 99% of the reported work-related skin neoplasia cases. Most cases reported (91%) were in males, and the majority (62%) were aged over 65 at the time of reporting. More detailed information on exposure was available for 42% of the cases, with the median time from exposure to symptom onset ranging from 44 (melanoma) to 57 (squamous cell carcinoma) years. Irrespective of diagnostic category, the median duration of exposure to 'sun/sunlight/ultraviolet light' appeared longer where exposures occurred in the UK (range 39-51 years) rather than outside the UK (range 2.5-6.5 years). It is important to provide effective information about skin protection to workers exposed to solar radiation, especially to outdoor workers based outside the UK. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Are Energetic Electrons in the Solar Wind the Source of the Outer Radiation Belt?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xinlin; Baker, D. N.; Temerin, M.; Larson, D.; Lin, R. P.; Reeves, G. D.; Looper, M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Using data from WIND, SAMPEX (Solar Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sensors onboard geostationary satellites, we investigate the correlation of energetic electrons in the 20–200 keV range in the solar wind and of high speed solar wind streams with relativistic electrons in the magnetosphere to determine whether energetic electrons in the solar wind are the source of the outer relativistic electron radiation belt. Though there is ...

  4. Plant responses to current solar ultraviolet-B radiation and to supplemented solar ultraviolet-B radiation simulating ozone depletion: an experimental comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, M Cecilia; Flint, Stephan D; Searles, Peter S; Caldwell, Martyn M

    2004-01-01

    Field experiments assessing UV-B effects on plants have been conducted using two contrasting techniques: supplementation of solar UV-B with radiation from fluorescent UV lamps and the exclusion of solar UV-B with filters. We compared these two approaches by growing lettuce and oat simultaneously under three conditions: UV-B exclusion, near-ambient UV-B (control) and UV-B supplementation (simulating a 30% ozone depletion). This permitted computation of "solar UV-B" and "supplemental UV-B" effects. Microclimate and photosynthetically active radiation were the same under the two treatments and the control. Excluding UV-B changed total UV-B radiation more than did supplementing UV-B, but the UV-B supplementation contained more "biologically effective" shortwave radiation. For oat, solar UV-B had a greater effect than supplemental UV-B on main shoot leaf area and main shoot mass, but supplemental UV-B had a greater effect on leaf and tiller number and UV-B-absorbing compounds. For lettuce, growth and stomatal density generally responded similarly to both solar UV-B and supplemented UV-B radiation, but UV-absorbing compounds responded more to supplemental UV-B, as in oat. Because of the marked spectral differences between the techniques, experiments using UV-B exclusion are most suited to assessing effects of present-day UV-B radiation, whereas UV-B supplementation experiments are most appropriate for addressing the ozone depletion issue.

  5. Fundamental and harmonic radiation in type III solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    1994-01-01

    Type III solar radio bursts are investigated by modeling the propagation of the electron beam and the generation and subsequent propagation of waves to the observer. Predictions from this model are compared in detail with particle, Langmuir wave, and radio data from the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 (ISSE-3) spacecraft and with other observations to clarify the roles of fundamental and harmonic emission in type III radio bursts. Langmuir waves are seen only after the arrival of the beam, in accord with the standard theory. These waves persist after a positive beam slope is last resolved, implying that sporadic positive slopes persist for some time, unresolved but in accord with the predictions of stochastic growth theory. Local electromagnetic emission sets in only after Langmuir waves are seen, in accord with the standard theory, which relies on nonlinear processes involving Langmuir waves. In the events investigated here, fundamental radiation appears to dominate early in the event, followed and/or accompanied by harmonic radiation after the peak, with a long-lived tail of multiply scattered fundamental or harmonic emission extending long afterwards. These results are largely independent of, but generally consistent with, the conclusions of earlier works.

  6. A Solar Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies. Volume 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation parameterization (CLIRAD-SW) developed at the Goddard Climate and Radiation Branch for application to atmospheric models are described. It includes the absorption by water vapor, O3, O2, CO2, clouds, and aerosols and the scattering by clouds, aerosols, and gases. Depending upon the nature of absorption, different approaches are applied to different absorbers. In the ultraviolet and visible regions, the spectrum is divided into 8 bands, and single O3 absorption coefficient and Rayleigh scattering coefficient are used for each band. In the infrared, the spectrum is divided into 3 bands, and the k-distribution method is applied for water vapor absorption. The flux reduction due to O2 is derived from a simple function, while the flux reduction due to CO2 is derived from precomputed tables. Cloud single-scattering properties are parameterized, separately for liquid drops and ice, as functions of water amount and effective particle size. A maximum-random approximation is adopted for the overlapping of clouds at different heights. Fluxes are computed using the Delta-Eddington approximation.

  7. Exploring Solar System Origins With The Desert Fireball Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Bland, P.

    2016-12-01

    Fireball camera networks are designed to recover meteorites with orbits. A geological context is a prerequisite for understanding terrestrial rocks. An improved dynamical context would benefit our understanding of extraterrestrial geology. A dozen projects - professional and amateur - have pursued this goal over the years. The effort has yielded 10 meteorites with orbits. Why so few? All these projects were in the temperate zone of the northern hemisphere: areas where meteorite recovery is marginal. Deserts are one of the few places on Earth where field searches for meteorites can be mounted with a realistic chance of success. This was the driver behind the Desert Fireball Network. The Desert Fireball Network (DFN) uses automated observatories across Australia to triangulate trajectories of meteorites entering the atmosphere, determine pre-entry orbits, and pinpoint their fall positions. Each observatory is an autonomous intelligent imaging system, taking 1000×36Megapixel all-sky images throughout the night, using neural network algorithms to recognise events. They are capable of operating for 12 months in a harsh environment, and store all imagery collected. We developed a completely automated software pipeline for data reduction, and built a supercomputer database for storage, allowing us to process our entire archive. We successfully recovered a meteorite from Lake Eyre on 31st December 2015, using this pipeline. By February 2016 we had reduced our complete fireball dataset, deriving precise orbits for >350 events: a dataset that provides a unique window on the dynamics of material in the inner solar system. The DFN currently stands at 50 stations distributed across the Australian continent, covering an area of 2.5 million km2. The fireball and meteorite orbital data that it can provide will deliver a new dynamical window on the inner solar system, and new insights into solar system origins. Working with DFN's partners at NASA's Solar System Exploration

  8. Online educative activities for solar ultraviolet radiation based on measurements of cloud amount and solar exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Turner, J; Amar, A

    2016-09-01

    A set of online activities for children and the community that are based on an integrated real-time solar UV and cloud measurement system are described. These activities use the functionality of the internet to provide an educative tool for school children and the public on the influence of cloud and the angle of the sun above the horizon on the global erythemal UV or sunburning UV, the diffuse erythemal UV, the global UVA (320-400nm) and the vitamin D effective UV. Additionally, the units of UV exposure and UV irradiance are investigated, along with the meaning and calculation of the UV index (UVI). This research will help ensure that children and the general public are better informed about sun safety by improving their personal understanding of the daily and the atmospheric factors that influence solar UV radiation and the solar UV exposures of the various wavebands in the natural environment. The activities may correct common misconceptions of children and the public about UV irradiances and exposure, utilising the widespread reach of the internet to increase the public's awareness of the factors influencing UV irradiances and exposures in order to provide clear information for minimizing UV exposure, while maintaining healthy, outdoor lifestyles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Solar ultraviolet-B radiation in urban environments: Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, Gordon M.; Grant, Richard H.; Gao, Wei; Slusser, James R.; Ehrlich, Corinne

    2003-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun, especially the UVB (280 to 320 nm), has important roles in urban ecosystems, including effects on human health. Broadband UVB radiation is being continuously monitored in the city of Baltimore, MD as part of a long-term ecological research program, the Baltimore Ecosystem Study. This paper compares above-canopy broadband UVB irradiance at the Baltimore station to broadband UVB irradiance at a more-rural station 64 km SE (at Wye Research Center in Queenstown, MD) and a station characterized as suburban within the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area, 42 km SW (at Beltsville Agricultural Experiment Station). The Baltimore data are from the initial 14 months of measurements there. The solar radiation monitoring station in Baltimore is located on a 33-m-tall building on a high point with no significant obstructions to sky view. The broadband instruments, all of which were provided by the USDA UVB Monitoring and Research Program, were calibrated in the same facility, the NOAA Central UV Calibration Facility in Colorado. In general, UVB irradiances at the three sites were similar. Over all conditions, Baltimore and the suburban site measured 3.4% less irradiance than the rural site. This difference is within the anticipated +/-3% calibration uncertainty of the broadband pyranometers. On the 59 days with cloud-free conditions at all three sites, the average differences between measured UVB at the three sites was even smaller; Baltimore measured 1.2% less irradiance than the rural site. On the clear days, differences between total daily irradiance and the trend of daily irradiance through the year were clearly related to total column ozone as indicated by the EPTOMS satellite. High aerosol optical thickness strongly reduced daily UVB dose; whereas [SO2] had no influence. Surface O3 increased with increasing UVB dose when [NO2] exceeded 10 ppb.

  10. Comparison of two intelligent models to estimate the instantaneous global solar radiation in semi-arid climate conditions: Application in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani Mohiabadi, Mostafa; Mirzaei, Mohsen

    2017-07-01

    Solar radiation incident on the earth's surface is a fundamental input for many aspects of climatology, hydrology, biology, and architecture. In addition, it is an important parameter in solar energy applications. Due to the high cost of the measuring instruments of solar radiation, many researchers have suggested different empirical methods to estimate this essential parameter. In this study, with the help of fuzzy systems and neural networks, two models have been designed to estimate the instantaneous global solar radiation in Rafsanjan city which has a typical climatic conditions of semi-arid region of middle eastern countries. In fuzzy and neural network model, the inputs are the number of the given day in the year, time, ambient temperature and cloudiness, The comparison between the results of the models and the measurements, shows that the estimated global radiation is similar to the measurement; for fuzzy model, statistical indicators RMSE, MBE and t-test are 103.4367 (w/m2), 4.1169 (w/m2) and 9.1318, respectively and for ANN, they are 85.46 (w/m2), 3.08 (w/m2) and 5.41, respectively. As the results indicate, both models are able to estimate the amount of radiation well, while the neural network has a higher accuracy. The output of the modes for six other cities of Iran, with similar climate conditions, also proves the ability of the proposed models.

  11. SERI Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Fiscal Year 1990 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, C; Maxwell, E; Stoffel, T; Rymes, M; Wilcox, S

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of the Solar Radiation Resource Project is to help meet the needs of the public, government, industry, and utilities for solar radiation data, models, and assessments as required to develop, design, deploy, and operate solar energy conversion systems. The project scientists produce information on the spatial (geographic), temporal (hourly, daily, and seasonal), and spectral (wavelength distribution) variability of solar radiation at different locations in the United States. Resources committed to the project in FY 1990 supported about four staff members, including part-time administrative support. With these resources, the staff must concentrate on solar radiation resource assessment in the United States; funds do not allow for significant efforts to respond to a common need for improved worldwide data. 34 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. An overview of global solar radiation measurements in Ghardaia area, south Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gairaa, Kacem; Bakelli, Yahia [Applied Research Unit for Renewables Energies, Ouargla Road, Ghardaia (Algeria)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of actual solar radiation data measurements in Ghardaia site (32.360 N, 3.810 W, 450 m above MSL). Global solar radiation and surface temperatures were measured and analyzed for one complete year from 1 January-31December 2005. The data thus recorded are compared with corresponding data of the 22-year average of NASA's surface meteorology and solar energy-model. Hourly, daily and monthly solar radiation was made from five-minute recorded by EKO Pyranometer. The highest measured daily and monthly mean solar radiation was found to be 369 and 326 (W/m2), and the highest five minute averaged solar radiation values up to 1268 (W/m2) were observed in the summer season from May to September, and the yearly average daily energy input was 21.83 (MJ/m2/day). Besides the global solar radiation, the daily and monthly average temperature variations are discussed. The collected data indicate that Ghardaia has a strong potential for solar energy applications.

  13. Prediction of Hourly Solar Radiation on Horizontal and Inclined Surfaces for Muscat/Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Z. Al-Rawahi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, hourly terrestrial radiation: direct beam, diffuse and global solar radiation are modelled and calculated based on daily measured data for a horizontal surface. In addition, the same parameters were modelled for inclined surfaces. Most of the parameters modelled in this work represent a part of the input data required by building thermal simulation and solar energy systems software. Important trends of the solar radiation on tilted surfaces as a function of time and direction are being presented and discussed. The comparison of some of the results with measured data from other sources shows good agreement. The effect of tilt angle and orientation on the incident solar radiation fluxes arepresented along with optimum surface tilt angles and directions for maximum solar radiation collection in Muscat area. The results presented in this paper are quite useful for quick estimation of solar radiation for calculations of cooling load and solar collector performance. Also, the models and the computer code developed in this work form the backbone of any computer-aided building thermal design and solar systems design calculations.

  14. Long-term solar UV radiation reconstructed by ANN modelling with emphasis on spatial characteristics of input data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Feister

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Neural Networks (ANN are efficient tools to derive solar UV radiation from measured meteorological parameters such as global radiation, aerosol optical depths and atmospheric column ozone. The ANN model has been tested with different combinations of data from the two sites Potsdam and Lindenberg, and used to reconstruct solar UV radiation at eight European sites by more than 100 years into the past. Special emphasis will be given to the discussion of small-scale characteristics of input data to the ANN model.

    Annual totals of UV radiation derived from reconstructed daily UV values reflect interannual variations and long-term patterns that are compatible with variabilities and changes of measured input data, in particular global dimming by about 1980/1990, subsequent global brightening, volcanic eruption effects such as that of Mt. Pinatubo, and the long-term ozone decline since the 1970s. Patterns of annual erythemal UV radiation are very similar at sites located at latitudes close to each other, but different patterns occur between UV radiation at sites in different latitude regions.

  15. Evaluation of linear interpolation method for missing value on solar radiation dataset in Perlis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saaban, Azizan; Zainudin, Lutfi [School of Science Quantitative, UUMCAS, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010 Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia); Bakar, Mohd Nazari Abu [Faculty of Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 02600 Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    This paper intends to reveal the ability of the linear interpolation method to predict missing values in solar radiation time series. Reliable dataset is equally tends to complete time series observed dataset. The absence or presence of radiation data alters long-term variation of solar radiation measurement values. Based on that change, the opportunities to provide bias output result for modelling and the validation process is higher. The completeness of the observed variable dataset has significantly important for data analysis. Occurrence the lack of continual and unreliable time series solar radiation data widely spread and become the main problematic issue. However, the limited number of research quantity that has carried out to emphasize and gives full attention to estimate missing values in the solar radiation dataset.

  16. The solar ultraviolet B radiation protection provided by shading devices with regard to its diffuse component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Avraham I; Harari, Marco; Evseev, Efim G

    2011-10-01

    The composition of the incident solar global ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation with regard to its beam and diffuse radiation fractions is highly relevant with regard to outdoor sun protection. This is especially true with respect to sun protection during leisure-time outdoor sun exposure at the shore and pools, where people tend to escape the sun under shade trees or different types of shading devices, e.g., umbrellas, overhangs, etc., believing they offer protection from the erythemal solar radiation. The degree of sun protection offered by such devices is directly related to the composition of the solar global UVB radiation, i.e., its beam and diffuse fractions. The composition of the incident solar global UVB radiation can be determined by measuring the global UVB (using Solar Light Co. Inc., Model 501A UV-Biometer) and either of its components. The beam component of the UVB radiation was determined by measuring the normal incidence beam radiation using a prototype, tracking instrument consisting of a Solar Light Co. Inc. Model 501A UV-Biometer mounted on an Eppley Solar Tracker Model St-1. The horizontal beam component of the global UVB radiation was calculated from the measured normal incidence using a simple geometric correlation and the diffuse component is determined as the difference between global and horizontal beam radiations. Horizontal and vertical surfaces positioned under a horizontal overhang/sunshade or an umbrella are not fully protected from exposure to solar global UVB radiation. They can receive a significant fraction of the UVB radiation, depending on their location beneath the shading device, the umbrella radius and the albedo (reflectance) of the surrounding ground surface in the case of a vertical surface. Shading devices such as an umbrella or horizontal overhang/shade provide relief from the solar global radiation and do block the solar global UVB radiation to some extent; nevertheless, a significant fraction of the solar global UVB

  17. Solar radiation during rewarming from torpor in elephant shrews: supplementation or substitution of endogenous heat production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michelle L; Mzilikazi, Nomakwezi; Bennett, Nigel C; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    Many small mammals bask in the sun during rewarming from heterothermy, but the implications of this behaviour for their energy balance remain little understood. Specifically, it remains unclear whether solar radiation supplements endogenous metabolic thermogenesis (i.e., rewarming occurs through the additive effects of internally-produced and external heat), or whether solar radiation reduces the energy required to rewarm by substituting (i.e, replacing) metabolic heat production. To address this question, we examined patterns of torpor and rewarming rates in eastern rock elephant shrews (Elephantulus myurus) housed in outdoor cages with access to either natural levels of solar radiation or levels that were experimentally reduced by means of shade cloth. We also tested whether acclimation to solar radiation availability was manifested via phenotypic flexibility in basal metabolic rate (BMR), non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) capacity and/or summit metabolism (Msum). Rewarming rates varied significantly among treatments, with elephant shrews experiencing natural solar radiation levels rewarming faster than conspecifics experiencing solar radiation levels equivalent to approximately 20% or 40% of natural levels. BMR differed significantly between individuals experiencing natural levels of solar radiation and conspecifics experiencing approximately 20% of natural levels, but no between-treatment difference was evident for NST capacity or Msum. The positive relationship between solar radiation availability and rewarming rate, together with the absence of acclimation in maximum non-shivering and total heat production capacities, suggests that under the conditions of this study solar radiation supplemented rather than substituted metabolic thermogenesis as a source of heat during rewarming from heterothermy.

  18. Solar and wind forecasting by NARX neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Piazza Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous input (NARX is used to perform hourly solar irradiation and wind speed forecasting, according to a multi-step ahead approach. Temperature has been considered as the exogenous variable. The NARX topology selection is supported by a combined use of two techniques: (1 a genetic algorithm (GA-based optimization technique and (2 a method that determines the optimal network architecture by pruning (optimal brain surgeon (OBS strategy. The considered variables are observed at hourly scale in a seven year dataset and the forecasting is done for several time horizons in the range from 8 to 24 h ahead.

  19. Characterization of Tin/Ethylene Glycol Solar Nanofluids Synthesized by Femtosecond Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Mendieta, Rafael; Mondragón, Rosa; Puerto-Belda, Verónica; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Lancis, Jesús; Juliá, J Enrique; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys

    2017-05-05

    Solar energy is available over wide geographical areas and its harnessing is becoming an essential tool to satisfy the ever-increasing demand for energy with minimal environmental impact. Solar nanofluids are a novel solar receiver concept for efficient harvesting of solar radiation based on volumetric absorption of directly irradiated nanoparticles in a heat transfer fluid. Herein, the fabrication of a solar nanofluid by pulsed laser ablation in liquids was explored. This study was conducted with the ablation of bulk tin immersed in ethylene glycol with a femtosecond laser. Laser irradiation promotes the formation of tin nanoparticles that are collected in the ethylene glycol as colloids, creating the solar nanofluid. The ability to trap incoming electromagnetic radiation, thermal conductivity, and the stability of the solar nanofluid in comparison with conventional synthesis methods is enhanced. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Estimation of solar radiation over Cambodia from long-term satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjai, S.; Pankaew, P.; Laksanaboonsong, J. [Solar Energy Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Kitichantaropas, P. [Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency, Ministry of Energy, 17 Rama 1 Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2011-04-15

    In this work, monthly average daily global solar irradiation over Cambodia was estimated from a long-term satellite data. A 14-year period (1995-2008) of visible channel data from GMS5, GOES9 and MTSAT-1R satellites were used to provide earth-atmospheric reflectivity. A satellite-based solar radiation model developed for a tropical environment was used to estimate surface solar radiation. The model relates the satellite-derived earth-atmospheric reflectivity to absorption and scattering coefficients of various atmospheric constituents. The absorption of solar radiation due to water vapour was calculated from precipitable water derived from ambient relative humidity and temperature. Ozone data from the TOMS and OMI satellite data were employed to compute the solar radiation absorption by ozone. The depletion of radiation due to aerosols was estimated from the visibility data. Five new solar radiation measuring stations were established at Cambodian cities, namely Siem Reap (13.87 N, 103.85 E), Kompong Thom (12.68 N, 104.88 E), Phnom Penh (11.55 N, 104.83 E), Sihanouke Ville (10.67 N, 103.63 E) and Kampot (10.70 N, 104.28 E). Global solar radiation measured at these stations was used to validate the model. The validation was also carried out by using solar radiation measured at four Thai meteorological stations. These stations are situated near the Cambodian border. Monthly average daily global irradiation from these stations was compared with that calculated from the model. The measured and calculated irradiation is in good agreement, with the root mean square difference of 6.3%, with respect to the mean values. After the validation, the model was used to calculate monthly average daily global solar irradiation over Cambodia. Based on this satellite-derived irradiation, solar radiation maps for Cambodia were generated. These maps show that solar radiation climate of this country is strongly influenced by the monsoons. A solar radiation database was also generated

  1. Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project: Solar Radiation Research annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, C.; Hulstrom, R.; Cannon, T.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

    1990-11-01

    This report gives an overview of the fiscal year 1990 research activities and results under the Solar Radiation Research Task of the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the Solar Energy Research Institute. The activities under this task include developing and applying measurement techniques, instrumentation, and data and models to understand and quantify the response of photovoltaic devices to variations in broadband and spectra solar radiation. The information presented in this report was presented at the SERI Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project 10th Review Meeting, October 1990, and will be published in a special issue of Solar Cells dedicated to the meeting.

  2. Improvement in the spatio-temporal distribution of surface solar radiation data over Belgium by merging ground-based and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journée, M.; Bertrand, C.

    2010-09-01

    Appropriate information on solar resources is very important for a variety of technological areas, such as: agriculture, meteorology, forestry engineering, water resources and in particular in the designing and sizing of solar energy systems. As an example, time-and space-dependent global solar radiation on horizontal surface at the location of interest is the most critical input parameter employed in the design and prediction of the performance of a solar energy device. Solar radiation is observed by means of networks of meteorological stations. Costs for installation and maintenance of such networks are very high and national networks comprise only few stations. Consequently the availability of observed solar radiation measurements has proven to be spatially and temporally inadequate for many applications. Mapping the solar radiation by interpolation/extrapolation of measurements is possible but leads to large errors, except if the network is dense. A global coverage of solar radiation can however be inferred from space-based observations. In the present study, we evaluate the potential benefit of merging global solar radiation measurements from the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMIB) solar measurements network with the operationally derived surface incoming global short-wave radiation products from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites imageries to improve the spatio-temporal resolution of the surface global solar radiation data over Belgium. Within the Satellite Application Facility (SAF) network supported by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (Eumetsat), the downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface of Belgium is operationally retrieved from MSG imageries by two decentralized SAFs: the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF) and the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). To retrieve the same parameter, the different SAFs use their own algorithms and

  3. Predicting astronaut radiation doses from major solar particle events using artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Nazila H.

    1998-06-01

    Space radiation is an important issue for manned space flight. For long missions outside of the Earth's magnetosphere, there are two major sources of exposure. Large Solar Particle Events (SPEs) consisting of numerous energetic protons and other heavy ions emitted by the Sun, and the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) that constitute an isotropic radiation field of low flux and high energy. In deep-space missions both SPEs and GCRs can be hazardous to the space crew. SPEs can provide an acute dose, which is a large dose over a short period of time. The acute doses from a large SPE that could be received by an astronaut with shielding as thick as a spacesuit maybe as large as 500 cGy. GCRs will not provide acute doses, but may increase the lifetime risk of cancer from prolonged exposures in a range of 40-50 cSv/yr. In this research, we are using artificial intelligence to model the dose-time profiles during a major solar particle event. Artificial neural networks are reliable approximators for nonlinear functions. In this study we design a dynamic network. This network has the ability to update its dose predictions as new input dose data is received while the event is occurring. To accomplish this temporal behavior of the system we use an innovative Sliding Time-Delay Neural Network (STDNN). By using a STDNN one can predict doses received from large SPEs while the event is happening. The parametric fits and actual calculated doses for the skin, eye and bone marrow are used. The parametric data set obtained by fitting the Weibull functional forms to the calculated dose points has been divided into two subsets. The STDNN has been trained using some of these parametric events. The other subset of parametric data and the actual doses are used for testing with the resulting weights and biases of the first set. This is done to show that the network can generalize. Results of this testing indicate that the STDNN is capable of predicting doses from events that it has not seen

  4. The potential of global solar radiation in the Silesia region as a renewable source of energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waniek Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, Silesia has been at the centre of the Polish coal industry for many years and thus has experienced poorer air quality compared to other voivodeships. However, in recent years strong economic transformation in the area has led to a considerable reduction in coal production. This study aimed to assess the variability of global solar radiation at selected stations within the Silesian voivodeship, in order to re-evaluate the resources of renewable solar energy during the period 1994–2013. The theoretical potential of solar radiation was calculated based on a three-dimensional terrain model. The data on global solar radiation from 13 stations within the Silesia region, covering the period 1994–2013, were obtained from the Regional Inspectorate of Environmental Protection in Katowice. The most favourable conditions for the use of solar energy were found at the cities Sosnowiec and Cieszyn. The largest increase in global radiation over the research period was observed in Zabrze. The average annual global radiation ranged between 600–1300 kWh·m−2. Digital Elevation Models (DEM for selected districts of the Silesia region were used to calculate the theoretical potential of global solar radiation. The highest theoretical potential of global radiation was found in the district of Cieszyn, located at the highest altitude.

  5. Network-Oriented Radiation Monitoring System (NORMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; David F. Spencer

    2007-10-01

    We have developed a multi-functional pocket radiation monitoring system capable of detecting and storing gamma ray and neutron data and then sending the data through a wireless connection to a remote central facility upon request. The device has programmable alarm trigger levels that can be modified for specific applications. The device could be used as a stand-alone device or in conjunction with an array to cover a small or large area. The data is stored with a date/time stamp. The device may be remotely configured. Data can be transferred and viewed on a PDA via direct connection or wirelessly. Functional/bench tests have been completed successfully. The device detects low-level neutron and gamma sources within a shielded container in a radiation field of 10 uR/hr above the ambient background level.

  6. Radiation detection and wireless networked early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David A.; Litz, Marc S.; Carroll, James J.; Katsis, Dimosthenis

    2012-06-01

    We have designed a compact, wireless, GPS-enabled array of inexpensive radiation sensors based on scintillation counting. Each sensor has a scintillator, photomultiplier tube, and pulse-counting circuit that includes a comparator, digital potentiometer and microcontroller. This design provides a high level of sensitivity and reliability. A 0.2 m2 PV panel powers each sensor providing a maintenance-free 24/7 energy source. The sensor can be mounted within a roadway light-post and monitor radiological activity along transport routes. Each sensor wirelessly transmits real-time data (as counts per second) up to 2 miles with a XBee radio module, and the data is received by a XBee receive-module on a computer. Data collection software logs the information from all sensors and provides real-time identification of radiation events. Measurements performed to-date demonstrate the ability of a sensor to detect a 20 μCi source at 3.5 meters when packaged with a PVT (plastic) scintillator, and 7 meters for a sensor with a CsI crystal (more expensive but ~5 times more sensitive). It is calculated that the sensor-architecture can detect sources moving as fast as 130 km/h based on the current data rate and statistical bounds of 3-sigma threshold detection. The sensor array is suitable for identifying and tracking a radiation threat from a dirty bomb along roadways.

  7. Solar Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22: Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance, 120 to 300 NM: Report of Working Groups 2 and 3 of SOLERS 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.; Cebula, R. P.; Gillotay, D.; Simon, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Working Group 2 and Working Group 3 of the SOLax Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22 (SOLERS22) Program. The international (SOLERS22) is Project 1.2 of the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) sponsored by SCOSTEP, a committee of the International Council of Scientific Unions). SOLERS22 is comprised of five Working Groups, each concentrating on a specific wave-length range: WG-1 - visible and infrared, WG-2 - mid-ultraviolet (200 solar irradiance values in the specified wavelength ranges, 2) consider the evolving solar structures as the cause of temporal variations, and 3) understand the underlying physical processes driving these changes.

  8. Simulating the Outer Radiation Belt During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kanekal, Shri; Nagai, Tsungunobu; Albert, Jay

    2011-01-01

    After prolonged period of solar minimum, there has been an increase in solar activity and its terrestrial consequences. We are in the midst of the rising phase of solar cycle 24, which began in January 2008. During the initial portion of the cycle, moderate geomagnetic storms occurred follow the 27 day solar rotation. Most of the storms were accompanied by increases in electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt. These enhancements were often preceded with rapid dropout at high L shells. We seek to understand the similarities and differences in radiation belt behavior during the active times observed during the of this solar cycle. This study includes extensive data and simulations our Radiation Belt Environment Model. We identify the processes, transport and wave-particle interactions, that are responsible for the flux dropout and the enhancement and recovery.

  9. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2010 Update: User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    This user's manual provides information on the updated 1991-2010 National Solar Radiation Database. Included are data format descriptions, data sources, production processes, and information about data uncertainty.

  10. A Study of Fitting the Generalized Lambda Distribution to Solar Radiation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, A.; Dale, R. F.

    1982-07-01

    The increased interest in the climatology of solar radiation dictates a need for a distribution to fit daily solar radiation totals which tend to have negatively-skewed probability distributions. Even daily mean solar radiation for weekly periods tends to have non-normal distributions. The generalized lambda distribution, which includes a wide variety of curve shapes, is discussed for fitting these data. The underlying probability distribution is a generalization of the lambda distribution from three to four parameters. Using the weekly averages of daily solar radiation totals for each of 12 weeks during the growing season and daily totals for the week 5-11 July at West Lafayette, Indiana, it is shown that the generalized lambda distribution model fits the data well. Some results concerning percentiles and quantiles, parameter estimates, and goodness-of-fit tests are also discussed.

  11. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  12. Preliminary Results on Design and Implementation of a Solar Radiation Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz Jäntschi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a solar radiation monitoring system, using two scientificpyranometers and an on-line computer home-made data acquisition system. The firstpyranometer measures the global solar radiation and the other one, which is shaded,measure the diffuse radiation. The values of total and diffuse solar radiation arecontinuously stored into a database on a server. Original software was created for dataacquisition and interrogation of the created system. The server application acquires the datafrom pyranometers and stores it into a database with a baud rate of one record at 50seconds. The client-server application queries the database and provides descriptivestatistics. A web interface allow to any user to define the including criteria and to obtainthe results. In terms of results, the system is able to provide direct, diffuse and totalradiation intensities as time series. Our client-server application computes also derivateheats. The ability of the system to evaluate the local solar energy potential is highlighted.

  13. The Temperature of Various Surfaces Exposed to Solar Radiation: An Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Dena G.; Bartels, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the effect of solar radiation on colored shingles. Describes the experimental procedure, results, and discussion. Presents a picture of the experimental arrangement and three graphs of data measured at different dates. (YP)

  14. Enhancement of growth and lipid production from microalgae using fluorescent paint under the solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Cho, Changsoon; Lee, Jung-Yong; Han, Jong-In

    2014-12-01

    Solar radiation has intensity that is too high to inhibit microalgae activity and is composed of wide light spectrum including ultraviolet (UV) range which cannot be utilized for microalgae. For these reasons, the modification of solar radiation is required for effective microalgae cultivation, and to do that, fluorescent paint was used for not only blocking excessive solar energy but also converting UV to visible light. With fluorescent aqueous layer, microalgae was protected from photoinhibition and could grow well, but there was difference in growth and lipid accumulation efficiencies depending on the color; maximum dry weight of 1.7 g/L was achieved in red paint, whereas best lipid content of 30% was obtained in blue one. This phenomenon was due to the different light spectrum made by colors. With simple process using fluorescent paint, modification of light was successfully done and allowing microalgae to grow under strong radiation such as solar radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary Results on Design and Implementation of a Solar Radiation Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Mugur C; Damian, Mihai; Jäntschi, Lorentz

    2008-02-19

    The paper presents a solar radiation monitoring system, using two scientificpyranometers and an on-line computer home-made data acquisition system. The firstpyranometer measures the global solar radiation and the other one, which is shaded,measure the diffuse radiation. The values of total and diffuse solar radiation arecontinuously stored into a database on a server. Original software was created for dataacquisition and interrogation of the created system. The server application acquires the datafrom pyranometers and stores it into a database with a baud rate of one record at 50seconds. The client-server application queries the database and provides descriptivestatistics. A web interface allow to any user to define the including criteria and to obtainthe results. In terms of results, the system is able to provide direct, diffuse and totalradiation intensities as time series. Our client-server application computes also derivateheats. The ability of the system to evaluate the local solar energy potential is highlighted.

  16. Window model. Part 1. Short-wave solar radiation; Fenstermodell. Teil 1. Kurzwellige Solarstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, J. [Georg-Simon-Ohm-Fachhochschule Nuernberg (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Modern external walls and window sizes require detailed calculations. The first part of the contribution discusses short-wave solar radiation while the second part will go into thermal exchange processes. (orig.)

  17. Mean annual solar radiation in the United States Pacific Northwest (1991-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent mean annual solar radiation in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States...

  18. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2005 Update: User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S.

    2007-04-01

    This manual describes how to obtain and interpret the data products from the updated 1991-2005 National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This is an update of the original 1961-1990 NSRDB released in 1992.

  19. National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) Station Data Output for 1991 to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) was produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy...

  20. GPP Webinar: Solar Utilization in Higher Education Networking & Information Sharing Group: Financing Issues Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation from a Solar Utilization in Higher Education Networking and Information webinar covers financing and project economics issues related to solar project development in the higher education sector.

  1. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  2. The Simulation of the Recharging Method Based on Solar Radiation for an Implantable Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Song, Yong; Kong, Xianyue; Li, Maoyuan; Zhao, Yufei; Hao, Qun; Gao, Tianxin

    2016-09-10

    A method of recharging implantable biosensors based on solar radiation is proposed. Firstly, the models of the proposed method are developed. Secondly, the recharging processes based on solar radiation are simulated using Monte Carlo (MC) method and the energy distributions of sunlight within the different layers of human skin have been achieved and discussed. Finally, the simulation results are verified experimentally, which indicates that the proposed method will contribute to achieve a low-cost, convenient and safe method for recharging implantable biosensors.

  3. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, W; Thorne, RM; Bortnik, J; Baker, DN; Reeves, GD; Kanekal, SG; Spence, HE; Green, JC

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations ( > 1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly c...

  4. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    OpenAIRE

    Smajo Sulejmanovic; Suad Kunosic; Ema Hankic

    2014-01-01

    This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to r...

  5. New gridded database of clear-sky solar radiation derived from ground-based observations over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartok, Blanka; Wild, Martin; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Hakuba, Maria Z.

    2017-04-01

    Since aerosols modify the entire energy balance of the climate system through different processes, assessments regarding aerosol multiannual variability are highly required by the climate modelling community. Because of the scarcity of long-term direct aerosol measurements, the retrieval of aerosol data/information from other type of observations or satellite measurements are very relevant. One approach frequently used in the literature is analyze of the clear-sky solar radiation which offer a better overview of changes in aerosol content. In the study first two empirical methods are elaborated in order to separate clear-sky situations from observed values of surface solar radiation available at the World Radiation Data Center (WRDC), St. Petersburg. The daily data has been checked for temporal homogeneity by applying the MASH method (Szentimrey, 2003). In the first approach, clear sky situations are detected based on clearness index, namely the ratio of the surface solar radiation to the extraterrestrial solar irradiation. In the second approach the observed values of surface solar radiation are compared to the climatology of clear-sky surface solar radiation calculated by the MAGIC radiation code (Muller et al. 2009). In both approaches the clear-sky radiation values highly depend on the applied thresholds. In order to eliminate this methodological error a verification of clear-sky detection is envisaged through a comparison with the values obtained by a high time resolution clear-sky detection and interpolation algorithm (Long and Ackermann, 2000) making use of the high quality data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). As the consequences clear-sky data series are obtained for 118 European meteorological stations. Next a first attempt has been done in order to interpolate the point-wise clear-sky radiation data by applying the MISH (Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenized Data Basis) method for the spatial interpolation of

  6. Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

  7. Passive-solar directional-radiating cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.

    1985-06-27

    A radiative cooling system for use with an ice-making system having a radiating surface aimed at the sky for radiating energy at one or more wavelength bands for which the atmosphere is transparent and a cover thermally isolated from the radiating surface and transparent at least to the selected wavelength or wavelengths, the thermal isolation reducing the formation of condensation on the radiating surface and/or cover and permitting the radiation to continue when the radiating surface is below the dewpoint of the atmosphere, and a housing supporting the radiating surface, cover and heat transfer means to an ice storage reservoir.

  8. Clear-Sky Probability for the August 21, 2017, Total Solar Eclipse Using the NREL National Solar Radiation Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Roberts, Billy J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kutchenreiter, Mark C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilcox, Steve [Solar Resource Solutions, LLC, Lakewood, CO (United States); Stoffel, Tom [Solar Resource Solutions, LLC, Lakewood, CO (United States)

    2017-07-21

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and collaborators have created a clear-sky probability analysis to help guide viewers of the August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse, the first continent-spanning eclipse in nearly 100 years in the United States. Using cloud and solar data from NREL's National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB), the analysis provides cloudless sky probabilities specific to the date and time of the eclipse. Although this paper is not intended to be an eclipse weather forecast, the detailed maps can help guide eclipse enthusiasts to likely optimal viewing locations. Additionally, high-resolution data are presented for the centerline of the path of totality, representing the likelihood for cloudless skies and atmospheric clarity. The NSRDB provides industry, academia, and other stakeholders with high-resolution solar irradiance data to support feasibility analyses for photovoltaic and concentrating solar power generation projects.

  9. Characterizing the Radiation Survivability of Space Solar Cell Technologies for Heliospheric Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Walker, D.; Mann, C. J.; Yue, Y.; Nocerino, J. C.; Smith, B. S.; Mulligan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Space solar cells are responsible for powering the majority of heliospheric space missions. This paper will discuss methods for characterizing space solar cell technologies for on-orbit operations that rely on a series of laboratory tests that include measuring the solar cells' beginning of life performance under simulated (e.g. AM0 or air mass zero) sunlight over different operating temperatures and observing their end of life performance following exposure to laboratory-generated charged particle radiation (protons and electrons). The Aerospace Corporation operates a proton implanter as well as electron gun facilities and collaborates with external radiation effects facilities to expose space solar cells or other space technologies to representative space radiation environments (i.e. heliosphere or magnetosphere of Earth or other planets), with goals of characterizing how the technologies perform over an anticipated space mission timeline and, through the application of precision diagnostic capabilities, understanding what part of the solar cell is impacted by varying space radiation environments. More recently, Aerospace has been hosting solar cell flight tests on its previously-flown CubeSat avionics bus, providing opportunities to compare the laboratory tests to on-orbit observations. We hope through discussion of the lessons learned and methods we use to characterize how solar cells perform after space radiation exposure that similar methodology could be adopted by others to improve the state of knowledge on the survivability of other space technologies required for future space missions.

  10. An artificial neural network based fast radiative transfer model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the present study, a fast radiative transfer model using neural networks is proposed to simulate radiances corresponding to the wavenumbers of ... in construction, purpose and design and already in use are used. The fast RT model is able to ... porates measurements from various instruments in comparison with other ...

  11. Direct solar radiation on various slopes from 0 to 60 degrees north latitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Buffo; Leo J. Fritschen; James L. Murphy

    1972-01-01

    Direct beam solar radiation is presented in graphical and tabular form for hourly, daily, and yearly values for seven slopes on each of 16 aspects from the Equator to 60 degrees north in 10-degree increments. Theoretical equations necessary for the calculations are given. Solar altitude and azimuth during the day and year are also presented for the same latitude.

  12. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-04-16

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008-2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002-2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 10(18) more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years.

  13. Photocatalytic ROS production and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles is dependent on solar UV radiation spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and its consequent phototoxicity to Daphnia magna were measured under different solar UV radiation spectrum by applying a series of optical filters in a solar simulator. Removing UVB (280-32...

  14. Assessment of the solar radiation potential of the Thika and Nairobi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The raw data was first converted to MJ/m2/day and then subjected to quality control procedures. After quality control procedures, the data was analyzed in terms of the average monthly daily insolation. Extraterrestrial solar radiation was estimated using an empirical formula and by using the values of the extraterrestrial solar ...

  15. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels are affected by airborne aerosols, such as particles and gases released during biomass burning events. Two large-scale fires in South Africa were identified and selected based on their proximity to solar UVR...

  16. CONVERTER SOLAR RADIATION INTO ELECTRICITY TO SUPPLY THE AUTOMOTIVE SEMICONDUCTOR THERMOELECTRIC AIR CONDITIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Ismailov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the possibility to increase the efficiency of converters of solar radiation into electricity by combining constructive photoelectric effect, See-beck thermoeffect and semiconductor solar cells, which will create integrated device to provide power semiconductor thermoelectric automobile air conditioner. 

  17. Analysis of Energy Efficiency in Dynamic Optical Networks Employing Solar Energy Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiayuan; Fagertun, Anna Manolova; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents energy efficient routing in dynamic optical networks, where solar energy sources are employed for the network nodes. Different parameters are evaluated, including the number of nodes that have access to solar energy sources, the different maximum solar output power, traffic type...... and the locations of solar powered nodes. Results show a maximum 39% savings in energy consumption with different increases in connection blocking probability....

  18. Physical model SOLARMET for determining total and direct solar radiation by meteosat satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliani, E.; Maccari, A. [ENEA, Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment, C.R. Casaccia, Solterm-Svil, P.O. Box 117, Via Anguillarese 301-00123, S. Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Ricchiazzi, P. [ICESS, Institute for Computational Earth System Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3060 (United States)

    2007-06-15

    A vigorous R and D program on solar concentrating power plants has been recently funded in Italy in order to demonstrate the feasibility of these technologies. Maps of direct normal radiation (DNI) are needed for the selection of construction sites for demonstration plants. This paper describes SOLARMET, a physical model that simulates the atmospheric effect on solar radiation. The SOLARMET model may be used to determine the solar radiation, total and direct, reaching the ground, based on information provided by satellite images. Atmosphere transmissivity, ground reflection coefficient, and other essential parameters in the model were determined from SBDART, a radiative transfer model, developed at University of California. Validation of the model have been carried out at Casaccia (Rome-Italy) ENEA centre. The results obtained in the 2002 year are encouraging. The difference between measured and calculated data, during this year, either for direct or global radiation, are lower than 6% on monthly basis. (author)

  19. Solar radiation increases suicide rate after adjusting for other climate factors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yu Jin; Choi, Nari; An, Hyonggin; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that suicide rates have significant seasonal variations. There is seasonal discordance between temperature and solar radiation due to the monsoon season in South Korea. We investigated the seasonality of suicide and assessed its association with climate variables in South Korea. Suicide rates were obtained from the National Statistical Office of South Korea, and climatic data were obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration for the period of 1992-2010. We conducted analyses using a generalized additive model (GAM). First, we explored the seasonality of suicide and climate variables such as mean temperature, daily temperature range, solar radiation, and relative humidity. Next, we identified confounding climate variables associated with suicide rate. To estimate the adjusted effect of solar radiation on the suicide rate, we investigated the confounding variables using a multivariable GAM. Suicide rate showed seasonality with a pattern similar to that of solar radiation. We found that the suicide rate increased 1.008 times when solar radiation increased by 1 MJ/m 2 after adjusting for other confounding climate factors (P Solar radiation has a significant linear relationship with suicide after adjusting for region, other climate variables, and time trends. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of solar radiation on the functional components of mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Mari; Katsube, Takuya; Koyama, Akio; Itamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The functional components of mulberry leaves have attracted the attention of the health food industry, and increasing their concentrations is an industry goal. This study investigated the effects of solar radiation, which may influence the production of flavonol and 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) functional components in mulberry leaves, by comparing a greenhouse (poor solar radiation) and outdoor (rich solar radiation) setting. The level of flavonol in leaves cultivated in the greenhouse was markedly decreased when compared with those cultivated outdoors. In contrast, the DNJ content in greenhouse-cultivated plants was increased only slightly when compared with those cultivated outdoors. Interestingly, the flavonol content was markedly increased in the upper leaves of mulberry trees that were transferred from a greenhouse to the outdoors compared with those cultivated only in the outdoors. Solar radiation conditions influence the synthesis of flavonol and DNJ, the functional components of mulberry leaves. Under high solar radiation, the flavonol level becomes very high but the DNJ level becomes slightly lower, suggesting that the impact of solar radiation is great on flavonol but small on DNJ synthesis. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Water disinfection with solar radiation; Desinfeccion del agua con radiacion solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Alejandra; Cortes, Juana E; Rodriguez, Miriam; Mundo, Alfredo; Vazquez, Sandra [Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia del Agua, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Estrada, Claudio A [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Water disinfection by exposure to solar radiation is a low cost and easy application option to rural communities. The treatment of water can be done using plastic bags or plastic bottles of two litters setting on a reflective material. The efficient of the plastic bottles is lower than the one plastic bags, but the plastic bottles have a much better control of the treated water avoiding its recontamination. In order to increase the efficiency of disinfection using plastic bottles, two solar concentrators, using flat mirrors, were designed and built. Effluent water from a treatment plant of residual waters was used for the testing. Several comparison were carried out taking into account the position of the concentrators, the transparency of the bottles and the bags. The results show that using the concentrator that adjust its position to the sun every hour, a 100% disinfection is obtained in 4 hours of direct exposure to the sun rays in a sunny day. The period of time can be reduced up to 2 hours, if instead using transparent bottles, the bottles are black painted at their bottom half. With these results, the basis to design a cheap concentrator of easy construction to be used in rural communities have been settle. [Spanish] La desinfeccion del agua por exposicion a la luz solar fotodesinfeccion es una opcion de bajo costo y facil aplicacion para las comunidades rurales. El tratamiento puede llevarse a cabo utilizando bolsas o botellas de plastico transparente de dos litros de capacidad colocadas sobre un material reflejante. Las botellas son menos eficientes que las bolsas, pero permiten un mejor control del agua tratada evitando su recontaminacion. Para aumentar la eficiencia de la desinfeccion utilizando las botellas, se disenaron y construyeron dos concentradores solares de espejos planos que permitieron disminuir el tiempo de exposicion requerido cuando se utilizan estas. Para las pruebas de desinfeccion se utilizo agua del efluente de una planta de tratamiento

  2. Potential solar radiation pattern in relation to the monthly distribution of giant pandas in Foping Nature Reserve, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Cheng, X.; Skidmore, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Solar radiation is an important parameter in ecological process modeling, hydrological modeling and bio-physical modeling. However, models focusing on solar radiation in relation to giant panda habitat and seasonal distribution are limited. The research aims to form spatial models of 12 month solar

  3. Experimental study and artificial neural network modeling of tartrazine removal by photocatalytic process under solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebti, Aicha; Souahi, Fatiha; Mohellebi, Faroudja; Igoud, Sadek

    2017-07-01

    This research focuses on the application of an artificial neural network (ANN) to predict the removal efficiency of tartrazine from simulated wastewater using a photocatalytic process under solar illumination. A program is developed in Matlab software to optimize the neural network architecture and select the suitable combination of training algorithm, activation function and hidden neurons number. The experimental results of a batch reactor operated under different conditions of pH, TiO2 concentration, initial organic pollutant concentration and solar radiation intensity are used to train, validate and test the networks. While negligible mineralization is demonstrated, the experimental results show that under sunlight irradiation, 85% of tartrazine is removed after 300 min using only 0.3 g/L of TiO2 powder. Therefore, irradiation time is prolonged and almost 66% of total organic carbon is reduced after 15 hours. ANN 5-8-1 with Bayesian regulation back-propagation algorithm and hyperbolic tangent sigmoid transfer function is found to be able to predict the response with high accuracy. In addition, the connection weights approach is used to assess the importance contribution of each input variable on the ANN model response. Among the five experimental parameters, the irradiation time has the greatest effect on the removal efficiency of tartrazine.

  4. Correlations during the day of diffuse solar radiation to the global solar radiation in Vigo (Spain); Correlaciones minutarias, horarias y diarias de la radiacion solar difusa a la radiacion solar global en Vigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.; Santos, J.

    2004-07-01

    In the Solar Energy Lab of the University of Vigo a weather station has been in operation since October 2001. Two Kipp and Zonen pyranometers, one of them with a shade ring, have been measuring global and diffuse solar radiation. From these data of the years 2002 and 2003, the diffuse-to-global minute, hourly and daily correlations are obtained and shown in graphs. These correlations are also plotted together with other correlations referred in the literature for comparison. The graphs show the effect of the clear-cloudy behaviour of the solar radiation for short periods of time, effect that is not seen for larger periods of time as daily periods. (Author)

  5. Estimating Monthly Solar Radiation in South-Central Chile Estimación de Radiación Solar Mensual en la Zona Centro Sur de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Álvarez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation is a key component in process-based models. The amount of this energy depends on the location, time of the year, and atmospheric conditions. Several equations and models have been developed for different conditions using historical data from weather station networks or satellite measurements. However, solar radiation estimates are too local since they rely on weather stations or have a resolution that is too coarse when working with satellites. In this study, we estimated monthly global solar radiation for the south-central region of Chile using the r.sun model and validated it with observations from automatic weather stations. We analyzed the performance of global radiation results with the Hargreaves-Samani (HS and Bristow-Campbell (BC models. Estimates from a calibrated rsun model accounted for 89% of the variance (r² = 0.89 in monthly mean values for 15 locations in the research area. The model performed very well for a wide area and conditions in Chile when we compared it with the HS and BC models. Our estimates of global solar radiation using the rsun model could be improved through calibration of ground measurements and more precise cloudiness estimates as they become available. With additional procedures, the rsun model could be used to provide spatial estimates of daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly solar radiation.La radiación solar es un componente clave en los modelos basados en procesos. La cantidad de esta energía depende de la ubicación, época del año, y también de las condiciones atmosféricas. Varias ecuaciones y modelos han sido desarrollados para diferentes condiciones, utilizando datos históricos de las redes de estaciones meteorológicas o de las mediciones por satélite. Sin embargo, las estimaciones de la radiación solar son demasiado locales con estaciones meteorológicas, o con una resolución muy gruesa cuando se trabaja con satélites. En el presente estudio se estimó radiación solar global

  6. Solar radiation measurements and their applications in climate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bangsheng

    Aerosols and clouds play important roles in the climate system through their radiative effects and their vital link in the hydrological cycle. Accurate measurements of aerosol and cloud optical and microphysical properties are crucial for the study of climate and climate change. This study develops/improves retrieval algorithms for aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) and low liquid water path (LWP) cloud optical properties, evaluates a new spectrometer, and applies long-term measurements to establish climatology of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The following results were obtained. (1) The ratio of diffuse horizontal and direct normal fluxes measured from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) has been used to derive the aerosol SSA. Various issues have impacts on the accuracy of SSA retrieval, from measurements (e.g., calibration accuracy, cosine respond correction, and forward scattering correction) to input parameters and assumptions (e.g., asymmetry factor, Rayleigh scattering optical depth, and surface albedo). This study carefully analyzed these issues and extensively assessed their impacts on the retrieval accuracy. Furthermore, the retrievals of aerosol SSA from MFRSR are compared with independent measurements from co-located instruments. (2) The Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) has been used to derive simultaneously the cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud drop effective radius (DER), subsequently inferring the cloud liquid-water path (LWP). The evaluation of the TCRSR indicates that the error of radiometric calibration has limited impact on the cloud DER retrievals. However, the retrieval accuracy of cloud DER is sensitive to the uncertainties of background setting (e.g., aerosol loading and the existence of ice cloud) and the measured solar aureole shape. (3) A new high resolution oxygen A-band spectrometer (HABS) has been developed, which has the ability to measure both direct-beam and zenith diffuse solar radiation

  7. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusswig, Philip D; Nechayev, Sergey; Scherer, Jennifer M; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Bawendi, Moungi G; Baldo, Marc A; Rotschild, Carmel

    2015-10-05

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped lasers that uses a luminescent solar concentrator to decouple the conventional trade-off between solar absorption efficiency and the mode volume of the optical gain material. We report a 750-μm-thick Nd(3+)-doped YAG planar waveguide sensitized by a luminescent CdSe/CdZnS (core/shell) colloidal nanocrystal, yielding a peak cascade energy transfer of 14%, a broad spectral response in the visible portion of the solar spectrum, and an equivalent quasi-CW solar lasing threshold of 23 W-cm(-2), or approximately 230 suns. The efficient coupling of incoherent, spectrally broad sunlight in small gain volumes should allow the generation of coherent laser light from intensities of less than 100 suns.

  8. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  9. Radiation Belt Electron Intensity Variations: Van Allen Probes era vs. Previous two Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Zhao, H.; Zhang, K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Long term (>2 solar cycles) measurements of solar wind speed, geomagnetic storm index (Dst), >2MeV electrons at geostationary orbit, 2MeV electrons in different L-shells measured at and normalized to low earth orbit show that the solar wind speed and the geomagnetic activity have been extremely low, so have been the MeV electron fluxes, during this current solar cycle, including years before and during Van Allen Probes era. There have been no 2MeV electrons enhancements deep inside L 2.6 since 2009, while numerous deep penetrations of MeV electrons into Lsolar wind conditions (high solar wind speed and sustained southward Bz) and thus stronger geomagnetic activity existed. We note that results from Van Allen Probes, which have been providing the finest measurements but in operation during an extremely quiet solar activity period, may not represent the overall radiation belt dynamics during other solar cycle phases.

  10. Photocarcinogenesis and toxicity of benzoyl peroxide in hairless mice after simulated solar radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Catharina M; Philipsen, Peter A; Poulsen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    with UV radiation. BPO can promote skin tumorigenesis in a mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis model. As acne vulgaris is frequently localized on sun-exposed areas, we investigated whether BPO or BPO-clin accelerates photocarcinogenesis in combination with simulated solar radiation (SSR) in 12 groups of 25...

  11. Validation of solar radiation surfaces from MODIS and reanalysis data over topographically complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Schroeder; Robbie Hember; Nicholas C. Coops; Shunlin Liang

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of incoming shortwave solar radiation (SW) has significant influence on the productive capacity of forest vegetation. Models that estimate forest productivity require accurate and spatially explicit radiation surfaces that resolve both long- and short-term temporal climatic patterns and that account for topographic variability of the land...

  12. Color Portion of Solar Radiation in the Partial Annular Solar Eclipse, October 3rd, 2005, at Helwan, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements were made of various solar radiation components, global, direct and diffuse and their fractions during the partial annular solar eclipse on October 3rd, 2005 at Helwan, Egypt (Lat. 29.866◦ N and Long. 31.20◦ E, and an analysis has been made. The duration of the solar eclipse was 3 h 17 min, and the maximum magnitude of the eclipse in this region was 0.65. The optical depth of the direct component and the relative humidity decreased, while both the transparency and the air temperature increased towards the maximum eclipse. The general trends of the global components are decreasing optical depth and increasing transparency between the first contact and the last contact. The prevailing color during the eclipse duration was diffused infrared (77 % of the total diffuse radiation level.

  13. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behne, Patrick Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  14. Solar UV radiation variations and their stratospheric and climatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Nimbus-7 SBUV measurements of the short-term solar UV variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution have determined the amplitude and wavelength dependence for the active-region component of solar UV variations. Intermediate-term variations lasting several months are associated with rounds of major new active regions. The UV flux stays near the peak value during the current solar cycle variation for more than two years and peaks about two years later than the sunspot number. Nimbus-7 measurements have observed the concurrent stratospheric ozone variations caused by solar UV variations. There is now no doubt that solar UV variations are an important cause of short- and long-term stratospheric variations, but the strength of the coupling to the troposphere and to climate has not yet been proven.

  15. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  16. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-06

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities.

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation induced variations in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    The detectability and interpretation of short-term solar UV induced responses of middle atmospheric ozone, temperature, and dynamics are reviewed. The detectability of solar UV induced perturbations in the middle atmosphere is studied in terms of seasonal and endogenic dynamical variations. The interpretation of low-latitude ozone and possible temperature responses on the solar rotation time scale is examined. The use of these data to constrain or test photochemical model predictions is discussed.

  18. Molecular effects of 1-naphthyl-methylcarbamate and solar radiation exposures on human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucio, Bianca; Tiago, Manoela; Fannin, Richard D; Liu, Liwen; Gerrish, Kevin; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Paules, Richard S; Barros, Silvia Berlanga de Moraes

    2017-02-01

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl-methylcarbamate), a broad-spectrum insecticide, has recently been associated with the development of cutaneous melanoma in an epidemiological cohort study with U.S. farm workers also exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the main etiologic factor for skin carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that carbaryl exposure may increase deleterious effects of UV solar radiation on skin melanocytes. This study aimed to characterize human melanocytes after individual or combined exposure to carbaryl (100μM) and solar radiation (375mJ/cm 2 ). In a microarray analysis, carbaryl, but not solar radiation, induced an oxidative stress response, evidenced by the upregulation of antioxidant genes, such as Hemeoxygenase-1 (HMOX1), and downregulation of Microphtalmia-associated Transcription Factor (MITF), the main regulator of melanocytic activity; results were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Carbaryl and solar radiation induced a gene response suggestive of DNA damage and cell cycle alteration. The expression of CDKN1A, BRCA1/2 and MDM2 genes was notably more intense in the combined treatment group, in a synergistic manner. Flow cytometry assays demonstrated S-phase cell cycle arrest, reduced apoptosis levels and faster induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) lesions in carbaryl treated groups. Our data suggests that carbaryl is genotoxic to human melanocytes, especially when associated with solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance of the meteorological radiation model during the solar eclipse of 29 March 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Psiloglou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Various solar broadband models have been developed in the last half of the 20th century. The driving demand has been the estimation of available solar energy at different locations on earth for various applications. The motivation for such developments, though, has been the ample lack of solar radiation measurements at global scale. Therefore, the main goal of such codes is to generate artificial solar radiation series or calculate the availability of solar energy at a place.

    One of the broadband models to be developed in the late 80's was the Meteorological Radiation Model (MRM. The main advantage of MRM over other similar models was its simplicity in acquiring and using the necessary input data, i.e. air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure and sunshine duration from any of the many meteorological stations.

    The present study describes briefly the various steps (versions of MRM and in greater detail the latest version 5. To show the flexibility and great performance of the MRM, a harsh test of the code under the (almost total solar eclipse conditions of 29 March 2006 over Athens was performed and comparison of its results with real measurements was made. From this hard comparison it is shown that the MRM can simulate solar radiation during a solar eclipse event as effectively as on a typical day. Because of the main interest in solar energy applications about the total radiation component, MRM focuses on that. For this component, the RMSE and MBE statistical estimators during this study were found to be 7.64% and −1.67% on 29 March as compared to the respective 5.30% and +2.04% for 28 March. This efficiency of MRM even during an eclipse makes the model promising for easy handling of typical situations with even better results.

  20. Neural Network on Photodegradation of Octylphenol using Natural and Artificial UV Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorentz JÄNTSCHI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper comes up with an experimental design meant to point out the factors interferingin octylphenol’s degradation in surface waters under solar radiation, underlining each factor’sinfluence on the process observable (concentration of p-octylphenol. Multiple linear regressionanalysis and artificial neural network (Multi-Layer Perceptron type were applied in order to obtaina mathematical model capable to explain the action of UV-light upon synthetic solutions of OP inultra-pure water (MilliQ type. Neural network proves to be the most efficient method in predictingthe evolution of OP concentration during photodegradation process. Thus, determination in neuralnetwork’s case has almost double value versus the regression analysis.

  1. Satellite-based climate data records of surface solar radiation from the CM SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Cremer, Roswitha; Kothe, Steffen; Müller, Richard; Pfeifroth, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The incoming surface solar radiation has been defined as an essential climate variable by GCOS. Long term monitoring of this part of the earth's energy budget is required to gain insights on the state and variability of the climate system. In addition, climate data sets of surface solar radiation have received increased attention over the recent years as an important source of information for solar energy assessments, for crop modeling, and for the validation of climate and weather models. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving climate data records (CDRs) from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. Within the CM SAF these CDRs are accompanied by operational data at a short time latency to be used for climate monitoring. All data from the CM SAF is freely available via www.cmsaf.eu. Here we present the regional and the global climate data records of surface solar radiation from the CM SAF. The regional climate data record SARAH (Surface Solar Radiation Dataset - Heliosat, doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/SARAH/V002) is based on observations from the series of Meteosat satellites. SARAH provides 30-min, daily- and monthly-averaged data of the effective cloud albedo, the solar irradiance (incl. spectral information), the direct solar radiation (horizontal and normal), and the sunshine duration from 1983 to 2015 for the full view of the Meteosat satellite (i.e, Europe, Africa, parts of South America, and the Atlantic ocean). The data sets are generated with a high spatial resolution of 0.05° allowing for detailed regional studies. The global climate data record CLARA (CM SAF Clouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data, doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLARA_AVHRR/V002) is based on observations from the series of AVHRR satellite instruments. CLARA provides daily- and monthly-averaged global data of the solar irradiance (SIS) from 1982 to 2015 with a spatial resolution of 0.25°. In addition to the solar surface

  2. A Novel Approach to Modeling the Effects of Radiation in Gallium-Arsenide Solar Cells Using Silvaco's ATLAS Software

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crespin, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    The effects of radiation in GaAs solar cells has been extensively researched and the results of numerous investigation have yielded a considerable amount of information about the degradation in irradiated solar cells...

  3. The influence of meteorological factors on solar ultraviolet radiation over Pretoria, South Africa for the year 2012

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgabutlane, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pretoria receives a fair amount of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Certain meteorological factors affect the amount of solar UVR that reaches the ground. The most dominant influencing meteorological factors are stratospheric ozone, cloud cover...

  4. A comparison of outer electron radiation belt dropouts during solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Energetic electrons are trapped in the Earth's radiation belts which occupy a toroidal region between 3 and 7 RE above the Earth's surface. Rapid loss of electrons from the radiation belts is known as dropouts. The source and loss mechanisms regulating the radiation belts population are not yet understood entirely, ...

  5. ANGULAR SPACE – TIME RELATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1979-03-01

    Mar 1, 1979 ... expressions will be familiar to workers in meteorology and to engineers involved in solar energy instrumentation and utilization on ground. The analyses are educational adaptations of engineering mechanics to this growing field of heliotechnoloy. NOTATION [1] α = solar altitude angle β = surface tilt angle, ...

  6. Monitoring Satellite-derived Surface Solar Radiation with Near Real Time Reference Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. Y.; Laszlo, I.; Liu, H.

    2015-12-01

    Geostationary satellite observations of the Earth are increasingly made more frequent. For example, Himawari-8 of Japanese Meteorological Agency takes images of the planet every 10 minutes in multiple bands. Similarly, the GOES-R satellite of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will make observations every 5 to 15 minutes. Products, like shortwave (solar) radiation budget at the surface, derived from these observations have or will have similar rapid refresh rates. Routine, near-real time assessment of the quality of these products ideally requires the availability of near-real time reference data. Such near-real time data has recently become available from the NOAA Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD). These data are disseminated every 15 minutes. However, in contrast to non-real-time data with fully quality control, which have a latency of 24 hours or more, the near-real time data have less quality control applied to them in order to achieve low latency. To assess applicability of this near-real time SURFRAD data for the evaluation satellite products we are using them experimentally to evaluate the quality of Downward Shortwave Radiation at the surface (DSR) retrieved operationally every hour from GOES and made available in the Geostationary Surface and Insolation Product (GSIP) . Metrics (accuracy and precision) are computed to characterize the level of agreement between satellite retrievals and the near-real time reference data. These metrics are then compared with metrics from the evaluation with the non-real time, fully quality controlled reference. The comparison shows that monitoring of DSR with near-real time data is not very different from monitoring it with non-real time data and so DSR retrievals can be evaluated hourly or shorter times depending on reference data availability.

  7. Solar radiation as a global driver of hillslope asymmetry: Insights from an ecogeomorphic landscape evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetemen, Omer; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Duvall, Alison R.

    2015-12-01

    Observations at the field, catchment, and continental scales across a range of arid and semiarid climates and latitudes reveal aspect-controlled patterns in soil properties, vegetation types, ecohydrologic fluxes, and hillslope morphology. Although the global distribution of solar radiation on earth's surface and its implications on vegetation dynamics are well documented, we know little about how variation of solar radiation across latitudes influence landscape evolution and resulting geomorphic difference. Here, we used a landscape evolution model that couples the continuity equations for water, sediment, and aboveground vegetation biomass at each model element in order to explore the controls of latitude and mean annual precipitation (MAP) on the development of hillslope asymmetry (HA). In our model, asymmetric hillslopes emerged from the competition between soil creep and vegetation-modulated fluvial transport, driven by spatial distribution of solar radiation. Latitude was a primary driver of HA because of its effects on the global distribution of solar radiation. In the Northern Hemisphere, north-facing slopes (NFS), which support more vegetation cover and have lower transport efficiency, get steeper toward the North Pole while south-facing slopes (SFS) get gentler. In the Southern Hemisphere, the patterns are reversed and SFS get steeper toward the South Pole. For any given latitude, MAP is found to have minor control on HA. Our results underscore the potential influence of solar radiation as a global control on the development of asymmetric hillslopes in fluvial landscapes.

  8. A model for managing and evaluating solar radiation for indoor thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Gennusa, Maria; Rizzo, Gianfranco [Dipartimento di Ricerche Energetiche ed Ambientali (DREAM), Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Nucara, Antonino; Pietrafesa, Matilde [Dipartimento di Informatica, Matematica, Elettronica e Trasporti (DIMET), Universita Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    Thermal comfort of people occupying indoor spaces depends, to a large extent, on the direct component of solar radiation incident on the human body. In turn, even the diffuse component of the solar radiation could affect the thermal sensations of people. Despite this evidence, at the present there is a lack in the availability of simple and reliable methods capable of taking into account the influence of the solar radiation on thermal balance in the human body. In this work a comprehensive method is presented for the computation of the mean radiant temperature of people in thermal moderate indoor environments in the presence of solar radiation. The effects produced on the amount of solar radiation entering rooms in the presence of shadowing devices are also analysed. Finally, an application of the method is provided for a non-parallelepiped room equipped with a south window: results are shown in terms of the mean radiant temperature. A simple evaluation of thermal comfort conditions, referring to the present international standards, is also provided. The model can be easily linked to the computerized methods for analyzing the thermal behaviour of buildings, and is intended as a support for the thermal comfort evaluation methods. (author)

  9. Validation of a Meteosat Second Generation solar radiation dataset over the northeastern Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation plays a key role in the Earth's energy balance and is used as an essential input data in radiation-based evapotranspiration (ET models. Accurate gridded solar radiation data at high spatial and temporal resolution are needed to retrieve ET over large domains. In this work we present an evaluation at hourly, daily and monthly time steps and regional scale (Catalonia, NE Iberian Peninsula of a satellite-based solar radiation product developed by the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facility (LSA SAF using data from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI. Product performance and accuracy were evaluated for datasets segmented into two terrain classes (flat and hilly areas and two atmospheric conditions (clear and cloudy sky, as well as for the full dataset as a whole. Evaluation against measurements made with ground-based pyranometers yielded good results in flat areas with an averaged model RMSE of 65 W m−2 (19%, 34 W m−2 (9.7% and 21 W m−2 (5.6%, for hourly, daily and monthly-averaged solar radiation and including clear and cloudy sky conditions and snow or ice cover. Hilly areas yielded intermediate results with an averaged model RMSE (root mean square error of 89 W m−2 (27%, 48 W m−2 (14.5% and 32 W m−2 (9.3%, for hourly, daily and monthly time steps, suggesting the need of further improvements (e.g., terrain corrections required for retrieving localized variability in solar radiation in these areas. According to the literature, the LSA SAF solar radiation product appears to have sufficient accuracy to serve as a useful and operative input to evaporative flux retrieval models.

  10. Effects of solar radiation on the abiotic and bacterially mediated carbon flux in aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anesio, A.M.

    2000-05-01

    In this thesis, I studied some of the current aspects of organic matter photochemistry. I analyzed abiotic photo transformations of several types of dissolved (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM). I also evaluated the effects of photo transformation of several types of DOM on bacteria. Finally, in a field experiment, I analyzed net effects of solar radiation on organic matter decomposition. DOM undergoes several transformations due to solar irradiation. One such transformation is photooxidation of organic matter into inorganic carbon. Results of this Thesis show that photooxidation is ubiquitous to all kinds of organic matter in both dissolved and particulate forms. The intensity of this process depends on several factors, including DOM composition, radiation type and time of exposure. Besides mineralization to inorganic carbon, DOM undergoes other chemical transformations due to UV radiation, with profound consequences to DOM availability for bacteria. Bioavailability was tested by measuring bacterial growth and respiration on irradiated and nonirradiated DOM from several types of humic matter and plant leachates. Irradiation of freshly-leached DOM often produced negative effects on bacteria, whereas irradiation of humic material was followed by stimulation of bacterial growth. The degree of stimulation seems to be related to the initial bioavailability of the DOM and to the capability of the DOM to produce hydrogen peroxide upon irradiation. Other factors also accounted for differences in bacterial response to photochemical modification of DOM, including length and type of irradiation exposure. The effects of solar radiation on litter decomposition were also evaluated using experiments that more closely mimic natural conditions. I could not observe differences between dry weight loss of leaves and culms exposed to solar radiation or kept in darkness, which may be explained by the fact that abiotic decomposition under solar radiation is counterbalanced by

  11. Cloud effects on the solar and thermal radiation budgets of the Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrina, M.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Fotiadi, A.; Papadimas, C. D.; Pavlakis, K. G.; Vardavas, I.

    2015-01-01

    The cloud effects on the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and net all-wave radiation budgets of the Mediterranean basin were computed using a detailed radiative transfer model together with satellite and reanalysis data for surface and atmospheric properties. The model radiation fluxes at TOA were validated against CERES and ERBE satellite data, while at the Earth's surface they were validated against ground-based GEBA and BSRN station measurements. The cloud radiative effects were obtained for low, middle, high-level clouds, and for total cloud cover. Overall for the basin, the effect on solar radiation is to produce radiative cooling at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface that more than balances the warming effects on terrestrial radiation. The result is a net radiative cooling at TOA and at the surface, equal to - 18.8 and - 15.9 Wm- 2, respectively. The low-level clouds are most important for the TOA budget through significant SW reflection and little LW emission to space. High clouds play an important role in net surface cooling (- 9.8 Wm- 2) through the combination of SW reflection to space and a much reduced LW warming effect at the surface. The geographical patterns of the effects are mainly characterized by a strong south to north increasing gradient. The seasonal variation of net radiative effects is dominated by solar radiation with maxima in spring and minima in winter.

  12. Exploration of solar radiation data from three geo-political zones in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejumo, Adebowale O; Suleiman, Esivue A; Okagbue, Hilary I

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, readings of solar radiation received at three meteorological sites in Nigeria were analysed. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) statistical test was carried out on the data set to observe the significant differences on radiations for each quarter of the specified years. The data were obtained in raw form from Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET), Oshodi, Lagos. In order to get a clear description and visualization of the fluctuations of the radiation data, each year were considered independently, where it was discovered that for the 3rd quarter of each year, there is a great fall in the intensity of the solar radiation to as low as 73.27 (W/m 2 ), 101.66 (W/m 2 ), 158.51 (W/m 2 ) for Ibadan, Port-Harcourt and Sokoto respectively. A detailed data description is available for the averages across months for each quarter. The data can provide insights on the health implications of exposure to solar radiation and the effect of solar radiation on climate change, food production, rainfall and flood patterns.

  13. Exploration of solar radiation data from three geo-political zones in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebowale O. Adejumo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, readings of solar radiation received at three meteorological sites in Nigeria were analysed. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA statistical test was carried out on the data set to observe the significant differences on radiations for each quarter of the specified years. The data were obtained in raw form from Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NIMET, Oshodi, Lagos. In order to get a clear description and visualization of the fluctuations of the radiation data, each year were considered independently, where it was discovered that for the 3rd quarter of each year, there is a great fall in the intensity of the solar radiation to as low as 73.27 (W/m2, 101.66 (W/m2, 158.51 (W/m2 for Ibadan, Port-Harcourt and Sokoto respectively. A detailed data description is available for the averages across months for each quarter. The data can provide insights on the health implications of exposure to solar radiation and the effect of solar radiation on climate change, food production, rainfall and flood patterns.

  14. Estimating Roof Solar Energy Potential in the Downtown Area Using a GPU-Accelerated Solar Radiation Model and Airborne LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy, as a clean and renewable resource is becoming increasingly important in the global context of climate change and energy crisis. Utilization of solar energy in urban areas is of great importance in urban energy planning, environmental conservation, and sustainable development. However, available spaces for solar panel installation in cities are quite limited except for building roofs. Furthermore, complex urban 3D morphology greatly affects sunlit patterns on building roofs, especially in downtown areas, which makes the determination of roof solar energy potential a challenging task. The object of this study is to estimate the solar radiation on building roofs in an urban area in Shanghai, China, and select suitable spaces for installing solar panels that can effectively utilize solar energy. A Graphic Processing Unit (GPU-based solar radiation model named SHORTWAVE-C simulating direct and non-direct solar radiation intensity was developed by adding the capability of considering cloud influence into the previous SHORTWAVE model. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR data was used as the input of the SHORTWAVE-C model and to investigate the morphological characteristics of the study area. The results show that the SHORTWAVE-C model can accurately estimate the solar radiation intensity in a complex urban environment under cloudy conditions, and the GPU acceleration method can reduce the computation time by up to 46%. Two sites with different building densities and rooftop structures were selected to illustrate the influence of urban morphology on the solar radiation and solar illumination duration. Based on the findings, an object-based method was implemented to identify suitable places for rooftop solar panel installation that can fully utilize the solar energy potential. Our study provides useful strategic guidelines for the selection and assessment of roof solar energy potential for urban energy planning.

  15. Accessibility determination of solar radiation by using GIS tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žofia Kuzevičová

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Slovakia belongs to countries with relatively good condition for using solar energy. Geographic information systems (GIScontents many methods, procedures and tools, which can be used for better widen of using renewable energies in the Slovakia. Usingmap algebra is one of the possibilities. Map algebra enables to combine one or more layers mathematically. Accessibility of solarradiation can be determinate by layers combinations. Final layer is used by making decision and finding location foe using solar energy.

  16. A link between solar events and congenital malformations: Is ionizing radiation enough to explain it?

    CERN Document Server

    Overholt, A C; Atri, D

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic rays are known to cause biological effects directly and through ionizing radiation produced by their secondaries. These effects have been detected in airline crews and other specific cases where members of the population are exposed to above average secondary fluxes. Recent work has found a correlation between solar particle events and congenital malformations. In this work we use the results of computational simulations to approximate the ionizing radiation from such events as well as longer term increases in cosmic ray flux. We find that the amounts of ionizing radiation produced by these events are insufficient to produce congenital malformations under the current paradigm regarding muon ionizing radiation. We believe that further work is needed to determine the correct ionizing radiation contribution of cosmogenic muons. We suggest that more extensive measurements of muon radiation effects may show a larger contribution to ionizing radiation dose than currently assumed.

  17. Effects of solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Watson, Phillip; Maughan, Ronald J

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity and thermoregulatory responses in a hot environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70 % maximum oxygen uptake until exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30 °C and 50 % relative humidity. Volunteers were tested under four solar radiation conditions: 800, 500, 250 and 0 W/m(2). Exercise time to exhaustion was less on the 800 W/m(2) trial (23 ± 4 min) than on all the other trials (500 W/m(2) 30 ± 7 min; P 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher on the 800 W/m(2) trial than the 250 and 0 W/m(2) trials (P solar radiation increases.

  18. Inconsistency in Chinese solar radiation data caused by instrument replacement: Quantification based on pan evaporation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hanbo; Li, Zhe; Li, Mingliang; Yang, Dawen

    2015-04-01

    Solar radiation determines our climate and hydrological cycle, and it has been widely measured by pyrometers at meteorological stations. In the early 1990s, a large-scale instrument replacement occurred across China, leading to inconsistent solar radiation observations. Fortunately, China has consistent pan evaporation (Epan) observations from Chinese micropans (with a diameter of 20 cm) from the 1950s to 2001. This study parameterized the PenPan-20 model for estimating Epan from these pans using a Bayesian approach. Furthermore, based on the PenPan-20 model, a shift in the solar radiation data (~1.4 ± 0.5 MJ/(d m2) or 16 ± 7 W/m2) in the early 1990s was revealed; this change was likely due to the large-scale retrofitting of new instruments and irregular calibration operations.

  19. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation of a cavity solar reactor for the reduction of cerium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafan-Vidales, H.I.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Dehesa-Carrasco, U. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco s/n, Col. Centro, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Romero-Paredes, H. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco No.186, Col. Vicentina, A.P. 55-534, Mexico D.F 09340 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    Radiative heat transfer in a solar thermochemical reactor for the thermal reduction of cerium oxide is simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The directional characteristics and the power distribution of the concentrated solar radiation that enters the cavity is obtained by carrying out a Monte Carlo ray tracing of a paraboloidal concentrator. It is considered that the reactor contains a gas/particle suspension directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation. The suspension is treated as a non-isothermal, non-gray, absorbing, emitting, and anisotropically scattering medium. The transport coefficients of the particles are obtained from Mie-scattering theory by using the optical properties of cerium oxide. From the simulations, the aperture radius and the particle concentration were optimized to match the characteristics of the considered concentrator. (author)

  20. A Temperature-Based Model for Estimating Monthly Average Daily Global Solar Radiation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huashan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since air temperature records are readily available around the world, the models based on air temperature for estimating solar radiation have been widely accepted. In this paper, a new model based on Hargreaves and Samani (HS method for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation is proposed. With statistical error tests, the performance of the new model is validated by comparing with the HS model and its two modifications (Samani model and Chen model against the measured data at 65 meteorological stations in China. Results show that the new model is more accurate and robust than the HS, Samani, and Chen models in all climatic regions, especially in the humid regions. Hence, the new model can be recommended for estimating solar radiation in areas where only air temperature data are available in China.

  1. Modelling the pressurization induced by solar radiation on above ground installations of LPG pipeline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporini, M.; Terenzi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Giacchetta, G.; Polonara, F.; Corvaro, F.; Cocci Grifoni, R.

    2017-11-01

    Pipelining Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) is a mode of LPG transportation more environmentally-friendly than others due to the lower energy consumption and exhaust emissions. Worldwide, there are over 20000 kilometers of LPG pipelines. There are a number of codes that industry follows for the design, fabrication, construction and operation of liquid LPG pipelines. However, no standards exist to modelling particular critical phenomena which can occur on these lines due to external environmental conditions like the solar radiation pressurization. In fact, the solar radiation can expose above ground pipeline sections at pressure values above the maximum Design Pressure with resulting risks and problems. The present work presents an innovative practice suitable for the Oil & Gas industry to modelling the pressurization induced by the solar radiation on above ground LPG pipeline sections with the application to a real case.

  2. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor (SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated (R 2  = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site

  3. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor ( SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated ( R 2 = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site productivity.

  4. Influence of solar radiation on nitrogen recovery by the biomass grown in high rate ponds.

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Eduardo de Aguiar do; Calijuri, Maria Lúcia; Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Tango, Mariana Daniel; Santiago, Aníbal da Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of different solar radiation intensities on nitrogen assimilation by a consortium of bacteria and microalgae grown in pilot scale high rate ponds (HRP) treating domestic wastewater. The HRPs received effluent from an anaerobic reactor. The experiment was carried out under tropical climate conditions. A total of five HRPs were used; four of them were covered with shading screens that blocked 9%, 18%, 30% and 60% of the incident solar radi...

  5. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  6. Trends in solar radiation in NCEP/NCAR database and measurements in northeastern Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Vicente de Paulo Rodrigues da; Silva, Roberta Araujo e; Cavalcanti, Enilson Palmeira; Braga, Celia Campos; Azevedo, Pedro Vieira de; Pereira, Emerson Ricardo Rodrigues [Federal University of Campina Grande/Center of Technology and Natural Resources/Academic Unity of Atmospheric Sciences, Av. Aprigio Veloso, 882, Bodocongo, 58109 970, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Singh, Vijay P. [Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A and M Univ., TX 77843-2117 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The database from the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) re-analysis project available for the period from 1948 to 2009 was used for obtaining long-term solar radiation for northeastern Brazil. Measurements of global solar radiation (R{sub s}) from data collection platform (DCP) for four climatic zones of northeastern Brazil were compared to the re-analysis data. Applying cluster analysis to R{sub s} from database, homogeneous sub-regions in northeastern Brazil were determined. Long times series of R{sub s} and sunshine duration measurements data for two sites, Petrolina (09 09'S, 40 22'W) and Juazeiro (09 24'S, 40 26'W), exceeding 30 years, were analyzed. In order to exclude the decadal variations which are linked to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, high-frequency cycles in the solar radiation and sunshine duration time series were eliminated by using a 14-year moving average, and the Mann-Kendall test was employed to assess the long-term variability of re-analysis and measured solar radiation. This study provides an overview of the decrease in solar radiation in a large area, which can be attributed to the global dimming effect. The global solar radiation obtained from the NCEP/NCAR re-analysis data overestimate that obtained from DCP measurements by 1.6% to 18.6%. Results show that there is a notable symmetry between R{sub s} from the re-analysis data and sunshine duration measurements. (author)

  7. Radiation emergency medical preparedness and assistance network in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E. S.; Kong, H. J.; Noh, J. H.; Lim, Y. K.; Kim, C. S. [Radiation Health Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    Nationwide Medical Preparedness for Nuclear Accidents as an integral part of nuclear safety system has been discussed for several years and Radiation Health Research Institute (RHRI) of Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. was established on July, 1999. The National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC) of Korea Cancer Center Hospital was also founded on September, 2002. Two organizations have established Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network in Korea to cope with accidental situations in nuclear power plants and also in handling sites of radionuclides. In order to construct an effective Nationwide Emergency Medical Network System they maintain good cooperation among regional hospitals. RHRI is going to make three types of medical groups, that is to say, the collaboration of the regional (primary appointed) hospital group around the nuclear power plants, the regional core (secondary appointed) hospital group and the central core hospital (RHRI). NREMC is also playing a central role in collaboration with 10 regional hospitals. Two cores are working key role for the maintenance of the network. Firstly, They maintain a radiological emergency response team consisting of physicians, nurses, health physicists, coordinators, and necessary support personnel to provide first-line responders with consultative or direct medical and radiological assistance at their facility or at the accident site. Secondly, they serves educational programs for the emergency personnel of collaborating hospitals not only as a treatment facility but also as a central training and demonstration unit. Regularly scheduled courses for the physician and nurse, and health/medical physicists are conducted. Therefore, to activate Nationwide Emergency Medical Network System and to maintain it for a long time, well-trained specialists and budgetary supports are indispensable.

  8. Spatial representativeness of ground-based solar radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The validation of gridded surface solar radiation (SSR) data, i.e., satellite-derived or climate model calculated, relies on the comparison with ground-based in-situ measurements. Detached from any modeling or temporal averaging biases, the question remains how representative a point measurement is for a larger-scale grid cell. In the present study, we make extensive use of high-resolution (0.03°) SSR data from the Satellite Application Facility on climate monitoring (CM SAF) to study in detail: 1) the spatial variability in SSR over Europe, 2) the sub-grid variability within an example grid of 1° resolution, 3) the representativeness of 143 surface sites (BSRN and GEBA) for their corresponding 1° grid cells, and 4) the point-centered and grid-independent surface sites' representativeness for larger-grid cells up to 3°. These analyses are done on a climatological annual mean basis over the period 2001-2005. Annually, the spatial variability as given in the CM SAF data set is largest in regions of sudden changes in weather conditions and topography, e.g., in Northern Spain, the Alpine region, the Carpathians, and Adriatic coast. The 1° sub-grid variability (mean absolute deviation from grid cell mean, relative to grid cell mean, RMAD) is on average 1.64 % (2.43 Wm-2) over European land, with maximum RMAD of up to 10% in Northern Spain. The surface sites' (GEBA and BSRN) representativeness for larger-grid cells is highly dependent on region and grid size. The difference between the CM SAF value at the GEBA site's location and the grid cell mean (calculated from CM SAF data) can vary from almost 0% to more than 10% for a 1° grid cell, and up to 15% for a 3° grid cell. On average, this spatial sampling error is below 5% even for grid cells of 3° resolution. We show that the latitudinal shift of a point relative to the larger-grid cell center may account for a spatial sampling error of up to +-1.81 Wm-2 (for a maximum distance of +-0.5° within 1° grid cell

  9. Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Andreea (Principal Investigator); Stella, Paul; Kerestes, Christopher; Sharps, Paul

    2017-01-01

    This is the Base Period final report DRAFT for the JPL task 'Solar Arrays for Low-Irradiance Low-Temperature and High-Radiation Environments', under Task Plan 77-16518 TA # 21, for NASA's Extreme Environments Solar Power (EESP) project. This report covers the Base period of performance, 7/18/2016 through 5/2/2017.The goal of this project is to develop an ultra-high efficiency lightweight scalable solar array technology for low irradiance, low temperature and high-radiation (LILT/Rad) environments. The benefit this technology will bring to flight systems is a greater than 20 reduction in solar array surface area, and a six-fold reduction in solar array mass and volume. The EESP project objectives are summarized in the 'NRA Goal' column of Table 1. Throughout this report, low irradiance low temperature (LILT) refers to 5AU -125 C test conditions; beginning of life (BOL) refers to the cell state prior to radiation exposure; and end of life (EOL) refers to the test article condition after exposure to a radiation dose of 4e15 1MeV e(-)/cm(exp 2).

  10. GLOBAL SOLAR RADIATION INTERCEPTION BY GRAPEVINES TRAINED TO A VERTICAL TRELLIS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA GUIMARÃES CAMARGO CAMPOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this paper we assess the utilization of radiant energy in the growing of grapevines (Cabernet Sauvignon trained to a vertical trellis system, and estimate the global solar radiation interception taking into account the physical characteristics of the training system at different phenological stages. The experiment was based on daily measurements of global solar radiation made by an automatic weather station placed at the vineyard of a winery located in the municipality of São Joaquim, in the southern Brazilian State of Santa Catarina (Villa Francioni winery, 28º 15’ 14” S, 49º 57’ 02” W, 1294m a.s.l.. Growth and phenological development of the shoots were evaluated. The global solar radiation is intercepted by the canopy (trained to a vertical trellis system in different orientations and the accumulated total is slightly greater on the east than on the west face of the canopy, especially after flowering. The daily variability of global solar radiation intercepted by the canopy is greater after flowering. The accumulated solar energy incident on the canopy increases until the onset of ripening. From the results, vineyards trained to a vertical trellis system in the north-south direction provide favorable sunlight exposure to leaves and fruits and are promising in quality and productivity.

  11. Occupational exposure to solar radiation in Australia: who is exposed and what protection do they use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Renee N; Glass, Deborah C; Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Benke, Geza; Driscoll, Timothy R; Fritschi, Lin

    2014-02-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is widely recognised as a leading cause of skin cancer, with outdoor workers being particularly at risk. Little is known on a national level about how many workers are exposed to solar radiation, the circumstances in which they are exposed, or their use of protective measures. The Australian Work Exposures Study (AWES) was a cross-sectional telephone survey of 5,023 Australian workers aged 18 to 65. A subset of 1,113 respondents who indicated they worked outdoors was asked about their exposure to solar radiation in terms of the amount of time they spent working outdoors, their working location and their use of sun protective measures. A total of 1,100 respondents (22% overall) were assessed as being exposed to solar radiation at work. Exposure was more likely among males and those residing in lower socioeconomic and regional areas. Sun protection was used by 95% of the respondents, although the level of protection varied among workers, with only 8.7% classified as fully protected. This study provides valuable information regarding solar exposure that has not previously been available. The results of this study will inform strategies for risk reduction. © 2014 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  13. On the semi-passive attitude control and propulsion of space vehicles using solar radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, V. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews attitude dynamics and trajectory mechanics of spacecraft in the presence of environmental forces with particular emphasis on the solar radiation induced pressure and thermal effects on attitude dynamics. In general, the effect is destabilizing as indicated by a significant reduction in the size of the limiting integral manifold. However, several semi-passive controllers have been proposed which can use the environmental forces to advantage in stabilizing the system. Furthermore, the solar radiation-induced forces can be used to advantage for propulsion and trajectory transfer. Examples of contemporary interest illustrate effectiveness of the concepts in achieving desired attitude and trajectory.

  14. Effects of solar radiation pressure torque on the rotational motion of an artificial satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Maria Cecilia F. P. S.; Vilhenademoraes, Rodolpho

    1992-01-01

    The motion of an artificial satellite about its center of mass is studied considering torques due to the gravity gradient and direct solar radiation pressure. A model for direct solar radiation torque is derived for a circular cylindrical satellite. An analytical solution is obtained by the method of variation of the parameters. This solution shows that the angular variables have secular variation but that the modulus of the rotational angular momentum, the projection of rotational angular momentum on the z axis of the moment of inertia and inertial axis z, suffer only periodic variations. Considering a hypothetical artificial satellite, a numerical application is demonstrated.

  15. The importance of maximum air temperature in the parameterisation of solar radiation in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ododo, J.C.; Sulaiman, A.T.; Ogbu, F.A. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Yola (Nigeria); Aidan, J. [Kashim Ibrahim Coll. of Education, Maiduguri (Nigeria); Yuguda, M.M. [Federal Coll. of Education, Yola (Nigeria)

    1995-12-01

    Using existing and new empirical model equations to analyse available data for nine stations located in different geographical and climatic zones in Nigeria, it is clearly demonstrated that maximum air temperature is an important climatological parameter which should be used in solar radiation modelling in Nigeria. It is also shown that seasonal variations in the values of the model parameters are significant. Preliminary investigations are also reported which show that (1) a slight modification of the Swartman-Ogunlade formulae improves their applicability to Nigerian stations, and (2) maximum air temperature and relative humidity can be used together (to the exclusion of sunshine duration) to predict solar radiation with satisfactory accuracy. (Author)

  16. Passive Collecting of Solar Radiation Energy using Transparent Thermal Insulators, Energetic Efficiency of Transparent Thermal Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajo Sulejmanovic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains passive collection of solar radiation energy using transparent thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators are transparent for sunlight, at the same time those are very good thermal insulators. Transparent thermal insulators can be placed instead of standard conventional thermal insulators and additionally transparent insulators can capture solar radiation, transform it into heat and save heat just as standard insulators. Using transparent insulators would lead to reduce in usage of fossil fuels and would help protection of an environment and reduce effects of global warming, etc.

  17. Validation of the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) (2005-2012): Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Manajit; Weekley, Andrew; Habte, Aron; Lopez, Anthony; Molling, Christine

    2015-09-15

    Publicly accessible, high-quality, long-term, satellite-based solar resource data is foundational and critical to solar technologies to quantify system output predictions and deploy solar energy technologies in grid-tied systems. Solar radiation models have been in development for more than three decades. For many years, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed and/or updated such models through the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB). There are two widely used approaches to derive solar resource data from models: (a) an empirical approach that relates ground-based observations to satellite measurements and (b) a physics-based approach that considers the radiation received at the satellite and creates retrievals to estimate clouds and surface radiation. Although empirical methods have been traditionally used for computing surface radiation, the advent of faster computing has made operational physical models viable. The Global Solar Insolation Project (GSIP) is an operational physical model from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that computes global horizontal irradiance (GHI) using the visible and infrared channel measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) system. GSIP uses a two-stage scheme that first retrieves cloud properties and then uses those properties in the Satellite Algorithm for Surface Radiation Budget (SASRAB) model to calculate surface radiation. NREL, the University of Wisconsin, and NOAA have recently collaborated to adapt GSIP to create a high temporal and spatial resolution data set. The product initially generates the cloud properties using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres-Extended (PATMOS-x) algorithms [3], whereas the GHI is calculated using SASRAB. Then NREL implements accurate and high-resolution input parameters such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) to compute direct normal irradiance (DNI) using the DISC model. The AOD and

  18. ISS and Space Shuttle Radiation Measurements at Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaza, Ramona; Welton, Andrew; Dunegan, Audrey; Lee, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    A summary of 2008-2011 ISS and Space Shuttle radiation dosimetry results for inside vehicle radiation monitoring in low-Earth orbit will be presented. Results include new data from ISS Expedition 22-25/20A radiation area monitors (RAM) and Shuttle Missions STS127-STS133 passive radiation dosimeters (PRD). ISS 20A radiation measurement locations included three Node 2 crew quarters locations at NOD2S5_CQ, NOD2P5_CQ and CQ-3 (Deck), as well as ESA Columbus, and JAXA Kibo locations. ISS 20A and STS127-STS133 missions were flown at 51.6 inclination with an altitude range of 330-350 km. The passive radiation results will be presented in terms of measured daily dose obtained using luminescence detectors (i.e., Al2O3:C, LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF2:Tm). In addition, preliminary results from the DOSIS 2 Project, in collaboration with the German Space Agency (DLR) will be presented. SRAG s participation to the DOSIS 2 exposure on ISS (11/16/2009-05/26/2010) involved passive radiation measurements at 10 different shielding locations inside the ESA Columbus Module.

  19. Evaluation of global solar radiation using multiple weather parameters as predictors for South Africa provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeala Adeyemi A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Models for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation were developed for South African provinces. These models, in addition to the traditional sunshine hours used in existing models incorporates ambient temperature, relative humidity and wind speed as variable parameters for predicting global solar radiation, making it different from most of the existing models that use only sunshine hours as variable. Meteorological data obtained for nine locations in South Africa were employed in the model formulation. The accuracy of the models were verified by comparing estimated values with measured values in terms of the following statistical error tests: mean bias error (MBE, mean absolute bias error (MABE, mean absolute percentage error (MAPE, root mean square error (RMSE, and the regression coefficient (R2.The values of R2 for the formulated models are between the ranges of 90% - 99%. It was also observed that for an accurate estimation of global solar radiation in Eastern Cape Province, all weather elements are needed. This implies that the models give an excellent prediction for global solar radiation for their corresponding locations. Also, different errors calculated for the formulated models are close to zero especially MAPE. The result shows that the formulated models are good enough to be used to predict monthly average daily radiation for South Africa and also, the inclusion of some other elements in some of the models improved the accuracy of the predictions made by the models.

  20. RADIATION MODEL FOR PREDICTING TEMPERATURE EVOLUTION IN SOLAR COOKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARID CHEJNE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Un modelo matemático que describe y simula el comportamiento térmico de una estufa solar fue desarrollado en base en la analogía de resistencias aléctricas. El modelo matemático incluye los tres diferentes mecanismos de transferencia de calor entre las diferentes superfi cies de la cocina solar y su entorno. El modelo matemático se utilizó para predecir la generación de entropía y de su efi ciencia; tambien, fue utilizado para evaluar los parametros de diseño de una estufa solar tipo caja. Los datos experimentales y teóricos fueron comparados satisfactoriamente.

  1. [Determination of the need for solar UV radiation protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letić, Milorad

    2010-01-01

    Effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin, the eyes and the immune system are well known. The need for UV radiation protection is popularized by the introduction of UV index. Uneven intensity of UV radiation in different regions in different periods of the year and in different times of the day requires that recommendations for UV radiation protection are given for possible UV index values in those regions. The aim of the study is to establish a simple and consistent method for the determination of the need for UV radiation protection in Serbia where UV radiation intensity can be approximated as uniform. Possible values of UV index during the year and the sun elevation during the day in periods throughout the year were used for the determination of maximal possible UV index values. These values were compared to UV index forecasts regarding UV radiation protection. Maximal possible values for UV index were used for producing the colour graph. Colours on the graph indicate the need for UV radiation protection. Green--protection is not needed, yellow--protection is needed, red--protection is obligatory. Comparisons with the need for protection based on forecasts showed congruence in 97% of cases. The use of the graph for the determination of the need for UV radiation protection gives nearly the same results as recommendations based on UV index forecasts. The advantages of the graph are that it gives recommendations for the whole year, for the time intervals during the day in every period of the year and for the whole territory of Serbia.

  2. Modeling Radiation Effects on a Triple Junction Solar Cell using Silvaco ATLAS

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In this research, Silvaco ATLAS, an advanced virtual wafer fabrication tool, was used to model the effects of radiation on a triple junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge solar cell. A Silvaco ATLAS model of a triple junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge cell was created by first creating individual models for solar cells composed of each material. Realistic doping levels were used and thicknesses were varied to produce the design parameters and create reasonably efficient solar cell models for testing. After the individua...

  3. A model to calculate solar radiation fluxes on the Martian surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente-Retortillo Álvaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new comprehensive radiative transfer model to study the solar irradiance that reaches the surface of Mars in the spectral range covered by MetSIS, a sensor aboard the Mars MetNet mission that will measure solar irradiance in several bands from the ultraviolet (UV to the near infrared (NIR. The model includes up-to-date wavelength-dependent radiative properties of dust, water ice clouds, and gas molecules. It enables the characterization of the radiative environment in different spectral regions under different scenarios. Comparisons between the model results and MetSIS observations will allow for the characterization of the temporal variability of atmospheric optical depth and dust size distribution, enhancing the scientific return of the mission. The radiative environment at the Martian surface has important implications for the habitability of Mars as well as a strong impact on its atmospheric dynamics and climate.

  4. Electromagnetic foundations of solar radiation collection a technology for sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Sangster, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    This text seeks to illuminate, mainly for the electrical power engineers of the future, the topic of large scale solar flux gathering schemes, which arguably represent the major source of renewable power available. The aim of the content is to impart, from an electromagnetic perspective, a deep and sound understanding of the topic of solar flux collection, ranging from the characteristics of light to the properties of antennas. To do this five chapters are employed to provide a thorough grounding in relevant aspects of electromagnetism and electromagnetic waves including optics, electromagneti

  5. Development of a Fast and Accurate PCRTM Radiative Transfer Model in the Solar Spectral Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K.; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTMSOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1 cm(exp -1) resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10(exp -3) mW/cm)exp 2)/sr/cm(exp -1) and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  6. Estimating Water Footprints of Vegetable Crops: Influence of Growing Season, Solar Radiation Data and Functional Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsie le Roux

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Water footprint (WF accounting as proposed by the Water Footprint Network (WFN can potentially provide important information for water resource management, especially in water scarce countries relying on irrigation to help meet their food requirements. However, calculating accurate WFs of short-season vegetable crops such as carrots, cabbage, beetroot, broccoli and lettuce presented some challenges. Planting dates and inter-annual weather conditions impact WF results. Joining weather datasets of just rainfall, minimum and maximum temperature with ones that include solar radiation and wind-speed affected crop model estimates and WF results. The functional unit selected can also have a major impact on results. For example, WFs according to the WFN approach do not account for crop residues used for other purposes, like composting and animal feed. Using yields in dry matter rather than fresh mass also impacts WF metrics, making comparisons difficult. To overcome this, using the nutritional value of crops as a functional unit can connect water use more directly to potential benefits derived from different crops and allow more straightforward comparisons. Grey WFs based on nitrogen only disregards water pollution caused by phosphates, pesticides and salinization. Poor understanding of the fate of nitrogen complicates estimation of nitrogen loads into the aquifer.

  7. Transcription factors and stress response gene alterations in human keratinocytes following Solar Simulated Ultra Violet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Thomas L Des; Kluz, Thomas; Xu, Dazhong; Zhang, Xiaoru; Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Costa, Max; Sun, Hong

    2017-10-19

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight is the major effector for skin aging and carcinogenesis. However, genes and pathways altered by solar-simulated UVR (ssUVR), a mixture of UVA and UVB, are not well characterized. Here we report global changes in gene expression as well as associated pathways and upstream transcription factors in human keratinocytes exposed to ssUVR. Human HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to either a single dose or 5 repetitive doses of ssUVR. Comprehensive analyses of gene expression profiles as well as functional annotation were performed at 24 hours post irradiation. Our results revealed that ssUVR modulated genes with diverse cellular functions changed in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression in cells exposed to a single dose of ssUVR differed significantly from those that underwent repetitive exposures. While single ssUVR caused a significant inhibition in genes involved in cell cycle progression, especially G2/M checkpoint and mitotic regulation, repetitive ssUVR led to extensive changes in genes related to cell signaling and metabolism. We have also identified a panel of ssUVR target genes that exhibited persistent changes in gene expression even at 1 week after irradiation. These results revealed a complex network of transcriptional regulators and pathways that orchestrate the cellular response to ssUVR.

  8. Estimating solar radiation using NOAA/AVHRR and ground measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Somayeh; Amanollahi, Jamil; Tzanis, Chris G.; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz

    2018-01-01

    Solar radiation (SR) data are commonly used in different areas of renewable energy research. Researchers are often compelled to predict SR at ground stations for areas with no proper equipment. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of the artificial neural network (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models for estimating monthly average SR over Kurdistan Province, Iran. Input data of the models were two data series with similar longitude, latitude, altitude, and month (number of months) data, but there were differences between the monthly mean temperatures in the first data series obtained from AVHRR sensor of NOAA satellite (DS1) and in the second data series measured at ground stations (DS2). In order to retrieve land surface temperature (LST) from AVHRR sensor, emissivity of the area was considered and for that purpose normalized vegetation difference index (NDVI) calculated from channels 1 and 2 of AVHRR sensor was utilized. The acquired results showed that the ANN model with DS1 data input with R2 = 0.96, RMSE = 1.04, MAE = 1.1 in the training phase and R2 = 0.96, RMSE = 1.06, MAE = 1.15 in the testing phase achieved more satisfactory performance compared with MLR model. It can be concluded that ANN model with remote sensing data has the potential to predict SR in locations with no ground measurement stations.

  9. Differential responses of tetrasporophytes and gametophytes of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta) under solar UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Nelso P; Figueroa, Félix L; Korbee, Nathalie; Mansilla, Andrés; Plastino, Estela M

    2016-06-01

    The effects of solar UV radiation on mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), growth, photosynthetic pigments (Chl a, phycobiliproteins), soluble proteins (SP), and C and N content of Mazzaella laminarioides tetrasporophytes and gametophytes were investigated. Apical segments of tetrasporophytes and gametophytes were exposed to solar radiation under three treatments (PAR [P], PAR+UVA [PA], and PAR+UVA+UVB [PAB]) during 18 d in spring 2009, Punta Arenas, Chile. Samples were taken after 2, 6, 12, and 18 d of solar radiation exposure. Most of the parameters assessed on M. laminarioides were significantly influenced by the radiation treatment, and both gametophytes and tetrasporophytes seemed to respond differently when exposed to high UV radiation. The two main effects promoted by UV radiation were: (i) higher synthesis of MAAs in gametophytes than tetrasporophytes at 2 d, and (ii) a decrease in phycoerythrin, phycocyanin, and SPs, but an increase in MAA content in tetrasporophytes at 6 and 12 d of culture. Despite some changes that were observed in biochemical parameters in both tetrasporophytes and gametophytes of M. laminarioides when exposed to UVB radiation, these changes did not promote deleterious effects that might interfere with the growth in the long term (18 d). The tolerance and resistance of M. laminarioides to higher UV irradiance were expected, as this intertidal species is exposed to variation in solar radiation, especially during low tide. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  10. Finite mobility effects on the radiative efficiency limit of pn-junction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mattheis, J.; Werner, J.H.; Rau, U.

    2008-01-01

    The maximum power conversion efficiency of a solar cell as defined by the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) radiative recombination limit relies on the assumption that the collection probability for all photogenerated electron/hole pairs is unity. This assumption implies a virtually infinite mobility mu(n) of the photogenerated charge carriers. In order to compute the radiative efficiency limit with finite mobilities, we solve the continuity equation for minority carrier transport including an additiona...

  11. The Role of Solar and UV Radiation in Environmental Stress Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of solar and UV radiation components in environmental stress assessment and to test the...contribution of the UV radiation variable in a modified environmental stress index (ESI). Meteorological variables, including ambient temperature, wet bulb...calculate the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and the environmental stress index (ESI). Accordingly, analysis of the weight for each parameter from

  12. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, W.K.; Prinzing, A.; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such

  13. The World Neutron Monitor Network as a tool for the study of solar neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Usoskin

    Full Text Available The use of the World Neutron Monitor Network to detect high-energy solar neutrons is discussed in detail. It is shown that the existing network can be used for the routine detection of intense sporadic solar-neutron events whenever they occur. A technique is suggested involving the weighted summation of responses of separate monitors to solar neutrons. It is demonstrated that the use of this method improves the significance of solar-neutron event detection. Different results of the simulation of the neutron-monitor sensitivity to solar neutrons have been tested with respect to their application for practical use. It is shown that the total number of neutrons with energy above 300 MeV injected from the Sun during a solar flare can be estimated directly from the time-integrated neutron-monitor response to solar neutrons without any model assumptions. The estimation technique has been developed.

  14. Solar radiation pressure model for the relay satellite of SELENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo-Oka, T.; Sengoku, A.

    1999-09-01

    A new radiation pressure model of the relay satellite of SELENE has been developed. The shape of the satellite was assumed to be a combination of a regular octagonal pillar and a column. Radiation forces acting on each part of the spacecraft were calculated independently and summed vectorially to obtain the mean acceleration of the satellite center of mass. We incorporated this new radiation pressure model into the orbit analysis software GEODYN-II and simulated the tracking data reduction process of the relay satellite. We compared two models: one is the new radiation pressure model developed in this work and the other a so-called "cannonball model" where the shape of the satellite is assumed to be a sphere. By the analysis of simulated two-way Doppler tracking data, we found that the new radiation pressure model reduces the observation residuals compared to the cannonball model. Moreover, we can decrease errors in the estimated lunar gravity field coefficients significantly by use of the new radiation pressure model.

  15. Angular Space –Time Relations in Solar Radiation | Ezeilo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The engineer relies greatly on Meteorological data for solar energy applications. In most case the available equipments indicate only the hourly or daily total irradiance on a flat horizontal surface. However, a more basic or fundamental information may also be necessary especially when application call for a knowledge of ...

  16. Stratospheric response to intraseasonal changes in incoming solar radiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garfinkel, C. I; Silverman, V; Harnik, N; Haspel, C; Riz, Y

    2015-01-01

    ... hPa, after a lag of approximately 6–10 days. Late winter (February–March) Arctic stratospheric temperatures also change in response to changing incoming solar flux in a manner consistent with that seen on the 11 year timescale: 10–30...

  17. ANGULAR SPACE – TIME RELATIONS IN SOLAR RADIATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    1979-03-01

    Mar 1, 1979 ... complementary modifier called the “Equation of Time” [2,4]. Insolation data must of necessity be reported on the basis of the. True Solar Time often termed the Local. Apparent Time. This paper considers what is often taken as the necessary first step towards equipment installation and data reporting.

  18. On the relative role of clouds and aerosols in the decadal changes of solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiacchio, M.; Vitolo, R.; Wild, M.

    2009-04-01

    This study aims at quantifying the most important factors for the decadal variations in the surface shortwave downward radiation. With reports describing global variations of this radiation parameter using surface and satellite-derived measurements, emphasis has recently been placed on regional studies to further understand the mechanisms that are contributing to the local changes in solar radiation. Analysis of this radiative parameter is performed on surface observations in Europe from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) from 1970 through 2005. This dataset is comprised of monthly mean surface downward radiation around the globe. The time series of these measurements are evaluated on an annual and seasonal basis to determine their trends using linear regression techniques. Since cloud cover and aerosols are major contributors for the variability of solar radiation, we assess the relative role of these two factors. Time series of cloud cover are taken from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) from 1971 to 1996. Monthly averages from this dataset are used to compute annual and seasonal trends. In addition, decadal changes in the total aerosol optical depth from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model are analysed. The effect of cloud cover and aerosols on surface shortwave downward radiation is evaluated through generalized linear models where these two factors act as covariates.

  19. Progress Report for Annex II--Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1993-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Amoudi, Anmed; Alawaji, Saleh H.; Cornwall, Chris; Mahfoodh, Mohammed bin; Marion, Bill; Maxwell, Eugene L.; Wilcox, Stephen M.

    1999-08-20

    In 1987, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) signed a five-year Agreement for Cooperation in the Field of Renewable Energy Research and Development (R and D), which has been extended to 2000. Tasks include: (1) upgrade solar radiation measurements in Saudi Arabia; (2) assemble a database of concurrent solar radiation, satellite (METEOSAT), and meteorological data; (3) adapt NREL models and other software for Saudi Arabia; (4) develop procedures, algorithms, and software to estimate solar irradiance; and (5) prepare a grid of solar radiation data for preparing maps and atlases and estimating solar radiation resources and solar energy system performances at locations in Saudi Arabia.

  20. The World Radiation Monitoring Center of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network: Status 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driemel, Amelie; König-Langlo, Gert; Sieger, Rainer; Long, Charles N.

    2017-04-01

    The World Radiation Monitoring Center (WRMC) is the central archive of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The BSRN was initiated by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Working Group on Radiative Fluxes and began operations in 1992. One of its aims is to provide short and long-wave surface radiation fluxes of the best possible quality to support the research projects of the WCRP and other scientific projects. The high quality, uniform and consistent measurements of the BSRN network can be used to monitor the short- and long-wave radiative components and their changes with the best methods currently available, to validate and evaluate satellite-based estimates of the surface radiative fluxes, and to verify the results of global climate models. In 1992 the BSRN/WRMC started at ETH Zurich, Switzerland with 9 stations. Since 2007 the archive is hosted by the Alfred-Wegener-Institut (AWI) in Bremerhaven, Germany (http://www.bsrn.awi.de/) and comprises a network of currently 59 stations in contrasting climatic zones, covering a latitude range from 80°N to 90°S. Of the 59 stations, 23 offer the complete radiation budget (down- and upwelling short- and long-wave data). In addition to the ftp-service access instituted at ETH Zurich, the archive at AWI offers data access via PANGAEA - Data Publisher for Earth & Environmental Science (https://www.pangaea.de). PANGAEA guarantees the long-term availability of its content through a commitment of the operating institutions. Within PANGAEA, the metadata of the stations are freely available. To access the data itself an account is required. If the scientist accepts to follow the data release guidelines of the archive (http://bsrn.awi.de/data/conditions-of-data-release/) he or she can get an account from amelie.driemel@awi.de. Currently, more than 9,400 station months (>780 years) are available for interested scientists (see also https://dataportals.pangaea.de/bsrn/?q=LR0100 for an overview on available data

  1. Simulation model of a new solar laser system of Fresnel lens according to real observed solar radiation data in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser A. Abdel-Hadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation model of a new solar pumped laser system was tested to be run in Helwan in Egypt (latitude φ = 29°52′N, longitude λ = 31°21′E and elevation = 141 m as an example of an industrial polluted area. The system is based on concentrating the solar radiation using a Fresnel lens on a laser head fixed on a mount tracking the sun during the day and powered by a DC battery. Two cases of this model are tested; the first one is the model consisting of a Fresnel lens and a two-dimensional Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC, while the other is the model consisting of a Fresnel lens and a three-dimensional Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC. The model is fed by real actual solar radiation data taken in Helwan Solar Radiation Station at NRIAG in the various seasons in order to know the laser power got from such a system in those conditions. For the system of Fresnel lens and 2D-CPC, an average laser output power of 1.27 W in Winter, 2 W in Spring, 5 W in Summer and 4.68 W in Autumn respectively can be obtained. Accordingly, the annual average output power for this system is 3.24 W. For the system of Fresnel lens and 3D-CPC, an average laser output power of 3.28 W in Winter, 3.55 W in Spring, 7.56 W in Summer and 7.13 W in Autumn respectively can be obtained. Accordingly, the annual average output power for this system is 5.38 W.

  2. Comparative sensitivity of six scleractinian corals to temperature and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scleractinian corals were subjected to six combinations of temperature and solar radiation regimes to evaluate their effects on coral bleaching, survival, and tissue surface area changes during and after an exposure period. A recirculating coral exposure system was coupled to a ...

  3. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn risk among schoolchildren in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available and African albinos, and people spending extended unprotected periods outdoors are at risk of sunburn, a risk factor for skin cancer. Sunburn becomes increasingly likely during the high solar UV radiation hours around midday, and previous studies have shown...

  4. Evaluation of temperature-based global solar radiation models in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoying; Mei, Xurong; Li, Yuzhong

    2009-01-01

    Estimation of global solar radiation (Rs) from the daily range of air temperature (¿T) offers an important alternative in the absence of measured Rs or sunshine duration because of the wide availability of air temperature data. In this paper, we assessed 16 Rs models including modified versions...

  5. Sensitivity of APSIM/ORYZA model due to estimation errors in solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, A.B.; Oort, van P.A.J.; Simoes Fernandes, D.; Maia, A.H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Crop models are ideally suited to quantify existing climatic risks. However, they require historic climate data as input. While daily temperature and rainfall data are often available, the lack of observed solar radiation (Rs) data severely limits site-specific crop modelling. The objective of this

  6. Topical tacrolimus in combination with simulated solar radiation does not enhance photocarcinogenesis in hairless mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C.M.; Philipsen, P.A.; Poulsen, T.

    2008-01-01

    tacrolimus ointment on squamous cell carcinoma formation in hairless female C3.Cg/TifBomTac immunocompetent mice exposed to solar simulated radiation (SSR). In a first experiment, mice (n = 200) had tacrolimus applied on their dorsal skin three times weekly followed by SSR (2, 4 or 6 standard erythema doses...

  7. Effects of solar UV-B radiation on canopy structure of Ulva communities from southern Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K; Peralta, G; Krabs, G; van de Poll, WH; Perez-Llorens, JL; Breeman, AM

    2002-01-01

    Within the sheltered creeks of Cadiz bay, Ulva thalli form extended mat-like canopies. The effect of solar ultraviolet radiation on photosynthetic activity, the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments, and the amount of RubisCO, chaperonin 60 (CPN 60), and the induction of DNA

  8. Use of MERRA-2 in the National Solar Radiation Database and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Manajit; Lopez, Anthony; Habte, Aron

    2017-07-06

    The National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) is a flagship product of NREL that provides solar radiation and ancillary meteorological information through a GIS based portal. This data is provided at a 4kmx4km spatial and 30 minute temporal resolution covering the period between 1998-2015. The gridded data that is distributed by the NSRDB is derived from satellite measurements using the Physical Solar Model (PSM) that contains a 2-stage approach. This 2-stage approach consists of first retrieving cloud properties using measurement from the GOES series of satellites and using that information in a radiative transfer model to estimate solar radiation at the surface. In addition to the satellite data the model requires ancillary meteorological information that is provided mainly by NASA's Modern Era Retrospecitve Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) 2 model output. This presentation provides an insight into how the NSRDB is developed using the PSM and how the various sources of data including the MERRA-2 data is used during the process.

  9. In situ impact of solar ultraviolet radiation on photosynthesis and DNA in temperate marine phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbling, E.W; Buma, A.G.J.; de Boer, M.K.; Villafane, V

    2001-01-01

    In situ experiments were conducted at various depths in the water column to determine the impact of solar UV radiation (280 to 400 nm) upon photosynthesis and DNA of natural phytoplankton assemblages from mid-latitudes of Patagonia (Bahia Bustamante, Chubut, Argentina; 45 degreesS, 66.5 degreesW).

  10. Analytical Methods for Temperature Field and Temperature Stress of Column Pier under Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous research work, a new idea is proposed for analyzing the impact of solar radiation on the substructure of bridges. Investigation is conducted in the thermodynamic phenomena and temperature stress of a dual-column pier. Research is led to the thermal conductivity of concrete structure and the values of the environmental parameters under solar radiation. An analytical code is written for the thermal analysis of the dual-column pier using the parametric modeling function of FE software, by means of which the temperature distribution of the bridge structure is computed under solar radiation. Using the thermal analytical results, the temperature stress of the dual-column pier is further calculated. The results tell that the temperature gradient distribution curve inside the concrete of the pier fits favorably the curve defined in the design specification and coincides quite well with real situation, which verifies the new idea proposed in this paper. Under the solar radiation which is a time-variable nonlinear temperature load to the bridge, the maximum principal stress is found at the corner of the pier with the sign of negative, which is believed to threaten the safety of the substructure of bridge and is necessary to arouse emphasis.

  11. Energy advantages of orientation to solar radiation in three African ruminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, R.S.; Maartin Strauss, W.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Bie, de S.; Prins, H.H.T.; Wieren, van S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal orientation relative to incident solar radiation allows an animal to effectively adjust the amount of radiant heat gained from an environment. Yet recent literature found ruminants to primarily orientate north/south and proposed magnetic alignment as the most parsimonious explanation. To test

  12. ATTENUATION OF SOLAR UV RADIATION BY AEROSOLS DURING AIR POLLUTION EPISODES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increase in the amount of solar UV radiation reaching the surface due to decrease in stratospheric ozone continues to be a major concern (WMO, 1998). However, recent studies show that absorption and smattering by aerosols during air pollution episode decreases the amount of radi...

  13. Surface temperature of wooden window frames under influence of solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castenmiller, C.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Under influence of solar radiation the surface temperature of wooden window frames can reach values above 60 0C. High temperature can cause considerable tensions within the window frame; as a result joints can be cracked and rain water can penetrate into these joints. This penetration of rain water

  14. Measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation intensity type A and B in Qazvin (2013-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAR. Babaee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR is considered one of the most important biological risk factors in the world. Most health damages from solar ultraviolet radiation at ground level are mainly caused by UVA and UVB spectrums. Objective: The aim of this study was to Measure the solar ultraviolet radiation intensity type A and B in Qazvin city. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the intensity of solar ultraviolet radiation type A and B was measured in Qazvin on years of 2013-14 (during one year every monthly at three times, in the morning, afternoon and evening by using a UV Radiometer. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings: The maximum average intensity of UVA and UVB rays during the one year with 28.36±1.88 W/m2 and 0.156±0.035 W/m2 respectively was in Tir month (June 22–July 22 and the minimum average intensity of UVA and UVB rays with 10.36±0.83 W/m2 and 0.041±0.010 W/m2 respectively was in Dai month (December 22–January 20. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it is recommended that individuals were less exposed to exposure time with direct sunshine and use appropriate protective measures such as; wear appropriate clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of solar radiation on glass. [space environment simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, R. F.; Harada, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The degradation of glass used on space structures due to electromagnetic and particulate radiation in a space environment was evaluated. The space environment was defined and a simulated space exposure apparatus was constructed. Four optical materials were exposed to simulated solar and particulate radiation in a space environment. Sapphire and fused silica experienced little change in transmittance, while optical crown glass and ultra low expansion glass darkened appreciably. Specimen selection and preparation, exposure conditions, and the effect of simulated exposure are discussed. A selective bibliography of the effect of radiation on glass is included.

  16. Seasonal and interannual variability of solar radiation at Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity landing sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Lemmon, M.T.; Martinez, G.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.; Martin, M.L.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we characterize the radiative environment at the landing sites of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions. We use opacity values obtained at the surface from direct imaging of the Sun and our radiative transfer model COMIMART to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of the daily irradiation at the MER and MSL landing sites. In addition, we analyze the behavior of the direct and diffuse components of the solar radiation at these landing sites. (Author)

  17. Simulation of direct solar radiation transmission in a building well

    OpenAIRE

    Juan José Eliçabe Urriol; Horacio A. Belluccia

    2010-01-01

    Con un modelo estocástico se simula la propagación de radiación solar directa en un hueco aire-luz de superficie interior cuasiespecular. Para situaciones típicas fueron calculadas las irradiancias sobre las ventanas internas y también la base del hueco. Los resultados numéricos, desde el punto de vista de la iluminación natural (de edificios), son significativos.

  18. Photodegradation of antibiotics under simulated solar radiation: implications for their environmental fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchu, Sudha Rani; Panditi, Venkata R; O'Shea, Kevin E; Gardinali, Piero R

    2014-02-01

    Roxithromycin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole are frequently detected antibiotics in environmental waters. Direct and indirect photolysis of these problematic antibiotics were investigated in pure and natural waters (fresh and salt water) under irradiation of different light sources. Fundamental photolysis parameters such as molar absorption coefficient, quantum yield and first order rate constants are reported and discussed. The antibiotics are degraded fastest under ultraviolet 254 nm, followed by 350 nm and simulated solar radiation. The composition of the matrix (pH, dissolved organic content, chloride ion concentration) played a significant role in the observed photodegradation. Under simulated solar radiation, ciprofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole degrade relatively quickly with half-lives of 0.5 and 1.5h, respectively. However, roxithromycin and erythromycin, macrolides are persistent (half-life: 2.4-10 days) under solar simulation. The transformation products (15) of the targeted antibiotics produced under irradiation experiments were identified using high resolution mass spectrometry and degradation pathways were proposed. © 2013.

  19. Evaluation of the cloudy sky solar UVA radiation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Turner, J

    2014-09-05

    The influence of cloud on the solar UVA (320-400 nm) exposures over five minute periods on a horizontal plane has been investigated. The first approach used cloud modification factors that were evaluated using the influence of clouds on the global solar exposures (310-2800 nm) and a model developed to apply these to the clear sky UVA exposures to allow calculation of the five minute UVA exposures for any cloud conditions. The second approach established a relationship between the UVA and the global solar exposures. The models were developed using the first six months of data in 2012 for SZA less than or equal to 70° and were applied and evaluated for the exposures in the second half of 2012. This comparison of the modelled exposures for all cloud conditions to the measured data provided an R(2) of 0.8 for the cloud modification model, compared to an R(2) of 0.7 for the UVA/global model. The cloud modification model provided 73% of the five minute exposures within 20% of the measured UVA exposures. This was improved to 89% of the exposures within 20% of the measured UVA exposures for the cases of cloud with the sun not obscured. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure of the solar photosphere studied from the radiation hydrodynamics code ANTARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, P.; Lemmerer, B.; Hanslmeier, A.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Veronig, A.; Grimm-Strele, H.; Muthsam, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    The ANTARES radiation hydrodynamics code is capable of simulating the solar granulation in detail unequaled by direct observation. We introduce a state-of-the-art numerical tool to the solar physics community and demonstrate its applicability to model the solar granulation. The code is based on the weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite volume method and by its implementation of local mesh refinement is also capable of simulating turbulent fluids. While the ANTARES code already provides promising insights into small-scale dynamical processes occurring in the quiet-Sun photosphere, it will soon be capable of modeling the latter in the scope of radiation magnetohydrodynamics. In this first preliminary study we focus on the vertical photospheric stratification by examining a 3-D model photosphere with an evolution time much larger than the dynamical timescales of the solar granulation and of particular large horizontal extent corresponding to 25''×25'' on the solar surface to smooth out horizontal spatial inhomogeneities separately for up- and downflows. The highly resolved Cartesian grid thereby covers ˜4 Mm of the upper convection zone and the adjacent photosphere. Correlation analysis, both local and two-point, provides a suitable means to probe the photospheric structure and thereby to identify several layers of characteristic dynamics: The thermal convection zone is found to reach some ten kilometers above the solar surface, while convectively overshooting gas penetrates even higher into the low photosphere. An ≈145 km wide transition layer separates the convective from the oscillatory layers in the higher photosphere.

  1. Structure of the solar photosphere studied from the radiation hydrodynamics code ANTARES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, P; Lemmerer, B; Hanslmeier, A; Zaqarashvili, T; Veronig, A; Grimm-Strele, H; Muthsam, H J

    2017-01-01

    The ANTARES radiation hydrodynamics code is capable of simulating the solar granulation in detail unequaled by direct observation. We introduce a state-of-the-art numerical tool to the solar physics community and demonstrate its applicability to model the solar granulation. The code is based on the weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite volume method and by its implementation of local mesh refinement is also capable of simulating turbulent fluids. While the ANTARES code already provides promising insights into small-scale dynamical processes occurring in the quiet-Sun photosphere, it will soon be capable of modeling the latter in the scope of radiation magnetohydrodynamics. In this first preliminary study we focus on the vertical photospheric stratification by examining a 3-D model photosphere with an evolution time much larger than the dynamical timescales of the solar granulation and of particular large horizontal extent corresponding to [Formula: see text] on the solar surface to smooth out horizontal spatial inhomogeneities separately for up- and downflows. The highly resolved Cartesian grid thereby covers [Formula: see text] of the upper convection zone and the adjacent photosphere. Correlation analysis, both local and two-point, provides a suitable means to probe the photospheric structure and thereby to identify several layers of characteristic dynamics: The thermal convection zone is found to reach some ten kilometers above the solar surface, while convectively overshooting gas penetrates even higher into the low photosphere. An [Formula: see text] wide transition layer separates the convective from the oscillatory layers in the higher photosphere.

  2. Kinetics of avoidance of simulated solar uv radiation by two arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelo, J.A.; Calkins, J.

    1980-12-01

    There is an increasing likelihood that the solar uv-B radiation (lambda = 280-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface will increase due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. It is recognized that many organisms are insufficiently resistant to solar uv-B to withstand full summer sunlight and thus mechanisms which facilitate avoidance of solar uv-B exposure may have significance for the survival of sensitive species. There are many alternative pathways which would lead to avoidance of solar uv-B. We have investigated the dynamics of biological reactions to simulated solar uv-B radiation in two small arthropods, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch and the aquatic copepod Cyclops serrulatus. Observations of positioning and rate of movement were made; a mathematical formalism was developed which assisted in interpretation of the observations. Our observations suggest that, although avoidance would mitigate increased solar uv-B effects, even organisms which specifically reduce their uv-B exposure would encounter additional stress if ozone depletion does occur.

  3. DOES THE VARIATION OF THE SOLAR INTRA-NETWORK HORIZONTAL FIELD FOLLOW THE SUNSPOT CYCLE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X., E-mail: cljin@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-07-01

    The ubiquitousness of the solar inter-network horizontal magnetic field has been revealed by space-borne observations with high spatial resolution and polarization sensitivity. However, no consensus has been achieved on the origin of the horizontal field among solar physicists. For a better understanding, in this study, we analyze the cyclic variation of the inter-network horizontal field by using the spectro-polarimeter observations provided by the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode, covering the interval from 2008 April to 2015 February. The method of wavelength integration is adopted to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is found that from 2008 to 2015 the inter-network horizontal field does not vary when solar activity increases, and the average flux density of the inter-network horizontal field is 87 ± 1 G, In addition, the imbalance between horizontal and vertical fields also keeps invariant within the scope of deviation, i.e., 8.7 ± 0.5, from the solar minimum to maximum of solar cycle 24. This result confirms that the inter-network horizontal field is independent of the sunspot cycle. The revelation favors the idea that a local dynamo is creating and maintaining the solar inter-network horizontal field.

  4. Photochemical degradation of the carbapenem antibiotics imipenem and meropenem in aqueous solutions under solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Alejandro Cabrera; Martínez-Piernas, Ana B; Bertakis, Yannis; Brebou, Christina; Xekoukoulotakis, Nikolaos P; Agüera, Ana; Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the photochemical fate of two representative carbapenem antibiotics, namely imipenem and meropenem, in aqueous solutions under solar radiation. The analytical method employed for the determination of the target compounds in various aqueous matrices, such as ultrapure water, municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents, and river water, at environmentally relevant concentrations, was liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap-mass spectrometry. The absorption spectra of both compounds were measured in aqueous solutions at pH values from 6 to 8, and both compounds showed a rather strong absorption band centered at about 300 nm, while their molar absorption coefficient was in the order from 9 × 10 3 -10 4  L mol -1  cm -1 . The kinetics of the photochemical degradation of the target compounds was studied in aqueous solutions under natural solar radiation in a solar reactor with compound parabolic collectors. It was found that the photochemical degradation of both compounds at environmentally relevant concentrations follows first order kinetics and the quantum yield was in the order of 10 -3  mol einsten -1 . Several parameters were studied, such as solution pH, the presence of nitrate ions and humic acids, and the effect of water matrix. In all cases, it was found that the presence of various organic and inorganic constituents in the aqueous matrices do not contribute significantly, either positively or negatively, to the photochemical degradation of both compounds under natural solar radiation. In a final set of photolysis experiments, the effect of the level of irradiance was studied under simulated solar radiation and it was found that the quantum yield for the direct photodegradation of both compounds remained practically constant by changing the incident solar irradiance from 28 to 50 W m -2 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential solar radiation and land cover contributions to digital climate surface modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Pol; Batalla, Meritxell; Pesquer, Lluís; Ninyerola, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Overview: We have designed a series of ad-hoc experiments to study the role of factors that a priori have a strong weight in developing digital models of temperature and precipitation, such as solar radiation and land cover. Empirical test beds have been designed to improve climate (mean air temperature and total precipitation) digital models using statistical general techniques (multiple regression) with residual correction (interpolated with inverse weighting distance). Aim: Understand what roles these two factors (solar radiation and land cover) play to incorporate them into the process of generating mapping of temperature and rainfall. Study area: The Iberian Peninsula and supported in this, Catalonia and the Catalan Pyrenees. Data: The dependent variables used in all experiments relate to data from meteorological stations precipitation (PL), mean temperature (MT), average temperature minimum (MN) and maximum average temperature (MX). These data were obtained monthly from the AEMET (Agencia Estatal de Meteorología). Data series of stations covers the period between 1950 to 2010. Methodology: The idea is to design ad hoc, based on a sample of more equitable space statistician, to detect the role of radiation. Based on the influence of solar radiation on the temperature of the air from a quantitative point of view, the difficulty in answering this lies in the fact that there are lots of weather stations located in areas where solar radiation is similar. This suggests that the role of the radiation variable remains "off" when, instead, we intuitively think that would strongly influence the temperature. We have developed a multiple regression analysis between these meteorological variables as the dependent ones (Temperature and rainfall), and some geographical variables: altitude (ALT), latitude (LAT), continentality (CON) and solar radiation (RAD) as the independent ones. In case of the experiment with land covers, we have used the NDVI index as a proxy of land

  6. [Analysis of the cumulative solar ultraviolet radiation in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Portales-González, Bárbara; Martínez-Rosales, Karla; Hernández-Blanco, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer has increased in Mexico in recent years. Ultraviolet radiation is the main risk factor associated. Due to the need to develop strategies to prevent skin cancer, the aim of the study was to estimate the UV intensity in several representative regions of Mexico, the average annual UV dose of these populations, and the potential benefit of applying sunscreen at different ages. The intensity of UV radiation was quantified by remote and terrestrial radiometry. The dose of UV exposure was measured in minimal erythema doses using validated models for face and arms. The benefit of using a sunscreen was calculated with the use of a sunscreen with SPF 15 from birth to age 70. The UV radiation is lower in December and greater in the period from May to July. The region with a lower annual dose is Tijuana; and the higher annual dose is in the Mexico City area. The annual difference between these regions was 58 %. Through life, a low SPF sunscreen can reduce up to 66 % of the received UV dose. The geographical location is a risk factor for accumulation of UV radiation in Mexico. Since childhood, people receive high amounts of it; however, most of this dose can be reduced using any commercially available sunscreen, if applied strategically.

  7. Radiation detection and situation management by distributed sensor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Frigo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Angela [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Detection of radioactive materials in an urban environment usually requires large, portal-monitor-style radiation detectors. However, this may not be a practical solution in many transport scenarios. Alternatively, a distributed sensor network (DSN) could complement portal-style detection of radiological materials through the implementation of arrays of low cost, small heterogeneous sensors with the ability to detect the presence of radioactive materials in a moving vehicle over a specific region. In this paper, we report on the use of a heterogeneous, wireless, distributed sensor network for traffic monitoring in a field demonstration. Through wireless communications, the energy spectra from different radiation detectors are combined to improve the detection confidence. In addition, the DSN exploits other sensor technologies and algorithms to provide additional information about the vehicle, such as its speed, location, class (e.g. car, truck), and license plate number. The sensors are in-situ and data is processed in real-time at each node. Relevant information from each node is sent to a base station computer which is used to assess the movement of radioactive materials.

  8. Toward a High-Efficient Utilization of Solar Radiation by Quad-Band Solar Spectral Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Huang, Yi; Tang, Lu; Sun, Tianyi; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2016-12-01

    The promising quad-band solar spectral splitter incorporates the properties of the optical filter and the spectrally selective solar thermal absorber can direct PV band to PV modules and absorb thermal band energy for thermal process with low thermal losses. It provides a new strategy for spectral splitting and offers potential ways for hybrid PVT system design. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Investigation of transient cooling of an automobile cabin with a virtual manikin under solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilgen Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present a three dimensional transient cooling analysis of an automobile cabin with a virtual manikin under solar radiation. In the numerical simulations the velocity and the temperature distributions in the automobile cabin as well as around the human body surfaces were computed during transient cooling period. The surface-to-surface radiation model was used for calculations of radiation heat transfer between the interior surfaces of the automobile cabin and a solar load model that can be used to calculate radiation effects from the sun's rays that enter from the glazing surfaces of the cabin was used for solar radiation effects. Inhomogeneous air flow and non-uniform temperature distributions were obtained in the automobile cabin and, especially in ten minutes of cooling period, high temperature gradients were computed and measured and high temperature values were obtained for the surfaces which were more affected from the sunlight. Validations of the numerical results were performed by comparing numerical data with the experimental data presented in this study. It is shown that the numerical results were good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Vitamin B12 deficiency is associated with geographical latitude and solar radiation in the older population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Sebastián; Benavente, David; Alvo, Miriam; de Pablo, Paola; Ferro, Charles J

    2014-11-01

    Vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency are common in the older and are associated with several conditions including anaemia, cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment and cancer. Evidence from in vitro studies suggests that solar radiation can degrade both vitamins in the skin. Chile is the longest country in the world running perfectly North-South making it an ideal place to study potential associations of latitude and solar radiation on vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency. The objective was to examine the association between vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies and latitude. Plasma samples were collected from Chileans aged 65+ years (n=1013) living across the whole country and assayed for vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations as part of the Chilean Health Survey 2009-2010, which is a national representative sample study. Overall, the prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was 11.3%, with the prevalence in the North of the country being significantly greater than in the Central and South zones (19.1%,10.5%, and 5.7%, respectively; Psolar radiation (OR 1.203 [95% confidence intervals 1.119-1.294], Psolar radiation. Although degradation by solar radiation might explain this observation, further work is required to establish the potential mechanisms. In countries that routinely fortify food with folic acid, efforts to identify vitamin B12 deficiency might be more cost-efficiently targeted in areas closest to the Equator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical solar energy adaptations and radiative temperature control of green leaves and tree barks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrion, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut [Department of Si-Photovoltaik and Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Trees have adapted to keep leaves and barks cool in sunshine and can serve as interesting bionic model systems for radiative cooling. Silicon solar cells, on the other hand, loose up to one third of their energy efficiency due to heating in intensive sunshine. It is shown that green leaves minimize absorption of useful radiation and allow efficient infrared thermal emission. Since elevated temperatures are detrimental for tensile water flow in the Xylem tissue below barks, the optical properties of barks should also have evolved so as to avoid excessive heating. This was tested by performing optical studies with tree bark samples from representative trees. It was found that tree barks have optimized their reflection of incoming sunlight between 0.7 and 2 {mu}m. This is approximately the optical window in which solar light is transmitted and reflected by green vegetation. Simultaneously, the tree bark is highly absorbing and thus radiation emitting between 6 and 10 {mu}m. These two properties, mainly provided by tannins, create optimal conditions for radiative temperature control. In addition, tannins seem to have adopted a function as mediators for excitation energy towards photo-antioxidative activity for control of radiation damage. The results obtained are used to discuss challenges for future solar cell optimization. (author)

  12. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trends in Downward Solar Radiation at the Surface over North America from Climate Model Projections and Implications for Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Andres Saenz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The projected changes in the downward solar radiation at the surface over North America for late 21st century are deduced from global climate model simulations with greenhouse-gas (GHG forcing. A robust trend is found in winter over the United States, which exhibits a simple pattern of a decrease of sunlight over Northern USA. and an increase of sunlight over Southern USA. This structure was identified in both the seasonal mean and the mean climatology at different times of the day. It is broadly consistent with the known poleward shift of storm tracks in winter in climate model simulations with GHG forcing. The centennial trend of the downward shortwave radiation at the surface in Northern USA. is on the order of 10% of the climatological value for the January monthly mean, and slightly over 10% at the time when it is midday in the United States. This indicates a nonnegligible influence of the GHG forcing on solar energy in the long term. Nevertheless, when dividing the 10% by a century, in the near term, the impact of the GHG forcing is relatively minor such that the estimate of solar power potential using present-day climatology will remain useful in the coming decades.

  14. [Effects of reduced solar radiation on winter wheat flag leaf net photosynthetic rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-Fei; Ni, Yan-Li; Mai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Rong-Jun; Feng, Yan; Sun, Jian; Li, Jian; Xu, Jing-Xin

    2011-06-01

    Taking winter wheat Triticum aestivum L. (cv. Yangmai 13) as test material, a field experiment was conducted in Nanjing City to study the effects of simulated reduced solar radiation on the diurnal variation of winter wheat flag leaf photosynthetic rate and the main affecting factors. Five treatments were installed, i. e., 15% (T15), 20% (T20) , 40% (T40), 60% (T60), and 100% (CK) of total incident solar radiation. Reduced solar irradiance increased the chlorophyll and lutein contents significantly, but decreased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn). Under different solar irradiance, the diurnal variation of Pn had greater difference, and the daily maximum Pn was in the order of CK > T60 > T40 > T 20 > T15. In CK, the Pn exhibited a double peak diurnal curve; while in the other four treatments, the Pn showed a single peak curve, and the peak was lagged behind that of CK. Correlation analysis showed that reduced solar irradiance was the main factor affecting the diurnal variation of Pn, but the physiological parameters also played important roles in determining the diurnal variation of Pn. In treatments T60 and T40, the photosynthesis active radiation (PAR), leaf temperature (T1) , stomatal conductance (Gs) , and transpiration rate (Tr) were significantly positively correlated with Pn, suggesting their positive effects on Pn. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and stomatal limitation (Ls) had significant negative correlations with Pn in treatments T60 and T40 but significant positive correlations with Pn in treatments T20 and T15, implying that the Ci and Ls had negative (or positive) effects on Pn when the solar irradiance was higher (or lower) than 40% of incident solar irradiance.

  15. Epidermal UV-A absorbance and whole-leaf flavonoid composition in pea respond more to solar blue light than to solar UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siipola, Sari M; Kotilainen, Titta; Sipari, Nina; Morales, Luis O; Lindfors, Anders V; Robson, T Matthew; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Plants synthesize phenolic compounds in response to certain environmental signals or stresses. One large group of phenolics, flavonoids, is considered particularly responsive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, here we demonstrate that solar blue light stimulates flavonoid biosynthesis in the absence of UV-A and UV-B radiation. We grew pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Meteor) outdoors, in Finland during the summer, under five types of filters differing in their spectral transmittance. These filters were used to (1) attenuate UV-B; (2) attenuate UV-B and UV-A radiation signals that extend into the visible region of the solar spectrum. Furthermore, solar blue light instead of solar UV-B radiation can be the main regulator of phenolic compound accumulation in plants that germinate and develop outdoors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

    1985-04-30

    An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

  17. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1995-11-01

    SOLARFLUX is a geographical information system (GIS) based computer program (running under ARC/INFO and GRID) that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. A convenient user interface allows specification of program parameters including latitude, time interval for simulation, file name of a topographic surface, atmospheric conditions (transmittivity), and file names for output. The user specifies a topographic surface as an array of elevation values (GRID). SOLARFLUX generates five basic types of output: 1) total direct radiation, 2) duration of direct sunlight, 3) total diffuse radiation, 4) skyview factor, and 5) hemispherical viewsheds of sky obstruction for specified surface locations. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modeling insolation on complex surfaces, our theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modeling.

  18. Neural Network Enhanced Structure Determination of Osteoporosis, Immune System, and Radiation Repair Proteins Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation will utilize self learning neural network technology to determine the structure of osteoporosis, immune system disease, and excess radiation...

  19. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  20. A comparison of data from SOLMET/ERSATZ and the National Solar Radiation Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W; Myers, D

    1992-11-01

    This report compares data from the new National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) with data from the earlier SOLMET/ERSATZ data base. It compares the two data bases, station-by-station, with respect to their long-term average daily values of global horizontal and direct normal solar radiation. We conclude that on an annual basis, NSRDB values for global horizontal radiation are within {plus_minus}5% of SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 60% of the stations, more than 5% greater than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 30% of the stations, and more than 5% less than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 10% of the stations. On an annual basis for direct nominal radiation, the NSRDB values are with {plus_minus}5% of the SOLMET/ERSATZ data for only 40% of the stations, more than 5% greater than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 45% of the stations, and more than 5% less than the SOLMET/ERSATZ values for 15% of the stations. In general, the NSRDB shows higher values of solar radiation for the eastern United States, particularly the Northeast, and lower values for some of the western states (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming). However, because some of the stations within a state show higher values of solar radiation while others show lower values, this generalization may be misleading when concerned with a particular station. Consequently, the appendices provide tables showing a station-by-station comparison of the NSRDB and SOLMET/ERSATZ data. In addition to comparing annual values, the tables compare the two data bases for the months of August and December. This comparison shows larger differences between the two data bases for December.

  1. Concentration of solar radiation by white backed photovoltaic panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smestad, G; Hamill, P

    1984-12-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the concentration achieved by white backed photovoltaic panels. Concentration is due to the trapping by light scattered in the refractive plate to which the solar cell is bonded. Using the reciprocity relation and assuming the ideal case of a Lambertian distribution, a detailed model is formulated that includes the effects of the thickness and walls of the concentrator. This model converges to the thermodynamic limit and is found to be consistent with experimental results for a wide range of cell sizes. Finally, the model is generalized to multiple-cell photovoltaic panels.

  2. Radiation belt electron dynamics at low L (Van Allen Probes era versus previous two solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Zhao, H.; Zhang, K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Schiller, Q.; Kanekal, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Temerin, M.

    2017-05-01

    Long-term (>2 solar cycles) measurements reveal that MeV electron fluxes, solar wind speed, and geomagnetic activity have been extremely low during this current solar cycle, including years before and during the Van Allen Probes era. This study examines solar wind speed, the geomagnetic storm index (Dst), >2 MeV electrons at geostationary orbit, and 2 MeV electrons across various L shells measured by Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer in low Earth orbit (LEO) and by the Van Allen Probes/Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) in a geotransfer-like orbit; the latter measurements are normalized to LEO based on comparison with Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment/Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) measurements in LEO. The average ratio of REPTile/REPT varies in a systematic manner with L, 16% at L = 2.7, decreasing with L and reaching 0.7% at L = 4.7, and increasing again with L though with greater uncertainty. We show that there have been no 2 MeV electron enhancements inside L 2.6 since 2006, prior to which numerous penetrations of 2 MeV electrons into L Van Allen Probes, which have been providing the finest measurements but in operation during a quiet solar activity period, may not be representative of radiation belt dynamics, particularly for the inner edge of the outer belt, during other solar cycle phases.

  3. Functional traits drive the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition among multiple arid-zone species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xu; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Ye, Xue-Hua; Cornwell, William K; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-08-18

    In arid zones, strong solar radiation has important consequences for ecosystem processes. To better understand carbon and nutrient dynamics, it is important to know the contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition of different arid-zone species. Here we investigated: (1) whether such contribution varies among plant species at given irradiance regime, (2) whether interspecific variation in such contribution correlates with interspecific variation in the decomposition rate under shade; and (3) whether this correlation can be explained by leaf traits. We conducted a factorial experiment to determine the effects of solar radiation and environmental moisture for the mass loss and the decomposition constant k-values of 13 species litters collected in Northern China. The contribution of solar radiation to leaf litter decomposition varied significantly among species. Solar radiation accelerated decomposition in particular in the species that already decompose quickly under shade. Functional traits, notably specific leaf area, might predict the interspecific variation in that contribution. Our results provide the first empirical evidence for how the effect of solar radiation on decomposition varies among multiple species. Thus, the effect of solar radiation on the carbon flux between biosphere and atmosphere may depend on the species composition of the vegetation.

  4. The Survival and Resistance of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus hamelinensis, and Halococcus morrhuae to Simulated Outer Space Solar Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, S; Domingos, C; Parpart, A; Reitz, G; Rettberg, P

    2015-11-01

    Solar radiation is among the most prominent stress factors organisms face during space travel and possibly on other planets. Our analysis of three different halophilic archaea, namely Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Halococcus hamelinensis, which were exposed to simulated solar radiation in either dried or liquid state, showed tremendous differences in tolerance and survivability. We found that Hcc. hamelinensis is not able to withstand high fluences of simulated solar radiation compared to the other tested organisms. These results can be correlated to significant differences in genomic integrity following exposure, as visualized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. In contrast to the other two tested strains, Hcc. hamelinensis accumulates compatible solutes such as trehalose for osmoprotection. The addition of 100 mM trehalose to the growth medium of Hcc. hamelinensis improved its survivability following exposure. Exposure of cells in liquid at different temperatures suggests that Hbt. salinarum NRC-1 is actively repairing cellular and DNA damage during exposure, whereas Hcc. morrhuae exhibits no difference in survival. For Hcc. morrhuae, the high resistance against simulated solar radiation may be explained with the formation of cell clusters. Our experiments showed that these clusters shield cells on the inside against simulated solar radiation, which results in better survival rates at higher fluences when compared to Hbt. salinarum NRC-1 and Hcc. hamelinensis. Overall, this study shows that some halophilic archaea are highly resistant to simulated solar radiation and that they are of high astrobiological significance. Halophiles-Solar radiation-Stress resistance-Survival.

  5. Assessment of global solar radiation to examine the best locations to install a PV system in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkilani, Kaouther; Ben Othman, Afef; Besbes, Mongi

    2018-02-01

    The study of the solar radiation is the starting point of any investigation for a new energy, to study and search the best location to install a PV system. A very important factor in the assessment of solar potential is the availability of data for global solar radiation that must be coherent and of high quality. In this paper, we analyze the estimation result of the monthly global solar radiation for three different locations, Bizerte in Northern Tunisia, Kairouan in Middle Eastern Tunisia, and Tozeur in Southern Tunisia, measured on the surface by the National Institute of Meteorology and the meteorological year irradiation based on satellite imagery result PVGIS radiation databases. To get the right measurements with minimum error, we propose a numerical model used to calculate the global solar radiation in the indicated three sites. The results show that the model can estimate the global solar radiation (kWh/m²) at a specific station and over most area of Tunisia. The model gives a good estimation for solar radiation where error between the measured values and those calculated are negligible.

  6. Solar radiation and climatic data for quasi-homogeneous climatic regions of the United States. Technical memo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecker, W.H.; Cotton, G.F.; Hass, W.A.

    1979-04-01

    Up-to-date solar radiation and unique climatic statistics are presented that apply to regions of the United States which are quasi-homogeneous in solar radiation, heating demand and topography. The contiguous USA was divided into 78 and Alaska into 11 such regions. The Hawaiian and Pacific Mandate Islands, Guantanamo Bay (Cuba) and Puerto Rico are also represented but no subdivisions were made. A total of 97 regions or localities are represented by these solar radiation-climatic statistics. The solar radiation and climatic characteristics of each region are represented by statistics from one National Weather Service station with a record of about 25 years of meteorological and observed, or derived, solar radiation data. Station latitude, longitude and elevation are also provided. Rehabilitated, observed solar radiation data are available for ten of the stations. The solar radiation at the remainder of the stations was derived from regression models. Whole-record daily average values (monthly and annual) for 11 of 12 statistics are tabulated for each station. Wind speed classes, the twelfth statistic, are stratified only by wind speed intervals, for the entire period of record.

  7. Solar ultraviolet radiation is necessary to enhance grapevine fruit ripening transcriptional and phenolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Diago, Maria-Paz; Martínez-Abaigar, Javier; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Tardáguila, Javier; Núñez-Olivera, Encarnación

    2014-07-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation modulates secondary metabolism in the skin of Vitis vinifera L. berries, which affects the final composition of both grapes and wines. The expression of several phenylpropanoid biosynthesis-related genes is regulated by UV radiation in grape berries. However, the complete portion of transcriptome and ripening processes influenced by solar UV radiation in grapes remains unknown. Whole genome arrays were used to identify the berry skin transcriptome modulated by the UV radiation received naturally in a mid-altitude Tempranillo vineyard. UV radiation-blocking and transmitting filters were used to generate the experimental conditions. The expression of 121 genes was significantly altered by solar UV radiation. Functional enrichment analysis of altered transcripts mainly pointed out that secondary metabolism-related transcripts were induced by UV radiation including VvFLS1, VvGT5 and VvGT6 flavonol biosynthetic genes and monoterpenoid biosynthetic genes. Berry skin phenolic composition was also analysed to search for correlation with gene expression changes and UV-increased flavonols accumulation was the most evident impact. Among regulatory genes, novel UV radiation-responsive transcription factors including VvMYB24 and three bHLH, together with known grapevine UV-responsive genes such as VvMYBF1, were identified. A transcriptomic meta-analysis revealed that genes up-regulated by UV radiation in the berry skin were also enriched in homologs of Arabidopsis UVR8 UV-B photoreceptor-dependent UV-B -responsive genes. Indeed, a search of the grapevine reference genomic sequence identified UV-B signalling pathway homologs and among them, VvHY5-1, VvHY5-2 and VvRUP were up-regulated by UV radiation in the berry skin. Results suggest that the UV-B radiation-specific signalling pathway is activated in the skin of grapes grown at mid-altitudes. The biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites, which are appreciated in winemaking and

  8. Fast All-Sky Radiation Model for Solar Applications (FARMS): A Brief Overview of Mechanisms, Performance, and Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-06-01

    Solar radiation can be computed using radiative transfer models, such as the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its general circulation model applications, and used for various energy applications. Due to the complexity of computing radiation fields in aerosol and cloudy atmospheres, simulating solar radiation can be extremely time-consuming, but many approximations--e.g., the two-stream approach and the delta-M truncation scheme--can be utilized. To provide a new fast option for computing solar radiation, we developed the Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) by parameterizing the simulated diffuse horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiance for cloudy conditions from the RRTM runs using a 16-stream discrete ordinates radiative transfer method. The solar irradiance at the surface was simulated by combining the cloud irradiance parameterizations with a fast clear-sky model, REST2. To understand the accuracy and efficiency of the newly developed fast model, we analyzed FARMS runs using cloud optical and microphysical properties retrieved using GOES data from 2009-2012. The global horizontal irradiance for cloudy conditions was simulated using FARMS and RRTM for global circulation modeling with a two-stream approximation and compared to measurements taken from the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Our results indicate that the accuracy of FARMS is comparable to or better than the two-stream approach; however, FARMS is approximately 400 times more efficient because it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. Radiative transfer model runs are computationally expensive, but this model is promising for broad applications in solar resource assessment and forecasting. It is currently being used in the National Solar Radiation Database, which is publicly available from the National Renewable Energy

  9. Investigation of the stochastic nature of solar radiation for renewable resources management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudouris, Giannis; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Iliopoulou, Theano; Mamasis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2017-04-01

    A detailed investigation of the variability of solar radiation can be proven useful towards more efficient and sustainable design of renewable resources systems. This variability is mainly caused from the regular seasonal and diurnal variation, as well as its stochastic nature of the atmospheric processes, i.e. sunshine duration. In this context, we analyze numerous observations in Greece (Hellenic National Meteorological Service; http://www.hnms.gr/) and around the globe (NASA SSE - Surface meteorology and Solar Energy; http://www.soda-pro.com/web-services/radiation/nasa-sse) and we investigate the long-term behaviour and double periodicity of the solar radiation process. Also, we apply a parsimonious double-cyclostationary stochastic model to a theoretical scenario of solar energy production for an island in the Aegean Sea. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  10. Infrared radiation increases skin damage induced by other wavelengths in solar urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gálvez, María Victoria; Aguilera, José; Sánchez-Roldán, Cristina; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Photodermatoses are typically investigated by analyzing the individual or combined effects of ultraviolet A (UVA), ultraviolet B (UVB), and visible light using light sources that simulate portions of the solar spectrum. Infrared radiation (IRR), however, accounts for 53% of incident solar radiation, but its effects are not taken into account in standard phototest protocols. The aim was to analyze the effects of IRR, alone and combined with UVA and visible light on solar urticaria lesions, with a distinction between infrared A (IRA) and infrared B (IRB). We performed standard phototests with UVA and visible light in four patients with solar urticaria and also tested the effects after blocking IRB with a water filter. To analyze the direct effect of IRR, we performed phototests with IRA and IRB. Initial standard phototests that were all positive found the induction of erythema and whealing, while when IRR was blocked from the UVA and visible light sources, three of the patients developed no lesions, while the fourth developed a very small wheal. These results suggest that IRR has the potential to produce and exacerbate lesions caused by other types of radiation. Consideration of these effects during phototesting could help prevent diagnostic errors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Solar ultraviolet radiation and its impact on aquatic systems of Patagonia, South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villafane, Virginia E.; Helbling, E. Walter [Estacion de Fotobiologia Playa Union, Trelew, Chubut (Argentina); Zagarese, Horacio E. [Univ. Nacional del Comahue, San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina). Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche

    2001-03-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) is known to cause a number of detrimental effects in aquatic organisms. The area of Patagonia, which is sometimes under the influence of the Antarctic ozone 'hole', occasionally receives enhanced levels of ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B, 280-315 nm). Great efforts have been put into creating a database for UVR climatology by installing a variety of instruments in several localities in the region. However, no comparable effort has been made to determine the impact of normal and enhanced levels of solar UVR upon organisms. Most of the photobiological research in aquatic systems of Patagonia has focused on determining the effects of solar UVR in phytoplankton photosynthesis, DNA damage, and mortality, fecundity and repair mechanisms in zooplanktonic species. Some work has also been done with fish larvae and interactions between species at low trophic levels of the aquatic food web. The results of these studies indicate that in order to assess the overall impact of UVR in a certain water body, it is also necessary to consider other variables, such as changes in cloudiness, ozone concentrations, differential sensitivity of organisms, and depth of the upper mixed layer/epilimnion. All factors that can preclude or benefit the acclimation of species to solar radiation.

  12. Effect of Step-Change Radiation Flux on Dynamic Characteristics in Tower Solar Cavity Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat flux on the inner surface of the tower solar thermal power plant system will show the characteristics of noncontinuous step change, especially in nonnormal and transient weather conditions, which may result in a continuous dynamic variation of the characteristic parameters. Therefore, the research of dynamic characteristics plays a very important role in the operation and the control safely in solar cavity receiver system. In this paper, based on the noncontinuous step change of radiation flux, a non-linear dynamic model is constructed to obtain the effects of the non-continuous step change radiation flux and step change feed water flow on the receiver performance by sequential modular approach. The subject investigated in our study is a 1 MW solar power station constructed in Yanqing county, Beijing, China. This study has obtained the dynamic responses of the characteristic parameters in the cavity receiver such as drum pressure, drum water level, main steam flow, and main steam enthalpy under step change radiation flux. And the influence of step-change feed water flow to the dynamic characteristics has also been analyzed. The results could provide general guidance for security operation and control in solar cavity receiver system.

  13. High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

  14. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  15. Radiation-Induced Topological Disorder in Irradiated Network Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Linn W.

    2002-12-21

    This report summarizes results of a research program investigating the fundamental principles underlying the phenomenon of topological disordering in a radiation environment. This phenomenon is known popularly as amorphization, but is more formally described as a process of radiation-induced structural arrangement that leads in crystals to loss of long-range translational and orientational correlations and in glasses to analogous alteration of connectivity topologies. The program focus has been on a set compound ceramic solids with directed bonding exhibiting structures that can be described as networks. Such solids include SiO2, Si3N4, SiC, which are of interest to applications in fusion energy production, nuclear waste storage, and device manufacture involving ion implantation or use in radiation fields. The principal investigative tools comprise a combination of experimental diffraction-based techniques, topological modeling, and molecular-dynamics simulations that have proven a rich source of information in the preceding support period. The results from the present support period fall into three task areas. The first comprises enumeration of the rigidity constraints applying to (1) more complex ceramic structures (such as rutile, corundum, spinel and olivine structures) that exhibit multiply polytopic coordination units or multiple modes of connecting such units, (2) elemental solids (such as graphite, silicon and diamond) for which a correct choice of polytope is necessary to achieve correct representation of the constraints, and (3) compounds (such as spinel and silicon carbide) that exhibit chemical disorder on one or several sublattices. With correct identification of the topological constraints, a unique correlation is shown to exist between constraint and amorphizability which demonstrates that amorphization occurs at a critical constraint loss. The second task involves the application of molecular dynamics (MD) methods to topologically-generated models

  16. Solar absorption estimated from surface radiation measurements and collocated satellite products over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is physically speaking a perturbation of the atmospheric energy budget through the insertion of constituents such as greenhouse gases or aerosols. Changes in the atmospheric energy budget largely affect the global climate and hydrological cycle, but the quantification of the different energy balance components is still afflicted with large uncertainties. The overall aim of the present study is the assessment of the mean state and the spatio-temporal variations in the solar energy disposition, in which we focus on obtaining an accurate partitioning of absorbed solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Surface based measurements of solar radiation (GEBA, BSRN) are combined with collocated satellite-retrieved surface albedo (MODIS, CERES FSW, or CM SAF GAC-SAL) and top-of-atmosphere net incoming solar radiation (CERES EBAF) to quantify the absorbed solar radiation (ASR) at the surface and within the atmosphere over Europe for the period 2001-2005. In a first step, we examine the quality and temporal homogeneity of the monthly time series beyond 2000 provided by GEBA in order to identify a subset of sufficient quality. We find the vast majority of monthly time series to be suitable for our purposes. Using the satellite-derived CM SAF surface solar radiation product at 0.03° spatial resolution, we assess the spatial representativeness of the GEBA and BSRN sites for their collocated 1° grid cells as we intend to combine the point measurements with the coarser resolved CERES EBAF products (1° resolution), and we find spatial sampling errors of on average 3 Wm-2 or 2% (normalized by point values). Based on the combination of 134 GEBA surface solar radiation (SSR) time series with MODIS white-sky albedo and CERES EBAF top-of-atmosphere net radiation (TOAnet), we obtain a European mean partitioning (2001-2005) of absorbed solar radiation (relative to total incoming radiation) of: ASRsurf= 41% and ASRatm= 25%, together equaling

  17. Contribution of solar radiation and geomagnetic activity to global structure of 27-day variation of ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yibin; Zhai, Changzhi; Kong, Jian; Liu, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Twenty-seven-day variation caused by solar rotation is one of the main periodic effects of solar radiation influence on the ionosphere, and there have been many studies on this periodicity using peak electron density N_{mF2} and solar radio flux index F10.7. In this paper, the global electron content (GEC) and observation of Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) represent the whole ionosphere and solar EUV flux, respectively, to investigate the 27-day variation. The 27-day period components of indices (GEC_{27}, SEM_{27}, F10.7_{27}, Ap_{27}) are obtained using Chebyshev band-pass filter. The comparison of regression results indicates that the index SEM has higher coherence than F10.7 with 27-day variation of the ionosphere. The regression coefficients of SEM_{27 } varied from 0.6 to 1.4 and the coefficients of Ap_{27} varied from {-}0.6 to 0.3, which suggests that EUV radiation seasonal variations are the primary driver for the 27-day variations of the ionosphere for most periods. TEC map grid points on three meridians where IGS stations are dense are selected for regression, and the results show that the contribution of solar EUV radiation is positive at all geomagnetic latitudes and larger than geomagnetic activity in most latitudes. The contribution of geomagnetic activity is negative at high geomagnetic latitude, increasing with decreasing geomagnetic latitudes, and positive at low geomagnetic latitudes. The global structure of 27-day variation of ionosphere is presented and demonstrates that there are two zonal anomaly regions along with the geomagnetic latitudes lines and two peaks in the north of Southeast Asia and the Middle Pacific where TEC_{27} magnitude values are notably larger than elsewhere along zonal anomaly regions.

  18. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth from surface solar radiation measurements using machine learning algorithms, non-linear regression and a radiative transfer-based look-up table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Huttunen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to have a good estimate of the current forcing by anthropogenic aerosols, knowledge on past aerosol levels is needed. Aerosol optical depth (AOD is a good measure for aerosol loading. However, dedicated measurements of AOD are only available from the 1990s onward. One option to lengthen the AOD time series beyond the 1990s is to retrieve AOD from surface solar radiation (SSR measurements taken with pyranometers. In this work, we have evaluated several inversion methods designed for this task. We compared a look-up table method based on radiative transfer modelling, a non-linear regression method and four machine learning methods (Gaussian process, neural network, random forest and support vector machine with AOD observations carried out with a sun photometer at an Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET site in Thessaloniki, Greece. Our results show that most of the machine learning methods produce AOD estimates comparable to the look-up table and non-linear regression methods. All of the applied methods produced AOD values that corresponded well to the AERONET observations with the lowest correlation coefficient value being 0.87 for the random forest method. While many of the methods tended to slightly overestimate low AODs and underestimate high AODs, neural network and support vector machine showed overall better correspondence for the whole AOD range. The differences in producing both ends of the AOD range seem to be caused by differences in the aerosol composition. High AODs were in most cases those with high water vapour content which might affect the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA through uptake of water into aerosols. Our study indicates that machine learning methods benefit from the fact that they do not constrain the aerosol SSA in the retrieval, whereas the LUT method assumes a constant value for it. This would also mean that machine learning methods could have potential in reproducing AOD from SSR even though SSA would have

  19. Rocket Measurements of the Direct Solar Lyman-alpha Radiation Penetrating in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guineva, V. H.; Witt, G.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.; Tashev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    The resonance transition 2P-2S of the atomic hydrogen (Lyman-alpha emission) is the strongest and most conspicuous feature in the solar EUV spectrum. The Lyman-alpha radiation transfer depends on the resonance scattering from the hydrogen atoms in the atmosphere and on the O2 absorption. Since the Lyman-alpha extinction in the atmosphere is a measure for the column density of the oxygen molecules, the atmospheric temperature profile can be calculated thereof. Rocket measurements of the direct Lyman-alpha radiation vertical profile in the summer mesosphere and thermosphere (up to 120 km), at high latitudes will be carried out in June 2006. The Lyman-alpha flux will be registered by a detector of solar Lyman-alpha radiation, manufactured in the Stara Zagora Department of the Solar-Terrestrial Influences Laboratory (STIL BAS). Its basic part is an ionization camera, filled in with NO. The scientific data analysis will include raw data reduction, radiative transfer simulations, temperature retrieval as well as co-analysis with other parameters, measured near the polar summer mesopause. This project is a scientific cooperation between STIL-BAS, Stara Zagora Department and the Atmospheric Physics Group at the Department of Meteorology (MISU), Stockholm University, Sweden. The joint project is part from the rocket experiment HotPay I, in the ALOMAR eARI Project, EU's 6th Framework Programme, Andoya Rocket Range, Andenes, Norway.

  20. THE EFFECT OF SOLAR RADIATION ON AUTOMOBILE ENVIRONMENT THROUGH NATURAL CONVECTION AND MIXED CONVECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD. FAISAL KADER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the effect of solar radiation on automobiles has been studied by both experimentally and numerically. The numerical solution is done by an operation friendly and fast CFD code – SC/Tetra with a full scale model of a SM3 car and turbulence is modeled by the standard k-ε equation. Numerical analysis of the three-dimensional model predicts a detailed description of fluid flow and temperature distribution in the passenger compartment during both the natural convection due to the incoming solar radiation and mixed convection due to the flow from defrost nozzle and radiation. It can be seen that solar radiation is an important parameter to raise the compartment temperature above the ambient temperature during summer. During natural convection, the rate of heat transfer is fast at the initial period. In the mixed convection analyses, it is found that the temperature drops down to a comfortable range almost linearly at the initial stage. Experimental investigations are performed to determine the temperature contour on the windshield and the local temperature at a particular point for further validation of the numerical results.