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Sample records for network tissue part

  1. Developmental engineering: a new paradigm for the design and manufacturing of cell-based products. Part II: from genes to networks: tissue engineering from the viewpoint of systems biology and network science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenas, Petros; Moos, Malcolm; Luyten, Frank P

    2009-12-01

    The field of tissue engineering is moving toward a new concept of "in vitro biomimetics of in vivo tissue development." In Part I of this series, we proposed a theoretical framework integrating the concepts of developmental biology with those of process design to provide the rules for the design of biomimetic processes. We named this methodology "developmental engineering" to emphasize that it is not the tissue but the process of in vitro tissue development that has to be engineered. To formulate the process design rules in a rigorous way that will allow a computational design, we should refer to mathematical methods to model the biological process taking place in vitro. Tissue functions cannot be attributed to individual molecules but rather to complex interactions between the numerous components of a cell and interactions between cells in a tissue that form a network. For tissue engineering to advance to the level of a technologically driven discipline amenable to well-established principles of process engineering, a scientifically rigorous formulation is needed of the general design rules so that the behavior of networks of genes, proteins, or cells that govern the unfolding of developmental processes could be related to the design parameters. Now that sufficient experimental data exist to construct plausible mathematical models of many biological control circuits, explicit hypotheses can be evaluated using computational approaches to facilitate process design. Recent progress in systems biology has shown that the empirical concepts of developmental biology that we used in Part I to extract the rules of biomimetic process design can be expressed in rigorous mathematical terms. This allows the accurate characterization of manufacturing processes in tissue engineering as well as the properties of the artificial tissues themselves. In addition, network science has recently shown that the behavior of biological networks strongly depends on their topology and has

  2. Extremity reconstruction using nonreplantable tissue ("spare parts").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert C; Neumeister, Michael W; Ostric, Srdjan Andrei; Engineer, Nitin J

    2007-04-01

    After a severe digital or extremity injury, the replantation surgeon should always seek to make the best use out of what tissue is available for reconstruction. Exercising sound surgical judgment and being creative allow the surgeon to restore function to critical areas of the hand or extremity by the judicious use of available tissues that would otherwise be discarded. The use of "spare parts" should, therefore, always be considered to facilitate digital or extremity reconstruction when routine replantation is not possible or is likely to produce a poor functional result. The surgeon should always try to use available nonreplantable tissue to preserve length, obtain soft tissue coverage, or most importantly improve the function of remaining less injured digits. This article presents several case studies that illustrate the principals of spare parts reconstruction performed at the time of the initial debridement using nonreplantable tissue to provide coverage or improve function.

  3. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  4. DNA from keratinous tissue. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Maia E.; Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2012-01-01

    Although good quality DNA can be recovered from the base of the calamus of freshly sampled feathers, as from other fully keratinized tissues such as nail or hair shaft, the quality and quantity of DNA in the majority of feather structures is much poorer. Little research has been performed...... to characterize the quality of this DNA is, and thus what a researcher might be able to achieve when using feathers as a source of DNA. In this review, we expand on our companion article detailing the quality of DNA in nail and hair, by synthesizing published, and new preliminary genetic data obtained from...... feathers. As with nail and hair, we demonstrate that although DNA can, in general, be recovered from all parts of the feather, the quality of such DNA varies. As such, although one can expect a priori that genetic analyses are possible on the feather, for PCR based analyses, it is extremely difficult...

  5. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  6. DNA from keratinous tissue. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Olsen, Maia E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2012-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...... and mitochondrial DNA appear to be present in almost all hair and nail samples, the quality of DNA, both in quantity and length of amplifiable DNA fragments, vary considerably not just by species, but by individual, and even within individual between hair types....

  7. Vascularization and Angiogenesis in Tissue Engineering: Beyond Creating Static Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tissues need a vascular network to supply cells with nutrients and oxygen after implantation. A network that can connect to the vasculature of the patient after implantation can be included during in vitro culture. For optimal integration, this network needs to be highly organized,

  8. Immediate tissue transplantation in upper limb trauma: spare parts reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih Hung; Webb, Kelli; Neumeister, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    The management of mutilated upper extremity wounds offers challenges for all hand surgeons. Loss of composite tissues usually requires grafts or flaps to gain coverage and restore function. Nonsalvagable digits or amputated parts are a source of spare tissues that can be used for reconstruction of the hand or limb. Immediate tissue transplantation is a resourceful technique for hand surgeons to limit donor morbidity while making the most out of a terrible injury to the hand or upper extremity. This article reviews the various methods by which immediate tissue transplantation can be employed in hand trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part I

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the second part of the paper, we first analyse random access wireless networks and pay special attention to 802·11 (Wi-Fi) networks. We then survey some topics in ad hoc multihop wireless networks, where we discuss arbitrary networks, as well as some theory of dense random networks. Finally, we provide an overview ...

  10. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  11. Exploring regulation in tissues with eQTL networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagny, Maud; Paulson, Joseph N; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Sonawane, Abhijeet R; Chen, Cho-Yi; Lopes-Ramos, Camila M; Glass, Kimberly; Quackenbush, John; Platig, John

    2017-09-12

    Characterizing the collective regulatory impact of genetic variants on complex phenotypes is a major challenge in developing a genotype to phenotype map. Using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses, we constructed bipartite networks in which edges represent significant associations between genetic variants and gene expression levels and found that the network structure informs regulatory function. We show, in 13 tissues, that these eQTL networks are organized into dense, highly modular communities grouping genes often involved in coherent biological processes. We find communities representing shared processes across tissues, as well as communities associated with tissue-specific processes that coalesce around variants in tissue-specific active chromatin regions. Node centrality is also highly informative, with the global and community hubs differing in regulatory potential and likelihood of being disease associated.

  12. Dynamics of HIV infection in lymphoid tissue network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Iwami, Shingo; Sato, Kei

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a fast replicating ribonucleic acid virus, which can easily mutate in order to escape the effects of drug administration. Hence, understanding the basic mechanisms underlying HIV persistence in the body is essential in the development of new therapies that could eradicate HIV infection. Lymphoid tissues are the primary sites of HIV infection. Despite the recent progress in real-time monitoring technology, HIV infection dynamics in a whole body is unknown. Mathematical modeling and simulations provide speculations on global behavior of HIV infection in the lymphatic system. We propose a new mathematical model that describes the spread of HIV infection throughout the lymphoid tissue network. In order to represent the volume difference between lymphoid tissues, we propose the proportionality of several kinetic parameters to the lymphoid tissues' volume distribution. Under this assumption, we perform extensive numerical computations in order to simulate the spread of HIV infection in the lymphoid tissue network. Numerical computations simulate single drug treatments of an HIV infection. One of the important biological speculations derived from this study is a drug saturation effect generated by lymphoid network connection. This implies that a portion of reservoir lymphoid tissues to which drug is not sufficiently delivered would inhibit HIV eradication despite of extensive drug injection.

  13. Hydrogel Bioprinted Microchannel Networks for Vascularization of Tissue Engineering Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertassoni, Luiz E.; Cecconi, Martina; Manoharan, Vijayan; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Cristino, Ana Luiza; Barabaschi, Giada; Demarchi, Danilo; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Yang, Yunzhi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization remains a critical challenge in tissue engineering. The development of vascular networks within densely populated and metabolically functional tissues facilitate transport of nutrients and removal of waste products, thus preserving cellular viability over a long period of time. Despite tremendous progress in fabricating complex tissue constructs in the past few years, approaches for controlled vascularization within hydrogel based engineered tissue constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a three dimensional (3D) micromolding technique utilizing bioprinted agarose template fibers to fabricate microchannel networks with various architectural features within photo cross linkable hydrogel constructs. Using the proposed approach, we were able to successfully embed functional and perfusable microchannels inside methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), star poly (ethylene glycol-co-lactide) acrylate (SPELA), poly (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels at different concentrations. In particular, GelMA hydrogels were used as a model to demonstrate the functionality of the fabricated vascular networks in improving mass transport, cellular viability and differentiation within the cell-laden tissue constructs. In addition, successful formation of endothelial monolayers within the fabricated channels was confirmed. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an effective technique for vascularization of hydrogel constructs with useful applications in tissue engineering and organs on a chip. PMID:24860845

  14. The importance of establishing an international network of tissue banks and regional tissue processing centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    During the past four decades, many tissue banks have been established across the world with the aim of supplying sterilized tissues for clinical use and research purposes. Between 1972 and 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency supported the establishment of more than sixty of these tissue banks in Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and the Pacific, Africa and Eastern Europe; promoted the use of the ionizing radiation technique for the sterilization of the processed tissues; and encouraged cooperation between the established tissue banks during the implementation of its program on radiation and tissue banking at national, regional and international levels. Taking into account that several of the established tissue banks have gained a rich experience in the procurement, processing, sterilization, storage, and medical use of sterilized tissues, it is time now to strengthen further international and regional cooperation among interested tissue banks located in different countries. The purpose of this cooperation is to share the experience gained by these banks in the procurement, processing, sterilization, storage, and used of different types of tissues in certain medical treatments and research activities. This could be done through the establishment of a network of tissue banks and a limited number of regional tissue processing centers in different regions of the world.

  15. A Metric on the Space of Partly Reduced Phylogenetic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of phylogenetic trees that allow for the representation of evolutionary events acting at the population level, such as recombination between genes, hybridization between lineages, and horizontal gene transfer. The researchers have designed several measures for computing the dissimilarity between two phylogenetic networks, and each measure has been proven to be a metric on a special kind of phylogenetic networks. However, none of the existing measures is a metric on the space of partly reduced phylogenetic networks. In this paper, we provide a metric, de-distance, on the space of partly reduced phylogenetic networks, which is polynomial-time computable.

  16. A Metric on the Space of Partly Reduced Phylogenetic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic networks are a generalization of phylogenetic trees that allow for the representation of evolutionary events acting at the population level, such as recombination between genes, hybridization between lineages, and horizontal gene transfer. The researchers have designed several measures for computing the dissimilarity between two phylogenetic networks, and each measure has been proven to be a metric on a special kind of phylogenetic networks. However, none of the existing measures is a metric on the space of partly reduced phylogenetic networks. In this paper, we provide a metric, d e -distance, on the space of partly reduced phylogenetic networks, which is polynomial-time computable.

  17. Biofabricated soft network composites for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Onur; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Meinert, Christoph; D'Angella, Davide; Baldwin, Jeremy G; Bray, Laura J; Wellard, R Mark; Kollmannsberger, Stefan; Rank, Ernst; Werner, Carsten; Klein, Travis J; Catelas, Isabelle; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2017-05-12

    Articular cartilage from a material science point of view is a soft network composite that plays a critical role in load-bearing joints during dynamic loading. Its composite structure, consisting of a collagen fiber network and a hydrated proteoglycan matrix, gives rise to the complex mechanical properties of the tissue including viscoelasticity and stress relaxation. Melt electrospinning writing allows the design and fabrication of medical grade polycaprolactone (mPCL) fibrous networks for the reinforcement of soft hydrogel matrices for cartilage tissue engineering. However, these fiber-reinforced constructs underperformed under dynamic and prolonged loading conditions, suggesting that more targeted design approaches and material selection are required to fully exploit the potential of fibers as reinforcing agents for cartilage tissue engineering. In the present study, we emulated the proteoglycan matrix of articular cartilage by using highly negatively charged star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol)/heparin hydrogel (sPEG/Hep) as the soft matrix. These soft hydrogels combined with mPCL melt electrospun fibrous networks exhibited mechanical anisotropy, nonlinearity, viscoelasticity and morphology analogous to those of their native counterpart, and provided a suitable microenvironment for in vitro human chondrocyte culture and neocartilage formation. In addition, a numerical model using the p-version of the finite element method (p-FEM) was developed in order to gain further insights into the deformation mechanisms of the constructs in silico, as well as to predict compressive moduli. To our knowledge, this is the first study presenting cartilage tissue-engineered constructs that capture the overall transient, equilibrium and dynamic biomechanical properties of human articular cartilage.

  18. Classifications of multispectral colorectal cancer tissues using convolution neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawraa Haj-Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer among men and women. Its diagnosis in early stages, typically done through the analysis of colon biopsy images, can greatly improve the chances of a successful treatment. This paper proposes to use convolution neural networks (CNNs to predict three tissue types related to the progression of CRC: benign hyperplasia (BH, intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, and carcinoma (Ca. Methods: Multispectral biopsy images of thirty CRC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Images of tissue samples were divided into three groups, based on their type (10 BH, 10 IN, and 10 Ca. An active contour model was used to segment image regions containing pathological tissues. Tissue samples were classified using a CNN containing convolution, max-pooling, and fully-connected layers. Available tissue samples were split into a training set, for learning the CNN parameters, and test set, for evaluating its performance. Results: An accuracy of 99.17% was obtained from segmented image regions, outperforming existing approaches based on traditional feature extraction, and classification techniques. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of CNN for the classification of CRC tissue types, in particular when using presegmented regions of interest.

  19. Deep convolutional neural network approach for forehead tissue thickness estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manit Jirapong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presented a deep convolutional neural network (CNN approach for forehead tissue thickness estimation. We use down sampled NIR laser backscattering images acquired from a novel marker-less near-infrared laser-based head tracking system, combined with the beam’s incident angle parameter. These two-channel augmented images were constructed for the CNN input, while a single node output layer represents the estimated value of the forehead tissue thickness. The models were – separately for each subject – trained and tested on datasets acquired from 30 subjects (high resolution MRI data is used as ground truth. To speed up training, we used a pre-trained network from the first subject to bootstrap training for each of the other subjects. We could show a clear improvement for the tissue thickness estimation (mean RMSE of 0.096 mm. This proposed CNN model outperformed previous support vector regression (mean RMSE of 0.155 mm or Gaussian processes learning approaches (mean RMSE of 0.114 mm and eliminated their restrictions for future research.

  20. Transplantation of Cadaver Tissues and Organs. Part 15. Chapter 338

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-09

    who provides cadaveric tissues and organs to transplantation surgeons. During the agonal days of a patient’s course, the family and neurosurgeon...Amendments of 1976. METHODS OF STERILIZATION OF TISSUES 45 Donald J. Prolo, M.D. Tissues for implantation must rigorously be free of contaminating bacteria

  1. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  2. Cross-Tissue Regulatory Gene Networks in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Ermel, Raili; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Kidd, Brian A; Readhead, Ben; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C; Ivert, Torbjörn; Dudley, Joel T; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Schadt, Eric E; Skogsberg, Josefin; Michoel, Tom; Björkegren, Johan L M

    2016-03-23

    Inferring molecular networks can reveal how genetic perturbations interact with environmental factors to cause common complex diseases. We analyzed genetic and gene expression data from seven tissues relevant to coronary artery disease (CAD) and identified regulatory gene networks (RGNs) and their key drivers. By integrating data from genome-wide association studies, we identified 30 CAD-causal RGNs interconnected in vascular and metabolic tissues, and we validated them with corresponding data from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. As proof of concept, by targeting the key drivers AIP, DRAP1, POLR2I, and PQBP1 in a cross-species-validated, arterial-wall RGN involving RNA-processing genes, we re-identified this RGN in THP-1 foam cells and independent data from CAD macrophages and carotid lesions. This characterization of the molecular landscape in CAD will help better define the regulation of CAD candidate genes identified by genome-wide association studies and is a first step toward achieving the goals of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Paediatric laser dentistry. Part 4: Soft tissue laser applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivi, G; Caprioglio, C; Olivi, M; Genovese, M D

    2017-12-01

    Lasers can provide effective soft tissues applications in children. All the wavelengths produce incision and vaporisation of oral tissues, together with a high bactericidal effect. The haemosthatic effect varys according to the wavelength used, and the choice of a visibile, near, medium or far infrared laser allows a better interaction with specific targets, gingiva, mucosa, frenum, or oral pathology.

  4. Microgrids in Active Network Management-Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palizban, Omid; Kauhaniemia, Kimmo; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    The microgrid concept has been closely investigated and implemented by numerous experts worldwide. The first part of this paper describes the principles of microgrid design, considering the operational concepts and requirements arising from participation in active network management. Over the last...

  5. Microgrids in Active Network Management-Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palizban, Omid; Kauhaniemi, Kimmo; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of distribution networks for participation in active network management (ANM) and smart grids is introduced using the microgrid concept. In recent years, this issue has been researched and implemented by many experts. The second part of this paper describes those developed......, following planned or unplanned transitions to island mode, microgrids may develop instability. For this reason, the paper addresses the principles behind island-detection methods, black-start operation, fault management, and protection systems, along with a comprehensive review of power quality. Finally...

  6. Liquid Crystalline Networks toward Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Daniele; Paoli, Paolo; Pioner, Josè M; Sacconi, Leonardo; Coppini, Raffaele; Santini, Lorenzo; Lulli, Matteo; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Wiersma, Diederik S; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Parmeggiani, Camilla

    2017-12-01

    The communication reports the use of liquid crystalline networks (LCNs) for engineering tissue cultures with human cells. Their ability as cell scaffolds for different cell lines is demonstrated. Preliminary assessments of the material biocompatibility are performed on human dermal fibroblasts and murine muscle cells (C2C12), demonstrating that coatings or other treatments are not needed to use the acrylate-based materials as support. Moreover, it is found that adherent C2C12 cells undergo differentiation, forming multinucleated myotubes, which show the typical elongated shape, and contain bundles of stress fibers. Once biocompatibility is demonstrated, the same LCN films are used as a substrate for culturing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocites (hiPSC-CMs) proving that LCNs are capable to develop adult-like dimensions and a more mature cell function in a short period of culture in respect to standard supports. The demonstrated biocompatibility together with the extraordinary features of LCNs opens to preparation of complex cell scaffolds, both patterned and stimulated, for dynamic cell culturing. The ability of these materials to improve cell maturation and differentiation will be developed toward engineered heart and skeletal muscular tissues exploring regenerative medicine toward bioartificial muscles for injured sites replacement. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Statistical learning of parts and wholes: A neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, David C; Vande Velde, Anna K

    2017-03-01

    Statistical learning is often considered to be a means of discovering the units of perception, such as words and objects, and representing them as explicit "chunks." However, entities are not undifferentiated wholes but often contain parts that contribute systematically to their meanings. Studies of incidental auditory or visual statistical learning suggest that, as participants learn about wholes they become insensitive to parts embedded within them, but this seems difficult to reconcile with a broad range of findings in which parts and wholes work together to contribute to behavior. Bayesian approaches provide a principled description of how parts and wholes can contribute simultaneously to performance, but are generally not intended to model the computations that actually give rise to this performance. In the current work, we develop an account based on learning in artificial neural networks in which the representation of parts and wholes is a matter of degree, and the extent to which they cooperate or compete arises naturally through incidental learning. We show that the approach accounts for a wide range of findings concerning the relationship between parts and wholes in auditory and visual statistical learning, including some findings previously thought to be problematic for neural network approaches. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Impedance-Source Networks for Electric Power Conversion Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwakoti, Yam P.; Peng, Fang Zheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    -based power converters has been covered in a previous paper and main topologies were discussed from an application point of view. Now Part II provides a comprehensive review of the most popular control and modulation strategies for impedance-source network-based power converters/inverters. These methods...... are compared in terms of theoretical complexity and performance, when applied to the respective switching topologies. Further, this paper provides as a guide and quick reference for researchers and practicing engineers in deciding which control and modulation method to consider for an application in a given......Impedance-source networks cover the entire spectrum of electric power conversion applications (dc-dc, dc-ac, ac-dc, ac-ac) controlled and modulated by different modulation strategies to generate the desired dc or ac voltage and current at the output. A comprehensive review of various impedance-source-network...

  9. Impedance-Source Networks for Electric Power Conversion Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwakoti, Yam P.; Peng, Fang Zheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    of the traditional voltage source, current source as well as various classical buck-boost, unidirectional, and bidirectional converter topologies. Proper implementation of the impedance-source network with appropriate switching configurations and topologies reduces the number of power conversion stages in the system...... power chain, which may improve the reliability and performance of the power system. The first part of this paper provides a comprehensive review of the various impedance-source-networks-based power converters and discusses the main topologies from an application point of view. This review paper......Impedance networks cover the entire of electric power conversion from dc (converter, rectifier), ac (inverter), to phase and frequency conversion (ac-ac) in a wide range of applications. Various converter topologies have been reported in the literature to overcome the limitations and problems...

  10. Disease gene prioritization by integrating tissue-specific molecular networks using a robust multi-network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jingchao; Koyuturk, Mehmet; Tong, Hanghang; Haines, Jonathan; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-10

    Accurately prioritizing candidate disease genes is an important and challenging problem. Various network-based methods have been developed to predict potential disease genes by utilizing the disease similarity network and molecular networks such as protein interaction or gene co-expression networks. Although successful, a common limitation of the existing methods is that they assume all diseases share the same molecular network and a single generic molecular network is used to predict candidate genes for all diseases. However, different diseases tend to manifest in different tissues, and the molecular networks in different tissues are usually different. An ideal method should be able to incorporate tissue-specific molecular networks for different diseases. In this paper, we develop a robust and flexible method to integrate tissue-specific molecular networks for disease gene prioritization. Our method allows each disease to have its own tissue-specific network(s). We formulate the problem of candidate gene prioritization as an optimization problem based on network propagation. When there are multiple tissue-specific networks available for a disease, our method can automatically infer the relative importance of each tissue-specific network. Thus it is robust to the noisy and incomplete network data. To solve the optimization problem, we develop fast algorithms which have linear time complexities in the number of nodes in the molecular networks. We also provide rigorous theoretical foundations for our algorithms in terms of their optimality and convergence properties. Extensive experimental results show that our method can significantly improve the accuracy of candidate gene prioritization compared with the state-of-the-art methods. In our experiments, we compare our methods with 7 popular network-based disease gene prioritization algorithms on diseases from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. The experimental results demonstrate that our methods

  11. Hydrogels of collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hyaluronan interpenetrating polymer network for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Yuan, Tun; Xiao, Zhanwen; Tang, Pingping; Xiao, Yumei; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-09-01

    The network structure of a three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold dominates its performance such as mechanical strength, mass transport capacity, degradation rate and subsequent cellular behavior. The hydrogels scaffolds with interpenetrating polymeric network (IPN) structure have an advantage over the individual component gels and could simulate partly the structure of native extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. In this study, to develop perfect cartilage tissue engineering scaffolds, IPN hydrogels of collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hyaluronan were prepared via two simultaneous processes of collagen self-assembly and cross linking polymerization of chondroitin sulfate-methacrylate (CSMA) and hyaluronic acid-methacrylate. The degradation rate, swelling performance and compressive modulus of IPN hydrogels could be adjusted by varying the degree of methacrylation of CSMA. The results of proliferation and fluorescence staining of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro culture demonstrated that the IPN hydrogels possessed good cytocompatibility. Furthermore, the IPN hydrogels could upregulate cartilage-specific gene expression and promote the chondrocytes secreting glycosaminoglycan and collagen II. These results suggested that IPN hydrogels might serve as promising hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

  12. Principles of Biomimetic Vascular Network Design Applied to a Tissue-Engineered Liver Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, David M.; Pryor, Howard I.; Spool, Ira D.; Burns, Owen H.; Gilmore, J. Randall

    2010-01-01

    Branched vascular networks are a central component of scaffold architecture for solid organ tissue engineering. In this work, seven biomimetic principles were established as the major guiding technical design considerations of a branched vascular network for a tissue-engineered scaffold. These biomimetic design principles were applied to a branched radial architecture to develop a liver-specific vascular network. Iterative design changes and computational fluid dynamic analysis were used to optimize the network before mold manufacturing. The vascular network mold was created using a new mold technique that achieves a 1:1 aspect ratio for all channels. In vitro blood flow testing confirmed the physiologic hemodynamics of the network as predicted by computational fluid dynamic analysis. These results indicate that this biomimetic liver vascular network design will provide a foundation for developing complex vascular networks for solid organ tissue engineering that achieve physiologic blood flow. PMID:20001254

  13. Investigations on some metabolites of Tecoma stans Juss. callus tissue. Part I. Tissue culture

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Dohnal

    2015-01-01

    Callus tissue satisfactorily growing was established from Tecoma stans Juss. seedlings in static and suspension cultures on Murashige medium modified by Mei-Lie-Lin (M-L) and on Murashige-Skoog Revised Tobacco Medium supplemented with 0.3 ppm kinetin (RT-k). Faster growth, better growth efficiency and higher anatomical organization of the cultured tissue were observed on RT-k medium.

  14. Investigations on some metabolites of Tecoma stans Juss. callus tissue. Part I. Tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dohnal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Callus tissue satisfactorily growing was established from Tecoma stans Juss. seedlings in static and suspension cultures on Murashige medium modified by Mei-Lie-Lin (M-L and on Murashige-Skoog Revised Tobacco Medium supplemented with 0.3 ppm kinetin (RT-k. Faster growth, better growth efficiency and higher anatomical organization of the cultured tissue were observed on RT-k medium.

  15. Role of inflammatory factors and adipose tissue in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Part I: Rheumatoid adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Prohorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Saied, Fadhil; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2013-06-01

    For many years, it was thought that synovial cells and chondrocytes are the only sources of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors found in the synovial fluid in patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, it is more and more frequently indicated that adipose tissue plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as that a range of pathological processes that take place in the adipose tissue, synovial membrane and cartilage are interconnected. The adipose tissue is considered a specialized form of the connective tissue containing various types of cells which produce numerous biologically active factors. The latest studies reveal that, similarly to the synovial membrane, articular adipose tissue may take part in the local inflammatory response and affect the metabolism of the cartilage and subchondral osseous tissue. In in vitro conditions, the explants of this tissue obtained from patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis produce similar pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to the explants of the synovial membrane. At this stage already, knowledge translates into imaging diagnostics. In radiological images, the shadowing of the periarticular soft tissues may not only reflect synovial membrane pathologies or joint effusion, but may also suggest inflammatory edema of the adipose tissue. On ultrasound examinations, abnormal presentation of the adipose tissue, i.e. increased echogenicity and hyperemia, may indicate its inflammation. Such images have frequently been obtained during ultrasound scanning and have been interpreted as inflammation, edema, hypertrophy or fibrosis of the adipose tissue. At present, when the knowledge concerning pathogenic mechanisms is taken into account, abnormal echogenicity and hyperemia of the adipose tissue may be considered as a proof of its inflammation. In the authors' own practice, the inflammation of the adipose tissue usually accompanies synovitis

  16. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Traditionally power distribution networks are either not observable or only partially observable. This complicates development and implementation of new smart grid technologies, such as those related to demand response, outage detection and management, and improved load-monitoring. In this two part paper, inspired by proliferation of the metering technology, we discuss estimation problems in structurally loopy but operationally radial distribution grids from measurements, e.g. voltage data, which are either already available or can be made available with a relatively minor investment. In Part I, the objective is to learn the operational layout of the grid. Part II of this paper presents algorithms that estimate load statistics or line parameters in addition to learning the grid structure. Further, Part II discusses the problem of structure estimation for systems with incomplete measurement sets. Our newly suggested algorithms apply to a wide range of realistic scenarios. The algorithms are also computationally efficient – polynomial in time– which is proven theoretically and illustrated computationally on a number of test cases. The technique developed can be applied to detect line failures in real time as well as to understand the scope of possible adversarial attacks on the grid.

  17. Wideband phantoms of different body tissues for heterogeneous models in body area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello-Palacios, Sergio; Garcia-Pardo, Concepcion; Fornes-Leal, Alejandro; Cardona, Narcis; Valles-Lluch, Ana

    2017-07-01

    One of the key issues about wireless technologies is their interaction with the human body. The so-called internet of things will comprise many devices that will transmit either around or through the human body. These devices must be tested either in their working medium, when possible, or in the most realistic one. For this purpose, tissue-like phantoms are the best alternative to carry out realistic analyses of the performance of body area networks. In addition, they are the conventional way to certify the compliance of commercial standards by these devices. However, the number of phantoms that work in large bandwidths is limited in literature. This work aims at presenting chemical solutions that will be useful to prepare a variety of wideband tissue phantoms. Besides, the colon was mimicked in two ways, the healthy tissue and the malignant one, taking into account studies that relate changes on the relative permittivity with cancer. They were designed on the basis of acetonitrile in aqueous solutions as described in a previous work. Thus, many scenarios could be developed such as multilayers which imitate parts of the heterogeneous body.

  18. Engineering reaction-diffusion networks with properties of neural tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litschel, Thomas; Norton, Michael M; Tserunyan, Vardges; Fraden, Seth

    2018-01-03

    We present an experimental system of networks of coupled non-linear chemical reactors, which we theoretically model within a reaction-diffusion framework. The networks consist of patterned arrays of diffusively coupled nanoliter-scale reactors containing the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. Microfluidic fabrication techniques are developed that provide the ability to vary the network topology and the reactor coupling strength and offer the freedom to choose whether an arbitrary reactor is inhibitory or excitatory coupled to its neighbor. This versatile experimental and theoretical framework can be used to create a wide variety of chemical networks. Here we design, construct and characterize chemical networks that achieve the complexity of central pattern generators (CPGs), which are found in the autonomic nervous system of a variety of organisms.

  19. Spare part management of an electricity distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauronen, J.

    1998-07-01

    Electricity distribution companies are required to improve their operational cost effectiveness. The storage systems of the companies have traditionally been based on the 'adequate' number of stores with plenty of different components. Therefore, they are potential objects for cost reduction. The effective operation of spare part management of an electricity distribution network requires that the spare components can be delivered at the fault site quickly in order to avoid excessive outage costs. In a fault situation the stores form a net structure. Currently the rural electricity distribution companies lack suitable methods for designing a spare part storage system. This thesis presents a suitable method for the designing problem. The models assume that faults of a distribution network are stochastic. Therefore, they are best suited for component types installed in large quantities. Improved methods for defining the outage, material and total costs for perpetual order quantity and periodic order-up-to-level storage control systems are described. The method for determining the control parameters of the stores is also presented and ways for finding the necessary initial parameter values are introduced. The developed method is tested in Haemeen Saehko Oy (HSOY). The results of the calculations are given. The key findings are: Small differences in the designing results can increase costs remarkably. For example, in HSOY too low stock levels can result in even eight folds higher outage costs than in the proper design. The best number of stores is not the same for all component types. For example, in HSOY the best number of stores is seven for the 50 kVA transformers and one for the 315 kVA transformers in a summer. If the stock levels are increased the protection against the demand variations is the better the shorter the duration of the review period and/or the replenishment lead time is. (orig.)

  20. [The use of the "spare-parts tissue bank" concept in emergency hand surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riah, Y; Balaguer, T; Médard de Chardon, V; Chignon-Sicard, B; Dannan, E; Lebreton, E

    2010-02-01

    In the case of multidigital hand trauma, the tissue of the amputated parts can be used for the reconstruction of the defected tissue localized on the other fingers. A series of seven patients has been reviewed in this paper; the authors illustrate the different possibilities of using the "spare-parts concept" in the emergency hand trauma surgery. The functional results are presented. The different techniques of reconstruction using the "spare-parts concept" are discussed. In the cases of multidigital lesions, the surgeon should choose the best opportunity to use the tissue of the amputated digits, or the non-conservable ones, to reconstruct the neighboring preserved segments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Social Networking: Boundaries and Limits Part 1: Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Antonette; AlDoubi, Suzan; Kaminski, Karen; Anderson, Sharon K.; Isaacs, Nelda

    2014-01-01

    The number of educators, administrators, and institutions that utilize social networking has increased dramatically. Many have adopted social networking in order to be up-to-date and connected with their students' learning beyond the boundaries of the classroom. However, this increase in the use of social networking in academia presents many…

  2. Cellular neural network modelling of soft tissue dynamics for surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-07-20

    Currently, the mechanical dynamics of soft tissue deformation is achieved by numerical time integrations such as the explicit or implicit integration; however, the explicit integration is stable only under a small time step, whereas the implicit integration is computationally expensive in spite of the accommodation of a large time step. This paper presents a cellular neural network method for stable simulation of soft tissue deformation dynamics. The non-rigid motion equation is formulated as a cellular neural network with local connectivity of cells, and thus the dynamics of soft tissue deformation is transformed into the neural dynamics of the cellular neural network. Results show that the proposed method can achieve good accuracy at a small time step. It still remains stable at a large time step, while maintaining the computational efficiency of the explicit integration. The proposed method can achieve stable soft tissue deformation with efficiency of explicit integration for surgical simulation.

  3. New tools for non-invasive exploration of collagen network in cartilaginous tissue-engineered substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrionnet, Christel; Dumas, Dominique; Hupont, Sébastien; Stoltz, Jean François; Mainard, Didier; Gillet, Pierre; Pinzano, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering approaches, the quality of substitutes is a key element to determine its ability to treat cartilage defects. However, in clinical practice, the evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage substitute quality is not possible due to the invasiveness of the standard procedure, which is to date histology. The aim of this work was to validate a new innovative system performed from two-photon excitation laser adapted to an optical macroscope to evaluate at macroscopic scale the collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes in confrontation with gold standard histologic techniques or immunohistochemistry to visualize type II collagen. This system permitted to differentiate the quality of collagen network between ITS and TGF-β1 treatments. Multiscale large field imaging combined to multimodality approaches (SHG-TCSPC) at macroscopical scale represent an innovative and non-invasive technique to monitor the quality of collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes before in vivo implantation.

  4. Deep tissue near-infrared imaging for vascular network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübra Seker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous vein network plays important roles to maintain microcirculation that is related to some diagnostic aspects. Despite developments of optical imaging technologies, still the difficulties about deep skin vascular imaging have been continued. On the other hand, since hemoglobin concentration of human blood has key role in the veins imaging by optical manner, the used wavelength in vascular imaging, must be chosen considering absorption of hemoglobin. In this research, we constructed a near infrared (NIR light source because of lower absorption of hemoglobin in this optical region. To obtain vascular image, reflectance geometry was used. Next, from recorded images, vascular network analysis, such as calculation of width of vascular of interest and complexity of selected region were implemented. By comparing with other modalities, we observed that proposed imaging system has great advantages including nonionized radiation, moderate penetration depth of 0.5–3mm and diameter of 1mm, cost-effective and algorithmic simplicity for analysis.

  5. Nondigital tissue replantation and microsurgical spare part utilization in mutilated hands: case reports and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Serdar; Aydin, Mustafa Asim; Gülgönen, Ayan

    2007-01-01

    Five cases with microsurgical utilization of spare parts from unreplantable amputated segments are presented. Besides, nondigital composite tissue replantations are firstly reported in hand. They all resulted in satisfactory outcomes compared to alternative treatments without any donor site morbidity. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Improving Research Visibility Part 6: Academic Social Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to disseminate and outreach their research outputs. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are ResearchGate and Academia.edu. These sites offer an instant technique to monitor wh...

  7. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We first provide an overview of the evolution of random access networks from Aloha to the currently popular 802·11 (Wi-Fi) networks. We then analyse the performance of the 802·11 random access protocol. We briefly discuss the problem of optimal association of nodes to Wi-Fi access points. Next, we consider topics in ad ...

  8. Vascularized Composite Tissue Spare Part Transfer for Central Hand Defect Reconstruction: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, Jessica; Johnson, Shepard P; Ogawa, Takeshi; Chung, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the hand with loss of joints, tendons, nerves, and soft tissue may require complex, innovative reconstructive techniques to achieve a favorable functional and aesthetic outcome. We present a case of a manual laborer who sustained a multifaceted injury from a metal press machine with loss of composite structures including the middle and ring finger metacarpophalangeal joints, flexor and extensor tendons, digital nerves, and dorsal/volar soft tissues. Reconstruction included using the spare parts technique for transferring his ring finger proximal interphalangeal joint as a pedicle to reconstitute the missing metacarpophalangeal joint of his middle finger. The soft tissue from the ring finger was rearranged to provide aesthetic coverage of the hand with like-to-like reconstruction of the glabrous and nonglabrous skin. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G. [Institute of Crystallography, CNR, via Salaria Km 29.300, I-00015, Monterotondo Roma (Italy); Fratini, M. [Centro Fermi -Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' Enrico Fermi' , Roma (Italy); Ricci, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Burghammer, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B. P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, and Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale dell' Università di Genova and AUO San Martino Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy); Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A. [Institute for Chemical and Physical Process, CNR, c/o Physics Dep. at Sapienza University, P-le A. Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  10. Diagnostic imaging of the equine tarsal region using radiography and ultrasonography. Part 1: the soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Raes, Els; Hoegaerts, Michel; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2009-02-01

    The equine tarsus is the most commonly affected hindlimb region associated with lameness. Diagnostic imaging is routinely applied but because of its complexity, being composed of 10 multifaceted bones and different joints, multiple ligaments, tendons and bursae, imaging this region can be a challenge. This is the first part of a two-part review of the structures and disorders of the equine tarsus. It describes the principal disorders affecting the soft tissues of the tarsal region and addresses some of the technical aspects in taking radiographic, ultrasonographic and scintigraphic images of the different soft tissue lesions. Where applicable, comments on the diagnostic use of contrast radiography, arthroscopy and tenoscopy are made. In current clinical practice a combination of radiography and ultrasonography is still most frequently used to arrive at a diagnosis.

  11. Development of a transplantation transmission sentinel network to improve safety and traceability of organ and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, D Michael; Seem, Debbie; Taylor, Gloria; Parker, Jory; Stewart, Darren; Kuehnert, Matthew J

    2010-11-01

    The US lags behind other developed countries in creating a system to monitor disease transmission and other complications from human allograft use, despite a pressing need. The risks of transmission are amplified in transplantation, since at least 8 organs and more than 100 tissues can be recovered from a single common organ and tissue donor. Moreover, since many allografts collected in the US are distributed internationally, tissue safety is a global concern. In June 2005, participants of a US government-sponsored workshop concluded that a communication network for the tracking and reporting of disease transmissions for tissues and organs was critically needed. The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) entered into a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2006 to develop a system prototype. Over the following 3 years, the Transplantation Transmission Sentinel Network (TTSN) was developed and piloted with the participation of organ procurement organizations, tissue banks and transplant centers. The prototype centered around three elements of data entry: (1) donation, (2) tissue implantation, and (3) adverse event. The pilot proved that a system can be built and operated successfully, but also suggested that users may be hesitant to report adverse events. CDC has requested further input on scope and cost to build a transplant surveillance infrastructure for a fully functional national system. For tissues however, in contrast to organs, tracking from recovery to implantation will be necessary before a system is operable, requiring common identifiers and nomenclature. Until a US sentinel network is operational, future transmission events that are preventable may result nationally and globally due to its absence.

  12. Is networking different with doctors working part-time? Differences in social networks of part-time and full-time doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiligers, Phil J M; de Jong, Judith D; Groenewegen, Peter P; Hingstman, Lammert; Völker, Beate; Spreeuwenberg, Peter

    2008-10-04

    Part-time working is a growing phenomenon in medicine, which is expected to influence informal networks at work differently compared to full-time working. The opportunity to meet and build up social capital at work has offered a basis for theoretical arguments. Twenty-eight teams of medical specialists in the Netherlands, including 226 individuals participated in this study. Interviews with team representatives and individual questionnaires were used. Data were gathered on three types of networks: relationships of consulting, communication and trust. For analyses, network and multilevel applications were used. Differences between individual doctors and between teams were both analysed, taking the dependency structure of the data into account, because networks of individual doctors are not independent. Teams were divided into teams with and without doctors working part-time. Contrary to expectations we found no impact of part-time working on the size of personal networks, neither at the individual nor at the team level. The same was found regarding efficient reachability. Whereas we expected part-time doctors to choose their relations as efficiently as possible, we even found the opposite in intended relationships of trust, implying that efficiency in reaching each other was higher for full-time doctors. But we found as expected that in mixed teams with part-time doctors the frequency of regular communication was less compared to full-time teams. Furthermore, as expected the strength of the intended relationships of trust of part-time and full-time doctors was equally high. From these findings we can conclude that part-time doctors are not aiming at efficiency by limiting the size of networks or by efficient reachability, because they want to contact their colleagues directly in order to prevent from communication errors. On the other hand, together with the growth of teams, we found this strategy, focussed on reaching all colleagues, was diminishing. And our data

  13. Towards Implantable Body Sensor Networks - Performance of MICS Band Radio Communication in Animal Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppiah Ramachandran, Vignesh Raja; Meratnia, Nirvana; Zhang, Kui; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    Reliable wireless communication inside the human body is crucial for the design of implantable body sensor networks (IBSN). The tissues in human body are heterogeneous and have dierent conductivity and permitivity, which make the modeling of the wireless channel challenging. The design of upper

  14. Note on the Complex Networks and Epidemiology Part I: Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, James

    2013-01-01

    Complex networks describe a wide range of systems in nature and society. Frequently cited examples include Internet, WWW, a network of chemicals linked by chemical reactions, social relationship networks, citation networks, etc. The research of complex networks has attracted many scientists' attention. Physicists have shown that these networks exhibit some surprising characters, such as high clustering coefficient, small diameter, and the absence of the thresholds of percolation. Scientists in mathematical epidemiology discovered that the threshold of infectious disease disappears on contact networks that following Scale-Free distribution. Researchers in economics and public health also find that the imitation behavior could lead to cluster phenomena of vaccination and un-vaccination. In this note, we will review the basic concepts of complex networks; Basic epidemic models; the development of complex networks and epidemiology.

  15. Network-Based Method for Identifying Co- Regeneration Genes in Bone, Dentin, Nerve and Vessel Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Pan, Hongying; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Feng, Kaiyan; Kong, XiangYin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-02

    Bone and dental diseases are serious public health problems. Most current clinical treatments for these diseases can produce side effects. Regeneration is a promising therapy for bone and dental diseases, yielding natural tissue recovery with few side effects. Because soft tissues inside the bone and dentin are densely populated with nerves and vessels, the study of bone and dentin regeneration should also consider the co-regeneration of nerves and vessels. In this study, a network-based method to identify co-regeneration genes for bone, dentin, nerve and vessel was constructed based on an extensive network of protein-protein interactions. Three procedures were applied in the network-based method. The first procedure, searching, sought the shortest paths connecting regeneration genes of one tissue type with regeneration genes of other tissues, thereby extracting possible co-regeneration genes. The second procedure, testing, employed a permutation test to evaluate whether possible genes were false discoveries; these genes were excluded by the testing procedure. The last procedure, screening, employed two rules, the betweenness ratio rule and interaction score rule, to select the most essential genes. A total of seventeen genes were inferred by the method, which were deemed to contribute to co-regeneration of at least two tissues. All these seventeen genes were extensively discussed to validate the utility of the method.

  16. Introduction : Part II: Networking for a global civil society

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K. (President, Dean and Professor of Sociology)

    2010-01-01

    Global Civil Society 2011 combines activist and academic accounts of contemporary struggles to promote, negotiate and deliver justice in a global frame without a central authority. In their engagement with cultural diversity and their networked communication the contributors rethink and remake justice beyond the confines of the nation state.

  17. A tutorial survey of topics in wireless networking: Part II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    first provide an overview of the evolution of random access networks from Aloha to the currently popular ... of the capacity of the wireless channel is lost in the arbitration for channel access and the rest is available to the ...... (Raman & Chebrolu 2007) provide Internet connectivity to a large rural areas which do not have any ...

  18. Three-dimensional Organization of Layered Apical Cytoskeletal Networks Associated with Mouse Airway Tissue Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Tomoki; Inoue, Kanako; Tsukita, Sachiko

    2017-03-01

    The cytoskeleton is an essential cellular component that enables various sophisticated functions of epithelial cells by forming specialized subcellular compartments. However, the functional and structural roles of cytoskeletons in subcellular compartmentalization are still not fully understood. Here we identified a novel network structure consisting of actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules directly beneath the apical membrane in mouse airway multiciliated cells and in cultured epithelial cells. Three-dimensional imaging by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy and immunofluorescence revealed that the morphological features of each network depended on the cell type and were spatiotemporally integrated in association with tissue development. Detailed analyses using Odf2 mutant mice, which lack ciliary basal feet and apical microtubules, suggested a novel contribution of the intermediate filaments to coordinated ciliary beating. These findings provide a new perspective for viewing epithelial cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis through the structure and function of apical cytoskeletal networks.

  19. Evaluation of Raman spectra of human brain tumor tissue using the learning vector quantization neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuo; Chen, Changshui; Shi, Xingzhe; Liu, Chengyong

    2016-05-01

    The Raman spectra of tissue of 20 brain tumor patients was recorded using a confocal microlaser Raman spectroscope with 785 nm excitation in vitro. A total of 133 spectra were investigated. Spectra peaks from normal white matter tissue and tumor tissue were analyzed. Algorithms, such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and the support vector machine, are commonly used to analyze spectral data. However, in this study, we employed the learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which is typically used for pattern recognition. By applying the proposed method, a normal diagnosis accuracy of 85.7% and a glioma diagnosis accuracy of 89.5% were achieved. The LVQ neural network is a recent approach to excavating Raman spectra information. Moreover, it is fast and convenient, does not require the spectra peak counterpart, and achieves a relatively high accuracy. It can be used in brain tumor prognostics and in helping to optimize the cutting margins of gliomas.

  20. Intelligent Current Sensors as Part of Smart Grid Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nowakowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuous development of the ITC systems, especially industrial Ethernet network using the IEC 61850 protocol allows to building a distributed sensor networks for control and monitor temporary states of the power infrastructure. In the paper the construction of the intelligent current sensors, Measurement Units (MU for the Smart Grid network has been presented. In the paper the circuit diagram of sensor and synchronization method of the analog to digital converter based on the UTC timestamps has been described. The presented method allows to synchronize intelligent current sensors with an accuracy better than 1 μs. The presented innovative synchronization method is characterized by a high level of resistance to disappearance and attack of the reference time signal. The measuring device MU design is based on the embedded Linux-platform and as a sensing element used air core current transducers based on Rogowski coil. The connection between the current transducers and the central unit is made using a fiber optic link. Built-in IEC-61850 server provides a real-time measurement value of the True RMS, harmonics spectrum and samples value. The intelligent current transducers in addition to being used in the MUs create also new possibilities in the substation construction like the possibility to place the Autonomous Sensors in large distance from Intelligent Electronic Devices that are located in the substation.

  1. Is networking different with doctors working part-time? : Differences in social networks of part-time and full-time doctors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, Phil J.M.; Jong, Judith D. de; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Hingstman, Lammert; Völker, Beate; Spreeuwenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background: Part-time working is a growing phenomenon in medicine, which is expected to influence informal networks at work differently compared to full-time working. The opportunity to meet and build up social capital at work has offered a basis for theoretical arguments. Methods: Twenty-eight

  2. Is networking different with doctors working part-time? Differences in social networks of part-time and full-time doctors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Jong, J.D. de; Hingstman, L.; Völker, B.; Spreeuwenberg, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Part-time working is a growing phenomenon in medicine, which is expected to influence informal networks at work differently compared to full-time working. The opportunity to meet and build up social capital at work has offered a basis for theoretical arguments. METHODS: Twenty-eight

  3. Multi-tissue omics analyses reveal molecular regulatory networks for puberty in composite beef cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Cánovas

    Full Text Available Puberty is a complex physiological event by which animals mature into an adult capable of sexual reproduction. In order to enhance our understanding of the genes and regulatory pathways and networks involved in puberty, we characterized the transcriptome of five reproductive tissues (i.e. hypothalamus, pituitary gland, ovary, uterus, and endometrium as well as tissues known to be relevant to growth and metabolism needed to achieve puberty (i.e., longissimus dorsi muscle, adipose, and liver. These tissues were collected from pre- and post-pubertal Brangus heifers (3/8 Brahman; Bos indicus x 5/8 Angus; Bos taurus derived from a population of cattle used to identify quantitative trait loci associated with fertility traits (i.e., age of first observed corpus luteum (ACL, first service conception (FSC, and heifer pregnancy (HPG. In order to exploit the power of complementary omics analyses, pre- and post-puberty co-expression gene networks were constructed by combining the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS, RNA-Seq, and bovine transcription factors. Eight tissues among pre-pubertal and post-pubertal Brangus heifers revealed 1,515 differentially expressed and 943 tissue-specific genes within the 17,832 genes confirmed by RNA-Seq analysis. The hypothalamus experienced the most notable up-regulation of genes via puberty (i.e., 204 out of 275 genes. Combining the results of GWAS and RNA-Seq, we identified 25 loci containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP associated with ACL, FSC, and (or HPG. Seventeen of these SNP were within a gene and 13 of the genes were expressed in uterus or endometrium. Multi-tissue omics analyses revealed 2,450 co-expressed genes relative to puberty. The pre-pubertal network had 372,861 connections whereas the post-pubertal network had 328,357 connections. A sub-network from this process revealed key transcriptional regulators (i.e., PITX2, FOXA1, DACH2, PROP1, SIX6, etc.. Results from these multi-tissue

  4. Tissue factor activates allosteric networks in factor VIIa through structural and dynamic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Jonasson; Persson, E.; Olsen, O. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tissue factor (TF) promotes colocalization of enzyme (factorVIIa) and substrate (FX or FIX), and stabilizes the active conformation of FVIIa. Details on how TF induces structural and dynamic changes in the catalytic domain of FVIIa to enhance its efficiency remain elusive. Objective......: To elucidate the activation of allosteric networks in the catalytic domain of the FVIIa protease it is when bound to TF.MethodsLong-timescale molecular dynamics simulations of FVIIa, free and in complex with TF, were executed and analyzed by dynamic network analysis. Results: Allosteric paths of correlated...

  5. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  6. A transportation network for human ovarian tissue is indispensable to success for fertility preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyono, K; Hashimoto, T; Toya, M; Koizumi, M; Sasaki, C; Shibasaki, S; Aono, N; Nakamura, Y; Obata, R; Okuyama, N; Ogura, Y; Igarashi, H

    2017-09-02

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an ovarian tissue transportation network for fertility preservation (FP) for cancer patients in Japan. PubMed was searched for papers on transportation of human ovarian tissue for FP. We analyzed population, area, number of cancer patients for ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTC), quality control/assessment and safety, cost of a cryopreservation center for the building for 30 years, and medical fees of cancer patients (operation, cryopreservation, and storage of ovarian tissue). More than twenty babies have been born in Denmark and Germany through a transportation system. Up to 400 new patients a year need OTC. The fees for removal, cryopreservation, and storage for 5 years, and transplantation of ovarian tissue are around €5,000, €4,000, and €5,000, respectively. It costs more than €5 million to establish and maintain one cryopreservation center for 30 years. If we have a few cryopreservation centers in Japan, we can cryopreserve 400 patients' ovarian tissue per year by safer slow freezing and maintain quality control/assessment. We need to lighten the patients' burden for easy to use FP by a government subsidy and medical insurance coverage. This model has been termed the Danish model ("the woman stays - the tissue moves"). This is truly patient-centered medicine. We can have maximum effects with the minimum burden. A transportation network like those of Denmark and Germany is the best strategy for FP in Japan. It may be the best system for cancer patients, medical staff, and the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare.

  7. Is networking different with doctors working part-time? Differences in social networks of part-time and full-time doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hingstman Lammert

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part-time working is a growing phenomenon in medicine, which is expected to influence informal networks at work differently compared to full-time working. The opportunity to meet and build up social capital at work has offered a basis for theoretical arguments. Methods Twenty-eight teams of medical specialists in the Netherlands, including 226 individuals participated in this study. Interviews with team representatives and individual questionnaires were used. Data were gathered on three types of networks: relationships of consulting, communication and trust. For analyses, network and multilevel applications were used. Differences between individual doctors and between teams were both analysed, taking the dependency structure of the data into account, because networks of individual doctors are not independent. Teams were divided into teams with and without doctors working part-time. Results and Discussion Contrary to expectations we found no impact of part-time working on the size of personal networks, neither at the individual nor at the team level. The same was found regarding efficient reachability. Whereas we expected part-time doctors to choose their relations as efficiently as possible, we even found the opposite in intended relationships of trust, implying that efficiency in reaching each other was higher for full-time doctors. But we found as expected that in mixed teams with part-time doctors the frequency of regular communication was less compared to full-time teams. Furthermore, as expected the strength of the intended relationships of trust of part-time and full-time doctors was equally high. Conclusion From these findings we can conclude that part-time doctors are not aiming at efficiency by limiting the size of networks or by efficient reachability, because they want to contact their colleagues directly in order to prevent from communication errors. On the other hand, together with the growth of teams, we found

  8. Computational analysis of cartilage implants based on an interpenetrated polymer network for tissue repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Sara; Poveda-Reyes, Sara; Ferrer, Gloria Gallego; Ochoa, Ignacio; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-10-01

    Interpenetrated polymer networks (IPNs), composed by two independent polymeric networks that spatially interpenetrate, are considered as valuable systems to control permeability and mechanical properties of hydrogels for biomedical applications. Specifically, poly(ethyl acrylate) (PEA)-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) IPNs have been explored as good hydrogels for mimicking articular cartilage. These lattices are proposed as matrix implants in cartilage damaged areas to avoid the discontinuity in flow uptake preventing its deterioration. The permeability of these implants is a key parameter that influences their success, by affecting oxygen and nutrient transport and removing cellular waste products to healthy cartilage. Experimental try-and-error approaches are mostly used to optimize the composition of such structures. However, computational simulation may offer a more exhaustive tool to test and screen out biomaterials mimicking cartilage, avoiding expensive and time-consuming experimental tests. An accurate and efficient prediction of material's permeability and internal directionality and magnitude of the fluid flow could be highly useful when optimizing biomaterials design processes. Here we present a 3D computational model based on Sussman-Bathe hyperelastic material behaviour. A fluid structure analysis is performed with ADINA software, considering these materials as two phases composites where the solid part is saturated by the fluid. The model is able to simulate the behaviour of three non-biodegradable hydrogel compositions, where percentages of PEA and PHEA are varied. Specifically, the aim of this study is (i) to verify the validity of the Sussman-Bathe material model to simulate the response of the PEA-PHEA biomaterials; (ii) to predict the fluid flux and the permeability of the proposed IPN hydrogels and (iii) to study the material domains where the passage of nutrients and cellular waste products is reduced leading to an inadequate flux

  9. Novel Discrete Compactness-Based Training for Vector Quantization Networks: Enhancing Automatic Brain Tissue Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pérez-Aguila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach for nonsupervised segmentation of Computed Tomography (CT brain slices which is based on the use of Vector Quantization Networks (VQNs is described. Images are segmented via a VQN in such way that tissue is characterized according to its geometrical and topological neighborhood. The main contribution rises from the proposal of a similarity metric which is based on the application of Discrete Compactness (DC which is a factor that provides information about the shape of an object. One of its main strengths lies in the sense of its low sensitivity to variations, due to noise or capture defects, in the shape of an object. We will present, compare, and discuss some examples of segmentation networks trained under Kohonen’s original algorithm and also under our similarity metric. Some experiments are established in order to measure the effectiveness and robustness, under our application of interest, of the proposed networks and similarity metric.

  10. Singular structure of Mueller matrices images of biological crystal networks for diagnostic human tissues pathological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnovskiy, M. Y.; Ushenko, V. A.

    2013-09-01

    The process of converting of laser radiation by optically anisotropic crystals of biological networks are singular in the sense of total (simultaneous) of mechanisms of orientation and phase (birefringence) anisotropy the formation of polarization-inhomogeneous field of scattered radiation. This work is aimed at developing a method of polarization selection mechanisms of blood plasma polycrystalline networks anisotropy. The relationship between statistics, correlation and fractal parameters of polarization-inhomogeneous images of blood plasma and by linear dichroism and linear birefringence of polycrystalline networks albumin and globulin was found. The criteria of differentiation and diagnostic images of polarization-inhomogeneous plasma samples of the control group (donor) and a group of patients with malignant changes of breast tissue was identified.

  11. Is networking different with part-time working colleagues? A study of medical teams.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.; Jong, J. de; Groenewegen, P.; Hingstman, L.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in work arrangements like the introduction of part-time work can affect both formal and informal organization. This study will focus on informal networks amongst teams of medical specialists, some but not all of which include part-time workers. Are there notable differences in the structure

  12. A network model of correlated growth of tissue stiffening in pulmonary fibrosis

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Cláudio L N; Suki, Béla

    2013-01-01

    During the progression of pulmonary fibrosis, initially isolated regions of high stiffness form and grow in the lung tissue due to collagen deposition by fibroblast cells. We have previously shown that ongoing collagen deposition may not lead to significant increases in the bulk modulus of the lung until these local remodeled regions have become sufficiently numerous and extensive to percolate in a continuous path across the entire tissue [Bates {\\it et al.} 2007 {\\it Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.} {\\bf 176} 617]. In the present study, we investigate whether spatial correlations influence the bulk modulus in a two-dimensional elastic network model of lung tissue. Random collagen deposition at a single site is modeled by increasing the elastic constant of the spring at that site by a factor of 100. By contrast, correlated collagen deposition is represented by stiffening the springs encountered along a random walk starting from some initial spring, the rationale being that excess collagen deposition is more li...

  13. Picrosirius red staining: a useful tool to appraise collagen networks in normal and pathological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattouf, Raed; Younes, Ronald; Lutomski, Didier; Naaman, Nada; Godeau, Gaston; Senni, Karim; Changotade, Sylvie

    2014-10-01

    Specific staining of the extracellular matrix components is especially helpful in studying tissue remodeling, particularly in the case of connective tissue pathologies. As developed by Junqueira and colleagues in 1979, specific staining by Picrosirius red is one of the most important stains to study collagen networks in different tissues. Under polarized light, collagen bundles appear green, red or yellow, and are easily differentiated from the black background, thus allowing for quantitative morphometric analysis. As Junqueira and colleagues point out, many studies use color staining to differentiate collagen bundles and to specify collagen types, yet other studies report that polarized colors only reflect fiber thickness and packing. Using a simple histological example, our study illustrates the inability of Picrosirius red staining to differentiate collagen types, since the absorbed amount of polarized light by this dye strictly depends on the orientation of the collagen bundles. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Binary tissue classification on wound images with neural networks and bayesian classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veredas, Francisco; Mesa, Héctor; Morente, Laura

    2010-02-01

    A pressure ulcer is a clinical pathology of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, shear, or friction. Diagnosis, treatment, and care of pressure ulcers are costly for health services. Accurate wound evaluation is a critical task for optimizing the efficacy of treatment and care. Clinicians usually evaluate each pressure ulcer by visual inspection of the damaged tissues, which is an imprecise manner of assessing the wound state. Current computer vision approaches do not offer a global solution to this particular problem. In this paper, a hybrid approach based on neural networks and Bayesian classifiers is used in the design of a computational system for automatic tissue identification in wound images. A mean shift procedure and a region-growing strategy are implemented for effective region segmentation. Color and texture features are extracted from these segmented regions. A set of k multilayer perceptrons is trained with inputs consisting of color and texture patterns, and outputs consisting of categorical tissue classes which are determined by clinical experts. This training procedure is driven by a k-fold cross-validation method. Finally, a Bayesian committee machine is formed by training a Bayesian classifier to combine the classifications of the k neural networks. Specific heuristics based on the wound topology are designed to significantly improve the results of the classification. We obtain high efficiency rates from a binary cascade approach for tissue identification. Results are compared with other similar machine-learning approaches, including multiclass Bayesian committee machine classifiers and support vector machines. The different techniques analyzed in this paper show high global classification accuracy rates. Our binary cascade approach gives high global performance rates (average sensitivity =78.7% , specificity =94.7% , and accuracy =91.5% ) and shows the highest average sensitivity score ( =86.3%) when detecting

  15. Design mobile satellite system architecture as an integral part of the cellular access digital network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, E. S. K.; Marinho, J. A.; Russell, J. E., Sr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cellular Access Digital Network (CADN) is the access vehicle through which cellular technology is brought into the mainstream of the evolving integrated telecommunications network. Beyond the integrated end-to-end digital access and per call network services provisioning of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the CADN engenders the added capability of mobility freedom via wireless access. One key element of the CADN network architecture is the standard user to network interface that is independent of RF transmission technology. Since the Mobile Satellite System (MSS) is envisioned to not only complement but also enhance the capabilities of the terrestrial cellular telecommunications network, compatibility and interoperability between terrestrial cellular and mobile satellite systems are vitally important to provide an integrated moving telecommunications network of the future. From a network standpoint, there exist very strong commonalities between the terrestrial cellular system and the mobile satellite system. Therefore, the MSS architecture should be designed as an integral part of the CADN. This paper describes the concept of the CADN, the functional architecture of the MSS, and the user-network interface signaling protocols.

  16. Evaluation of Fibrin-Based Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Potential Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Gsib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs have gained great attention for a number of biomedical applications due to their improved properties compared to individual components alone. In this study, we investigated the capacity of newly-developed naturally-derived IPNs as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering. These IPNs combine the biologic properties of a fibrous fibrin network polymerized at the nanoscale and the mechanical stability of polyethylene oxide (PEO. First, we assessed their cytotoxicity in vitro on L929 fibroblasts. We further evaluated their biocompatibility ex vivo with a chick embryo organotypic culture model. Subcutaneous implantations of the matrices were subsequently conducted on nude mice to investigate their biocompatibility in vivo. Our preliminary data highlighted that our biomaterials were non-cytotoxic (viability above 90%. The organotypic culture showed that the IPN matrices induced higher cell adhesion (across all the explanted organ tissues and migration (skin, intestine than the control groups, suggesting the advantages of using a biomimetic, yet mechanically-reinforced IPN-based matrix. We observed no major inflammatory response up to 12 weeks post implantation. All together, these data suggest that these fibrin-based IPNs are promising biomaterials for tissue engineering.

  17. Microgrids in Active Network Management-Part II:System Operation, Power Quality and Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Palizban, Omid; Kauhaniemi, Kimmo; Josep M. Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    The development of distribution networks for participation in active network management (ANM) and smart grids is introduced using the microgrid concept. In recent years, this issue has been researched and implemented by many experts. The second part of this paper describes those developed operational concepts of microgrids that have an impact on their participation in ANM and in the requirements for achieving targets. Power quality is the most challenging task in microgrids, especially when t...

  18. An optimization model for the costs allocation in spare parts collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Chiara; Ferrara, Andrea; Grassi, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The paper focuses on the aftermarket spare parts in the automotive industry. In particular, only products with infrequent and low quantity demand are considered. This work is an extention of a previuos work by the same authors in which a stochastic model for the optimal inventory policy of spare parts has been presented. In this paper the authors improved what has been called "the second layer" in the previous model, that is the products allocation among a collaborative network of distributors. The improvement is related to the basic model and to the introducion of new products in the network.

  19. Human gene coexpression landscape: confident network derived from tissue transcriptomic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Prieto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of gene expression data using genome-wide microarrays is a technique often used in genomic studies to find coexpression patterns and locate groups of co-transcribed genes. However, most studies done at global "omic" scale are not focused on human samples and when they correspond to human very often include heterogeneous datasets, mixing normal with disease-altered samples. Moreover, the technical noise present in genome-wide expression microarrays is another well reported problem that many times is not addressed with robust statistical methods, and the estimation of errors in the data is not provided. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human genome-wide expression data from a controlled set of normal-healthy tissues is used to build a confident human gene coexpression network avoiding both pathological and technical noise. To achieve this we describe a new method that combines several statistical and computational strategies: robust normalization and expression signal calculation; correlation coefficients obtained by parametric and non-parametric methods; random cross-validations; and estimation of the statistical accuracy and coverage of the data. All these methods provide a series of coexpression datasets where the level of error is measured and can be tuned. To define the errors, the rates of true positives are calculated by assignment to biological pathways. The results provide a confident human gene coexpression network that includes 3327 gene-nodes and 15841 coexpression-links and a comparative analysis shows good improvement over previously published datasets. Further functional analysis of a subset core network, validated by two independent methods, shows coherent biological modules that share common transcription factors. The network reveals a map of coexpression clusters organized in well defined functional constellations. Two major regions in this network correspond to genes involved in nuclear and mitochondrial

  20. In Vitro Construction of Scaffold-Free Bilayered Tissue-Engineered Skin Containing Capillary Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many types of skin substitutes have been constructed using exogenous materials. Angiogenesis is an important factor for tissue-engineered skin constructs. In this study, we constructed a scaffold-free bilayered tissue-engineered skin containing a capillary network. First, we cocultured dermal fibroblasts with dermal microvascular endothelial cells at a ratio of 2 : 1. A fibrous sheet was formed by the interactions between the fibroblasts and the endothelial cells, and capillary-like structures were observed after 20 days of coculture. Epithelial cells were then seeded on the fibrous sheet to assemble the bilayered tissue. HE staining showed that tissue-engineered skin exhibited a stratified epidermis after 7 days. Immunostaining showed that the epithelium promoted the formation of capillary-like structures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis showed that the capillary-like structures were typical microblood vessels. ELISA demonstrated that vascularization was promoted by significant upregulation of vascularization associated growth factors due to interactions among the 3 types of cells in the bilayer, as compared to cocultures of fibroblast and endothelial cells and monocultures.

  1. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Dong

    Full Text Available The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize.

  2. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yongbin; Wang, Qilei; Zhang, Long; Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize.

  3. Tissue microstructure estimation using a deep network inspired by a dictionary-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chuyang

    2017-12-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) captures the anisotropic pattern of water displacement in the neuronal tissue and allows noninvasive investigation of the complex tissue microstructure. A number of biophysical models have been proposed to relate the tissue organization with the observed diffusion signals, so that the tissue microstructure can be inferred. The Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging (NODDI) model has been a popular choice and has been widely used for many neuroscientific studies. It models the diffusion signal with three compartments that are characterized by distinct diffusion properties, and the parameters in the model describe tissue microstructure. In NODDI, these parameters are estimated in a maximum likelihood framework, where the nonlinear model fitting is computationally intensive. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop efficient and accurate algorithms for NODDI microstructure estimation, which is still an open problem. In this work, we propose a deep network based approach that performs end-to-end estimation of NODDI microstructure, which is named Microstructure Estimation using a Deep Network (MEDN). MEDN comprises two cascaded stages and is motivated by the AMICO algorithm, where the NODDI microstructure estimation is formulated in a dictionary-based framework. The first stage computes the coefficients of the dictionary. It resembles the solution to a sparse reconstruction problem, where the iterative process in conventional estimation approaches is unfolded and truncated, and the weights are learned instead of predetermined by the dictionary. In the second stage, microstructure properties are computed from the output of the first stage, which resembles the weighted sum of normalized dictionary coefficients in AMICO, and the weights are also learned. Because spatial consistency of diffusion signals can be used to reduce the effect of noise, we also propose MEDN+, which is an extended version of MEDN. MEDN

  4. The missing part of seed dispersal networks: structure and robustness of bat-fruit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Marco Aurelio Ribeiro; Marquitti, Flávia Maria Darcie; Guimarães, Paulo Roberto; Kalko, Elisabeth Klara Viktoria; Jordano, Pedro; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2011-02-28

    Mutualistic networks are crucial to the maintenance of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, what we know about seed dispersal networks is based only on bird-fruit interactions. Therefore, we aimed at filling part of this gap by investigating bat-fruit networks. It is known from population studies that: (i) some bat species depend more on fruits than others, and (ii) that some specialized frugivorous bats prefer particular plant genera. We tested whether those preferences affected the structure and robustness of the whole network and the functional roles of species. Nine bat-fruit datasets from the literature were analyzed and all networks showed lower complementary specialization (H(2)' = 0.37±0.10, mean ± SD) and similar nestedness (NODF = 0.56±0.12) than pollination networks. All networks were modular (M = 0.32±0.07), and had on average four cohesive subgroups (modules) of tightly connected bats and plants. The composition of those modules followed the genus-genus associations observed at population level (Artibeus-Ficus, Carollia-Piper, and Sturnira-Solanum), although a few of those plant genera were dispersed also by other bats. Bat-fruit networks showed high robustness to simulated cumulative removals of both bats (R = 0.55±0.10) and plants (R = 0.68±0.09). Primary frugivores interacted with a larger proportion of the plants available and also occupied more central positions; furthermore, their extinction caused larger changes in network structure. We conclude that bat-fruit networks are highly cohesive and robust mutualistic systems, in which redundancy is high within modules, although modules are complementary to each other. Dietary specialization seems to be an important structuring factor that affects the topology, the guild structure and functional roles in bat-fruit networks.

  5. The missing part of seed dispersal networks: structure and robustness of bat-fruit interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Ribeiro Mello

    Full Text Available Mutualistic networks are crucial to the maintenance of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, what we know about seed dispersal networks is based only on bird-fruit interactions. Therefore, we aimed at filling part of this gap by investigating bat-fruit networks. It is known from population studies that: (i some bat species depend more on fruits than others, and (ii that some specialized frugivorous bats prefer particular plant genera. We tested whether those preferences affected the structure and robustness of the whole network and the functional roles of species. Nine bat-fruit datasets from the literature were analyzed and all networks showed lower complementary specialization (H(2' = 0.37±0.10, mean ± SD and similar nestedness (NODF = 0.56±0.12 than pollination networks. All networks were modular (M = 0.32±0.07, and had on average four cohesive subgroups (modules of tightly connected bats and plants. The composition of those modules followed the genus-genus associations observed at population level (Artibeus-Ficus, Carollia-Piper, and Sturnira-Solanum, although a few of those plant genera were dispersed also by other bats. Bat-fruit networks showed high robustness to simulated cumulative removals of both bats (R = 0.55±0.10 and plants (R = 0.68±0.09. Primary frugivores interacted with a larger proportion of the plants available and also occupied more central positions; furthermore, their extinction caused larger changes in network structure. We conclude that bat-fruit networks are highly cohesive and robust mutualistic systems, in which redundancy is high within modules, although modules are complementary to each other. Dietary specialization seems to be an important structuring factor that affects the topology, the guild structure and functional roles in bat-fruit networks.

  6. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using repair priorities to reduce stock investment in spare part networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleptchenko, Andrei; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; van Harten, Aart

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the impact of repair priorities in spare part networks. Several heuristics for assigning priorities to items as well as optimising stock levels are developed, extending the well-known VARI-METRIC method. We model repair shops by multi-class, multi-server priority queues. A

  8. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 58 - Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Network Design Criteria for Ambient Air Quality Monitoring D Appendix D to Part 58 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... associated with area dimensions ranging from several meters up to about 100 meters. (2) Middle scale—Defines...

  9. Allocating service parts in two-echelon networks at a utility company

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, D.; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Schuur, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We study a multi-item, two-echelon, continuous-review inventory problem at a Dutch utility company. We develop a model for the optimal allocation of service parts in a two-echelon network under an aggregate waiting time constraint. Specific model aspects are emergency shipments in case of stockout,

  10. Novel Loci for metabolic networks and multi-tissue expression studies reveal genes for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Kettunen, Johannes; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Savolainen, Markku J; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Palotie, Aarno; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2012-01-01

    Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively) in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis.

  11. Novel Loci for metabolic networks and multi-tissue expression studies reveal genes for atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Inouye

    Full Text Available Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis.

  12. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Andrew Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24mg/kg (14 ppm rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  13. RNA sequencing identifies gene regulatory networks controlling extracellular matrix synthesis in intervertebral disk tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M; Lin, Yang; Wang, Wei; Cong, Lin; Mohamed Ali, Abdel-Moneim; Peck, Sun H; Smith, Lachlan J; Currier, Bradford L; Clark, Michelle; Huddleston, Paul; Krauss, William; Yaszemski, Michael J; Morrey, Mark E; Abdel, Matthew P; Bydon, Mohamad; Qu, Wenchun; Larson, Annalise N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Nassr, Ahmad

    2017-12-11

    Degenerative disk disease of the spine is a major cause of back pain and disability. Optimization of regenerative medical therapies for degenerative disk disease requires a deep mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling the structural integrity of spinal tissues. In this investigation, we sought to identify candidate regulatory genes controlling extracellular matrix synthesis in spinal tissues. To achieve this goal we performed high throughput next generation RNA sequencing on 39 annulus fibrosus and 21 nucleus pulposus human tissue samples. Specimens were collected from patients undergoing surgical discectomy for the treatment of degenerative disk disease. Our studies identified associations between extracellular matrix genes, growth factors, and other important regulatory molecules. The fibrous matrix characteristic of annulus fibrosus was associated with expression of the growth factors platelet derived growth factor beta (PDGFB), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC), and fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9). Additionally we observed high expression of multiple signaling proteins involved in the NOTCH and WNT signaling cascades. Nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix related genes were associated with the expression of numerous diffusible growth factors largely associated with the transforming growth signaling cascade, including transforming factor alpha (TGFA), inhibin alpha (INHA), inhibin beta A (INHBA), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP2, BMP6), and others. this investigation provides important data on extracellular matrix gene regulatory networks in disk tissues. This information can be used to optimize pharmacologic, stem cell, and tissue engineering strategies for regeneration of the intervertebral disk and the treatment of back pain. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Convolutional neural networks for an automatic classification of prostate tissue slides with high-grade Gleason score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez del Toro, Oscar; Atzori, Manfredo; Otálora, Sebastian; Andersson, Mats; Eurén, Kristian; Hedlund, Martin; Rönnquist, Peter; Müller, Henning

    2017-03-01

    The Gleason grading system was developed for assessing prostate histopathology slides. It is correlated to the outcome and incidence of relapse in prostate cancer. Although this grading is part of a standard protocol performed by pathologists, visual inspection of whole slide images (WSIs) has an inherent subjectivity when evaluated by different pathologists. Computer aided pathology has been proposed to generate an objective and reproducible assessment that can help pathologists in their evaluation of new tissue samples. Deep convolutional neural networks are a promising approach for the automatic classification of histopathology images and can hierarchically learn subtle visual features from the data. However, a large number of manual annotations from pathologists are commonly required to obtain sufficient statistical generalization when training new models that can evaluate the daily generated large amounts of pathology data. A fully automatic approach that detects prostatectomy WSIs with high-grade Gleason score is proposed. We evaluate the performance of various deep learning architectures training them with patches extracted from automatically generated regions-of-interest rather than from manually segmented ones. Relevant parameters for training the deep learning model such as size and number of patches as well as the inclusion or not of data augmentation are compared between the tested deep learning architectures. 235 prostate tissue WSIs with their pathology report from the publicly available TCGA data set were used. An accuracy of 78% was obtained in a balanced set of 46 unseen test images with different Gleason grades in a 2-class decision: high vs. low Gleason grade. Grades 7-8, which represent the boundary decision of the proposed task, were particularly well classified. The method is scalable to larger data sets with straightforward re-training of the model to include data from multiple sources, scanners and acquisition techniques. Automatically

  15. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothausmann, Roman; Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Grothausmann R, Knudsen L, Ochs M, Mühlfeld C. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 312: L243-L257, 2017. First published December 2, 2016; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00326.2016-The alveolar capillary network (ACN) provides an enormously large surface area that is necessary for pulmonary gas exchange. Changes of the ACN during normal or pathological development or in pulmonary diseases are of great functional impact and warrant further analysis. Due to the complexity of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the ACN, 2D approaches are limited in providing a comprehensive impression of the characteristics of the normal ACN or the nature of its alterations. Stereological methods offer a quantitative way to assess the ACN in 3D in terms of capillary volume, surface area, or number but lack a 3D visualization to interpret the data. Hence, the necessity to visualize the ACN in 3D and to correlate this with data from the same set of data arises. Such an approach requires a large sample volume combined with a high resolution. Here, we present a technically simple and cost-efficient approach to create 3D representations of lung tissue ranging from bronchioles over alveolar ducts and alveoli up to the ACN from more than 1 mm sample extent to a resolution of less than 1 μm. The method is based on automated image acquisition of serially sectioned epoxy resin-embedded lung tissue fixed by vascular perfusion and subsequent automated digital reconstruction and analysis of the 3D data. This efficient method may help to better understand mechanisms of vascular development and pathology of the lung. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Landscape Planning and Ecological Networks. Part A. A Rural System in Nuoro, Sardinia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Montis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Urban-rural landscape planning research is nowadays focusing on strategies and tools that support practitioners in designing integrated spaces starting from the analysis of local areas, where human and natural pressures interfere. A prominent framework is provided by the ecological networks, whose design regards the combination of a set of green areas or patches (the nodes interconnected through environmental corridors (the edges. Ecological networks are useful for biodiversity protection and enhancement, as they are able to counteract fragmentation, and to create or strengthen relations and exchanges among otherwise isolated elements. Biodiversity evolution, indeed, depends on the quantity and quality of spatial cohesion of natural areas.  In this paper, we aim at designing an ecological network for the periurban area on the town of Nuoro in central Sardinia. The narrative unfolds in two parts. Part A is presented in this paper and includes its methodological premises, i.e. biodiversity conservation and ecological network analysis and design, and the introductory elements of a spatial analysis on a pilot ecological network of one hundred patches. We locate patches by focusing on the ecosystems supported by the target vegetal species holm oak (Quercus ilex and cultivated or wild olive (Olea europaea var. sativa, O. europaea var. sylverstis. These are very common plants species in the municipality and some animal species are active as seed dispersal. The reminder, i.e. Part B, of the essay is presented in an homonymous paper that focuses on the illustration of the network analysis conceived as a monitoring system and, in future perspective, as a planning support system.

  17. Rapid Alterations in Perirenal Adipose Tissue Transcriptomic Networks with Cessation of Voluntary Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N Ruegsegger

    Full Text Available In maturing rats, the growth of abdominal fat is attenuated by voluntary wheel running. After the cessation of running by wheel locking, a rapid increase in adipose tissue growth to a size that is similar to rats that have never run (i.e. catch-up growth has been previously reported by our lab. In contrast, diet-induced increases in adiposity have a slower onset with relatively delayed transcriptomic responses. The purpose of the present study was to identify molecular pathways associated with the rapid increase in adipose tissue after ending 6 wks of voluntary running at the time of puberty. Age-matched, male Wistar rats were given access to running wheels from 4 to 10 weeks of age. From the 10th to 11th week of age, one group of rats had continued wheel access, while the other group had one week of wheel locking. Perirenal adipose tissue was extracted, RNA sequencing was performed, and bioinformatics analyses were executed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA. IPA was chosen to assist in the understanding of complex 'omics data by integrating data into networks and pathways. Wheel locked rats gained significantly more fat mass and significantly increased body fat percentage between weeks 10-11 despite having decreased food intake, as compared to rats with continued wheel access. IPA identified 646 known transcripts differentially expressed (p < 0.05 between continued wheel access and wheel locking. In wheel locked rats, IPA revealed enrichment of transcripts for the following functions: extracellular matrix, macrophage infiltration, immunity, and pro-inflammatory. These findings suggest that increases in visceral adipose tissue that accompanies the cessation of pubertal physical activity are associated with the alteration of multiple pathways, some of which may potentiate the development of pubertal obesity and obesity-associated systemic low-grade inflammation that occurs later in life.

  18. Rapid Alterations in Perirenal Adipose Tissue Transcriptomic Networks with Cessation of Voluntary Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Company, Joseph M; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Roberts, Christian K; Roberts, Michael D; Booth, Frank W

    2015-01-01

    In maturing rats, the growth of abdominal fat is attenuated by voluntary wheel running. After the cessation of running by wheel locking, a rapid increase in adipose tissue growth to a size that is similar to rats that have never run (i.e. catch-up growth) has been previously reported by our lab. In contrast, diet-induced increases in adiposity have a slower onset with relatively delayed transcriptomic responses. The purpose of the present study was to identify molecular pathways associated with the rapid increase in adipose tissue after ending 6 wks of voluntary running at the time of puberty. Age-matched, male Wistar rats were given access to running wheels from 4 to 10 weeks of age. From the 10th to 11th week of age, one group of rats had continued wheel access, while the other group had one week of wheel locking. Perirenal adipose tissue was extracted, RNA sequencing was performed, and bioinformatics analyses were executed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). IPA was chosen to assist in the understanding of complex 'omics data by integrating data into networks and pathways. Wheel locked rats gained significantly more fat mass and significantly increased body fat percentage between weeks 10-11 despite having decreased food intake, as compared to rats with continued wheel access. IPA identified 646 known transcripts differentially expressed (p rats, IPA revealed enrichment of transcripts for the following functions: extracellular matrix, macrophage infiltration, immunity, and pro-inflammatory. These findings suggest that increases in visceral adipose tissue that accompanies the cessation of pubertal physical activity are associated with the alteration of multiple pathways, some of which may potentiate the development of pubertal obesity and obesity-associated systemic low-grade inflammation that occurs later in life.

  19. Role of inflammatory factors and adipose tissue in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Part I: Rheumatoid adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł‑Szopińska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years, it was thought that synovial cells and chondrocytes are the only sources of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors found in the synovial fluid in patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, it is more and more frequently indicated that adipose tissue plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as that a range of pathological processes that take place in the adipose tissue, synovial membrane and cartilage are interconnected. The adipose tissue is considered a specialized form of the connective tissue containing various types of cells which produce numerous biologically active factors. The latest studies reveal that, similarly to the synovial membrane, articular adipose tissue may take part in the local inflammatory response and affect the metabolism of the cartilage and subchondral osseous tissue. In in vitro conditions, the explants of this tissue obtained from patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis produce similar pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to the explants of the synovial membrane. At this stage already, knowledge translates into imaging diagnostics. In radiological images, the shadowing of the periarticular soft tissues may not only reflect synovial membrane pathologies or joint effusion, but may also suggest inflammatory edema of the adipose tissue. On ultrasound examinations, abnormal presentation of the adipose tissue, i.e. increased echogenicity and hyperemia, may indicate its inflammation. Such images have frequently been obtained during ultrasound scanning and have been interpreted as inflammation, edema, hypertrophy or fibrosis of the adipose tissue. At present, when the knowledge concerning pathogenic mechanisms is taken into account, abnormal echogenicity and hyperemia of the adipose tissue may be considered as a proof of its inflammation. In the authors’ own practice, the

  20. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of disease-related genes based on weighted tissue-specific networks by using DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Jiayi; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jianxin; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Predicting disease-related genes is one of the most important tasks in bioinformatics and systems biology. With the advances in high-throughput techniques, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which make it possible to identify disease-related genes at the network level. However, network-based identification of disease-related genes is still a challenge as the considerable false-positives are still existed in the current available protein interaction networks (PIN). Considering the fact that the majority of genetic disorders tend to manifest only in a single or a few tissues, we constructed tissue-specific networks (TSN) by integrating PIN and tissue-specific data. We further weighed the constructed tissue-specific network (WTSN) by using DNA methylation as it plays an irreplaceable role in the development of complex diseases. A PageRank-based method was developed to identify disease-related genes from the constructed networks. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we constructed PIN, weighted PIN (WPIN), TSN, WTSN for colon cancer and leukemia, respectively. The experimental results on colon cancer and leukemia show that the combination of tissue-specific data and DNA methylation can help to identify disease-related genes more accurately. Moreover, the PageRank-based method was effective to predict disease-related genes on the case studies of colon cancer and leukemia. Tissue-specific data and DNA methylation are two important factors to the study of human diseases. The same method implemented on the WTSN can achieve better results compared to those being implemented on original PIN, WPIN, or TSN. The PageRank-based method outperforms degree centrality-based method for identifying disease-related genes from WTSN.

  2. Active tension network model suggests an exotic mechanical state realized in epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Nicholas; Mani, Madhav; Heemskerk, Idse; Streichan, Sebastian J.; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical interactions play a crucial role in epithelial morphogenesis, yet understanding the complex mechanisms through which stress and deformation affect cell behaviour remains an open problem. Here we formulate and analyse the active tension network (ATN) model, which assumes that the mechanical balance of cells within a tissue is dominated by cortical tension and introduces tension-dependent active remodelling of the cortex. We find that ATNs exhibit unusual mechanical properties. Specifically, an ATN behaves as a fluid at short times, but at long times supports external tension like a solid. Furthermore, an ATN has an extensively degenerate equilibrium mechanical state associated with a discrete conformal--`isogonal'--deformation of cells. The ATN model predicts a constraint on equilibrium cell geometries, which we demonstrate to approximately hold in certain epithelial tissues. We further show that isogonal modes are observed in the fruit fly embryo, accounting for the striking variability of apical areas of ventral cells and helping understand the early phase of gastrulation. Living matter realizes new and exotic mechanical states, the study of which helps to understand biological phenomena.

  3. Bayesian state space models for dynamic genetic network construction across multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yulan; Kelemen, Arpad

    2016-08-01

    Construction of gene-gene interaction networks and potential pathways is a challenging and important problem in genomic research for complex diseases while estimating the dynamic changes of the temporal correlations and non-stationarity are the keys in this process. In this paper, we develop dynamic state space models with hierarchical Bayesian settings to tackle this challenge for inferring the dynamic profiles and genetic networks associated with disease treatments. We treat both the stochastic transition matrix and the observation matrix time-variant and include temporal correlation structures in the covariance matrix estimations in the multivariate Bayesian state space models. The unevenly spaced short time courses with unseen time points are treated as hidden state variables. Hierarchical Bayesian approaches with various prior and hyper-prior models with Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Gibbs sampling algorithms are used to estimate the model parameters and the hidden state variables. We apply the proposed Hierarchical Bayesian state space models to multiple tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney) Affymetrix time course data sets following corticosteroid (CS) drug administration. Both simulation and real data analysis results show that the genomic changes over time and gene-gene interaction in response to CS treatment can be well captured by the proposed models. The proposed dynamic Hierarchical Bayesian state space modeling approaches could be expanded and applied to other large scale genomic data, such as next generation sequence (NGS) combined with real time and time varying electronic health record (EHR) for more comprehensive and robust systematic and network based analysis in order to transform big biomedical data into predictions and diagnostics for precision medicine and personalized healthcare with better decision making and patient outcomes.

  4. A network model of correlated growth of tissue stiffening in pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cláudio L. N.; Bates, Jason H. T.; Suki, Béla

    2014-06-01

    During the progression of pulmonary fibrosis, initially isolated regions of high stiffness form and grow in the lung tissue due to collagen deposition by fibroblast cells. We have previously shown that ongoing collagen deposition may not lead to significant increases in the bulk modulus of the lung until these local remodeled regions have become sufficiently numerous and extensive to percolate in a continuous path across the entire tissue (Bates et al 2007 Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 176 617). This model, however, did not include the possibility of spatially correlated deposition of collagen. In the present study, we investigate whether spatial correlations influence the bulk modulus in a two-dimensional elastic network model of lung tissue. Random collagen deposition at a single site is modeled by increasing the elastic constant of the spring at that site by a factor of 100. By contrast, correlated collagen deposition is represented by stiffening the springs encountered along a random walk starting from some initial spring, the rationale being that excess collagen deposition is more likely in the vicinity of an already stiff region. A combination of random and correlated deposition is modeled by performing random walks of length N from randomly selected initial sites, the balance between the two processes being determined by N. We found that the dependence of bulk modulus, B(N,c), on both N and the fraction of stiff springs, c, can be described by a strikingly simple set of empirical equations. For c0.8, B(N,c) is linear in c and independent of N, such that B(N,c)=100\\;{{B}_{0}}-100{{a}_{III}}(1-c){{B}_{0}}, where {{a}_{III}}=2.857. For small concentrations, the physiologically most relevant regime, the forces in the network springs are distributed according to a power law. When c = 0.3, the exponent of this power law increases from -4.5, when N = 1, and saturates to about -2, as N increases above 40. These results suggest that the spatial correlation of

  5. Discriminating solitary cysts from soft tissue lesions in mammography using a pretrained deep convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Thijs; van Ginneken, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico; den Heeten, Ard

    2017-03-01

    It is estimated that 7% of women in the western world will develop palpable breast cysts in their lifetime. Even though cysts have been correlated with risk of developing breast cancer, many of them are benign and do not require follow-up. We develop a method to discriminate benign solitary cysts from malignant masses in digital mammography. We think a system like this can have merit in the clinic as a decision aid or complementary to specialized modalities. We employ a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) to classify cyst and mass patches. Deep CNNs have been shown to be powerful classifiers, but need a large amount of training data for which medical problems are often difficult to come by. The key contribution of this paper is that we show good performance can be obtained on a small dataset by pretraining the network on a large dataset of a related task. We subsequently investigate the following: (a) when a mammographic exam is performed, two different views of the same breast are recorded. We investigate the merit of combining the output of the classifier from these two views. (b) We evaluate the importance of the resolution of the patches fed to the network. (c) A method dubbed tissue augmentation is subsequently employed, where we extract normal tissue from normal patches and superimpose this onto the actual samples aiming for a classifier invariant to occluding tissue. (d) We combine the representation extracted using the deep CNN with our previously developed features. We show that using the proposed deep learning method, an area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.80 can be obtained on a set of benign solitary cysts and malignant mass findings recalled in screening. We find that it works significantly better than our previously developed approach by comparing the AUC of the ROC using bootstrapping. By combining views, the results can be further improved, though this difference was not found to be significant. We find no significant difference between

  6. Intra-abdominal fat. Part I. The images of the adipose tissue localized beyond organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unaltered fat is a permanent component of the abdominal cavity, even in slim individuals. Visceral adiposity is one of the important factors contributing to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain neoplasms. Moreover, the adipose tissue is an important endocrine and immune organ of complex function both when normal and pathological. Its role in plastic surgery, reconstruction and transplantology is a separate issue. The adipose tissue has recently drawn the attention of research institutes owing to being a rich source of stem cells. This review, however, does not include these issues. The identifi cation of fat is relatively easy using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. It can be more diffi cult in an ultrasound examination for several reasons. The aim of this paper is to present various problems associated with US imaging of unaltered intra-abdominal fat located beyond organs. Based on the literature and experience, it has been demonstrated that the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity has variable echogenicity, which primarily depends on the amount of extracellular fl uid and the number of connective tissue septa, i.e. elements that potentiate the number of areas that refl ect and scatter ultrasonic waves. The normal adipose tissue presents itself on a broad gray scale: from a hyperechoic area, through numerous structures of lower refl ection intensity, to nearly anechoic regions mimicking the presence of pathological fl uid collections. The features that facilitate proper identifi cation of this tissue are: sharp margins, homogeneous structure, high compressibility under transducer pressure, no signs of infi ltration of the surrounding structures and no signs of vascularization when examined with the color and power Doppler. The accumulation of fat tissue in the abdominal cavity can be generalized, regional or focal. The identifi cation of the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity using ultrasonography is not always

  7. Soft tissue recession around implants: is it still unavoidable?--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, André P; Touati, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    When treatment with dental implants is indicated, an accurate diagnosis must be made to evaluate the clinical parameters and determine the optimal time for immediate or delayed (ie, early or late) implant placement and loading following tooth extraction. It is also important to identify complications and their implications on the aesthetic outcome. This article explains the behavior of the hard and soft tissue around the implant, evaluates the timing of implant placement after extraction, and reviews various parameters that influence tissue marginal remodeling.

  8. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue, ...

  9. Diagnostic imaging of the equine fetlock region using radiography and ultrasonography. Part 1: Soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2009-08-01

    The equine fetlock is the joint most commonly associated with lameness. Although the fetlock is regarded as a simple joint, diagnosis of a fetlock disorder can be a challenge and various imaging modalities are routinely used to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. This review describes the principal disorders affecting the soft tissues of the fetlock region and addresses some of the technical aspects involved in taking radiographic and ultrasonographic images of the different soft tissue lesions. A combination of radiography and ultrasonography is still the most commonly used diagnostic approach in clinical practice.

  10. Development of Electrically Conductive Double-Network Hydrogels via One-Step Facile Strategy for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Boguang; Yao, Fanglian; Hao, Tong; Fang, Wancai; Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Yan; Li, Junjie; Wang, Changyong

    2016-02-18

    Cardiac tissue engineering is an effective method to treat the myocardial infarction. However, the lack of electrical conductivity of biomaterials limits their applications. In this work, a homogeneous electronically conductive double network (HEDN) hydrogel via one-step facile strategy is developed, consisting of a rigid/hydrophobic/conductive network of chemical crosslinked poly(thiophene-3-acetic acid) (PTAA) and a flexible/hydrophilic/biocompatible network of photo-crosslinking methacrylated aminated gelatin (MAAG). Results suggest that the swelling, mechanical, and conductive properties of HEDN hydrogel can be modulated via adjusting the ratio of PTAA network to MAAG network. HEDN hydrogel has Young's moduli ranging from 22.7 to 493.1 kPa, and its conductivity (≈10(-4) S cm(-1)) falls in the range of reported conductivities for native myocardium tissue. To assess their biological activity, the brown adipose-derived stem cells (BADSCs) are seeded on the surface of HEDN hydrogel with or without electrical stimulation. Our data show that the HEDN hydrogel can support the survival and proliferation of BADSCs, and that it can improve the cardiac differentiation efficiency of BADSCs and upregulate the expression of connexin 43. Moreover, electrical stimulation can further improve this effect. Overall, it is concluded that the HEDN hydrogel may represent an ideal scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Soft and Hard Tissue Management in Implant Therapy—Part I: Surgical Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio D'Addona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant therapy has become a reliable and predictable treatment alternative for the replacement of missing teeth with conventional removable and fixed partial dentures. Recently though, in the pursuit for improved esthetics, the literature has dedicated a considerable amount of its research on the successful maintenance and regeneration of the surrounding gingiva and bone, which are lost following extraction of a tooth. Thoroughly analyzing the anatomic situation and well-planned treatment has become a requirement, because incorrectly planned and positioned implants may jeopardize long-term esthetic and functional prognosis. In addition, many types of biocompatible materials, autogenous hard and soft tissue grafts, and different surgical techniques have been developed, and their viability has been investigated. As a result, implant specialists have gained a greater understanding of the dynamics and anatomical and biological concepts of the periodontium and peri-implant tissues both at the surgical and prosthetic phases of treatment, which contributes to better soft and hard tissue management (SHTM. This may further contribute to achieving a superior final result which is obtained by having a harmonious soft tissue profile, a correctly placed and contoured final restoration, and the reestablishment of masticatory function and phonetics.

  12. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    A. E. Karateev; D. E. Karateev; E. S. Orlova; Yu. A. Ermakova

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST) (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc.) are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and confere...

  13. Bone tissue in different parts of the edentulous maxilla and mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhe, Jan; Bressan, Eriberto; Cecchinato, Denis; Corrá, Enrico; Toia, Marco; Liljenberg, Birgitta

    2013-04-01

    The composition of the fully healed edentulous ridge of the posterior maxilla was recently examined and was found to contain about 50% mineralized bone and 16% bone marrow. The objective was to examine the composition of the tissue of the fully healed ridge in different portions of the maxilla and the mandible in partially dentate subjects. Eighty-seven healthy subjects were included. A trephine drill was used to harvest hard tissue specimens. The biopsies were decalcified, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, stained, and examined using a point-counting procedure. The marginal portion of the jaws almost consistently contained a cortical cap that was significantly wider in the mandible than in the maxilla and twice as wide in the anterior as in the posterior segments of the mandible. Lamellar bone and bone marrow were the dominating tissue elements. Lamellar bone occupied about 63% of the tissue in the mandible and 46% in the maxilla. The maxilla contained about 23% bone marrow as compared to 16% in the mandible. In the mandible, 70% (anterior) and 57% (posterior) were made up of lamellar bone. In the maxilla, the proportion of lamellar bone in the anterior and posterior segments was similar (about 45%). Bone marrow occupied close to 40% of the anterior maxilla, while in the posterior maxilla and the anterior and posterior mandible marrow comprised between 13 and 18%. Marked differences existed with respect to tissue composition of the edentulous ridge between the maxilla and the mandible. The cortical crest was wider in the mandible than in the maxilla, and widest in the symphysis region of the mandible. The proportion of bone marrow was greater in the maxilla than in the mandible. The maxillary front tooth region was poor in lamellar bone but rich in bone marrow, while the anterior mandible contained large amounts of mineralized bone but small amounts of bone marrow. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Advanced biomaterial strategies to transplant preformed micro-tissue engineered neural networks into the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. P.; Struzyna, L. A.; Murphy, P. L.; Adewole, D. O.; Kuo, E.; Cullen, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Connectome disruption is a hallmark of many neurological diseases and trauma with no current strategies to restore lost long-distance axonal pathways in the brain. We are creating transplantable micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), which are preformed constructs consisting of embedded neurons and long axonal tracts to integrate with the nervous system to physically reconstitute lost axonal pathways. Approach. We advanced micro-tissue engineering techniques to generate micro-TENNs consisting of discrete populations of mature primary cerebral cortical neurons spanned by long axonal fascicles encased in miniature hydrogel micro-columns. Further, we improved the biomaterial encasement scheme by adding a thin layer of low viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to enable needle-less insertion and rapid softening for mechanical similarity with brain tissue. Main results. The engineered architecture of cortical micro-TENNs facilitated robust neuronal viability and axonal cytoarchitecture to at least 22 days in vitro. Micro-TENNs displayed discrete neuronal populations spanned by long axonal fasciculation throughout the core, thus mimicking the general systems-level anatomy of gray matter—white matter in the brain. Additionally, micro-columns with thin CMC-coating upon mild dehydration were able to withstand a force of 893 ± 457 mN before buckling, whereas a solid agarose cylinder of similar dimensions was predicted to withstand less than 150 μN of force. This thin CMC coating increased the stiffness by three orders of magnitude, enabling needle-less insertion into brain while significantly reducing the footprint of previous needle-based delivery methods to minimize insertion trauma. Significance. Our novel micro-TENNs are the first strategy designed for minimally invasive implantation to facilitate nervous system repair by simultaneously providing neuronal replacement and physical reconstruction of long-distance axon pathways in the brain

  15. Laser sintering fabrication of three-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds with a flow channel network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niino, T; Hamajima, D; Montagne, K; Oizumi, S; Naruke, H; Huang, H; Sakai, Y; Kinoshita, H; Fujii, T

    2011-09-01

    The fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds for the reconstruction of highly oxygen-dependent inner organs is discussed. An additive manufacturing technology known as selective laser sintering was employed to fabricate a highly porous scaffold with an embedded flow channel network. A porogen leaching system was used to obtain high porosity. A prototype was developed using the biodegradable plastic polycaprolactone and sodium chloride as the porogen. A high porosity of 90% was successfully obtained. Micro x-ray CT observation was carried out to confirm that channels with a diameter of approximately 1 mm were generated without clogging. The amount of residual salt was 930 µg while the overall volume of the scaffold was 13 cm(3), and it was confirmed that the toxicity of the salt was negligible. The hydrophilization of the scaffold to improve cell adhesion on the scaffold is also discussed. Oxygen plasma ashing and hydrolysis with sodium hydroxide, typically employed to improve the hydrophilicity of plastic surfaces, were tested. The improvement of hydrophilicity was confirmed by an increase in water retention by the porous scaffold from 180% to 500%.

  16. Active Tension Network model reveals an exotic mechanical state realized in epithelial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Nicholas; Mani, Madhav; Heemskerk, Idse; Streicha, Sebastian; Shraiman, Boris

    Mechanical interactions play a crucial role in epithelial morphogenesis, yet understanding the complex mechanisms through which stress and deformation affect cell behavior remains an open problem. Here we formulate and analyze the Active Tension Network (ATN) model, which assumes that mechanical balance of cells is dominated by cortical tension and introduces tension dependent active remodeling of the cortex. We find that ATNs exhibit unusual mechanical properties: i) ATN behaves as a fluid at short times, but at long times it supports external tension, like a solid; ii) its mechanical equilibrium state has extensive degeneracy associated with a discrete conformal - ''isogonal'' - deformation of cells. ATN model predicts a constraint on equilibrium cell geometry, which we demonstrate to hold in certain epithelial tissues. We further show that isogonal modes are observed in a fruit fly embryo, accounting for the striking variability of apical area of ventral cells and helping understand the early phase of gastrulation. Living matter realizes new and exotic mechanical states, understanding which helps understand biological phenomena.

  17. Discovering the structure of nerve tissue: part 1: from Marcello Malpighi to Christian Berres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvátal, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    The invention of the microscope at the beginning of the seventeenth century was a pivotal event for subsequent studies of the microscopic structure of nerve tissue. The present article, using translations of the original texts, presents a recollection of the discoveries made during the second half of the seventeenth century up to the beginning of the nineteenth century by prominent scholars as well as those nearly forgotten today. The findings in the field of neuroanatomy are collected together into a coherent form and in chronological order, showing the progress of the discoveries from a historical perspective. The early scientists discovered, and then repeatedly confirmed, that nerve tissue was remarkably similar over a wide range of animal forms. While they offered little detail, and much of what was described was flawed because of various technical restraints of the time, what they did report was very similar from animal to animal. Their studies, however, in parallel with the improvement of microscopic techniques as well as the processing and fixation of animal tissues, helped to create fertile ground for a number of important neurohistological discoveries in the first half of the nineteenth century.

  18. MyProteinNet: build up-to-date protein interaction networks for organisms, tissues and user-defined contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Omer; Flom, Dvir; Barshir, Ruth; Smoly, Ilan; Tirman, Shoval; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2015-07-01

    The identification of the molecular pathways active in specific contexts, such as disease states or drug responses, often requires an extensive view of the potential interactions between a subset of proteins. This view is not easily obtained: it requires the integration of context-specific protein list or expression data with up-to-date data of protein interactions that are typically spread across multiple databases. The MyProteinNet web server allows users to easily create such context-sensitive protein interaction networks. Users can automatically gather and consolidate data from up to 11 different databases to create a generic protein interaction network (interactome). They can score the interactions based on reliability and filter them by user-defined contexts including molecular expression and protein annotation. The output of MyProteinNet includes the generic and filtered interactome files, together with a summary of their network attributes. MyProteinNet is particularly geared toward building human tissue interactomes, by maintaining tissue expression profiles from multiple resources. The ability of MyProteinNet to facilitate the construction of up-to-date, context-specific interactomes and its applicability to 11 different organisms and to tens of human tissues, make it a powerful tool in meaningful analysis of protein networks. MyProteinNet is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/myproteinnet. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. SLIT3-ROBO4 activation promotes vascular network formation in human engineered tissue and angiogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jonathan D; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Toth, Peter T; Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Bindokas, Vytas P; Smith, David W; Murry, Charles E; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-11-01

    Successful implantation and long-term survival of engineered tissue grafts hinges on adequate vascularization of the implant. Endothelial cells are essential for patterning vascular structures, but they require supportive mural cells such as pericytes/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to generate stable, functional blood vessels. While there is evidence that the angiogenic effect of MSCs is mediated via the secretion of paracrine signals, the identity of these signals is unknown. By utilizing two functionally distinct human MSC clones, we found that so-called "pericytic" MSCs secrete the pro-angiogenic vascular guidance molecule SLIT3, which guides vascular development by directing ROBO4-positive endothelial cells to form networks in engineered tissue. In contrast, "non-pericytic" MSCs exhibit reduced activation of the SLIT3/ROBO4 pathway and do not support vascular networks. Using live cell imaging of organizing 3D vascular networks, we show that siRNA knockdown of SLIT3 in MSCs leads to disorganized clustering of ECs. Knockdown of its receptor ROBO4 in ECs abolishes the generation of functional human blood vessels in an in vivo xenogenic implant. These data suggest that the SLIT3/ROBO4 pathway is required for MSC-guided vascularization in engineered tissues. Heterogeneity of SLIT3 expression may underlie the variable clinical success of MSCs for tissue repair applications. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Use of Composite Tissue Spare Parts to Restore Tripod Hand Function in Post-Traumatic and Congenital Hand Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhaskaranand; Bhat, Anil Keshavamurthy; Acharya, Ashwath Madhusudan

    2015-10-01

    The principle aim in complex defects in hand is to restore a functioning tripod pinch. Among the various options, the use of locally available spare parts offers to improve both functions and cosmetics. 10 patients underwent surgeries to restore tripod pinch using this concept of spare parts. Four of them were children with congenital differences and the rest were adults with post traumatic defects. Eight of them underwent on-top plasty out of which four underwent an island pedicled transfer of phalanges and the rest involved distraction lengthening and transfer of metacarpals. One patient underwent a vascularized tenocutaneous joint transfer and another, a non-vascularized metacarpal transfer. At last follow up, eight of them were using hand with tripod pinch and one, using a lateral pinch. A carefully planned use of local tissues as spare part results in satisfactory outcome without the need for additional graft material in hands with absent or poor function.

  1. [Cryobiology and pathologic lesions induced by freezing-thawing processes in prostatic tissue. Second part].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero Barrilero, Angel; Arias Fúnez, Fernando; Patrón Rodríguez, Rafael Rodríguez; García González, Ricardo; Cuesta Roca, Carmen

    2004-12-01

    Cryosurgery is an emerging technology consisting on controlled freezing of tissues. Good results, maintained in the long-term, have been referred in the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. A role as possible substitute of partial nephrectomy in the treatment of renal adenocarcinomas smaller than 4-5 cm is under research. There is no discussion that freezing destroys cellular machinery and triggers several events the final result of which is cell death by necrosis and apoptosis. The decrease of temperature makes extracellular liquid crystallize and creates a hyperosmotic environment, which induces water to go out of the cell producing intracellular dehydration. Intracellular ice is created with fast freezing speeds being attributed the most destructive effect on biological tissues with irreparable damage. In blood vessels, it directly induces endothelial cell death and mechanical lesions of the endothelium; the consequence is the formation of thrombi that obstruct the lumen of the vessel. In the post-thawing phase there is an increase in free radicals formation and neutrophil activity, which induces cellular membrane lipids peroxidation and new endothelium lesions. Tissue destruction is determined by: minimal temperature achieved, freezing speeds, freezing phase duration, number of freezing-thawing cycles provided, and distance to the freezing focus. As we move away from the freezing focus cells are affected in different ways, and there are several mechanisms proposed to explain the lethal action induced by temperatures higher than--40 degrees C. In our series pathologic findings were: necrosis, hemorrhagic areas either developed or not, fibrosis, hyalinization and increases in the relative number of hematic capillaries, microscopic calcifications, basal cells hyperplasia, and transitional or squamous metaplasia. Residual cancer is localized in the areas less affected by freezing. It should be emphasize the scarce morbimortality associated with the procedure. It

  2. A facile one-step strategy for development of a double network fibrous scaffold for nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golafshan, Nasim; Gharibi, Hamidreza; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Fathi, Mohammadhossein

    2017-04-28

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel double network scaffold composed of polycaprolactone fumarate (PCLF) and eggshell membrane (ESM) (ESM:PCLF) by using the vacuum infiltration method. Compared to ESM, the mechanical properties of double network scaffold were significantly improved, depending on the solvents applied for double network scaffold formation; acetic acid and dichloromethane. Noticeably, the toughness and strength of double network scaffold prepared using acetic acid were significantly improved compared to ESM (26.6 and 25 times, respectively) attributed to the existence of hydrophilic functional groups in acetic acid which made ESM flexible to absorb further PCLF solution. To assess the effect of double network formation on the biological behavior of ESM, the attachment, proliferation and spreading of PC12 cells cultured on the ESM:PCLF scaffolds were evaluated. Results revealed that the number of cells attached on double network ESM:PCLF scaffold were nearly similar to ESM and significantly higher than that of on the tissue culture plate (2.6 times) and PCLF film (1.7 times). It is envisioned that the offered ESM:PCLF double network scaffold might have great potential to develop the constructs for nerve regeneration.

  3. Effect of vascular network and nanoparticles on heat transfer and intracellular ice formation in tumor tissues during cryosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianfeng; Yi, Jungru; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Yuntian

    2014-01-01

    Cryosurgery is a physical therapy of tumor treatment which is welcome in clinics for its minimally invasive advantage. However, the high recurrence rate makes the conventional cryosurgery unsatisfactory, which needs adjuvant treatment such as introduction of nanoparticles. This study is to examine the effects of vascular network and MgO nanoparticles on heat transfer and intracellular ice formation in tumor tissues during cryosurgery. We developed a multi-scale model to study the efficiency of cryosurgery, including the macro-level (mass tumor tissue) heat transfer and the micro-level (tumor cells) probability of intracellular ice formation (PIF). The model is used to examine the effects of fractal vascular network (VN) and nanoparticles with different concentration on heat transfer and PIF during cryosurgery in the breast cancer tissue (MCF-7 cells). The nucleation rate kinetic parameter and the thermodynamic parameter of MCF-7 cells are determined by nonlinear curve-fitting the published experimental data, and then the probability of intracellular ice formation of the picked points in the tumor tissue are determined using the classic model for intracellular ice nucleation with the simulated thermal profiles at those points during cryosurgery. The introduction of nanoparticles have significantly enhanced the heat transfer in the mass tumor tissue and increased the PIF of tumor cells, indicating the nanocryosurgery is more efficient than conventional cryosurgery.

  4. Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Abdomen and Pelvis: Radiologic-Pathologic Features, Part 2-Uncommon Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Angela D; Manning, Maria A; Miettinen, Markku M

    2017-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas occurring in the abdomen and pelvis are an uncommon but important group of malignancies. Recent changes to the World Health Organization classification of soft-tissue tumors include the movement of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) into the soft-tissue tumor classification. GIST is the most common intraperitoneal sarcoma. Liposarcoma is the most common retroperitoneal sarcoma, and leiomyosarcoma is the second most common. GIST, liposarcoma, and leiomyosarcoma account for the majority of sarcomas encountered in the abdomen and pelvis and are discussed in part 1 of this article. Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (previously called malignant fibrous histiocytoma), dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, solitary fibrous tumor, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, extraskeletal chondro-osseous sarcomas, vascular sarcomas, and sarcomas of uncertain differentiation uncommonly arise in the abdomen and pelvis and the abdominal wall. Although these lesions are rare sarcomas and their imaging features overlap, familiarity with the locations where they occur and their imaging features is important so they can be diagnosed accurately. The anatomic location and clinical history are important factors in the differential diagnosis of these lesions because metastasis, more-common sarcomas, borderline fibroblastic proliferations (such as desmoid tumors), and endometriosis have imaging findings that overlap with those of these uncommon sarcomas. In this article, the clinical, pathologic, and imaging findings of uncommon soft-tissue sarcomas of the abdomen and pelvis and the abdominal wall are reviewed, with an emphasis on their differential diagnosis.

  5. 2D correlation Raman microspectroscopy of chosen parts of rat's brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zięba-Palus, J.; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, A.; Sacharz, J.; Lewandowski, M. H.; Palus, K.; Chrobok, Ł.; Kowalski, R.; Moskal, P.; Birczyńska, M.; Sozańska, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    Raman spectra of two areas of Wistar rat brain tissue, tissue that are linked functionally to one another -the somatosensory cortex (Sc) and the dorsolateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus (DLG)- excited with 442 nm, 514.5 nm, 785 nm and 1064 nm laser lines- were studied. No fixation method was used to preserve samples taken from the precisely defined anatomical areas of the brain. The brain slides were kept in artificial cerebrospinal fluid during the measurements. Averaged spectra were analyzed using the 2D correlation method. The varying wavelength/energy of the excitation laser was regarded as an external stimulus. 2D correlation analysis resolved differences between Sc and DLG in the range of 1800-1000 cm-1 and also in the hetero-spectral regions of about 1800-1200 cm-1 and 3100-2500 cm-1. Auto-peaks at 1659 cm-1 and 1666 cm-1 characterize the phase of the constituent lipid clusters with proteins and cholesterol in Sc and cholesterol in DLG, respectively. Appearing cross-peaks indicate the correlations with different phospholipids structures and protein bands and also cholesterol for Sc and DLG, respectively. Asynchronous spectra distinguish between areas of the brain due to the presence of neurotransmitters.

  6. Morphological and biochemical examination of Cosmos 1887 rat heart tissue. Part 1: Ultrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Popova, I. A.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Miquel, J.; Sapp, W.

    1990-01-01

    Morphological changes were observed in the left ventricle of rat heart tissue from animals flown on the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite for 12.5 days. These tissues were compared to the synchronous and vivarium control hearts. While many normal myofibrils were observed, others exhibited ultrastructural alterations, i.e., damaged and irregular-shaped mitochondria and generalized myofibrillar edema. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the volume density data revealed a statistically significant increase in glycogen and a significant decrease in mitochondria compared to the synchronous and vivarium controls. Point counting indicated an increase in lipid and myeloid bodies and a decrease in microtubules, but these changes were not statistically significant. In addition, the flight animals exhibited some patchy loss of protofibrils (actin and myosin filaments) and some abnormal supercontracted myofibrils that were not seen in the controls. This study was undertaken to gain insight into the mechanistic aspects of cardiac changes in both animals and human beings as a consequence of space travel. Cardiac hypotrophy and fluid shifts have been observed after actual or simulated weightlessness and raise concerns about the functioning of the heart and circulatory system during and after travel in space.

  7. Relationship between aneurism of ascending part of aorta and syndrome of connective tissue dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osovska N.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper identifies the main reasons for the development of an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and predictors of its complications in patients of all ages. To determine the cause and age-associated risk factors for aneurysms there were examined 154 patients with the presence of the expansion of the root and / or ascending aorta of more than 40 mm, according to echocardiographic examination. Patients were divided into 4 categories by age: 18-29 years, 30-44 years 45-59 years 60-74 years. Instrumental methods of examination: echocardiography, ECG, ECG monitoring and blood pressure, heart rate variability, ultrasound of internal organs were used. Syndrome of connective tissue dysplasia was established according to the criteria of the working group of the British Society of Rheumatology. Joint hypermobility syndrome was determined according to the Brayton criteria. Statistical processing was carried out by methods of variation statistic program StatSoft "Statistica" v.10.0. It was established that in young and middle aged patients the cause of aneurysm of ascending aorta more often is connective tissue dysplasia syndrome. In older patients the main cause of aneurysm of ascending aorta is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and decreased contractile function of the heart.

  8. Parametric methods for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 2): T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Palazón, R J; Solé Arqués, M; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Ortiz Pérez, J T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the reference technique for characterizing myocardial tissue; for example, T2-weighted sequences make it possible to evaluate areas of edema or myocardial inflammation. However, traditional sequences have many limitations and provide only qualitative information. Moreover, traditional sequences depend on the reference to remote myocardium or skeletal muscle, which limits their ability to detect and quantify diffuse myocardial damage. Recently developed magnetic resonance myocardial mapping techniques enable quantitative assessment of parameters indicative of edema. These techniques have proven better than traditional sequences both in acute cardiomyopathy and in acute ischemic heart disease. This article synthesizes current developments in T2 mapping as well as their clinical applications and limitations. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A multi-tissue type genome-scale metabolic network for analysis of whole-body systems physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bordbar, Aarash; Feist, Adam M; Usaite-Black, Renata; Woodcock, Joseph; Palsson, Bernhard O; Famili, Iman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions provide a biologically meaningful mechanistic basis for the genotype-phenotype relationship. The global human metabolic network, termed Recon 1, has recently been reconstructed allowing the systems analysis of human metabolic physiology and pathology. Utilizing high-throughput data, Recon 1 has recently been tailored to different cells and tissues, including the liver, kidney, brain, and alveolar macrophage. These models have shown ut...

  11. System model network for adipose tissue signatures related to weight changes in response to calorie restriction and subsequent weight maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H M; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  12. System model network for adipose tissue signatures related to weight changes in response to calorie restriction and subsequent weight maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Montastier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD. After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the

  13. System Model Network for Adipose Tissue Signatures Related to Weight Changes in Response to Calorie Restriction and Subsequent Weight Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H. M.; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  14. Reconstruction of enhancer-target networks in 935 samples of human primary cells, tissues and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qin; Anyansi, Christine; Hu, Xihao; Xu, Liangliang; Xiong, Lei; Tang, Wenshu; Mok, Myth T S; Cheng, Chao; Fan, Xiaodan; Gerstein, Mark; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yip, Kevin Y

    2017-10-01

    We propose a new method for determining the target genes of transcriptional enhancers in specific cells and tissues. It combines global trends across many samples and sample-specific information, and considers the joint effect of multiple enhancers. Our method outperforms existing methods when predicting the target genes of enhancers in unseen samples, as evaluated by independent experimental data. Requiring few types of input data, we are able to apply our method to reconstruct the enhancer-target networks in 935 samples of human primary cells, tissues and cell lines, which constitute by far the largest set of enhancer-target networks. The similarity of these networks from different samples closely follows their cell and tissue lineages. We discover three major co-regulation modes of enhancers and find defense-related genes often simultaneously regulated by multiple enhancers bound by different transcription factors. We also identify differentially methylated enhancers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and experimentally confirm their altered regulation of HCC-related genes.

  15. Is Your Biobank Up to Standards? A Review of the National Canadian Tissue Repository Network Required Operational Practice Standards and the Controlled Documents of a Certified Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Victoria; Castillo-Pelayo, Tania; Babinszky, Sindy; Dee, Simon; Leblanc, Jodi; Matzke, Lise; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Carpenter, Jane; Carter, Candace; Rush, Amanda; Byrne, Jennifer; Barnes, Rebecca; Mes-Messons, Anne-Marie; Watson, Peter

    2017-11-17

    Ongoing quality management is an essential part of biobank operations and the creation of high quality biospecimen resources. Adhering to the standards of a national biobanking network is a way to reduce variability between individual biobank processes, resulting in cross biobank compatibility and more consistent support for health researchers. The Canadian Tissue Repository Network (CTRNet) implemented a set of required operational practices (ROPs) in 2011 and these serve as the standards and basis for the CTRNet biobank certification program. A review of these 13 ROPs covering 314 directives was conducted after 5 years to identify areas for revision and update, leading to changes to 7/314 directives (2.3%). A review of all internal controlled documents (including policies, standard operating procedures and guides, and forms for actions and processes) used by the BC Cancer Agency's Tumor Tissue Repository (BCCA-TTR) to conform to these ROPs was then conducted. Changes were made to 20/106 (19%) of BCCA-TTR documents. We conclude that a substantial fraction of internal controlled documents require updates at regular intervals to accommodate changes in best practices. Reviewing documentation is an essential aspect of keeping up to date with best practices and ensuring the quality of biospecimens and data managed by biobanks.

  16. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc. are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and conferences of rheumatologists in recent years. This review is to refresh physicians’interest in this problem. Part 1 of this review briefly considers the general issues relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of RDJAST of the upper extremity, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  17. A mussel tissue certified reference material for multiple phycotoxins. Part 3: homogeneity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Pearse; Emteborg, Håkan; Giddings, Sabrina D; Wright, Elliott; Quilliam, Michael A

    2011-05-01

    A candidate certified reference material (CRM) for multiple shellfish toxins (domoic acid, okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins, pectenotoxins, yessotoxin, azaspiracids and spirolides) has been prepared as a freeze-dried powder from mussel tissues (Mytilus edulis). Along with the certified values, the most important characteristics for a reference material to be fit-for-purpose are homogeneity and stability. Acceptable between-bottle homogeneity was found for this CRM. Within-bottle homogeneity was assessed using domoic acid, and it was shown that repeated subsampling of the CRM can be performed precisely down to 0.35 g. Both short- and long-term stability studies carried out under isochronous conditions demonstrated excellent stability of the various toxins present in the material. While degradation of some analytes was observed at +60°C in short-term studies, it was determined that shipping at ambient temperature is adequate. No instability was detected in long-term stability studies, and it was shown that the material can be held at +18°C safely for up to 1 year. To guarantee stability of the CRM over its lifetime the stock will be maintained at -20°C. The results of the homogeneity and stability testing show that CRM-FDMT1 is appropriate for its intended use in quality assurance and quality control of shellfish toxin analysis methods.

  18. Interpenetrating networks based on gelatin methacrylamide and PEG formed using concurrent thiol click chemistries for hydrogel tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Michael A; Adams, André A; Naciri, Jawad; North, Stella H; Ligler, Frances S

    2014-02-01

    The integration of biological extracellular matrix (ECM) components and synthetic materials is a promising pathway to fabricate the next generation of hydrogel-based tissue scaffolds that more accurately emulate the microscale heterogeneity of natural ECM. We report the development of a bio/synthetic interpenetrating network (BioSINx), containing gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) polymerized within a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) framework to form a mechanically robust network capable of supporting both internal cell encapsulation and surface cell adherence. The covalently crosslinked PEG network was formed by thiol-yne coupling, while the bioactive GelMA was integrated using a concurrent thiol-ene coupling reaction. The physical properties (i.e. swelling, modulus) of BioSINx were compared to both PEG networks with physically-incorporated gelatin (BioSINP) and homogenous hydrogels. BioSINx displayed superior physical properties and significantly lower gelatin dissolution. These benefits led to enhanced cytocompatibility for both cell adhesion and encapsulation; furthermore, the increased physical strength provided for the generation of a micro-engineered tissue scaffold. Endothelial cells showed extensive cytoplasmic spreading and the formation of cellular adhesion sites when cultured onto BioSINx; moreover, both encapsulated and adherent cells showed sustained viability and proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural network-based brain tissue segmentation in MR images using extracted features from intraframe coding in H.264

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mehdi; Kasaei, Shohreh

    2012-01-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is a crucial task in diagnosis and treatment of medical images. This paper presents a new algorithm to segment different brain tissues, such as white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), background (BKG), and tumor tissues. The proposed technique uses the modified intraframe coding yielded from H.264/(AVC), for feature extraction. Extracted features are then imposed to an artificial back propagation neural network (BPN) classifier to assign each block to its appropriate class. Since the newest coding standard, H.264/AVC, has the highest compression ratio, it decreases the dimension of extracted features and thus yields to a more accurate classifier with low computational complexity. The performance of the BPN classifier is evaluated using the classification accuracy and computational complexity terms. The results show that the proposed technique is more robust and effective with low computational complexity compared to other recent works.

  20. Indirect adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural network with self- recurrent consequent part for AC servo system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Runmin; Wang, Li; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Yuanglong; Wang, Chao

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel indirect adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural network (IAFWNN) to control the nonlinearity, wide variations in loads, time-variation and uncertain disturbance of the ac servo system. In the proposed approach, the self-recurrent wavelet neural network (SRWNN) is employed to construct an adaptive self-recurrent consequent part for each fuzzy rule of TSK fuzzy model. For the IAFWNN controller, the online learning algorithm is based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. Moreover, an improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) is used to adapt the learning rate. The aid of an adaptive SRWNN identifier offers the real-time gradient information to the adaptive fuzzy wavelet neural controller to overcome the impact of parameter variations, load disturbances and other uncertainties effectively, and has a good dynamic. The asymptotical stability of the system is guaranteed by using the Lyapunov method. The result of the simulation and the prototype test prove that the proposed are effective and suitable. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-mediated cell differentiation to proteolysis mechanism networks from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Diao, Haizhen; Zhou, Huilei; Li, Xiaohe; Chen, Qingchun; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao; Wolfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To understand cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) mechanism network from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma. COMP complete different activated (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC lung adenocarcinoma compared with lower human normal adjacent tissues from the corresponding COMP-stimulated (≥0.25) or inhibited (Pearson CC ≤ -0.25) overlapping molecules of Pearson correlation coefficient (CC) and GRNInfer, respectively. COMP complete different activated and inhibited (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues were constructed by integration of Pearson CC, GRNInfer and GO. As visualized by integration of GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and Disease, we deduced COMP complete different activated and inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues. As visualized by GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and disease database integration, we proposed mainly that the mechanism and function of COMP complete different activated network in higher lung adenocarcinoma was involved in COMP activation with matrix-localized insulin-like factor coupling carboxypeptidase to metallopeptidase-induced proteolysis, whereas the corresponding inhibited network in lower human normal adjacent tissues participated in COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized vasculogenesis, B and T cell differentiation and neural endocrine factors coupling pyrophosphatase-mediated proteolysis. However, COMP complete different inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma included COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized chromatin maintenance, licensing and assembly factors coupling phosphatase-inhibitor to cytokinesis regulators-mediated cell differentiation, whereas the corresponding activated network in lower human normal adjacent tissues contained COMP activation with cytolplasm-localized translation elongation factor coupling fucosyltransferase to ubiquitin-protein ligase-induced cell

  2. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josine L Min

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome (MetS is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD and gluteal (GLU adipose tissue, and whole blood (WB, from 29 MetS cases and 44 controls. Co-expression network analysis for each tissue independently identified nine, six, and zero MetS-associated modules of coexpressed genes in ABD, GLU, and WB, respectively. Of 8,992 probesets expressed in ABD or GLU, 685 (7.6% were expressed in ABD and 51 (0.6% in GLU only. Differential eigengene network analysis of 8,256 shared probesets detected 22 shared modules with high preservation across adipose depots (D(ABD-GLU = 0.89, seven of which were associated with MetS (FDR P100,000 individuals; rs10282458, affecting expression of RARRES2 (encoding chemerin, was associated with body mass index (BMI (P = 6.0×10(-4; and rs2395185, affecting inter-depot differences of HLA-DRB1 expression, was associated with high-density lipoprotein (P = 8.7×10(-4 and BMI-adjusted waist-to-hip ratio (P = 2.4×10(-4. Since many genes and their interactions influence complex traits such as MetS, integrated analysis of genotypes and coexpression networks across multiple tissues relevant to clinical traits is an efficient strategy to identify novel associations.

  3. Implantable Body Sensor Network MAC Protocols Using Wake-up Radio – Evaluation in Animal Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppiah Ramachandran, Vignesh Raja; van der Zwaag, B.J.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    Applications of implantable sensor networks in the health-care industry have increased tremendously over the last decade. There are different types of medium access control (MAC) protocols that are designed for implantable body sensor networks, using different physical layer technologies such as

  4. Comparison of Metabolic Network between Muscle and Intramuscular Adipose Tissues in Hanwoo Beef Cattle Using a Systems Biology Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jeong Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between muscle and adipose tissues plays a major role in determining the quality of carcass traits. The objective of this study was to compare metabolic differences between muscle and intramuscular adipose (IMA tissues in the longissimus dorsi (LD of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae using the RNA-seq technology and a systems biology approach. The LD sections between the 6th and 7th ribs were removed from nine (each of three cows, steers, and bulls Hanwoo beef cattle (carcass weight of 430.2±40.66 kg immediately after slaughter. The total mRNA from muscle, IMA, and subcutaneous adipose and omental adipose tissues were isolated and sequenced. The reads that passed quality control were mapped onto the bovine reference genome (build bosTau6, and differentially expressed genes across tissues were identified. The KEGG pathway enrichment tests revealed the opposite direction of metabolic regulation between muscle and IMA. Metabolic gene network analysis clearly indicated that oxidative metabolism was upregulated in muscle and downregulated in IMA. Interestingly, pathways for regulating cell adhesion, structure, and integrity and chemokine signaling pathway were upregulated in IMA and downregulated in muscle. It is thus inferred that IMA may play an important role in the regulation of development and structure of the LD tissues and muscle/adipose communication.

  5. Comparison of Metabolic Network between Muscle and Intramuscular Adipose Tissues in Hanwoo Beef Cattle Using a Systems Biology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Hye-Sun; Kim, Woonsu; Yoon, Duhak; Seo, Seongwon

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationship between muscle and adipose tissues plays a major role in determining the quality of carcass traits. The objective of this study was to compare metabolic differences between muscle and intramuscular adipose (IMA) tissues in the longissimus dorsi (LD) of Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) using the RNA-seq technology and a systems biology approach. The LD sections between the 6th and 7th ribs were removed from nine (each of three cows, steers, and bulls) Hanwoo beef cattle (carcass weight of 430.2 ± 40.66 kg) immediately after slaughter. The total mRNA from muscle, IMA, and subcutaneous adipose and omental adipose tissues were isolated and sequenced. The reads that passed quality control were mapped onto the bovine reference genome (build bosTau6), and differentially expressed genes across tissues were identified. The KEGG pathway enrichment tests revealed the opposite direction of metabolic regulation between muscle and IMA. Metabolic gene network analysis clearly indicated that oxidative metabolism was upregulated in muscle and downregulated in IMA. Interestingly, pathways for regulating cell adhesion, structure, and integrity and chemokine signaling pathway were upregulated in IMA and downregulated in muscle. It is thus inferred that IMA may play an important role in the regulation of development and structure of the LD tissues and muscle/adipose communication.

  6. Impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, A; Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach. The array of neural networks are coupled in a random fashion which is governed by Bernoulli random variable. The aim of this paper is to obtain the synchronization criteria, which is suitable for both exactly known and partly unknown transition probabilities such that the coupled neural network is synchronized with mixed time-delay. The considered impulsive effects can be synchronized at partly unknown transition probabilities. Besides, a multiple integral approach is also proposed to strengthen the Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities. By making use of Kronecker product and some useful integral inequalities, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was designed for handling the coupled neural network with mixed delay and then impulsive synchronization criteria are solvable in a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cyclic deformation-induced solute transport in tissue scaffolds with computer designed, interconnected, pore networks: experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Buijs, Jorn Op; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Ritman, Erik L

    2009-08-01

    Nutrient supply and waste removal in porous tissue engineering scaffolds decrease from the periphery to the center, leading to limited depth of ingrowth of new tissue into the scaffold. However, as many tissues experience cyclic physiological strains, this may provide a mechanism to enhance solute transport in vivo before vascularization of the scaffold. The hypothesis of this study was that pore cross-sectional geometry and interconnectivity are of major importance for the effectiveness of cyclic deformation-induced solute transport. Transparent elastic polyurethane scaffolds, with computer-programmed design of pore networks in the form of interconnected channels, were fabricated using a 3D printing and injection molding technique. The scaffold pores were loaded with a colored tracer for optical contrast, cyclically compressed with deformations of 10 and 15% of the original undeformed height at 1.0 Hz. Digital imaging was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the tracer concentration within the pores. Numerical simulations of a fluid-structure interaction model of deformation-induced solute transport were compared to the experimental data. The results of experiments and modeling agreed well and showed that pore interconnectivity heavily influences deformation-induced solute transport. Pore cross-sectional geometry appears to be of less relative importance in interconnected pore networks. Validated computer models of solute transport can be used to design optimal scaffold pore geometries that will enhance the convective transport of nutrients inside the scaffold and the removal of waste, thus improving the cell survivability deep inside the scaffold.

  8. Development of poly(trimethylene carbonate) network implants for annulus fibrosus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquer, Sébastien B G; Sharifi, Shahriar; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral disk degeneration is the main cause of chronic back pain. Disk degeneration often leads to tearing of the annulus fibrosus (AF) and extrusion of the nucleus pulposus (NP), which compresses the nerves. Current treatment involves removing the herniated NP and suturing the damaged AF tissue. This surgical approach has several drawbacks. In this study, we designed a biodegradable AF closure system comprising a tissue engineering scaffold, a supporting membrane and an adhesive material, to not only restore the function of the herniated disc but also to promote tissue regeneration. Porous scaffolds with precisely defined architectures were built by stereolithography using resins based on poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) macromers functionalized with methacrylate endgroups. In addition, a porous photo-cross-linked PTMC membrane was developed that can be used to keep the scaffold in place in the AF tissue. After synthesis and characterization, the components of the implant are glued together and to the AF tissue using a diisocyanate glue based on polyethylene glycol-PTMC triblock copolymers. The adhesion strengths of the materials to each other and to AF tissue were determined in lap-shear tests. This study showed that a device for AF tissue engineering can be prepared from PTMC-based scaffolds, membranes and glues.

  9. Greenhouse gas network design using backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling - Part 2: Sensitivity analyses and South African test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickless, A.; Ziehn, T.; Rayner, P. J.; Scholes, R. J.; Engelbrecht, F.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second part of a two-part paper considering a measurement network design based on a stochastic Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) developed by Marek Uliasz, in this case for South Africa. A sensitivity analysis was performed for different specifications of the network design parameters which were applied to this South African test case. The LPDM, which can be used to derive the sensitivity matrix used in an atmospheric inversion, was run for each candidate station for the months of July (representative of the Southern Hemisphere winter) and January (summer). The network optimisation procedure was carried out under a standard set of conditions, similar to those applied to the Australian test case in Part 1, for both months and for the combined 2 months, using the incremental optimisation (IO) routine. The optimal network design setup was subtly changed, one parameter at a time, and the optimisation routine was re-run under each set of modified conditions and compared to the original optimal network design. The assessment of the similarity between network solutions showed that changing the height of the surface grid cells, including an uncertainty estimate for the ocean fluxes, or increasing the night-time observation error uncertainty did not result in any significant changes in the positioning of the stations relative to the standard design. However, changing the prior flux error covariance matrix, or increasing the spatial resolution, did. Large aggregation errors were calculated for a number of candidate measurement sites using the resolution of the standard network design. Spatial resolution of the prior fluxes should be kept as close to the resolution of the transport model as the computing system can manage, to mitigate the exclusion of sites which could potentially be beneficial to the network. Including a generic correlation structure in the prior flux error covariance matrix led to pronounced changes in the network solution. The genetic

  10. Train-Network Interactions and Stability Evaluation in High-Speed Railways--Part I: Phenomena and Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Haitao; Tao, Haidong; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an impedance-based model to systematically investigate the interaction performance of multiple trains and traction network interaction system, aiming to evaluate the serious phenomena, including low-frequency oscillation (LFO), harmonic resonance and resonance instability....... The train-network interaction mechanism is therefore studied and one presents a detailed coupling model for investigating the three interactive phenomena and their characteristics, influential factors, analysis methods and possible mitigation schemes. In the Part I of the two-part paper, the measured...

  11. Different types of laughter modulate connectivity within distinct parts of the laughter perception network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Wildgruber

    Full Text Available Laughter is an ancient signal of social communication among humans and non-human primates. Laughter types with complex social functions (e.g., taunt and joy presumably evolved from the unequivocal and reflex-like social bonding signal of tickling laughter already present in non-human primates. Here, we investigated the modulations of cerebral connectivity associated with different laughter types as well as the effects of attention shifts between implicit and explicit processing of social information conveyed by laughter using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Complex social laughter types and tickling laughter were found to modulate connectivity in two distinguishable but partially overlapping parts of the laughter perception network irrespective of task instructions. Connectivity changes, presumably related to the higher acoustic complexity of tickling laughter, occurred between areas in the prefrontal cortex and the auditory association cortex, potentially reflecting higher demands on acoustic analysis associated with increased information load on auditory attention, working memory, evaluation and response selection processes. In contrast, the higher degree of socio-relational information in complex social laughter types was linked to increases of connectivity between auditory association cortices, the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and brain areas associated with mentalizing as well as areas in the visual associative cortex. These modulations might reflect automatic analysis of acoustic features, attention direction to informative aspects of the laughter signal and the retention of those in working memory during evaluation processes. These processes may be associated with visual imagery supporting the formation of inferences on the intentions of our social counterparts. Here, the right dorsolateral precentral cortex appears as a network node potentially linking the functions of auditory and visual associative sensory cortices

  12. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  13. A fully-automated neural network analysis of AFM force-distance curves for cancer tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Eleonora; Ciasca, Gabriele; Sassun, Tanya Enny; Antonelli, Manila; Palmieri, Valentina; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Santoro, Antonio; Giangaspero, Felice; Delfini, Roberto; Campi, Gaetano; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability of probing the nanoscale mechanical properties of biological systems that affect and are affected by the occurrence of many pathologies, including cancer. This capability has triggered growing interest in the translational process of AFM from physics laboratories to clinical practice. A factor still hindering the current use of AFM in diagnostics is related to the complexity of AFM data analysis, which is time-consuming and needs highly specialized personnel with a strong physical and mathematical background. In this work, we demonstrate an operator-independent neural-network approach for the analysis of surgically removed brain cancer tissues. This approach allowed us to distinguish—in a fully automated fashion—cancer from healthy tissues with high accuracy, also highlighting the presence and the location of infiltrating tumor cells.

  14. Mueller-matrix mapping of biological tissues in differential diagnosis of optical anisotropy mechanisms of protein networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushenko, V A; Sidor, M I [Yuriy Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine); Marchuk, Yu F; Pashkovskaya, N V; Andreichuk, D R [Bukovinian State Medical University, Chernivtsi (Ukraine)

    2015-03-31

    We report a model of Mueller-matrix description of optical anisotropy of protein networks in biological tissues with allowance for the linear birefringence and dichroism. The model is used to construct the reconstruction algorithms of coordinate distributions of phase shifts and the linear dichroism coefficient. In the statistical analysis of such distributions, we have found the objective criteria of differentiation between benign and malignant tissues of the female reproductive system. From the standpoint of evidence-based medicine, we have determined the operating characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the Mueller-matrix reconstruction method of optical anisotropy parameters and demonstrated its effectiveness in the differentiation of benign and malignant tumours. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  16. Tuning mechanical performance of poly(ethylene glycol) and agarose interpenetrating network hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennerfeldt, Deena A; Renth, Amanda N; Talata, Zsolt; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogels are attractive for tissue engineering applications due to their incredible versatility, but they can be limited in cartilage tissue engineering applications due to inadequate mechanical performance. In an effort to address this limitation, our team previously reported the drastic improvement in the mechanical performance of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose relative to pure PEG-DA and agarose networks. The goal of the current study was specifically to determine the relative importance of PEG-DA concentration, agarose concentration, and PEG-DA molecular weight in controlling mechanical performance, swelling characteristics, and network parameters. IPNs consistently had compressive and shear moduli greater than the additive sum of either single network when compared to pure PEG-DA gels with a similar PEG-DA content. IPNs withstood a maximum stress of up to 4.0 MPa in unconfined compression, with increased PEG-DA molecular weight being the greatest contributing factor to improved failure properties. However, aside from failure properties, PEG-DA concentration was the most influential factor for the large majority of properties. Increasing the agarose and PEG-DA concentrations as well as the PEG-DA molecular weight of agarose/PEG-DA IPNs and pure PEG-DA gels improved moduli and maximum stresses by as much as an order of magnitude or greater compared to pure PEG-DA gels in our previous studies. Although the viability of encapsulated chondrocytes was not significantly affected by IPN formulation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was significantly influenced, with a 12-fold increase over a three-week period in gels with a lower PEG-DA concentration. These results suggest that mechanical performance of IPNs may be tuned with partial but not complete independence from biological performance of encapsulated cells. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The calculation of flicker propagation in part of the Slovenian transmission network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksic, Milos; Papic, Igor [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Trzaska 25, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-11-15

    Voltage fluctuations in transmission networks caused by the operations of large consumers, for example, electric arc furnaces, are often the primary sources of high levels of flicker at the end-users in low-voltage networks. This article compares two methods for simulating the flicker propagation in a meshed high-voltage network by comparing simulated levels of flicker with levels obtained from field measurements. The simulations were performed by varying several of the parameters in both methods. The comparison of the simulated and measured flicker values was extended to include two different network schemes and provides a further insight into the nature of flicker propagation in power networks. (author)

  18. Functional and gene network analyses of transcriptional signatures characterizing pre-weaned bovine mammary parenchyma or fat pad uncovered novel inter-tissue signaling networks during development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neonatal bovine mammary fat pad (MFP surrounding the mammary parenchyma (PAR is thought to exert proliferative effects on the PAR through secretion of local modulators of growth induced by systemic hormones. We used bioinformatics to characterize transcriptomics differences between PAR and MFP from ~65 d old Holstein heifers. Data were mined to uncover potential crosstalk through the analyses of signaling molecules preferentially expressed in one tissue relative to the other. Results Over 9,000 differentially expressed genes (DEG; False discovery rate ≤ 0.05 were found of which 1,478 had a ≥1.5-fold difference between PAR and MFP. Within the DEG highly-expressed in PAR vs. MFP (n = 736 we noted significant enrichment of functions related to cell cycle, structural organization, signaling, and DNA/RNA metabolism. Only actin cytoskeletal signaling was significant among canonical pathways. DEG more highly-expressed in MFP vs. PAR (n = 742 belong to lipid metabolism, signaling, cell movement, and immune-related functions. Canonical pathways associated with metabolism and signaling, particularly immune- and metabolism-related were significantly-enriched. Network analysis uncovered a central role of MYC, TP53, and CTNNB1 in controlling expression of DEG highly-expressed in PAR vs. MFP. Similar analysis suggested a central role for PPARG, KLF2, EGR2, and EPAS1 in regulating expression of more highly-expressed DEG in MFP vs. PAR. Gene network analyses revealed putative inter-tissue crosstalk between cytokines and growth factors preferentially expressed in one tissue (e.g., ANGPTL1, SPP1, IL1B in PAR vs. MFP; ADIPOQ, IL13, FGF2, LEP in MFP vs. PAR with DEG preferentially expressed in the other tissue, particularly transcription factors or pathways (e.g., MYC, TP53, and actin cytoskeletal signaling in PAR vs. MFP; PPARG and LXR/RXR Signaling in MFP vs. PAR. Conclusions Functional analyses underscored a reciprocal influence in

  19. Characterization of Sequential Collagen-Poly(ethylene glycol) Diacrylat Interpenetrating Networks and Initial Assessment of their Potential for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Pinto, Dany J.; Jimenez-Vergara, Andrea Carolina; Gharat, Tanmay; Hahn, Mariah S.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen hydrogels have been widely investigated as scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering due in part to the capacity of collagen to promote robust cell adhesion and elongation. However, collagen hydrogels display relatively low stiffness and strength, are thrombogenic, and are highly susceptible to cell-mediated contraction. In the current work, we develop and characterize a sequentially-formed interpenetrating network (IPN) that retains the benefits of collagen, but which displays enhanced mechanical stiffness and strength, improved thromboresistance, high physical stability and resistance to contraction. In this strategy, we first form a collagen hydrogel, infuse this hydrogel with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), and subsequently crosslink the PEGDA by exposure to longwave UV light. These collagen-PEGDA IPNs allow for cell encapsulation during the fabrication process with greater than 90% cell viability via inclusion of cells within the collagen hydrogel precursor solution. Furthermore, the degree of cell spreading within the IPNs can be tuned from rounded to fully elongated by varying the time delay between the formation of the cell-laden collagen hydrogel and the formation of the PEGDA network. We also demonstrate that these collagen-PEGDA IPNs are able to support the initial stages of smooth muscle cell lineage progression by elongated human mesenchymal stems cells. PMID:25433604

  20. Biomechanics of the Sensor–Tissue Interface—Effects of Motion, Pressure, and Design on Sensor Performance and the Foreign Body Response—Part I: Theoretical Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Helton, Kristen L; Ratner, Buddy D.; Wisniewski, Natalie A.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of biomechanics in glucose sensor function has been largely overlooked. This article is the first part of a two-part review in which we look beyond commonly recognized chemical biocompatibility to explore the biomechanics of the sensor–tissue interface as an important aspect of continuous glucose sensor biocompatibility. Part I provides a theoretical framework to describe how biomechanical factors such as motion and pressure (typically micromotion and micropressure) give rise t...

  1. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  2. A hybrid analytical network process and fuzzy goal programming for supplier selection: A case study of auto part maker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Zande Hesami

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to present a hybrid model to select auto part suppliers. The proposed method of this paper uses factor analysis to find the most influencing factors on part maker selection and the results are validated using different statistical tests such as Cronbach's Alpha and Kaiser-Meyer.The hybrid model uses analytical network process to rank different part maker suppliers and fuzzy goal programming to choose the appropriate alternative among various choices. The implementation of the proposed model of this paper is used for a case study of real-world problem and the results are discussed.

  3. Control of uncertain systems by feedback linearization with neural networks augmentation. Part II. Controller validation by numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper was conceived in two parts. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the main steps of adaptive output feedback control for non-affine uncertain systems, having a known relative degree. The main paradigm of this approach was the feedback linearization (dynamic inversion with neural network augmentation. Meanwhile, based on new contributions of the authors, a new paradigm, that of robust servomechanism problem solution, has been added to the controller architecture. The current Part II of the paper presents the validation of the controller hereby obtained by using the longitudinal channel of a hovering VTOL-type aircraft as mathematical model.

  4. Endothelial cells assemble into a 3-dimensional prevascular network in a bone tissue engineering construct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2006-01-01

    To engineer tissues with clinically relevant dimensions, one must overcome the challenge of rapidly creating functional blood vessels to supply cells with oxygen and nutrients and to remove waste products. We tested the hypothesis that endothelial cells, cocultured with osteoprogenitor cells, can

  5. Analytical transport network theory to guide the design of 3-D microstructural networks in energy materials: Part 2. Flow with reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alex P.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2017-12-01

    We extend the fully analytical, heuristic "Analytical Transport Network Model" for steady-state, diffusive flow in a 3-D network to account for surface reactions. In the limit of negligible reactions, the model reduces to the conserved flow solution. The extension does not increase the time required to run the model, which in Part 1 was shown to be 0.5-1.5 and 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than electrochemical fin (ECF) theory and finite element analysis (FEA) for conserved flow, respectively. The model is compared to reacting-flow ECF and FEA as well as to experiments and is demonstrated as a potentially useful heuristic for understanding the influence of morphology and topology on reactive-diffusive flow through a 3-D microstructural network.

  6. Transplantation of tissue engineering neural network and formation of neuronal relay into the transected rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bi-Qin; Che, Ming-Tian; Du, Bao-Ling; Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Feng, Bo; Qiu, Xue-Chen; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Shu; Shen, Hui-Yong; Wu, Jin-Lang; Ling, Eng-Ang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2016-12-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neural connectivity and permanent functional deficits. Re-establishment of new neuronal relay circuits after SCI is therefore of paramount importance. The present study tested our hypothesis if co-culture of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene-modified Schwann cells (SCs, NT-3-SCs) and TrkC (NT-3 receptor) gene-modified neural stem cells (NSCs, TrkC-NSCs) in a gelatin sponge scaffold could construct a tissue engineering neural network for re-establishing an anatomical neuronal relay after rat spinal cord transection. Eight weeks after transplantation, the neural network created a favorable microenvironment for axonal regeneration and for survival and synaptogenesis of NSC-derived neurons. Biotin conjugates of cholera toxin B subunit (b-CTB, a transneuronal tracer) was injected into the crushed sciatic nerve to label spinal cord neurons. Remarkably, not only ascending and descending nerve fibers, but also propriospinal neurons, made contacts with b-CTB positive NSC-derived neurons. Moreover, b-CTB positive NSC-derived neurons extended their axons making contacts with the motor neurons located in areas caudal to the injury/graft site of spinal cord. Further study showed that NT-3/TrkC interactions activated the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and PI3K/AKT/CREB pathway affecting synaptogenesis of NSC-derived neurons. Together, our findings suggest that NT-3-mediated TrkC signaling plays an essential role in constructing a tissue engineering neural network thus representing a promising avenue for effective exogenous neuronal relay-based treatment for SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewu eDing

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane and extracellular, which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network.

  8. Design and Development of Potential Tissue Engineering Scaffolds from Structurally Different Longitudinal Parts of a Bovine-Femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Sumit; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Cho, Jongman; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2014-07-01

    The complex architecture of the cortical part of the bovine-femur was examined to develop potential tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds. Weight-change and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that significant phase transformation and morphology conversion of the bone occur at 500-750°C and 750-900°C, respectively. Another breakthrough finding was achieved by determining a sintering condition for the nucleation of hydroxyapatite crystal from bovine bone via XRD technique. Scanning electron microscopy results of morphological growth suggests that the concentration of polymer fibrils increases (or decreases, in case of apatite crystals) from the distal to proximal end of the femur. Energy-dispersive analysis of X-ray, Fourier transform infrared, micro-computer tomography, and mechanical studies of the actual composition also strongly support our microscopic results and firmly indicate the functionally graded material properties of bovine-femur. Bones sintered at 900 and 1000°C show potential properties for soft and hard TE applications, respectively.

  9. Deep convolutional neural network and 3D deformable approach for tissue segmentation in musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhou, Zhaoye; Jang, Hyungseok; Samsonov, Alexey; Zhao, Gengyan; Kijowski, Richard

    2017-07-21

    To describe and evaluate a new fully automated musculoskeletal tissue segmentation method using deep convolutional neural network (CNN) and three-dimensional (3D) simplex deformable modeling to improve the accuracy and efficiency of cartilage and bone segmentation within the knee joint. A fully automated segmentation pipeline was built by combining a semantic segmentation CNN and 3D simplex deformable modeling. A CNN technique called SegNet was applied as the core of the segmentation method to perform high resolution pixel-wise multi-class tissue classification. The 3D simplex deformable modeling refined the output from SegNet to preserve the overall shape and maintain a desirable smooth surface for musculoskeletal structure. The fully automated segmentation method was tested using a publicly available knee image data set to compare with currently used state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The fully automated method was also evaluated on two different data sets, which include morphological and quantitative MR images with different tissue contrasts. The proposed fully automated segmentation method provided good segmentation performance with segmentation accuracy superior to most of state-of-the-art methods in the publicly available knee image data set. The method also demonstrated versatile segmentation performance on both morphological and quantitative musculoskeletal MR images with different tissue contrasts and spatial resolutions. The study demonstrates that the combined CNN and 3D deformable modeling approach is useful for performing rapid and accurate cartilage and bone segmentation within the knee joint. The CNN has promising potential applications in musculoskeletal imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Rapid Alterations in Perirenal Adipose Tissue Transcriptomic Networks with Cessation of Voluntary Running

    OpenAIRE

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N.; Company, Joseph M.; Toedebusch, Ryan G.; Roberts, Christian K.; Roberts, Michael D.; Booth, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    In maturing rats, the growth of abdominal fat is attenuated by voluntary wheel running. After the cessation of running by wheel locking, a rapid increase in adipose tissue growth to a size that is similar to rats that have never run (i.e. catch-up growth) has been previously reported by our lab. In contrast, diet-induced increases in adiposity have a slower onset with relatively delayed transcriptomic responses. The purpose of the present study was to identify molecular pathways associated wi...

  11. A heart-brain-kidney network controls adaptation to cardiac stress through tissue macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiu, Katsuhito; Shibata, Munehiko; Nakayama, Yukiteru; Ogata, Fusa; Matsumoto, Sahohime; Noshita, Koji; Iwami, Shingo; Nakae, Susumu; Komuro, Issei; Nagai, Ryozo; Manabe, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by insufficient cardiac function. In addition to abnormalities intrinsic to the heart, dysfunction of other organs and dysregulation of systemic factors greatly affect the development and consequences of heart failure. Here we show that the heart and kidneys function cooperatively in generating an adaptive response to cardiac pressure overload. In mice subjected to pressure overload in the heart, sympathetic nerve activation led to activation of renal collecting-duct (CD) epithelial cells. Cell-cell interactions among activated CD cells, tissue macrophages and endothelial cells within the kidney led to secretion of the cytokine CSF2, which in turn stimulated cardiac-resident Ly6Clo macrophages, which are essential for the myocardial adaptive response to pressure overload. The renal response to cardiac pressure overload was disrupted by renal sympathetic denervation, adrenergic β2-receptor blockade or CD-cell-specific deficiency of the transcription factor KLF5. Moreover, we identified amphiregulin as an essential cardioprotective mediator produced by cardiac Ly6Clo macrophages. Our results demonstrate a dynamic interplay between the heart, brain and kidneys that is necessary for adaptation to cardiac stress, and they highlight the homeostatic functions of tissue macrophages and the sympathetic nervous system.

  12. Internet Worm Detection as part of a Distributed Network Inspection System

    OpenAIRE

    Linehan, Eamonn

    2004-01-01

    The most widely publicized, and arguably most damaging, types of malicious traffic on the Internet today include worms, spam, viruses and denial of service attacks. Internet worms self propagate across networks exploiting flaws in operating systems and services, spreading viruses and congesting network links. Worms constitute a significant security and performance threat and have recently been used to facilitate distributed denial of service (dDoS) attacks. It is the aim of thi...

  13. Tissue and cell-type co-expression networks of transcription factors and wood component genes in Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Jack P; Lin, Ying-Chung; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Chen, Hao; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2017-05-01

    Co-expression networks based on transcriptomes of Populus trichocarpa major tissues and specific cell types suggest redundant control of cell wall component biosynthetic genes by transcription factors in wood formation. We analyzed the transcriptomes of five tissues (xylem, phloem, shoot, leaf, and root) and two wood forming cell types (fiber and vessel) of Populus trichocarpa to assemble gene co-expression subnetworks associated with wood formation. We identified 165 transcription factors (TFs) that showed xylem-, fiber-, and vessel-specific expression. Of these 165 TFs, 101 co-expressed (correlation coefficient, r > 0.7) with the 45 secondary cell wall cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin biosynthetic genes. Each cell wall component gene co-expressed on average with 34 TFs, suggesting redundant control of the cell wall component gene expression. Co-expression analysis showed that the 101 TFs and the 45 cell wall component genes each has two distinct groups (groups 1 and 2), based on their co-expression patterns. The group 1 TFs (44 members) are predominantly xylem and fiber specific, and are all highly positively co-expressed with the group 1 cell wall component genes (30 members), suggesting their roles as major wood formation regulators. Group 1 TFs include a lateral organ boundary domain gene (LBD) that has the highest number of positively correlated cell wall component genes (36) and TFs (47). The group 2 TFs have 57 members, including 14 vessel-specific TFs, and are generally less correlated with the cell wall component genes. An exception is a vessel-specific basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene that negatively correlates with 20 cell wall component genes, and may function as a key transcriptional suppressor. The co-expression networks revealed here suggest a well-structured transcriptional homeostasis for cell wall component biosynthesis during wood formation.

  14. Wound ballistics of firearm-related injuries--part 1: missile characteristics and mechanisms of soft tissue wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanopoulos, P K; Filippakis, K; Soupiou, O T; Pazarakiotis, V C

    2014-12-01

    Firearm-related injuries are caused by a wide variety of weapons and projectiles. The kinetic energy of the penetrating projectile defines its ability to disrupt and displace tissue, whereas the actual tissue damage is determined by the mode of energy release during the projectile-tissue interaction and the particular characteristics of the tissues and organs involved. Certain projectile factors, namely shape, construction, and stability, greatly influence the rate of energy transfer to the tissues along the wound track. Two zones of tissue damage can be identified, the permanent cavity created by the passage of the bullet and a potential area of contused tissue surrounding it, produced mainly by temporary cavitation which is a manifestation of effective high-energy transfer to tissue. Due to the complex nature of these injuries, wound assessment and the type and extent of treatment required should be based on an understanding of the various mechanisms contributing to tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary care clinicians' perspectives on management of skin and soft tissue infections: an Iowa Research Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Jeanette M; Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Smith, Tara C; Merchant, Mary L; Bergus, George R; Jogerst, Gerald J

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 95,000 people developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections during 2005 of which 14% were community-associated and 85% were hospital or other health setting associated, and 19,000 Americans died from these infections that year. To explore health care providers' perspectives on management of skin and soft tissue infections to gain a better understanding of the problems faced by busy providers in primary care settings. Focus group meetings were held at 9 family physician offices in the Iowa Research Network. Seventy-eight clinicians including physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, and house officers attended. Meeting audiotapes were transcribed and coded by 3 investigators, and a MRSA-management taxonomy was developed. The main themes that emerged from the focus groups included epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, management, prevention, special populations, and public relations. The incidence of MRSA infections was perceived to have increased over the past decade. However, diagnosis and treatment protocols for physicians in the outpatient setting have lagged behind, and no well-accepted diagnostic or treatment algorithms were used by physicians attending the focus groups. The clinicians in this study noted considerable confusion and inconsistency in the management of skin and soft tissue infections, particularly those due to MRSA. © 2010 National Rural Health Association.

  16. Transcriptional Networks in Single Perivascular Cells Sorted from Human Adipose Tissue Reveal a Hierarchy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, W Reef; Moldovan, Nicanor I; Moldovan, Leni; Livak, Kenneth J; Datta, Krishna; Goswami, Chirayu; Corselli, Mirko; Traktuev, Dmitry O; Murray, Iain R; Péault, Bruno; March, Keith

    2017-05-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of multipotent mesenchymal stem-like cells, located in the perivascular niche. Based on their surface markers, these have been assigned to two main categories: CD31 - /CD45 - /CD34 + /CD146 - cells (adventitial stromal/stem cells [ASCs]) and CD31 - /CD45 - /CD34 - /CD146 + cells (pericytes [PCs]). These populations display heterogeneity of unknown significance. We hypothesized that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a functional marker of primitivity, could help to better define ASC and PC subclasses. To this end, the stromal vascular fraction from a human lipoaspirate was simultaneously stained with fluorescent antibodies to CD31, CD45, CD34, and CD146 antigens and the ALDH substrate Aldefluor, then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Individual ASCs (n = 67) and PCs (n = 73) selected from the extremities of the ALDH-staining spectrum were transcriptionally profiled by Fluidigm single-cell quantitative polymerase chain reaction for a predefined set (n = 429) of marker genes. To these single-cell data, we applied differential expression and principal component and clustering analysis, as well as an original gene coexpression network reconstruction algorithm. Despite the stochasticity at the single-cell level, covariation of gene expression analysis yielded multiple network connectivity parameters suggesting that these perivascular progenitor cell subclasses possess the following order of maturity: (a) ALDH br ASC (most primitive); (b) ALDH dim ASC; (c) ALDH br PC; (d) ALDH dim PC (least primitive). This order was independently supported by specific combinations of class-specific expressed genes and further confirmed by the analysis of associated signaling pathways. In conclusion, single-cell transcriptional analysis of four populations isolated from fat by surface markers and enzyme activity suggests a developmental hierarchy among perivascular mesenchymal stem cells supported by markers and coexpression

  17. Bone cement with a modified polyphosphate network structure stimulates hard tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Hong, Min-Ho; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a calcium polyphosphate cement (CpPC) consisting of basic components was investigated to assess its potential for hard tissue regeneration. The added basic components for improving the structural stability, which controlled the setting time, where the setting reaction resulted in the formation of amorphous structure with a re-constructed polyphosphate. Moreover, the characteristics were controlled by the composition, which determined the polyphosphate structure. CpPC exhibited outstanding dissolution rate compared with the common biodegradable cement, brushite cement (2.5 times). Despite high amounts of dissolution products, no significant cytotoxicity ensued. Induction of calcification in MG-63 cells treated with CpPC, the level of calcification increased with increasing CpPC dissolution rate. Induced calcification was observed also in CpPC-treated ST2 cells, in contrast with MG-63 and ST2 treated with brushite cement, for which no calcification was observed. In vivo tests using a rat calvarial defect model showed that resorbed CpPC resulted in favorable host responses and promoted bone formation. Additionally, there was a significant increase in defect closure, and new bone formation progressed from CpPC mid-sites as well as defect margins. From these results, CpPC exhibits significant potential as biodegradable bone substitute for bone regeneration. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Abdomen and Pelvis: Radiologic-Pathologic Features, Part 1-Common Sarcomas: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Angela D; Manning, Maria A; Al-Refaie, Waddah B; Miettinen, Markku M

    2017-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas are a diverse group of rare mesenchymal malignancies that can arise at any location in the body and affect all age groups. These sarcomas are most common in the extremities, trunk wall, retroperitoneum, and head and neck. In the adult population, soft-tissue sarcomas arising in the abdomen and pelvis are often large masses at the time of diagnosis because they are usually clinically silent or cause vague or mild symptoms until they invade or compress vital organs. In contrast, soft-tissue sarcomas arising from the abdominal wall come to clinical attention earlier in the course of disease because they cause a palpable mass, abdominal wall deformity, or pain that is more clinically apparent. The imaging features of abdominal and pelvic sarcomas and abdominal wall sarcomas can be nonspecific and overlap with more common pathologic conditions, making diagnosis difficult or, in some cases, delaying diagnosis. Liposarcoma (well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas), leiomyosarcoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) are the most common intra-abdominal primary sarcomas. Any soft-tissue sarcoma can arise in the abdominal wall. Knowledge of the classification and pathologic features of soft-tissue sarcomas, the anatomic locations where they occur, and their cross-sectional imaging features helps the radiologist establish the diagnosis or differential diagnosis so that patients with soft-tissue sarcomas can receive optimal treatment and management. In part 1 of this article, the most common soft-tissue sarcomas (liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and GIST) are reviewed, with a discussion on anatomic locations, classification, clinical considerations, and differential diagnosis. Part 2 will focus on the remainder of the soft-tissue sarcomas occurring in the abdomen and pelvis.

  19. Cross tissue trait-pathway network reveals the importance of oxidative stress and inflammation pathways in obesity-induced diabetes in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouguo Gao

    Full Text Available Complex disorders often involve dysfunctions in multiple tissue organs. Elucidating the communication among them is important to understanding disease pathophysiology. In this study we integrate multiple tissue gene expression and quantitative trait measurements of an obesity-induced diabetes mouse model, with databases of molecular interaction networks, to construct a cross tissue trait-pathway network. The animals belong to two strains of mice (BTBR or B6, of two obesity status (obese or lean, and at two different ages (4 weeks and 10 weeks. Only 10 week obese BTBR animals are diabetic. The expression data was first utilized to determine the state of every pathway in each tissue, which is subsequently utilized to construct a pathway co-expression network and to define trait-relevant and trait-linking pathways. Among the six tissues profiled, the adipose contains the largest number of trait-linking pathways. Among the eight traits measured, the body weight and plasma insulin level possess the most number of relevant and linking pathways. Topological analysis of the trait-pathway network revealed that the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway in liver and the insulin signaling pathway in muscle are of top importance to the information flow in the network, with the highest degrees and betweenness centralities. Interestingly, pathways related to metabolism and oxidative stress actively interact with many other pathways in all animals, whereas, among the 10 week animals, the inflammation pathways were preferentially interactive in the diabetic ones only. In summary, our method offers a systems approach to delineate disease trait relevant intra- and cross tissue pathway interactions, and provides insights to the molecular basis of the obesity-induced diabetes.

  20. Effect of morphology on water sorption in cellular solid foods. Part I: Pore scale network model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esveld, D.C.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Dalen, van G.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    A pore scale network model is developed to predict the dynamics of moisture diffusion into complex cellular solid foods like bread, crackers, and cereals. The morphological characteristics of the sample, including the characteristics of each cellular void and the open pore connections between them

  1. An overview of recent findings of the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network (Part I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, RM; Leverich, GS; Altshuler, LL; Frye, MA; Suppes, TM; Keck, PE; McElroy, SL; Kupka, R; Nolen, WA; Grunze, H; Walden, J

    2003-01-01

    Aim and Methods: Selected recent findings of the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network are briefly reviewed and their clinical implications discussed. Results: Daily prospective ratings on the NIMH-LCM indicate a high degree of residual depressive morbidity (three times that of hypomania or mania)

  2. A motivational health companion in the home as part of an intelligent health monitoring sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, V.; Wildvuur, S.; Kröse, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes our work in progress to develop a personal monitoring system that can monitor the physical and emotional condition of a patient by using contextual information from a sensor network, provide the patient with feedback concerning their health status and motivate the patient to

  3. Mechanical response of transient telechelic networks with many-part stickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Michelle K.; Ramírez, Jorge; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2017-11-01

    A central question in soft matter is understanding how several individual, weak bonds act together to produce collective interactions. Here, gel-forming telechelic polymers with multiple stickers at each chain end are studied through Brownian dynamics simulations to understand how collective interaction of the bonds affects mechanical response of the gels. These polymers are modeled as finitely extensible dumbbells using an explicit tau-leap algorithm and the binding energy of these associations was kept constant regardless of the number of stickers. The addition of multiple bonds to the associating ends of telechelic polymers increases or decreases the network relaxation time depending on the relative kinetics of association but increases both shear stress and extensional viscosity. The relationship between the rate of association and the Rouse time of dangling chains results in two different regimes for the equilibrium stress relaxation of associating physical networks. In case I, a dissociated dangling chain is able to fully relax before re-associating to the network, resulting in two characteristic relaxation times and a non-monotonic terminal relaxation time with increasing number of bonds per polymer endgroup. In case II, the dissociated dangling chain is only able to relax a fraction of the way before it re-attaches to the network, and increasing the number of bonds per endgroup monotonically increases the terminal relaxation time. In flow, increasing the number of stickers increases the steady-state shear and extensional viscosities even though the overall bond kinetics and equilibrium constant remain unchanged. Increased dissipation in the simulations is primarily due to higher average chain extension with increasing bond number. These results indicate that toughness and dissipation in physically associating networks can both be increased by breaking single, strong bonds into smaller components.

  4. Application of fuzzy analytic network process for barrier evaluation in automotive parts remanufacturing towards cleaner production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Shankar, Madan; Kannan, Devika

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of end-of-life vehicles and a burgeoning concern for conservation of resources pressures the implementation of auto parts remanufacturing globally. But unlike in developed nations, developing countries encounter struggle with the implementation of auto parts remanufacturing due...

  5. Network performance measurements as part of feasibility studies on moving an ATLAS event filter to off-site institutes

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, K; Dobinson, Robert W; Ivanovici, M; Losada-Maia, Marcia; Meirosu, C; Sladowski, G

    2004-01-01

    We present a system for measuring network performance as part of the feasibility studies for locating the ATLAS third level trigger, the event filter (EF), in remote locations. Part of the processing power required to run the EF algorithms, the current estimate is 2000 state off the art processors, can be provided in remote, CERN-affiliated institutes, if a suitable network connection between CERN and the remote site could be achieved. The system is composed of two PCs equipped with GPS systems, CERN-designed clock cards and Alteon gigabit programmable network interface cards. In the first set of measurements we plan to quantify connection in terms of end-to-end latency, throughput, jitter and packet loss. Running streaming tests and study throughput, IP QoS, routing testing and traffic shaping follows this. Finally, we plan to install the event filter software in a remote location and feed it with data from test beams at CERN. Each of these tests should be preformed with the test traffic treated in the netwo...

  6. Bidirectional Long Short-Term Memory Network with a Conditional Random Field Layer for Uyghur Part-Of-Speech Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maihemuti Maimaiti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Uyghur is an agglutinative and a morphologically rich language; natural language processing tasks in Uyghur can be a challenge. Word morphology is important in Uyghur part-of-speech (POS tagging. However, POS tagging performance suffers from error propagation of morphological analyzers. To address this problem, we propose a few models for POS tagging: conditional random fields (CRF, long short-term memory (LSTM, bidirectional LSTM networks (BI-LSTM, LSTM networks with a CRF layer, and BI-LSTM networks with a CRF layer. These models do not depend on stemming and word disambiguation for Uyghur and combine hand-crafted features with neural network models. State-of-the-art performance on Uyghur POS tagging is achieved on test data sets using the proposed approach: 98.41% accuracy on 15 labels and 95.74% accuracy on 64 labels, which are 2.71% and 4% improvements, respectively, over the CRF model results. Using engineered features, our model achieves further improvements of 0.2% (15 labels and 0.48% (64 labels. The results indicate that the proposed method could be an effective approach for POS tagging in other morphologically rich languages.

  7. Discovering the structure of nerve tissue: Part 3: From Jan Evangelista Purkyně to Ludwig Mauthner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvátal, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    The previous works of Purkyně, Valentin, and Remak showed that the central and peripheral nervous systems contained not only nerve fibers but also cellular elements. The use of microscopes and new fixation techniques enabled them to accurately obtain data on the structure of nerve tissue and consequently in many European universities microscopes started to become widely used in histological and morphological studies. The present review summarizes important discoveries concerning the structure of neural tissue, mostly from vertebrates, during the period from 1838 to 1865. This review describes the discoveries of famous as well as less well-known scholars of the time, who contributed significantly to current understandings about the structure of neural tissue. The period is characterized by the first descriptions of different types of nerve cells and the first attempts of a cytoarchitectonic description of the spinal cord and brain. During the same time, the concept of a neuroglial tissue was introduced, first as a tissue for "gluing" nerve fibers, cells, and blood capillaries into one unit, but later some glial cells were described for the first time. Questions arose as to whether or not cells in ganglia and the central nervous system had the same morphological and functional properties, and whether nerve fibers and cell bodies were interconnected. Microscopic techniques started to be used for the examination of physiological as well as pathological nerve tissues. The overall state of knowledge was just a step away from the emergence of the concept of neurons and glial cells.

  8. Mobile satellite business networks: A part of the European mobile system

    Science.gov (United States)

    deMateo, M. L.; Jongejans, A.; Loisy, C.; VanHimbeeck, C.; Marchal, J. P.; Borella, A.; Sartori, M.

    1995-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is presently procuring an L-band payload EMS, to be embarked on the ITALSAT-2 satellite due for launch in early 1996, in order to promote a regional European mobile system. One of the Land Mobile Communication systems supported by EMS is the MSBN (Mobile Satellite Business Network) voice and data system which will offer the services of a business network on a seamless European coverage. This paper will first recall the characteristics of the MSBN system, which is based on quasi-synchronized CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) techniques in both directions, and then describe the CDMA receivers implementation. Main validation test results will also be reported confirming predicted performances.

  9. Effects of Hofmeister salt series on gluten network formation: Part II. Anion series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhumury, H C D; Small, D M; Day, L

    2016-12-01

    Different anion salts from the Hofmeister series were used to investigate their effects on gluten network formation. The effects of these anion salts on the mixing properties of the dough and the rheological and chemical properties of gluten samples extracted from the dough with these respective salts were compared. The aim of this work was to determine how different anion salts influence the formation of the gluten structure during dough mixing. It was found that the Hofmeister anion salts affected the gluten network formation by interacting directly with specific amino acid residues that resulted in changes in gluten protein composition, specifically the percentage of the unextractable polymeric protein fractions (%UPP). These changes consequently led to remarkable differences in the mixing profiles and microstructural features of the dough, small deformation rheological properties of the gluten and a strain hardening behaviour of both dough and gluten samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Network Centric Operations (NCO) Case Study. The British Approach to Low-Intensity Operations: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-12

    population and sow seeds of doubts in the minds of the rebel leadership about their precise role. The aim was to deter the RUF from continuing its...example, while 19 Bde took the decision to spread itself as widely as possible, 20 Bde focused its forces more narrowly around the oil infrastructure...Lim, Soon- Chia , ‘Network Centric Warfare: A Command and Control Perspective’, Thesis submitted to the US Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA

  11. LINKEDIN TRILOGY: Part 1. Top 10 Reasons You Should NOT Join LinkedIn Professional Network!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2013-01-01

    Disclaimer: I have been an active "free" user of LinkedIn for 5.463 years with more than 3000 (1st degree) connections from all over the world. I have no vested interest in LinkedIn other than as a user of the services it provides. Despite the fact that LinkedIn was originally designed as a network for business professionals, not…

  12. Radiofrequency exposure near an attocell as part of an ultra-high density access network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielens, Arno; Vermeeren, Günter; Caytan, Olivier; Torfs, Guy; Demeester, Piet; Bauwelinck, Johan; Rogier, Hendrik; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2017-05-01

    In the future, wireless radiofrequency (RF) telecommunications networks will provide users with gigabit-per-second data rates. Therefore, these networks are evolving toward hybrid networks, which will include commonly used macro- and microcells in combination with local ultra-high density access networks consisting of so-called attocells. The use of attocells requires a proper compliance assessment of exposure to RF electromagnetic radiation. This paper presents, for the first time, such a compliance assessment of an attocell operating at 3.5 GHz with an input power of 1 mW, based on both root-mean-squared electric field strength (Erms ) and peak 10 g-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR10g ) values. The Erms values near the attocell were determined using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations and measurements by a tri-axial probe. They were compared to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection's (ICNIRP) reference levels. All measured and simulated Erms values above the attocell were below 5.9 V/m and lower than reference levels. The SAR10g values were measured in a homogeneous phantom, which resulted in an SAR10g of 9.7 mW/kg, and used FDTD simulations, which resulted in an SAR10g of 7.2 mW/kg. FDTD simulations of realistic exposure situations were executed using a heterogeneous phantom, which yielded SAR10g values lower than 2.8 mW/kg. The studied dosimetric quantities were in compliance with ICNIRP guidelines when the attocell was fed an input power <1 mW. The deployment of attocells is thus a feasible solution for providing broadband data transmission without drastically increasing personal RF exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:295-306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Anatomically Inspired Three-dimensional Micro-tissue Engineered Neural Networks for Nervous System Reconstruction, Modulation, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzyna, Laura A; Adewole, Dayo O; Gordián-Vélez, Wisberty J; Grovola, Michael R; Burrell, Justin C; Katiyar, Kritika S; Petrov, Dmitriy; Harris, James P; Cullen, D Kacy

    2017-05-31

    Functional recovery rarely occurs following injury or disease-induced degeneration within the central nervous system (CNS) due to the inhibitory environment and the limited capacity for neurogenesis. We are developing a strategy to simultaneously address neuronal and axonal pathway loss within the damaged CNS. This manuscript presents the fabrication protocol for micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), implantable constructs consisting of neurons and aligned axonal tracts spanning the extracellular matrix (ECM) lumen of a preformed hydrogel cylinder hundreds of microns in diameter that may extend centimeters in length. Neuronal aggregates are delimited to the extremes of the three-dimensional encasement and are spanned by axonal projections. Micro-TENNs are uniquely poised as a strategy for CNS reconstruction, emulating aspects of brain connectome cytoarchitecture and potentially providing means for network replacement. The neuronal aggregates may synapse with host tissue to form new functional relays to restore and/or modulate missing or damaged circuitry. These constructs may also act as pro-regenerative "living scaffolds" capable of exploiting developmental mechanisms for cell migration and axonal pathfinding, providing synergistic structural and soluble cues based on the state of regeneration. Micro-TENNs are fabricated by pouring liquid hydrogel into a cylindrical mold containing a longitudinally centered needle. Once the hydrogel has gelled, the needle is removed, leaving a hollow micro-column. An ECM solution is added to the lumen to provide an environment suitable for neuronal adhesion and axonal outgrowth. Dissociated neurons are mechanically aggregated for precise seeding within one or both ends of the micro-column. This methodology reliably produces self-contained miniature constructs with long-projecting axonal tracts that may recapitulate features of brain neuroanatomy. Synaptic immunolabeling and genetically encoded calcium

  14. An approach for tissue density classification in mammographic images using artificial neural network based on wavelet and curvelet transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaşar, Hüseyin; Ceylan, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the types of cancer which is most commonly seen in women. Density of breast is an important indicator for the risk of cancer. In addition, densities of tissue may harden the diagnosis by hiding the abnormalities occurring on the breast. For this reason, during the process of diagnosis, the process of automatic classification of breast density has a significant importance. In this study, a new system with the base of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and multiple resolution analysis is suggested. Wavelet and curvelet analyses having the most common use have been used as multi resolution analysis. 4 pieces of statistics which are minimum value, maximum value, mean value and standard deviation have been extracted from the images which have been eluted to their sub-bands via multi resolution analysis. For the purpose of testing the success of the system, 322 pieces of images which are in MIAS database have been used. The obtained results for different backgrounds are so satisfying; and the highest classification values have been obtained as 97.16 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty background and 79.80 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty-glanduar background. The same results have been obtained using Wavelet transform and ANN and Curvelet transform and ANN for dense background and accuracy rate of 84.82 % have been reached. The results of mean classification have been obtained, for three pieces of tissue types (fatty, fatty-glanduar, dense), in sequence as 84.47 % with the use of ANN, 85.71 % with the use of curvelet analysis and ANN; and 87.26 % with the use of wavelet analysis and ANN.

  15. Biomechanics of the Sensor–Tissue Interface—Effects of Motion, Pressure, and Design on Sensor Performance and the Foreign Body Response—Part I: Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, Kristen L; Ratner, Buddy D; Wisniewski, Natalie A

    2011-01-01

    The importance of biomechanics in glucose sensor function has been largely overlooked. This article is the first part of a two-part review in which we look beyond commonly recognized chemical biocompatibility to explore the biomechanics of the sensor–tissue interface as an important aspect of continuous glucose sensor biocompatibility. Part I provides a theoretical framework to describe how biomechanical factors such as motion and pressure (typically micromotion and micropressure) give rise to interfacial stresses, which affect tissue physiology around a sensor and, in turn, impact sensor performance. Three main contributors to sensor motion and pressure are explored: applied forces, sensor design, and subject/patient considerations. We describe how acute forces can temporarily impact sensor signal and how chronic forces can alter the foreign body response and inflammation around an implanted sensor, and thus impact sensor performance. The importance of sensor design (e.g., size, shape, modulus, texture) and specific implant location on the tissue response are also explored. In Part II: Examples and Application (a sister publication), examples from the literature are reviewed, and the application of biomechanical concepts to sensor design are described. We believe that adding biomechanical strategies to the arsenal of material compositions, surface modifications, drug elution, and other chemical strategies will lead to improvements in sensor biocompatibility and performance. PMID:21722578

  16. Investigations on some metabolites of Tecoma stans Juss. callus tissue. Part II. Chromatographical analysis of alkaloid and quinone compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dohnal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tecoma stans Juss. callus tissue grown on Murashige-Mei Lie Lin (M-L and Murashige-Skoog (RT-k medium supplemented with Tecoma alkaloid precursors like lysine, mevalonic acid lactone and quinolinic acid, were investigated for their alkaloid content by thin-layer (TLC and paper (PC chromatography methods. The results were compared with those obtained by parallel analysis of greenhouse plant leaves. Seven alkaloid spots were detected in the leaf extracts, namely: actinidine, 4-noractinidine, boschniakine, tecomanine, two spots of skytanthine derivatives and one unidentified spot. Only l spot corresponding to skytanthine derivatives appeard in the extracts of callus tissues cultured on basal M-L medium or supplemented with lysine or mevalonic acid lactone. However, 3 alkaloid spots were revealed in extracts of homogeneous parenchyma-like callus tissues obtained o-n, RT-k medium. Beside the skytanthine derivatives rnentioned above, actinidine and tecomanine were identified, and moreover, in callus tissues growing on the same medium (RT-k supplemented with quinolinic acid, boschniakine was found. It was found that T. stans leaves as well as callus tissues cultured on RT-k medium contained traces of lapachol and another quinone-type compound.

  17. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part I: Forward models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of coastal processes, including waves, currents, and sediment transport, can be obtained from a variety of detailed geophysical-process models with many simulations showing significant skill. This capability supports a wide range of research and applied efforts that can benefit from accurate numerical predictions. However, the predictions are only as accurate as the data used to drive the models and, given the large temporal and spatial variability of the surf zone, inaccuracies in data are unavoidable such that useful predictions require corresponding estimates of uncertainty. We demonstrate how a Bayesian-network model can be used to provide accurate predictions of wave-height evolution in the surf zone given very sparse and/or inaccurate boundary-condition data. The approach is based on a formal treatment of a data-assimilation problem that takes advantage of significant reduction of the dimensionality of the model system. We demonstrate that predictions of a detailed geophysical model of the wave evolution are reproduced accurately using a Bayesian approach. In this surf-zone application, forward prediction skill was 83%, and uncertainties in the model inputs were accurately transferred to uncertainty in output variables. We also demonstrate that if modeling uncertainties were not conveyed to the Bayesian network (i.e., perfect data or model were assumed), then overly optimistic prediction uncertainties were computed. More consistent predictions and uncertainties were obtained by including model-parameter errors as a source of input uncertainty. Improved predictions (skill of 90%) were achieved because the Bayesian network simultaneously estimated optimal parameters while predicting wave heights.

  18. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  19. HIGH SPEED RAILWAY LINES – FUTURE PART OF CZECH RAILWAY NETWORK?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Týfa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper first describes high speed rail generally and explains the relationship between high speed and conventional railway networks (according to the vehicle types in operation on the network. The core of the paper is comprised of the methodology for choosing the best route for a railway line and its application to the high speed railway connection Praha – Brno. The Algorithm used assumes the existence of more route proposals, which could be different in terms of the operational conception, line routing or types of vehicles used. The optimal variant is the one with the lowest daily cost, which includes infrastructure and vehicle costs; investment and operational costs. The results from applying this model confirmed the assumption, that a dedicated high speed railway line, only for high speed trains, has the same or lower investment costs than a line for both high speed and conventional trains. Furthermore, a dedicated high line also has a lower cost for infrastructure maintenance but a higher cost for buying high speed multiple units.

  20. Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous tissues. Part II: Mixed-hybrid finite element solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakpoor, K.; Kaasschieter, E.F.; Huyghe, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The swelling and shrinkage of biological tissues are modelled by a four-component mixture theory [J.M. Huyghe and J.D. Janssen, Int. J. Engng. Sci. 35 (1997) 793-802; K. Malakpoor, E.F. Kaasschieter and J.M. Huyghe, Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous

  1. Neural Network Classifiers to Grade Parts Based on Surface Defects with Spatial Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt

    1995-01-01

    In many manufacturing situations, production parts must be assigned a qualitative grade, rather than only accepted or rejected. When this is done, spatial relationships between defect areas can be a critical factor in making grade assignments. In the case of grading hardwood lumber, for instance, there exists a highly complex set of grading rules which incorporate...

  2. Sequence-dependent clustering of parts and machines : a Fuzzy ART neural network approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suresh, N.; Slomp, J.; Kaparthi, S.

    1999-01-01

    This study addresses the problem of identifying families of parts having a similar sequence of operations. This is a prerequisite for the implementation of cellular manufacturing, group technology, just-in-time manufacturing systems, and for streamlining material flows in general. A pattern

  3. Monitoring of persistent organic pollutants in Africa. Part 2: design of a network to monitor the continental and intercontinental background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammel, G; Dobrovolný, P; Dvorská, A; Chromá, K; Brázdil, R; Holoubek, I; Hosek, J

    2009-11-01

    A network for the study of long-term trends of the continental background in Africa and the intercontinental background of persistent organic pollutants as resulting from long-range transport of contaminants from European, South Asian, and other potential source regions, as well as by watching supposedly pristine regions, i.e. the Southern Ocean and Antarctica is designed. The results of a pilot phase sampling programme in 2008 and meteorological and climatological information from the period 1961-2007 was used to apply objective criteria for the selection of stations for the monitoring network: out the original 26 stations six have been rejected because of suggested strong local sources of POPs and three others because of local meteorological effects, which may prevent part of the time long-range transported air to reach the sampling site. Representativeness of the meteorological patterns during the pilot phase with respect to climatology was assessed by comparison of the more local airflow situation as given by climatological vs. observed wind roses and by comparison of backward trajectories with the climatological wind (NCEP/NCAR re-analyses). With minor exceptions advection to nine inspected stations was typical for present-day climate during the pilot phase, 2008. Six to nine stations would cover satisfyingly large and densely populated regions of North-eastern, West and East Africa and its neighbouring seas, the Mediterranean, Northern and Equatorial Atlantic Ocean, the Western Indian Ocean and the Southern Ocean. Among the more densely populated areas Southern Cameroon, parts of the Abessinian plateau and most of the Great Lakes area would not be covered. The potential of the network is not hampered by on-going long-term changes of the advection to the selected stations, as these do hardly affect the coverage of target areas.

  4. Use of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles for enhanced interlibrary loan, part II: Network application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, V M; Dell, E Y

    1993-07-01

    The Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery, and Union List Task Force of the Health Sciences Libraries Consortium (HSLC) accepted the charge of maximizing use of the advanced features of group 3-level memory telefacsimiles. A pilot project was initiated to address the task force's recommendation to the HSLC Board that all nonrush interlibrary loan (ILL) documents be transmitted to participants within forty-eight hours of request receipt. This paper describes the project, which tests a network application for unattended, overnight transmission of documents. In determining whether this technology could be used as the primary medium for ILL of photocopies, the following criteria were used: the percentage of ILL requests filled by telefacsimile; the speed, quality, and reliability of service; and the impact of telefacsimile on document delivery costs. The article discusses the project history, optimal use of equipment features for library applications, full-scale implementation, and operational issues that affect ILL policy.

  5. Effects of Hofmeister salt series on gluten network formation: Part I. Cation series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhumury, H C D; Small, D M; Day, L

    2016-12-01

    Different cationic salts were used to investigate the effects of the Hofmeister salt series on gluten network formation. The effects of cationic salts on wheat flour dough mixing properties, the rheological and the chemical properties of the gluten extracted from the dough with different respective salts, were investigated. The specific influence of different cationic salts on the gluten structure formation during dough mixing, compared to the sodium ion, were determined. The effects of different cations on dough and gluten of different flours mostly followed the Hofmeister series (NH4(+), K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)). The impacts of cations on gluten structure and dough rheology at levels tested were relatively small. Therefore, the replacement of sodium from a technological standpoint is possible, particularly by monovalent cations such as NH4(+), or K(+). However the levels of replacement need to take into account sensory attributes of the cationic salts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Label-free LC-MSe in tissue and serum reveals protein networks underlying differences between benign and malignant serous ovarian tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Wegdam

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To identify proteins and (molecular/biological pathways associated with differences between benign and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES: Serum of six patients with a serous adenocarcinoma of the ovary was collected before treatment, with a control group consisting of six matched patients with a serous cystadenoma. In addition to the serum, homogeneous regions of cells exhibiting uniform histology were isolated from benign and cancerous tissue by laser microdissection. We subsequently employed label-free liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSe to identify proteins in these serum and tissues samples. Analyses of differential expression between samples were performed using Bioconductor packages and in-house scripts in the statistical software package R. Hierarchical clustering and pathway enrichment analyses were performed, as well as network enrichment and interactome analysis using MetaCore. RESULTS: In total, we identified 20 and 71 proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between benign and malignant serum and tissue samples, respectively. The differentially expressed protein sets in serum and tissue largely differed with only 2 proteins in common. MetaCore network analysis, however inferred GCR-alpha and Sp1 as common transcriptional regulators. Interactome analysis highlighted 14-3-3 zeta/delta, 14-3-3 beta/alpha, Alpha-actinin 4, HSP60, and PCBP1 as critical proteins in the tumor proteome signature based on their relative overconnectivity. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001084. DISCUSSION: Our analysis identified proteins with both novel and previously known associations to ovarian cancer biology. Despite the small overlap between differentially expressed protein sets in serum and tissue, APOA1 and Serotransferrin were significantly lower expressed in both serum and cancer tissue samples, suggesting a tissue-derived effect in serum

  7. The Connective Tissue Components of Optic Nerve Head Cupping in Monkey Experimental Glaucoma Part 1: Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Ren, Ruojin; Lockwood, Howard; Williams, Galen; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, Crawford; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize optic nerve head (ONH) connective tissue change within 21 monkey experimental glaucoma (EG) eyes, so as to identify its principal components. Methods Animals were imaged three to five times at baseline then every 2 weeks following chronic unilateral IOP elevation, and euthanized early through end-stage confocal scanning laser tomographic change. Optic nerve heads were serial-sectioned, three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall EG versus control eye differences were assessed by general estimating equations (GEE). Significant, animal-specific, EG eye change was required to exceed the maximum physiologic intereye differences in six healthy animals. Results Overall EG eye change was significant (P cupping” in monkey EG which serve as targets for longitudinally staging and phenotyping ONH connective tissue alteration within all forms of monkey and human optic neuropathy. PMID:26641545

  8. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats using scanning electron microscope - Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; Maghraby, Ahmed; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, 40 adult male albino rats were used to study the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues (enamel surface, dentinal tubules and the cementum surface). The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma doses. The effects of irradiated hard dental tissues samples were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. For doses up to 0.5 Gy, there was no evidence of the existence of cracks on the enamel surface. With 1 Gy irradiation dose, cracks were clearly observed with localized erosive areas. At 2 Gy irradiation dose, the enamel showed morphological alterations as disturbed prismatic and interprismatic areas. An increase in dentinal tubules diameter and a contemporary inter-tubular dentine volume decrease were observed with higher irradiation dose. Concerning cementum, low doses,teeth.

  9. Biomechanics of the Sensor–Tissue Interface—Effects of Motion, Pressure, and Design on Sensor Performance and Foreign Body Response—Part II: Examples and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, Kristen L; Ratner, Buddy D; Wisniewski, Natalie A

    2011-01-01

    This article is the second part of a two-part review in which we explore the biomechanics of the sensor–tissue interface as an important aspect of continuous glucose sensor biocompatibility. Part I, featured in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, describes a theoretical framework of how biomechanical factors such as motion and pressure (typically micromotion and micropressure) affect tissue physiology around a sensor and in turn, impact sensor performance. Here in Part II, a literature review is presented that summarizes examples of motion or pressure affecting sensor performance. Data are presented that show how both acute and chronic forces can impact continuous glucose monitor signals. Also presented are potential strategies for countering the ill effects of motion and pressure on glucose sensors. Improved engineering and optimized chemical biocompatibility have advanced sensor design and function, but we believe that mechanical biocompatibility, a rarely considered factor, must also be optimized in order to achieve an accurate, long-term, implantable sensor. PMID:21722579

  10. A systematic review on soft-to-hard tissue ratios in orthognathic surgery part II: Chin procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel Moragas, Joan; Oth, Olivier; Büttner, Michael; Mommaerts, Maurice Y

    2015-10-01

    Precise soft-to-hard tissue ratios in orthofacial chin procedures are not well established. The aim of this study was to determine useful soft-to-hard tissue ratios for planning the magnitude of sliding genioplasty (chin osteotomy), osseous chin recontouring and alloplastic chin augmentation. A systematic review of English and non-English articles using PubMed central, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Science Citation Index, Elsevier Science Direct Complete, Highwire Press, Springer Standard Collection, SAGE premier 2011, DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals, Sweetswise, Free E-Journals, Ovid Lippincott Williams & Wilkins total Access Collection, Wiley Online Library Journals, and Cochrane Plus databases from their onset until July 2014. Additional studies were identified by searching the references. Search terms included soft tissue, ratios, genioplasty, mentoplasty, chin, genial AND advancement, augmentation, setback, retrusion, impaction, reduction, vertical deficit, widening, narrowing, and expansion. Study selection criteria were as follows: only academic publications; human patients; no reviews; systematic reviews or meta-analyses; no cadavers; no syndromic patients; no pathology at the chin or mandible region; only articles of level of evidence from I to IV; number of patients must be cited in the articles; hard-to-soft tissue ratios must be cited in the articles or at least are able to be calculated with the quantitative data available in the article; if all patients of one article have had bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) performed along with chin osteotomy, there should be an independent group evaluation of the data concerning to the chin; and no restriction regarding the size of the group. Independent extraction of articles by two authors using predefined data fields, including study quality indicators (level of evidence). The search identified 22 articles. Eleven additional articles were found in their reference sections. Of these, two were

  11. Constraint handling using tournament selection: abductive inference in partly deterministic bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Severino F; Mengshoel, Ole J

    2009-01-01

    Constraints occur in many application areas of interest to evolutionary computation. The area considered here is Bayesian networks (BNs), which is a probability-based method for representing and reasoning with uncertain knowledge. This work deals with constraints in BNs and investigates how tournament selection can be adapted to better process such constraints in the context of abductive inference. Abductive inference in BNs consists of finding the most probable explanation given some evidence. Since exact abductive inference is NP-hard, several approximate approaches to this inference task have been developed. One of them applies evolutionary techniques in order to find optimal or close-to-optimal explanations. A problem with the traditional evolutionary approach is this: As the number of constraints determined by the zeros in the conditional probability tables grows, performance deteriorates because the number of explanations whose probability is greater than zero decreases. To minimize this problem, this paper presents and analyzes a new evolutionary approach to abductive inference in BNs. By considering abductive inference as a constraint optimization problem, the novel approach improves performance dramatically when a BN's conditional probability tables contain a significant number of zeros. Experimental results are presented comparing the performances of the traditional evolutionary approach and the approach introduced in this work. The results show that the new approach significantly outperforms the traditional one.

  12. A Multiple Case Study Discovering Part-Time Faculties' Perceptions of Their Professional Needs, Working Conditions, Social Network, and Job Satisfaction at Three Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner-Harlee, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This study employed a multiple case study design to evaluate the perspectives of part-time faculties at three community colleges in the Northeast. The purpose of this study was to discover how needs, working conditions, and social networks influence the part-time faculties' job satisfaction. Maslow (1954), Bourdieu (1986), and Herzberg, Mausner,…

  13. The pathway to drive decompression microbubbles from the tissues to the blood and the lymphatic system as a part of this transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugon, J; Barthelemy, L; Rostain, J C; Gardette, B

    2009-01-01

    The formation sites of the microbubbles that are routinely detected in the bloodstream at precordial level by Doppler after a decompression are reviewed and discussed here. First, microbubbles could form on the endothelium lumen wall of the capillaries, at specific nanometric sites, but the release mechanism of such small emerging entities remains puzzling. They could be also formed from pre-existing gas nuclei present in the blood when favorable local hydrodynamic/supersaturation conditions generate microcavitation and tribonucleation phenomena. Finally, tissues could represent large pools for microbubble formation and amplification. Nevertheless, it remains to explain what the potential pathways are to drive them to the blood. Knowing that the permeability of most of the blood capillary network is quite low, an alternative is proposed for such transport. The lymphatic system, which drains the interstitial fluid to guarantee the fluid balance of tissues, could allow the transfer of micrometric elements like stabilized microbubbles formed in tissues on long distances. A final rejection in the bloodstream at the termination of both right lymphatic and thoracic ducts can be expected. The characteristics of this slow transport, activated by the muscular pump, could explain the detection on long periods of massive venous gas emboli.

  14. Adaptive pattern recognition by mini-max neural networks as a part of an intelligent processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold H.

    1990-01-01

    In this decade and progressing into 21st Century, NASA will have missions including Space Station and the Earth related Planet Sciences. To support these missions, a high degree of sophistication in machine automation and an increasing amount of data processing throughput rate are necessary. Meeting these challenges requires intelligent machines, designed to support the necessary automations in a remote space and hazardous environment. There are two approaches to designing these intelligent machines. One of these is the knowledge-based expert system approach, namely AI. The other is a non-rule approach based on parallel and distributed computing for adaptive fault-tolerances, namely Neural or Natural Intelligence (NI). The union of AI and NI is the solution to the problem stated above. The NI segment of this unit extracts features automatically by applying Cauchy simulated annealing to a mini-max cost energy function. The feature discovered by NI can then be passed to the AI system for future processing, and vice versa. This passing increases reliability, for AI can follow the NI formulated algorithm exactly, and can provide the context knowledge base as the constraints of neurocomputing. The mini-max cost function that solves the unknown feature can furthermore give us a top-down architectural design of neural networks by means of Taylor series expansion of the cost function. A typical mini-max cost function consists of the sample variance of each class in the numerator, and separation of the center of each class in the denominator. Thus, when the total cost energy is minimized, the conflicting goals of intraclass clustering and interclass segregation are achieved simultaneously.

  15. Polyurethane/fluor-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Part I: morphological, physical, and mechanical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefnejad, Azadeh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Farsadzadeh, Babak

    2011-01-01

    In this study, new nano-fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA)/polyurethane composite scaffolds were fabricated for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Polyester urethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. Nano fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA) was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The solid–liquid phase separation and solvent sublimation methods were used for preparation of the porous composites. Mechanical properties, chemical structure, and morphological characteristics of the samples were investigated by compressive test, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, respectively. The effect of nFHA powder content on porosity and pore morphology was investigated. SEM images demonstrated that the scaffolds were constituted of interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores. The pore size of the scaffolds was in the range 50–250 μm. The result obtained in this research revealed that the porosity and pore average size decreased and compressive modulus increased with nFHA percentage. Considering morphological, physical, and mechanical properties, the scaffold with a higher ratio of nFHA has suitable potential use in tissue regeneration. PMID:21289986

  16. Polyurethane/fluor-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Part I: morphological, physical, and mechanical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefnejad, Azadeh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Farsadzadeh, Babak

    2011-01-06

    In this study, new nano-fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA)/polyurethane composite scaffolds were fabricated for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Polyester urethane samples were synthesized from polycaprolactone, hexamethylene diisocyanate, and 1,4-butanediol as chain extender. Nano fluor-hydroxyapatite (nFHA) was successfully synthesized by sol-gel method. The solid-liquid phase separation and solvent sublimation methods were used for preparation of the porous composites. Mechanical properties, chemical structure, and morphological characteristics of the samples were investigated by compressive test, Fourier transform infrared, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, respectively. The effect of nFHA powder content on porosity and pore morphology was investigated. SEM images demonstrated that the scaffolds were constituted of interconnected and homogeneously distributed pores. The pore size of the scaffolds was in the range 50-250 μm. The result obtained in this research revealed that the porosity and pore average size decreased and compressive modulus increased with nFHA percentage. Considering morphological, physical, and mechanical properties, the scaffold with a higher ratio of nFHA has suitable potential use in tissue regeneration.

  17. Greenhouse gas network design using backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling − Part 1: Methodology and Australian test case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziehn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the generation of optimal atmospheric measurement networks for determining carbon dioxide fluxes over Australia using inverse methods. A Lagrangian particle dispersion model is used in reverse mode together with a Bayesian inverse modelling framework to calculate the relationship between weekly surface fluxes, comprising contributions from the biosphere and fossil fuel combustion, and hourly concentration observations for the Australian continent. Meteorological driving fields are provided by the regional version of the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS at 12 km resolution at an hourly timescale. Prior uncertainties are derived on a weekly timescale for biosphere fluxes and fossil fuel emissions from high-resolution model runs using the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE model and the Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS respectively. The influence from outside the modelled domain is investigated, but proves to be negligible for the network design. Existing ground-based measurement stations in Australia are assessed in terms of their ability to constrain local flux estimates from the land. We find that the six stations that are currently operational are already able to reduce the uncertainties on surface flux estimates by about 30%. A candidate list of 59 stations is generated based on logistic constraints and an incremental optimisation scheme is used to extend the network of existing stations. In order to achieve an uncertainty reduction of about 50%, we need to double the number of measurement stations in Australia. Assuming equal data uncertainties for all sites, new stations would be mainly located in the northern and eastern part of the continent.

  18. Greenhouse gas network design using backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling - Part 1: Methodology and Australian test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziehn, T.; Nickless, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Law, R. M.; Roff, G.; Fraser, P.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the generation of optimal atmospheric measurement networks for determining carbon dioxide fluxes over Australia using inverse methods. A Lagrangian particle dispersion model is used in reverse mode together with a Bayesian inverse modelling framework to calculate the relationship between weekly surface fluxes, comprising contributions from the biosphere and fossil fuel combustion, and hourly concentration observations for the Australian continent. Meteorological driving fields are provided by the regional version of the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) at 12 km resolution at an hourly timescale. Prior uncertainties are derived on a weekly timescale for biosphere fluxes and fossil fuel emissions from high-resolution model runs using the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) model and the Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS) respectively. The influence from outside the modelled domain is investigated, but proves to be negligible for the network design. Existing ground-based measurement stations in Australia are assessed in terms of their ability to constrain local flux estimates from the land. We find that the six stations that are currently operational are already able to reduce the uncertainties on surface flux estimates by about 30%. A candidate list of 59 stations is generated based on logistic constraints and an incremental optimisation scheme is used to extend the network of existing stations. In order to achieve an uncertainty reduction of about 50%, we need to double the number of measurement stations in Australia. Assuming equal data uncertainties for all sites, new stations would be mainly located in the northern and eastern part of the continent.

  19. Restoration variables and postoperative hypersensitivity in Class I restorations: PEARL Network findings. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Peter; Wong, Ying; Matthews, Abigail G; Vena, Donald; Craig, Ronald G; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated postoperative hypersensitivity at 1, 4, and 13 weeks following resin-based composite restoration of occlusal caries as well as the relationship to materials and technique employed by PEARL Network Practitioner Investigators (P-Is). PEARL P-Is (n = 45) enrolled patients with early occlusal caries lesions deemed to require treatment and placed restorations using their routine technique. Data on 485 restorations at 4 weeks included: baseline sensitivity; ranking of dentin caries activity; post-preparation use of antimicrobials, liners, and dentin bonding agent; type of resin-based composite (RBC) employed; whether layer or bulk fill was used; and patient demographics. Patients anonymously reported at 1, 4, and 13 weeks any sensitivity to hot, cold, sweets, clenching, and chewing as well as quality of life (QOL) related to the restoration(s). Appreciable hypersensitivity (AH)--ie, sensitivity of 3 or greater on an 11-point anchored scale--was reported in 30% of all 668 eligible carious teeth at baseline. Among them, 10% of study teeth with no baseline AH had developed AH at 4 weeks post-treatment. With restoration, 63% of teeth with baseline AH no longer had AH, while the remainder had no improvement. Neither change in AH nor change in greatest sensitivity was associated with use of a liner, use of flowable or hybrid RBC, or bulk or layer technique. With use of an antimicrobial, at 1 week, there was a significant but transient effect on AH (P = 0.006), which was generally not present at 4 weeks, although it continued for one product. At 4 weeks, the change in greatest sensitivity was associated with the type of dentin bonding agent, total etch or self etch, (P = 0.004). Using similar materials and techniques, P-Is had widely differing patient-reported outcomes. Patient self-reported post-restoration AH-either acquired or remaining-at 4 weeks was generally not related to the materials or techniques recorded in these small- to moderate

  20. Bone transplantation and tissue engineering, part III: allografts, bone grafting and bone banking in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    During the 20th century, allograft implantation waned in popularity as a clinical activity. Reports appeared in the literature describing several small series of patients in whom bone was obtained from amputation specimens or recently deceased individuals. The concept of bone banking became a reality during and after World War II when the National Naval Tissue Bank was established in Bethesda and a number of small banks sprang up in hospitals throughout the world. Small fragments, either of cortical or medullary bone, from these banks were used heterotopically to augment spinal fusions, to implant into cyst cavities, or to serve as a scaffolding for repair of non- or delayed union of fractures of the long bones.

  1. Primary Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma of the Salivary Glands: A Multicenter Rare Cancer Network Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anacak, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.anacak@ege.edu.tr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Miller, Robert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Constantinou, Nikos [Department of Hematology, Theagenion Cancer Center, Thessaloniki (Greece); Mamusa, Angela M. [Division of Hematology, Armando Businco Cancer Center, Cagliari (Italy); Epelbaum, Ron [Department of Oncology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Li Yexiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Calduch, Anna Lucas [Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica, Institut Catala d' Oncologia, Barcelona (Spain); Kowalczyk, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk (Poland); Weber, Damien C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland); Kadish, Sidney P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School/Center, North Worcester, MA (United States); Bese, Nuran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Poortmans, Philip [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Kamer, Serra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ege University Medical School, Izmir (Turkey); Ozsahin, Mahmut [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Involvement of salivary glands with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is rare. This retrospective study was performed to assess the clinical profile, treatment outcome, and prognostic factors of MALT lymphoma of the salivary glands. Methods and Materials: Thirteen member centers of the Rare Cancer Network from 10 countries participated, providing data on 63 patients. The median age was 58 years; 47 patients were female and 16 were male. The parotid glands were involved in 49 cases, submandibular in 15, and minor glands in 3. Multiple glands were involved in 9 patients. Staging was as follows: IE in 34, IIE in 12, IIIE in 2, and IV in 15 patients. Results: Surgery (S) alone was performed in 9, radiotherapy (RT) alone in 8, and chemotherapy (CT) alone in 4 patients. Forty-one patients received combined modality treatment (S + RT in 23, S + CT in 8, RT + CT in 4, and all three modalities in 6 patients). No active treatment was given in one case. After initial treatment there was no tumor in 57 patients and residual tumor in 5. Tumor progression was observed in 23 (36.5%) (local in 1, other salivary glands in 10, lymph nodes in 11, and elsewhere in 6). Five patients died of disease progression and the other 5 of other causes. The 5-year disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival were 54.4%, 93.2%, and 81.7%, respectively. Factors influencing disease-free survival were use of RT, stage, and residual tumor (p < 0.01). Factors influencing disease-specific survival were stage, recurrence, and residual tumor (p < 0.01). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the largest series of MALT lymphomas of the salivary glands published to date. This disease may involve all salivary glands either initially or subsequently in 30% of patients. Recurrences may occur in up to 35% of patients at 5 years; however, survival is not affected. Radiotherapy is the only treatment modality that improves disease-free survival.

  2. Cutting State Diagnosis for Shearer through the Vibration of Rocker Transmission Part with an Improved Probabilistic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Si

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve more accurate and reliable identification of shearer cutting state, this paper employs the vibration of rocker transmission part and proposes a diagnosis method based on a probabilistic neural network (PNN and fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA. The original FOA is modified with a multi-swarm strategy to enhance the search performance and the modified FOA is utilized to optimize the smoothing parameters of the PNN. The vibration signals of rocker transmission part are decomposed by the ensemble empirical mode decomposition and the Kullback-Leibler divergence is used to choose several appropriate components. Forty-five features are extracted to estimate the decomposed components and original signal, and the distance-based evaluation approach is employed to select a subset of state-sensitive features by removing the irrelevant features. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated via the simulation studies of shearer cutting state diagnosis and the comparison results indicate that the proposed method outperforms the competing methods in terms of diagnosis accuracy.

  3. Development and validation of a numerical model for cross-section optimization of a multi-part probe for soft tissue intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, L; Neubert, J; Reina, S; Oldfield, M; Davies, B L; Rodriguez Y Baena, F

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of minimally invasive surgical procedures is driving the development of novel, safer and more accurate surgical tools. In this context a multi-part probe for soft tissue surgery is being developed in the Mechatronics in Medicine Laboratory at Imperial College, London. This study reports an optimization procedure using finite element methods, for the identification of an interlock geometry able to limit the separation of the segments composing the multi-part probe. An optimal geometry was obtained and the corresponding three-dimensional finite element model validated experimentally. Simulation results are shown to be consistent with the physical experiments. The outcome of this study is an important step in the provision of a novel miniature steerable probe for surgery.

  4. Penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood tissue, part I: Radial penetration of UF adhesives into beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović-Grmuša Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive penetration plays an important role in wood adhesion, since wood is a porous material. The degree of penetration mostly depends on the wood factors, resin type and formulation and processing parameters. Tangentially cut 5 mm thick beech wood (Fagus moesiaca plies, 100 mm long (parallel to grain and 30 mm wide, were prepared for this study. The urea-formaldehyde (UF adhesive was applied to the surface of one ply. Two plies were assembled into sample so that the grains of two plies were parallel. Samples were pressed in a hydraulic press at 120°C and 0,7 MPa for 15 min. Microtome test-specimens were cut of each sample. 20 μm thick microtomes were cut by sliding microtome apparatus, exposing a bondline with a cross-sectional surface. The lack of more exhausting research on the penetration of urea-formaldehyde adhesives in wood is evident. Since ureaformaldehyde (UF glue resins were the most important type of adhesives in the wood industry in the last 60 years (Dunky, 2000, the objective of this research was microscopic detection of UF adhesive penetration in wood tissue. Four types of UF resins with different levels of polycondensation were used in this research. Safranin was added in resins, since epi-fluorescence microscope was used in this research for measuring the adhesive penetration.

  5. Long-Term Over-Expression of Neuropeptide Y in Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Contributes to Adipose Tissue Insulin Resistance Partly via the Y5 Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Long

    Full Text Available Intracerebroventricular injection and overexpression of Neuropeptide Y (NPY in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN has been shown to induce obesity and glucose metabolism disorder in rodents; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism contributing to glucose metabolic disturbance induced by NPY. Recombinant lentiviral NPY vectors were injected into the PVN of rats fed a high fat (HFD or low-fat diet. 8 weeks later, in vivo intravenous glucose tolerance tests and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp revealed that insulin resistance of adipose tissue were induced by NPY overexpression with or without HFD. NPY increased food intake, but did not change blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or lipid levels. However, NPY decreased the expression of pGSK3β, PI3K p85 and pAKTSer473 in adipose tissue of rats. In vitro, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with NPY, NPY Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists. Glucose consumption and 2-deoxy-D-[3H] glucose uptake were partly inhibited by NPY, while a decrease in PI3K-AKT pathway signaling and a decreased expression of pGSK3α and pGSK3β were observed. Nevertheless, a Y5 receptor antagonist (L-152,804 reversed the effects of NPY on glucose uptake and consumption. These data suggest that long-term over-expression of NPY in PVN contributes to the establishment of adipose tissue insulin resistance, at least partly via the Y5 Receptor.

  6. Multi-tissue analysis of co-expression networks by higher-order generalized singular value decomposition identifies functionally coherent transcriptional modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaolin; Moreno-Moral, Aida; Rotival, Maxime; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Recent high-throughput efforts such as ENCODE have generated a large body of genome-scale transcriptional data in multiple conditions (e.g., cell-types and disease states). Leveraging these data is especially important for network-based approaches to human disease, for instance to identify coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) that can inform functional disease mechanisms and pathological pathways. Yet, genome-scale network analysis across conditions is significantly hampered by the paucity of robust and computationally-efficient methods. Building on the Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition, we introduce a new algorithmic approach for efficient, parameter-free and reproducible identification of network-modules simultaneously across multiple conditions. Our method can accommodate weighted (and unweighted) networks of any size and can similarly use co-expression or raw gene expression input data, without hinging upon the definition and stability of the correlation used to assess gene co-expression. In simulation studies, we demonstrated distinctive advantages of our method over existing methods, which was able to recover accurately both common and condition-specific network-modules without entailing ad-hoc input parameters as required by other approaches. We applied our method to genome-scale and multi-tissue transcriptomic datasets from rats (microarray-based) and humans (mRNA-sequencing-based) and identified several common and tissue-specific subnetworks with functional significance, which were not detected by other methods. In humans we recapitulated the crosstalk between cell-cycle progression and cell-extracellular matrix interactions processes in ventricular zones during neocortex expansion and further, we uncovered pathways related to development of later cognitive functions in the cortical plate of the developing brain which were previously unappreciated. Analyses of seven rat tissues identified a multi-tissue subnetwork of co

  7. Multi-tissue analysis of co-expression networks by higher-order generalized singular value decomposition identifies functionally coherent transcriptional modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-throughput efforts such as ENCODE have generated a large body of genome-scale transcriptional data in multiple conditions (e.g., cell-types and disease states. Leveraging these data is especially important for network-based approaches to human disease, for instance to identify coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks that can inform functional disease mechanisms and pathological pathways. Yet, genome-scale network analysis across conditions is significantly hampered by the paucity of robust and computationally-efficient methods. Building on the Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition, we introduce a new algorithmic approach for efficient, parameter-free and reproducible identification of network-modules simultaneously across multiple conditions. Our method can accommodate weighted (and unweighted networks of any size and can similarly use co-expression or raw gene expression input data, without hinging upon the definition and stability of the correlation used to assess gene co-expression. In simulation studies, we demonstrated distinctive advantages of our method over existing methods, which was able to recover accurately both common and condition-specific network-modules without entailing ad-hoc input parameters as required by other approaches. We applied our method to genome-scale and multi-tissue transcriptomic datasets from rats (microarray-based and humans (mRNA-sequencing-based and identified several common and tissue-specific subnetworks with functional significance, which were not detected by other methods. In humans we recapitulated the crosstalk between cell-cycle progression and cell-extracellular matrix interactions processes in ventricular zones during neocortex expansion and further, we uncovered pathways related to development of later cognitive functions in the cortical plate of the developing brain which were previously unappreciated. Analyses of seven rat tissues identified a multi-tissue

  8. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  9. Organ and Tissue-specific Sucrose Transporters. Important Hubs in Gene and Metabolite Networks Regulating Carbon Use in Wood-forming Tissues of Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Scott A. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Tsai, Chung-Jui [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The overall project objective was to probe the relationship between sucrose transporters and plant productivity in the biomass for biofuels woody perennial, Populus. At the time the proposal was written, sucrose transporters had already been investigated in many plant model systems, primarily with respect to the export of photosynthate sucrose from source leaves, and the uptake of sucrose in storage organs and seeds. Preliminary findings by the PI found that in Populus, sucrose transporter genes (SUTs) were well expressed in wood-forming tissues that comprise the feedstock for biofuels production. Because sucrose comprises by far the predominant form in which photosynthate is delivered from source organs to sink organs like roots and wood-forming tissues, SUTs control a gate that nominally at least could impact the allocation or partitioning of sucrose for potentially competing end uses like growth (stem biomass) and storage. In addition, water use might be conditioned by the way in which sucrose is distributed throughout the plant, and/or by the way in which sucrose is partitioned intracellularly. Several dozen transgenic lines were produced in year 1 of the project to perturb the expression ratio of multiple plasma membrane (PM) SUTs (intercellular trafficking), versus the single tonoplast membrane (TM) sucrose transporter that effectively regulates intracellular trafficking of sucrose. It was possible to obtain transgenic lines with dual SUT gene knockdown using the 35S promoter, but not the wood-specific TUA1 promoter. By the end of project year 2, a decision was made to work with the 35S plants while archiving the TUA1 plants. The PhD candidate charged with producing the transgenic lines abandoned the project during its second year, substantially contributing to the decision to operate with just the 35S lines. That student’s interests ranged more toward evolutionary topics, and a report on SUT gene evolution was published (Peng et al 2014).

  10. The neural network as a part of decision support system for quality management for production objects in machining process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepanska I.Yu.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The research discusses the use of artificial neural networks (ANN as components of a decision support system (DSS to automate quality control manufacturing facilities machining business at the production, which should be focused on the analysis of large amounts of heterogeneous information. The necessity to use ANN as a part of DSS is justified by the fact that quality control during production is multistage and time-consuming process that is formalized difficult, and moreover requires considerable information and material costs for the efficiency of manufacturing operations performed. Taking into account the existing experience of successful use of ANN to solve difficult formal problems associated with handling large volumes of diverse and rapidly changing information, the authors synthesized ANN for automated determination of the causes deterioration of the quality of production objects (PO in the performance of manufacturing operations application. Particular attention is paid to the definition of the dimension of the hidden layer ANN synthesized due to the fact that today still there is no analytical expression to determine the dimension of the hidden layer ANN and size of the latter is determined only by the experimental results of ANN several different structures by comparison the results, in particular the value of mean square error.

  11. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hybrid alginate-polyester bimodal network hydrogel for tissue engineering--Influence of structured water on long-term cellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finosh, G T; Jayabalan, M; Vandana, S; Raghu, K G

    2015-11-01

    The development of biodegradable scaffolds (which promote cell-binding, proliferation, long-term cell viability and required biomechanical stability) for cardiac tissue engineering is a challenge. In this study, biosynthetic amphiphilic hybrid hydrogels were prepared using a graft comacromer of natural polysaccharide alginate and synthetic polyester polypropylene fumarate (PPF). Monomodal network hydrogel (HPAS-NO) and bimodal network hydrogel (HPAS-AA) were prepared. Between the two hydrogels, HPAS-AA hydrogel excels over the HPAS-NO hydrogel. HPAS-AA hydrogel is mechanically more stable in the culture medium and undergoes gradual degradation in vitro in PBS (phosphate buffered saline). HPAS-AA contains nano-porous structure and acquires structured water (non-freezing-bound water) (53.457%) along with free water (11.773%). It absorbs more plasma proteins and prevents platelet adsorption and hemolysis when contacted with blood. HPAS-AA hydrogel is cytocompatible and promote 3D cell growth (≈ 70%) of L929 fibroblast even after 18 days and H9C2 cardiomyoblasts. The enhanced and long-term cellular growth of HPAS-AA hydrogel is attributed to the cell responsive features of structured water. HPAS-AA hydrogel can be a better candidate for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Human-Systems Integration (HSI) and the Network Integration Evaluations (NIEs), Part 3: Mitigating Cognitive Load in Network-Enabled Mission Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    in NIE CPs primarily involve ICTs . Levy and Murnane (2012) argue that the increasing use of ...require higher levels of mental ability as well as higher levels of education , training, and experience for effective use . In short, ICT insertions such...key aspects of cognitive load in mission command and network/S6 operations. ARL/HRED personnel also used this SME after the fact to assist in

  14. A primer of statistical methods for correlating parameters and properties of electrospun poly( l -lactide) scaffolds for tissue engineering-PART 2: Regression

    KAUST Repository

    Seyedmahmoud, Rasoul

    2014-04-07

    This two-articles series presents an in-depth discussion of electrospun poly-l-lactide scaffolds for tissue engineering by means of statistical methodologies that can be used, in general, to gain a quantitative and systematic insight about effects and interactions between a handful of key scaffold properties (Ys) and a set of process parameters (Xs) in electrospinning. While Part-1 dealt with the DOE methods to unveil the interactions between Xs in determining the morphomechanical properties (ref. Y1-4), this Part-2 article continues and refocuses the discussion on the interdependence of scaffold properties investigated by standard regression methods. The discussion first explores the connection between mechanical properties (Y4) and morphological descriptors of the scaffolds (Y1-3) in 32 types of scaffolds, finding that the mean fiber diameter (Y1) plays a predominant role which is nonetheless and crucially modulated by the molecular weight (MW) of PLLA. The second part examines the biological performance (Y5) (i.e. the cell proliferation of seeded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) on a random subset of eight scaffolds vs. the mechanomorphological properties (Y1-4). In this case, the featured regression analysis on such an incomplete set was not conclusive, though, indirectly suggesting in quantitative terms that cell proliferation could not fully be explained as a function of considered mechanomorphological properties (Y1-4), but in the early stage seeding, and that a randomization effects occurs over time such that the differences in initial cell proliferation performance (at day 1) is smeared over time. The findings may be the cornerstone of a novel route to accrue sufficient understanding and establish design rules for scaffold biofunctional vs. architecture, mechanical properties, and process parameters.

  15. A primer of statistical methods for correlating parameters and properties of electrospun poly(L-lactide) scaffolds for tissue engineering--PART 2: regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmahmoud, Rasoul; Mozetic, Pamela; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Basoli, Francesco; Trombetta, Marcella; Traversa, Enrico; Licoccia, Silvia; Rinaldi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This two-articles series presents an in-depth discussion of electrospun poly-L-lactide scaffolds for tissue engineering by means of statistical methodologies that can be used, in general, to gain a quantitative and systematic insight about effects and interactions between a handful of key scaffold properties (Ys) and a set of process parameters (Xs) in electrospinning. While Part-1 dealt with the DOE methods to unveil the interactions between Xs in determining the morphomechanical properties (ref. Y₁₋₄), this Part-2 article continues and refocuses the discussion on the interdependence of scaffold properties investigated by standard regression methods. The discussion first explores the connection between mechanical properties (Y₄) and morphological descriptors of the scaffolds (Y₁₋₃) in 32 types of scaffolds, finding that the mean fiber diameter (Y₁) plays a predominant role which is nonetheless and crucially modulated by the molecular weight (MW) of PLLA. The second part examines the biological performance (Y₅) (i.e. the cell proliferation of seeded bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) on a random subset of eight scaffolds vs. the mechanomorphological properties (Y₁₋₄). In this case, the featured regression analysis on such an incomplete set was not conclusive, though, indirectly suggesting in quantitative terms that cell proliferation could not fully be explained as a function of considered mechanomorphological properties (Y₁₋₄), but in the early stage seeding, and that a randomization effects occurs over time such that the differences in initial cell proliferation performance (at day 1) is smeared over time. The findings may be the cornerstone of a novel route to accrue sufficient understanding and establish design rules for scaffold biofunctional vs. architecture, mechanical properties, and process parameters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bridging the gap between modules in isolation and as part of networks: A systems framework for elucidating interaction and regulation of signalling modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Govind; Krishnan, J.

    2016-07-01

    While signalling and biochemical modules have been the focus of numerous studies, they are typically studied in isolation, with no examination of the effects of the ambient network. In this paper we formulate and develop a systems framework, rooted in dynamical systems, to understand such effects, by studying the interaction of signalling modules. The modules we consider are (i) basic covalent modification, (ii) monostable switches, (iii) bistable switches, (iv) adaptive modules, and (v) oscillatory modules. We systematically examine the interaction of these modules by analyzing (a) sequential interaction without shared components, (b) sequential interaction with shared components, and (c) oblique interactions. Our studies reveal that the behaviour of a module in isolation may be substantially different from that in a network, and explicitly demonstrate how the behaviour of a given module, the characteristics of the ambient network, and the possibility of shared components can result in new effects. Our global approach illuminates different aspects of the structure and functioning of modules, revealing the importance of dynamical characteristics as well as biochemical features; this provides a methodological platform for investigating the complexity of natural modules shaped by evolution, elucidating the effects of ambient networks on a module in multiple cellular contexts, and highlighting the capabilities and constraints for engineering robust synthetic modules. Overall, such a systems framework provides a platform for bridging the gap between non-linear information processing modules, in isolation and as parts of networks, and a basis for understanding new aspects of natural and engineered cellular networks.

  17. Analytical transport network theory to guide the design of 3-D microstructural networks in energy materials: Part 1. Flow without reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alex P.; Nakajo, Arata; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2017-12-01

    We present a fully analytical, heuristic model - the "Analytical Transport Network Model" - for steady-state, diffusive, potential flow through a 3-D network. Employing a combination of graph theory, linear algebra, and geometry, the model explicitly relates a microstructural network's topology and the morphology of its channels to an effective material transport coefficient (a general term meant to encompass, e.g., conductivity or diffusion coefficient). The model's transport coefficient predictions agree well with those from electrochemical fin (ECF) theory and finite element analysis (FEA), but are computed 0.5-1.5 and 5-6 orders of magnitude faster, respectively. In addition, the theory explicitly relates a number of morphological and topological parameters directly to the transport coefficient, whereby the distributions that characterize the structure are readily available for further analysis. Furthermore, ATN's explicit development provides insight into the nature of the tortuosity factor and offers the potential to apply theory from network science and to consider the optimization of a network's effective resistance in a mathematically rigorous manner. The ATN model's speed and relative ease-of-use offer the potential to aid in accelerating the design (with respect to transport), and thus reducing the cost, of energy materials.

  18. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids inside the linear tubules vs. bulk parts of mitochondrial network as visualized by 4Pi microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlasková, Andrea; Engstová, Hana; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Lessard, Mark; Alán, Lukáš; Reguera, David Pajuelo; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial nucleoids are confined sites of mitochondrial DNA existing in complex clusters with the DNA-compacting mitochondrial (mt) transcription factor A (TFAM) and other accessory proteins and gene expression machinery proteins, such as a mt single-stranded-DNA-binding protein (mtSSB). To visualize nucleoid distribution within the mt reticular network, we have employed three-dimensional (3D) double-color 4Pi microscopy. The mt network was visualized in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells via mt-matrix-addressed GFP, while 3D immunocytochemistry of mtSSB was performed. Optimization of iso-surface computation threshold for nucleoid 4Pi images to 30 led to an average nucleoid diameter of 219 ± 110 and 224 ± 100 nm in glucose- and galactose-cultivated HepG2 cells (the latter with obligatory oxidative phosphorylation). We have positioned mtDNA nucleoids within the mt reticulum network and refined our model for nucleoid redistribution within the fragmented network--clustering of up to ten nucleoids in 2 μm diameter mitochondrial spheroids of a fragmented mt network, arising from an original 10 μm mt tubule of a 400 nm diameter. However, the theoretically fragmented bulk parts were observed most frequently as being reintegrated into the continuous mt network in 4Pi images. Since the predicted nucleoid counts within the bulk parts corresponded to the model, we conclude that fragmentation/reintegration cycles are not accompanied by mtDNA degradation or that mtDNA degradation is equally balanced by mtDNA replication.

  19. Diagnosis of embankment dam distresses using Bayesian networks. Part I. Global-level characteristics based on a dam distress database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, L. M; Xu, Y; Jia, J. S; Zhao, C

    2011-01-01

    .... The main objective of this paper is to develop a robust probability-based tool using Bayesian networks for the diagnosis of embankment dam distresses at the global level based on past dam distress data...

  20. A primer of statistical methods for correlating parameters and properties of electrospun poly(L-lactide) scaffolds for tissue engineering--PART 1: design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmahmoud, Rasoul; Rainer, Alberto; Mozetic, Pamela; Maria Giannitelli, Sara; Trombetta, Marcella; Traversa, Enrico; Licoccia, Silvia; Rinaldi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds produced by electrospinning are of enormous interest, but still lack a true understanding about the fundamental connection between the outstanding functional properties, the architecture, the mechanical properties, and the process parameters. Fragmentary results from several parametric studies only render some partial insights that are hard to compare and generally miss the role of parameters interactions. To bridge this gap, this article (Part-1 of 2) features a case study on poly-L-lactide scaffolds to demonstrate how statistical methods such as design of experiments can quantitatively identify the correlations existing between key scaffold properties and control parameters, in a systematic, consistent, and comprehensive manner disentangling main effects from interactions. The morphological properties (i.e., fiber distribution and porosity) and mechanical properties (Young's modulus) are "charted" as a function of molecular weight (MW) and other electrospinning process parameters (the Xs), considering the single effect as well as interactions between Xs. For the first time, the major role of the MW emerges clearly in controlling all scaffold properties. The correlation between mechanical and morphological properties is also addressed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A primer of statistical methods for correlating parameters and properties of electrospun poly(l -lactide) scaffolds for tissue engineering-PART 1: Design of experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Seyedmahmoud, Rasoul

    2014-03-20

    Tissue engineering scaffolds produced by electrospinning are of enormous interest, but still lack a true understanding about the fundamental connection between the outstanding functional properties, the architecture, the mechanical properties, and the process parameters. Fragmentary results from several parametric studies only render some partial insights that are hard to compare and generally miss the role of parameters interactions. To bridge this gap, this article (Part-1 of 2) features a case study on poly-l-lactide scaffolds to demonstrate how statistical methods such as design of experiments can quantitatively identify the correlations existing between key scaffold properties and control parameters, in a systematic, consistent, and comprehensive manner disentangling main effects from interactions. The morphological properties (i.e., fiber distribution and porosity) and mechanical properties (Young\\'s modulus) are "charted" as a function of molecular weight (MW) and other electrospinning process parameters (the Xs), considering the single effect as well as interactions between Xs. For the first time, the major role of the MW emerges clearly in controlling all scaffold properties. The correlation between mechanical and morphological properties is also addressed.

  2. NANOG Plays a Hierarchical Role in the Transcription Network Regulating the Pluripotency and Plasticity of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrone, Maria; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Tomasello, Laura; Coppola, Antonina; Morini, Lorenzo; Pantuso, Gianni; Ficarella, Romina; Guarnotta, Valentina; Perrini, Sebastio; Giorgino, Francesco; Giordano, Carla

    2017-05-23

    The stromal vascular cell fraction (SVF) of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VAT and SAT) has increasingly come into focus in stem cell research, since these compartments represent a rich source of multipotent adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). ASCs exhibit a self-renewal potential and differentiation capacity. Our aim was to study the different expression of the embryonic stem cell markers NANOG (homeobox protein NANOG), SOX2 (SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2) and OCT4 (octamer-binding transcription factor 4) and to evaluate if there exists a hierarchal role in this network in ASCs derived from both SAT and VAT. ASCs were isolated from SAT and VAT biopsies of 72 consenting patients (23 men, 47 women; age 45 ± 10; BMI between 25 ± 5 and 30 ± 5 range) undergoing elective open-abdominal surgery. Sphere-forming capability was evaluated by plating cells in low adhesion plastic. Stem cell markers CD90, CD105, CD29, CD31, CD45 and CD146 were analyzed by flow cytometry, and the stem cell transcription factors NANOG, SOX2 and OCT4 were detected by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. NANOG, SOX2 and OCT4 interplay was explored by gene silencing. ASCs from VAT and SAT confirmed their mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) phenotype expressing the specific MSC markers CD90, CD105, NANOG, SOX2 and OCT4. NANOG silencing induced a significant OCT4 (70 ± 0.05%) and SOX2 (75 ± 0.03%) downregulation, whereas SOX2 silencing did not affect NANOG gene expression. Adipose tissue is an important source of MSC, and siRNA experiments endorse a hierarchical role of NANOG in the complex transcription network that regulates pluripotency.

  3. Greenhouse gas network design using backward Lagrangian particle dispersion modelling – Part 2: Sensitivity analyses and South African test case

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nickless, A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse gase network design South Africa A. Nickless et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References Tables Figures J I J I Back Close Full Screen / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion D iscussion P aper | D iscussion P aper... and Physics O pen Access Discussions This discussion paper is/has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Greenhouse gas network design using backward...

  4. Automated cancer stem cell recognition in H and E stained tissue using convolutional neural networks and color deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Wolfgang; Krappe, Sebastian; Cetin, A. Enis; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Üner, Aysegül; Benz, Michaela; Wittenberg, Thomas; Stamminger, Marc; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The analysis and interpretation of histopathological samples and images is an important discipline in the diagnosis of various diseases, especially cancer. An important factor in prognosis and treatment with the aim of a precision medicine is the determination of so-called cancer stem cells (CSC) which are known for their resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment and involvement in tumor recurrence. Using immunohistochemistry with CSC markers like CD13, CD133 and others is one way to identify CSC. In our work we aim at identifying CSC presence on ubiquitous Hematoxilyn and Eosin (HE) staining as an inexpensive tool for routine histopathology based on their distinct morphological features. We present initial results of a new method based on color deconvolution (CD) and convolutional neural networks (CNN). This method performs favorably (accuracy 0.936) in comparison with a state-of-the-art method based on 1DSIFT and eigen-analysis feature sets evaluated on the same image database. We also show that accuracy of the CNN is improved by the CD pre-processing.

  5. Investigating the effectiveness of many-core network processors for high performance cyber protection systems. Part I, FY2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Naegle, John Hunt; Wright, Brian J.; Benner, Robert E., Jr.; Shelburg, Jeffrey Scott; Pearson, David Benjamin; Johnson, Joshua Alan; Onunkwo, Uzoma A.; Zage, David John; Patel, Jay S.

    2011-09-01

    This report documents our first year efforts to address the use of many-core processors for high performance cyber protection. As the demands grow for higher bandwidth (beyond 1 Gbits/sec) on network connections, the need to provide faster and more efficient solution to cyber security grows. Fortunately, in recent years, the development of many-core network processors have seen increased interest. Prior working experiences with many-core processors have led us to investigate its effectiveness for cyber protection tools, with particular emphasis on high performance firewalls. Although advanced algorithms for smarter cyber protection of high-speed network traffic are being developed, these advanced analysis techniques require significantly more computational capabilities than static techniques. Moreover, many locations where cyber protections are deployed have limited power, space and cooling resources. This makes the use of traditionally large computing systems impractical for the front-end systems that process large network streams; hence, the drive for this study which could potentially yield a highly reconfigurable and rapidly scalable solution.

  6. The blunted effect of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese subjects is partly reversed by weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, M; Arngrim, N; Simonsen, L.

    2016-01-01

    adipose tissue in obese subjects. METHODS: Five obese males participated in a 12-week weight loss program, which consisted of caloric restriction (800 Cal day(-)(1)) followed by 4 weeks of weight-maintenance diet. Before and after weight loss, subcutaneous adipose tissue lipid metabolism was studied...... loss, induced by calorie restriction, improves the blunted effect of GIP on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue metabolism....

  7. A two-echelon spare parts network with lateral and emergency shipments: A product-form approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucherie, Richardus J.; van Houtum, Geert-Jan; Timmer, Judith B.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    2016-01-01

    We consider a single-item, two-echelon spare parts inventory model for repairable parts for capital goods with high down time costs. The inventory system consists of a central warehouse and multiple local warehouses, from where customers are served, and a central repair facility at an external

  8. Distributed Uplink Resource Allocation in Cognitive Radio Networks -- Part II: Equilibria and Algorithms for Joint Access Point Selection and Power Allocation

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Mingyi; Barrera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of this paper, we have studied solely the spectrum sharing aspect of the above problem, and proposed algorithms for the CUs in the single AP network to efficiently share the spectrum. In this second part of the paper, we build upon our previous understanding of the single AP network, and formulate the joint spectrum decision and spectrum sharing problem in a multiple AP network into a non-cooperative game, in which the feasible strategy of a player contains a discrete variable (the AP/spectrum decision) and a continuous vector (the power allocation among multiple channels). The structure of the game is hence very different from most non-cooperative spectrum management game proposed in the literature. We provide characterization of the Nash Equilibrium (NE) of this game, and present a set of novel algorithms that allow the CUs to distributively and efficiently select the suitable AP and share the channels with other CUs. Finally, we study the properties of the proposed algorithms as well as t...

  9. Development of a logic model to support a network approach in delivering 24/7 children's palliative care: part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Linda; Lynn, Deborah

    2016-04-02

    This research aimed to develop and evaluate a 24/7 symptom-management service for children with life-limiting conditions and a model for palliative care nursing. A combination of audit and qualitative and quantitative evaluation. A consultant nurse-led service (n=5 clinical nurse specialists) provided care and support to children and their families, which spanned a range of settings (home, hospital, hospice) supported by a managed clinical network of consultant paediatricians (n=4) with postgraduate expertise in palliative care. A pluralistic evaluation was conducted where the predefined service standards were audited and the predetermined service objectives were evaluated using daily diary data from the nursing team (micro), qualitative and quantitative survey data of stakeholders using the service (mezzo) and family assessment of children's palliative care (CPC) standards across the CPC network (macro).

  10. Earth and environmental science in the 1980's: Part 1: Environmental data systems, supercomputer facilities and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Overview descriptions of on-line environmental data systems, supercomputer facilities, and networks are presented. Each description addresses the concepts of content, capability, and user access relevant to the point of view of potential utilization by the Earth and environmental science community. The information on similar systems or facilities is presented in parallel fashion to encourage and facilitate intercomparison. In addition, summary sheets are given for each description, and a summary table precedes each section.

  11. Rome - Naples - part of Italy's future high-speed network; Hochgeschwindigkeitsverkehr in Italien am Beispiel Rom - Neapel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinge, R. [IVV Ingenieurgesellschaft fuer Verkehrsplanung und Verkehrssicherung GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Fasciolo, S.P.; Cattaneo, C. [Balfour Beatty Rail SpA, Milano (Italy)

    2005-04-15

    By the year 2015 Italy is going to build a high-speed network more than 1,00 km length which will add to a future-oriented Europe-wide high-speed railway system. The project gave rise to the development of a new overhead contact line system for a maximum speed of 300 km/h. The lines will be provided with a 2 a.c., 50/25 kV, 50 Hz power supply system. (orig.)

  12. GAZIANTEP AS PART OF THE UNESCO CREATIVE CITIES NETWORK: AN ASSESSMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF EXISTING REPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    AKIN, Nisa; BOSTANCI, Barış

    2017-01-01

    Theaim of the article is to develop a policy recommendation that will allowGaziantep, which has the feature of being the only city to represent Turkey in116 cities in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and CulturalOrganization (UNESCO) Creative Cities Network (UCCN), to formulate a requiredmembership monitoring report by 30 November 2019, by using the self-evaluationand membership monitoring reports already published. Within the scope of theresearch, membership monitoring reports of 1...

  13. Um exame dos modelos de redes de filas abertas aplicados a sistemas de manufatura discretos: parte II A survey on open queueing network models applied to discrete manufacturing systems: part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Bitran

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta a segunda (e última parte do nosso exame dos modelos de redes de filas abertas aplicados a sistemas de manufatura discretos. Nosso enfoque é em modelos de projeto e planejamento de job-shops. Na primeira parte (BITRAN & MORABITO, 1995b revisamos métodos de decomposição exatos e aproximados para modelos de avaliação de desempenho em sistemas com múltiplas classes de produtos e diversas estações de trabalho. Nesta segunda parte examinamos modelos de otimização de três categorias de problemas: a primeira minimiza o investimento de capital de maneira a atingir uma medida de desempenho (estoque em processo ou leadtime, a segunda busca otimizar a medida de desempenho sujeito às restrições de recursos, e a terceira explora resultados de pesquisas recentes com a redução de complexidade mediante reprojeto da planta e da partição de produtos.This paper presents the second (and last part of our survey on open queueing network models applied to discrete manufacturing systems. We focus on design and planning for job-shops. In the first part (Bitran and Morabito, 1995b we reviewed exact and approximate decomposition methods for performance evaluation models for single and multiple product class systems. The second part reviews optimization models of three categories of problems: the first minimizes capital investment subject to attaining a performance measure (WIP or leadtime, the second seeks to optimize the performance measure subject to resource constraints, and the third explores recent research developments in complexity reduction through shop redesign and products partitioning.

  14. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)-poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks for improving optrode-neural tissue interface in optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Li, Yanling; Pan, Jianqing; Wei, Pengfei; Liu, Nan; Wu, Bifeng; Cheng, Jinbo; Lu, Caiyi; Wang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The field of optogenetics has been successfully used to understand the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric diseases through the precise spatial and temporal control of specific groups of neurons in a neural circuitry. However, it remains a great challenge to integrate optogenetic modulation with electrophysiological and behavioral read out methods as a means to explore the causal, temporally precise, and behaviorally relevant interactions of neurons in the specific circuits of freely behaving animals. In this study, an eight-channel chronically implantable optrode array was fabricated and modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)-poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks (PEDOT/PSS-PVA/PAA IPNs) for improving the optrode-neural tissue interface. The conducting polymer-hydrogel IPN films exhibited a significantly higher capacitance and lower electrochemical impedance at 1 kHz as compared to unmodified optrode sites and showed significantly improved mechanical and electrochemical stability as compared to pure conducting polymer films. The cell attachment and neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells on the IPN films were clearly observed through calcein-AM staining. Furthermore, the optrode arrays were chronically implanted into the hippocampus of SD rats after the lentiviral expression of synapsin-ChR2-EYFP, and light-evoked, frequency-dependant action potentials were obtained in freely moving animals. The electrical recording results suggested that the modified optrode arrays showed significantly reduced impedance and RMS noise and an improved SNR as compared to unmodified sites, which may have benefited from the improved electrochemical performance and biocompatibility of the deposited IPN films. All these characteristics are greatly desired in optogenetic applications, and the fabrication method of conducting polymer-hydrogel IPNs can be easily integrated with other modification methods to build a

  15. Primary cutaneous actinomycosis of the foot simulating a soft tissue neoplasm: a case report; Actinomicose cutanea primaria do pe simulando neoplasia de partes moles: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Renata La Rocca; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Yamashita, Jane; Oliveira, Heverton Cesar de; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Turrini, Elizabete [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Disciplina de Dermatologia]. E-mail: renatalarocca@bol.com.br

    2003-08-01

    We report a case of a patient with primary cutaneous actinomycosis of the foot simulating a soft tissue neoplasm. A literature review on the incidence, clinical features, pathology and imaging findings is also presented. The plain films and magnetic resonance imaging findings and the pathology results are presented. This paper reports a rare disease occurring in an atypical location, simulating a soft tissue neoplasm. (author)

  16. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view.

  17. Recent Advances in Atmospheric, Solar-Terrestrial Physics and Space Weather From a North-South network of scientists [2006-2016] PART B : Results and Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fleury, R.; Petitdidier, M.; Soula, S.; Masson, F.; Davila, J.; Doherty, P.; Elias, A.; Gadimova, S.; Makela, J.; Nava, B.; Radicella, S.; Richardson, J.; Touzani, A.; Girgea Team

    2017-12-01

    This paper reviews scientific advances achieved by a North-South network between 2006 and 2016. These scientific advances concern solar terrestrial physics, atmospheric physics and space weather. This part B is devoted to the results and capacity building. Our network began in 1991, in solar terrestrial physics, by our participation in the two projects: International Equatorial Electrojet Year IEEY [1992-1993] and International Heliophysical Year IHY [2007-2009]. These two projects were mainly focused on the equatorial ionosphere in Africa. In Atmospheric physics our research focused on gravity waves in the framework of the African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis project n°1 [2005-2009 ], on hydrology in the Congo river basin and on lightning in Central Africa, the most lightning part of the world. In Vietnam the study of a broad climate data base highlighted global warming. In space weather, our results essentially concern the impact of solar events on global navigation satellite system GNSS and on the effects of solar events on the circulation of electric currents in the earth (GIC). This research began in the framework of the international space weather initiative project ISWI [2010-2012]. Finally, all these scientific projects have enabled young scientists from the South to publish original results and to obtain positions in their countries. These projects have also crossed disciplinary boundaries and defined a more diversified education which led to the training of specialists in a specific field with knowledge of related scientific fields.

  18. Practical recommendations for fertility preservation in women by the FertiPROTEKT network. Part II: fertility preservation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wolff, Michael; Germeyer, A; Liebenthron, J; Korell, M; Nawroth, F

    2018-01-01

    In addition to guidelines focusing on scientific evidence, practical recommendations on fertility preservation are also needed. A selective literature search was performed based on the clinical and scientific experience of the authors. This article (Part II) focuses on fertility preservation techniques. Part I, also published in this journal, provides information on disease prognosis, disease-specific therapy, and risks for loss of fertility. Ovarian stimulation including double stimulation and freezing of oocytes is the best-established therapy providing live birth chances in women good ovarian, if spontaneous conception is favoured and if preservation in women provides realistic chances of becoming pregnant. The choice of technique needs to be based on the time required, the woman's age, its risks and efficacy, and the individual preference of the patient.

  19. Aspectos ético-legais da retirada e transplante de tecidos, órgãos e partes do corpo humano Aspectos ético-legales de la retirada y transplante de tejidos, organos y partes del cuerpo humano Legal-ethical aspects of the removal and transplantation of tissues, organs and parts of the human body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Dias Ribeiro de Paula Lima

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available As autoras fazem uma análise crítica da legislação em vigor relativa aos transplantes de órgãos, tecidos e partes do corpo humano, e tecem comentários sobre os artigos pertinentes a eles nos respectivos códigos de ética médica e da enfermagem, alertando os profissionais de enfermagem para a necessidade de registrarem as infrações cometidas contra o cliente, à luz desses códigos.Las autoras hacen un analisis crítico de la legislación en vigor referente a los transplantes de órganos, tejidos y partes del cuerpo humano y hacen comentarios sobre los artículos pertinentes a ellos en los respectivos códigos de ética médica y de enfermería, alertando a los profesionales de enfermería sobre la necesidad de registrar las transgresiones hechas contra el cliente, a la luz de esos códigos.The authors analise critically the current legislation related to the transplantation of organs, tissues and parts of the human body, as well as they comment the articles which refer to this topic and which are found in medical and nursing ethical codes, advising nursing professionals to the need of registration of legal infractions attempted against the clients.

  20. Recognition of disturbances with specified morphology in time series. Part 1: Spikes on magnetograms of the worldwide INTERMAGNET network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoutdinov, Sh. R.; Gvishiani, A. D.; Agayan, S. M.; Solovyev, A. A.; Kin, E.

    2010-11-01

    The International Real-time Magnetic Observatory Network (INTERMAGNET) is the world's biggest international network of ground-based observatories, providing geomagnetic data almost in real time (within 72 hours of collection) [Kerridge, 2001]. The observation data are rapidly transferred by the observatories participating in the program to regional Geomagnetic Information Nodes (GINs), which carry out a global exchange of data and process the results. The observations of the main (core) magnetic field of the Earth and its study are one of the key problems of geophysics. The INTERMAGNET system is the basis of monitoring the state of the Earth's magnetic field; therefore, the information provided by the system is required to be very reliable. Despite the rigid high-quality standard of the recording devices, they are subject to external effects that affect the quality of the records. Therefore, an objective and formalized recognition with the subsequent remedy of the anomalies (artifacts) that occur on the records is an important task. Expanding on the ideas of Agayan [Agayan et al., 2005] and Gvishiani [Gvishiani et al., 2008a; 2008b], this paper suggests a new algorithm of automatic recognition of anomalies with specified morphology, capable of identifying both physically- and anthropogenically-derived spikes on the magnetograms. The algorithm is constructed using fuzzy logic and, as such, is highly adaptive and universal. The developed algorithmic system formalizes the work of the expert-interpreter in terms of artificial intelligence. This ensures identical processing of large data arrays, almost unattainable manually. Besides the algorithm, the paper also reports on the application of the developed algorithmic system for identifying spikes at the INTERMAGNET observatories. The main achievement of the work is the creation of an algorithm permitting the almost unmanned extraction of spike-free (definitive) magnetograms from preliminary records. This automated

  1. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 is part of a p53–microRNA-34 network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Jordan A.; Tenga, Alexa; Hills, Justin; Hoyer, Jessica D.; Cherian, Milu T.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 2 (NR4A2) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is over-expressed in cancer and promotes cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and chemoresistance. Increased expression and function of NR4A2 have been attributed to various signaling pathways, but little is known about microRNA (miRNA) regulation of NR4A2 in cancer. To investigate the posttranscriptional regulation of NR4A2, we used a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) reporter screen and identified miR-34 as a putative regulator of NR4A2. By using computer predictions, we identified and confirmed an miRNA recognition element in the 3′ UTR of NR4A2 that was responsible for miR-34–mediated suppression. We next demonstrated that overexpression of exogenous miR-34 or activation of the p53 pathway, which regulates endogenous miR-34 expression, decreased NR4A2 expression. Consistent with previous reports, overexpression of NR4A2 blocked the induction of p53 target genes, including mir-34a. This was a phenotypic effect, as NR4A2 overexpression could rescue cells from p53-induced inhibition of proliferation. In summary, our results are the first characterization of a cancer-related miRNA capable of regulating NR4A2 and suggest a network and possible feedback mechanism involving p53, miR-34, and NR4A2. PMID:27121375

  2. A two-step convolutional neural network based computer-aided detection scheme for automatically segmenting adipose tissue volume depicting on CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Accurately assessment of adipose tissue volume inside a human body plays an important role in predicting disease or cancer risk, diagnosis and prognosis. In order to overcome limitation of using only one subjectively selected CT image slice to estimate size of fat areas, this study aims to develop and test a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technique to automatically segment subcutaneous fat areas (SFA) and visceral fat areas (VFA) depicting on volumetric CT images. A retrospectively collected CT image dataset was divided into two independent training and testing groups. The proposed CAD framework consisted of two steps with two convolution neural networks (CNNs) namely, Selection-CNN and Segmentation-CNN. The first CNN was trained using 2,240 CT slices to select abdominal CT slices depicting SFA and VFA. The second CNN was trained with 84,000pixel patches and applied to the selected CT slices to identify fat-related pixels and assign them into SFA and VFA classes. Comparing to the manual CT slice selection and fat pixel segmentation results, the accuracy of CT slice selection using the Selection-CNN yielded 95.8%, while the accuracy of fat pixel segmentation using the Segmentation-CNN was 96.8%. This study demonstrated the feasibility of applying a new deep learning based CAD scheme to automatically recognize abdominal section of human body from CT scans and segment SFA and VFA from volumetric CT data with high accuracy or agreement with the manual segmentation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Network Frontier Workshop 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-11

    networks, biological networks, cognitive and semantic networks and social networks. This field has received a major boost caused by the availability of huge...networks, which require new ways of thinking about the world. Part of the new cognition is provided by the fractional calculus description of temporal...structures in a wide range of examples—including road networks in large urban areas, a rabbit warren, a dolphin social network, a European interbank network

  4. Formal Methods for Information Protection Technology. Task 1: Formal Grammar-Based Approach and Tool for Simulation Attacks against Computer Network. Part 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karsayev, O

    2004-01-01

    .... Integrity, confidentiality and availability of the network resources must be assured. To detect and suppress different types of computer unauthorized intrusions, modern network security systems (NSS...

  5. Evolution of Research into the Management of Family Businesses that are Part of the Instituto de la Empresa Familiar Network of Chairs (1992-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Casillas-Bueno

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The family business field of study has grown considerably in recent years in Spain. In fact, it is no exaggeration to say that twenty years ago there was barely any research in this field. In 1992, exactly 25 years ago, a group of family entrepreneurs founded the Instituto de la Empresa Familiar (IEF. IEF created the Chair in Family Business at Spanish universities to foster its inclusion in Business Administration syllabuses and promote its research by Spanish academics. This paper analyses the evolution of research into family businesses carried out by academics who are part of the IEF Network of Chairs, both at international and management level. To do this, the ISI Web of Knowledge database and Scopus were used as sources of information.

  6. Investigations on some metabolites of Tecoma stans Juss. callus tissue. Part III. Chromatographical search for iridoids, phenolic acids, terpenoids and sugars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dohnal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissus cultures of Tecoma stans Juss. cultivated on modified Murashige-Skoog medium (RT-k were phytochemically analysed by means of chromatographical methods (PC, TLC. The following products were found as metabolites: phenolic acids - chlorogenics, caffeic, ferulic, vanillic, o-coumaric and sinapic; steroids - β-sitosterol; triterpenes - ursolic and oleanolic acids, α-amyrine; sugars - glucose, fructose, sucrose, xylose. Meso-inositol was isolated in 0.8% yield. In intact plant leaves, some differences concerning the content and/or number of individual compounds were observed, namely: lack of sinapic acid and occurrence of p-coumaric acid, lower content of β-sitosterol, lack of oleanolic acid, occurrence of β-amyrine and of one unidentified triterpenoid, lack of xylose, occurrence of maltose, raffinose, and stachiose. The level of mesoinositol inn leaves was distincly lower than in the callus tissues. Neither in callus tissues nor in leaves iridoid glycosides were found.

  7. Rapid 3D Modeling and Parts Recognition on Automotive Vehicles Using a Network of RGB-D Sensors for Robot Guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Chávez-Aragón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach for the automatic detection and fast 3D profiling of lateral body panels of vehicles. The work introduces a method to integrate raw streams from depth sensors in the task of 3D profiling and reconstruction and a methodology for the extrinsic calibration of a network of Kinect sensors. This sensing framework is intended for rapidly providing a robot with enough spatial information to interact with automobile panels using various tools. When a vehicle is positioned inside the defined scanning area, a collection of reference parts on the bodywork are automatically recognized from a mosaic of color images collected by a network of Kinect sensors distributed around the vehicle and a global frame of reference is set up. Sections of the depth information on one side of the vehicle are then collected, aligned, and merged into a global RGB-D model. Finally, a 3D triangular mesh modelling the body panels of the vehicle is automatically built. The approach has applications in the intelligent transportation industry, automated vehicle inspection, quality control, automatic car wash systems, automotive production lines, and scan alignment and interpretation.

  8. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 2. Drug and non-drug treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev; D. E. Karateev; Yu. A. Ermakova

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST) of the upper extremity (rotator cuff tendinitis, epicondylitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome) entails a combination of drug and nondrug therapies. The basic agents that have been proven to be efficacious in this pathology are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and glucocorticosteroids (GCs). The paper considers the largest and known studies that are an evidence base for th...

  9. Crystal structure of a partly self-complementary peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomer showing a duplex-triplex network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Britt; Nielsen, Bettina Bryde; Rasmussen, Hanne

    2005-01-01

    of the decamer (G(4)A(5)T(6)C(7)). One right- and one left-handed Watson-Crick duplex are formed. The two PNA units C(9)T(10) change helical handedness, so that each PNA strand contains both a right- and a left-handed section. The changed handedness in C(9)T(10) allows formation of Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding...... Hoogsteen type. The structural diversity of this PNA demonstrates how the PNA backbone is able to adapt to structures governed by the stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions between the nucleobases. The crystal structure further shows how PNA oligomers containing limited sequence complementarity may form......The X-ray structure of a partly self-complementary peptide nucleic acid (PNA) decamer (H-GTAGATCACT-l-Lys-NH(2)) to 2.60 A resolution is reported. The structure is mainly controlled by the canonical Watson-Crick base pairs formed by the self-complementary stretch of four bases in the middle...

  10. Neuronal regeneration in the newt: a model to study the partly reconstruction of the neural tissue in real and simulated weightles sness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, H.; Grigoryan, E.; Mitashov, V.

    The micro -"g" effect on nervous tissue regeneration in newts has been investigated by our group for many years. It has been performed in real and in simulated microgravity with a clinostat. During limb regeneration the motor - and sensory nerves regrow perfectly within the newly formed limb. Like in `1g' conditions they are responsible for the initiation of blastema formation and continuity of g owth andr differentiation. Except for a general acceleration of growth and differentiation processes no differences became visible. Tail regeneration, which is perfectly regulated in newts during their whole life, includes the restoration of the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. They follow or initiate an accelerated growth. Up to the present the cellular derivation of the sensory neurones within the regenerate has not yet been clarified. But growth acceleration comprises the whole nervous system. That means a totally new formation of the sensory connection from the periphery to the whole spinal cord. Regeneration must be initiated by the outgrowth of nerve fibres into the wound area. This may be performed by the remaining cut sensory fibres of the last stump segment and should be followed by the differentiation of undifferentiated cells of neural crest origin nearby the amputation area. Such cells are present in the form of meningeal cells which are the origin of mantle and Schwann cells too. Corresponding to the well proved growth acceleration of lens, retina, connective tissue, muscle and skin, the real and simulated microgravity affects the nervous system in the same manner. Tissues and organs of adult organisms have no chance to remain unaffected by the microgravity effect. We try to find the trigger which initiates the accelerated proliferation of the stem cells of sensory neurons, mantle and sheath cells under micro-"g" conditions.

  11. Infiltration of soft tissue by myeloma after internal fixation of pathologic femoral fracture; Infiltracion de partes blandas por mieloma, tras la fijacion interna de una fractura patologica femoral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.; Escape, I.; Bastart, F.; Solduga, C. [Hospital de Barcelona. Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    a 75-year-old man with multiple myeloma presented with a pathologic fracture of distal right femoral diaphysis, which was fixed with Ender nails. Two and a half months later, the patients was readmitted with rapidly progressive swelling of right thigh. Ultrasound computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed infiltration of anterior right thigh muscles, extending upward to the iliopsoas muscle and retroperitoneal space, above ipsilateral renal vein. Ultrasound-guided biopsy of the soft tissue of the thigh revealed diffuse myelomatous infiltration by plasma blasts. (Author) 9 refs.

  12. Chemical analysis of the liberation of calcium and hydroxyl ions from calcium hydroxide pastes in connective tissue in the dog--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, C; Pesce, H F

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to chemically analyze calcium hydroxide pastes added to three hydrosoluble vehicles having different acid-base characteristics using polyethylene tubes implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue in a dog, evaluating the liberation of calcium and hydroxyl ions over a period of 7, 30, 45 and 60 days. The three vehicles were saline, anesthetic, and polyethylene glycol 400. Chemical analysis of the liberated calcium ions was done by means of conductimetry using EDTA for titration. Liberation of hydroxyl ions was determined by analogy of calcium ions liberated, which are in direct proportion to the molecular weight of calcium hydroxide.

  13. Automatic Categorization and Scoring of Solid, Part-Solid and Non-Solid Pulmonary Nodules in CT Images with Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xiaoguang; Xie, Mei; Gao, Jingjing; Ma, Zheng; Chen, Daiqiang; Wang, Qingfeng; Finlayson, Samuel G; Ou, Yangming; Cheng, Jie-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    We present a computer-aided diagnosis system (CADx) for the automatic categorization of solid, part-solid and non-solid nodules in pulmonary computerized tomography images using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). Provided with only a two-dimensional region of interest (ROI) surrounding each nodule, our CNN automatically reasons from image context to discover informative computational features. As a result, no image segmentation processing is needed for further analysis of nodule attenuation, allowing our system to avoid potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing. We implemented two computerized texture analysis schemes, classification and regression, to automatically categorize solid, part-solid and non-solid nodules in CT scans, with hierarchical features in each case learned directly by the CNN model. To show the effectiveness of our CNN-based CADx, an established method based on histogram analysis (HIST) was implemented for comparison. The experimental results show significant performance improvement by the CNN model over HIST in both classification and regression tasks, yielding nodule classification and rating performance concordant with those of practicing radiologists. Adoption of CNN-based CADx systems may reduce the inter-observer variation among screening radiologists and provide a quantitative reference for further nodule analysis.

  14. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 2. Drug and non-drug treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST of the upper extremity (rotator cuff tendinitis, epicondylitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome entails a combination of drug and nondrug therapies. The basic agents that have been proven to be efficacious in this pathology are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and glucocorticosteroids (GCs. The paper considers the largest and known studies that are an evidence base for the expediency of using agents, such NSAIDs, local administration of GCs, hyaluronic acid, and plateletrich plasma, as well as different non-drug treatments, in RDJAST. The latter (physiotherapy, exercises, and rehabilitation programs should be regarded as a necessary component of the therapeutic process in patients with RDJAST-associated chronic pain. Preservation of obvious pain and impaired function despite medical therapy should be regarded as an indication for surgical treatment.

  15. Design, parallel synthesis, and crystal structures of biphenyl antithrombotics as selective inhibitors of tissue factor FVIIa complex. Part 1: Exploration of S2 pocket pharmacophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotian, Pravin L; Krishnan, Raman; Rowland, Scott; El-Kattan, Yahya; Saini, Surendra K; Upshaw, Ramanda; Bantia, Shanta; Arnold, Shane; Babu, Y Sudhakar; Chand, Pooran

    2009-06-01

    Factor VIIa (FVIIa), a serine protease enzyme, coupled with tissue factor (TF) plays an important role in a number of thrombosis-related disorders. Inhibition of TF x FVIIa occurs early in the coagulation cascade and might provide some safety advantages over other related enzymes. We report here a novel series of substituted biphenyl derivatives that are highly potent and selective TF x FVIIa inhibitors. Parallel synthesis coupled with structure-based drug design allowed us to explore the S2 pocket of the enzyme active site. A number of compounds with IC(50) value of ring in the S2 pocket. Compounds with these two substituents are the most potent compounds in this series with good selectivity over related serine proteases. These compounds will be further explored for structure-activity relationship.

  16. Sex-, tissue-, and exposure duration-dependent effects of imidacloprid modulated by piperonyl butoxide and menadione in rats. Part I: oxidative and neurotoxic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Mustafa; Sevgiler, Yusuf; Rencuzogullari, Eyyup; Arslan, Mehmet; Buyukleyla, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2014-12-01

    Earlier research has evidenced the oxidative and neurotoxic potential of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, in different animal species. The primary aim of this study was to determine how metabolic modulators piperonyl butoxide and menadione affect imidacloprid's adverse action in the liver and kidney of Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes. The animals were exposed to imidacloprid alone (170 mg kg⁻¹) or in combination with piperonyl butoxide (100 mg kg⁻¹) or menadione (25 mg kg⁻¹) for 12 and 24 h. Their liver and kidney homogenates were analysed spectrophotometrically for glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, catalase, total cholinesterase specific activities, total glutathione, total protein content, and lipid peroxidation levels. Imidacloprid displayed its prooxidative and neurotoxic effects predominantly in the kidney of male rats after 24 h of exposure. Our findings suggest that the observed differences in prooxidative and neurotoxic potential of imidacloprid could be related to differences in its metabolism between the sexes. Co-exposure (90-min pre-treatment) with piperonyl butoxide or menadione revealed tissue-specific effect of imidacloprid on total cholinesterase activity. Increased cholinesterase activity in the kidney could be an adaptive response to imidacloprid-induced oxidative stress. In the male rat liver, co-exposure with piperonyl butoxide or menadione exacerbated imidacloprid toxicity. In female rats, imidacloprid+menadione co-exposure caused prooxidative effects, while no such effects were observed with imidacloprid alone or menadione alone. In conclusion, sex-, tissue-, and duration-specific effects of imidacloprid are remarkable points in its toxicity.

  17. Bypassing damaged nervous tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show the principal ability of bypassing damaged demyelinated portions of nervous tissue, thereby restoring its normal function for the passage of action potentials. We carry out a theoretical analysis on the basis of the synchronization mechanism of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons, proposed recently in [1]. And we discuss the feasibility of implement a bypass to restore damaged nervous tissue and creating an artificial neuron network.

  18. Tissue-Specific Transcriptome and Hormonal Regulation of Pollinated and Parthenocarpic Fig (Ficus carica L. Fruit Suggest that Fruit Ripening is Coordinated by the Reproductive Part of the Syconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogev Rosianski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the unconventional climacteric fig (Ficus carica fruit, pollinated and parthenocarpic fruit of the same genotype exhibit different ripening characteristics. Integrative comparative analyses of tissue-specific transcript and of hormone levels during fruit repining from pollinated vs. parthenocarpic fig fruit were employed to unravel the similarities and differences in their regulatory processes during fruit repining. Assembling tissue-specific transcripts into 147,000 transcripts with 53,000 annotated genes provided new insights into the spatial distribution of many classes of regulatory and structural genes, including those related to color, taste and aroma, storage, protein degradation, seeds and embryos, chlorophyll, and hormones. Comparison of the pollinated and parthenocarpic tissues during fruit ripening showed differential gene expression, especially in the fruit inflorescence. The distinct physiological green phase II and ripening phase III differed significantly in their gene-transcript patterns in both pulp and inflorescence tissues. Gas chromatographic analysis of whole fruits enabled the first determination of ripening-related hormone levels from pollinated and non-pollinated figs. Ethylene and auxin both increased during fruit ripening, irrespective of pollination, whereas no production of active gibberellins or cytokinins was found in parthenocarpic or pollinated ripening fruit. Tissue-specific transcriptome revealed apparent different metabolic gene patterns for ethylene, auxin and ABA in pollinated vs. parthenocarpic fruit, mostly in the fruit inflorescence. Our results demonstrate that the production of abscisic acid (ABA, non-active ABA–GE conjugate and non-active indoleacetic acid (IAA–Asp conjugate in pollinated fruits is much higher than in parthenocarpic fruits. We suggest that fruit ripening is coordinated by the reproductive part of the syconium and the differences in ABA production between pollinated and

  19. Mechanical device for tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, J.L.; Maij, E.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a mechanical device for tissue- regeneration inside a patient, comprising means (2, 3) to place a scaffold for the tissue under mechanical stress. Said means comprise a first device-part (2) and a second device-part (3) which parts are arranged to be movable with respect to

  20. Compensation of skeletal Class III malocclusion by isolated extraction of mandibular teeth: Part 2: Skeletal, dentoalveolar and soft tissue parameters in comparison with nonextraction Class III therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Bernd; Gaida, Sarah; Dathe, Henning

    2016-03-01

    To retrospectively compare two compensatory approaches taken in skeletal Class III patients during the main treatment stage, including a study group of multiband treatment plus isolated extraction of mandibular teeth and a control group of multiband treatment without extraction of teeth. The extraction group included 22 (12 female, 10 male) patients receiving compensatory multiband treatment for a mean of 3.47 ± 1.14 years and 16.22 ± 1.92 years old at debonding. The nonextraction group included 24 (14 female, 10 male) patients undergoing multiband treatment for 2.76 ± 1.28 years and 15.38 ± 1.46 years old at debonding. Lateral cephalograms obtained at baseline and upon completion of active treatment were traced for skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue parameters. Welch and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze intergroup differences (initial values, final values, initial-to-final changes) and within-group differences (p < 0.05). Upon completion of active treatment, the only significant intergroup differences were noted for U1NA and L1ML. Significant within-group changes over the courses of treatment were seen for SNB, MLNL, U1NA, U1NL, L1NB, L1ML, H-angle, ULipEL, and LLipEL (extraction group) or for SNB, ANB, individual ANB, Wits appraisal, U1NA, U1NL, H-angle, Naslab-a, ULipEL, and LLipEL (nonextraction group). Parameters that changed by significantly different amounts in both groups included Wits appraisal, L1NB, L1ML, and LLipEL. The added value of isolated extraction therapy basically lies in increasing the potential for retruding the lower incisor inclinations, so that compensatory treatment becomes an option even in selected patients presenting with adverse occlusal situations that would otherwise require orthognathic surgery. Given the successful outcomes in both groups, which had been established by Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores, it was possible to define the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft tissue characteristics of successful treatment more

  1. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the pelvis and lower extremity: Diagnosis and treatment. Part 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain associated with rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST of the pelvis and lower extremity is a frequent reason for seeking advice from general practitioners and rheumatologists. However, the true cause of painful sensations is often overlooked by a physician and the patient is long and frequently treated unsuccessfully for lumbago, coxarthrosis, or gonarthrosis.The complexities of topical diagnosis are largely associated with the fact that instrumental methods virtually always determine these or those degenerative changes in the lumbar spine and hip joint (HJ, which formally supports the presence of nonspecific low back pain and coxarthrosis. Differential diagnosis can be made between these conditions if their clinical features are considered, by discriminating symptoms, such as pains in the back or buttock, and those located predominantly in the hip and groin area.The most known forms of RDJAST of the pelvis and HJ may include trochanteritis, hip abductor and adductor syndromes, iliopectineal bursitis, and ischial tuberosity bursitis.This review briefly describes the major forms of RDJAST of the mentioned area, their clinical manifestations, and topical diagnostic techniques. It also considers main therapeutic approaches: the administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, local injections of glucocorticoids and plateletrich plasma, and physiotherapy.

  2. Biological Properties of Low-Toxicity PLGA and PLGA/PHB Fibrous Nanocomposite Implants for Osseous Tissue Regeneration. Part I: Evaluation of Potential Biotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Krucińska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In response to the demand for new implant materials characterized by high biocompatibility and bioresorption, two prototypes of fibrous nanocomposite implants for osseous tissue regeneration made of a newly developed blend of poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA and syntheticpoly([R,S]-3-hydroxybutyrate, PLGA/PHB, have been developed and fabricated. Afibre-forming copolymer of glycolide and l-lactide (PLGA was obtained by a unique method of synthesis carried out in blocksusing Zr(AcAc4 as an initiator. The prototypes of the implants are composed of three layers of PLGA or PLGA/PHB, nonwoven fabrics with a pore structure designed to provide the best conditions for the cell proliferation. The bioactivity of the proposed implants has been imparted by introducing a hydroxyapatite material and IGF1, a growth factor. The developed prototypes of implants have been subjected to a set of in vitro and in vivobiocompatibility tests: in vitro cytotoxic effect, in vitro genotoxicity and systemic toxicity. Rabbitsshowed no signs of negative reactionafter implantation of the experimental implant prototypes.

  3. Authentication of Chinese Materia Medica decoction dregs. Part II: comparison before and after decoction of four Chinese Materia Medica that mainly comprise storage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lailai; Liang, Zhitao; Chen, Hubiao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2012-02-01

    Authentication of Chinese Materia Medica (CMM) decoction dregs is important for ensuring the efficacy and safety of CMM when they are used in decoction. If someone got worse or poisoned after taking a decoction while the formula is appropriate, the authentication of CMM dregs is the effective method to explore the reasons. Therefore, a systematic study on the authentication of CMM dregs was carried out. In this study, two pairs of easily confused CMM dregs, Fenge (Puerariae Thomsonii Radix) and Shanyao (Dioscoreae Rhizoma), Dihuang (Rehmanniae Radix) and Huangjing (Polygonati Rhizoma), which mostly comprise storage tissues, were investigated by comparing the morphological and microscopic characteristics. Fenge and Shanyao contain abundant starch granules. After decoction their dregs were hard, nonstarchy and horn-like. Fully gelatinized starch granules were found in the powder of Fenge dregs while incompletely gelatinized starch granules were occasionally found in the Shanyao dregs. In contrast, Dihuang and Huangjing contain water-soluble sugars. After decoction, their dregs were hard and brittle. Their parenchymatous cells were shrunken and unknown crystals were found under microscope. Hence, the morphological and microscopic characteristics of CMM before and after decoction were different, and different changes in the CMM dregs can be illustrated by the different nature of their ergastic substance. These differences could be used to authenticate CMM dregs. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  5. Combined Use of Tissue Morphology, Neural Network Analysis of Chromatin Texture and Clinical Variables to Predict Prostate Cancer Agressiveness from Biopsy Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Partin, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To combine clinical, serum, pathologic and computer derived information into an artificial neural network to develop/validate a model to predict prostate cancer tumor aggressiveness in both a...

  6. Combined Use of Tissue Morphology, Neural Network Analysis of Chromatin Texture & Clinical Variables to Predict Prostate Cancer Agressiveness from Biopsy Material

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Partin, Alan

    1999-01-01

    the purpose of this report is to combine clinical, serum, pathological and computer derived information into an artificial neural network to develop/validate a model to predict prostate cancer tumor...

  7. Accumulation of Metals in Liver Tissues of Sympatric Golden Jackal (Canis aureus) and Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) in the Southern Part of Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Attila; Bidló, András; Bolodár-Varga, Bernadett; Jánoska, Ferenc

    2017-04-01

    Several previous study results have already demonstrated that golden jackal and red fox may serve as biological indicators of trace elements and heavy metal concentrations in the various regions they inhabit. The aim of this study was to evaluate accumulation patterns of targeted elements (Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni and Pb) in liver samples of red foxes and golden jackals collected during the same period in the southern part of Romania. The accumulation patterns of trace elements in the livers of sympatric golden jackal and red fox were practically the same. To date, separate studies of the species individually in different habitats have shown that either of the species can be used for ecotoxicological and biomonitoring studies. Moreover, in general gender related studies, no significant differences in the concentrations of the investigated elements were found in either jackals or foxes. Also, average metal concentrations in liver samples do not show significant differences between groups under and above 12 months of age.

  8. Connectivity of communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Guoqiang

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces a number of recent developments on connectivity of communication networks, ranging from connectivity of large static networks and connectivity of highly dynamic networks to connectivity of small to medium sized networks. This book also introduces some applications of connectivity studies in network optimization, in network localization, and in estimating distances between nodes. The book starts with an overview of the fundamental concepts, models, tools, and methodologies used for connectivity studies. The rest of the chapters are divided into four parts: connectivity of large static networks, connectivity of highly dynamic networks, connectivity of small to medium sized networks, and applications of connectivity studies.

  9. Telecommunication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Balachandran, Kartheepan; Hald, Sara Ligaard

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we look into the role of telecommunication networks and their capability of supporting critical infrastructure systems and applications. The focus is on smart grids as the key driving example, bearing in mind that other such systems do exist, e.g., water management, traffic control......, etc. First, the role of basic communication is examined with a focus on critical infrastructures. We look at heterogenic networks and standards for smart grids, to give some insight into what has been done to ensure inter-operability in this direction. We then go to the physical network, and look...... at the deployment of the physical layout of the communication network and the related costs. This is an important aspect as one option to use existing networks is to deploy dedicated networks. Following this, we look at some generic models that describe reliability for accessing dynamic information. This part...

  10. Effective half-lives of ¹³⁷Cs in giant butterbur and field horsetail, and the distribution differences of potassium and ¹³⁷Cs in aboveground tissue parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    Concentrations of (137)Cs and (40)K in different tissues of edible wild herbaceous plants, that is, leaf blade and petiole for giant butterbur (Petasites japonicas (Siebold et Zucc.) Maxim.), and leaf, stem and strobilus for fertile shoot of field horsetail (Equisetum arvense L.) were measured in 2012-2014 to clarify the effect in Japan from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The concentrations of (137)Cs decreased with time with effective half-lives of ca. 450 d and 360 d for giant butterbur and field horsetail, respectively. The ANOVA test revealed that (40)K and (137)Cs distributions in leaf blade and petiole for giant butterbur and leaf and stem for field horsetail were different. Therefore, other plants, leaf and stem for Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica (Houtt.) Ronse Decr.) and Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.), and leaf blade and petiole for gingko (Ginkgo biloba L.) and Someiyoshino cherry (Cerasus × yedoensis (Matsum.) A.V.Vassil. 'Somei-yoshino') were collected from the same sampling field and their (137)Cs and (40)K concentrations were compared to those in the giant butterbur and field horsetail parts. For (137)Cs, concentrations in leaf blade and leaf parts were 1.1-6.0 times higher than those in petiole and stem parts for all six plants. On the other hand, (40)K concentrations in leaf blade and leaf parts were 0.40-0.97 of those observed in petiole and stem parts. Discrimination ratios of (40)K/(137)Cs of leaf blade to petiole or leaf to stem were then calculated and they ranged from 0.09 to 0.57. These results suggested that Cs and K did not behave similarly in these plants. Thus, to understand the radiocesium fate in plants, K measurement results should not be used as an analog for Cs behavior although Cs is known to have a similar chemical reactivity to that of K. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  12. Computer networks monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Antončič , Polona

    2012-01-01

    The present thesis entitled Computer Networks Monitoring introduces the basics of computer networks, the aim and the computer data reclamation from networking devices, software for the system follow-up together with the case of monitoring a real network with tens of network devices. The networks represent an important part in the modern information technology and serve for the exchange of data and sources which makes their impeccability of crucial importance. Correct and efficient sys...

  13. Classification of Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectra from Normal and Malignant bladder tissues using Learning Vector Quantization Neural Network in Bladder Cancer Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Mascarenhas, Kim Komal; Patil, Choudhary

    2008-01-01

    In the present work we discuss the potential of recently developed classification algorithm, Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ), for the analysis of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectra, recorded from normal and malignant bladder tissue samples. The algorithm is prototype based and inherently...

  14. Using networking and communications software in business

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, PK

    2014-01-01

    Using Networking and Communications Software in Business covers the importance of networks in a business firm, the benefits of computer communications within a firm, and the cost-benefit in putting up networks in businesses. The book is divided into six parts. Part I looks into the nature and varieties of networks, networking standards, and network software. Part II discusses the planning of a networked system, which includes analyzing the requirements for the network system, the hardware for the network, and network management. The installation of the network system and the network managemen

  15. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  16. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  17. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergomas, Francesca; Grizzi, Fabio; Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha; Laghi, Luigi; Allavena, Paola; Mantovani, Alberto; Marchesi, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response. PMID:24213222

  18. Technologies for Home Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A broad overview of the home networking field, ranging from wireless technologies to practical applications. In the future, it is expected that private networks (e.g. home networks) will become part of the global network ecosystem, participating in sharing their own content, running IP...

  19. Tissue tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue tests are widely used in horticulture practice and have in comparison with soil or substrate testing advantages as well disadvantages in comparison with soil testing. One of the main advantages of tissue tests is the certainty that analysed nutrients in plant tissues are really present in the

  20. An evaluation of the National Public Health Leadership Institute--1991-2006: part II. Strengthening public health leadership networks, systems, and infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umble, Karl; Baker, Edward L; Diehl, Sandra J; Haws, Susan; Steffen, David; Frederick, Steve; Woltring, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The year-long National Public Health Leadership Institute's (PHLI) goals are to develop the capacity of individual leaders and networks of leaders so that both can lead improvements in public health systems, infrastructure, and population health. To evaluate PHLI's impact on networks, systems, and infrastructure. Senior leaders from government, health care, associations, and other organizations who graduated from PHLI between 1992 and 2006. Retreats; readings, conference calls, and webinars; personal assessments, feedback, and coaching; and action learning projects. A cross-sectional survey sent in 2007 to all leaders from the program's first 15 cohorts. Between 1992 and 2006, PHLI graduated 806 leaders. Of the 646 graduates located, 393 (61%) responded, for an overall response rate of 49% (393/806). Telephone interviews of 35 key informants were also conducted. Graduates fostered changes in systems, policies, organizations, and programs and frequently described these changes as resulting from their work as or with networks. Many graduates formed an informal national network of "thought leaders" and volunteered with professional associations to help in creating methods for improving systems and infrastructure. At the state level, graduates worked as informal networks and with associations to restructure services, reorganize agencies, catalyze new laws, and develop programs. Locally, graduates developed coalitions, fostered new laws, and improved programs, among other changes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's multiyear sponsorship of a national program fostered national networks among "thought leaders" who helped to lead the development and diffusion of numerous innovations. Public health leadership development program sponsors should foster collaborative leadership by engaging leaders in systems thinking, team leadership, dialogue, conflict resolution, and negotiation, recommend using networks for sustained personal and system development, and link

  1. Tissue segmentation-assisted analysis of fMRI for human motor response: an approach combining artificial neural network and fuzzy C means

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, MJ; Lin, CC; Chuang, KH; Chen, JH; Huang, KM

    2001-01-01

    The authors have developed an automated algorithm for segmentation of magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain. They investigated the quantitative analysis of tissue-specific human motor response through an approach combining gradient echo functional MRI and automated segmentation analysis. Fifteen healthy volunteers, placed in a 1.5 T clinical MR imager, performed a self-paced finger opposition throughout the activation periods. T1-weighted images (WI), T2WI, and proton density WI ...

  2. Tissue segmentation-assisted analysis of fMRI for human motor response: an approach combining artificial neural network and fuzzy C means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, M J; Lin, C C; Chuang, K H; Chen, J H; Huang, K M

    2001-03-01

    The authors have developed an automated algorithm for segmentation of magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain. They investigated the quantitative analysis of tissue-specific human motor response through an approach combining gradient echo functional MRI and automated segmentation analysis. Fifteen healthy volunteers, placed in a 1.5 T clinical MR imager, performed a self-paced finger opposition throughout the activation periods. T1-weighted images (WI), T2WI, and proton density WI were acquired for segmentation analysis. Single-slice axial T2* fast low-angle shot (FLASH) images were obtained during the functional study. Pixelwise cross-correlation analysis was performed to obtain an activation map. A cascaded algorithm, combining Kohonen feature maps and fuzzy C means, was applied for segmentation. After processing, masks for gray matter, white matter, small vessels, and large vessels were generated. Tissue-specific analysis showed a signal change rate of 4.53% in gray matter, 2.98% in white matter, 5.79% in small vessels, and 7.24% in large vessels. Different temporal patterns as well as different levels of activation were identified in the functional response from various types of tissue. High correlation exists between cortical gray matter and subcortical white matter (r = 0.957), while the vessel behaves somewhat different temporally. The cortical gray matter fits best to the assumed input function (r = 0.957) followed by subcortical white matter (r = 0.829) and vessels (r = 0.726). The automated algorithm of tissue-specific analysis thus can assist functional MRI studies with different modalities of response in different brain regions.

  3. Evaluation of water quality parameters for the Mamasin dam in Aksaray City in the central Anatolian part of Turkey by means of artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatip, Hatim; Kömür, M. Aydin

    2008-01-01

    Sustaining the human ecological benefits of surface water requires carefully planned strategies for reducing the cumulative risks posed by diverse human activities. The municipality of Aksaray city plays a key role in developing solutions to surface water management and protection in the central Anatolian part of Turkey. The responsibility to provide drinking water and sewage works, regulate the use of private land and protect public health provides the mandate and authority to take action. The present approach discusses the main sources of contamination and the result of direct wastewater discharges into the Melendiz and Karasu rivers, which recharge the Mamasın dam sites by the use of artificial neural network (ANN) modeling techniques. The present study illustrates the ability to predict and/or approve the output values of previously measured water quality parameters of the recharge and discharge areas at the Mamasin dam site by means of ANN techniques. Using the ANN model is appreciated in such environmental research. Here, the ANN is used for estimating if the field parameters are agreeable to the results of this model or not. The present study simulates a situation in the past by means of ANN. But in case any field measurements of some relative parameters at the outlet point “discharge area” have been missed, it could be possible to predict the approximate output values from the detailed periodical water quality parameters. Because of the high variance and the inherent non-linear relationship of the water quality parameters in time series, it is difficult to produce a reliable model with conventional modeling approaches. In this paper, the ANN modeling technique is used to establish a model for evaluating the change in electrical conductivity (EC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) values in recharge (input) and discharge (output) areas of the dam water under pollution risks. A general ANN modeling scheme is also recommended for the water parameters. The modeling

  4. Empirical research on complex networks modeling of combat SoS based on data from real war-game, Part I: Statistical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Kou, Yingxin; Li, Zhanwu; Xu, An; Wu, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    We build a complex networks model of combat System-of-Systems (SoS) based on empirical data from a real war-game, this model is a combination of command & control (C2) subnetwork, sensors subnetwork, influencers subnetwork and logistical support subnetwork, each subnetwork has idiographic components and statistical characteristics. The C2 subnetwork is the core of whole combat SoS, it has a hierarchical structure with no modularity, of which robustness is strong enough to maintain normal operation after any two nodes is destroyed; the sensors subnetwork and influencers subnetwork are like sense organ and limbs of whole combat SoS, they are both flat modular networks of which degree distribution obey GEV distribution and power-law distribution respectively. The communication network is the combination of all subnetworks, it is an assortative Small-World network with core-periphery structure, the Intelligence & Communication Stations/Command Center integrated with C2 nodes in the first three level act as the hub nodes in communication network, and all the fourth-level C2 nodes, sensors, influencers and logistical support nodes have communication capability, they act as the periphery nodes in communication network, its degree distribution obeys exponential distribution in the beginning, Gaussian distribution in the middle, and power-law distribution in the end, and its path length obeys GEV distribution. The betweenness centrality distribution, closeness centrality distribution and eigenvector centrality are also been analyzed to measure the vulnerability of nodes.

  5. Network effects in railways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Railway operation is often affected by network effects as a change in one part of the network can influence other parts of the network. Network effects occur because the train runs may be quite long and since the railway system has a high degree of interdependencies as trains cannot cross....../overtake each other everywhere in the network. First this paper describes network effects in general (section 1). In section 2 the network effects for trains and how they can be measured by scheduled waiting time is described. When the trains are affected by network effects the passengers are also affected....... Therefore, sections 3 and 4 describe the network effects for passengers and how they can be measured using passenger delay models. Before the concluding remarks in section 6, section 5 discusses how the operation can be improved by examining network effects in the planning process. © 2012 WIT Press....

  6. Tissue types (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  7. Jones-matrix tomography of biological tissues phase anisotropy in the diagnosis of uterus wall prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonyuk, L.; Baranovsky, V.; Dubolazov, O. V.; Ushenko, V. O.; Ushenko, O. G.; Zhytaryuk, V. G.; Prydiy, O. G.; Vanchulyak, O.

    2018-01-01

    The work consists of two parts. In the first part - we mapped a distribution of optical activity and birefringence in polycrystalline networks of biological tissues. The Jones-matrix formalism is used for accessible quantitative description of these types of optical anisotropy. We demonstrate that differentiation of polycrystalline networks of biological tissues can be performed based on the statistical analysis of distribution of rotation angles and phase shifts associated with the optical activity and birefringence, respectively. In the second part we defined - practical operational characteristics, such as sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of Jones-matrix reconstruction of optical anisotropy were identified with the special emphasis on biomedical application, specifically for differentiation of two types of pathology: prolapse and albuminuria.

  8. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be ste...

  9. In vivo genome-wide analysis of multiple tissues identifies gene regulatory networks, novel functions and downstream regulatory genes for Bapx1 and its co-regulation with Sox9 in the mammalian vertebral column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sumantra; Sivakamasundari, V; Yap, Sook Peng; Kraus, Petra; Kumar, Vibhor; Xing, Xing; Lim, Siew Lan; Sng, Joel; Prabhakar, Shyam; Lufkin, Thomas

    2014-12-05

    Vertebrate organogenesis is a highly complex process involving sequential cascades of transcription factor activation or repression. Interestingly a single developmental control gene can occasionally be essential for the morphogenesis and differentiation of tissues and organs arising from vastly disparate embryological lineages. Here we elucidated the role of the mammalian homeobox gene Bapx1 during the embryogenesis of five distinct organs at E12.5 - vertebral column, spleen, gut, forelimb and hindlimb - using expression profiling of sorted wildtype and mutant cells combined with genome wide binding site analysis. Furthermore we analyzed the development of the vertebral column at the molecular level by combining transcriptional profiling and genome wide binding data for Bapx1 with similarly generated data sets for Sox9 to assemble a detailed gene regulatory network revealing genes previously not reported to be controlled by either of these two transcription factors. The gene regulatory network appears to control cell fate decisions and morphogenesis in the vertebral column along with the prevention of premature chondrocyte differentiation thus providing a detailed molecular view of vertebral column development.

  10. Oligomerization of a trans Golgi/trans Golgi network retained protein occurs in the Golgi complex and may be part of its retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Locker, J.K.; Opstelten, D.J.; Ericsson, M.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The mouse hepatitis virus M protein is a triple spanning membrane glycoprotein that, when expressed independently, localizes to trans-Golgi as well as to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Passage of this protein from the endoplasmic reticulum through the intermediate compartment to the late Golgi and

  11. Conducting Indirect-Treatment-Comparison and Network-Meta-Analysis Studies : Report of the ISPOR Task Force on Indirect Treatment Comparisons Good Research Practices: Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoaglin, David C.; Hawkins, Neil; Jansen, Jeroen P.; Scott, David A.; Itzler, Robbin; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Boersma, Cornelis; Thompson, David; Larholt, Kay M.; Diaz, Mireya; Barrett, Annabel

    Evidence-based health care decision making requires comparison of all relevant competing interventions. In the absence of randomized controlled trials involving a direct comparison of all treatments of interest, indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis provide useful evidence for

  12. Gene network and pathway analysis of bovine mammary tissue challenged with Streptococcus uberis reveals induction of cell proliferation and inhibition of PPARγ signaling as potential mechanism for the negative relationships between immune response and lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Zas Sandra L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information generated via microarrays might uncover interactions between the mammary gland and Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis that could help identify control measures for the prevention and spread of S. uberis mastitis, as well as improve overall animal health and welfare, and decrease economic losses to dairy farmers. The main objective of this study was to determine the most affected gene networks and pathways in mammary tissue in response to an intramammary infection (IMI with S. uberis and relate these with other physiological measurements associated with immune and/or metabolic responses to mastitis challenge with S. uberis O140J. Results Streptococcus uberis IMI resulted in 2,102 (1,939 annotated differentially expressed genes (DEG. Within this set of DEG, we uncovered 20 significantly enriched canonical pathways (with 20 to 61 genes each, the majority of which were signaling pathways. Among the most inhibited were LXR/RXR Signaling and PPARα/RXRα Signaling. Pathways activated by IMI were IL-10 Signaling and IL-6 Signaling which likely reflected counter mechanisms of mammary tissue to respond to infection. Of the 2,102 DEG, 1,082 were up-regulated during IMI and were primarily involved with the immune response, e.g., IL6, TNF, IL8, IL10, SELL, LYZ, and SAA3. Genes down-regulated (1,020 included those associated with milk fat synthesis, e.g., LPIN1, LPL, CD36, and BTN1A1. Network analysis of DEG indicated that TNF had positive relationships with genes involved with immune system function (e.g., CD14, IL8, IL1B, and TLR2 and negative relationships with genes involved with lipid metabolism (e.g., GPAM, SCD, FABP4, CD36, and LPL and antioxidant activity (SOD1. Conclusion Results provided novel information into the early signaling and metabolic pathways in mammary tissue that are associated with the innate immune response to S. uberis infection. Our study indicated that IMI challenge with S. uberis (strain O140J elicited

  13. Tissue Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leemput, Koen; Puonti, Oula

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for automatically segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain have seen tremendous advances in recent years. So-called tissue classification techniques, aimed at extracting the three main brain tissue classes (white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid), are now...... well established. In their simplest form, these methods classify voxels independently based on their intensity alone, although much more sophisticated models are typically used in practice. This article aims to give an overview of often-used computational techniques for brain tissue classification...

  14. Bioprinting: Functional droplet networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tasoglu, Savas; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-06-01

    Tissue-mimicking printed networks of droplets separated by lipid bilayers that can be functionalized with membrane proteins are able to spontaneously fold and transmit electrical currents along predefined paths.

  15. Un Algoritmo Genético Especializado en Planeamiento de Redes de Distribución. Parte I. Fundamentos Técnicos del Algoritmo; A specialized Genetic Algorithm in Distribution Network planning. Part I. Algorithm Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Nicolás Carvajal Pérez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La planificación de redes eléctricas de distribución utilizando técnicas naturales es un tema de actualidad científica. Se destacan entre estas técnicas los algoritmos genéticos. El problema del planeamiento se representa mediante modelos matemáticos de gran cantidad de restricciones. Su solución aconseja la utilización de algoritmos genéticos especializados. Aquí se presenta un algoritmo genético de este tipo elaborado por el autor para realizar estudios de expansión y reconfiguracion de redes. Se explican los procedimientos elaborados y la magnitud de los parámetros generales a partir del trabajo experimental.  The distribution network planning using natural techniques is an actual scientific thematic; specially Genetic Algorithms. The representative mathematical model in this case has a lot of restrictions. In this paper is presented a specialized genetic algorithm to realize distribution network expansion studies. The author explains the basic procedures and experimental work to determine the general parameters magnitude.

  16. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  17. Rapid 3D Modeling and Parts Recognition on Automotive Vehicles Using a Network of RGB-D Sensors for Robot Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Chávez-Aragón; Rizwan Macknojia; Pierre Payeur; Robert Laganière

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the automatic detection and fast 3D profiling of lateral body panels of vehicles. The work introduces a method to integrate raw streams from depth sensors in the task of 3D profiling and reconstruction and a methodology for the extrinsic calibration of a network of Kinect sensors. This sensing framework is intended for rapidly providing a robot with enough spatial information to interact with automobile panels using various tools. When a vehicle is position...

  18. Definition, analysis and development of an optical data distribution network for integrated avionics and control systems. Part 2: Component development and system integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, H. W.; Morrison, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber optic transmission is emerging as an attractive concept in data distribution onboard civil aircraft. Development of an Optical Data Distribution Network for Integrated Avionics and Control Systems for commercial aircraft will provide a data distribution network that gives freedom from EMI-RFI and ground loop problems, eliminates crosstalk and short circuits, provides protection and immunity from lightning induced transients and give a large bandwidth data transmission capability. In addition there is a potential for significantly reducing the weight and increasing the reliability over conventional data distribution networks. Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is a candidate method for data communication between the various avionic subsystems. With WDM all systems could conceptually communicate with each other without time sharing and requiring complicated coding schemes for each computer and subsystem to recognize a message. However, the state of the art of optical technology limits the application of fiber optics in advanced integrated avionics and control systems. Therefore, it is necessary to address the architecture for a fiber optics data distribution system for integrated avionics and control systems as well as develop prototype components and systems.

  19. OSI Network Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ethan

    1990-01-01

    Management of heterogeneous networks is complicated by the persistence of proprietary management schemes. The need for integration of network management capabilities is pressing. The International Organization for Standardization is developing standards for managing networks as part of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) effort. OSI management…

  20. Fractal network dimension and viscoelastic powerlaw behavior: II. An experimental study of structure-mimicking phantoms by magnetic resonance elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Posnansky, Oleg; Hirsch, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Taupitz, Matthias; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-06-01

    The dynamics of the complex shear modulus, G*, of soft biological tissue is governed by the rigidity and topology of multiscale mechanical networks. Multifrequency elastography can measure the frequency dependence of G* in soft biological tissue, providing information about the structure of tissue networks at multiple scales. In this study, the viscoelastic properties of structure-mimicking phantoms containing tangled paper stripes embedded in agarose gel are investigated by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography within the dynamic range of 40-120 Hz. The effective media viscoelastic properties are analyzed in terms of the storage modulus (the real part of G*), the loss modulus (the imaginary part of G*) and the viscoelastic powerlaw given by the two-parameter springpot model. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging is used for investigating the effect of network structures on water mobility. The following observations were made: the random paper networks with fractal dimensions between 2.481 and 2.755 had no or minor effects on the storage modulus, whereas the loss modulus was significantly increased about 2.2 kPa per fractal dimension unit (R = 0.962, P soft-tissue viscoelastic parameters. In the dynamic range of in vivo elastography, the fractal network dimension primarily correlates to the loss behavior of soft tissue as can be seen from the loss modulus or the powerlaw exponent of the springpot model. These findings represent the experimental underpinning of structure-sensitive elastography for an improved characterization of various soft-tissue diseases.

  1. Modeling semiflexible polymer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Broedersz, Chase P.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of theoretical approaches to semiflexible polymers and their networks. Such semiflexible polymers have large bending rigidities that can compete with the entropic tendency of a chain to crumple up into a random coil. Many studies on semiflexible polymers and their assemblies have been motivated by their importance in biology. Indeed, crosslinked networks of semiflexible polymers form a major structural component of tissue and living cells. Reconstituted networks o...

  2. Tissue Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The project began as a e ort to support InLight and Lumidigm. With the sale of the companies to a non-New Mexico entity, the project then focused on supporting a new company Medici Technologies. The Small Business (SB) is attempting to quantify glucose in tissue using a series of short interferometer scans of the nger. Each scan is produced from a novel presentation of the nger to the device. The intent of the project is to identify and, if possible, implement improved methods for classi cation, feature selection, and training to improve the performance of predictive algorithms used for tissue classi cation.

  3. Social network data analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Charu C

    2011-01-01

    Social network analysis applications have experienced tremendous advances within the last few years due in part to increasing trends towards users interacting with each other on the internet. Social networks are organized as graphs, and the data on social networks takes on the form of massive streams, which are mined for a variety of purposes. Social Network Data Analytics covers an important niche in the social network analytics field. This edited volume, contributed by prominent researchers in this field, presents a wide selection of topics on social network data mining such as Structural Pr

  4. The Economics of Networks: theory and empirics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van der Leij (Marco)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWherever we are, networks are all around us. The roads that we travel form a network. The websites that we visit form an enormous information network. But, above all, we are part of a network ourselves, the network of social contacts and relations. These networks play an

  5. Tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  6. Medicare Program; Revisions to Payment Policies Under the Physician Fee Schedule and Other Revisions to Part B for CY 2017; Medicare Advantage Bid Pricing Data Release; Medicare Advantage and Part D Medical Loss Ratio Data Release; Medicare Advantage Provider Network Requirements; Expansion of Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program Model; Medicare Shared Savings Program Requirements. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    This major final rule addresses changes to the physician fee schedule and other Medicare Part B payment policies, such as changes to the Value Modifier, to ensure that our payment systems are updated to reflect changes in medical practice and the relative value of services, as well as changes in the statute. This final rule also includes changes related to the Medicare Shared Savings Program, requirements for Medicare Advantage Provider Networks, and provides for the release of certain pricing data from Medicare Advantage bids and of data from medical loss ratio reports submitted by Medicare health and drug plans. In addition, this final rule expands the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program model.

  7. Network Survivability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzo, José L.; Stidsen, Thomas Riis; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2010-01-01

    – are vital to modern services such as mobile telephony, online banking and VoIP. This book examines communication networking from a mathematical viewpoint. The contributing authors took part in the European COST action 293 – a four-year program of multidisciplinary research on this subject. In this book...... they offer introductory overviews and state-of-the-art assessments of current and future research in the fields of broadband, optical, wireless and ad hoc networks. Particular topics of interest are design, optimization, robustness and energy consumption. The book will be of interest to graduate students......, researchers and practitioners in the areas of networking, theoretical computer science, operations research, distributed computing and mathematics....

  8. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  9. Tissue architecture: the ultimate regulator of breast epithelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Mian, Saira

    2003-10-20

    A problem in developmental biology that continues to take center stage is how higher organisms generate diverse tissues and organs given the same cellular genotype. In cell and tumor biology, the key question is not the production of form, but its preservation: how do tissues and organs maintain homeostasis, and how do cells within tissues lose or overcome these controls in cancer? Undoubtedly, mechanisms that maintain tissue specificity should share features with those employed to drive formation of the tissues. However, they are unlikely to be identical. At a simplistic level, developmental pathways may be thought of as a series of extremely rapid short-term events. Each new step depends on what came before, and the outcome is the organism itself at birth. All organs, with a few notable exceptions, such as the mammary gland and the brain, 'arrive' together and are complete when the organism is born. In mice and humans, these events occur in a mere 21 days and 9 months respectively. The stability of the differentiated state and the homeostasis of the organism, on the other hand, will last 40-110 times longer. How does the organism achieve this feat? How are tissues maintained? These questions also relate fundamentally to how tissues become malignant and, although not discussed here, to aging. While there is much literature on differentiation - loosely defined as the gain of a single or a series of functions - we know much less about the forces and the pathways that maintain organ morphology and function as a unit. This may be partly because it is difficult to study a tissue as a unit in vivo and there are few techniques that allow maintenance of organs in vitro long enough and in such a way as to make cell and molecular biology experiments possible. Techniques for culturing cells in three-dimensional gels (3D) as a surrogate for tissues, however, have been steadily improving and the method is now used by several laboratories. In this commentary we

  10. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  11. Design and validation of a specialized training model for tissue bank personnel as a result of the European Quality System for Tissue Banking (EQSTB) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, A; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, I; Miranda, B; Navarro, A; Manyalich, M

    2007-11-01

    The main objective of European Quality System for Tissue Banking (EQSTB) project was to analyze throughout different working areas the factors that may influence the final tissue quality and safety for transplantation, providing greater benefit to recipients. Fifteen national organizations and tissue establishments from 12 European countries took part in this project. The Sanco-EQSTB project was organized in four Working Groups. The objectives of each was focused on a specific area. The Standards Working Group analyzed different standards or guides used in various European tissue banks as a quality and safety system. The Registry Working Group created a Tissue Registry through a multinational European network database. The Education Working Group created a specialized training model for tissue bank personnel. The Audit Working Group created an European model of Auditing for tissue establishments. The aim of this article was to describe the activities of Working Group 3 in designing and validating a specialized training model among tissue bank personnel that could become the approved education system recommended by European Union members.

  12. Multiscale mechanical modeling of soft biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2008-10-01

    Soft biological tissues include both native and artificial tissues. In the human body, tissues like the articular cartilage, arterial wall, and heart valve leaflets are examples of structures composed of an underlying network of collagen fibers, cells, proteins and molecules. Artificial tissues are less complex than native tissues and mainly consist of a fiber polymer network with the intent of replacing lost or damaged tissue. Understanding of the mechanical function of these materials is essential for many clinical treatments (e.g. arterial clamping, angioplasty), diseases (e.g. arteriosclerosis) and tissue engineering applications (e.g. engineered blood vessels or heart valves). This thesis presents the derivation and application of a multiscale methodology to describe the macroscopic mechanical function of soft biological tissues incorporating directly their structural architecture. The model, which is based on volume averaging theory, accounts for structural parameters such as the network volume fraction and orientation, the realignment of the fibers in response to strain, the interactions among the fibers and the interactions between the fibers and the interstitial fluid in order to predict the overall tissue behavior. Therefore, instead of using a constitutive equation to relate strain to stress, the tissue microstructure is modeled within a representative volume element (RVE) and the macroscopic response at any point in the tissue is determined by solving a micromechanics problem in the RVE. The model was applied successfully to acellular collagen gels, native blood vessels, and electrospun polyurethane scaffolds and provided accurate predictions for permeability calculations in isotropic and oriented fiber networks. The agreement of model predictions with experimentally determined mechanical properties provided insights into the mechanics of tissues and tissue constructs, while discrepancies revealed limitations of the model framework.

  13. Hardwiring Stem Cell Communication through Tissue Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-03-10

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function, but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hardwiring stem cell communication through tissue structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tianchi; Greco, Valentina; Myung, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues. PMID:26967287

  15. Learning Networks, Networked Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter; Berlanga, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Sloep, P. B., & Berlanga, A. J. (2011). Learning Networks, Networked Learning [Redes de Aprendizaje, Aprendizaje en Red]. Comunicar, XIX(37), 55-63. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-05

  16. Regulation of tissue morphogenesis by endothelial cell-derived signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Saravana K.; Kusumbe, Anjali P.; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Endothelial cells form an extensive network of blood vessels that has numerous essential functions in the vertebrate body. In addition to their well-established role as a versatile transport network, blood vessels can induce organ formation or direct growth and differentiation processes by providing signals in a paracrine (angiocrine) fashion. Tissue repair also requires the local restoration of vasculature. Endothelial cells are emerging as important signaling centers that coordinate regeneration and help to prevent deregulated, disease-promoting processes. Vascular cells are also part of stem cell niches and play key roles in hematopoiesis, bone formation and neurogenesis. Here, we will review these newly identified roles of endothelial cells in the regulation of organ morphogenesis, maintenance and regeneration. PMID:25529933

  17. Dense Ocean Floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis; DONET/ DONET2, Part2 -Development and data application for the mega thrust earthquakes around the Nankai trough-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Y.; Kawaguchi, K.; Araki, E.; Matsumoto, H.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, M.; Kamiya, S.; Ariyoshi, K.; Baba, T.; Ohori, M.; Hori, T.; Takahashi, N.; Kaneko, S.; Donet Research; Development Group

    2010-12-01

    Yoshiyuki Kaneda Katsuyoshi Kawaguchi*, Eiichiro Araki*, Shou Kaneko*, Hiroyuki Matsumoto*, Takeshi Nakamura*, Masaru Nakano*, Shinichirou Kamiya*, Keisuke Ariyoshi*, Toshitaka Baba*, Michihiro Ohori*, Narumi Takakahashi*, and Takane Hori** * Earthquake and Tsunami Research Project for Disaster Prevention, Leading Project , Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) **Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) DONET (Dense Ocean Floor Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis) is the real time monitoring system of the Tonankai seismogenic zones around the Nankai trough southwestern Japan. We were starting to develop DONET to perform real time monitoring of crustal activities over there and the advanced early warning system. DONET will provide important and useful data to understand the Nankai trough maga thrust earthquake seismogenic zones and to improve the accuracy of the earthquake recurrence cycle simulation. Details of DONET concept are as follows. 1) Redundancy, Extendable function and advanced maintenance system using the looped cable system, junction boxes and the ROV/AUV. DONET has 20 observatories and incorporated in a double land stations concept. Also, we are developed ROV for the 10km cable extensions and heavy weight operations. 2) Multi kinds of sensors to observe broad band phenomena such as long period tremors, very low frequency earthquakes and strong motions of mega thrust earthquakes over M8: Therefore, sensors such as a broadband seismometer, an accelerometer, a hydrophone, a precise pressure gauge, a differential pressure gauge and a thermometer are equipped with each observatory in DONET. 3) For speedy detections, evaluations and notifications of earthquakes and tsunamis: DONET system will be deployed around the Tonankai seismogenic zone. 4) Provide data of ocean floor crustal deformations derived from pressure sensors: Simultaneously, the development of data

  18. A method for quantifying mechanical properties of tissue following viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Lam

    Full Text Available Viral infection and replication involves the reorganization of the actin network within the host cell. Actin plays a central role in the mechanical properties of cells. We have demonstrated a method to quantify changes in mechanical properties of fabricated model three-dimensional (3D connective tissue following viral infection. Using this method, we have characterized the impact of infection by the human herpesvirus, cytomegalovirus (HCMV. HCMV is a member of the herpesvirus family and infects a variety of cell types including fibroblasts. In the body, fibroblasts are necessary for maintaining connective tissue and function by creating mechanical force. Using this 3D connective tissue model, we observed that infection disrupted the cell's ability to generate force and reduced the cumulative contractile force of the tissue. The addition of HCMV viral particles in the absence of both viral gene expression and DNA replication was sufficient to disrupt tissue function. We observed that alterations of the mechanical properties are, in part, due to a disruption of the underlying complex actin microfilament network established by the embedded fibroblasts. Finally, we were able to prevent HCMV-mediated disruption of tissue function by the addition of human immune globulin against HCMV. This study demonstrates a method to quantify the impact of viral infection on mechanical properties which are not evident using conventional cell culture systems.

  19. Prevalencia de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en infecciones de piel y partes blandas en pacientes ambulatorios Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in skin and soft tissue infections, in ambulatory patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Bermejo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recientemente se ha observado un aumento en la prevalencia de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (SAMR en pacientes ambulatorios con infecciones de piel y partes blandas (IPyPB. Los datos epidemiológicos locales disponibles son limitados. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, prospectivo, de consultantes con IPyPB en la División Infectología del Hospital General de Agudos Juan A. Fernández, en el período 01/10/2009 a 31/01/2011. Fueron 130; edad mediana 36 años (RIC 25.9-43.5; hombres 61.5%. El 46.9% era HIV+. Cien cultivos (76.9%, de 100 pacientes, resultaron positivos: 83 S. aureus, 8 Streptococcus spp. y 9 con otros microorganismos. De los S. aureus aislados, 62 (74.7% fueron resistentes a oxacilina, 12 (14.4% a clindamicina, 14 (16.9% a eritromicina, 5 (6% a ciprofloxacina, presentando en algunos casos más de una resistencia. Todos fueron sensibles a rifampicina y minociclina, y 98.8% (82 a trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol. El 83.8% (52 de los pacientes con SAMR tenían algún factor de riesgo (FR, sin diferencias con los pacientes con otros aislamientos. La presentación clínica más frecuente de IPyPB / SAMR fue forunculosis: 56.4 (35/62 vs. 28.9% (11/38 en infecciones por otros microorganismos (p = 0.013. La resistencia a oxacilina fue similar entre pacientes HIV+ y negativos (79.1 vs. 70%, p = 0.179 (34/43 vs. 28/40. Concluimos que en la población estudiada se encontró una alta prevalencia de SAMR, independientemente de la serología para HIV o la presencia de FR. Las opciones de tratamiento empírico para este microorganismo son minociclina y trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol.An increased prevalence of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI has been recently reported. Epidemiological data in Argentina is limited. Our objectives were to evaluate etiological agents, clinical presentation, risk factors and evolution of SSTI in ambulatory patients, in a

  20. Low-cost computing and network communication for a point-of-care device to perform a 3-part leukocyte differential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powless, Amy J.; Feekin, Lauren E.; Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Alapat, Daisy V.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2016-03-01

    Point-of-care approaches for 3-part leukocyte differentials (granulocyte, monocyte, and lymphocyte), traditionally performed using a hematology analyzer within a panel of tests called a complete blood count (CBC), are essential not only to reduce cost but to provide faster results in low resource areas. Recent developments in lab-on-a-chip devices have shown promise in reducing the size and reagents used, relating to a decrease in overall cost. Furthermore, smartphone diagnostic approaches have shown much promise in the area of point-of-care diagnostics, but the relatively high per-unit cost may limit their utility in some settings. We present here a method to reduce computing cost of a simple epi-fluorescence imaging system using a Raspberry Pi (single-board computer, Raspberry Pi to a main server and return results back to the user, exporting the bulk of the computational requirements. Six images were acquired per minute with up to 200 cells per field of view. Preliminary results showed that the differential count varied significantly in monocytes with a 1 minute time difference indicating the importance of time-gating to produce an accurate/consist differential.

  1. Hydrodynamic theory of tissue shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Popović, Marko; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements. We identify a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We show that anisotropic deformation of tissue and cells can arise from two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven cellular rearrangements. These two active processes result in distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  2. A network of networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iedema, Rick; Verma, Raj; Wutzke, Sonia; Lyons, Nigel; McCaughan, Brian

    2017-04-10

    Purpose To further our insight into the role of networks in health system reform, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how one agency, the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI), and the multiple networks and enabling resources that it encompasses, govern, manage and extend the potential of networks for healthcare practice improvement. Design/methodology/approach This is a case study investigation which took place over ten months through the first author's participation in network activities and discussions with the agency's staff about their main objectives, challenges and achievements, and with selected services around the state of New South Wales to understand the agency's implementation and large system transformation activities. Findings The paper demonstrates that ACI accommodates multiple networks whose oversight structures, self-organisation and systems change approaches combined in dynamic ways, effectively yield a diversity of network governances. Further, ACI bears out a paradox of "centralised decentralisation", co-locating agents of innovation with networks of implementation and evaluation expertise. This arrangement strengthens and legitimates the role of the strategic hybrid - the healthcare professional in pursuit of change and improvement, and enhances their influence and impact on the wider system. Research limitations/implications While focussing the case study on one agency only, this study is unique as it highlights inter-network connections. Contributing to the literature on network governance, this paper identifies ACI as a "network of networks" through which resources, expectations and stakeholder dynamics are dynamically and flexibly mediated and enhanced. Practical implications The co-location of and dynamic interaction among clinical networks may create synergies among networks, nurture "strategic hybrids", and enhance the impact of network activities on health system reform. Social implications Network governance requires more

  3. Ground-based instruments of the PWING project to investigate dynamics of the inner magnetosphere at subauroral latitudes as a part of the ERG-ground coordinated observation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Katoh, Yasuo; Hamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yuka; Adachi, Takumi; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Oyama, Shin-Ichiro; Nosé, Masahito; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Otsuka, Yuichi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Takagi, Yuki; Takeshita, Yuhei; Shinbori, Atsuki; Kurita, Satoshi; Hori, Tomoaki; Nishitani, Nozomu; Shinohara, Iku; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Obana, Yuki; Suzuki, Shin; Takahashi, Naoko; Seki, Kanako; Kadokura, Akira; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Connors, Martin; Michael Ruohoniemi, J.; Engebretson, Mark; Turunen, Esa; Ulich, Thomas; Manninen, Jyrki; Raita, Tero; Kero, Antti; Oksanen, Arto; Back, Marko; Kauristie, Kirsti; Mattanen, Jyrki; Baishev, Dmitry; Kurkin, Vladimir; Oinats, Alexey; Pashinin, Alexander; Vasilyev, Roman; Rakhmatulin, Ravil; Bristow, William; Karjala, Marty

    2017-11-01

    The plasmas (electrons and ions) in the inner magnetosphere have wide energy ranges from electron volts to mega-electron volts (MeV). These plasmas rotate around the Earth longitudinally due to the gradient and curvature of the geomagnetic field and by the co-rotation motion with timescales from several tens of hours to less than 10 min. They interact with plasma waves at frequencies of mHz to kHz mainly in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere, obtain energies up to MeV, and are lost into the ionosphere. In order to provide the global distribution and quantitative evaluation of the dynamical variation of these plasmas and waves in the inner magnetosphere, the PWING project (study of dynamical variation of particles and waves in the inner magnetosphere using ground-based network observations, http://www.isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp/dimr/PWING/) has been carried out since April 2016. This paper describes the stations and instrumentation of the PWING project. We operate all-sky airglow/aurora imagers, 64-Hz sampling induction magnetometers, 40-kHz sampling loop antennas, and 64-Hz sampling riometers at eight stations at subauroral latitudes ( 60° geomagnetic latitude) in the northern hemisphere, as well as 100-Hz sampling EMCCD cameras at three stations. These stations are distributed longitudinally in Canada, Iceland, Finland, Russia, and Alaska to obtain the longitudinal distribution of plasmas and waves in the inner magnetosphere. This PWING longitudinal network has been developed as a part of the ERG (Arase)-ground coordinated observation network. The ERG (Arase) satellite was launched on December 20, 2016, and has been in full operation since March 2017. We will combine these ground network observations with the ERG (Arase) satellite and global modeling studies. These comprehensive datasets will contribute to the investigation of dynamical variation of particles and waves in the inner magnetosphere, which is one of the most important research topics in recent space

  4. Tunnel technique with connective tissue graft versus coronally advanced flap with enamel matrix derivative for root coverage: a RCT using 3D digital measuring methods. Part II. Volumetric studies on healing dynamics and gingival dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebele, Stephan F; Zuhr, Otto; Schneider, David; Jung, Ronny E; Hürzeler, Markus B

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this randomized clinical trial (RCT) was to compare the clinical performance of the tunnel technique with subepithelial connective tissue graft (TUN) versus a coronally advanced flap with enamel matrix derivative (CAF) in the treatment of gingival recession defects. The use of innovative 3D digital measuring methods allowed to study healing dynamics at connective tissue (CT)-grafted sites and to evaluate the influence of the thickness of the root covering soft tissues on the outcome of surgical root coverage. Twenty-four patients contributed a total of 47 Miller class I or II recessions for scientific evaluation. Precise study models collected at baseline and follow-up examinations were optically scanned and virtually superimposed for digital evaluation of clinical outcome measures including mean marginal soft tissue thickness (THK). Healing dynamics were measured in a defined region of interest at CT-grafted sites where volume differences between time points were calculated. At 12 months, recession reduction as well as mean root coverage were significantly better at CT-grafted sites treated in the TUN group (1.94 mm and 98.4% respectively) compared to the non-augmented sites of the CAF group (1.17 mm and 71.8% respectively) and statistical analysis revealed a positive correlation of THK (1.63 mm TUN versus 0.91 mm CAF, p tissue healing following surgical root coverage with CT-grafting was mainly accomplished after 6 months, with around two-thirds of the augmented volume being maintained after 12 months. The TUN resulted in thicker gingiva and better clinical outcomes compared to CAF. Increased gingival thickness was associated with better surgical outcomes in terms of recession reduction and root coverage. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nicotine and periodontal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use has been recognized to be a significant risk factor for the development and progression of periodontal disease. Its use is associated with increased pocket depths, loss of periodontal attachment, alveolar bone and a higher rate of tooth loss. Nicotine, a major component and most pharmacologically active agent in tobacco is likely to be a significant contributing factor for the exacerbation of periodontal diseases. Available literature suggests that nicotine affects gingival blood flow, cytokine production, neutrophil and other immune cell function; connective tissue turnover, which can be the possible mechanisms responsible for overall effects of tobacco on periodontal tissues. Inclusion of tobacco cessation as a part of periodontal therapy encourages dental professionals to become more active in tobacco cessation counseling. This will have far reaching positive effects on our patients′ oral and general health.

  6. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  7. Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (PMN) is a part of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS). The PMN was created as an outreach program to connect...

  8. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Gajiwala, Astrid; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    The banking of tissues such bone and skin began in India in the 1980s and 1990s. Although eye banking started in 1945 there was little progress in this field for the next five decades. As part of the IAEA/RCA program to use ionising radiation for the sterilisation of biological tissues in Asia and the Pacific Region, the Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) in 1986 decided to set up a tissue bank in Mumbai funded by the Government of India. The TMH Tissue Bank became operational in January 1988, and stands as a pioneering effort in the country to provide safe, clinically useful and cost-effective human allografts for transplantation. It uses the IAEA International Standards on Tissue Banking. All the grafts are sterilised terminally by exposure to a dose of 25 kGy of gamma radiation, which has been validated as recommended by the IAEA Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilisation of Tissues Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control. The TMH Tissue Bank is registered with the Maharashtra State Health Authorities, and in May 2004, it became India's first Tissue Bank to receive ISO 9001:2000 certification of its Quality Management System. From 1989 to September 2007, the TMH Tissue Bank has supplied 11,369 allografts to 310 surgeons operating in 69 hospitals in Mumbai and 56 hospitals in other parts of India. These numbers have been limited by difficulties with the retrieval of tissues from deceased donors due to inadequate resources and tissue donation policies of hospitals. As the Government of India representative in the IAEA program, the TMH Tissue Bank has promoted and co-coordinated these activities in the country and the development of tissue banks using radiation sterilisation of tissue grafts. Towards this end it has been engaged in training personnel, drawing up project proposals, and supporting the establishment of a Tissue Retrieval Centre in Mumbai. Currently it networks with the Zonal Transplant Co-ordination Centre of the Government of

  9. Un Algoritmo Genético Especializado en Planeamiento de Redes de Distribución. Parte II. Detalles del algoritmo y su aplicación; A specialized Genetic Algorithm in Distribution Network planning. Part II. Algorithm details and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Nicolás Carvajal Pérez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available En la Parte I de este articulo, se expusieron las características de la planificación de redes y su influencia en la selección de métodos específicos en cada uno de los procedimientos para desarrollar los pasos del algoritmo genético especializado. Aquí se exponen las interioridades del algoritmo y el trabajo experimental para fijar la magnitud de los parámetros generales de las poblaciones y la cantidad de éstas. Se presentan casos resueltos durante el ajuste del sistema de cálculo.  The first section explained the specifics characteristics of network planning and the selected method for genetic operators. In this papers, expose details about the algorithm steps, the mathematical procedures and some applications.

  10. [Use of gold implants as a treatment of pain related to canine hip dysplasia--a review. Part 1: Background and current state of research regarding the effects of implanting gold in tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisenroth, A; Nolte, I; Wefstaedt, P

    2013-01-01

    Gold-bead implantation as a method of pain treatment in dogs suffering from osteoarthritic disease is receiving increasing attention in veterinary medicine. For the present article, publications from veterinary books and journals were collected and evaluated, together with related articles in human medicine. After providing an overview of the historical use of gold and gold compounds, the technique of implanting this noble metal is introduced. The reasons for establishing the terms gold acupuncture and gold (bead) implantation are described, considering the question whether and what kind of methodological differences exist behind these terms. Next, previous publications concerning the effects of gold implantation in tissue are summarised. In 2002 it was proven that gold ions are released from the surface of gold implants by a process termed dissolucytosis. Subsequent publications further investigated details about the interaction between gold ions and tissue as well as the distribution pattern of bio-released ions. Gold compounds were previously used for chrysotherapy in human medicine until medication with fewer side effects became established. The anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties of gold compounds were used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Current research aims to ascertain whether the anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating effects of gold compounds are imitated by gold ions released from gold implants at a local level. In conclusion, the present review summarises important findings about the effects of gold implanted in tissue. However, further research is necessary to estimate the limitations and benefits of this auromedication.

  11. Spare-part surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yeong Pin; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2013-11-01

    The authors discuss the use of scavenged tissue for reconstruction of an injured limb, also referred to as "spare-part surgery." It forms an important part of overall reconstructive strategy. Though some principles can be laid down, there is no "textbook" method for the surgeon to follow. Successful application of this strategy requires understanding of the concept, accurate judgment, and the ability to plan "on-the-spot," as well as knowledge and skill to improvise composite flaps from nonsalvageable parts. Requirements for limb reconstruction vary from simple solutions such as tissue coverage, which include skin grafts or flaps to more complex planning as in functional reconstruction of the hand, where the functional importance of individual digits as well as the overall prehensile function of the hand needs to be addressed right from the time of primary surgery. The incorporation of the concept of spare-part surgery allows the surgeon to carry out primary reconstruction of the limb without resorting to harvest tissue from other regions of the body.

  12. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  13. Gene therapy for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Kenneth R

    2003-02-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration are the normal biological responses of many different tissues in the body to injury. During the healing process, profound changes occur in cell composition and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation. Fibroblasts and equivalent reparative cells migrate to the wounded area and subsequently proliferate. These cells and reparative cells from the surrounding tissue are responsible for the rapid repair which results in tissue regeneration. Growth factors, one of which is transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), stimulate fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells to proliferate and synthesize ECM proteins. This process of early repair provides a rapid way to restore new tissue and mechanical integrity. This early tissue repair process is normally followed by involution, which requires the production and activation of proteases, tissue maturation and remodeling, reorganization and finally regeneration. Alternately, failure to replace the critical components of the ECM, including elastin and basement membrane, results in abnormal regeneration of the epithelial cell layer. Although remodeling should occur during healing, provisional repair may be followed by excessive synthesis and deposition of collagen, which results in irreversible fibrosis and scarring. This excessive fibrosis which occurs in aberrant healing is at least in part mediated by persistent TGF-beta. Because of the central role of collagen in the wound healing process, the pharmacological control of collagen synthesis has been of paramount importance as a possible way to abrogate aberrant healing and prevent irreversible fibrosis. Fibrosis is an abnormal response to tissue injury. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity response to environmentally relevant complex metal mixture (Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd) accumulated in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Part I: importance of exposure time and tissue dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevičiūtė, Milda; Sauliutė, Gintarė; Svecevičius, Gintaras; Kazlauskienė, Nijolė; Baršienė, Janina

    2017-10-01

    Health impact of metal mixture at environment realistic concentrations are difficult to predict especially for long-term effects where cause-and-effect relationships may not be directly obvious. This study was aimed to evaluate metal mixture (Zn-0.1, Cu-0.01, Ni-0.01, Cr-0.01, Pb-0.005 and Cd-0.005 mg/L, respectively for 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days at concentrations accepted for the inland waters in EU) genotoxicity (micronuclei, nuclear buds, nuclear buds on filament), cytotoxicity (8-shaped nuclei, fragmented-apoptotic erythrocytes), bioaccumulation, steady-state and the reference level of geno-cytotoxicity in hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon tissues. Metals accumulated mostly in gills and kidneys, to the lesser extent in the muscle. Uptake of metals from an entire mixture in the fish for 14 days is sufficient to reach steady-state Cr, Pb concentrations in all tissues; Zn, Cu-in kidneys and muscle, Ni-in liver, kidneys, muscle and Cd-in muscle. Treatment with metal mixture significantly increased summed genotoxicity levels at 7 days of exposure in peripheral blood and liver erythrocytes, at 14 days of exposure in gills and kidney erythrocytes. Significant elevation of cytotoxicity was detected after 2 and 14 days of exposure in gills erythrocytes and after 28 days-in peripheral blood erythrocytes. The amount of Cu, Cr, Pb and Cd accumulated in tissues was dependent upon duration of exposure; nuclear buds, 8-shaped nuclei frequencies also were dependent upon duration of exposure. This study indicates that metals at low levels when existing in mixture causes significant geno-cytotoxicity responses and metals bioaccumulation in salmon.

  15. Drawing rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Daniel H

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a collection of species is usually represented by a phylogenetic tree. Sometimes, phylogenetic networks are used as a means of representing reticulate evolution or of showing uncertainty and incompatibilities in evolutionary datasets. This is often done using unrooted phylogenetic networks such as split networks, due in part, to the availability of software (SplitsTree) for their computation and visualization. In this paper we discuss the problem of drawing rooted phylogenetic networks as cladograms or phylograms in a number of different views that are commonly used for rooted trees. Implementations of the algorithms are available in new releases of the Dendroscope and SplitsTree programs.

  16. Sustainable wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zhongming; Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    This brief focuses on network planning and resource allocation by jointly considering cost and energy sustainability in wireless networks with sustainable energy. The characteristics of green energy and investigating existing energy-efficient green approaches for wireless networks with sustainable energy is covered in the first part of this brief. The book then addresses the random availability and capacity of the energy supply. The authors explore how to maximize the energy sustainability of the network and minimize the failure probability that the mesh access points (APs) could deplete their

  17. A comprehensive functional analysis of tissue specificity of human gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryanov Alexey

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the maturation of microarray technology has allowed the genome-wide analysis of gene expression patterns to identify tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed ('housekeeping' genes. We have performed a functional and topological analysis of housekeeping and tissue-specific networks to identify universally necessary biological processes, and those unique to or characteristic of particular tissues. Results We measured whole genome expression in 31 human tissues, identifying 2374 housekeeping genes expressed in all tissues, and genes uniquely expressed in each tissue. Comprehensive functional analysis showed that the housekeeping set is substantially larger than previously thought, and is enriched with vital processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis, translation and energy metabolism. Network topology of the housekeeping network was characterized by higher connectivity and shorter paths between the proteins than the global network. Ontology enrichment scoring and network topology of tissue-specific genes were consistent with each tissue's function and expression patterns clustered together in accordance with tissue origin. Tissue-specific genes were twice as likely as housekeeping genes to be drug targets, allowing the identification of tissue 'signature networks' that will facilitate the discovery of new therapeutic targets and biomarkers of tissue-targeted diseases. Conclusion A comprehensive functional analysis of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes showed that the biological function of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes was consistent with tissue origin. Network analysis revealed that tissue-specific networks have distinct network properties related to each tissue's function. Tissue 'signature networks' promise to be a rich source of targets and biomarkers for disease treatment and diagnosis.

  18. Network cities and externalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Boix Domènech

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of «agglomeration economies» explains the existence of advantages derived from the concentration of population and activity. However, it does not explain the existence of spatially dynamic external economies. Network economies generated in networks of cities correspond to this last type, since they are generated from the interaction between urban units, linked by a network relationship. The objective of this research is to advance in the study of the relationship between the networks of cities and the generation of external economies. The research is divided in four parts: first we expose the link between networks of cities and external economies. The second part outlines a model for the combined measuring of the concentration and network economies. The third part explains the results of applying the model to a case of study: the network of cities of Catalonia. The results suggest that there is a causal relationship between the organization of the urban units forming networks of cities and the generation of external economies that affect growth and economic development. Finally, conclusions and policy implications are drawn up.

  19. Tension, contraction and tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Natalie C; Martin, Adam C

    2017-12-01

    D'Arcy Thompson was a proponent of applying mathematical and physical principles to biological systems, an approach that is becoming increasingly common in developmental biology. Indeed, the recent integration of quantitative experimental data, force measurements and mathematical modeling has changed our understanding of morphogenesis - the shaping of an organism during development. Emerging evidence suggests that the subcellular organization of contractile cytoskeletal networks plays a key role in force generation, while on the tissue level the spatial organization of forces determines the morphogenetic output. Inspired by D'Arcy Thompson's On Growth and Form, we review our current understanding of how biological forms are created and maintained by the generation and organization of contractile forces at the cell and tissue levels. We focus on recent advances in our understanding of how cells actively sculpt tissues and how forces are involved in specific morphogenetic processes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Perfusion imaging of the right perisylvian neural network in acute spatial neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Zopf

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested a tightly connected perisylvian neural network associated with spatial neglect. Here we investigated whether structural damage in one part of the network typically is accompanied with functional damage in other, structurally intact areas of this network. By combining normalized fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI we asked whether or not lesions centering on fronto-temporal regions co-occur with abnormal perfusion in structurally intact parietal cortex. We found small areas of perfusion differences in the superior temporal gyrus (STG, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, insula, and postcentral gyrus of our patients with spatial neglect. However, with thresholds applied to delineate behaviorally relevant malperfusion of brain tissue, the analysis of normalised time-to-peak (TTP and maximal signal reduction (MSR perfusion maps did not reveal significant changes outside the area of structural damage. In particular, we found no abnormal perfusion in the structurally intact inferior parietal lobule (IPL and/or the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ. The present results obtained in three consecutively admitted neglect patients indicate that structural damage in one part of the right perisylvian network associated with spatial neglect does not necessarily require dysfunction by malperfusion in other, structurally intact parts of the network to provoke spatial neglect. The neural tissue in the fronto-temporal cortex appears to have an original role in processes of spatial orienting and exploration.

  1. Gradient polymers for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Gunnewiek, Michel

    2015-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, there is an constant demand for finding solutions to restore damaged or diseased tissues and organs. Regenerative medicine holds the promise to create continuous body-part replacements through the combination of cells, biological factors, and synthetic scaffolds.

  2. Bioprinting for vascular and vascularized tissue biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ayan, Bugra; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-03-15

    Bioprinting is a promising technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision. Bioprinting enables the deposition of various biologics including growth factors, cells, genes, neo-tissues and extra-cellular matrix-like hydrogels. Benefits of bioprinting have started to make a mark in the fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and pharmaceutics. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, the creation of vascularized tissue constructs has remained a principal challenge till date. However, given the myriad advantages over other biofabrication methods, it becomes organic to expect that bioprinting can provide a viable solution for the vascularization problem, and facilitate the clinical translation of tissue engineered constructs. This article provides a comprehensive account of bioprinting of vascular and vascularized tissue constructs. The review is structured as introducing the scope of bioprinting in tissue engineering applications, key vascular anatomical features and then a thorough coverage of 3D bioprinting using extrusion-, droplet- and laser-based bioprinting for fabrication of vascular tissue constructs. The review then provides the reader with the use of bioprinting for obtaining thick vascularized tissues using sacrificial bioink materials. Current challenges are discussed, a comparative evaluation of different bioprinting modalities is presented and future prospects are provided to the reader. Biofabrication of living tissues and organs at the clinically-relevant volumes vitally depends on the integration of vascular network. Despite the great progress in traditional biofabrication approaches, building perfusable hierarchical vascular network is a major challenge. Bioprinting is an emerging technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision

  3. Estimation of Expectable Network Quality in Wireless Mesh Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wollenberg, Till

    2012-01-01

    Part 3: Computing in Networks; International audience; Our work aims to improve the usability of wireless mesh networks as communication layer of smart office environments. While wireless mesh networks are well-suited for this task in general, the negative impact of interference, fading, and saturation makes the communication basically opportunistic. Our goal is to develop a system which allows a short-term estimation of network quality in terms of throughput, packet loss and latency. The est...

  4. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB....... The first part of the scientific contribution investigates an implementation of pulse inversion for THI on the experimental ultrasound system SARUS. The technique is initially implemented for linear array transducers and then expanded for convex array transducers. The technique is evaluated based on spatial...

  5. Declarative Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Loo, Boon Thau

    2012-01-01

    Declarative Networking is a programming methodology that enables developers to concisely specify network protocols and services, which are directly compiled to a dataflow framework that executes the specifications. Declarative networking proposes the use of a declarative query language for specifying and implementing network protocols, and employs a dataflow framework at runtime for communication and maintenance of network state. The primary goal of declarative networking is to greatly simplify the process of specifying, implementing, deploying and evolving a network design. In addition, decla

  6. Symmetry in Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Garrido

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze a few interrelated concepts about graphs, such as their degree, entropy, or their symmetry/asymmetry levels. These concepts prove useful in the study of different types of Systems, and particularly, in the analysis of Complex Networks. A System can be defined as any set of components functioning together as a whole. A systemic point of view allows us to isolate a part of the world, and so, we can focus on those aspects that interact more closely than others. Network Science analyzes the interconnections among diverse networks from different domains: physics, engineering, biology, semantics, and so on. Current developments in the quantitative analysis of Complex Networks, based on graph theory, have been rapidly translated to studies of brain network organization. The brain's systems have complex network features—such as the small-world topology, highly connected hubs and modularity. These networks are not random. The topology of many different networks shows striking similarities, such as the scale-free structure, with the degree distribution following a Power Law. How can very different systems have the same underlying topological features? Modeling and characterizing these networks, looking for their governing laws, are the current lines of research. So, we will dedicate this Special Issue paper to show measures of symmetry in Complex Networks, and highlight their close relation with measures of information and entropy.

  7. Motorcycle Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    An article in NASA Tech Briefs describing a vacuum bagging process for forming composite parts helped a small Oklahoma Company to improve its manufacturing process. President of Performance Extremes, Larry Ortega, and his partners make motorcycle parts from carbon/epoxy to reduce weight. Using vacuum bags, parts have a better surface and fewer voids inside. When heat used in the vacuum bag process caused deformation upon cooling, a solution found in another tech brief solved the problem. A metal plate inside the vacuum bag made for more even heat transfer. A third article described a simple procedure for repairing loose connector pins, which the company has also utilized.

  8. Taking Part

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodworth, Max; Ulfstjerne, Michael Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how a resource bonanza in Ordos Municipality, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, in the 2000s translated into broad-based participation in informal lending networks and drove a remarkable, but short-lived, phase of urban expansion and private wealth accumulation. Local lending...... networks inflated enormous credit and property bubbles, which ultimately burst in 2011 with severe ramifications for Ordos's urban expansion and households' livelihoods. Based on fifteen months of ethnographic fieldwork in Ordos, the analysis advances the idea of “taking part” to explore the interconnected...... desires to participate in urban expansion and to seize for oneself a portion of the local bonanzas in natural resources, property, and finance. The socio-spatial impacts of the financialization of the everyday environment are discussed in relation to urban transformation, the production of a “ghost town...

  9. Networked Microgrids Scoping Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dobriansky, Larisa [General MicroGrids, San Diego, CA (United States); Glover, Steve [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, Chen-Ching [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Looney, Patrick [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mashayekh, Salman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pratt, Annabelle [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schneider, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stadler, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Starke, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yue, Meng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Much like individual microgrids, the range of opportunities and potential architectures of networked microgrids is very diverse. The goals of this scoping study are to provide an early assessment of research and development needs by examining the benefits of, risks created by, and risks to networked microgrids. At this time there are very few, if any, examples of deployed microgrid networks. In addition, there are very few tools to simulate or otherwise analyze the behavior of networked microgrids. In this setting, it is very difficult to evaluate networked microgrids systematically or quantitatively. At this early stage, this study is relying on inputs, estimations, and literature reviews by subject matter experts who are engaged in individual microgrid research and development projects, i.e., the authors of this study The initial step of the study gathered input about the potential opportunities provided by networked microgrids from these subject matter experts. These opportunities were divided between the subject matter experts for further review. Part 2 of this study is comprised of these reviews. Part 1 of this study is a summary of the benefits and risks identified in the reviews in Part 2 and synthesis of the research needs required to enable networked microgrids.

  10. Fish oil-derived long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce expression of M1-associated macrophage markers in an ex vivo adipose tissue culture model, in part through adiponectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. De Boer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue (AT macrophages (ATM play a key role in obesity-associated pathologies, and their phenotype can be influenced by the local tissue microenvironment. Interestingly, long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA and the LC n-3 PUFA-upregulated adipokine, adiponectin (Ad, may mitigate excessive ATM inflammatory M1-polarization responses. However, to what extent LC n-3 PUFA and Ad work in concert to affect macrophage phenotype has not been examined. Thus, we used an established ex vivo AT organ culture model using visceral AT from mice fed a control (CON; 10% w/w safflower oil n-6 PUFA-rich diet or an isocaloric fish-oil (FO; 3% w/w menhaden oil + 7% w/w safflower oil-derived LC n-3 PUFA-rich diet to generate AT conditioned media (ACM. We then evaluated if CON or FO ACM affected macrophage polarization markers in a model designed to mimic acute (18 h ACM plus LPS for the last 6 h or chronic (macrophages treated with LPS-challenged CON or FO ACM for 24 h inflammation ± Ad-neutralizing antibody and the LPS-neutralizing agent, polymyxin B. In the acute inflammation model, macrophages treated with FO ACM had decreased lipid uptake and mRNA expression of M1 markers (Nos2, Nfκb, Il6, Il18, Ccl2 and Ccl5 compared with CON ACM (p≤0.05; however, these effects were largely attenuated when Ad was neutralized (p>0.05. Further, in the chronic inflammation model, macrophages treated with FO ACM had decreased mRNA expression of M1 markers (Nos2, Tnfα, Ccl2 and Il1β and IL-6 and CCL2 secretion (p≤0.05; however, some of these effects were lost when Ad was neutralized, and were further exacerbated when both Ad and LPS were neutralized. Taken together, this work shows that LC n-3 PUFA and Ad work in concert to suppress certain M1 macrophage responses. Thus, future strategies to modulate the ATM phenotype should consider the role of both LC n-3 PUFA and Ad in mitigating obese AT inflammation.

  11. A research on the application of software defined networking in satellite network architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huan; Chen, Jinqiang; Cao, Suzhi; Cui, Dandan; Li, Tong; Su, Yuxing

    2017-10-01

    Software defined network is a new type of network architecture, which decouples control plane and data plane of traditional network, has the feature of flexible configurations and is a direction of the next generation terrestrial Internet development. Satellite network is an important part of the space-ground integrated information network, while the traditional satellite network has the disadvantages of difficult network topology maintenance and slow configuration. The application of SDN technology in satellite network can solve these problems that traditional satellite network faces. At present, the research on the application of SDN technology in satellite network is still in the stage of preliminary study. In this paper, we start with introducing the SDN technology and satellite network architecture. Then we mainly introduce software defined satellite network architecture, as well as the comparison of different software defined satellite network architecture and satellite network virtualization. Finally, the present research status and development trend of SDN technology in satellite network are analyzed.

  12. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  13. Carcass or Tissue Packaging and Shipping

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — SOP on proper shipping of wildlife tissues to labs. Provides stepwise instructions and guidance on how to collect and ship wildlife carcasses, carcass parts, or...

  14. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER THROUGH NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GYÖRGY ATTILA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a vital intangible asset for any organization and cannot be valued exactly due its special form of materialization. Although we have this drawback, a scientifically established value should be used in order to measure the performance of knowledge holders. A correct valuation helps to know the worth of assets offered in exploitation. Exploitation of this resource could be done in several different ways, but integration in knowledge networks seems to generate best efficiency ratio. Networks offer the possibility to change information, to obtain new information, to build further ideas arose from network partners or to develop together new ideas. Thus, networks assure conditions to optimize the members’ knowledge portfolios. Optimization of knowledge usage creates benefits for network members. These benefits could be profits (if members are private companies or social welfare (if members are looking after collective purposes. Taxonomy of knowledge networks is diverse, permitting an adaptation to the needs of members. Networks permit a large scale of heterogeneity. Since an important part of new knowledge creating costs is covered from public budgetary resources, a special development is recorded at those networks which are exclusively or partly organized in the public sector or benefit by participation from the public sector.

  15. Using network science to evaluate exercise-associated brain changes in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan H. Burdette; Laurienti, Paul J.; Espeland, Mark A.; Morgan, Ashley R.; Qawi Telesford; Vechlekar, Crystal D.; Satoru Hayaska; Janine J Jennings; Jeff A Katula; Kraft, Robert A.; Walter J Rejeski

    2010-01-01

    Literature has shown that exercise is beneficial for cognitive function in older adults and that aerobic fitness is associated with increased hippocampal tissue and blood volumes. The current study used novel network science methods to shed light on the neurophysiological implications of exercise-induced changes in the hippocampus of older adults. Participants represented a volunteer subgroup of older adults that were part of either the exercise training (ET) or healthy aging educational cont...

  16. Metabolomic correlation-network modules in Arabidopsis based on a graph-clustering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redestig Henning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deciphering the metabolome is essential for a better understanding of the cellular metabolism as a system. Typical metabolomics data show a few but significant correlations among metabolite levels when data sampling is repeated across individuals grown under strictly controlled conditions. Although several studies have assessed topologies in metabolomic correlation networks, it remains unclear whether highly connected metabolites in these networks have specific functions in known tissue- and/or genotype-dependent biochemical pathways. Results In our study of metabolite profiles we subjected root tissues to gas chromatography-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS and used published information on the aerial parts of 3 Arabidopsis genotypes, Col-0 wild-type, methionine over-accumulation 1 (mto1, and transparent testa4 (tt4 to compare systematically the metabolomic correlations in samples of roots and aerial parts. We then applied graph clustering to the constructed correlation networks to extract densely connected metabolites and evaluated the clusters by biochemical-pathway enrichment analysis. We found that the number of significant correlations varied by tissue and genotype and that the obtained clusters were significantly enriched for metabolites included in biochemical pathways. Conclusions We demonstrate that the graph-clustering approach identifies tissue- and/or genotype-dependent metabolomic clusters related to the biochemical pathway. Metabolomic correlations complement information about changes in mean metabolite levels and may help to elucidate the organization of metabolically functional modules.

  17. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  18. Networks in social policy problems

    CERN Document Server

    Scotti, marco

    2012-01-01

    Network science is the key to managing social communities, designing the structure of efficient organizations and planning for sustainable development. This book applies network science to contemporary social policy problems. In the first part, tools of diffusion and team design are deployed to challenges in adoption of ideas and the management of creativity. Ideas, unlike information, are generated and adopted in networks of personal ties. Chapters in the second part tackle problems of power and malfeasance in political and business organizations, where mechanisms in accessing and controlling informal networks often outweigh formal processes. The third part uses ideas from biology and physics to understand global economic and financial crises, ecological depletion and challenges to energy security. Ideal for researchers and policy makers involved in social network analysis, business strategy and economic policy, it deals with issues ranging from what makes public advisories effective to how networks influenc...

  19. Materials for engineering vascularized adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Uriel, Shiri; Brey, Eric M

    2011-05-01

    Loss of adipose tissue can occur due to congenital and acquired lipoatrophies, trauma, tumor resection, and chronic disease. Clinically, it is difficult to regenerate or reconstruct adipose tissue. The extensive microvsacular network present in adipose, and the sensitivity of adipocytes to hypoxia, hinder the success of typical tissue transfer procedures. Materials that promote the formation of vascularized adipose tissue may offer alternatives to current clinical treatment options. A number of synthetic and natural biomaterials common in tissue engineering have been investigated as scaffolds for adipose regeneration. While these materials have shown some promise they do not account for the unique extracellular microenvironment of adipose. Adipose derived hydrogels more closely approximate the physical and chemical microenvironment of adipose tissue, promote preadipocyte differentiation and vessel assembly in vitro, and stimulate vascularized adipose formation in vivo. The combination of these materials with techniques that promote rapid and stable vascularization could lead to new techniques for engineering stable, vascularized adipose tissue for clinical application. In this review we discuss materials used for adipose tissue engineering and strategies for vascularization of these scaffolds. Materials that promote formation of vascularized adipose tissue have the potential to serve as alternatives or supplements to existing treatment options, for adipose defects or deficiencies resulting from chronic disease, lipoatrophies, trauma, and tumor resection. Copyright © 2009 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The network researchers' network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C.; Jiang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987). In thi......The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987......). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...

  1. Colloidal gas aphron foams: A novel approach to a hydrogel based tissue engineered myocardial patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth Edna

    Cardiovascular disease currently affects an estimated 58 million Americans and is the leading cause of death in the US. Over 2.3 million Americans are currently living with heart failure a leading cause of which is acute myocardial infarction, during which a part of the heart muscle is damaged beyond repair. There is a great need to develop treatments for damaged heart tissue. One potential therapy involves replacement of nonfunctioning scar tissue with a patch of healthy, functioning tissue. A tissue engineered cardiac patch would be ideal for such an application. Tissue engineering techniques require the use of porous scaffolds, which serve as a 3-D template for initial cell attachment and grow-th leading to tissue formation. The scaffold must also have mechanical properties closely matching those of the tissues at the site of implantation. Our research presents a new approach to meet these design requirements. A unique interaction between poly(vinyl alcohol) and amino acids has been discovered by our lab, resulting in the production of novel gels. These unique synthetic hydrogels along with one natural hydrogel, alginate (derived from brown seaweed), have been coupled with a new approach to tissue scaffold fabrication using solid colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs). CGAs are colloidal foams containing uniform bubbles with diameters on the order of micrometers. Upon solidification the GCAs form a porous, 3-D network suitable for a tissue scaffold. The project encompasses four specific aims: (I) characterize hydrogel formation mechanism, (II) use colloidal gas aphrons to produce hydrogel scaffolds, (III) chemically and physically characterize scaffold materials and (IV) optimize and evaluate scaffold biocompatibility.

  2. Network cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  3. Network Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  4. High-Performance Networking

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    The series will start with an historical introduction about what people saw as high performance message communication in their time and how that developed to the now to day known "standard computer network communication". It will be followed by a far more technical part that uses the High Performance Computer Network standards of the 90's, with 1 Gbit/sec systems as introduction for an in depth explanation of the three new 10 Gbit/s network and interconnect technology standards that exist already or emerge. If necessary for a good understanding some sidesteps will be included to explain important protocols as well as some necessary details of concerned Wide Area Network (WAN) standards details including some basics of wavelength multiplexing (DWDM). Some remarks will be made concerning the rapid expanding applications of networked storage.

  5. Collective network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  6. Experiment K-6-13. Morphological and biochemical examination of heart tissue. Part 1: Effects of microgravity on the myocardial fine structure of rats flown on Cosmos 1887. Ultrastructure studies. Part 2: Cellular distribution of cyclic ampdependent protein kinase regulatory subunits in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Miquel, Jaime; Mednieks, M. I.; Sapp, W.; Popova, I. A.; Serova, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    The left ventricle of hearts from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite for 12.5 days was compared to the same tissue of synchronous and vivarium control animals maintained in a ground based laboratory. The volume density of the mitochondria in the myocardium of the space-flown animals was statistically less (p equal less than 0.01) than that of the synchronous or vivarium control rats. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a certain degree of myocardial degeneration manifested in mitochondrial changes and accumulation of myeloid bodies. Generalized myofibrillar edema was also observed.

  7. Part two

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Korsgaard, Anders

    2008-01-01

    A novel micro combined heat and power system and a dynamic model thereof were presented in part one of the publication. In the following, the control system and dynamic performance of the system are presented. The model is subjected to a measured consumption pattern of 25 Danish single family hou...

  8. Networks and Transaction Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Henning, Christian; Henningsen, Geraldine; Henningsen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Based on the well-known fact that social networks can provide effective mechanisms that help to increase the trust level between two trade partners, we apply a simple game-theoretical framework to derive transaction costs as a high risk of opportunistic behavior in a repeated trade relation determined by the density and size of trading networks. In the empirical part of the paper we apply a two stage procedure to estimate the impact of social network structures on farm’s transaction costs obs...

  9. Delays and networked control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hetel, Laurentiu; Daafouz, Jamal; Johansson, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This edited monograph includes state-of-the-art contributions on continuous time dynamical networks with delays. The book is divided into four parts. The first part presents tools and methods for the analysis of time-delay systems with a particular attention on control problems of large scale or infinite-dimensional systems with delays. The second part of the book is dedicated to the use of time-delay models for the analysis and design of Networked Control Systems. The third part of the book focuses on the analysis and design of systems with asynchronous sampling intervals which occur in Networked Control Systems. The last part of the book exposes several contributions dealing with the design of cooperative control and observation laws for networked control systems. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of control theory, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students. .

  10. Simulated Associating Polymer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, Joris

    Telechelic associating polymer networks consist of polymer chains terminated by endgroups that have a different chemical composition than the polymer backbone. When dissolved in a solution, the endgroups cluster together to form aggregates. At low temperature, a strongly connected reversible network is formed and the system behaves like a gel. Telechelic networks are of interest since they are representative for biopolymer networks (e.g. F-actin) and are widely used in medical applications (e.g. hydrogels for tissue engineering, wound dressings) and consumer products (e.g. contact lenses, paint thickeners). In this thesis such systems are studied by means of a molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo simulation. At first, the system in rest is studied by means of graph theory. The changes in network topology upon cooling to the gel state, are characterized. Hereto an extensive study of the eigenvalue spectrum of the gel network is performed. As a result, an in-depth investigation of the eigenvalue spectra for spatial ER, scale-free, and small-world networks is carried out. Next, the gel under the application of a constant shear is studied, with a focus on shear banding and the changes in topology under shear. Finally, the relation between the gel transition and percolation is discussed.

  11. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  12. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David W [Bone and Joint Research Group, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, General Hospital, University of Southampton, SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Hindoostuart@googlemail.com

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  13. Biodegradable Microfluidic Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    bonding multiple microfluidic layers. Introduction Overcoming the problems of nutrient transport is critical in the design of tissue engineering...an intrinsic vascular network within these scaffolds. More specifically, the application of microfabrication and BioMEMS technology has been focused

  14. American Association of Tissue Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brightest in Tissue Banking FIND AATB ACCREDITED TISSUE BANK INSTITUTIONS SEARCH STANDARDS FOR TISSUE BANKING ACCESS CERTIFIED TISSUE BANK SPECIALISTS (CTBS) MANAGE QDEW Workshop | Baltimore, MD Save ...

  15. Endoscopic tissue diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2008-09-01

    The extremely poor outcome in patients with cholangiocarcinoma, in large part, reflects the late presentation of these tumors and the challenging nature of establishing a tissue diagnosis. Establishing a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma requires obtaining evidence of malignancy from sampling of the epithelium of the biliary tract, which has proven to be challenging. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration performs slightly better than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosing cholangiocarcinoma, both endoscopic approaches demonstrate disappointing performance characteristics.

  16. Telecommunication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iannone, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Many argue that telecommunications network infrastructure is the most impressive and important technology ever developed. Analyzing the telecom market's constantly evolving trends, research directions, infrastructure, and vital needs, Telecommunication Networks responds with revolutionized engineering strategies to optimize network construction. Omnipresent in society, telecom networks integrate a wide range of technologies. These include quantum field theory for the study of optical amplifiers, software architectures for network control, abstract algebra required to design error correction co

  17. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Barshir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs. The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  18. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-06-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  19. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Amezcua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  20. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amezcua, Rodolfo; Shirolkar, Ajay; Fraze, Carolyn; Stout, David A

    2016-07-19

    Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  1. Interconnected networks

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides an introduction to and overview of the emerging field of interconnected networks which include multi layer or multiplex networks, as well as networks of networks. Such networks present structural and dynamical features quite different from those observed in isolated networks. The presence of links between different networks or layers of a network typically alters the way such interconnected networks behave – understanding the role of interconnecting links is therefore a crucial step towards a more accurate description of real-world systems. While examples of such dissimilar properties are becoming more abundant – for example regarding diffusion, robustness and competition – the root of such differences remains to be elucidated. Each chapter in this topical collection is self-contained and can be read on its own, thus making it also suitable as reference for experienced researchers wishing to focus on a particular topic.

  2. Methadone Recycling Sustains Drug Reservoir in Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Fudin, Jeffrey; Daly, Annemarie; Schiesser, William E; Boston, Raymond C

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that there is a tissue store of methadone content in humans that is not directly accessible, but is quantifiable. Further, we hypothesize the mechanism by which methadone content is sustained in tissue stores involves methadone uptake, storage, and release from tissue depots in the body (recycling). Accordingly, we hypothesize that such tissue stores, in part, determine plasma methadone levels. We studied a random sample of six opioid-naïve healthy subjects. We performed a clinical trial simulation in silico using pharmacokinetic modeling. We found a large tissue store of methadone content whose size was much larger than methadone's size in plasma in response to a single oral dose of methadone 10 mg. The tissue store measured 13-17 mg. This finding could only be explained by the contemporaneous storage of methadone in tissue with dose recycling. We found that methadone recycles 2-5 times through an inaccessible extravascular compartment (IAC), from an accessible plasma-containing compartment (AC), before exiting irreversibly. We estimate the rate of accumulation (or storage) of methadone in tissue was 0.029-7.29 mg/h. We predict 39 ± 13% to 83 ± 6% of methadone's tissue stores "spillover" into the circulation. Our results indicate that there exists a large quantifiable tissue store of methadone in humans. Our results support the notion that methadone in humans undergoes tissue uptake, storage, release into the circulation, reuptake from the circulation, and re-release into the circulation, and that spillover of methadone from tissue stores, in part, maintain plasma methadone levels in humans.

  3. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes chara...

  4. Privacy in Online Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Raad, Elie; Chbeir, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Online social networks have become an important part of the online activities on the web and one of the most influencing media. Unconstrained by physical spaces, online social networks offer to web users new interesting means to communicate, interact, and socialize. While these networks make frequent data sharing and inter-user communications instantly possible, privacy-related issues are their obvious much discussed immediate consequences. Although the notion of privacy may take different fo...

  5. Information ethics on social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Harňaková, Soňa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis highlights the benefits and risks arising from using of social networks and assess if social networks are following ethical principles. The first part of the thesis deals with information, ethics and information ethics, which arises from the needs to apply ethical principles in the field of information processing. The second chapter of this thesis outlines the basic aspects of social networks and their impact on society, describes the key advantages and disadvantages associated wi...

  6. Network maintenance

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    A site wide network maintenance has been scheduled for Saturday 28 February. Most of the network devices of the General Purpose network will be upgraded to a newer software version, in order to improve our network monitoring capabilities. This will result in a series of short (2-5 minutes) random interruptions everywhere on the CERN sites along this day. This upgrade will not affect: the Computer centre itself, building 613, the Technical Network and the LHC experiments dedicated networks at the pits. Should you need more details on this intervention, please contact Netops by phone 74927 or email mailto:Netops@cern.ch. IT/CS Group

  7. Network maintenance

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A site-wide network maintenance operation has been scheduled for Saturday 28 February. Most of the network devices of the general purpose network will be upgraded to a newer software version, in order to improve our network monitoring capabilities. This will result in a series of short (2-5 minutes) random interruptions everywhere on the CERN sites throughout the day. This upgrade will not affect the Computer Centre itself, Building 613, the Technical Network and the LHC experiments, dedicated networks at the pits. For further details of this intervention, please contact Netops by phone 74927 or e-mail mailto:Netops@cern.ch. IT/CS Group

  8. Queuing theory and telecommunications networks and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Giambene, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a basic description of current networking technologies and protocols as well as important tools for network performance analysis based on queuing theory. The second edition adds selected contents in the first part of the book for what concerns: (i) the token bucket regulator and traffic shaping issues; (ii) the TCP protocol congestion control that has a significant part in current networking; (iii) basic satellite networking issues; (iv) adding details on QoS support in IP networks. The book is organized so that networking technologies and protocols (Part I) are first and are then followed by theory and exercises with applications to the different technologies and protocols (Part II). This book is intended as a textbook for master level courses in networking and telecommunications sectors.

  9. Multiplexed lasing in tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Qiushu; Fan, Xudong

    2017-02-01

    Biolasers are an emerging technology for next generation biochemical detection and clinical applications. Progress has recently been made to achieve lasing from biomolecules and single living cells. Tissues, which consist of cells embedded in extracellular matrix, mimic more closely the actual complex biological environment in a living body and therefore are of more practical significance. Here, we developed a highly versatile tissue laser platform, in which tissues stained with fluorophores are sandwiched in a high-Q Fabry-Pérot microcavity. Distinct lasing emissions from muscle and adipose tissues stained respectively with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY), and hybrid muscle/adipose tissue with dual-staining were achieved with a threshold of only 10 μJ/mm2. Additionally, we investigated how tissue structure/geometry, tissue thickness, and staining dye concentration affect the tissue laser. It is further found that, despite large fluorescence spectral overlap between FITC and BODIPY in tissues, their lasing emissions could be clearly distinguished and controlled due to their narrow lasing bands and different lasing thresholds, thus enabling highly multiplexed detection. Our tissue laser platform can be broadly applicable to various types of tissues/diseases. It provides a new tool for a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, such as diagnostics/screening of tissues and identification/monitoring of biological transformations in tissue engineering.

  10. A Social Networks in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Poulova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    At present social networks are becoming important in all areas of human activities. They are simply part and parcel of everyday life. They are mostly used for advertising, but they have already found their way into education. The future potential of social networks is high as it can be seen from their statistics on a daily, monthly or yearly…

  11. Privacy in Online Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beye, Michael; Jeckmans, Arjan; Erkin, Zekeriya; Erkin, Zekeriya; Hartel, Pieter H.; Lagendijk, Reginald; Tang, Qiang; Abraham, A.

    Online Social Networks (OSNs) have become part of daily life for millions of users. Users building explicit networks that represent their social relationships and often share a wealth of personal information to their own benefit. The potential privacy risks of such behavior are often underestimated

  12. The EUROCET Network: Support for Coding, Vigilance and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareri, Maura; Filippetti, Marzia; Ghirardini, Angelo; Vespasiano, Francesca; Ciaccio, Paola Di; Nanni Costa, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND: In the last years, there have been increasing concerns about the safety and traceability of human tissues and cells in Europe. In order to regulate this part of medical practice, the European Commission issued 3 directives between 2004 and 2006 and endorsed EUROCET to support member states in fulfilling some of their obligations. MATHODS: EUROCET created a connection with the European Union (EU) Competent Authorities (CAs) and set up a website where lists of the CAs, the authorized Tissue Establishments (TEs) and the activity data are published and updated. Moreover, EUROCET is involved within the Vigilance and Surveillance of Substances of Human Origin (SOHO V&S) project, aiming to support the EU member states in the establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for tissues and cells. EUROCET is also working with EU stakeholders to develop a common coding system concerning donation and products. RESULTS: There are 33 countries in EUROCET and 57 CAs. 3,974 TEs are recorded: 1,108 for tissues, 1,480 for haematopoietic progenitor cells and 1,386 for assisted reproduction. On the website, it is possible to find the 2010 activity data report. CONCLUSION: Based on its cooperation with the CAs, EUROCET represents them in the European network. Nowadays, the EU member states can rely on a web portal and database in order to put the tissue and cell directives into practice.

  13. Network Ambivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Jagoda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The language of networks now describes everything from the Internet to the economy to terrorist organizations. In distinction to a common view of networks as a universal, originary, or necessary form that promises to explain everything from neural structures to online traffic, this essay emphasizes the contingency of the network imaginary. Network form, in its role as our current cultural dominant, makes scarcely imaginable the possibility of an alternative or an outside uninflected by networks. If so many things and relationships are figured as networks, however, then what is not a network? If a network points towards particular logics and qualities of relation in our historical present, what others might we envision in the future? In  many ways, these questions are unanswerable from within the contemporary moment. Instead of seeking an avant-garde approach (to move beyond networks or opting out of networks (in some cases, to recover elements of pre-networked existence, this essay proposes a third orientation: one of ambivalence that operates as a mode of extreme presence. I propose the concept of "network aesthetics," which can be tracked across artistic media and cultural forms, as a model, style, and pedagogy for approaching interconnection in the twenty-first century. The following essay is excerpted from Network Ambivalence (Forthcoming from University of Chicago Press. 

  14. The Network Completion Problem: Inferring Missing Nodes and Edges in Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Leskovec, J

    2011-11-14

    Network structures, such as social networks, web graphs and networks from systems biology, play important roles in many areas of science and our everyday lives. In order to study the networks one needs to first collect reliable large scale network data. While the social and information networks have become ubiquitous, the challenge of collecting complete network data still persists. Many times the collected network data is incomplete with nodes and edges missing. Commonly, only a part of the network can be observed and we would like to infer the unobserved part of the network. We address this issue by studying the Network Completion Problem: Given a network with missing nodes and edges, can we complete the missing part? We cast the problem in the Expectation Maximization (EM) framework where we use the observed part of the network to fit a model of network structure, and then we estimate the missing part of the network using the model, re-estimate the parameters and so on. We combine the EM with the Kronecker graphs model and design a scalable Metropolized Gibbs sampling approach that allows for the estimation of the model parameters as well as the inference about missing nodes and edges of the network. Experiments on synthetic and several real-world networks show that our approach can effectively recover the network even when about half of the nodes in the network are missing. Our algorithm outperforms not only classical link-prediction approaches but also the state of the art Stochastic block modeling approach. Furthermore, our algorithm easily scales to networks with tens of thousands of nodes.

  15. Laser/tissue interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederich, D N

    1991-01-01

    When laser light impinges on tissue, it can reflect, scatter, be absorbed, or transmit to the surrounding tissue. Absorption controls to a great degree the extent to which reflection, scattering and transmission occur, and wavelength is the primary determinant of absorption. The CO2 laser is consistently absorbed by most materials and tissues and the Nd-YAG laser wavelength is preferentially absorbed in pigmented tissues. The factors which determine the initial tissue effect include the laser wavelength, laser power, laser waveform, tissue optical properties, and tissue thermal properties. There are almost an infinite number of combinations of these factors possible, many of which would result in unacceptable damage to the tissues. This underscores the need to thoroughly test any particular combination of these factors on the conceptual, in-vitro, and in-vivo level before a treatment is offered.

  16. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  17. FRD tissue archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The fishery genetics tissue collection has over 80,000 tissues stored in 95% ethanol representing fishes and invertebrates collected globally but with a focus on the...

  18. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Biorepository at the University of Washington joined the Prostate Cancer Pathology Resource Network (PCBN) September 30th 2014. The purpose of this...Cancer Biorepository at the University of Washington joined the Prostate Cancer Pathology Resource Network (PCBN) September 30th 2014. The UW Prostate...outcomes for the project include tissue acquisition, PDX development, and TMA construction , and specimen distribution are already discussed under

  19. Network versus Economic Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Albrekt

    might be an important part of the vicious circles of unemployment. Finally, the article analyse the importance of network versus the importance of economic incentives. The result supports the thesis that economic sociology provides a better account of the transition from unemployment to employment than...

  20. Adipose tissue fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Buechler, Christa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a major interest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissue cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteins whose composition and remodeling is of crucial importance for cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue in obesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygen and hypoxia development. Subsequent activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. The...

  1. Bioreactors for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huang-Chi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2006-09-01

    Bioreactors are essential in tissue engineering, not only because they provide an in vitro environment mimicking in vivo conditions for the growth of tissue substitutes, but also because they enable systematic studies of the responses of living tissues to various mechanical and biochemical cues. The basic principles of bioreactor design are reviewed, the bioreactors commonly used for the tissue engineering of cartilage, bone and cardiovascular systems are assessed in terms of their performance and usefulness. Several novel bioreactor types are also reviewed.

  2. Cable networks, services, and management

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Cable Networks, Services, and Management is the first book to cover cable networks, services, and their management, in-depth, for network operators, engineers, researchers, and students. Thirteen experts in various fields have contributed their knowledge of network architectures and services, Operations, Administration, Maintenance, Provisioning, Troubleshooting (OAMPT) for residential and business services, cloud, Software Defined Networks (SDN), as well as virtualization concepts and their applications as part of the future directions of cable networks. The book begins by introducing architecture and services for Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS) 3.0/ 3.1, Converged Cable Access Platform (CCAP), Content Distribution Networks (CDN, IP TV, and Packet Cable and Wi-Fi for Residential Services. Topics that are discussed in proceeding chapters include: operational systems and management architectures, service orders, provisioning, fault manageme t, performance management, billing systems a...

  3. Network neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Danielle S; Sporns, Olaf

    2017-02-23

    Despite substantial recent progress, our understanding of the principles and mechanisms underlying complex brain function and cognition remains incomplete. Network neuroscience proposes to tackle these enduring challenges. Approaching brain structure and function from an explicitly integrative perspective, network neuroscience pursues new ways to map, record, analyze and model the elements and interactions of neurobiological systems. Two parallel trends drive the approach: the availability of new empirical tools to create comprehensive maps and record dynamic patterns among molecules, neurons, brain areas and social systems; and the theoretical framework and computational tools of modern network science. The convergence of empirical and computational advances opens new frontiers of scientific inquiry, including network dynamics, manipulation and control of brain networks, and integration of network processes across spatiotemporal domains. We review emerging trends in network neuroscience and attempt to chart a path toward a better understanding of the brain as a multiscale networked system.

  4. Organizational Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grande, Bård; Sørensen, Ole Henning

    1998-01-01

    The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept of organizational network are identified and critically discussed. Special focus is placed on how information and communication technologies as communication mediators and cognitive pictures influence...

  5. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...... network methodology in one’s research might supersede the perceived benefits of doing so. As a response to that problem, we argue that workshops can act as a road towards meaningful engagement with networks and highlight that network methodology promises new ways of interpreting data to answer questions...

  6. Circuit switched optical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kloch, Allan

    2003-01-01

    -connects can substitute the electrical nodes that today connect the installed optical fibres. This substitution will enable a massive increase in capacity since the bandwidth of the individual wavelength channels can be increased drastically when the electronic bit processing can be omitted. Furthermore......, it is expected that the optical solution will offer an economical benefit for hight bit rate networks. This thesis begins with a discussion of the expected impact on communications systems from the rapidly growing IP traffic, which is expected to become the dominant source for traffic. IP traffic has some...... characteristics, which are best supported by an optical network. The interest for such an optical network is exemplified by the formation of the ACTS OPEN project which aim was to investigate the feasibility of an optical network covering Europe. Part of the work presented in this thesis is carried out within...

  7. Adipose tissue plasticity from WAT to BAT and in between.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Mottillo, Emilio P; Granneman, James G

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue plays an essential role in regulating energy balance through its metabolic, cellular and endocrine functions. Adipose tissue has been historically classified into anabolic white adipose tissue and catabolic brown adipose tissue. An explosion of new data, however, points to the remarkable heterogeneity among the cells types that can become adipocytes, as well as the inherent metabolic plasticity of mature cells. These data indicate that targeting cellular and metabolic plasticity of adipose tissue might provide new avenues for treatment of obesity-related diseases. This review will discuss the developmental origins of adipose tissue, the cellular complexity of adipose tissues, and the identification of progenitors that contribute to adipogenesis throughout development. We will touch upon the pathological remodeling of adipose tissue and discuss how our understanding of adipose tissue remodeling can uncover new therapeutic targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Vascularization Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwkema, Jeroen; Rivron, N.C.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering has been an active field of research for several decades now. However, the amount of clinical applications in the field of tissue engineering is still limited. One of the current limitations of tissue engineering is its inability to provide sufficient blood supply in the initial

  9. Tertiary lymphoid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caro, Giuseppe; Marchesi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes influence colorectal cancer progression. We have recently documented that tertiary lymphoid tissue in the colorectal cancer microenvironment orchestrates lymphocyte infiltration and that tertiary lymphoid tissue and lymphocytes cooperate in a coordinated antitumor immune response to improve patient outcome. Thus, tertiary lymphoid tissue represents a potential target in the design of tailored immune-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:25083321

  10. Development of tissue bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of tissue banking is as old as the use of skin grafting for resurfacing of burn wounds. Beneficial effects of tissue grafts led to wide spread use of auto and allograft for management of varied clinical conditions like skin wounds, bone defects following trauma or tumor ablation. Availability of adequate amount of tissues at the time of requirement was the biggest challenge that forced clinicians to find out techniques to preserve the living tissue for prolonged period of time for later use and thus the foundation of tissue banking was started in early twentieth century. Harvesting, processing, storage and transportation of human tissues for clinical use is the major activity of tissue banks. Low temperature storage of processed tissue is the best preservation technique at present. Tissue banking organization is a very complex system and needs high technical expertise and skilled personnel for proper functioning in a dedicated facility. A small lapse/deviation from the established protocol leads to loss of precious tissues and or harm to recipients as well as the risk of transmission of deadly diseases and tumors. Strict tissue transplant acts and stringent regulations help to streamline the whole process of tissue banking safe for recipients and to community as whole.

  11. Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martí, Joan; Zenou, Yves

    2009-01-01

    We survey the literature on social networks by putting together the economics, sociological and physics/applied mathematics approaches, showing their similarities and differences. We expose, in particular, the two main ways of modeling network formation. While the physics/applied mathematics approach is capable of reproducing most observed networks, it does not explain why they emerge. On the contrary, the economics approach is very precise in explaining why networks emerge but does a poor jo...

  12. Network virtualization as enabler for cloud networking

    OpenAIRE

    Turull, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has exponentially grown and now it is part of our everyday life. Internet services and applications rely on back-end servers that are deployed on local servers and data centers. With the growing use of data centers and cloud computing, the locations of these servers have been externalized and centralized, taking advantage of economies of scale. However, some applications need to define complex network topologies and require more than simple connectivity to the remote sites. Ther...

  13. Cirurgia conservadora, radioterapia externa e reforço de dose com braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose: uma nova perspectiva no tratamento de sarcomas de partes moles do adulto Limb-sparing surgery, external beam radiotherapy and boost with high-dose rate brachytherapy: a new perspective for the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cássio Assis Pellizzon

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência no controle local de pacientes adultos e portadores de sarcoma de partes moles em extremidades e submetidos a cirurgia conservadora do membro, com braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose (BATD como reforço para a radioterapia externa (RT. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 16 pacientes tratados, de 1993 até 1999. A RT foi utilizada com finalidade pré ou pós-operatória (30--55 Gy e BATD com dose de 18--36 Gy (fx 3--6 Gy BID. Com base no modelo linear quadrático calculou-se a dose efetiva biológica ("biological effective dose" - BED para o tumor e comparou-se seu valor a dados da literatura internacional, que utiliza tratamentos com RT e braquiterapia de baixa taxa de dose (BBTD. RESULTADOS: Os valores médios e medianos da BED para os sarcomas de partes moles foram de 78,5 Gy7 e 80 Gy7. A análise univariada mostrou que a BED para o tumor, quando utilizada BATD, era semelhante ao valor de 83 Gy7 quando utilizada BBTD (p = 0,008. As taxas de controle local, sobrevida livre de doença e sobrevida global atuarial em cinco anos foram de 83,2%, 75% e 93,7%, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: A BATD, quando utilizada como método complementar no reforço de dose da RT no tratamento conservador dos sarcomas de partes moles, apresenta taxas de controle local equiparáveis às da literatura internacional; no entanto, estudos com número maior de pacientes e período maior de seguimento são ainda necessários para determinar o verdadeiro potencial da BATD em substituir a BBTD.PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence on local control in adult patients with soft tissue sarcomas of the limbs that underwent limb-sparing surgery and high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB in association with teletherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen patients treated from 1993 to 1999 were reviewed. Teletherapy was used pre- or postoperatively (30--55 Gy in association with HDRB in a dose range of 18--36 Gy (fx 3--6 Gy BID. The linear quadratic model was

  14. Vascularization regenerative medicine and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brey, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    A Complex and Growing Field The study of vascularization in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) and its applications is an emerging field that could revolutionize medical approaches for organ and tissue replacement, reconstruction, and regeneration. Designed specifically for researchers in TERM fields, Vascularization: Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering provides a broad overview of vascularization in TERM applications. This text summarizes research in several areas, and includes contributions from leading experts in the field. It defines the difficulties associated with multicellular processes in vascularization and cell-source issues. It presents advanced biomaterial design strategies for control of vascular network formation and in silico models designed to provide insight not possible in experimental systems. It also examines imaging methods that are critical to understanding vascularization in engineered tissues, and addresses vascularization issues within the context of specific...

  15. Launch Control Network Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is being built at the Kennedy Space Center in order to successfully launch NASA’s revolutionary vehicle that allows humans to explore further into space than ever before. During my internship, I worked with the Network, Firewall, and Hardware teams that are all contributing to the huge SCCS network project effort. I learned the SCCS network design and the several concepts that are running in the background. I also updated and designed documentation for physical networks that are part of SCCS. This includes being able to assist and build physical installations as well as configurations. I worked with the network design for vehicle telemetry interfaces to the Launch Control System (LCS); this allows the interface to interact with other systems at other NASA locations. This network design includes the Space Launch System (SLS), Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). I worked on the network design and implementation in the Customer Avionics Interface Development and Analysis (CAIDA) lab.

  16. Network Coding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Network coding is a technique to increase the amount of information °ow in a network by mak- ing the key observation that information °ow is fundamentally different from commodity °ow. Whereas, under traditional methods of opera- tion of data networks, intermediate nodes are restricted to simply forwarding their incoming.

  17. Identification and analysis of glutathione S-transferase gene family in sweet potato reveal divergent GST-mediated networks in aboveground and underground tissues in response to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Na; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wu, Yunxiang; Wang, Ruyuan; Cui, Huihui; Huang, Rulin; Luo, Yonghai

    2017-11-28

    Sweet potato, a hexaploid species lacking a reference genome, is one of the most important crops in many developing countries, where abiotic stresses are a primary cause of reduction of crop yield. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance and cellular detoxification. A total of 42 putative full-length GST genes were identified from two local transcriptome databases and validated by molecular cloning and Sanger sequencing. Sequence and intraspecific phylogenetic analyses revealed extensive differentiation in their coding sequences and divided them into eight subfamilies. Interspecific phylogenetic and comparative analyses indicated that most examined GST paralogs might originate and diverge before the speciation of sweet potato. Results from large-scale RNA-seq and quantitative real-time PCR experiments exhibited extensive variation in gene-expression profiles across different tissues and varieties, which implied strong evolutionary divergence in their gene-expression regulation. Moreover, we performed five manipulated stress experiments and uncovered highly divergent stress-response patterns of sweet potato GST genes in aboveground and underground tissues. Our study identified a large number of sweet potato GST genes, systematically investigated their evolutionary diversification, and provides new insights into the GST-mediated stress-response mechanisms in this worldwide crop.

  18. Paediatric laser dentistry. Part 2: Hard tissue laser applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivi, G; Caprioglio, C; Olivi, M; Genovese, M D

    2017-06-01

    Erbium lasers can provide effective and minimally invasive caries removal in children. The bonding phase remains a critic step as well as the choice of material. Glass ionomers exhibits lower bonding properties in laser irradiated teeth compared to the conventional method or to composite and resin modified glass ionomer. Laser can also provide effective decontamination and coagulation effects in vital and non vital pulp therapy of primary teeth, improving and simplifying the cleaning and disinfecting steps.

  19. (segunda parte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Oliva-Martínez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo es la continuación de otro anterior (Oliva, 2004, ambos dedicados al estudio de la importancia del pensamiento analógico en la construcción histórica de la noción de fuerza gravitatoria y del modelo de Sistema Solar. En aquella ocasión analizamos dicho papel durante el período comprendido desde las antiguas civilizaciones hasta llegar a la revolución copernicana con científicos como Copérnico, Gilbert, Kepler o el propio Galileo. En esta segunda parte, se continúa con algunos de los razonamientos analógicos proporcionados desde la vertiente mecanicista, capitaneada por Descartes y desde la tradición subsiguiente que se desarrolló en línea con la utilización del método de la analogía como criterio argumentativo (Huyghens, Hooke, Bernoulli, etc.. Dedicamos asimismo un capítulo aparte a la figura de Newton, quien continúa con dicha tradición en su intento de explicar la naturaleza de la gravitación. Finalmente se procede, a modo de síntesis, a realizar una clasificación de distintos tipos de razonamientos analógicos aportados en el desarrollo histórico en torno a estos temas, estudiando el papel científico y divulgativo de cada uno

  20. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  1. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Barshir; Omer Shwartz; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Esti Yeger-Lotem

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  2. Adipose tissue fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechler, Christa; Krautbauer, Sabrina; Eisinger, Kristina

    2015-05-15

    The increasing prevalence of obesity causes a major interest in white adipose tissue biology. Adipose tissue cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix proteins whose composition and remodeling is of crucial importance for cell function. The expansion of adipose tissue in obesity is linked to an inappropriate supply with oxygen and hypoxia development. Subsequent activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibits preadipocyte differentiation and initiates adipose tissue fibrosis. Thereby adipose tissue growth is limited and excess triglycerides are stored in ectopic tissues. Stressed adipocytes and hypoxia contribute to immune cell immigration and activation which further aggravates adipose tissue fibrosis. There is substantial evidence that adipose tissue fibrosis is linked to metabolic dysfunction, both in rodent models and in the clinical setting. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonists and adiponectin both reduce adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulin resistance. Current knowledge suggests that antifibrotic drugs, increasing adipose tissue oxygen supply or HIF-1 antagonists will improve adipose tissue function and thereby ameliorate metabolic diseases.

  3. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    “Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  4. Networks in Social Policy Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedres, Balázs; Scotti, Marco

    2012-08-01

    1. Introduction M. Scotti and B. Vedres; Part I. Information, Collaboration, Innovation: The Creative Power of Networks: 2. Dissemination of health information within social networks C. Dhanjal, S. Blanchemanche, S. Clemençon, A. Rona-Tas and F. Rossi; 3. Scientific teams and networks change the face of knowledge creation S. Wuchty, J. Spiro, B. F. Jones and B. Uzzi; 4. Structural folds: the innovative potential of overlapping groups B. Vedres and D. Stark; 5. Team formation and performance on nanoHub: a network selection challenge in scientific communities D. Margolin, K. Ognyanova, M. Huang, Y. Huang and N. Contractor; Part II. Influence, Capture, Corruption: Networks Perspectives on Policy Institutions: 6. Modes of coordination of collective action: what actors in policy making? M. Diani; 7. Why skewed distributions of pay for executives is the cause of much grief: puzzles and few answers so far B. Kogut and J.-S. Yang; 8. Networks of institutional capture: a case of business in the State apparatus E. Lazega and L. Mounier; 9. The social and institutional structure of corruption: some typical network configurations of corruption transactions in Hungary Z. Szántó, I. J. Tóth and S. Varga; Part III. Crisis, Extinction, World System Change: Network Dynamics on a Large Scale: 10. How creative elements help the recovery of networks after crisis: lessons from biology A. Mihalik, A. S. Kaposi, I. A. Kovács, T. Nánási, R. Palotai, Á. Rák, M. S. Szalay-Beko and P. Csermely; 11. Networks and globalization policies D. R. White; 12. Network science in ecology: the structure of ecological communities and the biodiversity question A. Bodini, S. Allesina and C. Bondavalli; 13. Supply security in the European natural gas pipeline network M. Scotti and B. Vedres; 14. Conclusions and outlook A.-L. Barabási; Index.

  5. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  6. Using network science to evaluate exercise-associated brain changes in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H Burdette

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Literature has shown that exercise is beneficial for cognitive function in older adults and that aerobic fitness is associated with increased hippocampal tissue and blood volumes. The current study used novel network science methods to shed light on the neurophysiological implications of exercise-induced changes in the hippocampus of older adults. Participants represented a volunteer subgroup of older adults that were part of either the exercise training (ET or healthy aging educational control (HAC treatment arms from the Seniors Health and Activity Research Program Pilot (SHARP-P trial. Following the four-month interventions, MRI measures of resting brain blood flow and connectivity were performed. The ET group’s hippocampal CBF exhibited statistically significant increases compared to the HAC group. Novel whole-brain network connectivity analyses showed greater connectivity in the hippocampi of the ET participants compared to HAC. Furthermore, the hippocampus was consistently shown to be within the same network neighborhood (module as the anterior cingulate cortex only within the ET group. Thus, within the ET group, the hippocampus and anterior cingulate were highly interconnected and localized to the same network neighborhood. This project shows the power of network science to investigate potential mechanisms for exercise-induced benefits to the brain in older adults. We show a link between neurological network features and cerebral blood flow, and it is possible that this alteration of functional brain networks may lead to the known improvement in cognitive function among older adults following exercise.

  7. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue specific and gender related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C.; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-01-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods.. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  8. Network science

    CERN Document Server

    Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Networks are everywhere, from the Internet, to social networks, and the genetic networks that determine our biological existence. Illustrated throughout in full colour, this pioneering textbook, spanning a wide range of topics from physics to computer science, engineering, economics and the social sciences, introduces network science to an interdisciplinary audience. From the origins of the six degrees of separation to explaining why networks are robust to random failures, the author explores how viruses like Ebola and H1N1 spread, and why it is that our friends have more friends than we do. Using numerous real-world examples, this innovatively designed text includes clear delineation between undergraduate and graduate level material. The mathematical formulas and derivations are included within Advanced Topics sections, enabling use at a range of levels. Extensive online resources, including films and software for network analysis, make this a multifaceted companion for anyone with an interest in network sci...

  9. Vulnerability of network of networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Bashan, A.; Gao, J.; Stanley, H. E.

    2014-10-01

    Our dependence on networks - be they infrastructure, economic, social or others - leaves us prone to crises caused by the vulnerabilities of these networks. There is a great need to develop new methods to protect infrastructure networks and prevent cascade of failures (especially in cases of coupled networks). Terrorist attacks on transportation networks have traumatized modern societies. With a single blast, it has become possible to paralyze airline traffic, electric power supply, ground transportation or Internet communication. How, and at which cost can one restructure the network such that it will become more robust against malicious attacks? The gradual increase in attacks on the networks society depends on - Internet, mobile phone, transportation, air travel, banking, etc. - emphasize the need to develop new strategies to protect and defend these crucial networks of communication and infrastructure networks. One example is the threat of liquid explosives a few years ago, which completely shut down air travel for days, and has created extreme changes in regulations. Such threats and dangers warrant the need for new tools and strategies to defend critical infrastructure. In this paper we review recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the vulnerabilities of interdependent networks with and without spatial embedding, attack strategies and their affect on such networks of networks as well as recently developed strategies to optimize and repair failures caused by such attacks.

  10. Open home networks: the TEAHA approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, H.W.; Scholten, Johan; Tobalina, Alvaro; García Muñoz, Victor; Milanini, Stephane; Kung, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The current trend for home appliances is networking. Although more and more of these appliances are networked, there is not a standard way of interaction, which restrains the development of services for in-home networks. The lack of standardisation is partly due to a legacy of business interests;

  11. Open Home Networks: the TEAHA Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, H.W.; Scholten, Johan; Tobalina, Alvaro; García Muñoz, Victor; Milanini, Stephane; Kung, Antonio; Dini, C.; Smekal, Z.; Lochin, E.; Verma, P.

    2007-01-01

    The current trend for home appliances is networking. Although more and more of these appliances are networked, there is not a standard way of interaction, which restrains the development of services for in-home networks. The lack of standardisation is partly due to a legacy of business interests;

  12. 78 FR 78769 - Medical Body Area Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 95 Medical Body Area Networks AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final... Spectrum for the Operation of Medical Body Area Networks'' adopted in a First Report and Order, ET Docket... relating to Spectrum for the Operation of Medical Body Area Networks rules contained in the Commission's...

  13. Hello! Kids Network around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynes, Kristine

    1996-01-01

    Describes Kids Network, an educational network available from the National Geographic Society that allows students in grades four through six to become part of research teams that include students from around the world. Computer hardware requirements and a list of Kids Network research questions are listed in a sidebar. (JMV)

  14. Analyzing security protocols in hierarchical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ye; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2006-01-01

    Validating security protocols is a well-known hard problem even in a simple setting of a single global network. But a real network often consists of, besides the public-accessed part, several sub-networks and thereby forms a hierarchical structure. In this paper we first present a process calculus...

  15. Vascularization of soft tissue engineering constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Carletto, Rodrigo

    with mechanical properties in the range of soft tissues has not been fully achieved. My project focused on the fabrication and the active perfusion of hydrogel constructs with multi-dimensional vasculature and controlled mechanical properties targeting soft tissues. Specifically, the initial part of the research...... nanotechnology-based paradigm for engineering vascularised liver tissue for transplantation”) and the Danish National Research Foundation and Villum Foundation’s Center for Intelligent Drug delivery and sensing Using microcontainers and Nanomechanics (Danish National Research Foundation (DNRF122)....

  16. Asynchronous control for networked systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Francisco; Bencomo, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    This book sheds light on networked control systems; it describes different techniques for asynchronous control, moving away from the periodic actions of classical control, replacing them with state-based decisions and reducing the frequency with which communication between subsystems is required. The text focuses specially on event-based control. Split into two parts, Asynchronous Control for Networked Systems begins by addressing the problems of single-loop networked control systems, laying out various solutions which include two alternative model-based control schemes (anticipatory and predictive) and the use of H2/H∞ robust control to deal with network delays and packet losses. Results on self-triggering and send-on-delta sampling are presented to reduce the need for feedback in the loop. In Part II, the authors present solutions for distributed estimation and control. They deal first with reliable networks and then extend their results to scenarios in which delays and packet losses may occur. The novel ...

  17. [Network structures in biological systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleskin, A V

    2013-01-01

    Network structures (networks) that have been extensively studied in the humanities are characterized by cohesion, a lack of a central control unit, and predominantly fractal properties. They are contrasted with structures that contain a single centre (hierarchies) as well as with those whose elements predominantly compete with one another (market-type structures). As far as biological systems are concerned, their network structures can be subdivided into a number of types involving different organizational mechanisms. Network organization is characteristic of various structural levels of biological systems ranging from single cells to integrated societies. These networks can be classified into two main subgroups: (i) flat (leaderless) network structures typical of systems that are composed of uniform elements and represent modular organisms or at least possess manifest integral properties and (ii) three-dimensional, partly hierarchical structures characterized by significant individual and/or intergroup (intercaste) differences between their elements. All network structures include an element that performs structural, protective, and communication-promoting functions. By analogy to cell structures, this element is denoted as the matrix of a network structure. The matrix includes a material and an immaterial component. The material component comprises various structures that belong to the whole structure and not to any of its elements per se. The immaterial (ideal) component of the matrix includes social norms and rules regulating network elements' behavior. These behavioral rules can be described in terms of algorithms. Algorithmization enables modeling the behavior of various network structures, particularly of neuron networks and their artificial analogs.

  18. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  19. A Radial Actin Network in Apical Constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhiyi; Großhans, Jörg

    2016-11-07

    Contractile actomyosin networks are central to cell shape change, rearrangements, and migration during animal tissue morphogenesis. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Coravos and Martin (2016) report that the actin network is radially polarized in apically constricting cells, suggesting a constriction model similar to the contraction mechanism in muscle sarcomeres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Informal Networks in Organizations - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Christian

    2001-01-01

    and assess the existing contributions to the understanding of these informal networks in organizations. The first part of the paper presents the key terms and concepts needed to understand social networks both in general and within the framework of formal organizations in particular. In the second part...

  1. Tissue procurement system in Japan: the role of a tissue bank in medical center for translational research, Osaka University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawara, H; Fukushima, N; Kitagawa, T; Ito, T; Masutani, Y; Sawa, Y

    2010-01-01

    Although organ procurement has been regulated by The Organ Transplantation Law (brain-dead donors since 1997, donors after cardiac death since 1979), there has been no law or governmental procurement network (except for cornea) in Japan. Since the late 1980s, some university hospitals have developed original banks. Finally, in 2001 guidelines for tissue procurement were established by The Japanese Society of Tissue Transplantation and Japan Tissue Transplant Network (JTTN) to coordinate tissue harvesting. Five tissue banks were joined to the tissue transplant network (skin in one, heart valves in two, and bone in two). As the number of tissue banks is small, each bank cooperates on procurement, but cannot cover the entire country. With regard to skin transplantation, only one skin bank-The Japan Skin Bank Network (JSBN), which is located in Tokyo-has organized skin procurement. Therefore, it has been difficult to procure skin in areas distant from Tokyo, especially around Osaka. In order to improve such a situation, a tissue bank collaborating with the JSBN was established at The Medical Center for Translational Research (MTR), Osaka University Hospital in April 2008. The bank has played a role in skin procurement center in western Japan and supported procurement and preservation at the time of the skin procurement. Between April 2008 and September 2009, the bank participated in eight tissue procurements in the western area. In the future, the bank is planning to procure and preserve pancreatic islets and bones. Moreover, there is a plan to set up an induced pluripotent stem cells center and stem cell bank in MTR. This tissue bank may play a role to increase tissue procurement in Japan, especially in the western area. .

  2. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Krigslund, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    . The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, which may also incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the upcoming 5G networks. This article not only proposes the fundamentals......Software defined networking has garnered large attention due to its potential to virtualize services in the Internet, introducing flexibility in the buffering, scheduling, processing, and routing of data in network routers. SDN breaks the deadlock that has kept Internet network protocols stagnant...... for decades, while applications and physical links have evolved. This article advocates for the use of SDN to bring about 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The latter constitutes a major leap forward compared to the state-of-the- art store and forward Internet paradigm...

  3. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage....... This paper advocates for the use of SDN to bring about future Internet and 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides a fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, that may also...... incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the future Internet and the upcoming 5G networks. This paper proposes some of the keys behind this intersection and supports it with use cases as well as a an implementation that integrated the Kodo library (NC) into OpenFlow (SDN...

  4. An electromechanical based deformable model for soft tissue simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongmin; Shirinzadeh, Bijan; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2009-11-01

    Soft tissue deformation is of great importance to surgery simulation. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviours of soft tissues, modelling of soft tissue deformation is still a challenging problem. This paper presents a new deformable model for simulation of soft tissue deformation from the electromechanical viewpoint of soft tissues. Soft tissue deformation is formulated as a reaction-diffusion process coupled with a mechanical load. The mechanical load applied to a soft tissue to cause a deformation is incorporated into the reaction-diffusion system, and consequently distributed among mass points of the soft tissue. Reaction-diffusion of mechanical load and non-rigid mechanics of motion are combined to govern the simulation dynamics of soft tissue deformation. An improved reaction-diffusion model is developed to describe the distribution of the mechanical load in soft tissues. A three-layer artificial cellular neural network is constructed to solve the reaction-diffusion model for real-time simulation of soft tissue deformation. A gradient based method is established to derive internal forces from the distribution of the mechanical load. Integration with a haptic device has also been achieved to simulate soft tissue deformation with haptic feedback. The proposed methodology does not only predict the typical behaviours of living tissues, but it also accepts both local and large-range deformations. It also accommodates isotropic, anisotropic and inhomogeneous deformations by simple modification of diffusion coefficients.

  5. Functions of Periostin in dental tissues and its role in periodontal tissues' regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Li, Minqi

    2017-12-01

    The goal of periodontal regenerative therapy is to predictably restore the tooth's supporting periodontal tissues and form a new connective tissue attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibers and new alveolar bone. Periostin is a matricellular protein so named for its expression primarily in the periosteum and PDL of adult mice. Its biological functions have been widely studied in areas such as cardiovascular physiology and oncology. Despite being initially identified in the dental tissues and bone, investigations of Periostin functions in PDL and alveolar-bone-related physiopathology are less abundant. Recently, several studies have suggested that Periostin may be an important regulator of periodontal tissue formation. By promoting collagen fibrillogenesis and the migration of fibroblasts and osteoblasts, Periostin might play a pivotal part in regeneration of the PDL and alveolar bone following periodontal surgery. The aim of this article is to provide an extensive review of the implications of Periostin in periodontal tissue biology and its potential use in periodontal tissue regeneration.

  6. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  7. Collagen tissue engineering: development of novel biomaterials and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Lian; Liu, Wei; Cui, Lei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin

    2008-05-01

    Scientific investigations involving collagen have inspired tissue engineering and design of biomaterials since collagen fibrils and their networks primarily regulate and define most tissues. The collagen networks form a highly organized, three-dimensional architecture to entrap other ingredients. Biomaterials are expected to function as cell scaffolds to replace native collagen-based extracellular matrix. The composition and properties of biomaterials used as scaffold for tissue engineering significantly affect the regeneration of neo-tissues and influence the conditions of collagen engineering. The complex scenario of collagen characteristics, types, fibril arrangement, and collagen structure-related functions (in a variety of connective tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, skin and cornea) are addressed in this review. Discussion will focus on nanofibrillar assemblies and artificial synthetic peptides that mimic either the fibrillar structure or the elemental components of type I collagen as illustrated by their preliminary applications in tissue engineering. Conventional biomaterials used as scaffolds in engineering collagen-containing tissues are also discussed. The design of novel biomaterials and application of conventional biomaterials will facilitate development of additional novel tissue engineering bioproducts by refining the currently available techniques. The field of tissue engineering will ultimately be advanced by increasing control of collagen in native tissue and by continual manipulation of biomaterials.

  8. Networked Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Larsen, Malene Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    In this article we take up a critique of the concept of Communities of Practice (CoP) voiced by several authors, who suggest that networks may provide a better metaphor to understand social forms of organisation and learning. Through a discussion of the notion of networked learning and the critique...... of CoPs we shall argue that the metaphor or theory of networked learning is itself confronted with some central tensions and challenges that need to be addressed. We then explore these theoretical and analytic challenges to the network metaphor, through an analysis of a Danish social networking site. We...... argue that understanding meaning-making and ‘networked identities’ may be relevant analytic entry points in navigating the challenges....

  9. Discovering network structure beyond communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes characterized by common network properties, including but not limited to communities of densely connected nodes. Without any prior information about the nature of the groups, the method simultaneously identifies the number of groups, the group assignment, and the properties that define these groups. The results of applying our method to real networks suggest the possibility that most group structures lurk undiscovered in the fast-growing inventory of social, biological, and technological networks of scientific interest.

  10. Functional classification of skeletal muscle networks. I. Normal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Winters, Jack; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2012-12-15

    Extensive measurements of the parts list of human skeletal muscle through transcriptomics and other phenotypic assays offer the opportunity to reconstruct detailed functional models. Through integration of vast amounts of data present in databases and extant knowledge of muscle function combined with robust analyses that include a clustering approach, we present both a protein parts list and network models for skeletal muscle function. The model comprises the four key functional family networks that coexist within a functional space; namely, excitation-activation family (forward pathways that transmit a motoneuronal command signal into the spatial volume of the cell and then use Ca(2+) fluxes to bind Ca(2+) to troponin C sites on F-actin filaments, plus transmembrane pumps that maintain transmission capacity); mechanical transmission family (a sophisticated three-dimensional mechanical apparatus that bidirectionally couples the millions of actin-myosin nanomotors with external axial tensile forces at insertion sites); metabolic and bioenergetics family (pathways that supply energy for the skeletal muscle function under widely varying demands and provide for other cellular processes); and signaling-production family (which represents various sensing, signal transduction, and nuclear infrastructure that controls the turn over and structural integrity and regulates the maintenance, regeneration, and remodeling of the muscle). Within each family, we identify subfamilies that function as a unit through analysis of large-scale transcription profiles of muscle and other tissues. This comprehensive network model provides a framework for exploring functional mechanisms of the skeletal muscle in normal and pathophysiology, as well as for quantitative modeling.

  11. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  12. Wireless Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Samaka, Mohammed; Khan, Khaled M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Wireless communication is the fastest-growing field in the telecommunication industry. Wireless networks have grown significantly as an important segment of the communications industry. They have become popular networks with the potential to provide high-speed, high-quality information exchange between two or more portable devices without any wire or conductors. Wireless networks can simply be characterized as the technology that provides seamless access to information, anywhere, anyplace, an...

  13. Enterpreneurial network

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Antonela; Nguyen, Lien; Kupsyte, Valdone

    2014-01-01

    Network has become more and more indispensable in the entrepreneurial world. Especially in startup businesses, network is crucial for new entrepreneurs. This project looks at how entrepreneurs in different sectors use network to become successful. We chose to work with three entrepreneurs from three companies that have been operational for a few years and conducted face to face interviews with them. Through the data from the interviews, we analyzed firstly what type of entrepreneurs they are,...

  14. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue-specific and gender-related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-06-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date.

  15. Fitness for synchronization of network motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, Y.M.; Vázquez-Prada, M.; Pacheco, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the synchronization of Kuramoto's oscillators in small parts of networks known as motifs. We first report on the system dynamics for the case of a scale-free network and show the existence of a non-trivial critical point. We compute the probability that network motifs synchronize, and fi...... that the fitness for synchronization correlates well with motifs interconnectedness and structural complexity. Possible implications for present debates about network evolution in biological and other systems are discussed....

  16. Real-time network traffic classification technique for wireless local area networks based on compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    Network traffic or data traffic in a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is the amount of network packets moving across a wireless network from each wireless node to another wireless node, which provide the load of sampling in a wireless network. WLAN's Network traffic is the main component for network traffic measurement, network traffic control and simulation. Traffic classification technique is an essential tool for improving the Quality of Service (QoS) in different wireless networks in the complex applications such as local area networks, wireless local area networks, wireless personal area networks, wireless metropolitan area networks, and wide area networks. Network traffic classification is also an essential component in the products for QoS control in different wireless network systems and applications. Classifying network traffic in a WLAN allows to see what kinds of traffic we have in each part of the network, organize the various kinds of network traffic in each path into different classes in each path, and generate network traffic matrix in order to Identify and organize network traffic which is an important key for improving the QoS feature. To achieve effective network traffic classification, Real-time Network Traffic Classification (RNTC) algorithm for WLANs based on Compressed Sensing (CS) is presented in this paper. The fundamental goal of this algorithm is to solve difficult wireless network management problems. The proposed architecture allows reducing False Detection Rate (FDR) to 25% and Packet Delay (PD) to 15 %. The proposed architecture is also increased 10 % accuracy of wireless transmission, which provides a good background for establishing high quality wireless local area networks.

  17. Network security

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, André

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the security mechanisms deployed in Ethernet, Wireless-Fidelity (Wi-Fi), Internet Protocol (IP) and MultiProtocol Label Switching (MPLS) networks. These mechanisms are grouped throughout the book according to the following four functions: data protection, access control, network isolation, and data monitoring. Data protection is supplied by data confidentiality and integrity control services. Access control is provided by a third-party authentication service. Network isolation is supplied by the Virtual Private Network (VPN) service. Data monitoring consists of applying

  18. Networking Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    HIDA). Many of these alumni have and will in the future exchange ideas and keep contact not only to Japan, but also to fellow alumni around the globe and, thereby, practice south-south exchanges, which are made possible and traceable by their established alumni network and the World Network of Friends...... (WNF). Through the alumni network, Japan continues to infuse ideas to participants and alumni, who interpret and disseminate these ideas through alumni society networks and activities, but their discussions nationally and regionally also get reported back to Japan and affect future policies...

  19. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  20. Social Networking: Changing the way we communicate and do business.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the value of social networking and the impact it can have on small and large businesses. The paper also reviews the Social Networking Business Plan and the power of recommender networks. Examples are given of inbound and outbound marketing techniques. Social Networking is an integral part of inbound marketing. A synopsis of the evolving demographic of social networkers is presented to add clarity and show potential for social networking websites and tools.

  1. Local aromatase activity in human breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J H; Daroszewski, J; Milewicz, A; Blankenstein, M A

    1993-03-01

    The presence of oestradiol in malignant breast cells is considered to be an important factor in the promotion of growth of the tumor. Therefore the regulation of the local high intra-tissue oestradiol concentrations, regardless of plasma concentrations, has been investigated. Experimental evidence suggests that in situ biosynthesis of oestrogens is at least partly responsible for the local accumulation of these steroids. In this paper we report further data on measurements in fatty and tumor tissues of local aromatase activities and of concentrations of substrates and products of this enzyme. Data are given on localization of aromatase and on steroid concentrations in tumors and in adipose tissues dissected from different quadrants of breasts with malignant tumors. In adipose tissues small variations in steroid concentrations in fatty tissues were found. No tumor-directed gradients in the adipose tissue-concentrations of the androgens dehydro-epiandrosterone, 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol, 4-androstene-3,17-dione and testosterone and of the oestrogens oestradiol, oestrone and their sulfates could be detected. Furthermore no consistent pattern could be recognized in the aromatase activities in the fatty tissues dissected from tumor-bearing and non-affected quadrants of the same breast. No correlations between aromatase activity measured in vitro and product concentrations in vivo were found. Therefore the mechanisms for regulation of the local oestradiol levels in breast tissues remain unknown.

  2. Photolithography and micromolding techniques for the realization of 3D polycaprolactone scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    KAUST Repository

    Limongi, Tania

    2015-06-01

    Material science, cell biology, and engineering are all part of the research field of tissue engineering. It is the application of knowledge, methods and instrumentations of engineering and life science to the development of biocompatible solutions for repair and/or replace tissues and damaged organs. Last generation microfabrication technologies utilizing natural and synthetic biomaterials allow the realization of scaffolds resembling tissue-like structures as skin, brain, bones, muscles, cartilage and blood vessels. In this work we describe an effective and simple micromolding fabrication process allowing the realization of 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for human neural stem cells (hNSC) culture. Scanning Electron Microscopy has been used to investigate the micro and nano features characterizing the surface of the device. Immunofluorescence analysis showed how, after seeding cells onto the substrate, healthy astrocytes grew up in a well-organized 3D network. Thus, we proposed this effective fabrication method for the production of nanopatterned PCL pillared scaffold providing a biomimetic environment for the growth of hNSC, a promising and efficient means for future applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. VISUALIZATION OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUE IMPEDANCE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Bankov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Investigation the opportunity for measurement of biological tissue impedance to visualize its parameters.Materials and methods. Studies were undertook on the experimental facility, consists of registrating measuring cell, constructed from flat inductors system, formed in oscillatory circuit, herewith investigated biological tissue is the part of this oscillatory circuit. An excitation of oscillatory circuit fulfilled by means of exciter inductor which forms impulse complex modulated electromagnetic field (ICM EMF. The measurement process and visualizations provided by set of certificated instruments: a digital oscillograph AKTAKOM ADS-2221MV, a digital generator АКТАКОМ AWG-4150 (both with software and a gauge RLC E7-22. Comparative dynamic studies of fixed volume and weight pig’s blood, adipose tissue, muscular tissue impedance were conducted by contact versus contactless methods. Contactless method in contrast to contact method gives opportunity to obtain the real morphological visualization of biological tissue irrespective of their nature.Results. Comparison of contact and contactless methods of impedance measurement shows that the inductance to capacitance ratio X(L / X(C was equal: 17 – for muscular tissue, 4 – for blood, 1 – for adipose tissue. It demonstrates the technical correspondence of both impedance registration methods. If propose the base relevance of X (L and X (C parameters for biological tissue impedance so contactless measurement method for sure shows insulating properties of adipose tissue and high conductivity for blood and muscular tissue in fixed volume-weight parameters. Registration of biological tissue impedance complex parameters by contactless method with the help of induced ICM EMF in fixed volume of biological tissue uncovers the most important informative volumes to characterize morphofunctional condition of biological tissue namely X (L / X (C.Conclusion. Contactless method of biological

  4. Donor cornea tissue in cases of drowning or water submersion: eye banks practice patterns and tissue outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Nithya P; Parikh, Purak; Mian, Shahzad I; Tennant, Brad; Grossman, Gregory H; Albrecht, Bob; Niziol, Leslie M; Woodward, Maria A

    2017-10-25

    Surgical use of donor corneal tissue from victims of water submersion (drowning or submersion secondary to death) remains controversial due to limited evidence about the quality of these tissues. To assess the safety of donor corneal tissue from victims of water submersion, an investigation of eye banks' practice patterns and tissue outcomes was conducted. All 79 Eye Bank Association of America accredited eye banks were contacted for a phone interview of practices regarding tissue from victims of water submersion. A retrospective review of corneal tissues from 2014 to 2016 from a large eye bank network was performed to identify all donors submerged in water. Corneal epithelial integrity, endothelial cell density (ECD), rim cultures, and adverse events were analyzed for associations with water submersion characteristics. 49 eye banks (62% response) participated in the survey. 55% of these eye banks had specific, written protocol for tissue eligibility from donors submerged in water. With or without specific protocol, eye banks reported considering water type (84%) and length of time submerged (92%) to determine eligibility. 22% of eye banks reported medical director involvement when eligibility determination was unclear. 79 tissues from 40 donors who were submerged were identified in 2014-2016 eye bank data. No donor tissues had pre-processing corneal infiltrates, positive rim cultures, or adverse events post-keratoplasty. Corneal epithelial integrity and ECD were not associated with water type or length of time submerged. In conclusion, data from a large eye bank network showed no adverse events or outcomes, indicating these tissues may be safe.

  5. OPTIMAL NETWORK TOPOLOGY DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed as part of a research study on the topology design and performance analysis for the Space Station Information System (SSIS) network. It uses an efficient algorithm to generate candidate network designs (consisting of subsets of the set of all network components) in increasing order of their total costs, and checks each design to see if it forms an acceptable network. This technique gives the true cost-optimal network, and is particularly useful when the network has many constraints and not too many components. It is intended that this new design technique consider all important performance measures explicitly and take into account the constraints due to various technical feasibilities. In the current program, technical constraints are taken care of by the user properly forming the starting set of candidate components (e.g. nonfeasible links are not included). As subsets are generated, they are tested to see if they form an acceptable network by checking that all requirements are satisfied. Thus the first acceptable subset encountered gives the cost-optimal topology satisfying all given constraints. The user must sort the set of "feasible" link elements in increasing order of their costs. The program prompts the user for the following information for each link: 1) cost, 2) connectivity (number of stations connected by the link), and 3) the stations connected by that link. Unless instructed to stop, the program generates all possible acceptable networks in increasing order of their total costs. The program is written only to generate topologies that are simply connected. Tests on reliability, delay, and other performance measures are discussed in the documentation, but have not been incorporated into the program. This program is written in PASCAL for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under PC DOS. The disk contains source code only. This program was developed in 1985.

  6. Mechanics of the foot Part 2: A coupled solid-fluid model to investigate blood transport in the pathologic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithraratne, K; Ho, H; Hunter, P J; Fernandez, J W

    2012-10-01

    A coupled computational model of the foot consisting of a three-dimensional soft tissue continuum and a one-dimensional (1D) transient blood flow network is presented in this article. The primary aim of the model is to investigate the blood flow in major arteries of the pathologic foot where the soft tissue stiffening occurs. It has been reported in the literature that there could be up to about five-fold increase in the mechanical stiffness of the plantar soft tissues in pathologic (e.g. diabetic) feet compared with healthy ones. The increased stiffness results in higher tissue hydrostatic pressure within the plantar area of the foot when loaded. The hydrostatic pressure acts on the external surface of blood vessels and tend to reduce the flow cross-section area and hence the blood supply. The soft tissue continuum model of the foot was modelled as a tricubic Hermite finite element mesh representing all the muscles, skin and fat of the foot and treated as incompressible with transversely isotropic properties. The details of the mechanical model of soft tissue are presented in the companion paper, Part 1. The deformed state of the soft tissue continuum because of the applied ground reaction force at three foot positions (heel-strike, midstance and toe-off) was obtained by solving the Cauchy equations based on the theory of finite elasticity using the Galerkin finite element method. The geometry of the main arterial network in the foot was represented using a 1D Hermite cubic finite element mesh. The flow model consists of 1D Navier-Stokes equations and a nonlinear constitutive equation to describe vessel radius-transmural pressure relation. The latter was defined as the difference between the fluid and soft tissue hydrostatic pressure. Transient flow governing equations were numerically solved using the two-step Lax-Wendroff finite difference method. The geometry of both the soft tissue continuum and arterial network is anatomically-based and was developed using

  7. Cascaded failures in weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzasoleiman, Baharan; Babaei, Mahmoudreza; Jalili, Mahdi; Safari, Mohammadali

    2011-10-01

    Many technological networks can experience random and/or systematic failures in their components. More destructive situations can happen if the components have limited capacity, where the failure in one of them might lead to a cascade of failures in other components, and consequently break down the structure of the network. In this paper, the tolerance of cascaded failures was investigated in weighted networks. Three weighting strategies were considered including the betweenness centrality of the edges, the product of the degrees of the end nodes, and the product of their betweenness centralities. Then, the effect of the cascaded attack was investigated by considering the local weighted flow redistribution rule. The capacity of the edges was considered to be proportional to their initial weight distribution. The size of the survived part of the attacked network was determined in model networks as well as in a number of real-world networks including the power grid, the internet in the level of autonomous system, the railway network of Europe, and the United States airports network. We found that the networks in which the weight of each edge is the multiplication of the betweenness centrality of the end nodes had the best robustness against cascaded failures. In other words, the case where the load of the links is considered to be the product of the betweenness centrality of the end nodes is favored for the robustness of the network against cascaded failures.

  8. Adipose tissue macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutens, Lily; Stienstra, Rinke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation originating from the adipose tissue is considered to be one of the main driving forces for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in obese individuals. Although a plethora of different immune cells shapes adipose tissue inflammation, this review is specifically

  9. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examples of connective tissue diseases include lupus , scleroderma , rheumatoid arthritis , Sjögren's syndrome , myositis and vasculitis . There are many people who have features of connective tissue disease, however, they do not fulfill the diagnostic criteria established for any one disease. In such ...

  10. Engineering Vascularized Adipose Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Verseijden (Femke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA large portion of the plastic and reconstructive surgical procedures performed each year is aimed at repairing soft tissue defects, which result for example from traumatic injury or tumor resections. Large soft tissue defects, lead to a change in function and ‘normal’ body contour,

  11. Tissue engineered aortic valve

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, P M

    2012-01-01

    Several prostheses are available to replace degenerative diseased aortic valves with unique advantages and disadvantages. Bioprotheses show excellent hemodynamic behavior and low risk of thromboembolic complications, but are limited by tissue deterioration. Mechanical heart valves have extended durability, but permanent anticoagulation is mandatory. Tissue engineering created a new generation heart valve, which overcome limitations of biological and mechanical heart valves due to remodelling,...

  12. Statistical Mechanics of Temporal and Interacting Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun

    In the last ten years important breakthroughs in the understanding of the topology of complexity have been made in the framework of network science. Indeed it has been found that many networks belong to the universality classes called small-world networks or scale-free networks. Moreover it was found that the complex architecture of real world networks strongly affects the critical phenomena defined on these structures. Nevertheless the main focus of the research has been the characterization of single and static networks. Recently, temporal networks and interacting networks have attracted large interest. Indeed many networks are interacting or formed by a multilayer structure. Example of these networks are found in social networks where an individual might be at the same time part of different social networks, in economic and financial networks, in physiology or in infrastructure systems. Moreover, many networks are temporal, i.e. the links appear and disappear on the fast time scale. Examples of these networks are social networks of contacts such as face-to-face interactions or mobile-phone communication, the time-dependent correlations in the brain activity and etc. Understanding the evolution of temporal and multilayer networks and characterizing critical phenomena in these systems is crucial if we want to describe, predict and control the dynamics of complex system. In this thesis, we investigate several statistical mechanics models of temporal and interacting networks, to shed light on the dynamics of this new generation of complex networks. First, we investigate a model of temporal social networks aimed at characterizing human social interactions such as face-to-face interactions and phone-call communication. Indeed thanks to the availability of data on these interactions, we are now in the position to compare the proposed model to the real data finding good agreement. Second, we investigate the entropy of temporal networks and growing networks , to provide

  13. The Social Network Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunus, Peter

    Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

  14. The Usage of Neural Networks for the Medical Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Malyshevska, Kateryna

    2009-01-01

    The problem of cancer diagnosis from multi-channel images using the neural networks is investigated. The goal of this work is to classify the different tissue types which are used to determine the cancer risk. The radial basis function networks and backpropagation neural networks are used for classification. The results of experiments are presented.

  15. Overlay networks toward information networking

    CERN Document Server

    Tarkoma, Sasu

    2010-01-01

    With their ability to solve problems in massive information distribution and processing, while keeping scaling costs low, overlay systems represent a rapidly growing area of R&D with important implications for the evolution of Internet architecture. Inspired by the author's articles on content based routing, Overlay Networks: Toward Information Networking provides a complete introduction to overlay networks. Examining what they are and what kind of structures they require, the text covers the key structures, protocols, and algorithms used in overlay networks. It reviews the current state of th

  16. Immunization of networks with community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Naoki [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)], E-mail: masuda@mist.i.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-12-15

    In this study, an efficient method to immunize modular networks (i.e. networks with community structure) is proposed. The immunization of networks aims at fragmenting networks into small parts with a small number of removed nodes. Its applications include prevention of epidemic spreading, protection against intentional attacks on networks, and conservation of ecosystems. Although preferential immunization of hubs is efficient, good immunization strategies for modular networks have not been established. On the basis of an immunization strategy based on eigenvector centrality, we develop an analytical framework for immunizing modular networks. To this end, we quantify the contribution of each node to the connectivity in a coarse-grained network among modules. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed method by applying it to model and real networks with modular structure.

  17. Heterodox networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lala, Purnima; Kumar, Ambuj

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative for the service providers to bring innovation in the network design to meet the exponential growth of mobile subscribers for multi-technology future wireless networks. As a matter of research, studies on providing services to moving subscriber groups aka ‘Place Time Capacity (PTC...

  18. Sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjea, Supriyo; Thurston, J.; Kininmonth, S.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the details of a sensor network that is currently being deployed at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The sensor network allows scientists to retrieve sensor data that has a high spatial and temporal resolution. We give an overview of the energy-efficient data aggregation

  19. Network Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Dunng the last ten years, many computer networks have been designed, implemented, and put into service in the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, and elsewhere. From the experience obtamed with these networks, certain key design principles have begun to emerge, principles that can be used to

  20. Probabilistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Finn Verner; Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the basic ideas and algorithms behind specification and inference in probabilistic networks based on directed acyclic graphs, undirected graphs, and chain graphs.......This article describes the basic ideas and algorithms behind specification and inference in probabilistic networks based on directed acyclic graphs, undirected graphs, and chain graphs....