WorldWideScience

Sample records for network supporting roaming

  1. Bluetooth Roaming for Sensor Network System in Clinical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Noma, Haruo; Takase, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Shigeto; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    A sensor network is key infrastructure for advancing a hospital information system (HIS). The authors proposed a method to provide roaming functionality for Bluetooth to realize a Bluetooth-based sensor network, which is suitable to connect clinical devices. The proposed method makes the average response time of a Bluetooth connection less than one second by making the master device repeat the inquiry process endlessly and modifies parameters of the inquiry process. The authors applied the developed sensor network for daily clinical activities in an university hospital, and confirmed the stabilitya and effectiveness of the sensor network. As Bluetooth becomes a quite common wireless interface for medical devices, the proposed protocol that realizes Bluetooth-based sensor network enables HIS to equip various clinical devices and, consequently, lets information and communication technologies advance clinical services.

  2. On the security of an anonymous roaming protocol in UMTS mobile networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Wu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, we first show that the privacy-preserving roaming protocol recently proposed for mobile networks cannot achieve the claimed security level. Then we suggest an improved protocol to remedy its security problems.

  3. Multi-operator collaboration for green cellular networks under roaming price consideration

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the collaboration between multiple mobile operators to optimize the energy efficiency of cellular networks. Our framework studies the case of LTE-Advanced networks deployed in the same area and owning renewable energy generators. The objective is to reduce the CO2 emissions of cellular networks via collaborative techniques and using base station sleeping strategy while respecting the network quality of service. Low complexity and practical algorithm is employed to achieve green goals during low traffic periods. Cooperation decision criteria are also established basing on derived roaming prices and profit gains of competitive mobile operators. Our numerical results show a significant save in terms of CO2 compared to the non-collaboration case and that cooperative mobile operator exploiting renewables are more awarded than traditional operators.

  4. Green collaboration in cognitive radio cellular networks with roaming and spectrum trading

    KAUST Repository

    Sboui, Lokman

    2015-08-30

    In this paper, we propose a new cognitive cellular network architecture based on the coexistence of primary and secondary networks, (PN) and (SN), respectively. The PN aims to minimize its energy consumption by switching off the maximum number of its BSs and offloading its users to the SN\\'s infrastructure to maintain its QoS. In return, the PN pays a roaming price and permits the SN to share or lease the spectrum at a certain price. We propose a low-complexity algorithm allowing the PN to minimize its energy consumption by selecting a suboptimal combination of active base stations. Our algorithm also optimizes the resource allocation of the SN to maximize its total sum-rate while respecting the minimal profit constraints for both networks. In the numerical results, we show that our proposed algorithm achieves close performances to the optimal exhaustive search algorithm. In addition, we investigate the impact of various system parameters in the collaboration decision.

  5. Supporting Local Mobility in Healthcare by Application Roaming among Heterogeneous Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind; Kjær, Thomas A.K.; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results from a research project aiming at developing an architecture supporting local mobility within hospitals. The architecture is based on fieldwork and design workshops within a large Danish hospital and it has been implemented and evaluated after a pilot phase. Our...... mobility, and how this architecture was implemented in the healthcare domain....... fieldwork has emphasised the differences between remote mobility, where users travel over long distances, and local mobility, where users walk around within a fixed set of buildings and/or places. Based on our field studies and our design work, we conclude that local mobility puts up three requirements...

  6. Online social support networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil; Atreja, Ashish

    2015-04-01

    Peer support groups have a long history and have been shown to improve health outcomes. With the increasing familiarity with online social networks like Facebook and ubiquitous access to the Internet, online social support networks are becoming popular. While studies have shown the benefit of these networks in providing emotional support or meeting informational needs, robust data on improving outcomes such as a decrease in health services utilization or reduction in adverse outcomes is lacking. These networks also pose unique challenges in the areas of patient privacy, funding models, quality of content, and research agendas. Addressing these concerns while creating patient-centred, patient-powered online support networks will help leverage these platforms to complement traditional healthcare delivery models in the current environment of value-based care.

  7. Internet roaming: a WLAN/3G integration system for enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Jiang, Zhimei; Kim, Byoung J.; Shankar, Narendra K.; Henry, Paul

    2002-08-01

    This paper proposes an enterprise-oriented WLAN/3G network integration solution, called the Internet Roaming system. Differing from other operator-oriented WLAN/3G network integration solutions, the Internet Roaming system is a practical IP-based corporate network architecture that provides seamless internetworking across office WLAN, home WLAN, public WLAN, and 2.5G/3G cellular network for corporate wireless data users. An Internet Roaming system may have four building blocks. They are IRC (Internet Roaming Client), SMG (secure mobility gateway), SIA (Secure IP Access) gateway, and VSA (virtual single account) server. The IRC is a special client tool (software or hardware) installed on a wireless data device. It provides a secure mobile IP connection from the wireless data device to the corporate network transparent to the operating system of the wireless data devices. The SMG is a mobile IPsec gateway installed on the corporate core network facing the Internet. It works with the IRC to maintain a secure mobile IP connection when the wireless data device is connected on the Internet through a home WLAN, a public WLAN, or a cellular network. The SIA server is a special IPsec gateway installed on the corporate intranet where office WLAN is installed. It works with the IRC to assure the security of office WLAN while improving the routing efficiency for users computers. The VSA server manages the IRC, SMG, and SIA servers.

  8. Supporting networks for realizing rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    The chapter explores how DFID, the British bi-lateral aid donor, adopted an innovative rights' based approach that rested on supporting in existing networks in Peru. Focus is put on the history and challenges of DFID's engagement with three networks in particular: in the fields of health, local...

  9. A Privacy-Protecting Authentication Scheme for Roaming Services with Smart Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyungho; Han, Dong-Guk; Won, Dongho

    In this work we propose a novel smart card based privacy-protecting authentication scheme for roaming services. Our proposal achieves so-called Class 2 privacy protection, i.e., no information identifying a roaming user and also linking the user's behaviors is not revealed in a visited network. It can be used to overcome the inherent structural flaws of smart card based anonymous authentication schemes issued recently. As shown in our analysis, our scheme is computationally efficient for a mobile user.

  10. Network Regulation and Support Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropenus, Stephanie; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    -in tariffs to market-based quota systems, and network regulation approaches, comprising rate-of-return and incentive regulation. National regulation and the vertical structure of the electricity sector shape the incentives of market agents, notably of distributed generators and network operators....... This article seeks to investigate the interactions between the policy dimensions of support schemes and network regulation and how they affect the deployment of distributed generation. Firstly, a conceptual analysis examines how the incentives of the different market agents are affected. In particular......At present, there exists no explicit European policy framework on distributed generation. Various Directives encompass distributed generation; inherently, their implementation is to the discretion of the Member States. The latter have adopted different kinds of support schemes, ranging from feed...

  11. Supporting rights and nurturing networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    The article explores how a bilateral aid donor (British DFID) managed their organizational and relational work when the local office (in Peru) put rights at the centre of their policy. Taking the example of DFID support to alternative thinking in the health sector, critical questions are raised a...... about the way donors engage with local networks....

  12. International Roaming of Mobile Services: The Need for Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This section discusses the need for regulation of international roaming charges. This is done through analysis of the EU experiences by a heavy handed price regulation of roaming services.......This section discusses the need for regulation of international roaming charges. This is done through analysis of the EU experiences by a heavy handed price regulation of roaming services....

  13. A game theoretical approach for cooperative green mobile operators under roaming price consideration

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-09-11

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of a green mobile operator collaborating with other traditional mobile operators. Its goal is to minimize its CO2 emissions, maximize its profit or achieve or tradeoff between both objectives by offloading its users to neighbor networks and exploiting renewable energies. On the other hand, traditional mobile operators aim to maximize their profits by attracting the maximum number of roamed users. The problem is modeled as a two-level Stackelberg game and its equilibrium is derived. A green mobile operator level that determines how many users per each base station to offload to each neighbor network, and a non-green mobile operator level where operators focus on finding the optimal roaming price. Our simulation results show a significant saving in terms of CO2 emissions compared to the non-cooperation case and that roaming decision depends essentially on the availability of renewable energy in base station sites. © 2015 IEEE.

  14. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  15. 75 FR 22338 - Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... have on the terms of retail service provided to consumers, how such impacts differ from those resulting... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 20 Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers... to data services that are provided without interconnection to the public switched network--including...

  16. Workshop on Roaming and Cold Molecule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    attempts  to  extend  conventional  transition   state   theory  to   describe  roaming.    Experimentally,  there  are...17 invited talks and more than 60 participants took part. The unusual "roaming" pathway was discussed in roughly half the talks. Collision ...dynamics at very low energies was the focus of four talks and the remaining talks focused on advances in electronic structure theory and unusual reaction

  17. Metropolitan area network support at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMar, Phil; Andrews, Chuck; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; Colon, Orlando; Fry, Steve; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Lamore, Donna; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Advances in wide area network service offerings, coupled with comparable developments in local area network technology have enabled many research sites to keep their offsite network bandwidth ahead of demand. For most sites, the more difficult and costly aspect of increasing wide area network capacity is the local loop, which connects the facility LAN to the wide area service provider(s). Fermilab, in coordination with neighboring Argonne National Laboratory, has chosen to provide its own local loop access through leasing of dark fiber to nearby network exchange points, and procuring dense wave division multiplexing (DWDM) equipment to provide data channels across those fibers. Installing and managing such optical network infrastructure has broadened the Laboratory's network support responsibilities to include operating network equipment that is located off-site, and is technically much different than classic LAN network equipment. Effectively, the Laboratory has assumed the role of a local service provider. This paper will cover Fermilab's experiences with deploying and supporting a Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) infrastructure to satisfy its offsite networking needs. The benefits and drawbacks of providing and supporting such a service will be discussed.

  18. Integrating Decision Support and Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Antunes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We elaborate on the shifting of decision support systems towards social networking, which is based on the concepts of Web 2.0 and Semantic Web technology. As the characteristics of the relevant components are different from traditional decision support systems, we present necessary adaptations when adopting social networks for decision support within an organization. We also present organizational obstacles when adopting/using such systems and clues to overcome them.

  19. Conceptualization of the social support and the social support network

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda B., Carolina; Instituto de Investigación en salud ocupacional, Departamento de salud pública, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Pando M., Manuel; Instituto de Investigación en salud ocupacional, Departamento de salud pública, Universidad de Guadalajara, México

    2014-01-01

    Many are the concepts and approaches whose have been proposed in the study of the social support as social support networks, as well as the use of some of these concepts to relate either social support or social support networks to the conditions and its importance in the protective role of it. The route on the conceptualization of both variables occurs since the fifties to the most current, closing with some brief conclusions. Numerosos son los conceptos y abordajes que se han propuesto e...

  20. Roaming livestock distribution, densities and population estimates for St. Eustatius, 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Hazenbosch, J.C.J.; Piontek, S.; Kraft, C.; Belle, van J.; Strijkstra, A.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of roaming livestock is a major impediment to agricultural development and nature conservation on St. Eustatius, as it also typically is on other islands in the region. In support of a government-led culling program, we here conducted a baseline study of livestock abundance and

  1. Social networks, support cliques, and kinship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, R I; Spoors, M

    1995-09-01

    Data on the number of adults that an individual contacts at least once a month in a set of British populations yield estimates of network sizes that correspond closely to those of the typical "sympathy group" size in humans. Men and women do not differ in their total network size, but women have more females and more kin in their networks than men do. Kin account for a significantly higher proportion of network members than would be expected by chance. The number of kin in the network increases in proportion to the size of the family; as a result, people from large families have proportionately fewer non-kin in their networks, suggesting that there is either a time constraint or a cognitive constraint on network size. A small inner clique of the network functions as a support group from whom an individual is particularly likely to seek advice or assistance in time of need. Kin do not account for a significantly higher proportion of the support clique than they do for the wider network of regular social contacts for either men or women, but each sex exhibits a strong preference for members of their own sex.

  2. Using Network Science to Support Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parraguez Ruiz, Pedro; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    A network-based perspective on designing permits research on the complexity of product, process, and people interactions. Strengthened by the latest advances in information technologies and accessibility of data, a network-based perspective and use of appropriate network analysis metrics, theories......, and tools allow us to explore new data-driven research approaches in design. These approaches allow us to move from counting to connecting, meaning to explicitly link disconnected pieces of data, information, and knowledge, and thus to answer far-reaching research questions with strong industrial...... and societal impact. This chapter contributes to the use of network science in empirical studies of design organisations. It focuses on introducing a network-based perspective on the design process and in particular on making use of network science to support design research and practice. The main contribution...

  3. A Novel Mobile Communications Authentication Scheme with Roaming Service and User Anonymity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Many novel, effective, and efficient applications and networking services are being developed for the Social Internet of Things. Recently, Li proposed a more secure and efficient authentication scheme with roaming service and user anonymity for mobile communications. The security analysis and discussion of the agreement phase is sufficiently safe; however, an attacker can intercept the identity of a mobile user’s home agent in the authentication phase. By using this information, the attacker can mount distributed denial-of-service attacks in the roaming phase through replay attacks targeting the network’s foreign agent and mobile user’s home agent by using their corresponding session keys. Li’s method also has some shortcomings regarding anonymity that we aim to address. To overcome these issues, this study proposes an elliptic curve–based wireless roaming anonymous login method for the authentication phase. The problems faced in the roaming phase are resolved, and this approach provides balanced session key computation between senders and receivers. Burrows-Abadi-Needham logic (BAN-logic is used to verify the security of the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme affords good security, efficiency, and integrity and maintains anonymity.

  4. Handoff Between a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN and a Wide Area Network (UMTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sánchez–García

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available With the appearance of wireless data networks with variable coverage, band width and handoff strategies, in addition to the growing need of mobile nodes to freely roam among these networks, the support of an interoperable handoff strategy for hybrid wireless data networks is a requirement that needs to be addressed. The current trend in wireless data networks is to offer multimedia access to mobile users by employing the wireless local area network (WLAN standard IEEE802.11 while the user is located indoors; on the other hand, 3rd generation wireless networks (WAN are being deployed to provide coverage while the user is located outdoors. As a result, the mobile node will require a handoff mechanism to allow the user to roam between WLAN and WAN environments; up to this date several strategies have been proposed (Sattari et al., 2004 and HyoJin, 2007 in the literature, however, none of these have been standardized to date. To support this interoperability, the mobile node must be equipped with configurable wireless inetrfaces to support the handoff between the WLAN and the WAN networks. In this work a new algorithm is proposed to allow a mobile node to roam between a wireless local area network (IEEE802.11 and a WAN base station (UMTS, while employing IP mobility support. The algorithm is implemented in simulation, using the Network Simulator 2.

  5. Developing networks to support science teachers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    In educational research literature constructing networks among practitioners has been suggested as a strategy to support teachers’ professional development (Huberman, 1995; Jackson & Temperley, 2007; Van Driel, Beijaard, & Verloop, 2001). The purpose of this paper is to report on a study about how...... networks provide opportunities for teachers from different schools to collaborate on improving the quality of their own science teaching practices. These networks exist at the meso-level of the educational system between the micro-realities of teachers’ individual practice and the macro-level, where...... to develop collaborative activities in primary science teacher communities in schools to improve individual teachers practice and in networks between teachers from different schools in each municipality. Each network was organized and moderated by a municipal science coordinator....

  6. Social relations: network, support and relational strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, P; Holstein, B; Lund, Rikke

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework with social relations as the main concept and the structure and the function of social relations as subconcepts. The structure of social relations covers aspects of formal relations and social network. The function of social relations covers social support......,011. The postal questionnaires were answered by a random sample in each of the age groups. The results show marked age and gender differences in both the structure and the function of social relations. The social network, measured as weekly contacts, weakens with age and so does instrumental support. Emotional...... support is unrelated to this decline in contact frequency and appears to be at the same level for younger and older individuals. Relational strain, measured as conflicts, declines with age for all kinds of social relations. The weakening of the social network with age does not seem to affect the level...

  7. Artificial neural networks and support vector mac

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantitative structure-property relationships of electroluminescent materials: Artificial neural networks and support vector machines to predict electroluminescence of organic molecules. ALANA FERNANDES GOLIN and RICARDO STEFANI. ∗. Laboratório de Estudos de Materiais (LEMAT), Instituto de Ciências Exatas e da ...

  8. Toxic Metals Profiles in Hair Samples from Street Roaming Animals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of toxic metals profiles in hair samples from street roaming animals in Yelwa-Yauri town, North Western, Nigeria was carried out. Hair samples for the analyses were collected from 108 animal (54 sheep and 54 goats) roaming the street of Yelwa-Yauri town and 45 samples from animals in the neighboring ...

  9. Roaming Reference: Reinvigorating Reference through Point of Need Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kealin M. McCabe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Roaming reference service was pursued as a way to address declining reference statistics. The service was staffed by librarians armed with iPads over a period of six months during the 2010-2011 academic year. Transactional statistics were collected in relation to query type (Research, Facilitative or Technology, location and approach (librarian to patron, patron to librarian or via chat widget. Overall, roaming reference resulted in an additional 228 reference questions, 67% (n=153 of which were research related. Two iterations of the service were implemented, roaming reference as a standalone service (Fall 2010 and roaming reference integrated with traditional reference desk duties (Winter 2011. The results demonstrate that although the Weller Library’s reference transactions are declining annually, they are not disappearing. For a roaming reference service to succeed, it must be a standalone service provided in addition to traditional reference services. The integration of the two reference models (roaming reference and reference desk resulted in a 56% decline in the total number of roaming reference questions from the previous term. The simple act of roaming has the potential to reinvigorate reference services as a whole, forcing librarians outside their comfort zones, allowing them to reach patrons at their point of need.

  10. Social relations: network, support and relational strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, P; Holstein, B; Lund, R; Modvig, J; Avlund, K

    1999-03-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework with social relations as the main concept and the structure and the function of social relations as subconcepts. The structure of social relations covers aspects of formal relations and social network. The function of social relations covers social support, social anchorage and relational strain. We use this conceptual framework to describe social relations in the Danish population, with questionnaire data from the Danish Longitudinal Health Behaviour Study including a random sample of each of the age groups 25-, 50-, 60-and 70-year olds, N = 2,011. The postal questionnaires were answered by a random sample in each of the age groups. The results show marked age and gender differences in both the structure and the function of social relations. The social network, measured as weekly contacts, weakens with age and so does instrumental support. Emotional support is unrelated to this decline in contact frequency and appears to be at the same level for younger and older individuals. Relational strain, measured as conflicts, declines with age for all kinds of social relations. The weakening of the social network with age does not seem to affect the level of emotional support and in turn seems to be partly compensated for by a simultaneous decline in relational strain.

  11. Network support for system initiated checkpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip

    2013-01-29

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in parallel computing systems. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity.

  12. Crime and punishment in a roaming cleanerfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Suzanne C; Côté, Isabelle M

    2010-12-07

    Cheating is common in cooperative interactions, but its occurrence can be controlled by various means ranging from rewarding cooperators to active punishment of cheaters. Punishment occurs in the mutualism involving the cleanerfish Labroides dimidiatus and its reef fish clients. When L. dimidiatus cheats, by taking scales and mucus rather than ectoparasites, wronged clients either chase or withhold further visits to the dishonest cleaner, which leads to more cooperative future interactions. Punishment of cheating L. dimidiatus may be effective largely because these cleaners are strictly site-attached, increasing the potential for repeated interactions between individual cleaners and clients. Here, we contrast the patterns of cheating and punishment in L. dimidiatus with its close relative, the less site-attached Labroides bicolor. Overall, L. bicolor had larger home ranges, cheated more often and, contrary to our prediction, were punished by cheated clients as frequently as, and not less often than, L. dimidiatus. However, adult L. bicolor, which had the largest home ranges, did not cheat more than younger conspecifics, suggesting that roaming, and hence the frequency of repeated interactions, has little influence on cheating and retaliation in cleaner-client relationships. We suggest that roaming cleaners offer the only option available to many site-attached reef fish seeking a cleaning service. This asymmetry in scope for partner choice encourages dishonesty by the partner with more options (i.e. L. bicolor), but to be cleaned by a cleaner that sometimes cheats may be a better option than not to be cleaned at all.

  13. Services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Kim; Uoti, Mikko; Karvonen, Iris

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale facilities such as power plants, process factories, ships and communication infrastructures are often engineered and delivered through geographically distributed operations. The competencies required are usually distributed across several contributing organisations. In these complicated projects, it is of key importance that all partners work coherently towards a common goal. VTT and a number of industrial organisations in the marine sector have participated in a national collaborative research programme addressing these needs. The main output of this programme was development of the Innovation and Engineering Maturity Model for Marine-Industry Networks. The recently completed European Union Framework Programme 7 project COIN developed innovative solutions and software services for enterprise collaboration and enterprise interoperability. One area of focus in that work was services for collaborative project management. This article first addresses a number of central underlying research themes and previous research results that have influenced the development work mentioned above. This article presents two approaches for the development of services that support distributed engineering work. Experience from use of the services is analysed, and potential for development is identified. This article concludes with a proposal for consolidation of the two above-mentioned methodologies. This article outlines the characteristics and requirements of future services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks.

  14. Seamless and secure communications over heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jiannong

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an overview of the requirements, challenges, design issues and major techniques for seamless and secure communications over heterogeneous wireless networks. It summarizes and provides detailed insights into the latest research on handoff management, mobility management, fast authentication and security management to support seamless and secure roaming for mobile clients. The reader will also learn about the challenges in developing relevant technologies and providing ubiquitous Internet access over heterogeneous wireless networks. The authors have extensive experience in im

  15. Firms' innovation benefiting from networking and institutional support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøtt, Thomas; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm

    2016-01-01

    Firms' networking for innovation is embedded in institutions of society, where national policies are increasingly designed to provide institutional support for firms' networking and thereby benefit innovation. But, globally, what are the quantitative and qualitative effects of institutional support...... for networking and, in turn, for innovation? 68 countries with 18,880 firms were surveyed in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, enabling generalization to the firms in the countries around the world. Two-level modeling shows that firms' networking benefits both process and product innovation. Institutional...... support does not significantly affect quantity of networking, but greatly enhances quality of networking in the sense that support for networking in a country enhances the benefits of networking for both process and product innovation. Contrasting low and high support for networking leads to estimating...

  16. Roaming Reference: Reinvigorating Reference through Point of Need Service

    OpenAIRE

    Kealin M. McCabe; James R.W. MacDonald

    2011-01-01

    Roaming reference service was pursued as a way to address declining reference statistics. The service was staffed by librarians armed with iPads over a period of six months during the 2010-2011 academic year. Transactional statistics were collected in relation to query type (Research, Facilitative or Technology), location and approach (librarian to patron, patron to librarian or via chat widget). Overall, roaming reference resulted in an additional 228 reference questions, 67% (n=153) of whic...

  17. Formaldehyde roaming dynamics: Comparison of quasi-classical trajectory calculations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L.; Wang, Xiaohong; Ghosh, Aryya; Bowman, Joel M.; Quinn, Mitchell S.; Kable, Scott H.

    2017-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of roaming in formaldehyde are studied by comparing quasi-classical trajectory calculations performed on a new potential energy surface (PES) to new and detailed experimental results detailing the CO + H2 product state distributions and their correlations. The new PES proves to be a significant improvement over the past one, now more than a decade old. The new experiments probe both the CO and H2 products of the formaldehyde dissociation. The experimental and trajectory data offer unprecedented detail about the correlations between internal states of the CO and H2 dissociation products as well as information on how these distributions are different for the roaming and transition-state pathways. The data investigated include, for dissociation on the formaldehyde 2143 band, (a) the speed distributions for individual vibrational/rotational states of the CO products, providing information about the correlated internal energy distributions of the H2 product, and (b) the rotational and vibrational distributions for the CO and H2 products as well as the contributions to each from both the transition state and roaming channels. The agreement between the trajectory and experimental data is quite satisfactory, although minor differences are noted. The general agreement provides support for future use of the experimental techniques and the new PES in understanding the dynamics of photodissociative processes.

  18. Formaldehyde roaming dynamics: Comparison of quasi-classical trajectory calculations and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Wang, Xiaohong; Ghosh, Aryya; Bowman, Joel M; Quinn, Mitchell S; Kable, Scott H

    2017-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of roaming in formaldehyde are studied by comparing quasi-classical trajectory calculations performed on a new potential energy surface (PES) to new and detailed experimental results detailing the CO + H2 product state distributions and their correlations. The new PES proves to be a significant improvement over the past one, now more than a decade old. The new experiments probe both the CO and H2 products of the formaldehyde dissociation. The experimental and trajectory data offer unprecedented detail about the correlations between internal states of the CO and H2 dissociation products as well as information on how these distributions are different for the roaming and transition-state pathways. The data investigated include, for dissociation on the formaldehyde 2143 band, (a) the speed distributions for individual vibrational/rotational states of the CO products, providing information about the correlated internal energy distributions of the H2 product, and (b) the rotational and vibrational distributions for the CO and H2 products as well as the contributions to each from both the transition state and roaming channels. The agreement between the trajectory and experimental data is quite satisfactory, although minor differences are noted. The general agreement provides support for future use of the experimental techniques and the new PES in understanding the dynamics of photodissociative processes.

  19. 47 CFR 54.518 - Support for wide area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Support for wide area networks. 54.518 Section... area networks. To the extent that states, schools, or libraries build or purchase a wide area network to provide telecommunications services, the cost of such wide area networks shall not be eligible for...

  20. Yucca Mountain licensing support network archive assistant.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Bauer, Travis L.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Shaneyfelt, Wendy

    2008-03-01

    This report describes the Licensing Support Network (LSN) Assistant--a set of tools for categorizing e-mail messages and documents, and investigating and correcting existing archives of categorized e-mail messages and documents. The two main tools in the LSN Assistant are the LSN Archive Assistant (LSNAA) tool for recategorizing manually labeled e-mail messages and documents and the LSN Realtime Assistant (LSNRA) tool for categorizing new e-mail messages and documents. This report focuses on the LSNAA tool. There are two main components of the LSNAA tool. The first is the Sandia Categorization Framework, which is responsible for providing categorizations for documents in an archive and storing them in an appropriate Categorization Database. The second is the actual user interface, which primarily interacts with the Categorization Database, providing a way for finding and correcting categorizations errors in the database. A procedure for applying the LSNAA tool and an example use case of the LSNAA tool applied to a set of e-mail messages are provided. Performance results of the categorization model designed for this example use case are presented.

  1. Enhanced Seamless Handover Algorithm for WiMAX and LTE Roaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HINDIA, M. N.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the ever evolving mobile communication technology, achieving a high quality seamless mobility access across mobile networks is the present challenge to research and development engineers. Existing algorithms are used to make handover while a mobile station is roaming between cells. Such algorithms have some handover instability due to method of making handover decision. This paper proposes an enhanced handover algorithm that substantially reduces the handover redundancy in vertical and horizontal handovers. Also, it enables users to select the most appropriate target network technology based on their preferences even in the worst case where the mobile station roams between cell boundaries, and has high ability to have efficient performance in the critical area full of interferences. The proposed algorithm uses additional quality of service criteria, such as cost, delay, available bandwidth and network condition with two handover thresholds to achieve a better seamless handover process. After developing and testing this algorithm, the simulation results show a major reduction in the redundant handover, so high accuracy of horizontal and vertical handovers obtained. Moreover, the signal strength is kept at a level higher than the threshold during the whole simulation period, while maintaining low delay and connection cost compared to other two algorithms in both scenarios.

  2. Using networked technologies to support conferences

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, B.; Tonkin, E.; Shabajee, P

    2005-01-01

    The increasing availability of WiFi networks in conference venues is an opportunity to provide additional services for conference delegates and to enhance and enrich the learning experience. This paper reviews experiences of use of networked applications in a conference environment and outlines a number of potentially useful technologies. The paper addresses potential concerns over use of networked technologies including dangers of disruption and distraction, legal and copyright issues as wel...

  3. Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. M.; Keiser, K.; Graves, S. J.; Conover, H.; Ebersole, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since the year 2000, Eastern Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, Alabama, and the western Florida panhandle have been affected by 28 tropical storms, seven of which were hurricanes. These tropical cyclones have significantly altered normal coastal processes and characteristics in the Gulf region through sediment disturbance. Although tides, seasonality, and agricultural development influence suspended sediment and sediment deposition over periods of time, tropical storm activity has the capability of moving the largest sediment loads in the shortest periods of time for coastal areas. The importance of sediments upon water quality, coastal erosion, habitats and nutrients has made their study and monitoring vital to decision makers in the region. Currently agencies such as United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), NASA, and Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) are employing a variety of in-situ and airborne based measurements to assess and monitor sediment loading and deposition. These methods provide highly accurate information but are limited in geographic range, are not continuous over a region and, in the case of airborne LIDAR are expensive and do not recur on a regular basis. Multi-temporal and multi-spectral satellite imagery that shows tropical-storm-induced suspended sediment and storm-surge sediment deposits can provide decision makers with immediate and long-term information about the impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes. It can also be valuable for those conducting research and for projects related to coastal issues such as recovery, planning, management, and mitigation. The recently awarded Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support will generate decision support products using NASA satellite observations from MODIS, Landsat and SeaWiFS instruments to support resource management, planning, and decision making activities in the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, SANDS will generate decision support products that address the impacts of tropical storms

  4. New networking solutions support GEANT2

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Researchers across the globe are benefiting from new advanced networking solutions, deployed as part of the GEANT2. For the first time, scientists collaborating on the world's largest particle physics experiment, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), now have access to point-to-point network connections between distributed research centres." (1 page)

  5. 36 CFR 261.23 - Wild free-roaming horses and burros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wild free-roaming horses and... AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.23 Wild free-roaming horses and burros. The following are prohibited: (a) Removing or attempting to remove a wild free-roaming horse or burro from the National Forest...

  6. Social networks as ICT collaborative and supportive learning media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ICT collaborative and supportive learning media utilisation within the Nigerian educational system. The concept of ICT was concisely explained vis-à-vis the social network concept, theory and collaborative and supportive learning media utilisation. Different types of social network are highlighted among which Facebook, ...

  7. An Assessment of the Emerging Networks of Support for Street ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria, being asignatory to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC, 1989) promulgated the Child Rights Act 2003, which aimed at ameliorating the condition of street children in Nigeria. In line with this, there are emerging networks of support for street children. The extent to which these support networks are ...

  8. Future networks and technologies supporting innovative communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    and applications. This paper focuses on the technological aspects of ubiquitous networking and communication technologies, including challenges related to green communications, and security, privacy and trust. The paper proposes a novel concept for a Wireless Innovative System for Dynamically Operating Mega......-communications (WISDOM) that combines the aspects of personal- and cognitive radio- networks to let seamlessly bridge the virtual and physical worlds offering a constant level of all-senses, context-based, rich communication experience over fixed and wireless networks for the end users while realizing a new generation...

  9. Performance Monitoring Techniques Supporting Cognitive Optical Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Borkowski, Robert; Zibar, Darko

    2013-01-01

    to solve this issue by realizing a network that can observe, act, learn and optimize its performance, taking into account end-to-end goals. In this letter we present the approach of cognition applied to heterogeneous optical networks developed in the framework of the EU project CHRON: Cognitive...... Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical Network. We focus on the approaches developed in the project for optical performance monitoring, which enable the feedback from the physical layer to the cognitive decision system by providing accurate description of the performance of the established lightpaths.......High degree of heterogeneity of future optical networks, such as services with different quality-of-transmission requirements, modulation formats and switching techniques, will pose a challenge for the control and optimization of different parameters. Incorporation of cognitive techniques can help...

  10. Support for School-to-School Networks: How Networking Teachers Perceive Support Activities of a Local Coordinating Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartory, Katharina; Jungermann, Anja-Kristin; Järvinen, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    External support by a local coordinating agency facilitates the work of school-to-school networks. This study provides an innovative theoretical framework to analyse how support provided by local education offices for school-to-school networks is perceived by the participating teachers. Based on a quantitative survey and qualitative interview data…

  11. Social Networks and Social Support in Health Promotion Programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Donev, Doncho; Pavlekovic, Gordana; Zaletel Kragelj, Lijana

    2008-01-01

    Social networks and social support are general terms to describe different aspects of social relationships, including those mechanisms, which may protect the individual from the negative effects of stress. The social support is offered by the part of the social network, the people around us, that are ready to help us, and on whose help we can always count. Those enjoying strong social ties appear to be at low risk of psychosocial and physical impairment, whereas a lack of social support has b...

  12. Network Support II: Randomized controlled trial of Network Support treatment and cognitive behavioral therapy for alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Mark D; Kadden, Ronald M; Tennen, Howard; Kabela-Cormier, Elise

    2016-08-01

    The social network of those treated for alcohol use disorder can play a significant role in subsequent drinking behavior, both for better and worse. Network Support treatment was devised to teach ways to reconstruct social networks so that they are more supportive of abstinence and less supportive of drinking. For many patients this may involve engagement with AA, but other strategies are also used. The current trial of Network Support treatment, building on our previous work, was intended to further enhance the ability of patients to construct abstinence-supportive social networks, and to test this approach against a strong control treatment. Patients were 193 men and women with alcohol use disorder recruited from the community and assigned to either 12 weeks of Network Support (NS) or Packaged Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (PCBT), and followed for 27 months. Results of multilevel analyses indicated that NS yielded better posttreatment results in terms of both proportion of days abstinent and drinking consequences, and equivalent improvements in 90-day abstinence, heavy drinking days and drinks per drinking day. Mediation analyses revealed that NS treatment effects were mediated by pre-post changes in abstinence self-efficacy and in social network variables, especially proportion of non-drinkers in the social network and attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous. It was concluded that helping patients enhance their abstinent social network can be effective, and may provide a useful alternative or adjunctive approach to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Jebaseeli Samuelraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6 is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node’s mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node’s mobility should be modified to support group nodes’ mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  14. Regulation of international roaming data services within the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Tadayoni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Europe has been the first region to intervene on the market for international roaming services. The first regulation was introduced in 2007 and has since then been revised several times. The latest revision took place in the summer 2012. This paper discusses the new legislation in view of recent...

  15. Social Network Supported Process Recommender System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanming; Yin, Jianwei; Xu, Yueshen

    2014-01-01

    Process recommendation technologies have gained more and more attention in the field of intelligent business process modeling to assist the process modeling. However, most of the existing technologies only use the process structure analysis and do not take the social features of processes into account, while the process modeling is complex and comprehensive in most situations. This paper studies the feasibility of social network research technologies on process recommendation and builds a social network system of processes based on the features similarities. Then, three process matching degree measurements are presented and the system implementation is discussed subsequently. Finally, experimental evaluations and future works are introduced. PMID:24672309

  16. Global Development Network: Supporting Global Research Capacity

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Global Development Network (GDN) is an international organization focused on building research capacity in development. Founded in 1999, GDN is ... The Centre for Research and Technology Development (RESTECH) is a two-year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya.

  17. Gender differences in the support networks of caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, J; Neufeld, A; Harrison, M J

    1996-09-01

    Nurses in home care and long-term care settings play an important role in assisting family caregivers of elders who are cognitively impaired to sustain personal support while caregiving. Research has shown that such support is associated with positive health status. The characteristics of the caregiver's social network provide information about the potential for support. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the social networks of men and women caregivers in terms of the composition of the social network and the size of the available, utilized and conflicted social networks. The possible relationship between the demographic characteristics of caregivers and the size and composition of their social networks was also examined. In comparison to men, the conflicted social networks of women were larger and comprised of more family members. For women, age, years of caregiving and socioeconomic status were not significantly related to the size of their social network. However, younger men and men of higher socioeconomic status reported significantly larger available social networks than other men. Knowledge of the gender differences in network size and composition that were identified in this study contributes to nurses' ability to identify caregivers who may be at risk for inadequate social support. In conjunction with the findings from related studies these results have implications for nursing assessment and intervention in home care and long-term care settings.

  18. Achieving population-level immunity to rabies in free-roaming dogs in Africa and Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle K Morters

    Full Text Available Canine rabies can be effectively controlled by vaccination with readily available, high-quality vaccines. These vaccines should provide protection from challenge in healthy dogs, for the claimed period, for duration of immunity, which is often two or three years. It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors. This may reduce the proportion of dogs that seroconvert to the vaccine during vaccination campaigns and the duration of immunity of those dogs that seroconvert. Vaccination coverage may also be limited through insufficient vaccine delivery during vaccination campaigns and the loss of vaccinated individuals from populations through demographic processes. This is the first longitudinal study to evaluate temporal variations in rabies vaccine-induced serological responses, and factors associated with these variations, at the individual level in previously unvaccinated free-roaming dog populations. Individual-level serological and health-based data were collected from three cohorts of dogs in regions where rabies is endemic, one in South Africa and two in Indonesia. We found that the vast majority of dogs seroconverted to the vaccine; however, there was considerable variation in titres, partly attributable to illness and lactation at the time of vaccination. Furthermore, >70% of the dogs were vaccinated through community engagement and door-to-door vaccine delivery, even in Indonesia where the majority of the dogs needed to be caught by net on successive occasions for repeat blood sampling and vaccination. This demonstrates the feasibility of achieving population-level immunity in free-roaming dog populations in rabies-endemic regions. However, attrition of immune individuals through demographic processes and waning immunity necessitates repeat vaccination of populations within at least

  19. Achieving Population-Level Immunity to Rabies in Free-Roaming Dogs in Africa and Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morters, Michelle K.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Horton, Daniel L.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Schoeman, Johan P.; Restif, Olivier; Whay, Helen R.; Goddard, Amelia; Fooks, Anthony R.; Damriyasa, I. Made; Wood, James L. N.

    2014-01-01

    Canine rabies can be effectively controlled by vaccination with readily available, high-quality vaccines. These vaccines should provide protection from challenge in healthy dogs, for the claimed period, for duration of immunity, which is often two or three years. It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors. This may reduce the proportion of dogs that seroconvert to the vaccine during vaccination campaigns and the duration of immunity of those dogs that seroconvert. Vaccination coverage may also be limited through insufficient vaccine delivery during vaccination campaigns and the loss of vaccinated individuals from populations through demographic processes. This is the first longitudinal study to evaluate temporal variations in rabies vaccine-induced serological responses, and factors associated with these variations, at the individual level in previously unvaccinated free-roaming dog populations. Individual-level serological and health-based data were collected from three cohorts of dogs in regions where rabies is endemic, one in South Africa and two in Indonesia. We found that the vast majority of dogs seroconverted to the vaccine; however, there was considerable variation in titres, partly attributable to illness and lactation at the time of vaccination. Furthermore, >70% of the dogs were vaccinated through community engagement and door-to-door vaccine delivery, even in Indonesia where the majority of the dogs needed to be caught by net on successive occasions for repeat blood sampling and vaccination. This demonstrates the feasibility of achieving population-level immunity in free-roaming dog populations in rabies-endemic regions. However, attrition of immune individuals through demographic processes and waning immunity necessitates repeat vaccination of populations within at least two years to ensure

  20. Supportive Networks: Life Ties for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilisuk, Marc; Minkler, Meredith

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes data showing the detrimental effects to the health of the elderly that are associated with diminution of supportive interpersonal ties. Describes six programs that illustrate the range of diversity of tasks involved in the provision of supportive associations for the elderly. (Author/GC)

  1. Supporting MOOC Instruction with Social Network Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Tanmay

    2014-01-01

    With an expansive and ubiquitously available gold mine of educational data, Massive Open Online courses (MOOCs) have become the an important foci of learning analytics research. In this paper, we investigate potential reasons as to why are these digitalized learning repositories being plagued with huge attrition rates. We analyze an ongoing online course offered in Coursera using a social network perspective, with an objective to identify students who are actively participating in course disc...

  2. Supporting Scientific Research with the Energy Sciences Network

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Monga, Inder

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified national network built to support scientific research. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, including the entire National Laboratory system, its supercomputing facilities, and its major scientific instruments. ESnet also connects to 140 research and commercial networks, permitting DOE-funded scientists to productively collaborate with partners around the world. ESnet Division Director (Interim) Inder Monga and ESnet Networking Engineer David Mitchell will present current ESnet projects and research activities which help support the HEP community. ESnet  helps support the CERN community by providing 100Gbps trans-Atlantic network transport for the LHCONE and LHCOPN services. ESnet is also actively engaged in researching connectivity to cloud computing resources for HEP workflows a...

  3. Quantifying Equid Behavior - A Research Ethogram for Free-Roaming Feral Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jason I.; Cade, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Feral horses (Equus caballus) are globally distributed in free-roaming populations on all continents except Antarctica and occupy a wide range of habitats including forest, grassland, desert, and montane environments. The largest populations occur in Australia and North America and have been the subject of scientific study for decades, yet guidelines and ethograms for feral horse behavioral research are largely absent in the scientific literature. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center conducted research on the influences of the immunocontraceptive porcine zona pellucida (PZP) on feral horse behavior from 2003-2006 in three discrete populations in the American west. These populations were the Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Range in Colorado, McCullough Peaks Herd Management Area in Wyoming, and Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range in Montana; the research effort included over 1,800 hours of behavioral observations of 317 adult free-roaming feral horses. An ethogram was developed during the course of this study to facilitate accurate scientific data collection on feral horse behavior, which is often challenging to quantify. By developing this set of discrete behavioral definitions and a set of strict research protocols, scientists were better able to address both applied questions, such as behavioral changes related to fertility control, and theoretical questions, such as understanding networks and dominance hierarchies within social groups of equids.

  4. Support network and social support for children with special health care need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Araújo Barbosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand and identify the support network and social support from the perspective of families of children with chronic conditions. Methods: a qualitative study, with content analysis of 134 records, followed by ten semi-structured interviews. Results: the analysis has revealed that the primary caregiver, the mother, participates in a network of limited support, only with the help of her husband, children, grandparents and the child´s godparents. They also have a social network through a multidisciplinary team, which in some cases is not effective. Conclusion: families have a deficient and limited support network and the demand for care rely only on the support of the husband, grandparents, children, and godparents. Social networking refers to the philanthropic institutions, while the aid of public service, basic health unit is basic.

  5. Tourists’ Perceptions of the Free-Roaming Dog Population in Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Magnus; Hill, Kate E.; Farnworth, Mark J.; Bolwell, Charlotte F.; Bridges, Janis; Acke, Els

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary For travelers, the way in which people in other nations interact with animals may be different to that in their home nation. This research explores how the treatment of dogs impacted upon the holiday experiences of tourists visiting a developing island nation. In general, and where tourists encountered dogs, their treatment was perceived as less positive than in their home country and had a negative impact upon the holiday experience. Although it is important to recognize that the local population will have a different worldview, tourists felt that the dog population required more effective management and were most supportive of techniques that were non-lethal and humane. Abstract A study was undertaken to establish how visiting tourists to Samoa perceived free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris) and their management, additionally some factors that influence their perceptions were assessed. Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks. Free-roaming dogs were seen by 98.2% (n = 269/274) of respondents, with 64.9% (n = 137/211) reporting that their presence had a negative effect on overall holiday experience. Respondents staying in the Apia (capital city) area were more likely to consider dogs a problem (p tourism industry in particular. The findings of this study further support the need for more discussion and action about the provision of veterinary services and population management for dogs in Samoa. It also provides information complementing an earlier study of the attitudes of local Samoans. PMID:26479002

  6. Advanced systems engineering and network planning support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David H.; Barrett, Larry K.; Boyd, Ronald; Bazaj, Suresh; Mitchell, Lionel; Brosi, Fred

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this task was to take a fresh look at the NASA Space Network Control (SNC) element for the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) such that it can be made more efficient and responsive to the user by introducing new concepts and technologies appropriate for the 1997 timeframe. In particular, it was desired to investigate the technologies and concepts employed in similar systems that may be applicable to the SNC. The recommendations resulting from this study include resource partitioning, on-line access to subsets of the SN schedule, fluid scheduling, increased use of demand access on the MA service, automating Inter-System Control functions using monitor by exception, increase automation for distributed data management and distributed work management, viewing SN operational control in terms of the OSI Management framework, and the introduction of automated interface management.

  7. Neural networks in support of manned space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werbos, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Many lobbyists in Washington have argued that artificial intelligence (AI) is an alternative to manned space activity. In actuality, this is the opposite of the truth, especially as regards artificial neural networks (ANNs), that form of AI which has the greatest hope of mimicking human abilities in learning, ability to interface with sensors and actuators, flexibility and balanced judgement. ANNs and their relation to expert systems (the more traditional form of AI), and the limitations of both technologies are briefly reviewed. A Few highlights of recent work on ANNs, including an NSF-sponsored workshop on ANNs for control applications are given. Current thinking on ANNs for use in certain key areas (the National Aerospace Plane, teleoperation, the control of large structures, fault diagnostics, and docking) which may be crucial to the long term future of man in space is discussed.

  8. Impact of support networks for breastfeeding: A multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baño-Piñero, Isabel; Martínez-Roche, María Emilia; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel; Carrillo-García, César; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2017-10-10

    The rates of breastfeeding worldwide are slowly improving since 1996. Europe is still trailing behind the global breastfeeding incidence and prevalence rates. Thus, breastfeeding promotion, protection, prolongation and support have become an important challenge as breastfeeding sharply decreases in the first six months of life. The aim of this project is to determine, assess and identify the real impact of breastfeeding support networks in Murcia (Spain). After searching unsuccessfully for a validated questionnaire, a specific one was developed and validated for measuring the impact of formal and informal support networks through five dimensions: satisfaction, consultation, experience, problems and support. The questionnaire was provided to 500 mothers with experience in breastfeeding, who brought their children to baby paediatricians between 2 June and 27 November 2014. Upon completion of the survey and fieldwork, a detailed statistical analysis was conducted. The degree of satisfaction perceived by the users of the services of support breastfeeding networks is remarkable. In addition, mothers who clarified their doubts and discussed their problems with health professionals and/or breastfeeding support networks were more likely to breastfeed for a longer duration compared to those who did not (p=0.005). Furthermore, mothers who sought support in breastfeeding are more likely to breastfeed for more than 6 months (psupport networks have a positive influence in the duration of a women's decision to breastfeed. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Decision support systems and methods for complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenyu [Richland, WA; Wong, Pak Chung [Richland, WA; Ma, Jian [Richland, WA; Mackey, Patrick S [Richland, WA; Chen, Yousu [Richland, WA; Schneider, Kevin P [Seattle, WA

    2012-02-28

    Methods and systems for automated decision support in analyzing operation data from a complex network. Embodiments of the present invention utilize these algorithms and techniques not only to characterize the past and present condition of a complex network, but also to predict future conditions to help operators anticipate deteriorating and/or problem situations. In particular, embodiments of the present invention characterize network conditions from operation data using a state estimator. Contingency scenarios can then be generated based on those network conditions. For at least a portion of all of the contingency scenarios, risk indices are determined that describe the potential impact of each of those scenarios. Contingency scenarios with risk indices are presented visually as graphical representations in the context of a visual representation of the complex network. Analysis of the historical risk indices based on the graphical representations can then provide trends that allow for prediction of future network conditions.

  10. Social networks, support and early psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer-Anderson, C; Morgan, C

    2013-06-01

    Background. There is strong evidence that those with a long-standing psychotic disorder have fewer social contacts and less social support than comparison groups. There is less research on the extent of social contacts and support prior to or at the onset of psychosis. In the light of recent evidence implicating a range of social experiences and contexts at the onset of psychosis, it is relevant to establish whether social networks and support diminished before or at the time of onset and whether the absence of such supports might contribute to risk, either directly or indirectly. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review of this literature to establish what is currently known about the relationship between social networks, support and early psychosis. Methods. We identified all studies investigating social networks and support in first episode psychosis samples and in general population samples with measures of psychotic experiences or schizotype by conducting systematic searches of electronic databases using pre-defined search terms and criteria. Findings were synthesized using non-quantitative approaches. Results. Thirty-eight papers were identified that met inclusion criteria. There was marked methodological heterogeneity, which limits the capacity to draw direct comparisons. Nonetheless, the existing literature suggests social networks (particularly close friends) and support diminished both among first episode samples and among non-clinical samples reporting psychotic experiences or with schizotype traits, compared with varying comparison groups. These differences may be more marked for men and for those from minority ethnic populations. Conclusions. Tentatively, reduced social networks and support appear to pre-date onset of psychotic disorder. However, the substantial methodological heterogeneity among the existing studies makes comparisons difficult and suggests a need for more robust and comparable studies on networks, support and early psychosis.

  11. Supporting Control Room Operators in Highly Automated Future Power Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Minjiang; Catterson, Victoria; Syed, Mazheruddin

    2017-01-01

    Operating power systems is an extremely challenging task, not least because power systems have become highly interconnected, as well as the range of network issues that can occur. It is therefore a necessity to develop decision support systems and visualisation that can effectively support the hu...

  12. Estimation of roaming dog populations in Timor Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Acáçio Cardoso; Ward, Michael P; da Costa Freitas, Joana

    2014-03-01

    The continued spread of rabies through the eastern islands of Indonesia poses a risk of rabies introduction to Timor Leste. To prepare for such an incursion and to undertake surveillance activities, the size and distribution of the roaming dog population needs to be estimated. We present the results of the first such surveys ever undertaken in Timor Leste. Roaming dog surveys were undertaken in each capital of the 13 districts of Timor Leste, including the national capital, Dili. Within these locations, local urban areas (aldeias) were targeted and sight-re-sight counts were undertaken on consecutive days. Estimated dog populations were adjusted for the sampling fraction. Overall, counts were performed in a total of 53 of 131 (40.5%) sucos and in 192 of 797 (24.1%) aldeias in these selected sucos. Within the surveyed urban areas, there were an estimated 21.2 people per roaming dog, a ratio substantially higher than the World Health Organization's average global estimate of 10 people per dog. The highest populations of dogs were estimated in the cities of Dili (4919), Baucau vila (3449) and Lospalos (2536). The latter two are important because of their location in the northeast of Timor Leste, where the risk of rabies incursion from recently infected islands in eastern Indonesia, is likely greatest. The sight-resight method of estimating roaming dog populations is practical in developing countries; more use of photography to aid resighting of dogs could increase the accuracy of this method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender differences in brain networks supporting empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Markowitsch, Hans J; Shah, N Jon; Fink, Gereon R; Piefke, Martina

    2008-08-01

    Females frequently score higher on standard tests of empathy, social sensitivity, and emotion recognition than do males. It remains to be clarified, however, whether these gender differences are associated with gender specific neural mechanisms of emotional social cognition. We investigated gender differences in an emotion attribution task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Subjects either focused on their own emotional response to emotion expressing faces (SELF-task) or evaluated the emotional state expressed by the faces (OTHER-task). Behaviorally, females rated SELF-related emotions significantly stronger than males. Across the sexes, SELF- and OTHER-related processing of facial expressions activated a network of medial and lateral prefrontal, temporal, and parietal brain regions involved in emotional perspective taking. During SELF-related processing, females recruited the right inferior frontal cortex and superior temporal sulcus stronger than males. In contrast, there was increased neural activity in the left temporoparietal junction in males (relative to females). When performing the OTHER-task, females showed increased activation of the right inferior frontal cortex while there were no differential activations in males. The data suggest that females recruit areas containing mirror neurons to a higher degree than males during both SELF- and OTHER-related processing in empathic face-to-face interactions. This may underlie facilitated emotional "contagion" in females. Together with the observation that males differentially rely on the left temporoparietal junction (an area mediating the distinction between the SELF and OTHERS) the data suggest that females and males rely on different strategies when assessing their own emotions in response to other people.

  14. Fecundity and longevity of roaming dogs in Jaipur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiby Elly F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of demographic parameters, such as age-specific survival and fecundity, age at first pregnancy and litter size, are required for roaming dogs (i.e. dogs that are neither confined nor restricted to assess the likely effect of proposed methods of population control. Data resulting from individual identification of dogs spayed as part of an Animal Birth Control (ABC programme in Jaipur, India, are used to derive such parameters for the roaming dog population of that city. Results The percentage of females becoming pregnant in any given year was estimated by inspection of over 25,000 females caught for spaying from 1995 to 2006. The point estimate is 47.5% with a 95% confidence interval from 44% to 51%. Adult annual survival of spayed females was estimated by recapture of 62 spayed females from 2002 to 2006. The point estimate is 0.70 (95% confidence interval from 0.62 to 0.78, corresponding to an expected total lifespan of 3.8 years for a spayed female at one year old. Conclusion Recording the pregnancy status of dogs collected for spaying and individual marking of dogs released following spaying can provide estimates of some of the demographic parameters essential for predicting the future effectiveness of an ABC programme. Further, we suggest that recording the number and location of spayed and unspayed dogs encountered by the catching teams could be the most effective way to monitor the size and composition of the roaming dog population.

  15. Decision Support for Countering Terrorist Threats against Transportation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Richard Adler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a dynamic decision support methodology forcounter-terrorism decision support. The initial sections introduce basic objectives and challenges of terrorism risk analysis and risk management. The remainder of the paper describes TRANSEC, a decision support framework for defining, validating, and monitoring strategies focused on managing terrorism risks to international transportation networks. The methodology and software tools underlying TRANSEC are applicable to other homeland security problems, such as critical infrastructure and border protection.

  16. Identifying changes in the support networks of end-of-life carers using social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Rosemary; Horsfall, Debbie; Noonan, Kerrie

    2015-06-01

    End-of-life caring is often associated with reduced social networks for both the dying person and for the carer. However, those adopting a community participation and development approach, see the potential for the expansion and strengthening of networks. This paper uses Knox, Savage and Harvey's definitions of three generations social network analysis to analyse the caring networks of people with a terminal illness who are being cared for at home and identifies changes in these caring networks that occurred over the period of caring. Participatory network mapping of initial and current networks was used in nine focus groups. The analysis used key concepts from social network analysis (size, density, transitivity, betweenness and local clustering) together with qualitative analyses of the group's reflections on the maps. The results showed an increase in the size of the networks and that ties between the original members of the network strengthened. The qualitative data revealed the importance between core and peripheral network members and the diverse contributions of the network members. The research supports the value of third generation social network analysis and the potential for end-of-life caring to build social capital. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Social Support and Social Networks in COPD: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Christopher; Effing, Tanya W; Cafarella, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to determine the size and nature of the evidence describing associations between social support and networks on health, management and clinical outcomes amongst patients with COPD. Searches of PubMed, PsychInfo and CINAHL were undertaken for the period 1966-December 2013. A descriptive synthesis of the main findings was undertaken to demonstrate where there is current evidence for associations between social support, networks and health outcomes, and where further research is needed. The search yielded 318 papers of which 287 were excluded after applying selection criteria. Two areas emerged in which there was consistent evidence of benefit of social support; namely mental health and self-efficacy. There was inconsistent evidence for a relationship between perceived social support and quality of life, physical functioning and self-rated health. Hospital readmission was not associated with level of perceived social support. Only a small number of studies (3 articles) have reported on the social network of individuals with COPD. There remains a need to identify the factors that promote and enable social support. In particular, there is a need to further understand the characteristics of social networks within the broader social structural conditions in which COPD patients live and manage their illness.

  18. Cascades of emotional support in friendship networks and adolescent smoking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia M Lakon

    Full Text Available Social support from peers and parents provides a key socialization function during adolescence. We examine adolescent friendship networks using a Stochastic Actor-Based modeling approach to observe the flow of emotional support provision to peers and the effect of support from parents, while simultaneously modeling smoking behavior. We utilized one school (n = 976 from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (AddHealth Study. Our findings suggest that emotional support is transacted through an interdependent contextual system, comprised of both peer and parental effects, with the latter also having distal indirect effects from youths' friends' parents.

  19. Cascades of emotional support in friendship networks and adolescent smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakon, Cynthia M; Wang, Cheng; Butts, Carter T; Jose, Rupa; Hipp, John R

    2017-01-01

    Social support from peers and parents provides a key socialization function during adolescence. We examine adolescent friendship networks using a Stochastic Actor-Based modeling approach to observe the flow of emotional support provision to peers and the effect of support from parents, while simultaneously modeling smoking behavior. We utilized one school (n = 976) from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (AddHealth) Study. Our findings suggest that emotional support is transacted through an interdependent contextual system, comprised of both peer and parental effects, with the latter also having distal indirect effects from youths' friends' parents.

  20. Cascades of emotional support in friendship networks and adolescent smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Butts, Carter T.; Jose, Rupa; Hipp, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Social support from peers and parents provides a key socialization function during adolescence. We examine adolescent friendship networks using a Stochastic Actor-Based modeling approach to observe the flow of emotional support provision to peers and the effect of support from parents, while simultaneously modeling smoking behavior. We utilized one school (n = 976) from The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (AddHealth) Study. Our findings suggest that emotional support is transacted through an interdependent contextual system, comprised of both peer and parental effects, with the latter also having distal indirect effects from youths’ friends’ parents. PMID:28662121

  1. Volunteering as a network of social support to young people

    OpenAIRE

    Mikelj, Lucija

    2015-01-01

    The master's thesis deals with volunteering as a network offering social support to young people. The theoretical part is based on different authors and pieces of research that focus on young people in modern times, pointing out the social vulnerability of young people as a result of a complex transition to adulthood. Furthermore, it analyses potential protective elements and opportunities of social inclusion, with special emphasis placed on (appropriate, good) social support as a powerful pr...

  2. Equipment to Support Development of Neuronal Network Controlled Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-25

    Equipment to Support Development of Neuronal Network Controlled Robots With this award, our team purchased an ALA 2-channel stimulus generator, an...34 laser cutter, and a Rethink Robotics Baxter Robot . This equipment supported two ARO awards, a DARPA award and two NSF-funded projects. The views...Controlled Robots Report Title With this award, our team purchased an ALA 2-channel stimulus generator, an ALA 60-channel amplifier with pre-filter

  3. Tourists’ Perceptions of the Free-Roaming Dog Population in Samoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Beckman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to establish how visiting tourists to Samoa perceived free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris and their management, additionally some factors that influence their perceptions were assessed. Questionnaires were administered to 281 tourists across Samoa over 5 weeks. Free-roaming dogs were seen by 98.2% (n = 269/274 of respondents, with 64.9% (n = 137/211 reporting that their presence had a negative effect on overall holiday experience. Respondents staying in the Apia (capital city area were more likely to consider dogs a problem (p < 0.0001, and there was a significant association between whether the respondent owned a dog and if they thought dogs were a nuisance in Samoa (p < 0.003. Forty-four percent (20/89 of non-dog owners agreed that dogs were a nuisance compared to 22% (80/182 of dog owners. The majority felt that dogs required better control and management in Samoa (81%, n = 222 and that there were too many “stray” dogs (67.9%, n = 188. More respondents were negatively affected by the dogs’ presence (64.9%, 137/211, and felt that the dogs made their holiday worse, than respondents that felt the dogs’ presence improved their holiday experience (35.1%, 74/211. Most respondents stated that the dogs had a low impact (one to three; 68%, 187/275 on their stay in Samoa, whilst 24% (65/275 and 8% (23/275 stated they had a medium or high impact, respectively, on their stay. Respondents showed strong support for humane population management. Free-roaming dogs present a complex problem for Samoa and for its tourism industry in particular. The findings of this study further support the need for more discussion and action about the provision of veterinary services and population management for dogs in Samoa. It also provides information complementing an earlier study of the attitudes of local Samoans.

  4. Quality of Service in Networks Supporting Cultural Multimedia Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Dimitris N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide an overview of representative multimedia applications in the cultural heritage sector, as well as research results on quality of service (QoS) mechanisms in internet protocol (IP) networks that support such applications. Design/methodology/approach: The paper's approach is a literature review. Findings: Cultural…

  5. Lesbian Friendships: An Exploration of Lesbian Social Support Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degges-White, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Lesbians may face unique challenges when building friendships. The intersection of culturally sanctioned discrimination and familial rejection may intensify the role friendships play for lesbians and the development of social support networks. The author discusses existing research and qualitative findings and provides suggestions for counselors…

  6. Evaluating the rural health placements of the Rural Support Network ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the rural health placements of the Rural Support Network at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town. ... The importance of community empowerment and of connecting and building relationships with communities was also emphasised. Challenges pertained to conflict within groups, incidents of ...

  7. Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresler, M.; Shirer, W.R.; Konrad, B.N.; Muller, N.C.J.; Wagner, I.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Czisch, M.; Greicius, M.D.

    2017-01-01

    Memory skills strongly differ across the general population; however, little is known about the brain characteristics supporting superior memory performance. Here we assess functional brain network organization of 23 of the world's most successful memory athletes and matched controls with fMRI

  8. Does Artificial Neural Network Support Connectivism's Assumptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDahdouh, Alaa A.

    2017-01-01

    Connectivism was presented as a learning theory for the digital age and connectivists claim that recent developments in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and, more specifically, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) support their assumptions of knowledge connectivity. Yet, very little has been done to investigate this brave allegation. Does the advancement…

  9. Support for Community Telecentres and Networks in Mali | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Support for Community Telecentres and Networks in Mali. Telecentres across French-speaking West Africa are struggling to attain financial sustainability while remaining relevant to their communities. This is because they have access to fewer online resources and a smaller community of practice than their ...

  10. Implementing e-network-supported inquiry learning in science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, John; Cowie, Bronwen; Khoo, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    of inquiry, the school must provide effective technological infrastructure and sympathetic curriculum parameters, and the students need to be carefully scaffolded to the point of engaging with the inquiry process. Within this study, e-networks supported students to exercise agency, collaborate, and co...

  11. Women in Midlife: Crises, Reverberations, and Support Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Joan F.

    1978-01-01

    Starting with a definition of what constitutes midlife, crises, and reverberations, the paper addresses some commonly preferred support networks chosen by women in midlife, with particular emphasis on the perceived value of each as a factor in adjustment and life satisfaction. (Author)

  12. Evaluating the rural health placements of the Rural Support Network ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-19

    Oct 19, 2011 ... by organising individual and group placements in rural hospitals during vacations. This paper describes a qualitative evaluation, from the students' perspective, of the 2010 RSN rural health placements in order to make recommendations for the. Abstract. Objectives: The Rural Support Network (RSN) is an ...

  13. Fracture Network Modeling and GoldSim Simulation Support

    OpenAIRE

    杉田 健一郎; Dershowiz, W.

    2003-01-01

    During Heisei-14, Golder Associates provided support for JNC Tokai through data analysis and simulation of the MIU Underground Rock Laboratory, participation in Task 6 of the Aspo Task Force on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Transport, and analysis of repository safety assessment technologies including cell networks for evaluation of the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) and total systems performance assessment (TSPA).

  14. Examining user satisfaction with single sign-on and computer application roaming within emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Patti; Zhang, Xiaoni

    2015-06-01

    In an age where mandatory computer usage within clinical care settings is a non-negotiable term of employment, the amount of applications a provider must access to document care is rapidly increasing. Each application contains an associated username and password. The increasing frequency with which clinicians have to log in and out of different applications is a source of frustration for many healthcare professionals. Healthcare executives see lost productivity. Single sign-on with added computer application roaming capabilities on shared workstations is a viable solution for both the clinician and the organization. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of implementation of single sign-on technology with application roaming on shared workstations. This study focuses on the perception of satisfaction with the implementation of single sign-on technologies within a midsized integrated delivery health network's five emergency departments. We contribute to theory with the following: (1) the development of a construct called facilitated technology interruptions, (2) validation of the construct facilitated technology interruptions, and (3) application of a quantitative method to test the relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and user satisfaction. We surveyed five emergency departments and proposed five hypotheses. We found the positive relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and user satisfaction; the positive relationships between effort expectancy and satisfaction, and effort expectancy and willingness to recommend; and the positive relationship between satisfaction and willingness to recommend. We did not confirm the positive relationship between facilitated technology interruptions and willingness to recommend. We conclude that single sign-on technology increases user satisfaction. Other organizations may use the findings from this study and perform pre-single sign-on versus post-single sign-on evaluations. In practice

  15. Household Disorder, Network Ties, and Social Support in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Erin York

    2016-08-01

    Family relationships, social interactions, and exchanges of support often revolve around the household context, but scholars rarely consider the social relevance of this physical space. In this article the author considers social causes and consequences of household disorder in the dwellings of older adults. Drawing from research on neighborhood disorder and social connectedness in later life, she describes how network characteristics may contribute to household disorder and how household disorder may weaken relationships and reduce access to support. This is explored empirically by estimating cross-lagged panel models with data from 2 waves of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. The results reveal that household disorder reflects a lack of social support, and it leads to more kin-centered networks and more strain within family relationships. The author concludes by urging greater attention to how the household context shapes-and is shaped by-the social interactions and processes that occur within it.

  16. Should government support business angel networks? The tale of Danish business angels network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper Lindgaard

    2011-01-01

    . This article discusses the possible rationale for governments to support BANs and what criteria to apply when evaluating such networks. The article is based on an in-depth observation study of the whole life cycle of a national BAN – the Danish Business Angel Network (DBAN) – and a comparison with a similar......Policies promoting informal venture capital generally and business angel networks (BANs) in particular have gained increased attention in recent years. As a consequence, BANs are now widespread across Europe. However, there continues to be a debate whether BANs should be supported with public money...... whether to provide continuing support to BANs they should evaluate not only their immediate effectiveness but also whether BANs should be considered a part of the general small business support infrastructure....

  17. Communication: Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 308 nm: Observation of H-roaming, CH3-roaming, and transition state pathways together along the ground state surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hou-Kuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hung, Kai-Chan; Kasai, Toshio; Lin, King-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Following photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 308 nm, the CO(v = 1-4) fragment is acquired using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The CO(v = 1) rotational distribution shows a bimodal feature; the low- and high-J components result from H-roaming around CH3CO core and CH3-roaming around CHO radical, respectively, in consistency with a recent assignment by Kable and co-workers (Lee et al., Chem. Sci. 5, 4633 (2014)). The H-roaming pathway disappears at the CO(v ≥ 2) states, because of insufficient available energy following bond-breaking of H + CH3CO. By analyzing the CH4 emission spectrum, we obtained a bimodal vibrational distribution; the low-energy component is ascribed to the transition state (TS) pathway, consistent with prediction by quasiclassical trajectory calculations, while the high-energy component results from H- and CH3-roamings. A branching fraction of H-roaming/CH3-roaming/TS contribution is evaluated to be (8% ± 3%)/(68% ± 10%)/(25% ± 5%), in which the TS pathway was observed for the first time. The three pathways proceed concomitantly along the electronic ground state surface.

  18. Social support networks among diverse sexual minority populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David M; Meyer, Ilan H; Schwartz, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a study of the function and composition of social support networks among diverse lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) men and women (n = 396) in comparison to their heterosexual peers (n = 128). Data were collected using a structured social support network matrix in a community sample recruited in New York City. Our findings show that gay and bisexual men may rely on "chosen families" more than lesbian and bisexual women. Both heterosexuals and LGBs relied less on family and more on other people (e.g., friends, coworkers) for everyday social support (e.g., recreational and social activities, talking about problems). Providers of everyday social support were most often of the same sexual orientation and race/ethnicity as participants. In seeking major support (e.g., borrowing large sums of money), heterosexual men and women along with lesbian and bisexual women relied primarily on their families, but gay and bisexual men relied primarily on other LGB individuals. Racial/ethnic minority LGBs relied on LGB similar others at the same rate as did White LGBs but, notably, racial/ethnic minority LGBs reported receiving fewer dimensions of support. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Representational Similarity Analysis Reveals Heterogeneous Networks Supporting Speech Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zane; Cusack, Rhodri; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    The everyday act of speaking involves the complex processes of speech motor control. One important feature of such control is regulation of articulation when auditory concomitants of speech do not correspond to the intended motor gesture. While theoretical accounts of speech monitoring posit...... is supported by a complex neural network that is involved in linguistic, motoric and sensory processing. With the aid of novel real-time acoustic analyses and representational similarity analyses of fMRI signals, our data show functionally differentiated networks underlying auditory feedback control of speech....... multiple functional components required for detection of errors in speech planning (e.g., Levelt, 1983), neuroimaging studies generally indicate either single brain regions sensitive to speech production errors, or small, discrete networks. Here we demonstrate that the complex system controlling speech...

  20. Using ELECTRE TRI to support maintenance of water distribution networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Trojan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Problems encountered in the context of the maintenance management of water supply are evidenced by the lack of decision support models which gives a manager overview of the system. This paper, therefore, develops a model that uses, in its framework, the multicriteria outranking method ELECTRE TRI. The objective is to sort the areas of water flow measurement of a water distribution network, by priority of maintenance, with data collected from an automated system of abnormalities detection. This sorting is designed to support maintenance decisions in terms of the measure more appropriate to be applied per region. To illustrate the proposed model, an application was performed in a city with 100 thousand water connections. With this model it becomes possible to improve the allocation of maintenance measures for regions and mainly to improve the operation of the distribution network.

  1. Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler, Martin; Shirer, William R; Konrad, Boris N; Müller, Nils C J; Wagner, Isabella C; Fernández, Guillén; Czisch, Michael; Greicius, Michael D

    2017-03-08

    Memory skills strongly differ across the general population; however, little is known about the brain characteristics supporting superior memory performance. Here we assess functional brain network organization of 23 of the world's most successful memory athletes and matched controls with fMRI during both task-free resting state baseline and active memory encoding. We demonstrate that, in a group of naive controls, functional connectivity changes induced by 6 weeks of mnemonic training were correlated with the network organization that distinguishes athletes from controls. During rest, this effect was mainly driven by connections between rather than within the visual, medial temporal lobe and default mode networks, whereas during task it was driven by connectivity within these networks. Similarity with memory athlete connectivity patterns predicted memory improvements up to 4 months after training. In conclusion, mnemonic training drives distributed rather than regional changes, reorganizing the brain's functional network organization to enable superior memory performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Supporting Dynamic Spectrum Access in Heterogeneous LTE+ Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luiz A. DaSilva; Ryan E. Irwin; Mike Benonis

    2012-08-01

    As early as 2014, mobile network operators’ spectral capac- ity is expected to be overwhelmed by the demand brought on by new devices and applications. With Long Term Evo- lution Advanced (LTE+) networks likely as the future one world 4G standard, network operators may need to deploy a Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA) overlay in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets) to extend coverage, increase spectrum efficiency, and increase the capacity of these networks. In this paper, we propose three new management frameworks for DSA in an LTE+ HetNet: Spectrum Accountability Client, Cell Spectrum Management, and Domain Spectrum Man- agement. For these spectrum management frameworks, we define protocol interfaces and operational signaling scenar- ios to support cooperative sensing, spectrum lease manage- ment, and alarm scenarios for rule adjustment. We also quan- tify, through integer programs, the benefits of using DSA in an LTE+ HetNet, that can opportunistically reuse vacant TV and GSM spectrum. Using integer programs, we consider a topology using Geographic Information System data from the Blacksburg, VA metro area to assess the realistic benefits of DSA in an LTE+ HetNet.

  3. Using 100G Network Technology in Support of Petascale Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, James P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA in collaboration with a number of partners conducted a set of individual experiments and demonstrations during SC 10 that collectively were titled "Using 100G Network Technology in Support of Petascale Science". The partners included the iCAIR, Internet2, LAC, MAX, National LambdaRail (NLR), NOAA and SCinet Research Sandbox (SRS) as well as the vendors Ciena, Cisco, ColorChip, cPacket, Extreme Networks, Fusion-io, HP and Panduit who most generously allowed some of their leading edge 40G/100G optical transport, Ethernet switch and Internet Protocol router equipment and file server technologies to be involved. The experiments and demonstrations featured different vendor-provided 40G/100G network technology solutions for full-duplex 40G and 100G LAN data flows across SRS-deployed single-node fiber-pairs among the Exhibit Booths of NASA, the National Center for Data lining, NOAA and the SCinet Network Operations Center, as well as between the NASA Exhibit Booth in New Orleans and the Starlight Communications Exchange facility in Chicago across special SC 10- only 80- and 100-Gbps wide area network links provisioned respectively by the NLR and Internet2, then on to GSFC across a 40-Gbps link. provisioned by the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads. The networks and vendor equipment were load-stressed by sets of NASA/GSFC High End Computer Network Team-built, relatively inexpensive, net-test-workstations that are capable of demonstrating greater than 100Gbps uni-directional nuttcp-enabled memory-to-memory data transfers, greater than 80-Gbps aggregate--bidirectional memory-to-memory data transfers, and near 40-Gbps uni-directional disk-to-disk file copying. This paper will summarize the background context, key accomplishments and some significances of these experiments and demonstrations.

  4. 36 CFR 222.25 - Protection of wild free-roaming horses and burros when they are upon other than the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-roaming horses and burros when they are upon other than the National Forest System or public lands. 222.25... MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.25 Protection of wild free-roaming horses... animals and herds of wild free-roaming horses and burros will be under the protection of the Chief, Forest...

  5. Toward Predicting Social Support Needs in Online Health Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Je; Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Sukwon; Kwon, Bum Chul; Yi, Ji Soo; Choo, Jaegul; Huh, Jina

    2017-08-02

    While online health social networks (OHSNs) serve as an effective platform for patients to fulfill their various social support needs, predicting the needs of users and providing tailored information remains a challenge. The objective of this study was to discriminate important features for identifying users' social support needs based on knowledge gathered from survey data. This study also provides guidelines for a technical framework, which can be used to predict users' social support needs based on raw data collected from OHSNs. We initially conducted a Web-based survey with 184 OHSN users. From this survey data, we extracted 34 features based on 5 categories: (1) demographics, (2) reading behavior, (3) posting behavior, (4) perceived roles in OHSNs, and (5) values sought in OHSNs. Features from the first 4 categories were used as variables for binary classification. For the prediction outcomes, we used features from the last category: the needs for emotional support, experience-based information, unconventional information, and medical facts. We compared 5 binary classifier algorithms: gradient boosting tree, random forest, decision tree, support vector machines, and logistic regression. We then calculated the scores of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) to understand the comparative effectiveness of the used features. The best performance was AUC scores of 0.89 for predicting users seeking emotional support, 0.86 for experience-based information, 0.80 for unconventional information, and 0.83 for medical facts. With the gradient boosting tree as our best performing model, we analyzed the strength of individual features in predicting one's social support need. Among other discoveries, we found that users seeking emotional support tend to post more in OHSNs compared with others. We developed an initial framework for automatically predicting social support needs in OHSNs using survey data. Future work should involve nonsurvey

  6. A Survey on Mobility Support in Wireless Body Area Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Kyong Hoon; Kim, Ki-Il

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs) have attracted research interests from the community, as more promising healthcare applications have a tendency to employ them as underlying network technology. While taking design issues, such as small size hardware as well as low power computing, into account, a lot of research has been proposed to accomplish the given tasks in WBAN. However, since most of the existing works are basically developed by assuming all nodes in the static state, these schemes therefore cannot be applied in real scenarios where network topology between sensor nodes changes frequently and unexpectedly according to human moving behavior. However, as far as the authors know, there is no survey paper to focus on research challenges for mobility support in WBAN yet. To address this deficiency, in this paper, we present the state-of-the-art approaches and discuss the important features of related to mobility in WBAN. We give an overview of mobility model and categorize the models as individual and group. Furthermore, an overview of networking techniques in the recent literature and summary are compiled for comparison in several aspects. The article also suggests potential directions for future research in the field. PMID:28387745

  7. A Survey on Mobility Support in Wireless Body Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom-Su Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs have attracted research interests from the community, as more promising healthcare applications have a tendency to employ them as underlying network technology. While taking design issues, such as small size hardware as well as low power computing, into account, a lot of research has been proposed to accomplish the given tasks in WBAN. However, since most of the existing works are basically developed by assuming all nodes in the static state, these schemes therefore cannot be applied in real scenarios where network topology between sensor nodes changes frequently and unexpectedly according to human moving behavior. However, as far as the authors know, there is no survey paper to focus on research challenges for mobility support in WBAN yet. To address this deficiency, in this paper, we present the state-of-the-art approaches and discuss the important features of related to mobility in WBAN. We give an overview of mobility model and categorize the models as individual and group. Furthermore, an overview of networking techniques in the recent literature and summary are compiled for comparison in several aspects. The article also suggests potential directions for future research in the field.

  8. iRoam: Leveraging Mobile Technology to Provide Innovative Point of Need Reference Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James MacDonald

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Northern British Columbia’s Geoffrey R. Weller Library can boast of a healthy and stable reference service. While statistical analysis reveals that patron use of this service is on the decline, this is not unlike current trends experienced by many libraries today. The library averages a total of 6300 reference transactions per year, a significant number for a small, research-intensive university serving 3500 FTE. The unanswered question is why are the numbers dropping? One theory is that providing research and reference assistance in a traditional manner is affecting the number of transactions. Reference service is traditionally provided in a stationary manner, whereby patrons are required to visit the reference desk of their own volition. Recognizing that a stationary librarian cannot reach a stationary patron, UNBC library began an innovative roaming reference pilot project in September, 2010. Combining the power of wireless networks, tablet computing and chat services, 5 librarians provided point-of-need, face-to-face and virtual reference services during peak reference hours over the fall 2010 semester. This article outlines the project and technologies employed to make it happen (iPad, apps, instant messaging widgets and wireless networks.

  9. Photodissociation of methyl formate: Conical intersections, roaming and triple fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, King-Chuen; Tsai, Po-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chao, Meng-Hsuan [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Lombardi, Andrea [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Palazzetti, Federico [Scuola Normale Superiore, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Aquilanti, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Struttura della Materia, 00016 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    The photodissociation channels of methyl formate have been extensively investigated by two different advanced experimental techniques, ion imaging and Fourier-Transform-Infrared emission spectroscopy, combined with quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Our aim is to characterize the role of alternative routes to the conventional transition-state mediated pathway: the roaming and the triple fragmentation processes. The photolysis experiments, carried out at a range of laser wavelengths in the vicinity of the triple fragmentation threshold, beside the simulation of large bunches of classical trajectories with different initial conditions, have shown that both mechanisms share a common path that involves a conical intersection during the relaxation process from the electronic excited state S{sub 1} to the ground state S{sub 0}.

  10. SEDIMENT ANALYSIS NETWORK FOR DECISION SUPPORT (SANDS) MODIS GULF SUBSETTED V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS) MODIS Gulf Subsetted -- The Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS) analyzes GeoTIFF images to...

  11. FAMILY EVALUATION: NETWORK OF SOCIAL SUPPORT IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Lavall, Eliane; UFRGS; Olschowsky, Agnes; UFRGS; Prado Kantorski, Luciane; Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPEL)

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the network of social support of a user and family upon a follow-up in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS). It consists of a subproject of the research named Evaluation of Psychosocial Care Centers from the southern region of Brazil, carried out in a CAPS of Porto Alegre having as subjects a user and a relative. It is a qualitative research of case study type that utilizes the Calgary Model of Family Evaluation. The collection of data provided the construction of ...

  12. First level network support handover to the IT Helpdesk

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 18th of May 2009, the first level network support will be handed over from Netops to the central IT Helpdesk. Thus, emails and phone calls directed to Netops (mailto:Netops@cern.ch and 74927) will be redirected to the Helpdesk (mailto:helpdesk.computing@cern.ch and 78888). Nevertheless, as in the past, escalation will be handled by IT/CS group. A detailed article on this change will be published in the next CERN Computer Newsletter. CS Group, IT Department

  13. First level network support handover to the IT Helpdesk

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 18th of May 2009, the first level network support will be handover from Netops to the central IT Helpdesk. Thus, emails and phone calls directed to Netops (mailto:Netops@cern.ch and 74927) will be redirected to the Helpdesk (mailto:helpdesk.computing@cern.ch and 78888). Nevertheless, as in the past, escalation will be handle by IT/CS group. A detailed article on this change will be published in the next CERN Computer Newsletter. CS Group, IT Department

  14. Achieving population-level immunity to rabies in free-roaming dogs in Africa and Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morters, Michelle K; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Horton, Daniel L; Cleaveland, Sarah; Schoeman, Johan P; Restif, Olivier; Whay, Helen R; Goddard, Amelia; Fooks, Anthony R; Damriyasa, I Made; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    .... It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors...

  15. Informal Support Networks among Aging Persons with Mental Retardation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Marty Wyngaarden; Erickson, Marji

    1988-01-01

    Data collected on the informal support networks of 49 aging persons with mental retardation indicated that persons living with family had significantly smaller support networks (composed primarily of family members), while those living in community residences or institutions had informal support networks composed equally of family, friends, and…

  16. Incremental Support Vector Machine Framework for Visual Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Motai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the emerging requirements of surveillance networks, we present in this paper an incremental multiclassification support vector machine (SVM technique as a new framework for action classification based on real-time multivideo collected by homogeneous sites. The technique is based on an adaptation of least square SVM (LS-SVM formulation but extends beyond the static image-based learning of current SVM methodologies. In applying the technique, an initial supervised offline learning phase is followed by a visual behavior data acquisition and an online learning phase during which the cluster head performs an ensemble of model aggregations based on the sensor nodes inputs. The cluster head then selectively switches on designated sensor nodes for future incremental learning. Combining sensor data offers an improvement over single camera sensing especially when the latter has an occluded view of the target object. The optimization involved alleviates the burdens of power consumption and communication bandwidth requirements. The resulting misclassification error rate, the iterative error reduction rate of the proposed incremental learning, and the decision fusion technique prove its validity when applied to visual sensor networks. Furthermore, the enabled online learning allows an adaptive domain knowledge insertion and offers the advantage of reducing both the model training time and the information storage requirements of the overall system which makes it even more attractive for distributed sensor networks communication.

  17. Social networking in online support groups for health: how online social networking benefits patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of online support groups (OSGs) have embraced the features of social networking. So far, little is known about how patients use and benefit from these features. By implementing the uses-and-gratifications framework, the author conducted an online survey with current users of OSGs to examine associations among motivation, use of specific features of OSG, and support outcomes. Findings suggest that OSG users make selective use of varied features depending on their needs, and that perceptions of receiving emotional and informational support are associated more with the use of some features than others. For example, those with strong motivation for social interaction use diverse features of OSG and make one-to-one connections with other users by friending. In contrast, those with strong motivation for information seeking limit their use primarily to discussion boards. Results also show that online social networking features, such as friending and sharing of personal stories on blogs, are helpful in satisfying the need for emotional support. The present study sheds light on online social networking features in the context of health-related OSGs and provides practical lessons on how to improve the capacity of OSGs to serve the needs of their users.

  18. Novel Network Services for Supporting Big Data Science Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Joaquin; Donovan, Sean; Bezerra, Jeronimo; Morgan, Heidi; Ibarra, Julio; Clark, Russ; Owen, Henry

    2017-01-01

    To interconnect research facilities across wide geographic areas, network operators deploy science networks, also referred to as Research and Education (R&E) networks. These networks allow experimenters to establish dedicated network connections between research facilities for transferring large amounts of data. Recently, R&E networks have started using Software-Defined Networking (SDN) and Software-Defined Exchanges (SDX) for deploying these connections. AtlanticWave/SDX is a response to the...

  19. CLIPS based decision support system for water distribution networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sandeep

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty in knowledge representation of a water distribution network (WDN problem has contributed to the limited use of artificial intelligence (AI based expert systems (ES in the management of these networks. This paper presents a design of a Decision Support System (DSS that facilitates "on-demand'' knowledge generation by utilizing results of simulation runs of a suitably calibrated and validated hydraulic model of an existing aged WDN corresponding to emergent or even hypothetical but likely scenarios. The DSS augments the capability of a conventional expert system by integrating together the hydraulic modelling features with heuristics based knowledge of experts under a common, rules based, expert shell named CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System. In contrast to previous ES, the knowledge base of the DSS has been designed to be dynamic by superimposing CLIPS on Structured Query Language (SQL. The proposed ES has an inbuilt calibration module that enables calibration of an existing (aged WDN for the unknown, and unobservable, Hazen-Williams C-values. In addition, the daily run and simulation modules of the proposed ES further enable the CLIPS inference engine to evaluate the network performance for any emergent or suggested test scenarios. An additional feature of the proposed design is that the DSS integrates computational platforms such as MATLAB, open source Geographical Information System (GIS, and a relational database management system (RDBMS working under the umbrella of the Microsoft Visual Studio based common user interface. The paper also discusses implementation of the proposed framework on a case study and clearly demonstrates the utility of the application as an able aide for effective management of the study network.

  20. Supporting tactical intelligence using collaborative environments and social networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollocko, Arthur B.; Farry, Michael P.; Stark, Robert F.

    2013-05-01

    Modern military environments place an increased emphasis on the collection and analysis of intelligence at the tactical level. The deployment of analytical tools at the tactical level helps support the Warfighter's need for rapid collection, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence. However, given the lack of experience and staffing at the tactical level, most of the available intelligence is not exploited. Tactical environments are staffed by a new generation of intelligence analysts who are well-versed in modern collaboration environments and social networking. An opportunity exists to enhance tactical intelligence analysis by exploiting these personnel strengths, but is dependent on appropriately designed information sharing technologies. Existing social information sharing technologies enable users to publish information quickly, but do not unite or organize information in a manner that effectively supports intelligence analysis. In this paper, we present an alternative approach to structuring and supporting tactical intelligence analysis that combines the benefits of existing concepts, and provide detail on a prototype system embodying that approach. Since this approach employs familiar collaboration support concepts from social media, it enables new-generation analysts to identify the decision-relevant data scattered among databases and the mental models of other personnel, increasing the timeliness of collaborative analysis. Also, the approach enables analysts to collaborate visually to associate heterogeneous and uncertain data within the intelligence analysis process, increasing the robustness of collaborative analyses. Utilizing this familiar dynamic collaboration environment, we hope to achieve a significant reduction of time and skill required to glean actionable intelligence in these challenging operational environments.

  1. Student Support Networks in Online Doctoral Programs: Exploring Nested Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharla Berry

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Enrollment in online doctoral programs has grown over the past decade. A sense of community, defined as feelings of closeness within a social group, is vital to retention, but few studies have explored how online doctoral students create community. Background: In this qualitative case study, I explore how students in one online doctoral program created a learning community. Methodology: Data for the study was drawn from 60 hours of video footage from six online courses, the message boards from the six courses, and twenty interviews with first and second-year students. Contribution: Findings from this study indicate that the structure of the social network in an online doctoral program is significantly different from the structure of learning communities in face-to-face programs. In the online program, the doctoral community was more insular, more peer-centered, and less reliant on faculty support than in in-person programs. Findings: Utilizing a nested communities theoretical framework, I identified four subgroups that informed online doctoral students’ sense of community: cohort, class groups, small peer groups, and study groups. Students interacted frequently with members of each of the aforementioned social groups and drew academic, social, and emotional support from their interactions. Recommendations for Practitioners: Data from this study suggests that online doctoral students are interested in making social and academic connections. Practitioners should leverage technology and on-campus supports to promote extracurricular interactions for online students. Recommendation for Researchers: Rather than focus on professional socialization, students in the online doctoral community were interested in providing social and academic support to peers. Researchers should consider how socialization in online doctoral programs differs from traditional, face-to-face programs. Impact on Society: As universities increase online offerings

  2. Fighting The Network: Manet Management In Support Of Littoral Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    can include API , SNMP and other network management communications schemas. The dynamism and fluidity of tactical networks challenge traditional...Wave Relay MPU-4 radios have an onboard management API that allows routers to be configured and monitored using an HTTPS interface, CodeMettle... API . The unified network management approach enables the network operator to perceive and proactively manipulate the network. Human perception

  3. Mobility support and networking for women in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellis, Giovanna; Didenkulova, Ira

    2017-04-01

    Mobility support for women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) career is an increasingly important issue in today's world. Cutting edge research tends to be undertaken via international collaboration, often within networks built up by moving to a new country. In addition, many of today's funding opportunities are geared towards international cooperation. There have been quite a few debates and several projects based on extended surveys to understand the role and impact of mobility on a scientific career. Although in general it is true that these issues are sensitive to the country and the scientific field for example, it is believed by the scientific community at least, that there is a connection between mobility and scientific excellence. Rewarding mobility is becoming a concern at the European level because mechanisms to measure in the best and objective way possible scientific excellence are not homogeneous. But still mobility is a key issue to strengthen a researcher's scientific curriculum and be recognised at the international level. Women have been widely recognised as a source of untapped potential. Different steps have been taken so far for a deeper understanding of barriers and different obstacles faced by women in the Science field. Present calls in the Science in Society panel in HORIZON 2020 deal with the horizontal and vertical segregation experienced by women in their careers and best practices to manage these issues. The general aim is to foster women participation in all scientific fields with particular regard to male dominated disciplines as STEM and increase the number and the effective representation of women in decision-making positions, to help also speed up the whole process. Mobility has demonstrated to be partly gender sensitive and this needs to be addressed in some way in order to ensure at least equal opportunities to male and female scientists regarding possibilities and benefits offered by mobility programmes

  4. Born to roam? Surveying cat owners in Tasmania, Australia, to identify the drivers and barriers to cat containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Bengsen, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming domestic cats, Felis catus, are a major public nuisance in neighbourhoods across the world, and have been linked to biodiversity loss and a host of community health problems. Owners who let their cats roam, also place their cats at risk of serious injury. One management strategy that is gaining considerable support involves encouraging cat owners to contain their pets within their property. Contemporary behaviour change models highlight the importance of identifying drivers and barriers that encourage and discourage target behaviours such as cat containment. Results from a random dial phone survey of 356 cat owners in northern Tasmania identified four distinct cat containment profiles: owners who contained their cat all the time, owners who only contained their cat at night, owners who sporadically contained their cat with no set routine, and owners who made no attempt to contain their pet. Our results indicated that cat-owners' decisions to contain or not contain their cats were guided by a range of factors including owners' beliefs about their ability to implement an effective containment strategy and their views about the physical and psychological needs of their cats. The results are discussed in terms of improving the behavioural effectiveness of cat containment interventions by selecting appropriate behavioural change tools for the identified drivers and barriers, and developing targeted engagement strategies and messaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Smartphone and GPS technology for free-roaming dog population surveillance - a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Shanis; Ippoliti, Carla; Di Flaviano, Daniele; De Ruvo, Andrea; Messori, Stefano; Giovannini, Armando; Dalla Villa, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Free-roaming dogs (FRD) represent a potential threat to the quality of life in cities from an ecological, social and public health point of view. One of the most urgent concerns is the role of uncontrolled dogs as reservoirs of infectious diseases transmittable to humans and, above all, rabies. An estimate of the FRD population size and characteristics in a given area is the first step for any relevant intervention programme. Direct count methods are still prominent because of their non-invasive approach, information technologies can support such methods facilitating data collection and allowing for a more efficient data handling. This paper presents a new framework for data collection using a topological algorithm implemented as ArcScript in ESRI® ArcGIS software, which allows for a random selection of the sampling areas. It also supplies a mobile phone application for Android® operating system devices which integrates Global Positioning System (GPS) and Google MapsTM. The potential of such a framework was tested in 2 Italian regions. Coupling technological and innovative solutions associated with common counting methods facilitate data collection and transcription. It also paves the way to future applications, which could support dog population management systems.

  6. Network characteristics, perceived social support, and psychological adjustment in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Paul R

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the characteristics of the support networks of 106 mothers of children with ASD and their relationship to perceived social support, depressed mood, and subjective well-being. Using structural equation modeling, two competing sets of hypotheses were assessed: (1) that network characteristics would impact psychological adjustment directly, and (2) that network effects on adjustment would be indirect, mediated by perceived social support. Results primarily lent support to the latter hypotheses, with measures of network structure (network size) and function (proportion of network members providing emotional support) predicting increased levels of perceived social support which, in turn, predicted decreased depressed mood and increased well-being. Results also indicated that increased interpersonal strain in the maternal network was directly and indirectly associated with increased maternal depression, while being indirectly linked to reduced well-being. Study limitations and implications are discussed.

  7. Public Safety Broadband Network Architecture Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    through roaming agreements o Clearinghouse IP eXchange o Satellite hub station o VSAT terminals o Transport network (backhaul) o Lawful intercept...Mobile Network VPN Virtual Private Network VQiPS Video Quality in Public Safety VSAT Very Small Aperture Terminal WAN Wide Area Network Wi-Fi

  8. The EUROCET Network: Support for Coding, Vigilance and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareri, Maura; Filippetti, Marzia; Ghirardini, Angelo; Vespasiano, Francesca; Ciaccio, Paola Di; Nanni Costa, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND: In the last years, there have been increasing concerns about the safety and traceability of human tissues and cells in Europe. In order to regulate this part of medical practice, the European Commission issued 3 directives between 2004 and 2006 and endorsed EUROCET to support member states in fulfilling some of their obligations. MATHODS: EUROCET created a connection with the European Union (EU) Competent Authorities (CAs) and set up a website where lists of the CAs, the authorized Tissue Establishments (TEs) and the activity data are published and updated. Moreover, EUROCET is involved within the Vigilance and Surveillance of Substances of Human Origin (SOHO V&S) project, aiming to support the EU member states in the establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for tissues and cells. EUROCET is also working with EU stakeholders to develop a common coding system concerning donation and products. RESULTS: There are 33 countries in EUROCET and 57 CAs. 3,974 TEs are recorded: 1,108 for tissues, 1,480 for haematopoietic progenitor cells and 1,386 for assisted reproduction. On the website, it is possible to find the 2010 activity data report. CONCLUSION: Based on its cooperation with the CAs, EUROCET represents them in the European network. Nowadays, the EU member states can rely on a web portal and database in order to put the tissue and cell directives into practice.

  9. Support networks and people with physical disabilities: social inclusion and access to health services

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holanda, Cristina Marques de Almeida; De Andrade, Fabienne Louise Juvêncio Paes; Bezerra, Maria Aparecida; Nascimento, João Paulo da Silva; Neves, Robson da Fonseca; Alves, Simone Bezerra; Ribeiro, Kátia Suely Queiroz Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to identify the formation of social support networks of people with physical disabilities, and how these networks can help facilitate access to health services and promote social inclusion...

  10. Modern Social Support Structures: Online Social Networks and their Implications for Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kala Chakradhar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mapping and assessing social networks and the quality of their social support is a valuable intervention strategy for social workers. These networks have now spread onto the digital realm in the form of Online Social Networks (OSNs. This study investigated the nature of social support provided by such networks to their users in a rural mid-South University (USA and explored parallels with the current understanding of social support in conventional social networks. A web-based survey administered to college students revealed that users of these online networks were predominantly undergraduate first year students, female, single, unemployed and from a variety of academic disciplines. The examination of the components of OSNs appears to mirror those of offline networks. They also seem to complement the effects of each other while contributing to an individual's support system. The paper concludes with critical implications of such online social networking for University students and social workers in practice and education.

  11. Network Support treatment for alcohol dependence: gender differences in treatment mechanisms and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Mark D; Kadden, Ronald M; Tennen, Howard

    2015-06-01

    Network Support treatment was intended to help alcohol dependent patients alter their close social support networks to be more supportive of sobriety and less supportive of drinking. The purpose of the present study was to examine the differential influences of Network Support treatment on men and women. Alcohol dependent men (n=122) and women (n=88) recruited from the community were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 12-week outpatient treatment conditions: Network Support (NS), Network Support+Contingency Management (NS+CM), or Case Management (CaseM; a control condition). Patients were then followed for a period of 27 months. Multilevel modeling was used to evaluate Sex×Treatment interaction effects on outcome variables over time. Tests of mediation were used to determine what factors might account for differential effectiveness for men or women in the NS conditions. Analyses of drinking-related outcome measures over the 27 months indicated that women fared less well overall, and particularly poorly in the Network Support conditions, relative to men. Tests of mediation indicated that self-efficacy change and change in the number of non-drinking close associates partially mediated the effect of NS treatments on outcome. It was concluded that the NS conditions failed to alter women's social networks, and may have had the effect of undermining women's self-efficacy. Network Support treatment might be applicable for women and more effective generally if particular attention is paid to understanding preexisting social support networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative study about social support network among familiar physicians and traffic officers, México

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda B., Carolina; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Torres L., Teresa; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Salazar E., José; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Pando M., Manuel; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México; Aldrete R., María Guadalupe; Instituto de Investigación en Salud Ocupacional, Universidad de Guadalajara, México

    2014-01-01

    The social support is the process that occurs between people that make up the social network of a subject. Actions such as listening, estimate, assess, and so on, are behaviors that occur among individuals who make up the network. The aim of this study analyze the situation of social support and social support networks on family physicians and traffic agents of a city in Mexico. 197 physicians and 875 traffic agents participated voluntarily with an informed consent. The information was collec...

  13. Social Networks, Interpersonal Social Support, and Health Outcomes: A Health Communication Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the development, impact, and several major research findings of studies in the area of social network support and health outcomes. The review focuses largely on the development of online social support networks and the ways in which they may interact with face-to-face support networks to influence physical and psychological health outcomes. The manuscript discusses this area, and it presents a research agenda for future work in this area from an Associate Editor’s pe...

  14. Bridging groundwater models and decision support with a Bayesian network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Masterson, John P.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Resource managers need to make decisions to plan for future environmental conditions, particularly sea level rise, in the face of substantial uncertainty. Many interacting processes factor in to the decisions they face. Advances in process models and the quantification of uncertainty have made models a valuable tool for this purpose. Long-simulation runtimes and, often, numerical instability make linking process models impractical in many cases. A method for emulating the important connections between model input and forecasts, while propagating uncertainty, has the potential to provide a bridge between complicated numerical process models and the efficiency and stability needed for decision making. We explore this using a Bayesian network (BN) to emulate a groundwater flow model. We expand on previous approaches to validating a BN by calculating forecasting skill using cross validation of a groundwater model of Assateague Island in Virginia and Maryland, USA. This BN emulation was shown to capture the important groundwater-flow characteristics and uncertainty of the groundwater system because of its connection to island morphology and sea level. Forecast power metrics associated with the validation of multiple alternative BN designs guided the selection of an optimal level of BN complexity. Assateague island is an ideal test case for exploring a forecasting tool based on current conditions because the unique hydrogeomorphological variability of the island includes a range of settings indicative of past, current, and future conditions. The resulting BN is a valuable tool for exploring the response of groundwater conditions to sea level rise in decision support.

  15. 36 CFR 222.21 - Administration of wild free-roaming horses and burros and their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration of wild free-roaming horses and burros and their environment. 222.21 Section 222.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Burros § 222.21 Administration of wild free-roaming horses and burros and their environment. (a) The...

  16. COMPARISON OF CHEMICAL AND SURGICAL VASECTOMY ON TESTICULAR ACTIVITY IN FREE-ROAMING HORSES (EQUUS CABALLUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Clare M; Lee, Rebecca L; Pielstick, Leon; Medlock, Jan; Patton, Kristin M; Collins, Gail H; Kutzler, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming horse (Equus caballus) management is a complex issue incorporating social, economic, emotional, political, and environmental factors. Currently, few proven field techniques exist for managing free-roaming horse population growth, which can reach 20-25% annually. Although there are several strategies available for sterilizing mares when managing free-roaming horse populations, surgical vasectomy is the only method used in the field for stallions. Some managers believe that surgically vasectomizing dominant stallions would have significant effects on reducing horse populations. However, sterilizing only dominant harem stallions results in a relatively modest reduction in population growth as substantial reproduction may occur even when 100% of the dominant harem stallions are sterilized if other males perform as little as 10% of the breeding. The overall goal of the current project was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel nonsurgical method for sterilizing free-roaming horses (chemical vasectomy). In September of 2013, stallions that had been previously surgically vasectomized (SURG, n = 25), previously chemically vasectomized (CHEM, n = 16), or untreated (CONT, n = 32) were captured and surgically castrated in preparation for adoption. When comparing both sterilization methods to CONT, serum testosterone and estrone sulfate concentrations did not differ (P > 0.05), suggesting that these methods for sterilizing free-roaming stallions would not disrupt herd social hierarchy. However, similar to the CONT, all CHEM stallions had sperm present within the vas deferens seminal fluid samples. CHEM stallions had more morphologically abnormal sperm than did CONT stallions but it is not known if this affected the actual fertility. Additional research is needed using alternative sclerosing agents for chemical vasectomy in free-roaming horse populations.

  17. Social networks, social support and psychiatric symptoms: social determinants and associations within a multicultural community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Natasha; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how social networks and social support are distributed within diverse communities and how different types of each are associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms. This study aims to address such shortcomings by: (1) describing the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of social networks and social support in a multicultural population and (2) examining how each is associated with multiple mental health outcomes. Data is drawn from the South East London Community Health Study; a cross-sectional study of 1,698 adults conducted between 2008 and 2010. The findings demonstrate variation in social networks and social support by socio-demographic factors. Ethnic minority groups reported larger family networks but less perceived instrumental support. Older individuals and migrant groups reported lower levels of particular network and support types. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups tended to report less social networks and support across the indicators measured. Perceived emotional and instrumental support, family and friend network size emerged as protective factors for common mental disorder, personality dysfunction and psychotic experiences. In contrast, both social networks and social support appear less relevant for hazardous alcohol use. The findings both confirm established knowledge that social networks and social support exert differential effects on mental health and furthermore suggest that the particular type of social support may be important. In contrast, different types of social network appear to impact upon poor mental health in a more uniform way. Future psychosocial strategies promoting mental health should consider which social groups are vulnerable to reduced social networks and poor social support and which diagnostic groups may benefit most.

  18. The middleware architecture supports heterogeneous network systems for module-based personal robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Seongho; Li, Vitaly; Choi, Dong Hee; Jung, Gi Deck; Park, Hong Seong; Ryuh, Youngsun

    2005-12-01

    On developing the personal robot system presently, the internal architecture is every module those occupy separated functions are connected through heterogeneous network system. This module-based architecture supports specialization and division of labor at not only designing but also implementation, as an effect of this architecture, it can reduce developing times and costs for modules. Furthermore, because every module is connected among other modules through network systems, we can get easy integrations and synergy effect to apply advanced mutual functions by co-working some modules. In this architecture, one of the most important technologies is the network middleware that takes charge communications among each modules connected through heterogeneous networks systems. The network middleware acts as the human nerve system inside of personal robot system; it relays, transmits, and translates information appropriately between modules that are similar to human organizations. The network middleware supports various hardware platform, heterogeneous network systems (Ethernet, Wireless LAN, USB, IEEE 1394, CAN, CDMA-SMS, RS-232C). This paper discussed some mechanisms about our network middleware to intercommunication and routing among modules, methods for real-time data communication and fault-tolerant network service. There have designed and implemented a layered network middleware scheme, distributed routing management, network monitoring/notification technology on heterogeneous networks for these goals. The main theme is how to make routing information in our network middleware. Additionally, with this routing information table, we appended some features. Now we are designing, making a new version network middleware (we call 'OO M/W') that can support object-oriented operation, also are updating program sources itself for object-oriented architecture. It is lighter, faster, and can support more operation systems and heterogeneous network systems, but other general

  19. Social Support Theory: A New Framework for Exploring Gender Differences in Business Owner Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle

    The paper argues that to advance knowledge about small firm networks and consider the impact of gender, research should also consider the network experiences of women business owners. To engage in such research, this paper proposes a conceptual model of business owner networking which is informed...... by social support theory....

  20. Social network, social support, and risk of incident stroke: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayoshi, Mako; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Iso, Hiroyasu; Mosley, Thomas H; Rose, Kathryn M; Lutsey, Pamela L

    2014-10-01

    Having a small social network and lack of social support have been associated with incident coronary heart disease; however, epidemiological evidence for incident stroke is limited. We assessed the longitudinal association of a small social network and lack of social support with risk of incident stroke and evaluated whether the association was partly mediated by vital exhaustion and inflammation. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study measured social network and social support in 13 686 men and women (mean, 57 years; 56% women; 24% black; 76% white) without a history of stroke. Social network was assessed by the 10-item Lubben Social Network Scale and social support by a 16-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-Short Form. During a median follow-up of 18.6 years, 905 incident strokes occurred. Relative to participants with a large social network, those with a small social network had a higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.44 [1.02-2.04]) after adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic variables, marital status, behavioral risk factors, and major stroke risk factors. Vital exhaustion, but not inflammation, partly mediated the association between a small social network and incident stroke. Social support was unrelated to incident stroke. In this sample of US community-dwelling men and women, having a small social network was associated with excess risk of incident stroke. As with other cardiovascular conditions, having a small social network may be associated with a modestly increased risk of incident stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Cohort Differences in Received Social Support in Later Life: The Role of Network Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanet, Bianca; Antonucci, Toni C

    2017-07-01

    The objective is to assess cohort differences in received emotional and instrumental support in relation to network types. The main guiding hypothesis is that due to increased salience of non-kin with recent social change, those in friend-focused and diverse network types receive more support in later birth cohorts than earlier birth cohorts. Data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam are employed. We investigate cohort differences in total received emotional and instrumental support in a series of linear regression models comparing birth cohorts aged 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85-94 across three time periods (1992, 2002, and 2012). Four network types (friend, family, restricted, and diverse) are identified. Friend-focused networks are more common in later birth cohorts, restrictive networks less common. Those in friend-focused networks in later cohorts report receiving more emotional and instrumental support. No differences in received support are evident upon diverse networks. The increased salience of non-kin is reflected in an increase in received emotional and instrumental support in friend-focused networks in later birth cohorts. The preponderance of non-kin in networks should not be perceived as a deficit model for social relationships as restrictive networks are declining across birth cohorts.

  2. Supporting communities in programmable grid networks: gTBN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cristea, M.L.; Strijkers, R.J.; Marchal, D.; Gommans, L.; de Laat, C.; Meijer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the generalised token based networking (gTBN) architecture, which enables dynamic binding of communities and their applications to specialised network services. gTBN uses protocol independent tokens to provide decoupling of authorisation from time of usage as well as

  3. Supporting Communities in Programmable Grid Networks: gTBN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christea, M.L; Strijkers, R.J.; Marchal, D.; Gommans, L.; Laat, C. de; Meijer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—This paper presents the generalised Token Based Networking (gTBN) architecture, which enables dynamic binding of communities and their applications to specialised network services. gTBN uses protocol independent tokens to provide decoupling of authorisation from time of usage as well as

  4. How Might Better Network Theories Support School Leadership Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Mark; Jopling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how recent research in education has applied different aspects of "network" theory to the study of school leadership. Constructs from different network theories are often used because of their perceived potential to clarify two perennial issues in leadership research. The first is the relative importance of formal and…

  5. Personal support networks, social capital, and risk of relapse among individuals treated for substance use issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Daria; Gallupe, Owen; Carrington, Peter J; Colozzi, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The success of treatment for substance use issues varies with personal and social factors, including the composition and structure of the individual's personal support network. This paper describes the personal support networks and social capital of a sample of Italian adults after long-term residential therapeutic treatment for substance use issues, and analyses network correlates of post-treatment substance use (relapse). Using a social network analysis approach, data were obtained from structured interviews (90-120 min long) with 80 former clients of a large non-governmental therapeutic treatment agency in Italy providing voluntary residential treatments and rehabilitation services for substance use issues. Participants had concluded the program at least six months prior. Data were collected on socio-demographic variables, addiction history, current drug use status (drug-free or relapsed), and the composition and structure of personal support networks. Factors related to risk of relapse were assessed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models. A main goal of this study was to identify differences between the support network profiles of drug free and relapsed participants. Drug free participants had larger, less dense, more heterogeneous and reciprocal support networks, and more brokerage social capital than relapsed participants. Additionally, a lower risk of relapse was associated with higher socio-economic status, being married/cohabiting, and having network members with higher socio-economic status, who have greater occupational heterogeneity, and reciprocate support. Post-treatment relapse was found to be negatively associated with the socioeconomic status and occupational heterogeneity of ego's support network, reciprocity in the ties between ego and network members, and a support network in which the members are relatively loosely connected with one another (i.e., ego possesses "brokerage social capital"). These findings suggest the

  6. Women and AIDS Support Network: mutual support to change community norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S

    1992-01-01

    A group of women formed the Women and AIDS Support Network (WASN) in Zimbabwe in June 1989 to improve women;s self-esteem and confidence and to bring about changes in attitudes and reactions toward AIDS-related problems. Both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women are WASN members. Women have limited control over sexual relationships. Women who know their partners are having intercourse with other women have few options, e.g., they may depend on their partners. A family council settles marital disagreements, but husbands do not always cooperate. Increased peer pressure could change societal acceptance of male infidelity to positive attitudes toward friendship and partnership in marriage. Therefore, WASN explores sexual relationships, especially control and power in them. These discussions should lead to affirmation of positive behavior. For example, men can promote condom use and monogamy to their male peers. They can also talk to their partners and their sons about HIV. Rural women should not blame urban women for their partner's HIV status. WASN also targets schoolgirls. Most early and some current messages of AIDS campaigns reinforces the dichotomy of good and bad women, supported by an earlier link between urban women and sexually transmitted diseases. Yet, they ignored men's role in HIV transmission. WASN speaks out against such negative images, e.g., dramas that depict the HIV-infected woman as evil and the innocent as good while the man worries about which woman infected him instead of feeling awful about infecting other women. WASN also addressee AIDS-related discrimination on the job and stigmatization issues. It now is conducting 2 research projects: information needs of urban and rural women and capacities of family support systems to assist HIV-positive women.

  7. The Structure and Quality of Social Network Support among Mental Health Consumers of Clubhouse Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernice-Duca, Francesca M.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the structure and quality of social network support among a group of adult consumers of community-based mental health programs known as "clubhouses". The structure and quality of social network support was also examined by diagnosis, specifically between consumers living with and without schizophrenia. The study…

  8. The deep space network. [tracking and communication support for space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the deep space network are summarized. Progress in flight project support, tracking and data acquisition research and technology, network engineering, hardware and software implementation, and operations is reported. Interface support for the Mariner Venus Mercury 1973 flight and Pioneer 10 and 11 missions is included.

  9. Network Characteristics, Perceived Social Support, and Psychological Adjustment in Mothers of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of the support networks of 106 mothers of children with ASD and their relationship to perceived social support, depressed mood, and subjective well-being. Using structural equation modeling, two competing sets of hypotheses were assessed: (1) that network characteristics would impact psychological adjustment…

  10. Computer-Supported Modelling of Multi modal Transportation Networks Rationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratko Zelenika

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues of shaping and functioning ofcomputer programs in the modelling and solving of multimoda Itransportation network problems. A methodology of an integrateduse of a programming language for mathematical modellingis defined, as well as spreadsheets for the solving of complexmultimodal transportation network problems. The papercontains a comparison of the partial and integral methods ofsolving multimodal transportation networks. The basic hypothesisset forth in this paper is that the integral method results inbetter multimodal transportation network rationalization effects,whereas a multimodal transportation network modelbased on the integral method, once built, can be used as the basisfor all kinds of transportation problems within multimodaltransport. As opposed to linear transport problems, multimodaltransport network can assume very complex shapes. This papercontains a comparison of the partial and integral approach totransp01tation network solving. In the partial approach, astraightforward model of a transp01tation network, which canbe solved through the use of the Solver computer tool within theExcel spreadsheet inteiface, is quite sufficient. In the solving ofa multimodal transportation problem through the integralmethod, it is necessmy to apply sophisticated mathematicalmodelling programming languages which supp01t the use ofcomplex matrix functions and the processing of a vast amountof variables and limitations. The LINGO programming languageis more abstract than the Excel spreadsheet, and it requiresa certain programming knowledge. The definition andpresentation of a problem logic within Excel, in a manner whichis acceptable to computer software, is an ideal basis for modellingin the LINGO programming language, as well as a fasterand more effective implementation of the mathematical model.This paper provides proof for the fact that it is more rational tosolve the problem of multimodal transportation networks by

  11. Neural networks supporting switching, hypothesis testing, and rule application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiya; Braunlich, Kurt; Wehe, Hillary S; Seger, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    We identified dynamic changes in recruitment of neural connectivity networks across three phases of a flexible rule learning and set-shifting task similar to the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: switching, rule learning via hypothesis testing, and rule application. During fMRI scanning, subjects viewed pairs of stimuli that differed across four dimensions (letter, color, size, screen location), chose one stimulus, and received feedback. Subjects were informed that the correct choice was determined by a simple unidimensional rule, for example "choose the blue letter". Once each rule had been learned and correctly applied for 4-7 trials, subjects were cued via either negative feedback or visual cues to switch to learning a new rule. Task performance was divided into three phases: Switching (first trial after receiving the switch cue), hypothesis testing (subsequent trials through the last error trial), and rule application (correct responding after the rule was learned). We used both univariate analysis to characterize activity occurring within specific regions of the brain, and a multivariate method, constrained principal component analysis for fMRI (fMRI-CPCA), to investigate how distributed regions coordinate to subserve different processes. As hypothesized, switching was subserved by a limbic network including the ventral striatum, thalamus, and parahippocampal gyrus, in conjunction with cortical salience network regions including the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortex. Activity in the ventral striatum was associated with switching regardless of how switching was cued; visually cued shifts were associated with additional visual cortical activity. After switching, as subjects moved into the hypothesis testing phase, a broad fronto-parietal-striatal network (associated with the cognitive control, dorsal attention, and salience networks) increased in activity. This network was sensitive to rule learning speed, with greater extended activity for the slowest

  12. The diet of free-roaming Australian Central Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonincx, D.G.A.B.; Leeuwen, van J.P.; Hendriks, W.H.; Poel, van der A.F.B.

    2015-01-01

    The central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) is one of the most popular pet lizards. However, little is known regarding their nutrient requirement, or their natural diet. Therefore, the stomach contents of 14 free-roaming P. vitticeps were determined by flushing. These stomach contents were

  13. Toward Understanding the Roaming Mechanism in H + MgH → Mg + HH Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauguière, Frédéric A L; Collins, Peter; Stamatiadis, Stamatis; Li, Anyang; Ezra, Gregory S; Farantos, Stavros C; Kramer, Zeb C; Carpenter, Barry K; Wiggins, Stephen; Guo, Hua

    2016-07-14

    The roaming mechanism in the reaction H + MgH →Mg + HH is investigated by classical and quantum dynamics employing an accurate ab initio three-dimensional ground electronic state potential energy surface. The reaction dynamics are explored by running trajectories initialized on a four-dimensional dividing surface anchored on three-dimensional normally hyperbolic invariant manifold associated with a family of unstable orbiting periodic orbits in the entrance channel of the reaction (H + MgH). By locating periodic orbits localized in the HMgH well or involving H orbiting around the MgH diatom, and following their continuation with the total energy, regions in phase space where reactive or nonreactive trajectories may be trapped are found. In this way roaming reaction pathways are deduced in phase space. Patterns similar to periodic orbits projected into configuration space are found for the quantum bound and resonance eigenstates. Roaming is attributed to the capture of the trajectories in the neighborhood of certain periodic orbits. The complex forming trajectories in the HMgH well can either return to the radical channel or "roam" to the MgHH minimum from where the molecule may react.

  14. Examining the Relationships Between Education, Social Networks and Democratic Support With ABM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Nick; Campbell, Kenyth

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces an agent-based model that explores the relationships between education, social networks, and support for democratic ideals. This study examines two factors thai affect democratic support, education, and social networks. Current theory concerning these two variables suggests that positive relationships exist between education and democratic support and between social networks and the spread of ideas. The model contains multiple variables of democratic support, two of which are evaluated through experimentation. The model allows individual entities within the system to make "decisions" about their democratic support independent of one another. The agent based approach also allows entities to utilize their social networks to spread ideas. Current theory supports experimentation results. In addion , these results show the model is capable of reproducing real world outcomes. This paper addresses the model creation process and the experimentation procedure, as well as future research avenues and potential shortcomings of the model

  15. Preventing Teenage Drug Abuse: Exploratory Effects of Network Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Leona L.; Herting, Jerald R.

    1991-01-01

    A sample of 124 high school students considered at risk for failure and continued drug use was enrolled in a program intended to determine the effect of teacher and peer social support. It was found that teacher support had a significant effect in decreasing drug use, but peer support had none. (DM)

  16. Modelling a Mutual Support Network for Coping with Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medeiros, L.; Sikkes, R.; Treur, J.; Nguyen, Ngoc-Thanh; Iliadis, Lazaros; Manolopoulos, Yannis; Trawiński, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The emotional state of an individual is continuously affected by daily events. Stressful periods can be coped with by support from a person’s social environment. Support can for example reduce stress and social disengagement. Before improvements on the process of support are however made, it is

  17. Using Bayesian networks to support decision-focused information retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, P.; Elsaesser, C.; Seligman, L. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper has described an approach to controlling the process of pulling data/information from distributed data bases in a way that is specific to a persons specific decision making context. Our prototype implementation of this approach uses a knowledge-based planner to generate a plan, an automatically constructed Bayesian network to evaluate the plan, specialized processing of the network to derive key information items that would substantially impact the evaluation of the plan (e.g., determine that replanning is needed), automated construction of Standing Requests for Information (SRIs) which are automated functions that monitor changes and trends in distributed data base that are relevant to the key information items. This emphasis of this paper is on how Bayesian networks are used.

  18. NASA Near Earth Network (NEN), Deep Space Network (DSN) and Space Network (SN) Support of CubeSat Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaire, Scott H.; Altunc, Serhat; Bussey, George; Shaw, Harry; Horne, Bill; Schier, Jim

    2015-01-01

    There has been a historical trend to increase capability and drive down the Size, Weight and Power (SWAP) of satellites and that trend continues today. Small satellites, including systems conforming to the CubeSat specification, because of their low launch and development costs, are enabling new concepts and capabilities for science investigations across multiple fields of interest to NASA. NASA scientists and engineers across many of NASAs Mission Directorates and Centers are developing exciting CubeSat concepts and welcome potential partnerships for CubeSat endeavors. From a communications and tracking point of view, small satellites including CubeSats are a challenge to coordinate because of existing small spacecraft constraints, such as limited SWAP and attitude control, low power, and the potential for high numbers of operational spacecraft. The NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Programs Near Earth Network (NEN), Deep Space Network (DSN) and the Space Network (SN) are customer driven organizations that provide comprehensive communications services for space assets including data transport between a missions orbiting satellite and its Mission Operations Center (MOC). The NASA NEN consists of multiple ground antennas. The SN consists of a constellation of geosynchronous (Earth orbiting) relay satellites, named the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The DSN currently makes available 13 antennas at its three tracking stations located around the world for interplanetary communication. The presentation will analyze how well these space communication networks are positioned to support the emerging small satellite and CubeSat market. Recognizing the potential support, the presentation will review the basic capabilities of the NEN, DSN and SN in the context of small satellites and will present information about NEN, DSN and SN-compatible flight radios and antenna development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and across

  19. Coeliac disease: the association between quality of life and social support network participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A R; Wolf, R; Contento, I; Verdeli, H; Green, P H R

    2016-06-01

    There is little information available on the use of social support systems for patients with coeliac disease (CD). We performed a cross-sectional study aiming to examine the association between participation in different types of social support networks and quality of life (QOL) in adults with CD. A survey including a validated CD specific QOL instrument was administered online and in-person to adults with CD who were following a gluten-free diet. Participation in social support networks (type, frequency and duration) were assessed. Among the 2138 participants, overall QOL scores were high, averaging 68.9 out of 100. Significant differences in QOL scores were found for age, length of time since diagnosis and level of education. Most (58%) reported using no social support networks. Of the 42% reporting use of social support networks (online 17.9%, face-to-face 10.8% or both 12.8%), QOL scores were higher for those individuals who used only face-to-face social support compared to only online support (72.6 versus 66.7; P networks is associated with greater QOL scores compared to online social support networks. These findings have potential implications for the management of individuals with CD. Emphasis on face-to-face support may improve long-term QOL and patient outcomes. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Existing PON Infrastructure Supported Hybrid Fiber-Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Zhao, Ying; Deng, Lei

    2012-01-01

    We propose a hybrid fiber wireless sensor network based on the existing PON infrastructure. The feasibility of remote sensing and PON convergence is experimentally proven by transmitting direct-sequence spread-spectrum wireless sensing and 2.5Gbps GPON signals.......We propose a hybrid fiber wireless sensor network based on the existing PON infrastructure. The feasibility of remote sensing and PON convergence is experimentally proven by transmitting direct-sequence spread-spectrum wireless sensing and 2.5Gbps GPON signals....

  1. Testing VHF/GPS collar design and safety in the study of free-roaming horses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail H Collins

    Full Text Available Effective and safe monitoring techniques are needed by U.S. land managers to understand free-roaming horse behavior and habitat use and to aid in making informed management decisions. Global positioning system (GPS and very high frequency (VHF radio collars can be used to provide high spatial and temporal resolution information for detecting free-roaming horse movement. GPS and VHF collars are a common tool used in wildlife management, but have rarely been used for free-roaming horse research and monitoring in the United States. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the design, safety, and detachment device on GPS/VHF collars used to collect free-roaming horse location and movement data. Between 2009 and 2010, 28 domestic and feral horses were marked with commercial and custom designed VHF/GPS collars. Individual horses were evaluated for damage caused by the collar placement, and following initial observations, collar design was modified to reduce the potential for injury. After collar modifications, which included the addition of collar length adjustments to both sides of the collar allowing for better alignment of collar and neck shapes, adding foam padding to the custom collars to replicate the commercial collar foam padding, and repositioning the detachment device to reduce wear along the jowl, we observed little to no evidence of collar wear on horses. Neither custom-built nor commercial collars caused injury to study horses, however, most of the custom-built collars failed to collect data. During the evaluation of collar detachment devices, we had an 89% success rate of collar devices detaching correctly. This study showed that free-roaming horses can be safely marked with GPS and/or VHF collars with minimal risk of injury, and that these collars can be a useful tool for monitoring horses without creating a risk to horse health and wellness.

  2. Social networks of HIV-positive women and their association with social support and depression symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederbaum, Julie A; Rice, Eric; Craddock, Jaih; Pimentel, Veronica; Beaver, Patty

    2017-02-01

    Social support is important to the mental health and well-being of HIV-positive women. Limited information exists about the specific structure and composition of HIV-positive women's support networks or associations of these network properties with mental health outcomes. In this pilot study, the authors examine whether support network characteristics were associated with depressive symptoms. Survey and network data were collected from HIV-positive women (N = 46) via a web-based survey and an iPad application in August 2012. Data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression models in SAS. Depressive symptoms were positively associated with a greater number of doctors in a woman's network; having more HIV-positive network members was associated with less symptom reporting. Women who reported more individuals who could care for them had more family support. Those who reported feeling loved were less likely to report disclosure stigma. This work highlighted that detailed social network data can increase our understanding of social support so as to identify interventions to support the mental health of HIV-positive women. Most significant is the ongoing need for support from peers.

  3. Support for Community Telecentres and Networks in Mali | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will give practitioners access to a Green telephone line (free dial-in), e-mail, Yahoo, MSN Messenger, chatrooms and facsimile to share issues and challenges from their telecentres. Other activities will include onsite mentoring, management training workshops, blogging and a telecentre network website with a ...

  4. Fast demand response in support of the active distribution network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacDougall, P.; Heskes, P.; Crolla, P.; Burt, G.; Warmer, C.

    2013-01-01

    Demand side management has traditionally been investigated for "normal" operation services such as balancing and congestion management. However they potentially could be utilized for Distributed Network Operator (DNO) services. This paper investigates and validates the use of a supply and demand

  5. The social support network for black psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ngubane

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out of almost 50% of Black inpatients in a state psychiatric hospital to evaluate the level of accessibility of the family network of the patients. Staff were interviewed on the problems they have with contacting families. The survey shows the extent of inadequate access and identifies reasons for the problem.

  6. Telepractice: Creating a Statewide Network of Support in Rural Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Karen; Keefe, Barbara; Bruno, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The Maine Educational Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing's (MECDHH's) "POINT" (Providing Opportunities for Integrating New Technologies) project is implementing a telepractice, distance learning collaborative in Maine with eight hub sites and 18 end points using Tandberg videoconferencing technology. This network is planned to be a…

  7. Youths navigating social networks and social support systems in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Struggling under the pressures of economic deprivation, social isolation, abuse and exploitation, these youths experience social suffering and feel the impact of social forces on their everyday lives. Yet, amid constraints in the environment, youths demonstrate resilience by actively navigating their social networks and ...

  8. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  9. Understanding the Relationship Between PTSD and Social Support: The Role of Negative Network Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Joshua D.; Beck, J. Gayle

    2009-01-01

    Network orientation is conceptualized as an individual’s attitudes and expectations regarding the usefulness of support networks in coping with stress. The present research examined the potential for network orientation to explicate the well documented association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attenuated social support. Data collected from survivors of serious motor vehicle trauma (N = 458) were used to test the hypothesis that severity of PTSD would hold a significant indirect relationship with social support through negative network orientation. Childhood victimization and elapsed time from the accident were examined as potential moderators of this indirect relationship. Consistent with hypotheses, path analyses demonstrated a significant indirect relationship between PTSD and social support through negative network orientation. Specifically, this indirect effect was the result of a direct association between PTSD severity and negative network orientation and an inverse association between negative network orientation and social support. This pattern of relationships was invariant across mode of PTSD assessment (interview vs. self-report). No moderation effects were noted. These data suggest that network orientation may be an important factor in understanding interface of interpersonal processes and posttrauma pathology. PMID:19162260

  10. Attitudes of street children to the network of support for them in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study findings show that 'of' the street children are the major targets by the network of the support since children 'on' the street are still being supported by their families and the assistance received by these children of the street from their peers and homeless adults is preferred to assistance from other support providers.

  11. Parents and Peers as Providers of Support in Adolescents' Social Network: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Jorge F.; Bravo, Amaia; Lopez, Monica

    2010-01-01

    The authors carried out an assessment of social support networks with a sample of 884 Spanish adolescents aged 12 to 17. The main goal was to analyze the development of the figures of parents and peers as providers of social support in the two basic dimensions of emotional and instrumental support. In peers, they distinguished between the contexts…

  12. Adaptive Information Access on Multiple Applications Support Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobgay, Sonam; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    is used for safety and security monitoring purposes. In this paper, we evaluate different access strategies to remote dynamic information and compare between achieving information reliability (mismatch probability) and the associated power consumption. Lastly, based on the models, we propose an adaptive......Accessing information remotely to dynamically changing information elements cannot be avoided and has become a required functionality for various network services. Most applications require up-to-date information which is reliable and accurate. The information reliability in terms of using correct...... information is challenged by dynamic nature of information elements. These challenges are more prominent in case of wireless sensor network (WSN) applications, as the information that the sensor node collects are mostly dynamic in nature (say, temperature). Therefore, it is likely that there can be a mismatch...

  13. Educational Designs Supporting Student Engagement Through Network Project Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2016-01-01

    , developed from the traditions of organizing university studies through student-driven project work and problem-driven learning approaches, which have been developed at the Danish universities of Roskilde and Aalborg as early as from the beginning of the 1970s. Specific educational designs integrating...... digital media are discussed, especially focusing on student engagement and the implications of organizing the pedagogical practice as networked project work. The discussions are based on the author’s experiences during 16 years of teaching and supervising at the Danish Master’s Program of ICT and Learning...... (MIL), where students conduct blended learning study in groups within a networked learning structure. In problem-oriented learning and teaching, teachers act as well as teachers and as supervisors of students’ projects. This challenges the traditional teacher role, and it is crucial for a teacher...

  14. Developing Educational designs supporting student engagement through networked project studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Birch Andreasen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    within a networked learning structure are studying in groups combining on-site seminars with independent and challenging virtually organized project periods, implementing new educational technology, which require teachers who are flexible and aware of the different challenges in the networked environment...... in the online dialogues. Thus in contrast to the traditional understanding of the teacher as the sole designer of the learning environment, here the students were involved as active co-designers. Our understanding of problem-based learning is characterized by collaborative project work in groups, where students...... and interconnected learners, and discuss cases of developing student engagement through educational designs that facilitates group organized project work and learners’ participation in dialogically organized online seminars. Here we will focus on how the dimensions of participation and reification are played out....

  15. Optimization of TTEthernet Networks to Support Best-Effort Traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamas-Selicean, Domitian; Pop, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the optimization of the TTEthernet communication protocol, which offers three traffic classes: time-triggered (TT), sent according to static schedules, rate-constrained (RC) that has bounded end-to-end latency, and best-effort (BE), the classic Ethernet traffic, with no timing...... guarantees. In our earlier work we have proposed an optimization approach named DOTTS that performs the routing, scheduling and packing / fragmenting of TT and RC messages, such that the TT and RC traffic is schedulable. Although backwards compatibility with classic Ethernet networks is one of TTEthernet......’s strong points, there is little research on this topic. However, in this paper, we extend our DOTTS optimization approach to optimize TTEthernet networks, such that not only the TT and RC messages are schedulable, but we also maximize the available bandwidth for BE messages. The proposed optimization has...

  16. [Map of the family social support network for the promotion of child development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Ana Maria Cosvoski; Labronici, Liliana Maria; Maftum, Mariluci Alves; Mazza, Verônica de Azevedo

    2012-04-01

    This descriptive, qualitative study was performed from September to November 2009, at a Family Health Strategy unit in a city in the metropolitan region of Curitiba-PR. Participants were eight families, represented by mothers, fathers and grandmothers. The study objective was to identify the family social support network for the promotion of child development, from the family's perspective. Data were collected through focal groups and subjected to content analysis. The family social support network was classified as located, consisting of 16 members distributed between the informal and formal network, established by close relationships, with a smaller level of commitment, and occasional. It is considered that the health workers' understanding regarding the role and importance of this network favors the networking proposal between members that contribute to supporting families in the promotion of child development.

  17. THE SUPPORTING OF EXPLOITATION AND MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT WITHIN NETWORKED TECHNICAL SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Network technical systems are complex systems, which include distribution networks with devices and engineering objects supporting their work. These kind of systems are used for media distribution, such as: drinking water, fuel, gas, heat, etc. One of specific features of this system is large territorial dispersion of technical objects within the system. The exploitation specificity of networked technical systems requires a special approach for implementing maintenance and repair work, taking...

  18. A Team Formation and Project-based Learning Support Service for Social Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Van de Vrie, Evert; Obreza, Matija; Sloep, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Internet affords new approaches to learning. Geographically dispersed self-directed learners can learn in computer-supported communities, forming social learning networks. However, self-directed learners can suffer from a lack of continuous motivation. And surprisingly, social learning networks

  19. Design and Evaluation of a Widget-Based Dashboard for Awareness Support in Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the rationale, design and evaluation of a widget-based dashboard to support scholars' awareness of their Research Networks. We introduce the concept of a Research Network and discuss Personal Research Environments that are built of as a development parallel to Personal Learning Environments. Based on the results…

  20. Migration patterns and influence of support networks: A case study of West Africans in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chelpi-den Hamer, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the influence of support networks in the migration process of West African migrants to the Netherlands. Taking a case-oriented biographic approach, the article analyzes the migration stories of several West African migrants with a focus on the networks that facilitated their

  1. Efficient cluster mobility support for tdma-based mac protocols in wireless sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabi, M.; Geilen, M.; Basten, A.A.; Blagojevic, M.

    2014-01-01

    Node mobility is a key feature of using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in many sensory applications, such as healthcare. The Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol should properly support the mobility in the network. In particular, mobility is complicated for contention-free protocols like Time

  2. Contingent association between the size of the social support network and osteoporosis among Korean elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; Seo, Da Hea; Kim, Kyoung Min; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Chang Oh; Youm, Yoosik; Rhee, Yumie

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association between the number of personal ties (or the size of the social support network) and the incidence of osteoporosis among older women in Korea. Data from the Korean Urban Rural Elderly Study were used. Bone density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and femur neck. T-score, the standardized bone density compared with what is normally expected in a healthy young adult, was measured and the presence of osteoporosis was determined, if the T-score was social support network size was measured by self-responses (number of confidants and spouse). Of the 1,846 participants, 44.9% were diagnosed with osteoporosis. The association between the social support network size and the incidence of osteoporosis was curvilinear in both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Having more people in one's social support network size was associated with lower risk of osteoporosis until it reached around four. Increasing the social support network size beyond four, in contrast, was associated with a higher risk of osteoporosis. This association was contingent on the average intimacy level of the social network. At the highest average intimacy level ("extremely close"), increasing the number of social support network members from one to six was associated with linear decrease in the predicted probability of osteoporosis from 45% to 30%. However, at the lowest average intimacy level ("not very close"), the predicted probability of osteoporosis dramatically increased from 48% to 80% as the size of the social network increased from one to six. Our results show that maintaining a large and intimate social support network is associated with a lower risk of osteoporosis among elderly Korean women, while a large but less-intimate social relationship is associated with a higher risk.

  3. Neural networks supporting autobiographical memory retrieval in post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Peggy L.; Kragel, Philip A.; Rubin, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects the functional recruitment and connectivity between neural regions during autobiographical memory (AM) retrieval that overlap with default and control networks. Whether such univariate changes relate to potential differences in the contribution of large-scale neural networks supporting cognition in PTSD is unknown. In the current functional MRI (fMRI) study we employ independent component analysis to examine the influence the engagement of neural networks during the recall of personal memories in PTSD (15 participants) compared to non-trauma exposed, healthy controls (14 participants). We found that the PTSD group recruited similar neural networks when compared to controls during AM recall, including default network subsystems and control networks, but there were group differences in the spatial and temporal characteristics of these networks. First, there were spatial differences in the contribution of the anterior and posterior midline across the networks, and with the amygdala in particular for the medial temporal subsystem of the default network. Second, there were temporal differences in the relationship of the medial prefrontal subsystem of the default network, with less temporal coupling of this network during AM retrieval in PTSD relative to controls. These findings suggest that spatial and temporal characteristics of the default and control networks potentially differ in PTSD versus healthy controls, and contribute to altered recall of personal memory. PMID:23483523

  4. SEDIMENT ANALYSIS NETWORK FOR DECISION SUPPORT (SANDS) LANDSAT GEOTIFF V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS) analyzes Geotiff images for sediment redistribution after a hurricane on the Gulf coast and then creates a...

  5. Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2010, 4 November). Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective. Presentation at ICO-Toogdag, Amstelveen, The Netherlands: VU Amsterdam.

  6. Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2010). Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective. ICO-Toogdag. November, 4, 2010, Amstelveen, The Netherlands: VU Amsterdam.

  7. AWESOME: A widget-based dashboard for awareness-support in Research Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2011). AWESOME: A widget-based dashboard for awareness-support in Research Networks. In Proceedings of The PLE Conference 2011. July, 11-13, 2011, Southampton, UK.

  8. Designing optimal peer support to alleviate learner cognitive load in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2012, 21 July). Designing optimal peer support to alleviate learner cognitive load in Learning Networks. Presentation at IADIS International Conference Web-Based Communities and Social Media 2012, Lisbon, Portugal.

  9. A Digital Hydrologic Network Supporting NAWQA MRB SPARROW Modeling--MRB_E2RF1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital hydrologic network was developed to support SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models within selected regions of the United...

  10. In-House Communication Support System Based on the Information Propagation Model Utilizes Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Teranishi, Yuuichi; Harumoto, Kaname; Shimojo, Shinji

    Almost all companies are now utilizing computer networks to support speedier and more effective in-house information-sharing and communication. However, existing systems are designed to support communications only within the same department. Therefore, in our research, we propose an in-house communication support system which is based on the “Information Propagation Model (IPM).” The IPM is proposed to realize word-of-mouth communication in a social network, and to support information-sharing on the network. By applying the system in a real company, we found that information could be exchanged between different and unrelated departments, and such exchanges of information could help to build new relationships between the users who are apart on the social network.

  11. A Digital Hydrologic Network Supporting NAWQA MRB SPARROW Modeling--MRB_E2RF1WS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital hydrologic network was developed to support SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models within selected regions of the United...

  12. Overcoming barriers to scheduling embedded generation to support distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.J.; Formby, J.R.

    2000-07-01

    Current scheduling of embedded generation for distribution in the UK is limited and patchy. Some DNOs actively schedule while others do none. The literature on the subject is mainly about accommodating volatile wind output, and optimising island systems, for both cost of supply and network stability. The forthcoming NETA will lower prices, expose unpredictable generation to imbalance markets and could introduce punitive constraint payments on DNOs, but at the same time create a dynamic market for both power and ancillary services from embedded generators. Most renewable generators either run as base load (e.g. waste ) or according to the vagaries of the weather (e.g. wind, hydro), so offer little scope for scheduling other than 'off'. CHP plant is normally heat- led for industrial processes or building needs, but supplementary firing or thermal storage often allow considerable scope for scheduling. Micro-CHP with thermal storage could provide short-term scheduling, but tends to be running anyway during the evening peak. Standby generation appears to be ideal for scheduling, but in practice operators may be unwilling to run parallel with the network, and noise and pollution problems may preclude frequent operation. Statistical analysis can be applied to calculate the reliability of several generators compared to one; with a large number of generators such as micro-CHP reliability of a proportion of load is close to unity. The type of communication for generation used will depend on requirements for bandwidth, cost, reliability and whether it is bundled with other services. With high levels of deeply embedded, small-scale generation using induction machines, voltage control and black start capability will become important concerns on 11 kV and LV networks. This will require increased generation monitoring and remote control of switchgear. Examples of cost benefits from scheduling are given, including deferred reinforcement, increased exports on non

  13. Supporting Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP in Wireless Meshed Networks using Random Linear Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøll, Martin; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the potential and impact of the FRANC network coding protocol for delivering high quality Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) in wireless networks. Although DASH aims to tailor the video quality rate based on the available throughput to the destination, it relies...

  14. Software Defined Networking to support IP address mobility in future LTE network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimzadeh Motallebi Azar, Morteza; Valtulina, Luca; van den Berg, Hans Leo; Pras, Aiko; Liebsch, Marco; Taleb, Tarik

    2017-01-01

    The existing LTE network architecture dose not scale well to increasing demands due to its highly centralized and hierarchical composition. In this paper we discuss the major modifications required in the current LTE network to realize a decentralized LTE architecture. Next, we develop two IP

  15. Investigating Social Support and Network Relationships in Substance Use Disorder Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Ed; Jason, Leonard A; Ram, Daphna; Light, John

    2015-01-01

    Social support and characteristics of one's social network have been shown to be beneficial for abstinence and substance use disorder recovery. The current study explores how specific sources of social support relate to general feelings of social support and abstinence-specific self-efficacy. Data were collected from 31 of 33 individuals residing in 5 recovery houses. Participants were asked to complete social support and social network measures, along with measures assessing abstinence from substance use, abstinence self-efficacy, and involvement in 12-step groups. A significant positive relationship was found between general social support and abstinence-specific self-efficacy. General social support was also significantly associated with the specific social support measures of sense of community and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) affiliation. Social network size predicted abstinence-related factors such as AA affiliation and perceived stress. These results provide insight regarding individual feelings of social support and abstinence-specific self-efficacy by showing that one's social network-level characteristics are related to one's perceptions of social support. We also found preliminary evidence that individual Oxford Houses influence one's feelings of social support.

  16. The social support and social network characteristics of smokers in methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Marcel Alejandro; Stanton, Cassandra A; Caviness, Celeste M; Niaura, Raymond; Stein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown social support and social network variables to be important factors in smoking cessation treatment. Tobacco use is highly prevalent among individuals in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). However, smoking cessation treatment outcomes in this vulnerable subpopulation have been poor and social support and social network variables may contribute. The current study examined the social support and social network characteristics of 151 MMT smokers involved in a randomized clinical trial of smoking cessation treatments. Participants were 50% women and 78% Caucasian. A high proportion (57%) of MMT smokers had spouses or partners who smoke and over two-thirds of households (68.5%) included at least one smoker. Our sample was characterized by relatively small social networks, but high levels of general social support and quitting support. The number of cigarettes per day was found to be positively associated with the number of smokers in the social network (r = .239, p < .05) and quitting self-efficacy was negatively associated with partner smoking (r = -.217, p < .001). Findings are discussed in the context of developing smoking cessation interventions that address the influential role of social support and social networks of smokers in MMT.

  17. SANDS: an architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2007-10-11

    A new architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support) is introduced and its performance evaluated. The architecture provides a method for performing clinical decision support across a network, as in a health information exchange. Using the prototype we demonstrated that, first, a number of useful types of decision support can be carried out using our architecture; and, second, that the architecture exhibits desirable reliability and performance characteristics.

  18. Creating Efficient Instrumentation Networks to Support Parametric Risk Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, P.

    2009-04-01

    The development and institutionalisation of Catastrophe modelling during the 1990s opened the way for Catastrophe risk securitization transactions in which catastrophe risk held by insurers is transferred to the capital markets in the form of a bond. Cat Bonds have been one of the few areas of the capital markets in which the risk modelling has remained secure and the returns on the bonds have held up well through the 2008 Credit Crunch. There are three ways of structuring the loss triggers on bonds: ‘indemnity triggers' - reflecting the actual losses to the issuers; ‘index triggers' reflecting the losses to some index such as reported insurance industry loss and ‘parametric triggers' reflecting the parameters of the underlying catastrophe event itself. Indemnity triggers require that the investors trust that the insurer is reporting all their underlying exposures, while both indemnity and index losses may take 1-2 years to settle before all the claims are reported and resolved. Therefore parametric structures have many advantages, in particular in that the bond can be settled rapidly after an event. The challenge is to create parametric indices that closely reflect the actual losses to the insurer - ie that minimise ‘basis risk'. First generation parametric indices had high basis risk as they were crudely based on the magnitude of an earthquake occurring within some defined geographical box, or the intensity of a hurricane relative to the distance of the storm from some location. Second generation triggers involve taking measurements of ground motion or windspeed or flood depths at many locations and weighting each value so that the overall index closely mimics insurance loss. Cat bonds with second generation parametric triggers have been successfully issued for European Windstorm, UK Flood and California and Japan Earthquake. However the spread of second generation parametric structures is limited by the availability of suitable networks of

  19. Unattended network operations technology assessment study. Technical support for defining advanced satellite systems concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kent M.; Holdridge, Mark; Odubiyi, Jide; Jaworski, Allan; Morgan, Herbert K.

    1991-01-01

    The results are summarized of an unattended network operations technology assessment study for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The scope of the work included: (1) identified possible enhancements due to the proposed Mars communications network; (2) identified network operations on Mars; (3) performed a technology assessment of possible supporting technologies based on current and future approaches to network operations; and (4) developed a plan for the testing and development of these technologies. The most important results obtained are as follows: (1) addition of a third Mars Relay Satellite (MRS) and MRS cross link capabilities will enhance the network's fault tolerance capabilities through improved connectivity; (2) network functions can be divided into the six basic ISO network functional groups; (3) distributed artificial intelligence technologies will augment more traditional network management technologies to form the technological infrastructure of a virtually unattended network; and (4) a great effort is required to bring the current network technology levels for manned space communications up to the level needed for an automated fault tolerance Mars communications network.

  20. An Assessment of the Emerging Networks of Support for Street ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    by the homeless adults on the street is most preferred (μ=3.26) while the government agencies were least on this ranking scale (μ=1.78).The study concluded that, despite the global shift from eradication of street children to providing support for them right on the streets, this paradigm shift has very weak roots in Nigeria.

  1. Support of Future Disaster Response Using Generalized Access Networks (GANs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Jones, Valerie M.; Heemstra de Groot, S.M.; Koutsouris, D.; Fotiadis, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    Efficient communication and coordination are major challenges experienced by the emergency services (firebrigade, police, ambulance) during the first response to a major incident. A major incident can happen anywhere and at any time, hence support for emergency communications services should be

  2. Support of Future Disaster Response Using Generalized Access Networks (GANs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Jones, Valerie M.; Heemstra de Groot, S.M.

    Efficient communication and coordination are major challenges experienced by the emergency services (firebrigade, police, ambulance) during the first response to a major incident. A major incident can happen anywhere and at any time, hence support for emergency communications services should be

  3. TRACKING VEHICLE IN GSM NETWORK TO SUPPORT INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Koppanyi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of GSM capable devices is very high, especially in Europe. To exploit the potential of turning these mobile devices into dynamic data acquisition nodes that provides valuable data for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS, position information is needed. The paper describes the basic operation principles of the GSM system and provides an overview on the existing methods for deriving location data in the network. A novel positioning solution is presented that rely on handover (HO zone measurements; the zone geometry properties are also discussed. A new concept of HO zone sequence recognition is introduced that involves application of Probabilistic Deterministic Finite State Automata (PDFA. Both the potential commercial applications and the use of the derived position data in ITS is discussed for tracking vehicles and monitoring traffic flow. As a practical cutting edge example, the integration possibility of the technology in the SafeTRIP platform (developed in an EC FP7 project is presented.

  4. Tracking Vehicle in GSM Network to Support Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppanyi, Z.; Lovas, T.; Barsi, A.; Demeter, H.; Beeharee, A.; Berenyi, A.

    2012-07-01

    The penetration of GSM capable devices is very high, especially in Europe. To exploit the potential of turning these mobile devices into dynamic data acquisition nodes that provides valuable data for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), position information is needed. The paper describes the basic operation principles of the GSM system and provides an overview on the existing methods for deriving location data in the network. A novel positioning solution is presented that rely on handover (HO) zone measurements; the zone geometry properties are also discussed. A new concept of HO zone sequence recognition is introduced that involves application of Probabilistic Deterministic Finite State Automata (PDFA). Both the potential commercial applications and the use of the derived position data in ITS is discussed for tracking vehicles and monitoring traffic flow. As a practical cutting edge example, the integration possibility of the technology in the SafeTRIP platform (developed in an EC FP7 project) is presented.

  5. Support network for families of children and adolescents with visual impairment: strengths and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Mayara Caroline; Broekman, Gabriela Van Der Zwaan; Souza, Renata Olzon Dionysio de; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia de; Wernet, Monika; Dupas, Giselle

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to understand the interactions established between social support networks and families that have children and adolescents with visual impairment, in two different cities in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This was a qualitative, descriptive study with symbolic interactionism as a theoretical framework. A genogram, ecomap and semi-structured interviews with 18 families were used. The method adopted for data analysis was narrative analysis. Two themes were found: potentials derived from the relationship with the support network, and, counterpoints in the support network. The family members accessed other members of their own family, friends, spiritual and cultural activities, health services, government institutions, and philanthropic organizations as support networks. The weakness in health services support is an obstacle to comprehensive healthcare for children and adolescents living in city A. In city B, other possibilities exist because it has a reference service. Despite the weaknesses in the support network in both cities, the family articulates and develops a foundation so that they can provide the best situation possible for their child or adolescent. It is up to health professionals to provide support to families and empower them to care for their members.

  6. [Social support network and health of elderly individuals with chronic pneumopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Rafael Barreto de; Morano, Maria Tereza Aguiar Pessoa; Landim, Fátima Luna Pinheiro; Collares, Patrícia Moreira Costa; Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa

    2012-05-01

    This study sought to analyze characteristics of the social support network of the elderly with chronic pneumopathies, establishing links with health maintenance/rehabilitation. The assumptions of Social Network Analysis (SNA) methodology were used, addressing the social support concept. A questionnaire and semi-structured interviews, both applied to 16 elderly people attended by a public hospital in Fortaleza-CE, were used for data collection. Quantitative data were processed using the UCINET 6.123, NetDraw 2.38 and Microsoft Excel software programs. In the qualitative analysis, the body of material was subjected to interpretations based on relevant and current theoretical references. Each informant brought an average of 10.37 individuals into the network. Among the 3 types of social support, there was a predominance of informational support given by health professionals. The importance of reciprocity in providing/receiving social support was also noted, as well as the participation of health professionals and the family functioning as social support. The conclusion reached was that the network of the elderly with pneumopathies is not cohesive, being restricted to the personal network of each individual, and that even so, the informants recognize and are satisfied with the social support it provides.

  7. Enhancing Time Synchronization Support in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Bruscato, Leandro; Heimfarth, Tales; Pignaton de Freitas, Edison

    2017-12-20

    With the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) technology becoming reality, a number of applications are being proposed. Several of these applications are highly dependent on wireless sensor networks (WSN) to acquire data from the surrounding environment. In order to be really useful for most of applications, the acquired data must be coherent in terms of the time in which they are acquired, which implies that the entire sensor network presents a certain level of time synchronization. Moreover, to efficiently exchange and forward data, many communication protocols used in WSN rely also on time synchronization among the sensor nodes. Observing the importance in complying with this need for time synchronization, this work focuses on the second synchronization problem, proposing, implementing and testing a time synchronization service for low-power WSN using low frequency real-time clocks in each node. To implement this service, three algorithms based on different strategies are proposed: one based on an auto-correction approach, the second based on a prediction mechanism, while the third uses an analytical correction mechanism. Their goal is the same, i.e., to make the clocks of the sensor nodes converge as quickly as possible and then to keep them most similar as possible. This goal comes along with the requirement to keep low energy consumption. Differently from other works in the literature, the proposal here is independent of any specific protocol, i.e., it may be adapted to be used in different protocols. Moreover, it explores the minimum number of synchronization messages by means of a smart clock update strategy, allowing the trade-off between the desired level of synchronization and the associated energy consumption. Experimental results, which includes data acquired from simulations and testbed deployments, provide evidence of the success in meeting this goal, as well as providing means to compare these three approaches considering the best synchronization

  8. Discursive Deployments: Mobilizing Support for Municipal and Community Wireless Networks in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Rosio; Rodriguez, Juana Maria

    2008-08-16

    This paper examines Municipal Wireless (MW) deployments in the United States. In particular, the interest is in understanding how discourse has worked to mobilize widespread support for MW networks. We explore how local governments discursively deploy the language of social movements to create a shared understanding of the networking needs of communities. Through the process of"framing" local governments assign meaning to the MW networks in ways intended to mobilize support anddemobilize opposition. The mobilizing potential of a frame varies and is dependent on its centrality and cultural resonance. We examine the framing efforts of MW networks by using a sample of Request for Proposals for community wireless networks, semi-structured interviews and local media sources. Prominent values that are central to a majority of the projects and others that are culturally specific are identified and analyzed for their mobilizing potency.

  9. Social support networks and eating disorders: an integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidas, Carolina; Dos Santos, Manoel Antônio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the scientific literature about social networks and social support in eating disorders (ED). By combining keywords, an integrative review was performed. It included publications from 2006-2013, retrieved from the MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. The selection of articles was based on preestablished inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 24 articles were selected for data extraction. There was a predominance of studies that used nonexperimental and descriptive designs, and which were published in international journals. This review provided evidence of the fact that fully consolidated literature regarding social support and social networks in patients with ED is not available, given the small number of studies dedicated to the subject. We identified evidence that the family social network of patients with ED has been widely explored by the literature, although there is a lack of studies about other networks and sources of social support outside the family. The evidence presented in this study shows the need to include other social networks in health care. This expansion beyond family networks would include significant others - such as friends, colleagues, neighbors, people from religious groups, among others - who could help the individual coping with the disorder. The study also highlights the need for future research on this topic, as well as a need for greater investment in publications on the various dimensions of social support and social networks.

  10. Interaction patterns of nurturant support exchanged in online health social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Katherine Y; Yang, Christopher C

    2012-05-03

    Expressing emotion in online support communities is an important aspect of enabling e-patients to connect with each other and expand their social resources. Indirectly it increases the amount of support for coping with health issues. Exploring the supportive interaction patterns in online health social networking would help us better understand how technology features impacts user behavior in this context. To build on previous research that identified different types of social support in online support communities by delving into patterns of supportive behavior across multiple computer-mediated communication formats. Each format combines different architectural elements, affecting the resulting social spaces. Our research question compared communication across different formats of text-based computer-mediated communication provided on the MedHelp.org health social networking environment. We identified messages with nurturant support (emotional, esteem, and network) across three different computer-mediated communication formats (forums, journals, and notes) of an online support community for alcoholism using content analysis. Our sample consisted of 493 forum messages, 423 journal messages, and 1180 notes. Nurturant support types occurred frequently among messages offering support (forum comments: 276/412 messages, 67.0%; journal posts: 65/88 messages, 74%; journal comments: 275/335 messages, 82.1%; and notes: 1002/1180 messages, 84.92%), but less often among messages requesting support. Of all the nurturing supports, emotional (ie, encouragement) appeared most frequently, with network and esteem support appearing in patterns of varying combinations. Members of the Alcoholism Community appeared to adapt some traditional face-to-face forms of support to their needs in becoming sober, such as provision of encouragement, understanding, and empathy to one another. The computer-mediated communication format may have the greatest influence on the supportive interactions

  11. Interaction Patterns of Nurturant Support Exchanged in Online Health Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Background Expressing emotion in online support communities is an important aspect of enabling e-patients to connect with each other and expand their social resources. Indirectly it increases the amount of support for coping with health issues. Exploring the supportive interaction patterns in online health social networking would help us better understand how technology features impacts user behavior in this context. Objective To build on previous research that identified different types of social support in online support communities by delving into patterns of supportive behavior across multiple computer-mediated communication formats. Each format combines different architectural elements, affecting the resulting social spaces. Our research question compared communication across different formats of text-based computer-mediated communication provided on the MedHelp.org health social networking environment. Methods We identified messages with nurturant support (emotional, esteem, and network) across three different computer-mediated communication formats (forums, journals, and notes) of an online support community for alcoholism using content analysis. Our sample consisted of 493 forum messages, 423 journal messages, and 1180 notes. Results Nurturant support types occurred frequently among messages offering support (forum comments: 276/412 messages, 67.0%; journal posts: 65/88 messages, 74%; journal comments: 275/335 messages, 82.1%; and notes: 1002/1180 messages, 84.92%), but less often among messages requesting support. Of all the nurturing supports, emotional (ie, encouragement) appeared most frequently, with network and esteem support appearing in patterns of varying combinations. Members of the Alcoholism Community appeared to adapt some traditional face-to-face forms of support to their needs in becoming sober, such as provision of encouragement, understanding, and empathy to one another. Conclusions The computer-mediated communication format may have the

  12. An Analysis for the Use of Research and Education Networks and Commercial Network Vendors in Support of Space Based Mission Critical and Non-Critical Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements are being used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate using other approaches to providing mission services for space ground operations. The current NASA approach is not in keeping with the evolution of network technologies. In the past decade various research and education networks dedicated to scientific and educational endeavors have emerged, as well as commercial networking providers, that employ advanced networking technologies. These technologies have significantly changed networking in recent years. Significant advances in network routing techniques, various topologies and equipment have made commercial networks very stable and virtually error free. Advances in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing will provide tremendous amounts of bandwidth for the future. The question is: Do these networks, which are controlled and managed centrally, provide a level of service that equals the stringent NASA performance requirements. If they do, what are the implication(s) of using them for critical space based ground operations as they are, without adding high cost contractual performance requirements? A second question is the feasibility of applying the emerging grid technology in space operations. Is it feasible to develop a Space Operations Grid and/or a Space Science Grid? Since these network's connectivity is substantial, both nationally and internationally, development of these sorts of grids may be feasible. The concept of research and education networks has evolved to the international community as well. Currently there are international RENs connecting the US in Chicago to and from Europe, South America, Asia and the Pacific rim, Russia and Canada. And most countries in these areas have their

  13. Reference models supporting enterprise networks and virtual enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Bernus, Peter

    2003-01-01

    This article analyses different types of reference models applicable to support the set up and (re)configuration of Virtual Enterprises (VEs). Reference models are models capturing concepts common to VEs aiming to convert the task of setting up of VE into a configuration task, and hence reducing ...... the time needed for VE creation. The reference models are analysed through a mapping onto the Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture (VERA) based upon GERAM and created in the IMS GLOBEMEN project.......This article analyses different types of reference models applicable to support the set up and (re)configuration of Virtual Enterprises (VEs). Reference models are models capturing concepts common to VEs aiming to convert the task of setting up of VE into a configuration task, and hence reducing...

  14. Cybersecurity Activities Support to DoD Information Network Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Component training or certification requirements. DoDI 8530.01, March 7, 2016 ENCLOSURE 4 33 ENCLOSURE 4 CYBERSECURITY INTEGRATION INTO DoDIN...Department of Defense INSTRUCTION NUMBER 8530.01 March 7, 2016 DoD CIO SUBJECT: Cybersecurity Activities Support to DoD Information...organizational entities within the DoD (referred to collectively in this instruction as the “DoD Components”). DoDI 8530.01, March 7, 2016 2 b

  15. Roaming behaviour of dogs in four remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, Australia: preliminary investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, S; Burleigh, A; Dürr, S; Ward, M P

    2017-03-01

    To estimate the home range (HR) and investigate the potential predictors for roaming of 58 dogs in four Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory. Prospective study. Global positioning system (GPS) collars were attached to the dogs for 1-4 days, recording location fixes every 1-3 min. Utilisation distributions (UDs) and extended (95% isopleth) and core (50% isopleth) HRs of dogs were determined. Potential predictors of roaming were assessed. Estimated core (median, 0.27 ha) and extended (median, 3.1 ha) HRs differed significantly (P = 0.0225 and 0.0345, respectively) between the four communities; dogs in the coastal community travelled significantly (P dogs in the three inland communities studied. Significant associations were found between extended HR size and sex (P = 0.0050) and sex + neuter (P = 0.0218), and between core HR size and sex (P = 0.0010), neuter status (P = 0.0255) and sex + neuter (P = 0.0025). Entire males roamed more than neutered females. The core HR of dogs with poor/fair body condition scores (BCSs) was larger than dogs with ideal/obese BCSs (P = 0.0394). Neutered male dogs also travelled more per day than entire female dogs (P = 0.0475). Roaming information can be used to inform the management of dogs in remote communities and to design disease control programs. Widespread data collection across the Northern Territory should be undertaken to further investigate the associations found in this study, considering that data were collected during relatively short periods of time in one season. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Mapping Engagement in Twitter-Based Support Networks for Adult Smoking Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakon, Cynthia M; Pechmann, Cornelia; Wang, Cheng; Pan, Li; Delucchi, Kevin; Prochaska, Judith J

    2016-08-01

    We examined engagement in novel quit-smoking private social support networks on Twitter, January 2012 to April 2014. We mapped communication patterns within 8 networks of adult smokers (n = 160) with network ties defined by participants' tweets over 3 time intervals, and examined tie reciprocity, tie strength, in-degree centrality (popularity), 3-person triangles, 4-person cliques, network density, and abstinence status. On average, more than 50% of ties were reciprocated in most networks and most ties were between abstainers and nonabstainers. Tweets formed into more aggregated patterns especially early in the study. Across networks, 35.00% (7 days after the quit date), 49.38% (30 days), and 46.88% (60 days) abstained from smoking. We demonstrated that abstainers and nonabstainers engaged with one another in dyads and small groups. This study preliminarily suggests potential for Twitter as a platform for adult smoking-cessation interventions.

  17. Municipal consultants’ participation in building networks to support science teachers’ work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    of professional learning networks to assess the consultants’ opportunities and constraints in terms of participating in network development. The results indicate that the consultants’ roles in successful network formation is characterized by personal stable contacts within the science teacher community......This paper focuses particularly on the role of municipal science consultants in developing and maintaining network activities and connections among primary school science teachers. The hypothesis is that consultants play a crucial role in supporting strategic planning, and sustaining contacts...... and activities within professional learning networks. The research is framed by a project that involved 80 primary science teachers in 20 schools. The aim of the project was to develop network activities that facilitate sustainable change of the participating schools’ collective culture and practice of science...

  18. Brain networks supporting perceptual grouping and contour selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor eVolberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The human visual system groups local elements into global objects seemingly without effort. Using a contour integration task and EEG source level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that perceptual grouping requires a top-down selection, rather than a passive pooling, of neural information that codes local elements in the visual image. The participants were presented visual displays with or without a hidden contour. Two tasks were performed: a central luminance-change detection task and a peripheral contour detection task. Only in the contour-detection task could we find differential brain activity between contour and non-contour conditions, within a distributed brain network including parietal, lateral occipital and primary visual areas. Contour processing was associated with an inflow of information from lateral occipital into primary visual regions, as revealed from the slope of phase differences between source level oscillations within these areas. The findings suggest that contour integration results from a selection of neural information from lower visual areas, and that this selection is driven by the lateral occipital cortex.

  19. Suppressing epidemic spreading in multiplex networks with social-support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Wang, Ruijie; Tang, Ming; Cai, Shimin; Stanley, H. Eugene; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2018-01-01

    Although suppressing the spread of a disease is usually achieved by investing in public resources, in the real world only a small percentage of the population have access to government assistance when there is an outbreak, and most must rely on resources from family or friends. We study the dynamics of disease spreading in social-contact multiplex networks when the recovery of infected nodes depends on resources from healthy neighbors in the social layer. We investigate how degree heterogeneity affects the spreading dynamics. Using theoretical analysis and simulations we find that degree heterogeneity promotes disease spreading. The phase transition of the infected density is hybrid and increases smoothly from zero to a finite small value at the first invasion threshold and then suddenly jumps at the second invasion threshold. We also find a hysteresis loop in the transition of the infected density. We further investigate how an overlap in the edges between two layers affects the spreading dynamics. We find that when the amount of overlap is smaller than a critical value the phase transition is hybrid and there is a hysteresis loop, otherwise the phase transition is continuous and the hysteresis loop vanishes. In addition, the edge overlap allows an epidemic outbreak when the transmission rate is below the first invasion threshold, but suppresses any explosive transition when the transmission rate is above the first invasion threshold.

  20. The relationship between social network, social support and periodontal disease among older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Wael; Tsakos, Georgios; Chandola, Tarani; Newton, Tim; Kawachi, Ichiro; Sheiham, Aubrey; Marmot, Michael G; Watt, Richard G

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between social network, social support and periodontal disease among older American adults and to test whether social network and support mediates socioeconomic inequality in periodontal disease. Data pertaining to participants aged 60 years and over from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2004 were used. Periodontal disease variables were extent loss of periodontal attachment ≥3 mm and moderate periodontitis. Social support and networks were indicated by the need for emotional support, number of close friends and marital status. Widowed and those with lowest number of friends had higher rates of the extent of loss of periodontal attachment (1.27, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.58) and (1.22, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.45), respectively. Marital status and number of friends were not significantly associated with moderate periodontitis after adjusting for behavioural factors. The need for more emotional support was not related to periodontal disease in this analysis. Social networks and support had no impact on socioeconomic inequality in periodontal disease. Certain aspects of social network, namely being widowed and having fewer friends, were linked to the extent of loss of periodontal attachment but not to the definition of moderate periodontitis, in older adults. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Adaptive Information Access in Multiple Applications Support Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobgay, Sonam; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Prasad, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    set of requirements. Lastly, the paper suggests a mechanism by which the information access or acquisition can be adapted as per the requirements of the application. The main parameters focused in this paper are mismatch probability [1] and power dissipation with respect to sampling rate....... specific WSN considering its resource constraints, neglecting the return-of-investment and usefulness of the system. In this paper, we bring out the WSN scenario which supports multiple applications and study the challenges that would pose in implementation as each specific application has its own specific...

  2. Support for Programming Models in Network-on-Chip-based Many-core Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Sleth

    This thesis addresses aspects of support for programming models in Network-on- Chip-based many-core architectures. The main focus is to consider architectural support for a plethora of programming models in a single system. The thesis has three main parts. The first part considers parallelization...... models to be supported by a single architecture. The architecture features a specialized network interface processor which allows extensive configurability of the memory system. Based on this architecture, a detailed implementation of the cache coherent shared memory programming model is presented...

  3. Space Network IP Services (SNIS): An Architecture for Supporting Low Earth Orbiting IP Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Network (SN) supports a variety of missions using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which includes ground stations in White Sands, New Mexico and Guam. A Space Network IP Services (SNIS) architecture is being developed to support future users with requirements for end-to-end Internet Protocol (IP) communications. This architecture will support all IP protocols, including Mobile IP, over TDRSS Single Access, Multiple Access, and Demand Access Radio Frequency (RF) links. This paper will describe this architecture and how it can enable Low Earth Orbiting IP satellite missions.

  4. Network Environments and Well-Being: An Examination of Personal Network Structure, Social Capital, and Perceived Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungyoon; Chung, Jae Eun; Park, Namkee

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the role of social networks, social capital, and social support in individuals' well-being. However, the ways in which these related constructs simultaneously influence one's well-being outcomes and relate to one another have not been closely examined. This study pays particular attention to the structural characteristics of personal networks, distinction between offline and online social capital, and different indicators of well-being outcomes. Based on survey data collected from 574 college students, the study found that two dimensions of personal networks-density and gender homophily-and social capital in the form of offline bonding capital explained perceived social support. Further, perceived social support consistently predicted well-being outcomes and played a mediating role between personal network density and well-being, as well as between offline bonding capital and well-being. The results offer implications for a more nuanced understanding of the role of individuals' interpersonal and social environments in well-being outcomes.

  5. Social support networks and eating disorders: an integrative review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas C

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Leonidas, Manoel Antônio dos Santos Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and Letters of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Brazil Aims: This study aimed to analyze the scientific literature about social networks and social support in eating disorders (ED. Methods: By combining keywords, an integrative review was performed. It included publications from 2006–2013, retrieved from the MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. The selection of articles was based on preestablished inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: A total of 24 articles were selected for data extraction. There was a predominance of studies that used nonexperimental and descriptive designs, and which were published in international journals. This review provided evidence of the fact that fully consolidated literature regarding social support and social networks in patients with ED is not available, given the small number of studies dedicated to the subject. We identified evidence that the family social network of patients with ED has been widely explored by the literature, although there is a lack of studies about other networks and sources of social support outside the family. Conclusion: The evidence presented in this study shows the need to include other social networks in health care. This expansion beyond family networks would include significant others – such as friends, colleagues, neighbors, people from religious groups, among others – who could help the individual coping with the disorder. The study also highlights the need for future research on this topic, as well as a need for greater investment in publications on the various dimensions of social support and social networks. Keywords: eating disorders, social networks, social support, family relations, peer relations

  6. Secure Plug-in Electric Vehicle PEV Charging in a Smart Grid Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Shuaib

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Charging of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs exposes smart grid systems and their users to different kinds of security and privacy attacks. Hence, a secure charging protocol is required for PEV charging. Existing PEV charging protocols are usually based on insufficiently represented and simplified charging models that do not consider the user’s charging modes (charging at a private location, charging as a guest user, roaming within one’s own supplier network or roaming within other suppliers’ networks. However, the requirement for charging protocols depends greatly on the user’s charging mode. Consequently, available solutions do not provide complete protocol specifications. Moreover, existing protocols do not support anonymous user authentication and payment simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive end-to-end charging protocol that addresses the security and privacy issues in PEV charging. The proposed protocol uses nested signatures to protect users’ privacy from external suppliers, their own suppliers and third parties. Our approach supports anonymous user authentication, anonymous payment, as well as anonymous message exchange between suppliers within a hierarchical smart grid architecture. We have verified our protocol using the AVISPA software verification tool and the results showed that our protocol is secure and works as desired.

  7. GE networked mass storage solutions supporting IEEE network mass storage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Donald

    1993-01-01

    The General Electric Government Communications Systems Department (GE/GCSD) has developed a near real time digital data storage and retrieval system that extends the capabilities currently available in today's marketplace. This system called DuraStore uses commercially available rotary tape drive technology with ANSI/IEEE standards for automated magnetic tape based data storage. It uses a nonproprietary approach to satisfy a wide range of data rates and storage capabilities requirements and is compliant with the IEEE Network Storage Model. Rotary tape drives, standard interfaces, application specific hardware/software, networked automated tape libraries, library administrator, write protection, volume/physical media linkages, and maximum resource utilization are addressed.

  8. The Role of Informal Support Networks in Teaching the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Benjamin C.; Olson, Joanne K.; Clough, Michael P.

    2017-06-01

    This study reports the participation of 13 secondary science teachers in informal support networks and how that participation was associated with their nature of science (NOS) teaching practices 2 to 5 years after having graduated from the same science teacher education program. The nine teachers who participated in informal support networks taught the NOS at high/medium levels, while the four non-participating teachers taught the NOS at low levels. The nine high/medium NOS implementation teachers credited the informal support networks for maintaining/heightening their sense of responsibility for teaching NOS and for helping them navigate institutional constraints that impede effective NOS instruction. Several high/medium NOS instruction implementers initially struggled to autonomously frame and resolve the complexities experienced in schools and thus drew from the support networks to engage in more sophisticated forms of teacher decision-making. In contrast, the NOS pedagogical decisions of the four teachers not participating in support networks were governed primarily by the expectations and constraints experienced in their schools. Implications of this study include the need for reconsidering the structure of teacher mentorship programs to ensure they do not promote archaic science teaching practices that are at odds with reform efforts in science education.

  9. Social networks, social support mechanisms, and quality of life after breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Ergas, Isaac J.; Wright, Jaime D.; Caan, Bette J.; Hershman, Dawn; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We examined mechanisms through which social relationships influence quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Methods This study included 3,139 women from the Pathways Study who were diagnosed with breast cancer from 2006-2011 and provided data on social networks (presence of spouse or intimate partner, religious/social ties, volunteering, and numbers of close friends and relatives), social support (tangible, emotional/informational, affection, positive social interaction), and quality of life (QOL), measured by the FACT-B, approximately two months post-diagnosis. We used logistic models to evaluate associations between social network size, social support, and lower vs. higher than median QOL scores. We further stratified by stage at diagnosis and treatment. Results In multivariate-adjusted analyses, women who were characterized as socially isolated had significantly lower FACT-B (OR=2.18, 95%CI:1.72-2.77), physical well-being (WB) (OR=1.61, 95%CI:1.27-2.03), functional WB (OR=2.08, 95%CI:1.65-2.63), social WB (OR=3.46, 95%CI:2.73-4.39), and emotional WB (OR=1.67, 95%CI:1.33-2.11) scores and higher breast cancer symptoms (OR=1.48, 95%CI:1.18-1.87), compared with socially integrated women. Each social network member independently predicted higher QOL. Simultaneous adjustment for social networks and social support partially attenuated associations between social networks and QOL. The strongest mediator and type of social support that was most predictive of QOL outcomes was “positive social interaction”. However, each type of support was important depending on outcome, stage, and treatment status. Conclusions Larger social networks and greater social support were related to higher QOL after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Effective social support interventions need to evolve beyond social-emotional interventions and need to account for disease severity and treatment status. PMID:23657404

  10. Local area network terminal management in support of stock point logistics integrated communications environment (SPLICE)

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, Jerry D.

    1982-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis examines the questions of user requirements, design considerations, and network environment for a local area network Terminal Management function in support of the Naval Supply Systems Command's Stock Point Logistics Integrated Communications Environment (SPLICE). Criteria are developed from this examination. They include process-process communication, virtual terminal, and user defined screen capabilities as well as a ne...

  11. The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN): A member-driven network approach to supporting women in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, M. G.; Kontak, R.; Adams, A. S.; Barnes, R. T.; Fischer, E. V.; Glessmer, M. S.; Holloway, T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Rodriguez, C.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Laursen, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) is an organization of women geoscientists, many in the early stages of their careers. The mission of ESWN is to promote success in scientific careers by facilitating career development, community, informal mentoring and support, and professional collaborations. ESWN currently connects nearly 2000 women across the globe, and includes graduate students, postdoctoral scientists, tenure and non-tenure track faculty from diverse colleges and universities, program managers, and government, non-government and industry researchers. In 2009, ESWN received an NSF ADVANCE PAID award, with the primary goals to grow our membership to serve a wider section of the geosciences community, to design and administer career development workshops, to promote professional networking at scientific conferences, and to develop web resources to build connections, collaborations, and peer mentoring for and among women in the Earth Sciences. Now at the end of the grant, ESWN members have reported gains in a number of aspects of their personal and professional lives including: knowledge about career resources; a greater understanding of the challenges facing women in science and resources to overcome them; a sense of community and less isolation; greater confidence in their own career trajectories; professional collaborations; emotional support on a variety of issues; and greater engagement and retention in scientific careers. The new ESWN web center (www.ESWNonline.org), a major development supported by NSF ADVANCE and AGU, was created to facilitate communication and networking among our members. The web center offers a state-of-the-art social networking platform and features: 1) a public site offering information on ESWN, career resources for all early career scientists, and a 'members' spotlight' highlighting members' scientific and professional achievements; and 2) a password protected member area where users can personalize profiles, create and

  12. The influence of social networks on self-management support: a metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne; Koetsenruijter, Jan

    2014-07-15

    There is increasing recognition that chronic illness management (CIM) is not just an individual but a collective process where social networks can potentially make a considerable contribution to improving health outcomes for people with chronic illness. However, the mechanisms (processes, activities) taking place within social networks are insufficiently understood. The aim of this review was to focus on identifying the mechanisms linking social networks with CIM. Here we consider network mechanisms as located within a broader social context that shapes practices, behaviours, and the multiplicity of functions and roles that network members fulfil. A systematic search of qualitative studies was undertaken on Medline, Embase, and Web for papers published between 1st January 2002 and 1st December 2013. Eligible for inclusion were studies dealing with diabetes, and with conditions or health behaviours relevant for diabetes management; and studies exploring the relationship between social networks, self-management, and deprivation. 25 papers met the inclusion criteria. A qualitative metasynthesis was undertaken and the review followed a line of argument synthesis. The main themes identified were: 1) sharing knowledge and experiences in a personal community; 2) accessing and mediation of resources; 3) self-management support requires awareness of and ability to deal with network relationships. These translated into line of argument synthesis in which three network mechanisms were identified. These were network navigation (identifying and connecting with relevant existing resources in a network), negotiation within networks (re-shaping relationships, roles, expectations, means of engagement and communication between network members), and collective efficacy (developing a shared perception and capacity to successfully perform behaviour through shared effort, beliefs, influence, perseverance, and objectives). These network mechanisms bring to the fore the close

  13. The dynamics of socio-connective trust within support networks accessed by informal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robin A; Street, Annette F

    2011-03-01

    This article introduces the concept of socio-connective trust, the synapse between the social structures and processes that underpin relationships in supportive care networks. Data from an ethnographic case study of 18 informal caregivers providing in-home care for people with life-limiting illness were analysed drawing on theoretical concepts from the work of Giddens and writings on social capital, as well as the construction of trust in the caregiving literature. While conceptions of trust were found to contribute to understanding supportive care relationships, they did not account for the dynamic nature of the availability and use of support networks. Instead, informal caregivers undertook ongoing reflexive negotiation of relationship boundaries in response to their own conception of the current situation and their perception of trust in their relationships with the various members of the support network. The concept of socio-connective trust describes the movement and flow of the flexible bonds that influence relationships among care networks and determine the type and range of support accessed by informal caregivers. Understanding the complexities of socio-connective trust in caregiving relationships will assist health and social care workers to mobilize relevant resources to support informal caregivers.

  14. Dynamics and nature of support in the personal networks of people with type 2 diabetes living in Europe: qualitative analysis of network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anne; Rogers, Anne; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Todorova, Elka; Roukova, Poli; Foss, Christina; Knutsen, Ingrid; Portillo, Mari Carmen; Mujika, Agurtzane; Serrano-Gil, Manuel; Lionis, Christos; Angelaki, Agapi; Ratsika, Nikoleta; Koetsenruijter, Jan; Wensing, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Living with and self-managing a long-term condition implicates a diversity of networked relationships. This qualitative study examines the personal communities of support of people with type 2 diabetes. We conducted 170 biographical interviews in six European countries (Bulgaria, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain and UK) to explore social support and networks. Analysis was framed with reference to three predetermined social support mechanisms: the negotiation of support enabling engagement with healthy practices, navigation to sources of support and collective efficacy. Each interview was summarized to describe navigation and negotiation of participants' networks and the degree of collective efficacy. Analysis highlighted the similarities and differences between countries and provided insights into capacities of networks to support self-management. The network support mechanisms were identified in all interviews, and losses and gains in networks impacted on diabetes management. There were contextual differences between countries, most notably the impact of financial austerity on network dynamics. Four types of network are suggested: generative, diverse and beneficial to individuals; proxy, network members undertook diabetes management work; avoidant, support not engaged with; and struggling, diabetes management a struggle or not prioritized. It is possible to differentiate types of network input to living with and managing diabetes. Recognizing the nature of active, generative aspects of networks support is likely to have relevance for self-management support interventions either through encouraging continuing development and maintenance of these contacts or intervening to address struggling networks through introducing the means to connect people to additional sources of support. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Decision-support networks of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Lauren P; Li, Yun; McLeod, M Chandler; Hamilton, Ann S; Ward, Kevin C; Veenstra, Christine M; An, Lawrence C; Janz, Nancy K; Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T

    2017-10-15

    Little is known about the size and characteristics of the decision-support networks of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer and whether their involvement improves breast cancer treatment decisions. A population-based sample of patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014 and 2015, as reported to the Georgia and Los Angeles Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registries, were surveyed approximately 7 months after diagnosis (N = 2502; response rate, 68%). Network size was estimated by asking women to list up to 3 of the most important decision-support persons (DSPs) who helped them with locoregional therapy decisions. Decision deliberation was measured using 4 items assessing the degree to which patients thought through the decision, with higher scores reflecting more deliberative breast cancer treatment decisions. The size of the network (range, 0-3 or more) was compared across patient-level characteristics, and adjusted mean deliberation scores were estimated across levels of network size using multivariable linear regression. Of the 2502 women included in this analysis, 51% reported having 3 or more DSPs, 20% reported 2, 18% reported 1, and 11% reported not having any DSPs. Married/partnered women, those younger than 45 years, and black women all were more likely to report larger network sizes (all P support networks were associated with more deliberative surgical treatment decisions (P breast cancer should acknowledge and engage informal DSPs. Cancer 2017;123:3895-903. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Competitive Remix Practice and Networks of Support in Electronic Dance Music Economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Karpetz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development and dissemination of social media fueled competition platforms has led to immediate shifts in the practices of creative workers in fields related to contest offerings.  In Electronic Dance Music (EDM, crowdsourced competitive remix platforms have reoriented certain practices into networks of competition, where winning distinction is often only part of a larger process of further enmeshing DJs, music producers and their supporters in the social media fueled ecosystems that these websites have created. In order to begin to analyze the impact of remix competitions on producers and their personal and professional networks, I intend to trace a line of recent history and debate to reveal the connections linking EDM websites, labels, marketers, DJs, producers and supporters and their engagement with remix competition platforms. I will examine the call for support that is involved in so much of socially networked EDM communication between contestants and their peers surrounding these remix contests.

  17. Social Support Networks and the Mental Health of Runaway and Homeless Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Wright

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to growing concerns about the rising number of runaway and homeless youth (RHY in the U.S., researchers have sought to improve the scientific understanding of health and mental health needs, as well as the social resources available to these youths. In this paper, we examine the relationship between personal support network resources and the mental health status of a sample of RHY (N = 693 surveyed in metro-Atlanta, Georgia. The results suggest that having more supportive network ties reduces the risk of youth experiencing significant symptoms of a severe mental illness. We also find that older youth and youth who have been homeless for six months or longer have fewer personal support network resources. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our findings for future research and services for this exceptionally vulnerable population.

  18. Perception of adult men on their preventive practices and health support networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Oliveira de Arruda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to know the preventive practices adopted by adult men in daily life and to identify health support networks. Methods: a descriptive qualitative study, made during the months of November and December 2012, at two emergency units, along with 32 men aged between 20 and 59 years. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and subjected to content analysis with thematic modality. Results: men highlighted different preventive practices such as sanitizing hands, eating properly, having screening tests, avoiding psychoactive substance abuse, using personal protective equipment at work and condoms during sex. Most of the participants had nuclear family and its members were their primary support network regarding the health-disease process. Conclusion: it is for health team members to try to leverage the adoption of preventive practices by adult men from the support networks they consider significant.

  19. Social Networks and Health Among Older Adults in Lebanon: The Mediating Role of Support and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Toni C.; Ajrouch, Kristine J.; Abdulrahim, Sawsan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Despite a growing body of literature documenting the influence of social networks on health, less is known in other parts of the world. The current study investigates this link by clustering characteristics of network members nominated by older adults in Lebanon. We then identify the degree to which various types of people exist within the networks. This study further examines how network composition as measured by the proportion of each type (i.e., type proportions) is related to health; and the mediating role of positive support and trust in this process. Method. Data are from the Family Ties and Aging Study (2009). Respondents aged ≥60 were selected (N = 195) for analysis. Results. Three types of people within the networks were identified: Geographically Distant Male Youth, Geographically Close/Emotionally Distant Family, and Close Family. Having more Geographically Distant Male Youth in one’s network was associated with health limitations, whereas more Close Family was associated with no health limitations. Positive support mediated the link between type proportions and health limitations, whereas trust mediated the link between type proportions and depressive symptoms. Discussion. Results document links between the social networks and health of older adults in Lebanon within the context of ongoing demographic transitions. PMID:25324295

  20. Social networks and health among older adults in Lebanon: the mediating role of support and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Noah J; Antonucci, Toni C; Ajrouch, Kristine J; Abdulrahim, Sawsan

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing body of literature documenting the influence of social networks on health, less is known in other parts of the world. The current study investigates this link by clustering characteristics of network members nominated by older adults in Lebanon. We then identify the degree to which various types of people exist within the networks. This study further examines how network composition as measured by the proportion of each type (i.e., type proportions) is related to health; and the mediating role of positive support and trust in this process. Data are from the Family Ties and Aging Study (2009). Respondents aged ≥60 were selected (N = 195) for analysis. Three types of people within the networks were identified: Geographically Distant Male Youth, Geographically Close/Emotionally Distant Family, and Close Family. Having more Geographically Distant Male Youth in one's network was associated with health limitations, whereas more Close Family was associated with no health limitations. Positive support mediated the link between type proportions and health limitations, whereas trust mediated the link between type proportions and depressive symptoms. Results document links between the social networks and health of older adults in Lebanon within the context of ongoing demographic transitions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Social support and social network as intermediary social determinants of dental caries in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanini, Humberto; Marshman, Zoe; Vettore, Mario

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between intermediary social determinants, namely social support and social network with dental caries in adolescents. An adapted version of the WHO social determinants of health conceptual framework was used to organize structural and intermediary social determinants of dental caries into six blocks including perceived social support and number of social networks. A cross-sectional study was conducted with a representative sample of 542 students between 12 and 14 years of age in public schools located in the city of Dourados, Brazil in 2012. The outcome variables were caries experience (DMFT ≥ 1) and current dental caries (component D of DMFT ≥ 1) recorded by a calibrated dentist. Individual interviews were performed to collect data on perceived social support and numbers of social networks from family and friends and covariates. Multivariate Poisson regressions using hierarchical models were conducted. The prevalence of adolescents with caries experience and current dental caries was 55.2% and 32.1%, respectively. Adolescents with low numbers of social networks and low levels of social support from family (PR 1.47; 95% CI = 1.01-2.14) were more likely to have DMFT ≥ 1. Current dental caries was associated with low numbers of social networks and low levels of social support from family (PR 2.26; 95% CI = 1.15-4.44). Social support and social network were influential psychosocial factors to dental caries in adolescents. This finding requires confirmation in other countries but potentially has implications for programmes to promote oral health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Size of the social network versus quality of social support: which is more protective against PTSD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Jonathan; Keyes, Katherine M; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-08-01

    Supportive social networks are important to the post-traumatic response process. However, the effects of social network structure may be distinct from the perceived function of those networks. The present study examined the relative importance of role diversity and perceived strength of social support in mitigating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were drawn from respondents who report lifetime potentially traumatic events in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N = 31,650). The Social Network Index (SNI) was used to measure the diversity of social connections. The Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-12) was used to measure the perceived availability of social support within the network. Odds of current PTSD were compared among individuals representing four dichotomous types of social support: high diversity/high perceived strength, high diversity/low perceived strength, low diversity/high perceived strength, and low diversity/low perceived strength to examine which type of support is more protective against PTSD. Unadjusted odds of PTSD were 1.59 (95 % CI 1.39-1.82) for those with low versus high perceived support strength, and 1.10 (0.94-1.28) among those with non-diverse versus diverse social networks. Compared to the reference group (high diversity/high perceived strength), the adjusted odds of current PTSD were higher for two groups: low diversity/low perceived strength (OR = 1.62; 1.33-1.99), and low diversity/high perceived strength (OR = 1.57; 1.3-1.91). The high diversity/low perceived strength group had no greater odds of PTSD (OR = 1.02; 0.81-1.28). The diversity of a social network is potentially more protective against PTSD than the perception of strong social support. This suggests that programs, which engage individuals in social groups and activities may effectively attenuate the risk of PTSD. A better understanding of how these networks operate with respect to PTSD prevention and mitigation holds

  3. Large scale brain functional networks support sentence comprehension: evidence from both explicit and implicit language tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zude; Fan, Yuanyuan; Feng, Gangyi; Huang, Ruiwang; Wang, Suiping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that sentences are comprehended via widespread brain regions in the fronto-temporo-parietal network in explicit language tasks (e.g., semantic congruency judgment tasks), and through restricted temporal or frontal regions in implicit language tasks (e.g., font size judgment tasks). This discrepancy has raised questions regarding a common network for sentence comprehension that acts regardless of task effect and whether different tasks modulate network properties. To this end, we constructed brain functional networks based on 27 subjects' fMRI data that was collected while performing explicit and implicit language tasks. We found that network properties and network hubs corresponding to the implicit language task were similar to those associated with the explicit language task. We also found common hubs in occipital, temporal and frontal regions in both tasks. Compared with the implicit language task, the explicit language task resulted in greater global efficiency and increased integrated betweenness centrality of the left inferior frontal gyrus, which is a key region related to sentence comprehension. These results suggest that brain functional networks support both explicit and implicit sentence comprehension; in addition, these two types of language tasks may modulate the properties of brain functional networks.

  4. Support networks and people with physical disabilities: social inclusion and access to health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marques de Almeida Holanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to identify the formation of social support networks of people with physical disabilities, and how these networks can help facilitate access to health services and promote social inclusion. It is a cross-sectional study, with data collected via a form applied to physically disabled persons over eighteen years of age registered with the Family Health Teams of the municipal district of João Pessoa in the state of Paraíba. It was observed that the support networks of these individuals predominantly consist of family members (parents, siblings, children, spouses and people outside the family (friends and neighbors. However, 50% of the interviewees declared that they could not count on any support from outside the family. It was observed that the support network contributes to access to the services and participation in social groups. However, reduced social inclusion was detected, due to locomotion difficulties, this being the main barrier to social interaction. Among those individuals who began to interact in society, the part played by social support was fundamental.

  5. Support networks and people with physical disabilities: social inclusion and access to health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Cristina Marques de Almeida; De Andrade, Fabienne Louise Juvêncio Paes; Bezerra, Maria Aparecida; Nascimento, João Paulo da Silva; Neves, Robson da Fonseca; Alves, Simone Bezerra; Ribeiro, Kátia Suely Queiroz Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to identify the formation of social support networks of people with physical disabilities, and how these networks can help facilitate access to health services and promote social inclusion. It is a cross-sectional study, with data collected via a form applied to physically disabled persons over eighteen years of age registered with the Family Health Teams of the municipal district of João Pessoa in the state of Paraíba. It was observed that the support networks of these individuals predominantly consist of family members (parents, siblings, children, spouses) and people outside the family (friends and neighbors). However, 50% of the interviewees declared that they could not count on any support from outside the family. It was observed that the support network contributes to access to the services and participation in social groups. However, reduced social inclusion was detected, due to locomotion difficulties, this being the main barrier to social interaction. Among those individuals who began to interact in society, the part played by social support was fundamental.

  6. Social Network Characteristics, Social Support, and Cigarette Smoking among Asian/Pacific Islander Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Fagan, Pebbles; Cassel, Kevin; Trinidad, Dennis R; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe'aimoku; Herzog, Thaddeus A

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoking may be one of the factors contributing to the high levels of cancer-related mortality experienced by certain Asian/Pacific Islander (A/PI) subgroups (e.g., Native Hawaiian). Given the collectivist cultural orientation attributed to A/PI groups, social strategies are recommended for substance abuse or smoking cessation treatment among A/PI. However, research examining how social network characteristics and social support relate to smoking across A/PI subgroups has been lacking. This study investigated the associations between social network characteristics (e.g., size, composition), perceived social support, and recent cigarette use across Native Hawaiian, Filipino, and East Asian (e.g., Japanese, Chinese) young adults (18-35 year old). Cross-sectional, self-report data were collected from N = 435 participants (M age = 25.6, SD = 8.3; 61% women). Ethnic differences were found in a number of pathways linking social network characteristics, perceived social support, and cigarette smoking. Larger network size was strongly associated with higher perceived social support and lower recent cigarette smoking among Native Hawaiians but not Filipinos or East Asians. Higher perceived social support was associated with lower recent smoking among East Asians and Filipinos but not Native Hawaiians. Implications are discussed with regard to smoking prevention and cessation among A/PI. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  7. Source and Size of Social Support Network on Sedentary Behavior Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Crush, Elizabeth A

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association of source of social support and size of social support network on sedentary behavior among older adults. Cross-sectional. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2006. 2519 older adults (60+ years). Sedentary behavior was assessed via accelerometry over a 7-day period. Social support was assessed via self-report. Sources evaluated include spouse, son, daughter, sibling, neighbor, church member, and friend. Regarding size of social network, participants were asked, "In general, how many close friends do you have?" Multivariable linear regression. After adjustment, there was no evidence of an association between the size of social support network and sedentary behavior. With regard to specific sources of social support, spousal social support was associated with less sedentary behavior (β = -11.6; 95% confidence interval: -20.7 to -2.5), with evidence to suggest that this was only true for men. Further, an inverse association was observed between household size and sedentary behavior, with those having a greater number of individuals in the house having lower levels of sedentary behavior. These associations occurred independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, age, gender, race-ethnicity, measured body mass index, total cholesterol, self-reported smoking status, and physician diagnosis of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, stroke, cancer, hypertension, or diabetes. Spouse-specific emotion-related social support (particularly for men) and household size were associated with less sedentary behavior.

  8. The meaning and validation of social support networks for close family of persons with advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjolander Catarina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To strengthen the mental well-being of close family of persons newly diagnosed as having cancer, it is necessary to acquire a greater understanding of their experiences of social support networks, so as to better assess what resources are available to them from such networks and what professional measures are required. The main aim of the present study was to explore the meaning of these networks for close family of adult persons in the early stage of treatment for advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. An additional aim was to validate the study’s empirical findings by means of the Finfgeld-Connett conceptual model for social support. The intention was to investigate whether these findings were in accordance with previous research in nursing. Methods Seventeen family members with a relative who 8–14 weeks earlier had been diagnosed as having lung or gastrointestinal cancer were interviewed. The data were subjected to qualitative latent content analysis and validated by means of identifying antecedents and critical attributes. Results The meaning or main attribute of the social support network was expressed by the theme Confirmation through togetherness, based on six subthemes covering emotional and, to a lesser extent, instrumental support. Confirmation through togetherness derived principally from information, understanding, encouragement, involvement and spiritual community. Three subthemes were identified as the antecedents to social support: Need of support, Desire for a deeper relationship with relatives, Network to turn to. Social support involves reciprocal exchange of verbal and non-verbal information provided mainly by lay persons. Conclusions The study provides knowledge of the antecedents and attributes of social support networks, particularly from the perspective of close family of adult persons with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer. There is a need for measurement instruments that could

  9. An Enhanced Multihoming Support Scheme with Proxy Mobile IPv6 for Convergent Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Kum, Dong-Won; Kang, Ju-Eun; Cho, You-Ze

    This paper analyzes the limitations of the multihoming support in the Proxy Mobile IPv6 protocol, then proposes an enhanced multihoming support scheme based on a per-interface address configuration method. The proposed scheme can provide a more flexible multihoming support and also maintain application session continuity during a handoff between two interfaces by using IPv6 extension headers. Plus, flow distribution with filters is also used to realize the advantages of multihoming. Simulation results with the OPNET validate the proposed multihoming support scheme for convergent networks.

  10. Network-based support vector machine for classification of microarray samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanni; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2009-01-30

    The importance of network-based approach to identifying biological markers for diagnostic classification and prognostic assessment in the context of microarray data has been increasingly recognized. To our knowledge, there have been few, if any, statistical tools that explicitly incorporate the prior information of gene networks into classifier building. The main idea of this paper is to take full advantage of the biological observation that neighboring genes in a network tend to function together in biological processes and to embed this information into a formal statistical framework. We propose a network-based support vector machine for binary classification problems by constructing a penalty term from the Finfinity-norm being applied to pairwise gene neighbors with the hope to improve predictive performance and gene selection. Simulation studies in both low- and high-dimensional data settings as well as two real microarray applications indicate that the proposed method is able to identify more clinically relevant genes while maintaining a sparse model with either similar or higher prediction accuracy compared with the standard and the L1 penalized support vector machines. The proposed network-based support vector machine has the potential to be a practically useful classification tool for microarrays and other high-dimensional data.

  11. Integrated Multimedia Based Intelligent Group Decision Support System for Electrical Power Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Saxena

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Power Network in recent time requires an intelligent, virtual environment based decision process for the coordination of all its individual elements and the interrelated tasks. Its ultimate goal is to achieve maximum productivity and efficiency through the efficient and effective application of generation, transmission, distribution, pricing and regulatory systems. However, the complexity of electrical power network and the presence of conflicting multiple goals and objectives postulated by various groups emphasized the need of an intelligent group decision support system approach in this field. In this paper, an Integrated Multimedia based Intelligent Group Decision Support System (IM1GDSS is presented, and its main components are analyzed and discussed. In particular attention is focused on the Data Base, Model Base, Central Black Board (CBB and Multicriteria Futuristic Decision Process (MFDP module. The model base interacts with Electrical Power Network Load Forecasting and Planning (EPNLFP Module; Resource Optimization, Modeling and Simulation (ROMAS Module; Electrical Power Network Control and Evaluation Process (EPNCAEP Module, and MFDP Module through CBB for strategic planning, management control, operational planning and transaction processing. The richness of multimedia channels adds a totally new dimension in a group decision making for Electrical Power Network. The proposed IMIGDSS is a user friendly, highly interactive group decision making system, based on efficient intelligent and multimedia communication support for group discussions, retrieval of content and multi criteria decision analysis.

  12. Social support and subsequent disability: it is not the size of your network that counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Deirdre; Leung, Janni; Pachana, Nancy; Flicker, Leon; Hankey, Graeme; Dobson, Annette

    2012-09-01

    high levels of social support and engagement may help sustain good health and functional ability. However, the definition of social support in previous research has been inconsistent and findings are mixed. The aim of this analysis was to explore the effect of two aspects of social support on subsequent disability in a group of community dwelling older women and men. data were drawn from two concurrent prospective observational cohort studies of community-based older Australian women (N = 2,013) and men (N = 680). Baseline and follow-up data were drawn from the second (1999) and fifth (2008) surveys of the women and the second (2001) and third (2008) surveys of the men. At baseline, social support was measured by the two subscales (social network and subjective support) of the Duke Social Support Index (DSSI). The outcome measure was Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). overall, social network size was not associated with subsequent disability in either women or men. After adjusting for health status at baseline, lack of satisfaction with social support was associated with greater difficulties in ADLs and IADLs for both women and men. our results suggest that the provision of social support is insufficient to limit subsequent disability: support provided must be subjectively perceived to be relevant and adequate.

  13. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are:

  14. Cortisol concentration, pain and sedation scale in free roaming dogs treated with carprofen after ovariohysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Nenadovic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: One of the topic issues in animal welfare activities is the free roaming dog welfare especially in developing countries such as Serbia. The way of controlling population of free roaming dogs is their reproduction with the method of "Catch-Neuter-Release." This complex process consists of capturing free roaming dogs in public areas, sterilizing, and returning them to the public area from which they were temporarily removed. Ovariohysterectomy present the period with a high intensity of stress reaction since many veterinarians in Serbia do not use analgesia for this group of dogs. The aim of this study was to compare the serum cortisol concentration before and after ovariohysterectomy and the level of post-operative pain and sedation in a group of free roaming female dogs treated with carprofen after surgical intervention and in a group with no treatment. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on a total of 20 female dogs under the program for free roaming dog control. Free-roaming dogs were captured in public areas by the communal animal hygiene service and were transported between 30 and 45 min to the clinic of a veterinary practice. Treatment began at 10:00 h on the next day and the bitches were kept in cages until they were returned to public locations from which they were temporarily removed to be sterilized. The G2 group received before closing the incision line carprofen in one dosage of 4 mg/kg given by subcutaneous injection into the scruff. Rescue protocol with carprofen was provided for G1 after 24 h following ovariohysterectomy same dosage as G2. Blood (2 ml was collected from the cephalic vein of each dog in disposable plastic syringes, containing heparin (1:1000 4 times: Before ovariohysterectomy, 30, 120 min and 24 h following ovariohysterectomy. Cortisol concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The multifactorial pain and sedation scale were used for the assessment of pain and

  15. Use of social network to support visually impaired people: A Facebook case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Miranda Caran

    Full Text Available The use of Information and Communication Technologies can be seen as an important factor for social inclusion in its different aspects - economic, social, relational and informational, among others. Inclusion potentiality is even more relevant for groups of people who face limiting life conditions which determine social barriers. This study investigated the social support offered to people with disabilities based on the social network analysis method. The research objective was to make the online support dynamics for low vision people, friends and relatives evident, having as case study the Facebook Low Vision group. The social network modelling and quantitative analysis were performed from user data collection, posts, comments and likes. Contents were classified according to the type of support (Emotional or Instrumental and according to its intention (Offered or Requested, represented in graphs as indicators for analysis. Results pointed towards a larger use rate of Instrumental and Offered support although a more intense and comprehensive exchange of Emotional and Requested support was found. Data collection limitations indicate the need for more empirical studies on the social use of socio-technical networks for different types of social support. This theme points to a research agenda about the role of information and communication technologies as a possible condition for inclusion, life quality and well-being of people with disabilities.

  16. Recurrent neural networks in computer-based clinical decision support for laryngopathies: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkoła, Jarosław; Pancerz, Krzysztof; Warchoł, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to give the basis for creating a computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) system for laryngopathies. One of approaches which can be used in the proposed CDS is based on the speech signal analysis using recurrent neural networks (RNNs). RNNs can be used for pattern recognition in time series data due to their ability of memorizing some information from the past. The Elman networks (ENs) are a classical representative of RNNs. To improve learning ability of ENs, we may modify and combine them with another kind of RNNs, namely, with the Jordan networks. The modified Elman-Jordan networks (EJNs) manifest a faster and more exact achievement of the target pattern. Validation experiments were carried out on speech signals of patients from the control group and with two kinds of laryngopathies.

  17. Global and national laboratory networks support high quality surveillance for measles and rubella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Huiling; Zhu, Zhen; Mao, Naiying; Mulders, Mick N; Rota, Paul A

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory networks are an essential component of disease surveillance systems because they provide accurate and timely confirmation of infection. WHO coordinates global laboratory surveillance of vaccine preventable diseases, including measles and rubella. The more than 700 laboratories within the WHO Global Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network (GMRLN) supports surveillance for measles, rubella and congenial rubella syndrome in 191 counties. This paper describes the overall structure and function of the GMRLN and highlights the largest of the national laboratory networks, the China Measles and Rubella Laboratory Network. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. A Framework Design for Load-balanced Green Access Networks supporting GSM Femtocell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray-Guang Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the energy consumption and carbon footprint emissions to improve the global climate change has become the global concern. However, CO2 generated from the current mobile devices and infrastructure has increased. Many researchers intended to develop the communication systems with low energy-consumption technologies, called the green communication. This paper proposes a framework of the load balanced green access network supporting the GSM femtocell service. By using the USRP software-defined radio device, we can build a GSM femtocell base station by software configuration. Besides, the proposed network can also extend the coverage of base stations by integrating with radio over fiber technology. With the load balancer, the proposed green access network can accomplish low power consumption, high energy efficiency, and easy to maintain. The experimental results showed that it can effectively save 24% energy consumption for the overall network and meet the quality-of-service of user when the proposed framework is applied.

  19. THE SUPPORTING OF EXPLOITATION AND MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT WITHIN NETWORKED TECHNICAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin DĄBROWSKI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Network technical systems are complex systems, which include distribution networks with devices and engineering objects supporting their work. These kind of systems are used for media distribution, such as: drinking water, fuel, gas, heat, etc. One of specific features of this system is large territorial dispersion of technical objects within the system. The exploitation specificity of networked technical systems requires a special approach for implementing maintenance and repair work, taking into account the large territorial dispersion of their components and limited access to technical infra-structure. The features pointed above show the difference between networked technical system and the typical industri-al technical objects (e.g. available in manufacturing plants. This difference also requires the use of specific IT tools for maintenance management. This article discusses examples of selected tools in this class.

  20. WeAidU-a decision support system for myocardial perfusion images using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Mattias

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-based decision support system for automated interpretation of diagnostic heart images (called WeAidU), which is made available via the Internet. The system is based on image processing techniques, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and large well-validated medical databases. We present results using artificial neural networks, and compare with two other classification methods, on a retrospective data set containing 1320 images from the clinical routine. The performance of the artificial neural networks detecting infarction and ischemia in different parts of the heart, measured as areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves, is in the range 0.83-0.96. These results indicate a high potential for the tool as a clinical decision support system.

  1. Content Aware Burst Assembly - Supporting Telesurgery and Telemedicine in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Orosco

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging Telemedicine and Telesurgery technologies allow patients to share medical experts remotely through communication networks. However, network bandwidth, network latency and jitter (variation of latency, are the obstacles to the widespread use of this technology remotely. Optical Burst Switching (OBS networks greatly expand network bandwidth in existing network infrastructure by utilizing multiple DWDM channels within a single fiber, enabling high bandwidth applications. However, the burst assembly process in OBS networks introduces latency and jitter, making it unsuitable for high bandwidth, latency sensitive applications such as telesurgery and telemedicine. In this paper, we propose a content aware burst assembly scheme which dynamically adjusts the burst assembly parameters based on the content being assembled. The proposed content aware burst assembly minimizes the latency and jitter within a video frame, as well as across the left-view and right-view frames for 3D vision generation. Simulation results have shown that the proposed scheme can effectively reduce the latency and jitter experienced by video streams, making OBS a promising candidate for supporting telesurgery and telemedicine applications.

  2. Project team formation support for self-directed learners in social learning networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Spoelstra, H., Van Rosmalen, P., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). Project team formation support for self-directed learners in social learning networks. In P. Kommers, P. Isaias, & N. Bessis (Eds.), Proceedings of the IADIS International Conference on Web Based Communities and Social Media (ICWBC & SM 2012)

  3. Application of Bayesian networks for hazard ranking of nanomaterials to support human health risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marvin, Hans J.P.; Bouzembrak, Yamine; Janssen, Esmée M.; Zande, van der Meike; Murphy, Finbarr; Sheehan, Barry; Mullins, Martin; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a Bayesian Network (BN) was developed for the prediction of the hazard potential and biological effects with the focus on metal- and metal-oxide nanomaterials to support human health risk assessment. The developed BN captures the (inter) relationships between the exposure route, the

  4. A Contextualised Multi-Platform Framework to Support Blended Learning Scenarios in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Tim; Fuertes, Alba; Schmeits, Tally; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    De Jong, T., Fuertes, A., Schmeits, T., Specht, M., & Koper, R. (2009). A Contextualised Multi-Platform Framework to Support Blended Learning Scenarios in Learning Networks. In D. Goh (Ed.), Multiplatform E-Learning Systems and Technologies: Mobile Devices for Ubiquitous ICT-Based Education (pp.

  5. Social embeddedness and late-life parenthood: Community activity, close ties, and support networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenger, G.C.; Dykstra, P.A.; Melkas, T.; Knipscheer, C.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people's involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show

  6. Social Embeddedness and Late-Life Parenthood : Community Activity, Close Ties, and Support Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenger, G. Clare; Dykstra, Pearl A.; Melkas, Tuula; Knipscheer, Kees C.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people’s involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show

  7. Measuring young children's perceptions of support, control, and maintenance in their own social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boosman, K.P.A.; Van der Meulen, Matty; Van Geert, P. L. C.; Jackson, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight children (aged 3;7-7;6) and one of their parents took part in a study concerning children perceptions of their social networks. The study made use of a newly developed instrument-the Support, Control and Maintenance Pictures Interview (SCAMPI). The SCAMPI offers an individualized

  8. Understanding the Online Information-Seeking Behaviours of Young People: The Role of Networks of Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynon, R.; Malmberg, L.-E.

    2012-01-01

    Information seeking is one of the most popular online activities for young people and can provide an additional information channel, which may enhance learning. In this study, we propose and test a model that adds to the existing literature by examining the ways in which parents, schools, and friends (what we call networks of support) effect young…

  9. Social embeddedness and late-life parenthood: community activity, close ties and support networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenger, G.; Dykstra, P.A.; Melkas, T.; Knipscheer, K.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people’s involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show

  10. Artificial neural networks and support vector machine in banking computer systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Balicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, some artificial neural networks as well as a support vector machines have been studied due to bank computer system development. These approaches with the contact-less microprocessor technologies can upsurge the bank competitiveness by adding new functionalities. Moreover, some financial crisis influences can be declines.

  11. Adolescent Peer Networks as a Context for Social and Emotional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Salazar, Ricardo D.; Spina, Stephanie Urso

    2005-01-01

    The findings reported here emerged from a larger study of the social support networks and help-seeking experiences of low-income, Mexican-origin adolescents in San Diego, California. This larger study used a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies, and included special attention to those instances in which participating…

  12. Water demand prediction using artificial neural networks and support vector regression

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Msiza, IS

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available comparison are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs). In this study it was observed that ANNs perform significantly better than SVMs. This performance is measured against the generalization ability of the two techniques in water...

  13. Ad-hoc transient communities in Learning Networks Connecting and supporting the learner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Brouns, F. (2009). Ad-hoc transient communities in Learning Networks Connecting and supporting the learner. Presentation given for Korean delegation of Chonnam National University and Dankook University (researchers dr. Jeeheon Ryu and dr. Minjeong Kim and a Group of PhD and Master students).

  14. Actor-network-theory perspective on a forestry decision support system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, L.G.J.; Ferritti, V.

    2014-01-01

    Use of decision support systems (DSS) has thus far been framed as a social process of adoption or technical process of usability. We analyze the development of a DSS as a process of institutionalization of new as well as drift of existing practices. We write an Actor-Network-Theory (ANT) account,

  15. Effects of the ISIS Recommender System for Navigation Support in Self-Organised Learning Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Hummel, Hans; van den Berg, Bert; Eshuis, Jannes; Waterink, Wim; Nadolski, Rob; Berlanga, Adriana; Boers, Nanda; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    The need to support users of the Internet with the selection of information is becoming more important. Learners in complex, self-organising Learning Networks have similar problems and need guidance to find and select most suitable learning activities, in order to attain their lifelong learning goals in the most efficient way. Several research…

  16. Designing optimal peer support to alleviate learner cognitive load in Learning Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). Designing optimal peer support to alleviate learner cognitive load in Learning Networks. In P. Kommers, & N. Bessis (Eds.), Proceedings of IADIS International Conference Web-Based Communities and Social Media 2012 (pp. 73-80). July, 19-21, 2012,

  17. The influence of personal networks and social support on study attainment of students in university education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggens, Lilian; van der Werf, M. P. C.; Bosker, R. J.

    In this paper, the influence of personal networks and social support on study attainment of students in university education is examined. Furthermore, the paper aimed at clarifying the possible mediating role of achievement motivation, time spent on studying and working, procrastination and

  18. Portable Operating Systems for Network Computers: Distributed Operating Systems Support for Group Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-31

    Modula-2 MICROS/ MICRONET " (5) William S. Holmes, May 1983, "Version and Source Code Support Environment" (6) Michael J. Palumbo. May 1983, "Stand...Dist. Comp. Sys., Denver, CO, May 1985, 386- 393. 7. A. van Tilborg and L. D. Wittie, "Operating Systems for the Micronet Network Computer", IEEE Micro

  19. An Implementation of a Twitter-Supported Personal Learning Network to Individualize Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyamport, W. H., III.

    2013-01-01

    In this action research study, eight teachers at an elementary school were trained in the use of Twitter to support the development of a personal learning network as a strategy to address non-differentiated professional development at the school. The main research question for this study was: In what ways, if any, can the use of a…

  20. Family Support Network for Adolescent Cannabis Users, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nancy L.; Brantley, Laura Bunch; Tims, Frank M.; Angelovich, Nancy; McDougall, Barbara

    Substance-abusing adolescents experiencing inadequate family structure and functioning will be at a serious disadvantage with regard to recovery. The family support network (FSN) intervention seeks to extend the focus of treatment beyond the world of the adolescent by engaging the family, a major system in his or her life. Designed to increase…

  1. Social Embeddedness and Late-Life Parenthood: Community Activity, Close Ties, and Support Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, G. Clare; Dykstra, Pearl A.; Melkas, Tuula; Knipscheer, Kees C. P. M.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways in which patterns of marriage and fertility shape older people's involvement in community groups and their support networks. The data are from Australia, Finland, Germany, Israel, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Findings show that childless older adults, regardless of…

  2. Late Departures from Paper-Based to Supported Networked Learning in South Africa: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Illasha; Beter, Petra; Esterhuizen, Hennie

    2018-01-01

    Fragmented connectivity in South Africa is the dominant barrier for digitising initiatives. New insights surfaced when a university-based nursing programme introduced tablets within a supportive network learning environment. A qualitative, explorative design investigated adult nurses' experiences of the realities when moving from paper-based…

  3. GMPLS control plane extensions in support of flex-grid enabled elastic optical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turus, Ioan; Fagertun, Anna Manolova; Dittmann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    of generalized labels format and enable enhancements for the wavelength selection procedures. OSPF-TE enables the creation of spectrum databases based on novel LSA sub-TLV attributes capable of advertising spectrum status. Based on the implemented extensions, we propose and evaluate advanced distributed spectrum...... allocation schemes and strategies for dynamic routing algorithms in support of flex-grid optical networks....

  4. Improvement of superficial protection of steel concrete supports of the contact network against corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Sychenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different water-repellent rendering compounds for steel concrete supports of a contact network on change of their electric resistance and water absorption is under study. It is shown that the domestic production "Silol" has the best parameters on these indices.

  5. Can a Social Networking Site Support Afterschool Group Learning of Mandarin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Crook, Charles; O'Malley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Schools are often encouraged to facilitate extra-curricular learning within their own premises. This study addresses the potential of social networking sites (SNS) for supporting such out-of-class study. Given concerns that learning on these sites may happen at a surface level, we adopted self-determination theory for designing a social networking…

  6. Social networks and social support for healthy eating among Latina breast cancer survivors: implications for social and behavioral interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookes, Danielle M; Shelton, Rachel C; Tehranifar, Parisa; Aycinena, Corina; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel R; Greenlee, Heather

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about Latina breast cancer survivors' social networks or their perceived social support to achieve and maintain a healthy diet. This paper describes the social networks and perceived support for healthy eating in a sample of breast cancer survivors of predominantly Dominican descent living in New York City. Spanish-speaking Latina breast cancer survivors enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a culturally tailored dietary intervention. Social networks were assessed using Cohen's Social Network Index and a modified General Social Survey Social Networks Module that included assessments of shared health promoting behaviors. Perceived social support from family and friends for healthy, food-related behaviors was assessed. Participants' networks consisted predominantly of family and friends. Family members were more likely than other individuals to be identified as close network members. Participants were more likely to share food-related activities than exercise activities with close network members. Perceived social support for healthy eating was high, although perceived support from spouses and children was higher than support from friends. Despite high levels of perceived support, family was also identified as a barrier to eating healthy foods by nearly half of women. Although friends are part of Latina breast cancer survivors' social networks, spouses and children may provide greater support for healthy eating than friends. Involving family members in dietary interventions for Latina breast cancer survivors may tap into positive sources of support for women, which could facilitate uptake and maintenance of healthy eating behaviors.

  7. Genotet: An Interactive Web-based Visual Exploration Framework to Support Validation of Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bowen; Doraiswamy, Harish; Chen, Xi; Miraldi, Emily; Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario Luis; Hafemeister, Christoph; Madar, Aviv; Bonneau, Richard; Silva, Cláudio T

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) is a fundamental goal in biology, and one of the most important components of TRNs are transcription factors (TFs), proteins that specifically bind to gene promoter and enhancer regions to alter target gene expression patterns. Advances in genomic technologies as well as advances in computational biology have led to multiple large regulatory network models (directed networks) each with a large corpus of supporting data and gene-annotation. There are multiple possible biological motivations for exploring large regulatory network models, including: validating TF-target gene relationships, figuring out co-regulation patterns, and exploring the coordination of cell processes in response to changes in cell state or environment. Here we focus on queries aimed at validating regulatory network models, and on coordinating visualization of primary data and directed weighted gene regulatory networks. The large size of both the network models and the primary data can make such coordinated queries cumbersome with existing tools and, in particular, inhibits the sharing of results between collaborators. In this work, we develop and demonstrate a web-based framework for coordinating visualization and exploration of expression data (RNA-seq, microarray), network models and gene-binding data (ChIP-seq). Using specialized data structures and multiple coordinated views, we design an efficient querying model to support interactive analysis of the data. Finally, we show the effectiveness of our framework through case studies for the mouse immune system (a dataset focused on a subset of key cellular functions) and a model bacteria (a small genome with high data-completeness).

  8. Investigating Patterns of Participation in an Online Support Group for Problem Drinking: a Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanoski, Karen; van Mierlo, Trevor; Cunningham, John

    2016-08-22

    This study contributes to emerging literature on online health networks by modeling communication patterns between members of a moderated online support group for problem drinking. Using social network analysis, we described members' patterns of joint participation in threads, parsing out the role of site moderators, and explored differences in member characteristics by network position. Posts made to the online support group of Alcohol Help Centre during 2013 were structured as a two-mode network of members (n = 205) connected via threads (n = 506). Metrics included degree centrality, clique membership, and tie strength. The network consisted of one component and no cliques of members, although most made few posts and a small number communicated only with the site's moderators. Highly active members were older and tended to have started posting prior to 2013. The distribution of members across threads varied from threads containing posts by one member to others that connected multiple members. Moderators accounted for sizable proportions of the connectivity between both members and threads. After 5 years of operation, the AHC online support group appears to be fairly cohesive and stable, in the sense that there were no isolated subnetworks comprised of specific types of members or devoted to specific topics. Participation and connectedness at the member-level was varied, however, and tended to be low on average. The moderators were among the most central in the network, although there were also members who emerged as central and dedicated contributors to the online discussions across topics. Study findings highlight a number of areas for consideration by online support group developers and managers.

  9. Free-Roaming Dogs in Nepal: Demographics, Health and Public Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massei, G; Fooks, A R; Horton, D L; Callaby, R; Sharma, K; Dhakal, I P; Dahal, U

    2017-02-01

    In Nepal, most dogs are free to roam and may transmit diseases to humans and animals. These dogs often suffer from malnutrition and lack basic health care. Minimal information is available about their demographics and about public attitudes concerning dogs and diseases. We carried out a study in Chitwan District (central Nepal), to collect baseline data on free-roaming owned dog demographics, assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of dog owners concerning dogs and rabies, evaluate rabies vaccination coverage and anthelmintic treatment of dogs, measure dogs' response to rabies vaccination and assess dog health through body condition scores and parasites. We conducted household interviews with owners of free-roaming female dogs (n = 60) and administered dogs with rabies vaccination and anthelmintics. Dog owners regularly fed free-roaming dogs but provided minimal health care; 42% of respondents did not claim ownership of the dog for which they provided care. We collected skin, faecal and blood samples for parasite identification and for measuring rabies virus-specific antibodies. Ninety-two per cent of dog owners were aware of the routes of rabies virus transmission, but only 35% described the correct post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) following a dog bite. Twenty-seven per cent of the dogs had measurable rabies virus-specific antibody titres and 14% had received anthelmintics in the previous year. Following rabies vaccination, 97% of dogs maintained an adequate antibody titre for ≥6 months. Most dogs appeared healthy, although haemoprotozoans, endoparasites and ectoparasites were identified in 12%, 73% and 40% of the dogs, respectively. Poor skin condition and parasite load were associated. Seventy-four per cent of the females had litters in 1 year (mean litter size = 4.5). Births occurred between September and February; we estimated 60% mortality in puppies. We concluded that vaccination coverage, PEP awareness and anthelmintic treatment should be

  10. CryptoCache: A Secure Sharable File Cache for Roaming Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian D.

    2000-01-01

    Small mobile computers are now sufficiently powerful to run many applications, but storage capacity remains limited so working files cannot be cached or stored locally. Even if files can be stored locally, the mobile device is not powerful enough to act as server in collaborations with other users....... Conventional distributed file systems cache everything locally or not at all; there is no possibility to cache files on nearby nodes.In this paper we present the design of a secure cache system called CryptoCache that allows roaming users to cache files on untrusted file hosting servers. The system allows...

  11. Large-Scale Brain Networks Supporting Divided Attention across Spatial Locations and Sensory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Santangelo

    2018-02-01

    brain networks implicated during divided attention across spatial locations and sensory modalities, pointing out the importance of investigating effective connectivity of large-scale brain networks supporting complex behavior.

  12. Developing an effective adaptive monitoring network to support integrated coastal management in a multiuser nature reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim Vugteveen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We elaborate the necessary conceptual and strategic elements for developing an effective adaptive monitoring network to support Integrated Coastal Management (ICM in a multiuser nature reserve in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region. We discuss quality criteria and enabling actions essential to accomplish and sustain monitoring excellence to support ICM. The Wadden Sea Long-Term Ecosystem Research project (WaLTER was initiated to develop an adaptive monitoring network and online data portal to better understand and support ICM in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region. Our comprehensive approach integrates ecological and socioeconomic data and links research-driven and policy-driven monitoring for system analysis using indicators of pressures, state, benefits, and responses. The approach and concepts we elaborated are transferable to other coastal regions to accomplish ICM in complex social-ecological systems in which scientists, multisectoral stakeholders, resource managers, and governmental representatives seek to balance long-term ecological, economic, and social objectives within natural limits.

  13. Intelligent vertical handover management in heterogeneous wireless networks

    OpenAIRE

    Haider, Ammar

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming generation of wireless networks are characterized by seamless mobility across wireless access networks belonging to different radio access technologies. This requires the heterogeneous access networks to be integrated together, and the mobile terminals to be equipped with multiple radio interfaces allowing the users to roam across different networks. Vertical Handover (VHO) is the process of transparent switching from one access network to other. To achieve seamless heterogeneous...

  14. Formation of self-supporting reversible cellular networks in suspensions of colloids and liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Doris; Hinze, Gerald; Ullrich, Beate; Poon, Wilson C K; Cates, Michael E; Schofield, Andrew B

    2005-05-24

    In mixtures of thermotropic liquid crystals with spherical poly (methyl methacrylate) particles, self-supporting networklike structures are formed during slow cooling past the isotropic-to-nematic phase transformation. To characterize the process of network formation in terms of morphology, phase transformation kinetics, and mechanical properties, we have combined data from polarization and laser scanning confocal microscopy with calorimetric, NMR, and rheological results. Our data suggest that the mechanism of network formation is dominated by a broadened temperature and time interval of phase transformation rather than by particle size or concentration. The observation that the width of the transformation interval strongly depends on sample preparation supports the hypothesis that a third component, most likely alkane remnants slowly liberated from the particles, plays a crucial role. In addition, calorimetric findings for liquid crystal/colloid mixtures, heated and cooled up to 13 times, point to separation of the liquid crystal into two compartments with different phase transformation kinetics. This could be explained by redistribution and enrichment of alkane in the particle-composed network walls. A further increase of the storage modulus, G', and incomplete dissolution of the networks in the isotropic state indicate that the formation of two compartments during repeated temperature cycles stabilizes the network and confers strong memory effects.

  15. Caring in the Information Age: Personal Online Networks to Improve Caregiver Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piraino, Emily; Byrne, Kerry; Heckman, George A; Stolee, Paul

    2017-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to find ways for caregivers and service providers to collaborate. This study explored the potential for improving care and social support through shared online network use by family caregivers and service providers in home care. This qualitative study was guided by Rogers' Theory of Diffusion of Innovations [NY: Free Press; 1995], and involved focus group and individual interviews of service providers (n = 31) and family caregivers (n = 4). Interview transcriptions were analyzed using descriptive, topic, and analytic coding, followed by thematic analysis. The network was identified as presenting an opportunity to fill communication gaps presented by other modes of communication and further enhance engagement with families. Barriers included time limitations and policy-related restrictions, privacy, security, and information ownership. Online networks may help address longstanding home-care issues around communication and information-sharing. The success of online networks in home care requires support from care partners. Future research should pilot the use of online networks in home care using barrier and facilitator considerations from this study.

  16. Changes in support networks in late middle age: the extension of gender and educational differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Claude S; Beresford, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This paper tests whether differences by gender and by educational attainment in contact with friends and family and in support expected from friends and family narrow or widen in late middle age. The data are drawn from about 4,800 members of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Survey who answered questions about their frequency of contact with social ties and expectations of 3 kinds of help in both 1993, when they were in their early 50s, and again in 2004. Using lagged dependent variable models, we find that between their 50s and 60s women's network advantages over men and college graduates' network advantages over high school graduates in frequency of social contact widened. The same was roughly true as well for expectations of social support, although here the divergences depended partly on the type of the support: Women gained relative to men in "talk" support and in help from nonkin if ill, but lost ground in financial support. The college-educated gained ground in all sorts of support from nonkin. These results reinforce concern that late middle age is a period when men and the less educated become yet more disadvantaged in social support, making attention to connectedness yet more critical. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Social Network Type and Long-Term Condition Management Support: A Cross-Sectional Study in Six European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Ivaylo; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne; Wensing, Michel; Koetsenruijter, Jan; Orlando, Rosanna; Portillo, Maria Carmen; Culliford, David

    2016-01-01

    Network types and characteristics have been linked to the capacity of inter-personal environments to mobilise and share resources. The aim of this paper is to examine personal network types in relation to long-term condition management in order to identify the properties of network types most likely to provide support for those with a long-term condition. A cross-sectional observational survey of people with type 2 diabetes using interviews and questionnaires was conducted between April and October 2013 in six European countries: Greece, Spain, Bulgaria, Norway, United Kingdom, and Netherlands. 1862 people with predominantly lower socio-economic status were recruited from each country. We used k-means clustering analysis to derive the network types, and one-way analysis of variance and multivariate logistic regression analysis to explore the relationship between network type socio-economic characteristics, self-management monitoring and skills, well-being, and network member work. Five network types of people with long-term conditions were identified: restricted, minimal family, family, weak ties, and diverse. Restricted network types represented those with the poorest self-management skills and were associated with limited support from social network members. Restricted networks were associated with poor indicators across self-management capacity, network support, and well-being. Diverse networks were associated with more enhanced self-management skills amongst those with a long-term condition and high level of emotional support. It was the three network types which had a large number of network members (diverse, weak ties, and family) where healthcare utilisation was most likely to correspond to existing health needs. Our findings suggest that type of increased social involvement is linked to greater self-management capacity and potentially lower formal health care costs indicating that diverse networks constitute the optimal network type as a policy in terms of

  18. Social support network characteristics of incarcerated women with co-occurring major depressive and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargiso, Jessica E; Kuo, Caroline C; Zlotnick, Caron; Johnson, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    The nature of social support available to incarcerated women is not well-understood, particularly among women at high risk of negative outcomes, including women dually diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder and a Substance Use Disorder (MDD-SUD). Descriptive statistics and paired-tests were conducted on 60 incarcerated MDD-SUD women receiving in-prison substance use and depression treatments to characterize the women's social networks, including the strength of support, network characteristics, and types of support provided as well as to determine what aspects of social support may be amenable to change during incarceration and post-release. Study results showed that, on average, women perceived they had moderately supportive individuals in their lives, although more than a quarter of the sample could not identify any regular supporters in their network at baseline. During incarceration, women's social networks significantly increased in general supportiveness, and decreased in network size and percentage of substance users in their networks. Participants maintained positive social support gains post-release in most areas while also significantly increasing the size of their support network post-release. Findings suggest that there are aspects of incarcerated MDD-SUD women's social networks that are amenable to change during incarceration and post-release and provide insight into treatment targets for this vulnerable population.

  19. Eating of the pudding - Supporting the development life-cycle of wireless sensor networks for environmental monitoring scientists and ecologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Kui

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present design and tooling solutions as well as network protocols to support application experts in the entire development life-cycle of wireless sensor networks. The complete life-cycle of wireless sensor networks starts with the user/application requirement analysis. It then goes

  20. Go Ask Alice: Uncovering the Role of a University Partner in an Informal Science Curriculum Support Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a study from the Linking Instructors Networks of Knowledge in Science Education project, which aims to examine the informal science curriculum support networks of teachers in a school-university curriculum reform partnership. We used social network analysis and qualitative methods to reveal characteristics of the informal…

  1. Application of structured support vector machine backpropagation to a convolutional neural network for human pose estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoonchart, Peerajak; Chongstitvatana, Prabhas

    2017-08-01

    In this study, for the first time, we show how to formulate a structured support vector machine (SSVM) as two layers in a convolutional neural network, where the top layer is a loss augmented inference layer and the bottom layer is the normal convolutional layer. We show that a deformable part model can be learned with the proposed structured SVM neural network by backpropagating the error of the deformable part model to the convolutional neural network. The forward propagation calculates the loss augmented inference and the backpropagation calculates the gradient from the loss augmented inference layer to the convolutional layer. Thus, we obtain a new type of convolutional neural network called an Structured SVM convolutional neural network, which we applied to the human pose estimation problem. This new neural network can be used as the final layers in deep learning. Our method jointly learns the structural model parameters and the appearance model parameters. We implemented our method as a new layer in the existing Caffe library. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multi-tree Coding Method (MCM) for drainage networks supporting high-efficient search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Guangqian

    2013-03-01

    River coding method for drainage networks plays an very important role in the physical simulation of river basins. In this study we developed a new river coding method named Multi-tree Coding Method (MCM), which has the following features: (1) it is established on a topological pattern reflecting the dendriform structure of drainage networks; (2) the multi-tree code can be effectively managed by the database to perform convenient topological search toward drainage networks using Structured Query Language (SQL); (3) the multi-tree code does not exhibit digital overflow problems in the computer, thus any resolution and scale drainage networks can easily be coded; and (4) it supports high-efficient search process. A river reach can be directly positioned in a drainage network under MCM, without the complex search process from all river reaches. This feature has great potential to improve the computational performance of basin models. We demonstrate here the efficiency and practicality of MCM by testing it in the Yalu Tsangpo river basin, Tibet. A drainage network with 140,745 digital reaches was extracted from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the multi-tree codes of all river reaches were obtained.

  3. Novel Roaming and Stationary Tethered Aerial Robots for Continuous Mobile Missions in Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom W. Gu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  4. Population ecology of free-roaming cats and interference competition by coyotes in urban parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrt, Stanley D; Wilson, Evan C; Brown, Justin L; Anchor, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Free-roaming cats are a common element of urban landscapes worldwide, often causing controversy regarding their impacts on ecological systems and public health. We monitored cats within natural habitat fragments in the Chicago metropolitan area to characterize population demographics, disease prevalence, movement patterns and habitat selection, in addition to assessing the possible influence of coyotes on cats. The population was dominated by adults of both sexes, and 24% of adults were in reproductive condition. Annual survival rate was relatively high (S=0.70, SE=0.10), with vehicles and predation the primary causes of death. Size of annual home range varied by sex, but not reproductive status or body weight. We observed partitioning of the landscape by cats and coyotes, with little interspecific overlap between core areas of activity. Coyotes selected for natural habitats whereas cats selected for developed areas such as residences. Free-roaming cats were in better condition than we predicted, but their use of natural habitat fragments, and presumably their ecological impact, appeared to be limited by coyotes through intraguild competition.

  5. Novel roaming and stationary tethered aerial robots for continuous mobile missions in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Beom W.; Choi, Su Y.; Rim, Chun T. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cai, Guowei; Seneviratne, Lakmal [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, new tethered aerial robots including roaming tethered aerial robots (RTARs) for radioactive material sampling and stationary tethered aerial robots (STARs) for environment monitoring are proposed to meet extremely-long-endurance missions of nuclear power plants. The flight of the proposed tethered aerial robots may last for a few days or even a few months as long as the tethered cable provides continuous power. A high voltage AC or DC power system was newly adopted to reduce the mass of the tethered cable. The RTAR uses a tethered cable spooled from the aerial robot and an aerial tension control system. The aerial tension control system provides the appropriate tension to the tethered cable, which is accordingly laid down on the ground as the RTAR roams. The STAR includes a tethered cable spooled from the ground and a ground tension control system, which enables the STAR to reach high altitudes. Prototypes of the RTAR and STAR were designed and successfully demonstrated in outdoor environments, where the load power, power type, operating frequency, and flight attitude of the RTAR and STAR were: 180 W, AC 100 kHz, and 20 m; and 300 W, AC or DC 100 kHz, and 80 m, respectively.

  6. Network support, technology use, depression, and ART adherence among HIV-positive MSM of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, I W; Tan, D; Dunlap, S L; Palmer, L; Beougher, S; Cederbaum, J A

    2017-09-01

    Depression is associated with poor antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS. This relationship may be moderated by an individual's social network characteristics. Our study sought to examine social network correlates of treatment adherence among HIV-positive men recruited from social service agencies throughout Los Angeles County (N = 150) to inform technology-driven social support interventions for this population. We administered egocentric social network and computer-assisted survey interviews focused on demographic characteristics, health history, depressive symptoms, and ART adherence, where adherence was assessed by the number of reasons participants missed taking their medication, if ever. Significant univariate correlates of adherence were included in a multivariable regression analysis, where the moderating effect of having a network member who reminds participants to take their HIV medication on the relationship between depression and adherence was tested. Over 60% of participants reported clinically significant depressive symptoms; this was significantly associated with lower adherence among those without someone in their social network to remind them about taking their HIV medication, even after adjusting for covariates in an ordinary least squares regression (adjusted mean difference b = -1.61, SE = 0.42, p = 0.0003). Having a network member who reminds participants to take their ART medication significantly ameliorated the negative association between depression and treatment adherence, especially for those reporting greater depressive symptoms (p = 0.0394). Additionally, participants demonstrated high rates of technology use to communicate with social network members. In order to achieve the aims of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, innovative interventions addressing mental health to improve ART adherence are needed. Network strategies that leverage technology may be helpful for improving ART

  7. Collectivism culture, HIV stigma and social network support in Anhui, China: a path analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Chunpeng; Guida, Jennifer; Sun, Yehuan; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    HIV stigma is rooted in culture and, therefore, it is essential to investigate it within the context of culture. The objective of this study was to examine the interrelationships among individualism-collectivism, HIV stigma, and social network support. A social network study was conducted among 118 people living with HIVAIDS in China, who were infected by commercial plasma donation, a nonstigmatized behavior. The Individualism-Collectivism Interpersonal Assessment Inventory (ICIAI) was used to measure cultural norms and values in the context of three social groups, family members, friends, and neighbors. Path analyses revealed (1) a higher level of family ICIAI was significantly associated with a higher level of HIV self-stigma (β=0.32); (2) a higher level of friend ICIAI was associated with a lower level of self-stigma (β=-035); (3) neighbor ICIAI was associated with public stigma (β=-0.61); (4) self-stigman was associated with social support from neighbors (β=-0.27); and (5) public stigma was associated with social support from neighbors (β=-0.24). This study documents that HIV stigma may mediate the relationship between collectivist culture and social network support, providing an empirical basis for interventions to include aspects of culture into HIV intervention strategies.

  8. [Social network, social support and feeding habits of infants in their fourth month of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Caroline Maria da Costa; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Hasselmann, Maria Helena

    2013-02-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the association between the social network, social support and the feeding habits of infants in their fourth month of life. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 294 children selected at 4 Primary Health Care Units in Rio de Janeiro/ Brazil. A 24-hour dietary recall was applied to the mothers to evaluate the feeding habits. Questions related to the number of people upon whom the woman can rely were asked as well as their participation in social activities to measure the social network. The scale in the Medical Outcomes Study was used to measure social support. The analysis was based on multinomial logistic regression models. Most of the infants (84%) received breast milk, but only 16% were exclusively breastfed. Children whose mothers had a small number of relatives to rely on and with low social support were more likely to be bottle-fed rather than exclusively breastfed. The need to integrate members of the social network of the woman during pre-natal care, birth and the after birth period should be encouraged, in such a way that social support can serve the mother's requirements, contributing to exclusive breastfeeding.

  9. A mixed-methods approach for analysing social support and social anchorage of single mothers’ personal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumino, Rosaria; Ragozini, Giancarlo; van Duijn, Marijtje; Vitale, Maria Prosperina

    2017-01-01

    The present paper analyses the relationship among social support and personal networks by focusing on social anchorage, which is a specific dimension of social support conveying to what extent people feel integrated into their personal networks. Specifying when, why, and how personal relationships

  10. Reciprocal Family, Friendship and Church Support Networks of African Americans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Mouzon, Dawne M; Nguyen, Ann W; Chatters, Linda M

    2016-12-01

    This study examined reciprocal support networks involving extended family, friends and church members among African Americans. Our analysis examined specific patterns of reciprocal support (i.e., received only, gave only, both gave and received, neither gave or received), as well as network characteristics (i.e., contact and subjective closeness) as correlates of reciprocal support. The analysis is based on the African American sub-sample of the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Overall, our findings indicate that African Americans are very involved in reciprocal support networks with their extended family, friends and church members. Respondents were most extensively involved in reciprocal supports with extended family members, followed closely by friends and church networks. Network characteristics (i.e., contact and subjective closeness) were significantly and consistently associated with involvement with reciprocal support exchanges for all three networks. These and other findings are discussed in detail. This study complements previous work on the complementary roles of family, friend and congregational support networks, as well as studies of racial differences in informal support networks.

  11. [Health system sustainability from a network perspective: a proposal to optimize healthy habits and social support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués Sánchez, Pilar; Fernández Peña, Rosario; Cabrera León, Andrés; Muñoz Doyague, María F; Llopis Cañameras, Jaime; Arias Ramos, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The search of new health management formulas focused to give wide services is one of the priorities of our present health policies. Those formulas examine the optimization of the links between the main actors involved in public health, ie, users, professionals, local socio-political and corporate agents. This paper is aimed to introduce the Social Network Analysis as a method for analyzing, measuring and interpreting those connections. The knowledge of people's relationships (what is called social networks) in the field of public health is becoming increasingly important at an international level. In fact, countries such as UK, Netherlands, Italy, Australia and U.S. are looking formulas to apply this knowledge to their health departments. With this work we show the utility of the ARS on topics related to sustainability of the health system, particularly those related with health habits and social support, topics included in the 2020 health strategies that underline the importance of the collaborative aspects in networks.

  12. Self-supported fibrin-polyvinyl alcohol interpenetrating polymer networks: an easily handled and rehydratable biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidault, Laurent; Deneufchatel, Marie; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Fichet, Odile; Larreta-Garde, Véronique

    2013-11-11

    A fibrin hydrogel at physiological concentration (5 mg/mL) was associated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) inside an interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) architecture. Previously, PVA has been modified with methacrylate functions in order to cross-link it by free-radical polymerization. The fibrin network was synthesized by the enzymatic hydrolysis of fibrinogen by thrombin. The resulting self-supported materials simultaneously exhibit the properties of the fibrin hydrogel and those of the synthetic polymer network. Their storage modulus is 50-fold higher than that of the fibrin hydrogel and they are completely rehydratable. These materials are noncytotoxic toward human fibroblast and the fibrin present on the surface of PVAm-based IPNs favors cell development.

  13. The Relationship Between Use of Social Network Sites, Online Social Support, and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Existing work on the effects of social network sites (SNS) on well-being has often stressed that SNS can help people gain social support from their online networks, which positively affects their well-being. However, the majority of studies in this area have been cross-sectional in nature and/or relied on student samples. Using data from six waves of a longitudinal study with a representative sample of Dutch Internet users, we first examined whether users and nonusers of SNS differ in online social support and well-being (as indicated by life satisfaction and stress). In a second step, we investigated in more detail how SNS use – more specifically, asking for advice and the number of strong ties on these SNS – are related to online social support, stress, and satisfaction with life. Overall, our results provide no evidence for SNS use and online social support affecting either stress or life satisfaction. SNS users reported more online social support than nonusers did, but also higher levels of stress; the two groups did not differ in overall life satisfaction. With regard to the underlying processes, we found positive cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between asking for advice on SNS and online social support, indicating that SNS can be an effective tool for receiving social support. However, online social support was not related to higher life satisfaction or reduced stress 6 months later; instead, it seems that SNS users with lower life satisfaction and/or higher stress seek more social support online by asking for advice on SNS. PMID:29147141

  14. Social support network structure in older people: underlying dimensions and association with psychological and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jeannette; Conroy, Ronán M; Lawlor, Brian A

    2009-05-01

    Social networks have been associated with a wide variety of health outcomes in older people. We examined the dimensions underlying the Wenger social support network type assessment to identify dimensions associated with mental and physical health. We interviewed 1334 community-dwelling participants aged 65+. The Geriatric Mental State automated geriatric examination for computer-assisted taxonomy interview was used to rate psychiatric symptoms and quality of life. Cognitive impairment was defined as a score of social support network domains: family (distance from and contact with relatives) and social engagement. Social engagement was associated with a lower age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of depression (odds ratio for a one-tertile increase 0.48), generalised anxiety disorder (OR 0.60), cognitive impairment (OR 0.68) and physical disability (OR 0.62) all p social engagement domain was also associated with better quality of life (OR 1.5) self-rated happiness (OR 1.3) and rating life as worth living (OR 1.4). The family domain, on the other hand, was not significantly associated with any health outcome. The results suggest that elective relationships and social engagement are the 'active ingredients' of social networks which promote health in later life.

  15. Path correlation considered prioritized burst segmentation for quality of service support in optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; Changyue, Jiana; He, Tingting; Yu, Jianwei; Lei, Bo; Mao, Tengyue

    2013-04-01

    Burst segmentation (BS) is a high-efficiency contention resolution scheme in bufferless optical burst switching (OBS) networks. A prioritized BS scheme for quality of service (QoS) support is developed. Unlike the existing work on the BS scheme, the proposed BS model considers path-correlated factors, such as path length, the adjoining paths carrying traffic on a given path, and the multipriority traffic coming from all paths. Byte loss probability for high-priority and low-priority bursts under the time-based assembly approach and the length-based assembly approach to estimate the performance of the proposed BS scheme by comparing the cumulative distribution function of a burst length in an OBS ingress node (source) with that in an egress node (destination) is introduced. A preemptive BS policy for different priority bursts is proposed to support the QoS of the OBS network. Finally, a simulation is given to validate the proposed analytical model in an existing OBS network with two priority bursts. It is shown that the proposed BS scheme can realize the service differentiation for multipriority traffic under the consideration of network topology-dependent parameters.

  16. How do students from Student Incubators (SI) use networks and how can SI support the activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Mariendal

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines Student Entrepreneur’s (SE) use of networks as part of their activities in a Student Incubator (SI). Recommendations are made as to how SI can create activities to support students' use of internal and external relationships and discusses the paradox between running a learning...... is on SEs because students are likely to have a smaller (in size), less well-founded and limited professional network. In addition, an SI is assumed to be characterized by “limitations” related to their student status. So far none has paid any attention to how SEs "compensate for" and/or develop relevant...... internal and external relationships and how SI supports an appropriate project and business development process with these assumptions and “limitations” in mind. To investigate this, a series of qualitative interviews with SEs are conducted, with an emphasis on the use of relationships...

  17. Supporting Structural and Functional Collaborative Networked Organizations Modeling with Service Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rubén Darío; Bas, Ángel Ortiz; Prats, Guillermo; Varela, Rosa Navarro

    This work focuses on the Service Entities definition as an approach that may help to support structural and functional Collaborative Networked Organizations (CNO) modeling, when VOs are engineered inside Virtual Breeding Environments Management Systems (VMS). Manbree is an undergoing development which is intended to provide an integrated framework for CNO modeling and execution based on that approach and it is briefly described at the final section.

  18. Distributed Agent-Based Networks in Support of Advanced Marine Corps Command and Control Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    DRAMA Dynamic Re-addressing and Management for the Army DTCS Distributed Tactical Communications System ECA Event-Condition-Action ECO Enhanced...Company Operations EM Electro-Magnetic EMO Enhanced MAGTF Operations GPA Group Policy Agent GUI Graphic User Interface JIFX Joint Interagency...support monitoring of the network and automatically enforce appropriate actions. In general, policies are defined as Event-Condition-Action ( ECA ) clauses

  19. Prevalence of feline leukemia virus infection and serum antibodies against feline immunodeficiency virus in unowned free-roaming cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Irene T; Levy, Julie K; Gorman, Shawn P; Crawford, P Cynda; Slater, Margaret R

    2002-03-01

    To determine prevalence of FeLV infection and serum antibodies against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in unowned free-roaming cats. Cross-sectional serologic survey. 733 unowned free-roaming cats in Raleigh, NC, and 1,143 unowned free-roaming cats in Gainesville, Fla. In Raleigh, overall prevalence of FeLV infection was 5.3%, and overall seroprevalence for FIV was 2.3%. In Gainesville, overall prevalence of FeLV infection was 3.7%, and overall seroprevalence for FIV was 4.3%. Overall, FeLV prevalence was 4.3%, and seroprevalence for FIV was 3.5%. Prevalence of FeLV infection was not significantly different between males (4.9%) and females (3.8%), although seroprevalence for FIV was significantly higher in male cats (6.3%) than in female cats (1.5%). Prevalence of FeLV infection and seroprevalence for FIV in unowned free-roaming cats in Raleigh and Gainesville are similar to prevalence rates reported for owned cats in the United States. Male cats are at increased risk for exposure to FIV, compared with female cats.

  20. Ab initio reaction pathways for photodissociation and isomerization of nitromethane on four singlet potential energy surfaces with three roaming paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Morokuma, Keiji [Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, 34-4 Takano Nishihiraki-cho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8103 (Japan); Maeda, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2014-06-28

    Photodissociation pathways of nitromethane following π → π{sup *} electronic excitation are reported. The potential energy surfaces for four lowest singlet states are explored, and structures of many intermediates, dissociation limits, transition states, and minimum energy conical intersections were determined using the automated searching algorism called the global reaction route mapping strategy. Geometries are finally optimized at CASSCF(14e,11o) level and energies are computed at CAS(14o,11e)PT2 level. The calculated preferable pathways and important products qualitatively explain experimental observations. The major photodissociation product CH{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} ({sup 2}B{sub 2}) is formed by direct dissociation from the S{sub 1} state. Important pathways involving S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} states for production of various dissociation products CH{sub 3}NO + O ({sup 1}D), CH{sub 3}O(X{sup 2}E) + NO (X{sup 2}Π), CH{sub 2}NO + OH, and CH{sub 2}O + HNO, as well as various isomerization pathways have been identified. Three roaming processes also have been identified: the O atom roaming in O dissociation from CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, the OH radical roaming in OH dissociation from CH{sub 2}N(O)(OH), and the NO roaming in NO dissociation from CH{sub 3}ONO.

  1. A survey of rabies virus antibodies in confined, hunting and roaming dogs in Ogun and Oyo States, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Oladimeji Oluwayelu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen for rabies virus (RABV antibodies in apparently healthy confined, hunting and roaming dogs by a community-based approach. Methods: Sera from 230 (80 confined, 92 hunting and 58 roaming dogs in some urban and periurban communities in Ogun and Oyo states, Southwestern Nigeria were screened for RABV antibodies using the indirect ELISA method. Results: Analysis of administered questionnaires showed that of 80 confined dog owners, 37 were aware of anti-rabies vaccination (i.e. they were informed while 17 were negligent and 26 uninformed. Of the 230 sera tested, only 13 (5.7% from vaccinated confined dogs in Oyo state were positive (i.e. had optimal RABV antibody titres (mean 0.54, 95% CI: 0.42–0.67 while all confined dog sera in Ogun state were negative. Eleven (12.0% and 14 (24.1% of the hunting and roaming dogs respectively had sub-optimal RABV antibody titres while the rest were negative. Conclusions: Evidently, these groups of dogs are a totally unprotected and susceptible dog population that can serve as potential reservoirs of RABV in the study area. Responsible pet ownership, vaccination of hunting and roaming dogs, and community-based active rabies surveillance are therefore advocated in Nigeria.

  2. Enhanced Situational Awareness and Decision Support for Operators of Future Distributed Power Network Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaher, Ammar S. A. E.; Catterson, V. M.; Syed, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    . The control room visualisation and decision support functionality for aiding the operator in restoring the frequency to its target value will be considered. The analysis takes place within the Web-ofCells framework, adopted to deal with power system control through a web of subsystems, called cells, which......This paper describes scenarios proposed for a control room decision support system aimed at future power network operators. The purpose is to consider the requirements of the future control room from the perspective of the operator under the conditions of a significant frequency excursion incident...

  3. The DARTNet Institute: Seeking a Sustainable Support Mechanism for Electronic Data Enabled Research Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Wilson D; Fox, Chester H; White, Turner; Graham, Deborah; Schilling, Lisa M; West, David R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical data research networks require large investments in infrastructure support to maintain their abilities to extract, transform, and load data from varied data sources, expand electronic data sources and develop learning communities. This paper outlines a sustainable business model of ongoing infrastructure support for clinical data research activities. The DARTNet Institute is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization that serves as a support entity for multiple practice-based research networks. Several clinical data research networks working closely with a professional society began collaborating to support shared goals in 2008. This loose affiliation called itself the "DARTNet Collaborative." In 2011, the DARTNet Institute incorporated as an independent, not-for-profit entity. The business structure allows DARTNet to advocate for all partners without operating its own practice-based research network, serve as a legal voice for activities that overlap multiple partners, share personnel resources through service contracts between partners, and purchase low-cost (nonprofit rate) software. DARTNet's business model relies upon four diverse sources of revenue: (1) DARTNet licenses and provides access to a propriety software system that extracts, transforms, and loads data from all major electronic health records (EHRs) utilized in the United States, and which also provides clinical decision support for research studies; (2) DARTNet operates a recognized, national professional-society-quality improvement registry that enables organizations to fulfill Meaningful Use 2 criteria; (3) DARTNet provides access to data for research activities that are funded by direct research dollars, provided at prices that generate excess revenue; and (4) DARTNet provides access to large primary care datasets for observational studies and pregrant analyses such as for sample size development. The ability of the system to support pragmatic trials will be described. The DARTNet model

  4. Dynamic Connectivity between Brain Networks Supports Working Memory: Relationships to Dopamine Release and Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Snellenberg, Jared X.; Benavides, Caridad; Slifstein, Mark; Wang, Zhishun; Moore, Holly; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2016-01-01

    STATEMENT It is unclear how communication between brain networks responds to changing environmental demands during complex cognitive processes. Also, unknown in regard to these network dynamics is the role of neuromodulators, such as dopamine, and whether their dysregulation could underlie cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric illness. We found that connectivity between brain networks changes with working-memory load and greater increases predict better working memory performance; however, it was not related to capacity for dopamine release in the cortex. Patients with schizophrenia did show dynamic internetwork connectivity; however, this was more weakly associated with successful performance in patients compared with healthy individuals. Our findings indicate that dynamic interactions between brain networks may support the type of flexible adaptations essential to goal-directed behavior. PMID:27076432

  5. roams 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small perforation ofthe buccinator muscle in this region can allow a large portion of the buccal fat pad to herniate into the oral cavity. This article reports the clinical presentation and treatment of one such case arising in a six-year-old boy, following trauma to the hue- cal mucosa of his left check from a toothbrush and.

  6. Exposure to vector-borne pathogens in candidate blood donor and free-roaming dogs of northeast Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascellari, Marta; Ravagnan, Silvia; Carminato, Antonio; Cazzin, Stefania; Carli, Erika; Da Rold, Graziana; Lucchese, Laura; Natale, Alda; Otranto, Domenico; Capelli, Gioia

    2016-06-29

    Many vector-borne pathogens including viruses, bacteria, protozoa and nematodes occur in northeast Italy, representing a potential threat to animal and human populations. Little information is available on the circulation of the above vector-borne pathogens in dogs. This work aims to (i) assess exposure to and circulation of pathogens transmitted to dogs in northeast Italy by ticks, sandflies, and mosquitoes, and (ii) drive blood donor screening at the newly established canine blood bank of the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie. Blood samples from 150 privately-owned canine candidate blood donors and 338 free-roaming dogs were screened by serology (IFA for Leishmania infantum, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocythophilum, Babesia canis, Rickettsia conorii, R. rickettsii), microscopic blood smear examination, and blood filtration for Dirofilaria spp. All candidate donors and seropositive free-roaming dogs were tested by PCR for L. infantum, E. canis, A. phagocythophilum, Babesia/Theileria and Rickettsia spp. The dogs had no clinical signs at the time of sampling. Overall, 40 candidate donors (26.7 %) and 108 free-roaming dogs (32 %) were seroreactive to at least one vector-borne pathogen. Seroprevalence in candidate donors vs free-roaming dogs was: Leishmania infantum 6.7 vs 7.1 %; Anaplasma phagocytophilum 4.7 vs 3.3 %; Babesia canis 1.3 vs 2.7 %; Ehrlichia canis none vs 0.9 %; Rickettsia conorii 16 vs 21.3 % and R. rickettsii 11 vs 14.3 %. Seroreactivity to R. rickettsii, which is not reported in Italy, is likely a cross-reaction with other rickettsiae. Filariae, as Dirofilaria immitis (n = 19) and D. repens (n = 2), were identified in free-roaming dogs only. No significant differences were observed between candidate donors and free-roaming dogs either in the overall seroprevalence of vector-borne pathogens or for each individual pathogen. All PCRs and smears performed on blood were negative. This study demonstrated that dogs are

  7. Standardization of Brief Inventory of Social Support Exchange Network (BISSEN) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Miyuki; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Fukuoka, Yoshiharu; Lebowitz, Adam; Shiratori, Yuki; Doi, Nagafumi; Matsui, Yutaka

    2017-07-01

    This study describes the Brief Inventory of Social Support Exchange Network (BISSEN) as a standardized brief inventory measuring various aspects of social support. We confirmed the reliability and validity for function and direction of support and standardized the BISSEN. For Sample 1, a stratified random sampling method was used to select 5200 residents in Japan. We conducted mail surveys and responses were retrieved from 2274 participants (collection rate 43.7%). Participants completed a questionnaire packet that included BISSEN, suicidal ideation, depression, support seeking, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS). Sample 2 surveys for test-retest reliability were conducted on 23 residents at approximately two-week intervals. Participants were asked about gender, age, and BISSEN. First, we assessed the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct, convergent, and concurrent validity. McDonald's omega (.73-.92) and test-retest correlations (.78-.85) demonstrated adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Depression, support seeking, and MSPSS were significantly correlated with all scores of BISSEN. The non-suicidal ideation group had significantly more support compared to the suicidal ideation group. Therefore, function and direction of support in BISSEN had sufficient reliability and validity. Next, we standardized BISSEN using Z-scores and percentile rank with respect to each 12 norm groups by age and gender. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impacts of Network Centrality and Self-Regulation on an E-Learning Environment with the Support of Social Network Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Huang, Hsieh-Hong; Chuang, Yuh-Shy

    2015-01-01

    An e-learning environment that supports social network awareness (SNA) is a highly effective means of increasing peer interaction and assisting student learning by raising awareness of social and learning contexts of peers. Network centrality profoundly impacts student learning in an SNA-related e-learning environment. Additionally,…

  9. Communication competence, social support, and depression among college students: a model of facebook and face-to-face support network influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kevin B; Rosenberg, Jenny; Egbert, Nicole; Ploeger, Nicole A; Bernard, Daniel R; King, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the social networking site Facebook and face-to-face support networks on depression among (N = 361) college students. The authors used the Relational Health Communication Competence Model as a framework for examining the influence of communication competence on social support network satisfaction and depression. Moreover, they examined the influence of interpersonal and social integrative motives as exogenous variables. On the basis of previous work, the authors propose and test a theoretical model using structural equation modeling. The results indicated empirical support for the model, with interpersonal motives predicting increased face-to-face and computer-mediated competence, increased social support satisfaction with face-to-face and Facebook support, and lower depression scores. The implications of the findings for theory, key limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

  10. Nonsurgical fertility control for managing free-roaming dog populations: a review of products and criteria for field applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massei, Giovanna; Miller, Lowell A

    2013-11-01

    About 75% of dogs worldwide are free to roam and reproduce, thus creating locally overabundant populations. Problems caused by roaming dogs include diseases transmitted to livestock and humans, predation on livestock, attacks on humans, road traffic accidents, and nuisance behavior. Nonsurgical fertility control is increasingly advocated as more cost-effective than surgical sterilization to manage dog populations and their impact. The aims of this review were to 1) analyze trends in numbers of scientific publications on nonsurgical fertility control for dogs; 2) illustrate the spectrum of fertility inhibitors available for dogs; 3) examine how differences between confined and free-roaming dogs might affect the choice of fertility inhibitors to be used in dog population management; and 4) provide a framework of criteria to guide decisions regarding the use of nonsurgical fertility control for dog population management. The results showed that the 117 articles published between 1982 and 2011 focussed on long-term hormonal contraceptives, such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, immunocontraceptives, and male chemical sterilants. The number of articles published biennially increased from one to five papers produced in the early 1980s to 10 to 20 in the past decade. Differences between confined dogs and free-roaming dogs include reproduction and survival as well as social expectations regarding the duration of infertility, the costs of sterilization, and the responsibilities for meeting these costs. These differences are likely to dictate which fertility inhibitors will be used for confined or free-roaming dogs. The criteria regarding the use of fertility control for dog population management, presented as a decision tree, covered social acceptance, animal welfare, effectiveness, legal compliance, feasibility, and sustainability. The review concluded that the main challenges for the future are evaluating the feasibility, effectiveness, sustainability, and

  11. Social support network to family caregiver of a patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy I and II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Barreto de Mesquita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the formal and informal support given to the family caregiver of a patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy I and II. Method: This was a study with a qualitative approach developed in 2008 in the homes of informants and in the premises of the Hospital Infantil Albert Sabin in Fortaleza, Ceara, conducted with 13 mothers, primary caregivers for their ill children. For data collection we used both the interview and the instrument generator of the names and qualifier of the relations, adapted for this study. Quantitative data were processed using the programs UCINET NetDraw 6.123 and 2.38, while the qualitative data were organized based on the technique of the Collective Subject Discourse. The analyses were conducted by means of network maps and collective discourses raised by central ideas. Results: The formal social network of family caregivers was composed of 72 actors, among professionals in the areas of health, education and others, linked to 12 institutions. The informal network was comprised of 83 actors. It was found that the management of care, even when the caregiver has support from other people is a cause of stress and overload. Conclusion: It is evident the importance of applying Social Network Analysis as a tool for understanding structural features and the dynamics of social relations of family caregiver. Of a patient with spinal muscular atrophy. The analysis suggests the need for intervention in thestudy group as a way to contribute to the recognition and use of existing services, increasing the significance of the help provided by network interactions.

  12. Maintenance and Logistics Support for the International Monitoring System Network of the CTBTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslinger, F.; Brely, N.; Akrawy, M.

    2007-05-01

    The global network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), once completed, will consist of 321 monitoring facilities of four different technologies: hydroacoustic, seismic, infrasonic, and radionuclide. As of today, about 65% of the installations are completed and contribute data to the products issued by the International Data Centre (IDC) of the CTBTO. In order to accomplish the task to reliably collect evidence for any potential nuclear test explosion anywhere on the planet, all stations are required to perform to very high data availability requirements (at least 98% data availability over a 12-month period). To enable reaching this requirement, a three-layer concept has been developed to allow efficient support of the IMS stations: Operations, Maintenance and Logistics, and Engineering. Within this concept Maintenance and Logistics provide second level support of the stations, whereby problems arising at the station are assigned through the IMS ticket system to Maintenance if they cannot be resolved on the Operations level. Maintenance will then activate the required resources to appropriately address and ultimately resolve the problem. These resources may be equipment support contracts, other third party contracts, or the dispatch of a maintenance team. Engineering Support will be activated if the problem requires redesign of the station or after catastrophic failures when a total rebuild of a station may be necessary. In this model, Logistics Support is responsible for parts replenishment and support contract management. Logistics Support also collects and analyzes relevant failure mode and effect information, develops supportability models, and has the responsibility for document management, obsolescence, risk & quality, and configuration management, which are key elements for efficient station support. Maintenance Support in addition is responsible for maintenance strategies, for

  13. The role of remote engagement in supporting boundary chain networks across Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P. Kettle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boundary organizations serve multiple roles in linking science and decision making, including brokering knowledge, supporting local- and cross-level networks, facilitating the co-production of knowledge, and negotiating conflict. Yet they face several challenges in providing services for an ever-increasing number of actors and institutions interested in climate information and adaptation. This study evaluates how the Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (ACCAP innovated its boundary spanning role to improve outcomes by partnering with other boundary organizations through its ongoing climate webinar series. We utilize the concept of boundary chains to investigate outcomes associated with different extended network connections. Our evaluation is based on the analysis three datasets, including interviews (2013 and two web-based questionnaires (2010 and 2013–2015. Findings from the evaluation reveal several ways that remote engagement via the ACCAP webinar series facilitates learning, decision application, and cross-level network building, and overcomes barriers associated with large geographic distances between communities. In an organic evolution and innovation of the climate webinar series, ACCAP partnered with other boundary organizations to establish satellite hub sites to facilitate in-person gatherings at remote locations, thereby increasing the number and diversity of participants served and supporting local networking within organizations, agencies, and communities. Leveraging complementary resources through the satellite hub sites provided mutual benefits for ACCAP and partnering boundary organizations. These findings advance our understanding of the value of remote engagement in supporting boundary spanning processes and how boundary organizations innovate their roles to build capacity and increase the usability of climate information.

  14. A Social Network Perspective on Peer Supported Learning in MOOCs for Educators

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    Shaun Kellogg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A recent phenomenon in the MOOC space has been the development of courses tailored to educators serving in K-12 settings. MOOCs, particularly as a form of educator professional development, face a number of challenges. Academics, as well as pundits from traditional and new media, have raised a number of concerns about MOOCs, including the lack of instructional and social supports. It is an assumption of this study that challenges arising form this problem of scale can be addressed by leveraging these massive numbers to develop robust online learning communities. This mixed-methods case study addresses critical gaps in the literature and issues of peer support in MOOCs through an examination of the characteristics, mechanisms, and outcomes of peer networks. Findings from this study demonstrate that even with technology as basic as a discussion forum, MOOCs can be leveraged to foster these networks and facilitate peer-supported learning. Although this study was limited to two unique cases along the wide spectrum of MOOCs, the methods applied provide other researchers with an approach for better understanding the dynamic process of peer supported learning in MOOCs.

  15. A Cross-Layer Duty Cycle MAC Protocol Supporting a Pipeline Feature for Wireless Sensor Networks

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    Young-Chon Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the conventional duty cycle MAC protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs such as RMAC perform well in terms of saving energy and reducing end-to-end delivery latency, they were designed independently and require an extra routing protocol in the network layer to provide path information for the MAC layer. In this paper, we propose a new cross-layer duty cycle MAC protocol with data forwarding supporting a pipeline feature (P-MAC for WSNs. P-MAC first divides the whole network into many grades around the sink. Each node identifies its grade according to its logical hop distance to the sink and simultaneously establishes a sleep/wakeup schedule using the grade information. Those nodes in the same grade keep the same schedule, which is staggered with the schedule of the nodes in the adjacent grade. Then a variation of the RTS/CTS handshake mechanism is used to forward data continuously in a pipeline fashion from the higher grade to the lower grade nodes and finally to the sink. No extra routing overhead is needed, thus increasing the network scalability while maintaining the superiority of duty-cycling. The simulation results in OPNET show that P-MAC has better performance than S-MAC and RMAC in terms of packet delivery latency and energy efficiency.

  16. A Network Topology Control and Identity Authentication Protocol with Support for Movable Sensor Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Wei; Liang, Jixing; Zheng, Bingxin; Jiang, Shengming

    2015-12-01

    It is expected that in the near future wireless sensor network (WSNs) will be more widely used in the mobile environment, in applications such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) for marine monitoring and mobile robots for environmental investigation. The sensor nodes' mobility can easily cause changes to the structure of a network topology, and lead to the decline in the amount of transmitted data, excessive energy consumption, and lack of security. To solve these problems, a kind of efficient Topology Control algorithm for node Mobility (TCM) is proposed. In the topology construction stage, an efficient clustering algorithm is adopted, which supports sensor node movement. It can ensure the balance of clustering, and reduce the energy consumption. In the topology maintenance stage, the digital signature authentication based on Error Correction Code (ECC) and the communication mechanism of soft handover are adopted. After verifying the legal identity of the mobile nodes, secure communications can be established, and this can increase the amount of data transmitted. Compared to some existing schemes, the proposed scheme has significant advantages regarding network topology stability, amounts of data transferred, lifetime and safety performance of the network.

  17. A Network Topology Control and Identity Authentication Protocol with Support for Movable Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that in the near future wireless sensor network (WSNs will be more widely used in the mobile environment, in applications such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs for marine monitoring and mobile robots for environmental investigation. The sensor nodes’ mobility can easily cause changes to the structure of a network topology, and lead to the decline in the amount of transmitted data, excessive energy consumption, and lack of security. To solve these problems, a kind of efficient Topology Control algorithm for node Mobility (TCM is proposed. In the topology construction stage, an efficient clustering algorithm is adopted, which supports sensor node movement. It can ensure the balance of clustering, and reduce the energy consumption. In the topology maintenance stage, the digital signature authentication based on Error Correction Code (ECC and the communication mechanism of soft handover are adopted. After verifying the legal identity of the mobile nodes, secure communications can be established, and this can increase the amount of data transmitted. Compared to some existing schemes, the proposed scheme has significant advantages regarding network topology stability, amounts of data transferred, lifetime and safety performance of the network.

  18. Cost-Effective and Fast Handoff Scheme in Proxy Mobile IPv6 Networks with Multicasting Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illkyun Im

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent advancements in wireless communication technologies, mobile multicasting is becoming important, in an effort to use network resources more efficiently. In the past, when various mobile IP-based multicast techniques were proposed, the focus was on the costs needed for network delivery to provide multicast services, as well as on minimizing the multicast handover delay. However, it is fundamentally difficult to resolve the problems of handover delay and tunnel convergence for techniques using MIPv6 (Mobile IPv6, a host-based mobility management protocol. To resolve these problems, the network-based mobility management protocol PMIPv6 (Proxy Mobile IPv6 was standardized. Although performance is improved in PMIPv6 over MIPv6, it still suffers from problems of handover delay and tunnel convergence. To overcome these limitations, a technique called LFH (Low-cost and Fast Handoff is proposed in this paper, for fast and low-cost mobility management with multicasting support in PMIPv6 networks. To reduce the interactions between the complex multicast routing protocol and multicast messages, a simplified proxy method called MLD (Multicast Listener Discovery is implemented and modified. Furthermore, a TCR (Tunnel Combination and Reconstruction algorithm was used in the multicast handover procedure within the LMA (Local Mobility Anchor domain, as well as in the multicast handover procedure between domains, in order to overcome the problem of tunnel convergence. It was found that, compared to other types of multicast techniques, LFH reduces multicast delay, and requires lower cost.

  19. Decision Support for Route Search and Optimum Finding in Transport Networks under Uncertainty

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    G. Szücs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to find solution for route planning in road network for a user, and to find the equilibrium in the path optimization problem, where the roads have uncertain attributes. The concept is based on the Dempster-Shafer theory and Dijkstra's algorithm, which help to model the uncertainty and to find the best route, respectively. Based on uncertain influencing factors an interval of travel time (so called cost interval of each road can be calculated. An algorithm has been outlined for determining the best route comparing the intervals and using decision rules depending on the user's attitude. Priorities can be defined among the rules, and the constructed rule based mechanism for users’ demands is great contribution of this paper. The first task is discussed in more general in this paper, i.e. instead of travel time a general cost is investigated for any kind of network. At the solution of the second task, where the goal is to find equilibrium in transport network at case of uncertain situation, the result of the first task is used. Simulation tool has been used to find the equilibrium, which gives only approximate solution, but this is sufficient and appropriate solution for large networks. Furthermore this is built in a decision support system, which is another contribution of this work. At the end of the paper the implementation of the theoretical concept is presented with a test bed of a town presenting effects of different uncertain influencing factors for the roads.

  20. ‘Living' theory: a pedagogical framework for process support in networked learning

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    Philipa Levy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the broad outcome of an action research project in which practical theory was developed in the field of networked learning through case-study analysis of learners' experiences and critical evaluation of educational practice. It begins by briefly discussing the pedagogical approach adopted for the case-study course and the action research methodology. It then identifies key dimensions of four interconnected developmental processes–orientation, communication, socialisation and organisation–that were associated with ‘learning to learn' in the course's networked environment, and offers a flavour of participants' experiences in relation to these processes. A number of key evaluation issues that arose are highlighted. Finally, the paper presents the broad conceptual framework for the design and facilitation of process support in networked learning that was derived from this research. The framework proposes a strong, explicit focus on support for process as well as domain learning, and progression from tighter to looser design and facilitation structures for process-focused (as well as domain-focused learning tasks.

  1. Innovative Improvement and Intensification of Business Relationships Supported by Cooperative Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vančová, Viera; Čambál, Miloš; Cagáňová, Dagmar

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, the opportunity for companies to be involved in cluster initiatives and international business associations is a major factor that contributes to the increase of their innovative potential. Companies organized in technological clusters have greater access to mutual business contacts, faster information transfer and deployment of advanced technologies. These companies cooperate more frequently with universities and research - development institutions on innovative projects. An important benefit of cluster associations is that they create a suitable environment for innovation and the transfer of knowledge by means of international cooperation and networking. This supportive environment is not easy to access for different small and mediumsized companies, who are not members of any clusters or networks. Supplier-customer business channels expand by means of transnational networks and exchanges of experience. Knowledge potential is broadened and joint innovative projects are developed. Reflecting the growing importance of clusters as driving forces of economic and regional development, a number of cluster policies and initiatives have emerged in the last few decades, oriented to encourage the establishment of new clusters, to support existing clusters, or to assist the development of transnational cooperation. To achieve the goals of the Europe 2020 Strategy, European countries should have an interest in building strong clusters and developing cluster cooperation by sharing specialized research infrastructures and testing facilities and facilitating knowledge transfer for crossborder cooperation. This requires developing a long term joint strategy in order to facilitate the development of open global clusters and innovative small and medium entrepreneurs.

  2. Network and social support in family care of children with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennafort, Viviane Peixoto Dos Santos; Queiroz, Maria Veraci Oliveira; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Guedes, Maria Vilani Cavalcante

    2016-01-01

    to understand the influence of network and social support in the care of a child with type 1 diabetes. qualitative study, with assumptions of ethnonursing, conducted in a reference service specialized in the treatment of diabetes, in 2014, in the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceará, Brazil. Twenty-six members of the family and their respective school children participated in the study. The process of collection and analysis followed the observation-participation-reflection model. the analytical categories showed that the social network in the care of children with diabetes helped sharing of information and experiences, moments of relaxation and aid in the acquisition of supplies for treatment, with positive repercussions in the family context, generating well-being and confidence in the care of children with diabetes. the cultural care provided by nurses strengthens the network and social support because it encourages autonomy in the promotion of the quality of life of children with type 1 diabetes and their families.

  3. Network externalities in telecommunication industry: An analysis of Serbian market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Dejan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with network competition and provides empirical analysis of market concentration, network and call externalities, access pricing, price discrimination and switching costs in Serbian mobile phone telecommunications market. It is shown that network externalities governed the expansion of this market until 2008. Upon entry of VIP incumbents didn't engage in predatory behaviour towards entrant aiming to benefit from locked- in users. The policy of mobile phone number portability reduced on-net prices and substantially increased consumer's surplus. In contrast to some previous research, this policy was pro-competitive in Serbia. We have also determined that users of the network with the largest market share benefit the most from call externalities. Finally, one network does not price discriminate between outgoing and incoming roaming calls, which implies that users of this network have higher level pecuniary externalities in roaming compared to users of price discriminating networks.

  4. Effects of sex and reproductive state on interactions between free-roaming domestic dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Sparkes

    Full Text Available Free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris are common worldwide, often maintaining diseases of domestic pets and wildlife. Management of these dogs is difficult and often involves capture, treatment, neutering and release. Information on the effects of sex and reproductive state on intraspecific contacts and disease transmission is currently lacking, but is vital to improving strategic management of their populations. We assessed the effects of sex and reproductive state on short-term activity patterns and contact rates of free-roaming dogs living in an Australian Indigenous community. Population, social group sizes and rates of contact were estimated from structured observations along walked transects. Simultaneously, GPS telemetry collars were used to track dogs' movements and to quantify the frequency of contacts between individual animals. We estimated that the community's dog population was 326 ± 52, with only 9.8 ± 2.5% confined to a house yard. Short-term activity ranges of dogs varied from 9.2 to 133.7 ha, with males ranging over significantly larger areas than females. Contacts between two or more dogs occurred frequently, with entire females and neutered males accumulating significantly more contacts than spayed females or entire males. This indicates that sex and reproductive status are potentially important to epidemiology, but the effect of these differential contact rates on disease transmission requires further investigation. The observed combination of unrestrained dogs and high contact rates suggest that contagious disease would likely spread rapidly through the population. Pro-active management of dog populations and targeted education programs could help reduce the risks associated with disease spread.

  5. Effects of sex and reproductive state on interactions between free-roaming domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Jessica; Körtner, Gerhard; Ballard, Guy; Fleming, Peter J S; Brown, Wendy Y

    2014-01-01

    Free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris) are common worldwide, often maintaining diseases of domestic pets and wildlife. Management of these dogs is difficult and often involves capture, treatment, neutering and release. Information on the effects of sex and reproductive state on intraspecific contacts and disease transmission is currently lacking, but is vital to improving strategic management of their populations. We assessed the effects of sex and reproductive state on short-term activity patterns and contact rates of free-roaming dogs living in an Australian Indigenous community. Population, social group sizes and rates of contact were estimated from structured observations along walked transects. Simultaneously, GPS telemetry collars were used to track dogs' movements and to quantify the frequency of contacts between individual animals. We estimated that the community's dog population was 326 ± 52, with only 9.8 ± 2.5% confined to a house yard. Short-term activity ranges of dogs varied from 9.2 to 133.7 ha, with males ranging over significantly larger areas than females. Contacts between two or more dogs occurred frequently, with entire females and neutered males accumulating significantly more contacts than spayed females or entire males. This indicates that sex and reproductive status are potentially important to epidemiology, but the effect of these differential contact rates on disease transmission requires further investigation. The observed combination of unrestrained dogs and high contact rates suggest that contagious disease would likely spread rapidly through the population. Pro-active management of dog populations and targeted education programs could help reduce the risks associated with disease spread.

  6. Childhood adversity, social support networks and well-being among youth aging out of care: An exploratory study of mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkman, Eran P

    2017-10-01

    The goals of the present study are to examine the relationship between childhood adversity and adult well-being among vulnerable young adults formerly placed in substitute care, and to investigate how characteristics of their social support networks mediate this association. A sample of 345 Israeli young adults (ages 18-25), who had aged out of foster or residential care, responded to standardized self-report questionnaires tapping their social support network characteristics (e.g., network size or adequacy) vis-à-vis several types of social support (emotional, practical, information and guidance), experiences of childhood adversity, and measures of well-being (psychological distress, loneliness, and life satisfaction). Structural equation modelling (SEM) provided support for the mediating role of social support in the relationship between early adversity and adult well-being. Although network size, frequency of contact with its members, satisfaction with support, and network adequacy, were all negatively related to early adversity, only network adequacy showed a major and consistent contribution to the various measures of well-being. While patterns were similar across the types of support, the effects of practical and guidance support were most substantial. The findings suggest that the detrimental long-term consequences of early adversity on adult well-being are related not only to impaired structural aspects of support (e.g., network size), but also to a decreased ability to recognize available support and mobilize it. Practical and guidance support, more than emotional support, seem to be of critical importance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) Support for Lunar and L1/L2 CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaire, Scott; Altunc, Serhat; Wong, Yen; Shelton, Marta; Celeste, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Perrotto, Trish

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) consists of globally distributed tracking stations, including NASA, commercial, and partner ground stations, that are strategically located to maximize the coverage provided to a variety of orbital and suborbital missions, including those in LEO, GEO, HEO, lunar and L1/L2 orbits. The NENs future mission set includes and will continue to include CubeSat missions. The majority of the CubeSat missions destined to fly on EM-1, launching in late 2018, many in a lunar orbit, will communicate with ground based stations via X-band and will utilize the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed IRIS radio. The NEN recognizes the important role CubeSats are beginning to play in carrying out NASAs mission and is therefore investigating the modifications needed to provide IRIS radio compatibility. With modification, the NEN could potentially expand support to the EM-1 lunar CubeSats.The NEN could begin providing significant coverage to lunar CubeSat missions utilizing three to four of the NENs mid-latitude sites. This coverage would supplement coverage provided by the JPL Deep Space Network (DSN). The NEN, with smaller apertures than DSN, provides the benefit of a larger beamwidth that could be beneficial in the event of uncertain ephemeris data. In order to realize these benefits the NEN would need to upgrade stations targeted based on coverage ability and current configuration/ease of upgrade, to ensure compatibility with the IRIS radio. In addition, the NEN is working with CubeSat radio developers to ensure NEN compatibility with alternative CubeSat radios for Lunar and L1/L2 CubeSats. The NEN has provided NEN compatibility requirements to several radio developers who are developing radios that offer lower cost and, in some cases, more capabilities with fewer constraints. The NEN is ready to begin supporting CubeSat missions. The NEN is considering network upgrades to broaden the types of CubeSat missions that can be supported and is

  8. The effect of social networking sites on the relationship between perceived social support and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Matthew A; Walsh, Michael; Wattier, Kristina; Knigge, Ryan; Miller, Lindsey; Stevermer, Michalene; Fogas, Bruce S

    2016-12-30

    This study examined whether Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have a negative moderator effect on the established relationship between perceived social support and depression in psychiatric inpatients. Survey instruments assessing for depression, perceived social support, and SNS use, were filled out by 301 psychiatric inpatients. Additional data on age, gender, and primary psychiatric diagnosis were collected. A step-wise multiple regression analysis was performed to determine significant interactions. There was no significant interaction of SNS use on the relationship between perceived social support and depression when measured by Social Media Use Integration Scale or by hours of SNS use per day. There was a significant negative relationship between perceived social support and depression, and a significant positive relationship between hours of SNS use per day and depression, measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Limitations include a gender discrepancy among participants, generalizability, recall bias, and SNS measurement. This is the first study to look at SNS use and depression in psychiatric inpatients. SNS use did not affect perceived social support or the protective relationship between perceived social support and depression. Hours of SNS use per day were correlated with depression scores. Future studies between SNS use and depression should quantify daily SNS use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Bayesian networks to analyze occupational stress caused by work demands: preventing stress through social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Herrero, Susana; Mariscal, M A; Gutiérrez, J M; Ritzel, Dale O

    2013-08-01

    Occupational stress is a major health hazard and a serious challenge to the effective operation of any company and represents a major problem for both individuals and organizations. Previous researches have shown that high demands (e.g. workload, emotional) combined with low resources (e.g. support, control, rewards) are associated with adverse health (e.g. psychological, physical) and organizational impacts (e.g. reduced job satisfaction, sickness absence). The objective of the present work is to create a model to analyze how social support reduces the occupational stress caused by work demands. This study used existing Spanish national data on working conditions collected by the Spanish Ministry of Labour and Immigration in 2007, where 11,054 workers were interviewed by questionnaire. A probabilistic model was built using Bayesian networks to explain the relationships between work demands and occupational stress. The model also explains how social support contributes positively to reducing stress levels. The variables studied were intellectually demanding work, overwork, workday, stress, and social support. The results show the importance of social support and of receiving help from supervisors and co-workers in preventing occupational stress. The study provides a new methodology that explains and quantifies the effects of intellectually demanding work, overwork, and workday in occupational stress. Also, the study quantifies the importance of social support to reduce occupational stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-supporting oxygen reduction electrocatalysts made from a nitrogen-rich network polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Watanabe, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2012-12-05

    We report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a new type of non-precious-metal catalyst made from network polymers. 2,6-Diaminopyridine was selected as a building-block monomer for the formation of a nitrogen-rich network polymer that forms self-supporting spherical backbone structures and contains a high density of metal-coordination sites. A Co-/Fe-coordinating pyrolyzed polymer exhibited a high specific oxygen reduction activity with onset and half-wave potentials of 0.87 and 0.76 V vs RHE, respectively, in neutral media. There was no crossover effect of organics on its activity. The power output of a microbial fuel cell equipped with this catalyst on its cathode was more than double the output with a commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst.

  11. Big Multidimensional Datasets Visualization Using Neural Networks – Efficient Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintautas Dzemyda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays business information systems are thought of as decision-oriented systems supported by different types of subsystems. Multidimensional data visualization is an essential part of such systems. As datasets tend to be increasingly large, more effective ways are required to display, analyze and interpret information they contain. Most of the classical visualization methods are unsuitable for large datasets. This paper focuses on the artificial neural networks-based methods for visualization of big multidimensional datasets; namely,  on the approaches for the faster obtaining of visual results. The new strategy, which is identified by the decreased number of cycles of data reviews (passes of training data up to the only one, when training neural networks, is proposed. To test this strategy, the results of experiments, using two unsupervised learning methods on benchmark data, are briefly presented.

  12. Social networks and support in first-episode psychosis: exploring the role of loneliness and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Oliver; Onwumere, Juliana; Kane, Fergus; Morgan, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    To investigate social support and network features in people with first-episode psychosis, and to examine anxiety as a possible mediator between loneliness and a rating of paranoia. Thirty-eight people with first-episode psychosis were recruited for a cross-sectional study. Self-report questionnaires and structured interviews assessed symptoms, functioning, and qualitative social network and support features. A mood-induction task involved watching anxiety-inducing pictures on a computer screen. Visual analogue scales assessed changes in paranoia, anxiety and loneliness and a mediation analysis was conducted. One-third of the sample (34%) had no confidant [95% CI (18.4, 50.0%)]. The average number of weekly contacts was 3.9, with 2.6 lonely days. Poor perceived social support, loneliness and the absence of a confidant were strongly associated with psychosis and depressive symptoms (0.35 loneliness and paranoia was mediated through anxiety (ab = 0.43, z = 3.5; p Anxiety may be one pathway through which loneliness affects psychosis. Interventions which focus on this are indicated.

  13. Social networks and support in first episode psychosis: exploring the role of loneliness and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Oliver; Onwumere, Juliana; Kane, Fergus; Morgan, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate social support and network features in people with first episode psychosis, and to examine anxiety as a possible mediator between loneliness and a rating of paranoia. METHOD Thirty eight people with first-episode psychosis were recruited for a cross-sectional study. Self report questionnaires and structured interviews assessed symptoms, functioning, and qualitative social network and support features. A mood-induction task involved watching anxiety-inducing pictures on a computer screen. Visual analogue scales assessed changes in paranoia, anxiety and loneliness and a mediation analysis was conducted. RESULTS One third of the sample (34%) had no confidant (95% CI 18.4%, 50.0%). The average number of weekly contacts was 3.9, with 2.6 lonely days. Poor perceived social support, loneliness and the absence of a confidant were strongly associated with psychosis and depressive symptoms (.35loneliness and paranoia was mediated through anxiety (ab=.43, z=3.5; pAnxiety may be one pathway through which loneliness affects psychosis. Interventions which focus on this are indicated. PMID:23955376

  14. Increased Modularity of Resting State Networks Supports Improved Narrative Production in Aphasia Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, E Susan; Small, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    The networks that emerge in the analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data are believed to reflect the intrinsic organization of the brain. One key property of such complex biological networks is modularity, a measure of community structure. This topological characteristic changes in neurological disease and recovery. Nineteen subjects with language disorders after stroke (aphasia) underwent neuroimaging and behavioral assessment at multiple time points before (baseline) and after an imitation-based therapy. Language was assessed with a narrative production task. Group independent component analysis was performed on the rsfMRI data to identify resting state networks (RSNs). For each participant and each rsfMRI acquisition, we constructed a graph comprising all RSNs. We assigned nodal community based on a region's RSN membership, calculated the modularity score, and then correlated changes in modularity and therapeutic gains on the narrative task. We repeated this comparison controlling for pretherapy performance and using a community structure not based on RSN membership. Increased RSN modularity was positively correlated with improvement on the narrative task immediately post-therapy. This finding remained significant when controlling for pretherapy performance. There were no significant findings for network modularity and behavior when nodal community was assigned without consideration of RSN membership. We interpret these findings as support for the adaptive role of network segregation in behavioral improvement in aphasia therapy. This has important clinical implications for the targeting of noninvasive brain stimulation in poststroke remediation and suggests potential for further insight into the processes underlying such changes through computational modeling.

  15. CIRCUIT-DESIGN SOLUTIONS AND INFORMATION SUPPORT OF CITY ELECTRIC NETWORKS IN THE CONDITIONS OF THE SMART GRID

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. Fursanov

    2017-01-01

    The structure, circuit-design solutions and information support of the city electric networks in the conditions of the SMART GRID have been analyzed. It is demonstrated that the new conditions of functioning of electric power engineering, increasing demands for its technological state and reliability in most countries determined the transition to a restructuring of electrical networks to be based on the SMART GRID (intelligent power networks) innovative new structure. The definitions of the S...

  16. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Zhang, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2 at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2 in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2 (p = 0.003. Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives.

  17. Social networks, work and network-based resources for the management of long-term conditions: a framework and study protocol for developing self-care support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapadia Dharmi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the effective targeting and promotion of self-care support for long-term conditions requires more of a focus on patient contexts and networks. The aim of this paper is to describe how within a programme of research and implementation, social networks are viewed as being centrally involved in the mobilisation and deployment of resources in the management of a chronic condition. This forms the basis of a novel approach to understanding, designing, and implementing new forms of self-management support. Methods Drawing on evidence syntheses about social networks and capital and the role of information in self-management, we build on four conceptual approaches to inform the design of our research on the implementation of self-care support for people with long-term conditions. Our approach takes into consideration the form and content of social networks, notions of chronic illness work, normalisation process theory (NPT, and the whole systems informing self-management engagement (WISE approach to self-care support. Discussion The translation and implementation of a self-care agenda in contemporary health and social context needs to acknowledge and incorporate the resources and networks operating in patients' domestic and social environments and everyday lives. The latter compliments the focus on healthcare settings for developing and delivering self-care support by viewing communities and networks, as well as people suffering from long-term conditions, as a key means of support for managing long-term conditions. By focusing on patient work and social-network provision, our aim is to open up a second frontier in implementation research, to translate knowledge into better chronic illness management, and to shift the emphasis towards support that takes place outside formal health services.

  18. Social networks, work and network-based resources for the management of long-term conditions: a framework and study protocol for developing self-care support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Anne; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Sanders, Caroline; Kirk, Susan; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Kennedy, Anne; Protheroe, Joanne; Bower, Peter; Blickem, Christian; Reeves, David; Kapadia, Dharmi; Brooks, Helen; Fullwood, Catherine; Richardson, Gerry

    2011-05-29

    Increasing the effective targeting and promotion of self-care support for long-term conditions requires more of a focus on patient contexts and networks. The aim of this paper is to describe how within a programme of research and implementation, social networks are viewed as being centrally involved in the mobilisation and deployment of resources in the management of a chronic condition. This forms the basis of a novel approach to understanding, designing, and implementing new forms of self-management support. Drawing on evidence syntheses about social networks and capital and the role of information in self-management, we build on four conceptual approaches to inform the design of our research on the implementation of self-care support for people with long-term conditions. Our approach takes into consideration the form and content of social networks, notions of chronic illness work, normalisation process theory (NPT), and the whole systems informing self-management engagement (WISE) approach to self-care support. The translation and implementation of a self-care agenda in contemporary health and social context needs to acknowledge and incorporate the resources and networks operating in patients' domestic and social environments and everyday lives. The latter compliments the focus on healthcare settings for developing and delivering self-care support by viewing communities and networks, as well as people suffering from long-term conditions, as a key means of support for managing long-term conditions. By focusing on patient work and social-network provision, our aim is to open up a second frontier in implementation research, to translate knowledge into better chronic illness management, and to shift the emphasis towards support that takes place outside formal health services.

  19. Network Regulation and Support Schemes - How Policy Interactions Affect the Integration of Distributed Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropenus, Stephanie; Jacobsen, Henrik; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate the interactions between the policy dimensions of support schemes and network regulation and how they affect distributed generation. Firstly, the incentives of distributed generators and distribution system operators are examined. Frequently there exists a trade......-off between the incentives for these two market agents to facilitate the integration of distributed generation. Secondly, the interaction of these policy dimensions is analyzed, including case studies based on five EU Member States. Aspects of operational nature and investments in grid and distributed...... generation facilities are covered. The question in which policy segment to incorporate locational signals is at the heart of the debate...

  20. Evaluation of Strategies for Dynamic Routing Algorithms in Support of Flex-Grid based GMPLS Elastic Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turus, Ioan; Kleist, Josva; Fagertun, Anna Manolova

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate OSPF-TE extensions within GMPLS framework in support of flex-grid optical networks. Based on OSPF-TE LSAs, two routing strategies are proposed achieving up to 15% and 70% respectively improved blocking ratio for low loaded network (10-30 Erlangs) compared to the shortest path scenario....

  1. Lean on me? The influence of parental separation and divorce on children’s support networks in four European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmijn, M.; Dronkers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Using data on 14-year old children in four European countries, this study compares the support networks of children in intact and separated families. It is found that a parental separation has significant effects on the nature of these networks. Children of separated parents are less likely to

  2. Offline Social Relationships and Online Cancer Communication: Effects of Social and Family Support on Online Social Network Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, Kang; Shah, Dhavan V; Gustafson, David H

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates how social support and family relationship perceptions influence breast cancer patients' online communication networks in a computer-mediated social support (CMSS) group. To examine social interactions in the CMSS group, we identified two types of online social networks: open and targeted communication networks. The open communication network reflects group communication behaviors (i.e., one-to-many or "broadcast" communication) in which the intended audience is not specified; in contrast, the targeted communication network reflects interpersonal discourses (i.e., one-to-one or directed communication) in which the audience for the message is specified. The communication networks were constructed by tracking CMSS group usage data of 237 breast cancer patients who participated in one of two National Cancer Institute-funded randomized clinical trials. Eligible subjects were within 2 months of a diagnosis of primary breast cancer or recurrence at the time of recruitment. Findings reveal that breast cancer patients who perceived less availability of offline social support had a larger social network size in the open communication network. In contrast, those who perceived less family cohesion had a larger targeted communication network in the CMSS group, meaning they were inclined to use the CMSS group for developing interpersonal relationships.

  3. Predictors of change in social networks, support and satisfaction following a first episode psychosis: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Laoise; Owens, Liz; Lyne, John; O'Donoghue, Brian; Roche, Eric; Drennan, Jonathan; Sheridan, Ann; Pilling, Mark; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Clarke, Mary

    2017-11-01

    Diminished social networks are common in psychosis but few studies have measured these comprehensively and prospectively to determine how networks and support evolve during the early phase. There is little information regarding perceived support in the early phase of illness. The aim of this study was to describe social support, networks and perceived satisfaction, explore the clinical correlates of these outcomes and examine whether phases of untreated psychosis are linked with social network variables to determine potential opportunities for intervention. During the study period, we assessed 222 people with first-episode psychosis at entry into treatment using valid and reliable measures of diagnosis, positive and negative symptoms, periods of untreated psychosis and prodrome and premorbid adjustment. For follow-up we contacted participants to conduct a second assessment (n=158). There were 97 people who participated which represented 61% of those eligible. Social network and support information obtained at both time points included the number of friends, self-reported satisfaction with support and social network size and clinician's evaluation of the degree of support received through networks. Mixed effects modelling determined the contribution of potential explanatory variables to social support measured. A number of clinical variables were linked with social networks, support and perceived support and satisfaction. The size of networks did not change over time but those with no friends and duration of untreated psychosis was significantly longer for those with no friends at entry into treatment (n=129, Median=24.5mths, IQR=7.25-69.25; Mann-Whitney U=11.78, p=0.008). Social support at baseline and at one year was predicted by homelessness (t=-2.98, p=0.001, CI -4.74 to -1.21), duration of untreated psychosis (t=-0.86, p=0.031, CI -1.65 to -0.08) and premorbid adjustment (t=-2.26, p=0.017, CI -4.11 to -0.42). Social support improved over time but the duration

  4. The Impact of Social Support Networks on Mental and Physical Health in the Transition to Older Adulthood: A Longitudinal, Pattern-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Katherine L.; Jager, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Social support is a multidimensional construct that consists of the type of support, the direction of support, the sources or targets of support, and whether support is actual or potential. We used latent class analysis to uncover network types based on these dimensions and to examine the association between network types and well-being among…

  5. Networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes as superior catalysts for methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meihua; Zhang, Jianshuo; Wu, Chuxin; Guan, Lunhui

    2017-02-01

    The high cost and short lifetime of the Pt-based anode catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) hamper the widespread commercialization of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Therefore, improving the activity of Pt-based catalysts is necessary for their practical application. For the first time, we prepared networks of connected Pt nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes with loading ratio as high as 91 wt% (Pt/MWCNTs). Thanks for the unique connected structure, the Pt mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs for methanol oxidation reaction is 4.4 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C (20 wt%). When carbon support is considered, the total mass activity of Pt/MWCNTs is 20 times as active as that of the commercial Pt/C. The durability and anti-poisoning ability are also improved greatly.

  6. Electrocardiogram Pattern Recognition and Analysis Based on Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Sansone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer systems for Electrocardiogram (ECG analysis support the clinician in tedious tasks (e.g., Holter ECG monitored in Intensive Care Units or in prompt detection of dangerous events (e.g., ventricular fibrillation. Together with clinical applications (arrhythmia detection and heart rate variability analysis, ECG is currently being investigated in biometrics (human identification, an emerging area receiving increasing attention. Methodologies for clinical applications can have both differences and similarities with respect to biometrics. This paper reviews methods of ECG processing from a pattern recognition perspective. In particular, we focus on features commonly used for heartbeat classification. Considering the vast literature in the field and the limited space of this review, we dedicated a detailed discussion only to a few classifiers (Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines because of their popularity; however, other techniques such as Hidden Markov Models and Kalman Filtering will be also mentioned.

  7. Automated and comprehensive link engineering supporting branched, ring, and mesh network topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, J.; Khomchenko, D.; Yevseyenko, D.; Meester, J.; Richter, A.

    2016-02-01

    Link design, while relatively easy in the past, can become quite cumbersome with complex channel plans and equipment configurations. The task of designing optical transport systems and selecting equipment is often performed by an applications or sales engineer using simple tools, such as custom Excel spreadsheets. Eventually, every individual has their own version of the spreadsheet as well as their own methodology for building the network. This approach becomes unmanageable very quickly and leads to mistakes, bending of the engineering rules and installations that do not perform as expected. We demonstrate a comprehensive planning environment, which offers an efficient approach to unify, control and expedite the design process by controlling libraries of equipment and engineering methodologies, automating the process and providing the analysis tools necessary to predict system performance throughout the system and for all channels. In addition to the placement of EDFAs and DCEs, performance analysis metrics are provided at every step of the way. Metrics that can be tracked include power, CD and OSNR, SPM, XPM, FWM and SBS. Automated routine steps assist in design aspects such as equalization, padding and gain setting for EDFAs, the placement of ROADMs and transceivers, and creating regeneration points. DWDM networks consisting of a large number of nodes and repeater huts, interconnected in linear, branched, mesh and ring network topologies, can be designed much faster when compared with conventional design methods. Using flexible templates for all major optical components, our technology-agnostic planning approach supports the constant advances in optical communications.

  8. Analysis of social networks supporting the self-management of type 2 diabetes for people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotty, Mikaila M; Henderson, Julie; Ward, Paul R; Fuller, Jeffrey; Rogers, Anne; Kralik, Debbie; Gregory, Sue

    2015-07-04

    People with mental illness have been identified as being more likely to experience type 2 diabetes and the complications arising from this, necessitating more complex chronic illness self-management. Social support has been identified as a significant factor in the successful adoption of lifestyle change for people with type 2 diabetes, however people with mental illness often have impoverished social networks leading to greater reliance upon professional care givers. This study maps the support provided by formal (paid and professional carers) and informal networks to people with mental illness and type 2 diabetes, comparing the experiences of people with a spouse with those without one. Interviews were conducted with 29 clients of a community nursing service with mental health problems who receive professional support to self-manage type 2 diabetes. Participants were asked to complete an egocentric social network map which involved mapping the people and services who support them to manage their health. Demographic data was collected as was data about co-morbidities and service use within the last 6 months. Network maps were supplemented by a series of open-ended questions about self-management practices, who supports these practices and what support they provide. Participants identified small social networks with few friendship ties. These networks had diminished due to illness. For people with a spouse, this person provided significant support for chronic illness self-management performing a range of daily care and illness management tasks. People without a spouse were more reliant on professional and paid care givers for daily care and illness management. People without a spouse also demonstrated greater reliance upon weak social ties for emotional support and social connection and often developed friendships with formal caregivers. Spousal support reduces the need for professional services. In the absence of a spouse, participants were more reliant upon paid

  9. The role of social support and social networks in health information-seeking behavior among Korean Americans: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonsun; Kreps, Gary L; Shin, Cha-Nam

    2015-04-28

    This study used social network theory to explore the role of social support and social networks in health information-seeking behavior among Korean American (KA) adults. A descriptive qualitative study using a web-based online survey was conducted from January 2013 to April 2013 in the U.S. The survey included open-ended questions about health information-seeking experiences in personal social networks and their importance in KA adults. Themes emerging from a constant comparative analysis of the narrative comments by 129 of the 202 respondents were analyzed. The sample consisted of 129 KA adults, 64.7% female, with a mean age of 33.2 (SD = 7.7). Friends, church members, and family members were the important network connections for KAs to obtain health information. KAs looked for a broad range of health information from social network members, from recommendations and reviews of hospitals/doctors to specific diseases or health conditions. These social networks were regarded as important for KAs because there were no language barriers, social network members had experiences similar to those of other KAs, they felt a sense of belonging with those in their networks, the network connections promoted increased understanding of different health care systems of the U.S. system, and communication with these network connections helped enhance feelings of being physically and mentally healthy. This study demonstrates the important role that social support and personal social networks perform in the dissemination of health information for a large ethnic population, KAs, who confront distinct cultural challenges when seeking health information in the U.S. Data from this study also illustrate the cultural factors that influence health information acquisition and access to social support for ethnic minorities. This study provides practical insights for professionals in health information services, namely, that social networks can be employed as a channel for disseminating

  10. CLASSIFICATION OF ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTIONS BY NEURAL NETWORKS, DECISION TREES AND SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Zekić-Sušac

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurial intentions of students are important to recognize during the study in order to provide those students with educational background that will support such intentions and lead them to successful entrepreneurship after the study. The paper aims to develop a model that will classify students according to their entrepreneurial intentions by benchmarking three machine learning classifiers: neural networks, decision trees, and support vector machines. A survey was conducted at a Croatian university including a sample of students at the first year of study. Input variables described students’ demographics, importance of business objectives, perception of entrepreneurial carrier, and entrepreneurial predispositions. Due to a large dimension of input space, a feature selection method was used in the pre-processing stage. For comparison reasons, all tested models were validated on the same out-of-sample dataset, and a cross-validation procedure for testing generalization ability of the models was conducted. The models were compared according to its classification accuracy, as well according to input variable importance. The results show that although the best neural network model produced the highest average hit rate, the difference in performance is not statistically significant. All three models also extract similar set of features relevant for classifying students, which can be suggested to be taken into consideration by universities while designing their academic programs.

  11. When information is insufficient: inspiring patients for medication adherence and the role of social support networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Maureen; Heryer, John W

    2011-01-01

    A report presented by the RAND Corporation for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality recommends that patient self-management programs should include supportive coaching, and the World Health Organization has suggested that the enhancement of patient motivation and behavioral skills is crucial to increasing patient care adherence. The US healthcare reform legislation also provides incentives for evidence-based activities (eg, coaching) that promote healthy behaviors. To review the current research on evidence-based coaching methods and their impact on medication adherence, as well as offer practical applications for such coaching interventions. The authors review the role of medication adherence in reducing the burden of chronic diseases, using the definitions of coaching and Network Coaching as a starting point for interventions that can enhance providers' skills in motivating patients to improve their treatment adherence. Practical examples are included throughout the article to illustrate the benefits of these coaching methods for patients and providers. The mnemonic COPE is used to assist providers in the recall of 4 significant coaching and Network Coaching concepts-connectedness and collaboration, open-ended questions, positive attitude, and encourage support. Following COPE can reinforce physicians and pharmacists in their attempt to improve patient medication adherence. The article presents healthcare providers, including physicians and pharmacists, with a rationale for developing evidence-based coaching skills and offers suggestions for the application of key coaching concepts.

  12. Monthly evaporation forecasting using artificial neural networks and support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Gulay; Buyukyildiz, Meral

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation is one of the most important components of the hydrological cycle, but is relatively difficult to estimate, due to its complexity, as it can be influenced by numerous factors. Estimation of evaporation is important for the design of reservoirs, especially in arid and semi-arid areas. Artificial neural network methods and support vector machines (SVM) are frequently utilized to estimate evaporation and other hydrological variables. In this study, usability of artificial neural networks (ANNs) (multilayer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function network (RBFN)) and ɛ-support vector regression (SVR) artificial intelligence methods was investigated to estimate monthly pan evaporation. For this aim, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and precipitation data for the period 1972 to 2005 from Beysehir meteorology station were used as input variables while pan evaporation values were used as output. The Romanenko and Meyer method was also considered for the comparison. The results were compared with observed class A pan evaporation data. In MLP method, four different training algorithms, gradient descent with momentum and adaptive learning rule backpropagation (GDX), Levenberg-Marquardt (LVM), scaled conjugate gradient (SCG), and resilient backpropagation (RBP), were used. Also, ɛ-SVR model was used as SVR model. The models were designed via 10-fold cross-validation (CV); algorithm performance was assessed via mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and coefficient of determination (R 2). According to the performance criteria, the ANN algorithms and ɛ-SVR had similar results. The ANNs and ɛ-SVR methods were found to perform better than the Romanenko and Meyer methods. Consequently, the best performance using the test data was obtained using SCG(4,2,2,1) with R 2 = 0.905.

  13. Health Social Networks as Online Life Support Groups for Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Edhelmira Lima, E-mail: edhyly@ic.uff.br; Loques, Orlando Filho [Instituto de Computação - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco [Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    The number of patients who use the internet in search for information that might improve their health conditions has increased. Among them, those looking for virtual environments to share experiences, doubts, opinions, and emotions, and to foster relationships aimed at giving and getting support stand out. Therefore, there is an increasing need to assess how those environments can affect the patients' health. This study was aimed at identifying scientific studies on the proliferation and impact of virtual communities, known as health social networks or online support groups, directed to cardiovascular diseases, which might be useful to patients with certain conditions, providing them with information and emotional support. A systematic review of the literature was conducted with articles published from 2007 to 2012, related to cardiovascular diseases and collected from the following databases: PubMed; Association for Computing Machinery(ACM); and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Four articles meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The results were interesting and relevant from the health viewpoint, identifying therapeutic benefits, such as provision of emotional support, greater compliance to treatment, and information sharing on diseases and on life experiences.

  14. Burden, professional support, and social network in families of children and young adults with muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliano, Lorenza; Patalano, Melania; Sagliocchi, Alessandra; Scutifero, Marianna; Zaccaro, Antonella; D'angelo, Maria Grazia; Civati, Federica; Brighina, Erika; Vita, Giuseppe; Vita, Gian Luca; Messina, Sonia; Sframeli, Maria; Pane, Marika; Lombardo, Maria Elena; Scalise, Roberta; D'amico, Adele; Colia, Giulia; Catteruccia, Michela; Balottin, Umberto; Berardinelli, Angela; Chiara Motta, Maria; Angelini, Corrado; Gaiani, Alessandra; Semplicini, Claudio; Bello, Luca; Battini, Roberta; Astrea, Guja; Politano, Luisa

    2015-07-01

    This study explores burden and social and professional support in families of young patients with muscular dystrophies (MDs) in Italy. The study was carried out on 502 key relatives of 4- to 25-year-old patients suffering from Duchenne, Becker, or Limb-Girdle MD who were living with at least 1 adult relative. A total of 77.1% of relatives reported feelings of loss, 74.0% had feelings of sadness, and 59.1% had constraints in leisure activities. Burden was higher among relatives of patients with higher disability and who spent more daily hours in caregiving. Practical difficulties were higher among relatives who perceived lower help in patient emergencies and less practical support by their social network. Psychological burden was higher in those relatives who were unemployed, those with poorer support in emergencies, and those with lower social contacts. Caring for patients with MDs may be demanding for relatives even in the early stages of these disorders, especially when social support is poor and the patient's disability increases. © 2014 The Authors. Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gender differences in the relationship between social network support and mortality: a longitudinal study of an elderly cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shye, D; Mullooly, J P; Freeborn, D K; Pope, C R

    1995-10-01

    Despite well-recognized gender differences in patterns of social network support, few studies have explored whether the pathways by which social support affects mortality risk differ for men and women. In a 15-year follow-up study of elderly HMO members, we found that network size affected men's mortality risk indirectly, through their health status, while no such indirect effect was found for women. The data also suggested that network size had a direct protective effect on mortality risk for both men and women, with men gaining protection at a lower level of network size than women. These findings confirm the need for a gender-specific approach to further research on this subject, and suggest the need to measure variables that capture the different meaning and value of social network participation for men and women.

  16. [The elderly with cognitive alterations in the context of poverty: a study of the social support network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Tábatta Renata Pereira; Costa, Reijane Salazar; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the structure and role of social support networks for the elderly with cognitive alterations, who lived in a context of high or very high social vulnerability, and identify the associations between the characteristics of the networks and functional capacity. The participants were 38 aged individuals living in a context of high or very high social vulnerability whose score on the Mini-Mental State Examination was below the cut-off point. All ethical considerations were observed. The following were administered: Mini-Mental State Examination, Convoy of Social Support, Katz Index, and Pfeffer Questionnaire. The results show that the elderly participants have a large social network, with most members in their inner circle, but only a few of the members play functional roles. A correlation was observed between the gender variable and the number of social network members. No significant correlation was observed between network characteristics and the functional capacity of the elderly.

  17. Is Wildlife Going to the Dogs? Impacts of Feral and Free-Roaming Dogs on Wildlife Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Julie K.; Olson, Kirk A.; Reading, Richard P.; Amgalanbaatar, Sukh; Berger, Joel

    2011-01-01

    In human-populated landscapes, dogs (Canis familiaris) are often the most abundant terrestrial carnivore. However, dogs can significantly disrupt or modify intact ecosystems well beyond the areas occupied by people. Few studies have directly quantified the environmental or economic effects of free-roaming and feral dogs. Here, we review wildlife-dog interactions and provide a case study that focuses on interactions documented from our research in Mongolia to underscore the need for studies de...

  18. Environmental Impact and Relative Invasiveness of Free-Roaming Domestic Carnivores—a North American Survey of Governmental Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lepe

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the United States and Canadian governmental agencies investigated the environmental impact and relative invasiveness of free-roaming domestic non-native carnivores—dogs, cats, and ferrets. Agencies represented wildlife, fish, game, natural or environmental resources, parks and recreation, veterinary and human health, animal control, and agriculture. Respondents were asked to document the number and frequency of sightings of unconfined animals, evidence for environmental harm, and the resulting “degree of concern” in their respective jurisdictions. Results confirmed the existence of feral (breeding cats and dogs, documenting high levels of concern regarding the impact of these animals on both continental and surrounding insular habitats. Except for occasional strays, no free-roaming or feral ferrets were reported; nor were there reports of ferrets impacting native wildlife, including ground-nesting birds, or sensitive species. This is the first study to report the relative impact of free-roaming domestic carnivores. Dogs and cats meet the current definition of “invasive” species, whereas ferrets do not. Differences in how each species impacts the North American environment highlights the complex interaction between non-native species and their environment. Public attitudes and perceptions regarding these species may be a factor in their control and agency management priorities.

  19. Environmental Impact and Relative Invasiveness of Free-Roaming Domestic Carnivores-a North American Survey of Governmental Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepe, Ana; Kaplan, Valerie; Arreaza, Alirio; Szpanderfer, Robert; Bristol, David; Sinclair, M Scott

    2017-10-14

    A survey of the United States and Canadian governmental agencies investigated the environmental impact and relative invasiveness of free-roaming domestic non-native carnivores-dogs, cats, and ferrets. Agencies represented wildlife, fish, game, natural or environmental resources, parks and recreation, veterinary and human health, animal control, and agriculture. Respondents were asked to document the number and frequency of sightings of unconfined animals, evidence for environmental harm, and the resulting "degree of concern" in their respective jurisdictions. Results confirmed the existence of feral (breeding) cats and dogs, documenting high levels of concern regarding the impact of these animals on both continental and surrounding insular habitats. Except for occasional strays, no free-roaming or feral ferrets were reported; nor were there reports of ferrets impacting native wildlife, including ground-nesting birds, or sensitive species. This is the first study to report the relative impact of free-roaming domestic carnivores. Dogs and cats meet the current definition of "invasive" species, whereas ferrets do not. Differences in how each species impacts the North American environment highlights the complex interaction between non-native species and their environment. Public attitudes and perceptions regarding these species may be a factor in their control and agency management priorities.

  20. Source and Size of Emotional and Financial-Related Social Support Network on Physical Activity Behavior Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Joyner, Chelsea

    2016-07-01

    To examine the association of source of emotional- and financial-related social support and size of social support network on physical activity behavior among older adults. Data from the 1999-2006 NHANES were used (N = 5616; 60 to 85 yrs). Physical activity and emotional- and financial-related social support were assessed via self-report. Older adults with perceived having emotional social support had a 41% increased odds of meeting physical activity guidelines (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.01-1.97). The only specific sources of social support that were associated with meeting physical activity guidelines was friend emotional support (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.01-1.41) and financial support (OR = 1.28; 95% CI: 1.09-1.49). With regard to size of social support network, a dose-response relationship was observed. Compared with those with 0 close friends, those with 1 to 2, 3 to 4, 5, and 6+ close friends, respectively, had a 1.70-, 2.38-, 2.57-, and 2.71-fold increased odds of meeting physical activity guidelines. There was some evidence of gender- and age-specific associations between social support and physical activity. Emotional- and financial-related social support and size of social support network are associated with higher odds of meeting physical activity guidelines among older adults.

  1. Population Dynamics of Owned, Free-Roaming Dogs: Implications for Rabies Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conan, Anne; Akerele, Oluyemisi; Simpson, Greg; Reininghaus, Bjorn; van Rooyen, Jacques; Knobel, Darryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is a serious yet neglected public health threat in resource-limited communities in Africa, where the virus is maintained in populations of owned, free-roaming domestic dogs. Rabies elimination can be achieved through the mass vaccination of dogs, but maintaining the critical threshold of vaccination coverage for herd immunity in these populations is hampered by their rapid turnover. Knowledge of the population dynamics of free-roaming dog populations can inform effective planning and implementation of mass dog vaccination campaigns to control rabies. Methodology/Principal Findings We implemented a health and demographic surveillance system in dogs that monitored the entire owned dog population within a defined geographic area in a community in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. We quantified demographic rates over a 24-month period, from 1st January 2012 through 1st January 2014, and assessed their implications for rabies control by simulating the decline in vaccination coverage over time. During this period, the population declined by 10%. Annual population growth rates were +18.6% in 2012 and -24.5% in 2013. Crude annual birth rates (per 1,000 dog-years of observation) were 451 in 2012 and 313 in 2013. Crude annual death rates were 406 in 2012 and 568 in 2013. Females suffered a significantly higher mortality rate in 2013 than males (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.28–1.85). In the age class 0–3 months, the mortality rate of dogs vaccinated against rabies was significantly lower than that of unvaccinated dogs (2012: MRR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.05–0.21; 2013: MRR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.11–0.69). The results of the simulation showed that achieving a 70% vaccination coverage during annual campaigns would maintain coverage above the critical threshold for at least 12 months. Conclusions and Significance Our findings provide an evidence base for the World Health Organization’s empirically-derived target of 70% vaccination coverage

  2. The "Tracked Roaming Transect" and distance sampling methods increase the efficiency of underwater visual censuses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo J Irigoyen

    Full Text Available Underwater visual census (UVC is the most common approach for estimating diversity, abundance and size of reef fishes in shallow and clear waters. Abundance estimation through UVC is particularly problematic in species occurring at low densities and/or highly aggregated because of their high variability at both spatial and temporal scales. The statistical power of experiments involving UVC techniques may be increased by augmenting the number of replicates or the area surveyed. In this work we present and test the efficiency of an UVC method based on diver towed GPS, the Tracked Roaming Transect (TRT, designed to maximize transect length (and thus the surveyed area with respect to diving time invested in monitoring, as compared to Conventional Strip Transects (CST. Additionally, we analyze the effect of increasing transect width and length on the precision of density estimates by comparing TRT vs. CST methods using different fixed widths of 6 and 20 m (FW3 and FW10, respectively and the Distance Sampling (DS method, in which perpendicular distance of each fish or group of fishes to the transect line is estimated by divers up to 20 m from the transect line. The TRT was 74% more time and cost efficient than the CST (all transect widths considered together and, for a given time, the use of TRT and/or increasing the transect width increased the precision of density estimates. In addition, since with the DS method distances of fishes to the transect line have to be estimated, and not measured directly as in terrestrial environments, errors in estimations of perpendicular distances can seriously affect DS density estimations. To assess the occurrence of distance estimation errors and their dependence on the observer's experience, a field experiment using wooden fish models was performed. We tested the precision and accuracy of density estimators based on fixed widths and the DS method. The accuracy of the estimates was measured comparing the actual

  3. An Examination of a Virtual Private Network Implementation to Support a Teleworking Initiative: The Marcus Food Company Inc. Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jason W.

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, the author examined the capabilities of virtual private networks (VPNs) in supporting teleworking environments for small businesses in the food marketing sector. The goal of this research was to develop an implementation model for small businesses in the food marketing sector that use a VPN solution to support teleworker…

  4. Lessons learnt from applying action research to support strategy formation processes in long-term care networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, Hendrik; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Voordijk, Johannes T.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how action research (AR) that is aimed at scaling-up experiments can be applied to support a strategy formation process (SFP) in a subsidized long-term care network. Previous research has developed numerous AR frameworks to support experiments in various domains, but has

  5. Tooling and Language Support for Robust and Easy Network Programming of Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xinxin

    2017-01-01

    Most of today’s mobile apps rely on the underlying networks to deliver key func- tions such as web browsing, file synchronization, and social networking. Compared to desktop-based networks, mobile networks are much more dynamic with frequent con- nectivity disruptions, network type switches, and quality changes, posing unique pro- gramming challenges for mobile app developers.As revealed in this thesis, many mobile app developers fail to handle these inter- mittent network conditions in the m...

  6. The Integrated Marine Postdoc Network: Support for postdoctoral researchers in marine sciences in Kiel, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Schelten, Christiane K.

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role postdoctoral researchers play in the German academic system their status is largely undefined: Being challenged by a multitude of tasks, their employment situation is often characterized by short term contracts and a well-defined and articulated academic career path is lacking. Moreover, their employment situation becomes increasingly insecure as the time post Ph.D. increases unless they manage to shift into a tenured professorship or into similar opportunities in the non-academic employment sector. All this results in insecurity in terms of career perspectives. The support of postdoctoral researchers through the 'Integrated Marine Postdoc Network (IMAP)' has been identified as one of the strategic goals of the Cluster of Excellence 'The Future Ocean' in Kiel, Germany, a large collaborative research project funded through the German Excellence Initiative. To improve the situation of researchers post Ph.D., IMAP has identified three main actions: Building a vibrant community of postdoctoral researchers, engaging in a strategic dialogue on structural changes within the academic system in Germany with special emphasis on more predictable career paths below the professorship level and enhancing the competitiveness of postdoctoral researchers in marine sciences in Kiel through tailored schemes for career support. Since 2012 IMAP has developed into a vibrant network of researchers post Ph.D. who engage in the diverse disciplines of marine sciences in Kiel - in natural, social and medical sciences, computing, economics, and law. With currently more than 90 members working at one of the partner institutions of the Cluster in Kiel - Kiel University, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, and the Institute for the World Economy the network hosts broad scientific expertise in integrated ocean research. It is professionally coordinated and operates at the interface between the partner institutions and large scale collaborative research projects

  7. A Bayesian belief network for quality assessment: application to employment officer support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooff, D A; Schneider, J M

    2006-02-01

    'Supported' employment stipulates that disabled people should have real jobs for real pay. This paper models kinds of supported employment, assesses how the support and placement features affect its outcomes and its quality from the perspective of the employees, and provides a dynamic model to help explore what types of interventions might promote greater social inclusion for people with learning and other disabilities. Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) provide the general framework for modelling the relationships between the variables and features of interest. The structure, probabilistic specification and quality indicators were elicited from project advisory groups, including people with learning disability, and took into account a pilot survey of 30 individuals. A subsequent survey of 1,461 supported employees was used to update the model and to provide actual assessments of quality of placement. We present the BBN methodology in some detail, as novel to this discipline. We show how the model was constructed, and its implications for supported employment. We derive indices for quality of placement, taking into account the views of clients. We show how survey and individual results can be used to update the model. Use of the model suggests that quality of placement is, on average, relatively high, with small differences between groups with differing primary disability. The BBN is the appropriate methodology to model complex relationships and interventions for problems such as these. The model developed in this study can be used to assess and improve the fit between people and jobs, both at the individual level and for groups of employees, and can take into account different kinds of quality for different stakeholders.

  8. Social networking site (SNS) use by adolescent mothers: Can social support and social capital be enhanced by online social networks? - A structured review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Samantha; Hendricks, Joyce; Ferguson, Sally; Towell, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    to critically appraise the available literature and summarise the evidence relating to adolescent mothers' use of social networking sites in terms of any social support and social capital they may provide and to identify areas for future exploration. social networking sites have been demonstrated to provide social support to marginalised individuals and provide psycho-social benefits to members of such groups. Adolescent mothers are at risk of; social marginalisation; anxiety disorders and depressive symptoms; and poorer health and educational outcomes for their children. Social support has been shown to benefit adolescent mothers thus online mechanisms require consideration. a review of original research articles METHOD: key terms and Boolean operators identified research reports across a 20-year timeframe pertaining to the area of enquiry in: CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline, Scopus, ERIC, ProQuest, PsychINFO, Web of Science, Health Collection (Informit) and Google Scholar databases. Eight original research articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. studies demonstrate that adolescent mothers actively search for health information using the Internet and social networking sites, and that social support and social capital can be attributed to their use of specifically created online groups from within targeted health interventions. Use of a message board forum for pregnant and parenting adolescents also demonstrates elements of social support. There are no studies to date pertaining to adolescent mothers' use of globally accessible social networking sites in terms of social support provision and related outcomes. further investigation is warranted to explore the potential benefits of adolescent mothers' use of globally accessible social networking sites in terms of any social support provision and social capital they may provide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Korean American dementia caregivers' attitudes toward caregiving: the role of social network versus satisfaction with social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youjung; Choi, Sunha

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Korean American family caregivers view the services they offer to patients with dementia. It also investigated the roles of social networks and satisfaction with social support on attitudes toward caregiving. Social network, satisfaction with social support, demographic characteristics, caregiving-related stress factors, and cultural factors were examined. We used a convenience sample of 85 Korean American dementia caregivers. The results from hierarchical multiple regression models show that the level of satisfaction with social support significantly contributed to Korean American caregivers' attitudes toward working with patients with dementia, while no statistically significant associate was found for social network. Higher levels of satisfaction with social support were associated with greater positive attitudes toward caregiving among Korean American caregivers (b = 0.26, p = .024). The implications for mental health professionals and policy makers are discussed.

  10. Cancer based pharmacogenomics network supported with scientific evidences: from the view of drug repurposing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Liu, Hongfang; Chute, Christopher G; Zhu, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) as an emerging field, is poised to change the way we practice medicine and deliver health care by customizing drug therapies on the basis of each patient's genetic makeup. A large volume of PGx data including information among drugs, genes, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been accumulated. Normalized and integrated PGx information could facilitate revelation of hidden relationships among drug treatments, genomic variations, and phenotype traits to better support drug discovery and next generation of treatment. In this study, we generated a normalized and scientific evidence supported cancer based PGx network (CPN) by integrating cancer related PGx information from multiple well-known PGx resources including the Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB), the FDA PGx Biomarkers in Drug Labeling, and the Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). We successfully demonstrated the capability of the CPN for drug repurposing by conducting two case studies. The CPN established in this study offers comprehensive cancer based PGx information to support cancer orientated research, especially for drug repurposing.

  11. An Efficient and QoS Supported Multichannel MAC Protocol for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Song

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs employ multichannel to provide a variety of safety and non-safety (transport efficiency and infotainment applications, based on the IEEE 802.11p and IEEE 1609.4 protocols. Different types of applications require different levels Quality-of-Service (QoS support. Recently, transport efficiency and infotainment applications (e.g., electronic map download and Internet access have received more and more attention, and this kind of applications is expected to become a big market driver in a near future. In this paper, we propose an Efficient and QoS supported Multichannel Medium Access Control (EQM-MAC protocol for VANETs in a highway environment. The EQM-MAC protocol utilizes the service channel resources for non-safety message transmissions during the whole synchronization interval, and it dynamically adjusts minimum contention window size for different non-safety services according to the traffic conditions. Theoretical model analysis and extensive simulation results show that the EQM-MAC protocol can support QoS services, while ensuring the high saturation throughput and low transmission delay for non-safety applications.

  12. Stability in the Social Support Networks of Homeless Families in Shelter: Findings from a Study of Families in a Faith-Based Shelter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Craig, Patricia; Koehly, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The following article outlines a longitudinal study tracking changes of the social support networks of 28 homeless families in shelter. Weekly changes in support networks of homeless mothers were tracked including 482 dyadic ties between mothers and supportive persons. Findings suggested that informal social support and persons who provided…

  13. SARS-coronavirus replication is supported by a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kèvin Knoops

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses, a large group including human pathogens such as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, replicate in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Their replication complexes are commonly associated with modified host cell membranes. Membrane structures supporting viral RNA synthesis range from distinct spherular membrane invaginations to more elaborate webs of packed membranes and vesicles. Generally, their ultrastructure, morphogenesis, and exact role in viral replication remain to be defined. Poorly characterized double-membrane vesicles (DMVs were previously implicated in SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. We have now applied electron tomography of cryofixed infected cells for the three-dimensional imaging of coronavirus-induced membrane alterations at high resolution. Our analysis defines a unique reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum that integrates convoluted membranes, numerous interconnected DMVs (diameter 200-300 nm, and "vesicle packets" apparently arising from DMV merger. The convoluted membranes were most abundantly immunolabeled for viral replicase subunits. However, double-stranded RNA, presumably revealing the site of viral RNA synthesis, mainly localized to the DMV interior. Since we could not discern a connection between DMV interior and cytosol, our analysis raises several questions about the mechanism of DMV formation and the actual site of SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. Our data document the extensive virus-induced reorganization of host cell membranes into a network that is used to organize viral replication and possibly hide replicating RNA from antiviral defense mechanisms. Together with biochemical studies of the viral enzyme complex, our ultrastructural description of this "replication network" will aid to further dissect the early stages of the coronavirus life cycle and its virus-host interactions.

  14. A Decision Support System For Equipment Allocation In A Telemedicine Referral Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treurnicht, Maria J.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine applications have had much success in strengthening health systems worldwide. Unfortunately, many systems are implemented without decisions based on proper needs assessments. In South Africa, this technology push approach has led to a large amount of equipment standing dormant. It is proposed that the potential of telemedicine be measured prior to implementation, thus pulling the technology towards a clinical need. A decision support system is developed that uses health informatics and computational intelligence to determine the need for telemedicine and to allocate equipment in a network of facilities to achieve the best cost benefit. The system facilitates the collection and storage of electronic health record (EHR data in a data warehouse. A linear programming model is used with a genetic algorithm. The system was developed and tested for the South African public health sector, using data from 27 hospitals in the Western Cape Province. Results have shown that if telemedicine workstations with specific peripheral equipment, as determined by the algorithm, were implemented in the given period, an estimated R8.7 million in referral costs could have been saved for the 27 hospitals. Thus the case study provided evidence for the benefits of implementation in the chosen network of hospitals. This new application of health informatics could provide telemedicine management with a useful tool for making implementation decisions based on evidence. Future work would include the development of similar systems for other markets.

  15. AQM controller design for networks supporting TCP vegas: a control theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Nooshin; Haeri, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model and control theoretical framework for designing AQM controllers in networks supporting TCP Vegas is introduced. We have emphasized on a modified TCP Vegas algorithm that can respond to congestion signals through explicit congestion notification (ECN). The overall nonlinear delayed differential equations of the dynamics model of closed loop system have been derived based on TCP Vegas model. The model is then linearized to derive a transfer function representation between the packet marking probability and the bottleneck router queue length as the input and output of the modified TCP Vegas/AQM system. The model properties have been then examined especially for the case of single bottleneck homogeneous network which is closely investigated. Finally an AQM controller based on Coefficient Diagram Method (CDM) has been designed for the system and its performance has been compared with some other AQM controllers. CDM is a new indirect pole placement method that considers the speed, stability and robustness of the closed loop system in terms of time domain specifications. In order for synthesizing the simulation scenarios, our campus router traffic has been studied experimentally for a sample period of one hour and the corresponding parameters has been extracted. The simulation results are representative of good performance of developed TCP Vegas/AQM structure for different simulated scenarios.

  16. Design and implementation of wireless dose logger network for radiological emergency decision support system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiation Impact Assessment Section, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2016-08-15

    A decision support system (DSS) is implemented in Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for providing guidance for emergency decision making in case of an inadvertent nuclear accident. Real time gamma dose rate measurement around the stack is used for estimating the radioactive release rate (source term) by using inverse calculation. Wireless gamma dose logging network is designed, implemented, and installed around the Madras Atomic Power Station reactor stack to continuously acquire the environmental gamma dose rate and the details are presented in the paper. The network uses XBee–Pro wireless modules and PSoC controller for wireless interfacing, and the data are logged at the base station. A LabView based program is developed to receive the data, display it on the Google Map, plot the data over the time scale, and register the data in a file to share with DSS software. The DSS at the base station evaluates the real time source term to assess radiation impact.

  17. Application of neural networks and support vector machine for significant wave height prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadran Berbić

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available For the purposes of planning and operation of maritime activities, information about wave height dynamics is of great importance. In the paper, real-time prediction of significant wave heights for the following 0.5–5.5 h is provided, using information from 3 or more time points. In the first stage, predictions are made by varying the quantity of significant wave heights from previous time points and various ways of using data are discussed. Afterwards, in the best model, according to the criteria of practicality and accuracy, the influence of wind is taken into account. Predictions are made using two machine learning methods – artificial neural networks (ANN and support vector machine (SVM. The models were built using the built-in functions of software Weka, developed by Waikato University, New Zealand.

  18. A comparative study of support vector machines and artificial neural networks for predicting precipitation in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Omid; Poorolajal, Jalal; Sadeghifar, Majid; Abbasi, Hamed; Maryanaji, Zohreh; Faridi, Hamid Reza; Tapak, Lily

    2015-02-01

    This study compared two machine learning techniques, support vector machines (SVM), and artificial neural network (ANN) in modeling monthly precipitation fluctuations. The SVM and ANN approaches were applied to the monthly precipitation data of two synoptic stations in Hamadan (Airport and Nojeh), the west of Iran. To avoid overfitting, the data were divided into two parts of training (70 %) and test sets (30 %). Then, monthly data from July 1976 to June 2001 and data from April 1961 to November 1996 were considered as training set for the Hamadan and Nojeh stations, respectively, and the remaining were used as test set. The results of the SVM model were compared with those of the ANN based on the root mean square errors, mean absolute errors, determination coefficient, and efficiency coefficient criteria. Based on the comparison, it was found that the SVM model outperformed the ANN, and the estimated precipitation values were in good agreement with the corresponding observed values.

  19. Microscopy and supporting data for osteoblast integration within an electrospun fibrous network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Stachewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains data related to the research article entitled “3D imaging of cell interactions with electrospun PLGA nanofiber membranes for bone regeneration” by Stachewicz et al. [1]. In this paper we include additional data showing degradation analysis of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA electrospun fibers in medium and air using fiber diameter distribution histograms. We also describe the steps used in “slice and view” tomography techniques with focused ion beam (FIB microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM and detail the image analysis to obtain 3D reconstruction of osteoblast cell integration with electrospun network of fibers. Further supporting data and detailed information on the quantification of cell growth within the electrospun nanofiber membranes is provided.

  20. Meteorological Support Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG) Instrumentation, Data Format, and Networks Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James; Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of instrumentation discussed at the Meteorological Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG), a reference for data formats currently used by members of the group, a summary of proposed formats for future use by the group, an overview of the data networks of the group's members. This document will be updated as new systems are introduced, old systems are retired, and when the MSICWG community necessitates a change to the formats. The MSICWG consists of personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the United States Air Force (USAF) 45th Space Wing and Weather Squadron. The purpose of the group is to coordinate the distribution of weather related data to support NASA space launch related activities.

  1. A speech recognition system based on hybrid wavelet network including a fuzzy decision support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemai, Olfa; Ejbali, Ridha; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims at developing a novel approach for speech recognition based on wavelet network learnt by fast wavelet transform (FWN) including a fuzzy decision support system (FDSS). Our contributions reside in, first, proposing a novel learning algorithm for speech recognition based on the fast wavelet transform (FWT) which has many advantages compared to other algorithms and in which major problems of the previous works to compute connection weights were solved. They were determined by a direct solution which requires computing matrix inversion, which may be intensive. However, the new algorithm was realized by the iterative application of FWT to compute connection weights. Second, proposing a new classification way for this speech recognition system. It operated a human reasoning mode employing a FDSS to compute similarity degrees between test and training signals. Extensive empirical experiments were conducted to compare the proposed approach with other approaches. Obtained results show that the new speech recognition system has a better performance than previously established ones.

  2. Source Authentication for Code Dissemination Supporting Dynamic Packet Size in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Code dissemination in wireless sensor networks (WSNs is a procedure for distributing a new code image over the air in order to update programs. Due to the fact that WSNs are mostly deployed in unattended and hostile environments, secure code dissemination ensuring authenticity and integrity is essential. Recent works on dynamic packet size control in WSNs allow enhancing the energy efficiency of code dissemination by dynamically changing the packet size on the basis of link quality. However, the authentication tokens attached by the base station become useless in the next hop where the packet size can vary according to the link quality of the next hop. In this paper, we propose three source authentication schemes for code dissemination supporting dynamic packet size. Compared to traditional source authentication schemes such as μTESLA and digital signatures, our schemes provide secure source authentication under the environment, where the packet size changes in each hop, with smaller energy consumption.

  3. Thermal Modeling in Support of the Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Edison program is intending to launch a swarm of at least 8 small satellites in 2013. This swarm of 1.5U Cubesats, the Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks (EDSN) project, will demonstrate intra-swarm communications and multi-point in-situ space physics data acquisition. In support of the design and testing of the EDSN satellites, a geometrically accurate thermal model has been constructed. Due to the low duty cycle of most components, no significant overheating issues were found. The predicted mininum temperatures of the external antennas are low enough, however, that some mitigation may be in order. The development and application of the model will be discussed in detail.

  4. A Wireless Sensor Network-Based Approach with Decision Support for Monitoring Lake Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoci Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Online monitoring and water quality analysis of lakes are urgently needed. A feasible and effective approach is to use a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN. Lake water environments, like other real world environments, present many changing and unpredictable situations. To ensure flexibility in such an environment, the WSN node has to be prepared to deal with varying situations. This paper presents a WSN self-configuration approach for lake water quality monitoring. The approach is based on the integration of a semantic framework, where a reasoner can make decisions on the configuration of WSN services. We present a WSN ontology and the relevant water quality monitoring context information, which considers its suitability in a pervasive computing environment. We also propose a rule-based reasoning engine that is used to conduct decision support through reasoning techniques and context-awareness. To evaluate the approach, we conduct usability experiments and performance benchmarks.

  5. A Wireless Sensor Network-Based Approach with Decision Support for Monitoring Lake Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoci; Yi, Jianjun; Chen, Shaoli; Zhu, Xiaomin

    2015-11-19

    Online monitoring and water quality analysis of lakes are urgently needed. A feasible and effective approach is to use a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). Lake water environments, like other real world environments, present many changing and unpredictable situations. To ensure flexibility in such an environment, the WSN node has to be prepared to deal with varying situations. This paper presents a WSN self-configuration approach for lake water quality monitoring. The approach is based on the integration of a semantic framework, where a reasoner can make decisions on the configuration of WSN services. We present a WSN ontology and the relevant water quality monitoring context information, which considers its suitability in a pervasive computing environment. We also propose a rule-based reasoning engine that is used to conduct decision support through reasoning techniques and context-awareness. To evaluate the approach, we conduct usability experiments and performance benchmarks.

  6. Simulating free-roaming cat population management options in open demographic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip S Miller

    Full Text Available Large populations of free-roaming cats (FRCs generate ongoing concerns for welfare of both individual animals and populations, for human public health, for viability of native wildlife populations, and for local ecological damage. Managing FRC populations is a complex task, without universal agreement on best practices. Previous analyses that use simulation modeling tools to evaluate alternative management methods have focused on relative efficacy of removal (or trap-return, TR, typically involving euthanasia, and sterilization (or trap-neuter-return, TNR in demographically isolated populations. We used a stochastic demographic simulation approach to evaluate removal, permanent sterilization, and two postulated methods of temporary contraception for FRC population management. Our models include demographic connectivity to neighboring untreated cat populations through natural dispersal in a metapopulation context across urban and rural landscapes, and also feature abandonment of owned animals. Within population type, a given implementation rate of the TR strategy results in the most rapid rate of population decline and (when populations are isolated the highest probability of population elimination, followed in order of decreasing efficacy by equivalent rates of implementation of TNR and temporary contraception. Even low levels of demographic connectivity significantly reduce the effectiveness of any management intervention, and continued abandonment is similarly problematic. This is the first demographic simulation analysis to consider the use of temporary contraception and account for the realities of FRC dispersal and owned cat abandonment.

  7. Simulating Free-Roaming Cat Population Management Options in Open Demographic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Philip S.; Boone, John D.; Briggs, Joyce R.; Lawler, Dennis F.; Levy, Julie K.; Nutter, Felicia B.; Slater, Margaret; Zawistowski, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Large populations of free-roaming cats (FRCs) generate ongoing concerns for welfare of both individual animals and populations, for human public health, for viability of native wildlife populations, and for local ecological damage. Managing FRC populations is a complex task, without universal agreement on best practices. Previous analyses that use simulation modeling tools to evaluate alternative management methods have focused on relative efficacy of removal (or trap-return, TR), typically involving euthanasia, and sterilization (or trap-neuter-return, TNR) in demographically isolated populations. We used a stochastic demographic simulation approach to evaluate removal, permanent sterilization, and two postulated methods of temporary contraception for FRC population management. Our models include demographic connectivity to neighboring untreated cat populations through natural dispersal in a metapopulation context across urban and rural landscapes, and also feature abandonment of owned animals. Within population type, a given implementation rate of the TR strategy results in the most rapid rate of population decline and (when populations are isolated) the highest probability of population elimination, followed in order of decreasing efficacy by equivalent rates of implementation of TNR and temporary contraception. Even low levels of demographic connectivity significantly reduce the effectiveness of any management intervention, and continued abandonment is similarly problematic. This is the first demographic simulation analysis to consider the use of temporary contraception and account for the realities of FRC dispersal and owned cat abandonment. PMID:25426960

  8. Perceived Stress in Online Prostate Cancer Community Participants: Examining Relationships with Stigmatization, Social Support Network Preference, and Social Support Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Camella J; Bol, Nadine; Burke-Garcia, Amelia; Rains, Stephen; Wright, Kevin B

    2017-06-01

    Men with prostate cancer often need social support to help them cope with illness-related physiological and psychosocial challenges. Whether those needs are met depends on receiving support optimally matched to their needs. This study examined relationships between perceived stress, prostate cancer-related stigma, weak-tie support preference, and online community use for social support in a survey of online prostate cancer community participants (n = 149). Findings revealed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress. This relationship, however, was moderated by weak-tie support preference and online community use for social support. Specifically, stigma was positively related to perceived stress when weak-tie support was preferred. Analyses also showed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress in those who used their online community for advice or emotional support. Health communication scholars should work collaboratively with diagnosed men, clinicians, and online community administrators to develop online interventions that optimally match social support needs.

  9. Are there more than cross-sectional relationships of social support and support networks with functional limitations and psychological distress in early rheumatoid arthritis? the European Research on Incapacitating Diseases and Social Support Longitudinal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demange, V.; Guillemin, F.; Suurmeijer, T.P.; Moum, T.; Doeglas, D.; Briancon, S.; van den Heuvel, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether greater social support and support network are cross-sectionally associated with less functional limitations and psychological distress in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA); whether this association is constant over time; and whether increases in social

  10. Strategic decision support for the expansion strategy of a national breastmilk banking network

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bean, W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available between network players • Transport partnerships – piggy-backing on existing medical distribution networks by using outside parties which travel routinely between the role players in the SABR network, such as pathology laboratories, pharmacies or blood... establish the milk banks, set up public-private synergies, execute quality control and train the volunteer nurses and doctors involved. Consequently, the SABR network would be expanded through decentralisation, spreading the workload amongst network role...

  11. Combining data and meta-analysis to build Bayesian networks for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yet, Barbaros; Perkins, Zane B; Rasmussen, Todd E; Tai, Nigel R M; Marsh, D William R

    2014-12-01

    Complex clinical decisions require the decision maker to evaluate multiple factors that may interact with each other. Many clinical studies, however, report 'univariate' relations between a single factor and outcome. Such univariate statistics are often insufficient to provide useful support for complex clinical decisions even when they are pooled using meta-analysis. More useful decision support could be provided by evidence-based models that take the interaction between factors into account. In this paper, we propose a method of integrating the univariate results of a meta-analysis with a clinical dataset and expert knowledge to construct multivariate Bayesian network (BN) models. The technique reduces the size of the dataset needed to learn the parameters of a model of a given complexity. Supplementing the data with the meta-analysis results avoids the need to either simplify the model - ignoring some complexities of the problem - or to gather more data. The method is illustrated by a clinical case study into the prediction of the viability of severely injured lower extremities. The case study illustrates the advantages of integrating combined evidence into BN development: the BN developed using our method outperformed four different data-driven structure learning methods, and a well-known scoring model (MESS) in this domain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Support Vector Machine Based Mobility Prediction Scheme in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the intelligence of the mobile-aware applications in the heterogeneous wireless networks (HetNets, it is essential to establish an advanced mechanism to anticipate the change of the user location in every subnet for HetNets. This paper proposes a multiclass support vector machine based mobility prediction (Multi-SVMMP scheme to estimate the future location of mobile users according to the movement history information of each user in HetNets. In the location prediction process, the regular and random user movement patterns are treated differently, which can reflect the user movements more realistically than the existing movement models in HetNets. And different forms of multiclass support vector machines are embedded in the two mobility patterns according to the different characteristics of the two mobility patterns. Moreover, the introduction of target region (TR cuts down the energy consumption efficiently without impacting the prediction accuracy. As reported in the simulations, our Multi-SVMMP can overcome the difficulties found in the traditional methods and obtain a higher prediction accuracy and user adaptability while reducing the cost of prediction resources.

  13. Energy-Efficient Region Shift Scheme to Support Mobile Sink Group in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Yongbin; Kim, Kyong Hoon; Aldwairi, Monther; Kim, Ki-Il

    2017-12-30

    Mobile sink groups play crucial roles to perform their own missions in many wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. In order to support mobility of such sink groups, it is important to design a mechanism for effective discovery of the group in motion. However, earlier studies obtain group region information by periodic query. For that reason, the mechanism leads to significant signaling overhead due to frequent flooding for the query regardless of the group movement. Furthermore, the mechanism worsens the problem by the flooding in the whole expected area. To deal with this problem, we propose a novel mobile sink group support scheme with low communication cost, called Region-Shift-based Mobile Geocasting Protocol (RSMGP). In this study, we utilize the group mobility feature for which members of a group have joint motion patterns. Thus, we could trace group movement by shifting the region as much as partial members move out of the previous region. Furthermore, the region acquisition is only performed at the moment by just deviated members without collaboration of all members. Experimental results validate the improved signaling overhead of our study compared to the previous studies.

  14. Social support network and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, David Castro; Sá, Maria José; Calheiros, José Manuel

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the relationship between the social support network (SSN) and health related quality of life (HRQOL) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The sample comprised 150 consecutive MS patients attending our MS clinic. To assess the socio-demographic data, a specifically designed questionnaire was applied. The HRQOL dimensions were measured with the Short-Form Health Survey Questionnaire-SF36 and the SSN with the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey. Spearman's correlation was used to compare the magnitude of the relationship between the SSN and HRQOL. The mean patient age was 41.7 years (± 10.4; range: 18-70 yr); the mean Expanded Disability Status Score was 2.5 (±2.4; range: 0-9). There was a statistically significant correlation between the structure of the SSN and the HRQOL. The composition of the SSN, social group membership and participation in voluntary work have an important role in the HRQOL of patients with MS.

  15. Research on Social Networking Sites and Social Support from 2004 to 2015: A Narrative Review and Directions for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo; Martinez, Lourdes; Holmstrom, Amanda; Chung, Minwoong; Cox, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a narrative review of scholarship on social support through social networking sites (SNSs) published from 2004 to 2015. By searching keywords related to social support and SNSs in major databases for social sciences, we identified and content analyzed directly relevant articles (N = 88). The article summarizes the prevalence of theory usage; the function of theory usage (e.g., testing a theory, developing a theory); major theories referenced; and methodologies, including research designs, measurement, and the roles of social support and SNS examined in this literature. It also reports four themes identified across the studies, indicating the trends in the current research. Based on the review, the article presents a discussion about study sites, conceptualization of social support, theoretical coherence, the role of social networks, and the dynamic relationships between SNS use and social support, which points out potential avenues for shaping a future research agenda.

  16. Social Support Networks and HIV/STI Risk Behaviors Among Latino Immigrants in a New Receiving Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Meghan D; Theall, Katherine; Schmidt, Norine; Hembling, John; Gebrekristos, Hirut T; Thompson, Michelle M; Muth, Stephen Q; Friedman, Samuel R; Kissinger, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe the quantity and quality of social support networks of Latino immigrants living in a new receiving environment, and (2) determine the role such networks play in their HIV/STI risk behaviors, including substance use. Double incentivized convenience sampling was used to collect egocentric social support network data on 144 Latino immigrants. Latent class analysis was used for data reduction and to identify items best suited to measure quality and quantity of social support. Moderate and high quantity and quality of social support were protective of HIV/STI sexual risk behavior compared to low quantity and quality of support, after adjustment for gender, years in New Orleans and residing with family. Neither measure of social support was associated with binge drinking. The findings suggest that increased quantity and quality of social support decrease HIV/STI sexual risk behaviors but do not influence binge drinking. Interventions that improve the quantity and quality of social support are needed for Latino immigrants.

  17. The energy dependence of CO(v,J) produced from H2CO via the transition state, roaming, and triple fragmentation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Mitchell S; Andrews, Duncan U; Nauta, Klaas; Jordan, Meredith J T; Kable, Scott H

    2017-07-07

    The dynamics of CO production from photolysis of H2CO have been explored over a 8000 cm-1 energy range (345 nm-266 nm). Two-dimensional ion imaging, which simultaneously measures the speed and angular momentum distribution of a photofragment, was used to characterise the distribution of rotational and translational energy and to quantify the branching fraction of roaming, transition state (TS), and triple fragmentation (3F) pathways. The rotational distribution for the TS channel broadens significantly with increasing energy, while the distribution is relatively constant for the roaming channel. The branching fraction from roaming is also relatively constant at 20% of the observed CO. Above the 3F threshold, roaming decreases in favour of triple fragmentation. Combining the present data with our previous study on the H-atom branching fractions and published quantum yields for radical and molecular channels, absolute quantum yields were determined for all five dissociation channels for the entire S1←S0 absorption band, covering almost 8000 cm-1 of excitation energy. The S0 radical and TS molecular channels are the most important over this energy range. The absolute quantum yield of roaming is fairly constant ∼5% at all energies. The T1 radical channel is important (20%-40%) between 1500 and 4000 cm-1 above the H + HCO threshold, but becomes unimportant at higher energy. Triple fragmentation increases rapidly above its threshold reaching a maximum of 5% of the total product yield at the highest energy.

  18. Design and evaluation of a peer network to support adherence to a web-based intervention for adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joyce; Corden, Marya E.; Caccamo, Lauren; Tomasino, Kathryn Noth; Duffecy, Jenna; Begale, Mark; Mohr, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression during adolescence is common but can be prevented. Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) designed to prevent depression in adolescence, especially standalone web-based interventions, have shown mixed outcomes, likely due to poor intervention adherence. BIT research involving adults has shown that the presence of coaches or peers promotes intervention use. Developmentally, adolescence is a time when peer-based social relationships take precedence. This study examines whether peer-networked support may promote adherence to BITs in this age group. Objective Adopting the framework of the Supportive Accountability model, which defines the types of human support and interactions required to maintain engagement and persistence with BITs, this paper presents a feasibility study of a peer-networked online intervention for depression prevention among adolescents. We described the development of the peer network, the evaluation of participant use of the peer networking features, and qualitative user feedback to inform continued BIT development. Method Two groups of adolescents (N = 13) participated in 10-week programs of the peer networked based online intervention. Adolescents had access to didactic lessons, CBT based mood management tools, and peer networking features. The peer networking features are integrated into the site by making use expectations explicit, allow network members to monitor the activities of others, and to supportively hold each other accountable for meeting use expectations. The study collected qualitative feedback from participants as well as usage of site features and tools. Results Participants logged in an average of 12.8 sessions over an average of 10.4 unique days during the 10-week program. On average, 66% of all use sessions occurred within the first 3 weeks of use. The number of “exchange comments”, that is, comments posted that were part of an exchange between two or more participants, was significantly

  19. Power structure among the actors of financial support to the poor to access health services: Social network analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadi, Manal; Gorji, Hasan Abolghasem; Kangarani, Hannaneh Mohammadi; Ashtarian, Kioomars

    2017-12-01

    The extent of universal health coverage in terms of financial protection is worrisome in Iran. There are challenges in health policies to guarantee financial accessibility to health services, especially for poor people. Various institutions offer support to ensure that the poor have financial access to health services. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship network among the institutions active in this field. This study is a policy document analysis. It evaluates the country's legal documents in the field of financial support to the poor for healthcare after the Islamic Revolution in Iran. The researchers looked for the documents on the related websites and referred to the related organizations. The social network analysis approach was chosen for the analysis of the documents. Block-modelling and multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) was used to determine the network structures. The UCINET software was employed to analyse the data. Most the main actors of this network are chosen from the government budget. There is no legal communication and cooperation among some of the actors because of their improper position in the network. Seven blocks have been clustered by CONCOR in terms of the actor's degree of similarity. The social distance among the actors of the seven blocks is very short. Power distribution in the field of financial support to the poor has a fragmented structure; however, it is mainly run by a dominant block consisting of The Supreme Council of Welfare and Social Security, Health Insurance Organization, and the Ministry of Health and Medical Education. The financial support for the poor network involves multiple actors. This variety has created a series of confusions in terms of the type, level, and scope of responsibilities among the actors. The weak presence legislative and regulatory institutions and also non-governmental institutions are the main weak points of this network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Data Integration in Support of a Real-Time Biosurveillance Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, S. L.; Scott, G. I.; Miglarese, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    Recent emergency and security events from both human and natural causes have increased the urgency for multidisciplinary data integration. For example, understanding natural resource mortalities on any given day and time of year may result in the timely identification of an intentional biological or chemical act, as well as assist in the development of recovery and restoration plans. The South Carolina Environmental Surveillance Network (ESN) is a real-time surveillance network of coastal-zone wildlife mortality incidents (e.g. fish kills, bird kills, animal disease outbreaks, harmful algal blooms, marine mammal strandings, etc.) that (1) notifies participating network science and regulatory experts of incidents; (2) allows for quick assessments of potential links between and among mortalities and (3) provides a mechanism to alert the emergency management community of incidents that could impact commerce and public health. The ESN data management system relies on a resource-based (or RESTful) approach and includes a Web mapping application that provides access to both real-time and historical data, as well as data flow that analyzes event co-occurrence and provides for email notification of a number of state and federal partners. Notably, it is not simply the occurrence, but the co-occurrence of these events that can signal emergency conditions; thus the real value of the ESN is in its integration of data streams across state and federal administrative lines that have historically provided barriers to data and information flow. In our experience, two recurring types of obstacles to data system integration are particularly challenging. One is the cultural tendency for an agency or agent to maintain tight control over data that they have collected. The second is the reluctance of Information Technology (IT) managers to allow remote access to data systems under their control, regardless of security measures taken. The ESN development has thus far been successful due

  1. The WMO RA VI Regional Climate Centre Network - a support to users in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, S.

    2012-04-01

    Climate, like weather, has no limits. Therefore the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), a specialized United Nations organization, has established a three-level infrastructure to better serve its member countries. This structure comprises Global Producing Centres for Long-range Forecasts (GPCs), Regional Climate Centres (RCCs) and National Meteorological or Hydrometeorological Services (NMHSs), in most cases representing their countries in WMO governance bodies. The elements of this infrastructure are also part of and contribute to the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) agreed to be established by World Climate Conference 3 (WCC-3) and last year's Sixteenth World Meteorological Congress (WMO Cg-XVI). RCCs are the core element of this infrastructure at the regional level and are being establish in all WMO Regional Associations (RAs), i.e. Africa (RA I); Asia (II); South America (III); North America, Central America and the Caribbean (IV); South-West Pacific (V); Europe (VI). Addressing inter-regional areas of common interest like the Mediterranean or the Polar Regions may require inter-regional RCCs. For each region the RCCs follow a user driven approach with regard to governance and structure as well as products generated for the users in the respective region. However, there are common guidelines all RCCs do have to follow. This is to make sure that services are provided based on best scientific standards, are routinely and reliably generated and made available in an operational mode. These guidelines are being developed within WMO and make use of decade-long experience gained in the business of operational weather forecast. Based on the requirements of the 50 member countries of WMO RA VI it was agreed to establish the WMO RCC as a network of centres of excellence that create regional products including long-range forecasts that support regional and national climate activities, and thereby strengthen the capacity of WMO Members in the region to

  2. A low-cost multichannel wireless neural stimulation system for freely roaming animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Monzurul; Chen, Xi; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    Objectives. Electrical stimulation of nerve tissue and recording of neural activity are the basis of many therapies and neural prostheses. Conventional stimulation systems have a number of practical limitations, especially in experiments involving freely roaming subjects. Our main objective was to develop a modular, versatile and inexpensive multichannel wireless system able to overcome some of these constraints. Approach. We have designed and implemented a new multichannel wireless neural stimulator based on commercial components. The system is small (2 cm × 4 cm × 0.5 cm) and light in weight (9 g) which allows it to be easily carried in a small backpack. To test and validate the performance and reliability of the whole system we conducted several bench tests and in vivo experiments. Main results. The performance and accuracy of the stimulator were comparable to commercial threaded systems. Stimulation sequences can be constructed on-the-fly with 251 selectable current levels (from 0 to 250 µA) with 1 µA step resolution. The pulse widths and intervals can be as long as 65 ms in 2 µs time resolution. The system covers approximately 10 m of transmission range in a regular laboratory environment and 100 m in free space (line of sight). Furthermore it provides great flexibility for experiments since it allows full control of the stimulator and the stimulation parameters in real time. When there is no stimulation, the device automatically goes into low-power sleep mode to preserve battery power. Significance. We introduce the design of a powerful multichannel wireless stimulator assembled from commercial components. Key features of the system are their reliability, robustness and small size. The system has a flexible design that can be modified straightforwardly to tailor it to any specific experimental need. Furthermore it can be effortlessly adapted for use with any kind of multielectrode arrays.

  3. [Online Activities to Support Networking in Mental Health Practices in Quebec].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Dominique; Briand, Catherine; Thibault, Véronique; Charbonneau, Karine

    2015-01-01

    ) networking and contact between individuals of different areas and c) access to continuing education remotely. A total of 62 members of the community of practice have actively taken part in one of the 5 debates on the blog. The activity of debate blog a) promotes egalitarian exchanges between different actors in mental health sector, b) encourages diversity of viewpoints and c) create a forum for dialogue and reduce stigma towards people with mental illnesses. For both types of Web activities, technological barriers (network security, outdated computer equipment, etc.) restrained the full participation of the participants. However, the assistance received from organizations and their openness towards new technologies has facilitated the experience of participants in both activities. Online activities as Web conference and debate blog are interesting avenues to facilitate access to knowledge and support exchanges between clinical, academic, community-based communities, people who use mental health services and their families.

  4. Perceived stress in online prostate cancer community participants: Examining relationships with stigmatization, social support network preference, and social support seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rising, C.J.; Bol, N.; Burke-Garcia, A.; Rains, S.; Wright, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Men with prostate cancer often need social support to help them cope with illness-related physiological and psychosocial challenges. Whether those needs are met depends on receiving support optimally matched to their needs. This study examined relationships between perceived stress, prostate

  5. 78 FR 41088 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Support Services for Community Services Division Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Services Division Networks AGENCY: National Institute of Corrections, U.S., Department of Justice. ACTION... for the network participants, prepare a detailed report for the network manager, create a quarterly...

  6. Measures of Patient Activation and Social Support in a Peer-Led Support Network for Women With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Dawn; Benson, Gretchen; Campbell, Susan; Sillah, Arthur; Berra, Kathy

    Social support has been associated with beneficial effects on many disease states and overall health and well-being. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of peer-led support models among women living with coronary heart disease. This study describes the structure of peer-led support groups offered by WomenHeart (WH): The National Coalition for Women Living with Heart Disease, and assesses WH participants' quality of life and social, emotional, and physical health. Participants were recruited from 50 WH groups. A 70-item online survey was administered, and the main analytic sample included 157 women. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient activation levels (lower activation levels: 1, 2 vs higher activation levels: 3, 4) and social support scores (range: lowest 8 to highest 34), adjusting for age. High levels of social support, patient activation, physical activity, and low levels of stress, anxiety, and depression were reported. Those who were at or above the median for the social support measures (indicating high levels of social support) had greater odds of high levels of patient activation (level 3 or 4) than individuals reporting low levels of social support (OR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.04-4.76; P = .012). Women who regularly attended a support group by a trained peer leader were highly engaged in their health care and had low levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. These findings lend credibility to the value of the peer support model and could potentially be replicated in other disease states to enhance patient care.

  7. Dataworks for GNSS: Software for Supporting Data Sharing and Federation of Geodetic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.; Wier, S.; Rost, M.; Matykiewicz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Continuously-operating Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks are increasingly being installed globally for a wide variety of science and societal applications. GNSS enables Earth science research in areas including tectonic plate interactions, crustal deformation in response to loading by tectonics, magmatism, water and ice, and the dynamics of water - and thereby energy transfer - in the atmosphere at regional scale. The many individual scientists and organizations that set up GNSS stations globally are often open to sharing data, but lack the resources or expertise to deploy systems and software to manage and curate data and metadata and provide user tools that would support data sharing. UNAVCO previously gained experience in facilitating data sharing through the NASA-supported development of the Geodesy Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) open source software. GSAC provides web interfaces and simple web services for data and metadata discovery and access, supports federation of multiple data centers, and simplifies transfer of data and metadata to long-term archives. The NSF supported the dissemination of GSAC to multiple European data centers forming the European Plate Observing System. To expand upon GSAC to provide end-to-end, instrument-to-distribution capability, UNAVCO developed Dataworks for GNSS with NSF funding to the COCONet project, and deployed this software on systems that are now operating as Regional GNSS Data Centers as part of the NSF-funded TLALOCNet and COCONet projects. Dataworks consists of software modules written in Python and Java for data acquisition, management and sharing. There are modules for GNSS receiver control and data download, a database schema for metadata, tools for metadata handling, ingest software to manage file metadata, data file management scripts, GSAC, scripts for mirroring station data and metadata from partner GSACs, and extensive software and operator documentation. UNAVCO plans to provide a cloud VM

  8. Supporting patients self-managing respiratory health: a qualitative study on the impact of the Breathe Easy voluntary group network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Ferhana; Merritt, Rowena

    2018-01-01

    Self-management strategies are designed to improve lung and respiratory health through structured self-management plans with regular practitioner reviews. Strategies have not, however, focused upon how patient support groups and advocacy networks can help with the management of these conditions; therefore, it is unknown what impact they may have on patient self-management. A qualitative study was designed to help understand what impact the British Lung Foundation's Breathe Easy (BE) groups have on patients managing their lung and respiratory conditions. A semistructured telephone interview schedule was developed to study the network. Topics covered included: perceptions about the BE groups; current referrals systems and integration pathways; benefits of attending the BE groups; and integration of the BE groups into the respiratory pathway. Key themes explored included: shared patient experience and peer support; patient self-management and self-education; attendance of healthcare professionals; and the impact of integrating BE groups into the respiratory pathway. BE networks were shown to support self-care initiatives for people attending the groups, and members expressed a social and educational benefit. BE networks were working with the local National Health Service to become an integral part of the respiratory pathway, yet there was evidence of resistance from the health service in incorporating the networks.

  9. Controlled retransmission scheme for prioritized burst segmentation to support quality-of-service in optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; He, Tingting; Mao, Tengyue

    2012-10-01

    In optical burst switching (OBS) networks, burst contentions in OBS core nodes may cause data loss. To reduce this data loss, a retransmission scheme has been applied. However, uncontrolled retransmission may significantly increase network load and data loss probability, thus defeating the retransmission purpose. In addition, in a priority traffic existing OBS network, OBS nodes may apply different retransmission mechanisms to priority bursts for quality-of-service (QoS) support. We present a controlled retransmission scheme for prioritized burst segmentation to support QoS in OBS networks. Different from previous work in the literature, we set a different value to retransmission probability at each contention and propose a retransmission analytical model for a burst segmentation contention resolution scheme. In addition, we apply the proposed retransmission scheme to the prioritized burst segmentation for QoS support. We take into account the load at each link due to both the fresh and the retransmitted traffic and calculate the path-blocking probability and the byte loss probability for high-priority and low-priority bursts to evaluate the network performance. An extensive simulation is proposed to validate our analytical model.

  10. Social Support Networks and Quality of Life of Rural Men in a Context of Marriage Squeeze in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sasa; Yang, Xueyan; Attané, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    A significant number of rural Chinese men are facing difficulties in finding a spouse and may fail to ever marry due to a relative scarcity of women in the adult population. Research has indicated that marriage squeeze is a stressful event which is harmful to men's quality of life, and also weakens their social support networks. Using data collected in rural Chaohu city, Anhui, China, this study explores the effects of social support networks on quality of life of rural men who experience a marriage squeeze. The results indicate that the size of social contact networks is directly and positively associated with the quality of life of marriage-squeezed men, and moderate the negative effect of age on quality of life. Having no or limited instrumental support network and social contact network are double-edged swords, which have direct negative associations with the quality of life of marriage-squeezed men, and have moderate effects on the relationship between marriage squeeze and quality of life.

  11. Free-roaming dogs control activities in one Italian province (2000-2013: Is the implemented approach effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, standards for the management of free-roaming dogs (FRDs are defined by regional norms, generating a high variability of approaches around the country. Despite efforts carried out by the competent authorities, FRDs are still a reality impacting upon animal health and welfare and public costs. A similar scenario can be found in many other Mediterranean and Balkan counties. Here we present 14 years of data (2000–2013 retrieved from the admission dog registry of a public shelter (PS responsible for the collection of stray dogs from one Italian province. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the local FRD population, identifying its source and to evaluate the effectiveness of the actions implemented by the local authorities. In the investigated period, 7,475 dogs were admitted to the PS. Despite the intense sterilisation plan (mean 381.7 sterilisations per year, the overall number of dogs entering PS did not decrease consistently across the years. Results highlighted a lack of responsibility of owners by failing to sterilise and identify their dogs and allowing intact animals to roam free, therefore producing uncontrolled and unwanted litters. The current dog population management strategy, based on both sheltering and capture-neuter-release programmes, is insufficient to tackle the straying phenomenon. Educational and sterilisation programmes should be an integral part of a successfully implemented FRD control plan. Our results provide further insight on free-roaming dog population dynamics and control systems, and may have important implications for many other local contexts across Europe trying to overcome the straying phenomenon.

  12. Ecology and Demography of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czupryna, Anna M; Brown, Joel S; Bigambo, Machunde A; Whelan, Christopher J; Mehta, Supriya D; Santymire, Rachel M; Lankester, Felix J; Faust, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    Free-roaming dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) are of public health and conservation concern because of their potential to transmit diseases, such as rabies, to both people and wildlife. Understanding domestic dog population dynamics and how they could potentially be impacted by interventions, such as rabies vaccination, is vital for such disease control efforts. For four years, we measured demographic data on 2,649 free-roaming domestic dogs in four rural villages in Tanzania: two villages with and two without a rabies vaccination campaign. We examined the effects of body condition, sex, age and village on survivorship and reproduction. Furthermore, we compared sources of mortality among villages. We found that adult dogs (>12mos) had higher survival than puppies in all villages. We observed a male-biased sex ratio across all age classes. Overall survival in one non-vaccination village was lower than in the other three villages, all of which had similar survival probabilities. In all villages, dogs in poor body condition had lower survival than dogs in ideal body condition. Sickness and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) predation were the two main causes of dog death. Within vaccination villages, vaccinated dogs had higher survivorship than unvaccinated dogs. Dog population growth, however, was similar in all the villages suggesting village characteristics and ownership practices likely have a greater impact on overall dog population dynamics than vaccination. Free-roaming domestic dogs in rural communities exist in the context of their human owners as well as the surrounding wildlife. Our results did not reveal a clear effect of vaccination programs on domestic dog population dynamics. An investigation of the role of dogs and their care within these communities could provide additional insight for planning and implementing rabies control measures such as mass dog vaccination.

  13. Free-roaming and surrendered dogs and cats submitted to a humane shelter in Wellington , New Zealand , 1999--2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinzin, K; Stevenson, Ma; Probert, Dw; Bird, Rg; Jackson, R; French, Np; Weir, Ja

    2008-12-01

    To describe submissions of dogs and cats to an animal welfare shelter over a 6-year period, and to evaluate the association between the numbers of dogs and cats submitted per square kilometre, human population density, and standardised measures of socioeconomic deprivation. Details of free-roaming and surrendered dogs and cats presented to the Wellington shelter of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) for the period 01 July 1999 to 28 February 2006 were recorded in a relational database. Data were plotted as counts of animals presented to the shelter each month as a function of calendar time. Kernel-smoothing techniques were used to describe the spatial distribution of capture location. The association between the number of dogs and cats submitted per square kilometre, human population density (both estimated at the mesh-block level), and mesh-block socioeconomic deprivation index were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r). The data comprised submission details for 3,709 dogs and 13,563 cats. There was a progressive decline in the number of dogs and cats submitted to the shelter over the study period, and a marked seasonal variation in submissions of cats. Submission density of dogs and cats was positively associated with human population density (Pearson's r=0.12; 95% CI=0.06-0.20 and 0.39; 95% CI=0.33-0.45, respectively) and socioeconomic deprivation (Pearson's r=0.12; 95% CI=0.05- 0.19 for both dogs and cats). Active approaches to free-roaming cat control by the Wellington SPCA should focus on the period June to September, prior to the feline breeding season, in population-dense and socioeconomically deprived areas. Composite analyses of submission details from all animal shelters in the Wellington region should allow factors associated with the distribution of free-roaming dogs and cats to be more precisely estimated.

  14. Ecology and Demography of Free-Roaming Domestic Dogs in Rural Villages near Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Czupryna

    Full Text Available Free-roaming dogs (Canis lupus familiaris are of public health and conservation concern because of their potential to transmit diseases, such as rabies, to both people and wildlife. Understanding domestic dog population dynamics and how they could potentially be impacted by interventions, such as rabies vaccination, is vital for such disease control efforts. For four years, we measured demographic data on 2,649 free-roaming domestic dogs in four rural villages in Tanzania: two villages with and two without a rabies vaccination campaign. We examined the effects of body condition, sex, age and village on survivorship and reproduction. Furthermore, we compared sources of mortality among villages. We found that adult dogs (>12mos had higher survival than puppies in all villages. We observed a male-biased sex ratio across all age classes. Overall survival in one non-vaccination village was lower than in the other three villages, all of which had similar survival probabilities. In all villages, dogs in poor body condition had lower survival than dogs in ideal body condition. Sickness and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta predation were the two main causes of dog death. Within vaccination villages, vaccinated dogs had higher survivorship than unvaccinated dogs. Dog population growth, however, was similar in all the villages suggesting village characteristics and ownership practices likely have a greater impact on overall dog population dynamics than vaccination. Free-roaming domestic dogs in rural communities exist in the context of their human owners as well as the surrounding wildlife. Our results did not reveal a clear effect of vaccination programs on domestic dog population dynamics. An investigation of the role of dogs and their care within these communities could provide additional insight for planning and implementing rabies control measures such as mass dog vaccination.

  15. The role of social network and support in mental health service use: findings from the Baltimore ECA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulik, Pallab K; Eaton, William W; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2009-09-01

    A significant number of people with mental illness do not use mental health services to receive treatment for their symptoms. This study examined the hypothesis that social network and social support affect mental health service use. Data were from the Baltimore cohort of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area study, a prospective cohort study that gathered data over four time points. This study examined data gathered in 1993-1996 (N=1,920) and 2004-2005 (N=1,071). The study examined indicators of social network and social support in relation to four types of service use (general medical, mental health within general medical, specialty psychiatric, and other human services) with multivariate logistic regression. Examples of other human services include a self-help group or crisis center for help with any psychological problem. Weighted generalized estimating equations were used for the analyses. Among persons with major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, or alcohol use disorder in the past year or psychological distress in the past few weeks, general medical service use was reduced when the frequency of contact with relatives or friends occurred less than daily, but it was increased by about 40% when there was a higher than median level of spousal support. In contrast, receiving general medical services for mental health problems was reduced by about 50% when there was a higher than median level of social support from relatives. Specialty psychiatric service use was reduced when there was regular contact with six or more relatives and there was a higher than median level of social support from friends and relatives. None of the social network or social support measures were significantly (pnetwork and higher levels of social support were associated with greater use of general medical services. However, more social support was associated with use of fewer

  16. A Framework for Supporting Survivability, Network Planning and Cross-Layer Optimization in Future Multi-Domain Terabit Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldin, Ilya [Renaissance Computing Inst. (RENCI), Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Huang, Shu [Renaissance Computing Inst. (RENCI), Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gopidi, Rajesh [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-01-28

    This final project report describes the accomplishments, products and publications from the award. It includes the overview of the project goals to devise a framework for managing resources in multi-domain, multi-layer networks, as well the details of the mathematical problem formulation and the description of the prototype built to prove the concept.

  17. Free-roaming dog populations: a cost-benefit model for different management options, applied to Abruzzo, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgåsen, H R; Er, C; Di Nardo, A; Dalla Villa, P

    2013-11-01

    Since 1991, Italian free-roaming dogs have been under government protection and euthanasia is restricted by law. Management measures are regulated at the regional level and include: kennelling, adoptions, conversion of stray dogs into block dogs, and population control of owned dogs. "Block dogs" are free-roaming dogs that have been collected by the veterinary services, microchipped, sterilised, vaccinated, and released under the responsibility of the local municipalities. The present paper describes a cost-benefit model for different management options and applies it to two provinces in Abruzzo, central Italy. The model considers welfare, nuisance and direct costs to the municipality. Welfare is quantified based on the expert opinions of 60 local veterinarians, who were asked to assign a score for each dog category according to the five freedoms: freedom from pain, physical discomfort, disease, fear, and freedom to express normal behaviour. Nuisance was assessed only for comparisons between management options, using the number of free-roaming dogs per inhabitant as a proxy indicator. A community dog population model was constructed to predict the effect of management on the different subpopulations of dogs during a ten-year period. It is a user-friendly deterministic model in Excel, easily adaptable to different communities to assess the impact of their dog management policy on welfare, nuisance and direct monetary cost. We present results for Teramo and Pescara provinces. Today's management system is compared to alternative models, which evaluate the effect of specific interventions. These include either a 10% yearly increase in kennel capacity, an increase in adoptions from kennels, a doubling of the capture of stray dogs, or a stabilisation of the owned dog population. Results indicate that optimal management decisions are complex because welfare, nuisance and monetary costs may imply conflicting interventions. Nevertheless, they clearly indicate that

  18. Exploring the CIGALA/CALIBRA network data base for supporting space weather service over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galera Monico, Joao Francisco; Shimabukuro, Milton; Vani, Bruno; Stuani, Vinicius

    Most of Brazil region is surrounded by equatorial anomaly northwards and southwards. Therefore, investigations related to space weather are quite important and very demanding. For example, GNSS applications are widely affected by ionospheric disturbances, a significant field within space weather. A network for continuous monitoring of ionosphere was deployed over its territory, starting on February/2011. This network was named CIGALA/CALIBRA according to the names of the two projects which originated it. Through CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America), which was funded by European Commission (EC) in the framework of the FP7-GALILEO-2009-GSA (European GNSS Agency), the first stations were deployed at Presidente Prudente, São Paulo state, at February 2011. CIGALA Project was finalized at February 2012 with eight stations distributed over the Brazilian territory. Through CALIBRA (Countering GNSS high Accuracy applications Limitations due to Ionospheric disturbances in BRAzil), which is also funded by the European Commission now in the framework of the FP7-GALILEO-2011-GSA, new stations were deployed. All monitoring stations were specifically placed at locations following geomagnetic arrangements for supporting development of ionospheric models. CALIBRA project started at November 2012 and will have two years of duration, focusing on development of new algorithms that can be applied to high accuracy GNSS techniques (RTK, PPP) in order to tackle the effects of ionospheric disturbances. All the stations have PolarRxS-PRO receivers, manufactured by Septentrio®. This multi-GNSS receiver can collect data up to 100 Hz rates, providing ionospheric indices like TEC, scintillation parameters like S4 and Sigma-Phi, and other signal metrics like locktime for all satellites and frequencies tracked. All collected data is sent to a central facility located at the Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Estadual

  19. Secure Your Wireless Network: Going Wireless Comes with Its Own Special Set of Security Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Jane; Musa, Atif

    2004-01-01

    Imagine a completely wireless school, an open network in which all students and staff can roam around using laptops or handheld computers to browse the Internet, access files and applications on the school server, and communicate with each other and the world via e-mail. It's a great picture--and at some schools the future is already here. But…

  20. High-performance hydrogen production and oxidation electrodes with hydrogenase supported on metallic single-wall carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedružić, Draženka; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Tenent, Robert C; Rocha, John-David R; Vinzant, Todd B; Heben, Michael J; King, Paul W

    2011-03-30

    We studied the electrocatalytic activity of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Clostridium acetobutylicum (CaH2ase) immobilized on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. SWNT networks were prepared on carbon cloth by ultrasonic spraying of suspensions with predetermined ratios of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. Current densities for both proton reduction and hydrogen oxidation electrocatalytic activities were at least 1 order of magnitude higher when hydrogenase was immobilized onto SWNT networks with high metallic tube (m-SWNT) content in comparison to hydrogenase supported on networks with low metallic tube content or when SWNTs were absent. We conclude that the increase in electrocatalytic activities in the presence of SWNTs was mainly due to the m-SWNT fraction and can be attributed to (i) substantial increases in the active electrode surface area, and (ii) improved electronic coupling between CaH2ase redox-active sites and the electrode surface.

  1. Optimizing Social Network Support to Families Living With Parental Cancer: Research Protocol for the Cancer-PEPSONE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauken, May Aasebø; Senneseth, Mette; Dyregrov, Atle; Dyregrov, Kari

    2015-12-30

    Parental cancer can have a significant impact on a family's psychosocial functioning and quality of life, whereby the children's situation is strongly related to parental coping and capacity. Such parents ask for more help in order to increase their care capacity, while the network is often insecure about how to help and thereby withdraw. They ask for guidance and training to be able to support cancer families. Based on this, the Cancer- Psycho-Educational Program for the SOcial NEtwork (PEPSONE) study was developed. To optimize social network support through a psycho-educational program for families living with parental cancer and their network members in order to increase parental capacity and thereby secure the children's safety and quality of life. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which families (N=60) living with parental cancer will be randomized to either an intervention group or a control group. The intervention will last for 3 hours and includes (1) introduction, (2) psycho-education (living with cancer in the family and the importance of social network support), and (3) discussion (this family's need for social support). Primary outcomes are social support, mental health, and quality of life, and secondary outcomes are resilience and parental capacity. Data will be collected by a set of questionnaires distributed to healthy parents (N=60) living with a partner with cancer, one child in the family between 8-18 years of age (N=60), and network members (N=210) of the intervention families at inclusion, and after 3 and 6 months. Comparing differences between the intervention group (n=30) and the control group (n=30), the power analysis shows that Peducational program for families living with parental cancer and their network members, as well as provide an evidence basis for social network support. The results may provide important knowledge that is useful for clinical practice and further research. The trial is reported according to the CONSORT

  2. Condition classification of small reciprocating compressor for refrigerators using artificial neural networks and support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo-Suk; Hwang, Won-Woo; Kim, Dong-Jo; Chit Tan, Andy

    2005-03-01

    The need to increase machine reliability and decrease production loss due to faulty products in highly automated line requires accurate and reliable fault classification technique. Wavelet transform and statistical method are used to extract salient features from raw noise and vibration signals. The wavelet transform decomposes the raw time-waveform signals into two respective parts in the time space and frequency domain. With wavelet transform prominent features can be obtained easily than from time-waveform analysis. This paper focuses on the development of an advanced signal classifier for small reciprocating refrigerator compressors using noise and vibration signals. Three classifiers, self-organising feature map, learning vector quantisation and support vector machine (SVM) are applied in training and testing for feature extraction and the classification accuracies of the techniques are compared to determine the optimum fault classifier. The classification technique selected for detecting faulty reciprocating refrigerator compressors involves artificial neural networks and SVMs. The results confirm that the classification technique can differentiate faulty compressors from healthy ones and with high flexibility and reliability.

  3. eHealth Service Support in Future IPv6 Vehicular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Vèque

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent vehicular networking activities include novel automotive applications, such as public vehicle to vehicle/infrastructure (V2X, large scale deployments, machine-to-machine (M2M integration scenarios, and more. The platform described in this paper focuses on the integration of eHealth in a V2I setting. This is to allow the use of Internet from a vehicular setting to disseminate health-related information. From an eHealth viewpoint, the use of remote healthcare solutions to record and transmit a patient’s vital signs is a special telemedicine application that helps hospital resident health professionals to optimally prepare the patient’s admittance. From the automotive perspective, this is a typical vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I communication scenario. This proposal provides an IPv6 vehicular platform, which integrates eHealth devices and allows sending captured health-related data to a personal health record (PHR application server in the IPv6 Internet. The collected data is viewed remotely by a doctor and supports his diagnostic decision. In particular, our work introduces the integration of vehicular and eHealth testbeds, describes related work and presents a lightweight auto-configuration method based on a DHCPv6 extension to provide IPv6 connectivity with a few numbers of messages.

  4. Target Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Online Semi-Supervised Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehyun Yoo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning has been successfully used for target localization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs due to its accurate and robust estimation against highly nonlinear and noisy sensor measurement. For efficient and adaptive learning, this paper introduces online semi-supervised support vector regression (OSS-SVR. The first advantage of the proposed algorithm is that, based on semi-supervised learning framework, it can reduce the requirement on the amount of the labeled training data, maintaining accurate estimation. Second, with an extension to online learning, the proposed OSS-SVR automatically tracks changes of the system to be learned, such as varied noise characteristics. We compare the proposed algorithm with semi-supervised manifold learning, an online Gaussian process and online semi-supervised colocalization. The algorithms are evaluated for estimating the unknown location of a mobile robot in a WSN. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more accurate under the smaller amount of labeled training data and is robust to varying noise. Moreover, the suggested algorithm performs fast computation, maintaining the best localization performance in comparison with the other methods.

  5. Application of Bayesian networks for hazard ranking of nanomaterials to support human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, Hans J P; Bouzembrak, Yamine; Janssen, Esmée M; van der Zande, Meike; Murphy, Finbarr; Sheehan, Barry; Mullins, Martin; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a Bayesian Network (BN) was developed for the prediction of the hazard potential and biological effects with the focus on metal- and metal-oxide nanomaterials to support human health risk assessment. The developed BN captures the (inter) relationships between the exposure route, the nanomaterials physicochemical properties and the ultimate biological effects in a holistic manner and was based on international expert consultation and the scientific literature (e.g., in vitro/in vivo data). The BN was validated with independent data extracted from published studies and the accuracy of the prediction of the nanomaterials hazard potential was 72% and for the biological effect 71%, respectively. The application of the BN is shown with scenario studies for TiO2, SiO2, Ag, CeO2, ZnO nanomaterials. It is demonstrated that the BN may be used by different stakeholders at several stages in the risk assessment to predict certain properties of a nanomaterials of which little information is available or to prioritize nanomaterials for further screening.

  6. Fractional Snow Cover Mapping by Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftçi, B. B.; Kuter, S.; Akyürek, Z.; Weber, G.-W.

    2017-11-01

    Snow is an important land cover whose distribution over space and time plays a significant role in various environmental processes. Hence, snow cover mapping with high accuracy is necessary to have a real understanding for present and future climate, water cycle, and ecological changes. This study aims to investigate and compare the design and use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs) algorithms for fractional snow cover (FSC) mapping from satellite data. ANN and SVM models with different model building settings are trained by using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance values of bands 1-7, normalized difference snow index and normalized difference vegetation index as predictor variables. Reference FSC maps are generated from higher spatial resolution Landsat ETM+ binary snow cover maps. Results on the independent test data set indicate that the developed ANN model with hyperbolic tangent transfer function in the output layer and the SVM model with radial basis function kernel produce high FSC mapping accuracies with the corresponding values of R = 0.93 and R = 0.92, respectively.

  7. QoS Supported IPTV Service Architecture over Hybrid-Tree-Based Explicit Routed Multicast Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chao Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid advance in multimedia streaming and multicast transport technology, current IP multicast protocols, especially PIM-SM, become the major channel delivery mechanism for IPTV system over Internet. The goals for IPTV service are to provide two-way interactive services for viewers to select popular program channel with high quality for watching during fast channel surfing period. However, existing IP multicast protocol cannot meet above QoS requirements for IPTV applications between media server and subscribers. Therefore, we propose a cooperative scheme of hybrid-tree based on explicit routed multicast, called as HT-ERM to combine the advantages of shared tree and source tree for QoS-supported IPTV service. To increase network utilization, the constrained shortest path first (CSPF routing algorithm is designed for construction of hybrid tree to deliver the high-quality video stream over watching channel and standard quality over surfing channel. Furthermore, the Resource Reservation Protocol- Traffic Engineering (RSVP-TE is used as signaling mechanism to set up QoS path for multicast channel admission control. Our simulation results demonstrated that the proposed HT-ERM scheme outperforms other multicast QoS-based delivery scheme in terms of channel switching delay, resource utilization, and blocking ratio for IPTV service.

  8. Performance Comparison Between Support Vector Regression and Artificial Neural Network for Prediction of Oil Palm Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustakim Mustakim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The largest region that produces oil palm in Indonesia has an important role in improving the welfare of society and economy. Oil palm has increased significantly in Riau Province in every period, to determine the production development for the next few years with the functions and benefits of oil palm carried prediction production results that were seen from time series data last 8 years (2005-2013. In its prediction implementation, it was done by comparing the performance of Support Vector Regression (SVR method and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. From the experiment, SVR produced the best model compared with ANN. It is indicated by the correlation coefficient of 95% and 6% for MSE in the kernel Radial Basis Function (RBF, whereas ANN produced only 74% for R2 and 9% for MSE on the 8th experiment with hiden neuron 20 and learning rate 0,1. SVR model generates predictions for next 3 years which increased between 3% - 6% from actual data and RBF model predictions.

  9. A comparative study of support vector machine, artificial neural network and bayesian classifier for mutagenicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anju; Kumar, Rajnish; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Ahmad, Ausaf; Ashraf, Ghulam Md

    2011-09-01

    Mutagenicity is the capability of a chemical to carry out mutations in genetic material of an organism. In order to curtail expensive drug failures due to mutagenicity found in late development or even in clinical trials, it is crucial to determine potential mutagenicity problems as early as possible. In this work we have proposed three different classifiers, i.e. Support Vector Machine (SVM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and bayesian classifiers, for the prediction of mutagenicity of compounds based on seventeen descriptors. Among the three classifiers Radial Basis Function (RBF) kernel based SVM classifier appeared to be more accurate for classifying the compounds under study on mutagens and non-mutagens. The overall prediction accuracy of SVM model was found to be 71.73% which was appreciably higher than the accuracy of ANN based classifier (59.72%) and bayesian classifier (66.61%). It suggests that SVM based prediction model can be used for predicting mutagenicity more accurately compared to ANN and bayesian classifier for data under consideration.

  10. The HMO Research Network Virtual Data Warehouse: A Public Data Model to Support Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Tyler R; Ng, Daniel; Brown, Jeffrey S; Pardee, Roy; Hornbrook, Mark C; Hart, Gene; Steiner, John F

    2014-01-01

    The HMO Research Network (HMORN) Virtual Data Warehouse (VDW) is a public, non-proprietary, research-focused data model implemented at 17 health care systems across the United States. The HMORN has created a governance structure and specified policies concerning the VDW's content, development, implementation, and quality assurance. Data extracted from the VDW have been used by thousands of studies published in peer-reviewed journal articles. Advances in software supporting care delivery and claims processing and the availability of new data sources have greatly expanded the data available for research, but substantially increased the complexity of data management. The VDW data model incorporates software and data advances to ensure that comprehensive, up-to-date data of known quality are available for research. VDW governance works to accommodate new data and system complexities. This article highlights the HMORN VDW data model, its governance principles, data content, and quality assurance procedures. Our goal is to share the VDW data model and its operations to those wishing to implement a distributed interoperable health care data system.

  11. Systems Medicine in Oncology: Signaling Network Modeling and New-Generation Decision-Support Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Silvio; Riccardi, Giuseppe; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Tortolina, Lorenzo; Maffei, Massimo; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Nencioni, Alessio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Patrone, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Two different perspectives are the main focus of this book chapter: (1) A perspective that looks to the future, with the goal of devising rational associations of targeted inhibitors against distinct altered signaling-network pathways. This goal implies a sufficiently in-depth molecular diagnosis of the personal cancer of a given patient. A sufficiently robust and extended dynamic modeling will suggest rational combinations of the abovementioned oncoprotein inhibitors. The work toward new selective drugs, in the field of medicinal chemistry, is very intensive. Rational associations of selective drug inhibitors will become progressively a more realistic goal within the next 3-5 years. Toward the possibility of an implementation in standard oncologic structures of technologically sufficiently advanced countries, new (legal) rules probably will have to be established through a consensus process, at the level of both diagnostic and therapeutic behaviors.(2) The cancer patient of today is not the patient of 5-10 years from now. How to support the choice of the most convenient (and already clinically allowed) treatment for an individual cancer patient, as of today? We will consider the present level of artificial intelligence (AI) sophistication and the continuous feeding, updating, and integration of cancer-related new data, in AI systems. We will also report briefly about one of the most important projects in this field: IBM Watson US Cancer Centers. Allowing for a temporal shift, in the long term the two perspectives should move in the same direction, with a necessary time lag between them.

  12. CIRCUIT-DESIGN SOLUTIONS AND INFORMATION SUPPORT OF CITY ELECTRIC NETWORKS IN THE CONDITIONS OF THE SMART GRID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fursanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure, circuit-design solutions and information support of the city electric networks in the conditions of the SMART GRID have been analyzed. It is demonstrated that the new conditions of functioning of electric power engineering, increasing demands for its technological state and reliability in most countries determined the transition to a restructuring of electrical networks to be based on the SMART GRID (intelligent power networks innovative new structure. The definitions of the SMART GRID, its various attributes and characteristics in most developed countries including Belarus are presented. It is revealed that the existing and future circuit and constructive solutions that can automate the process of managing modes of urban electric networks under the SMART GRID conditions are manifold. At present, the most common in distribution networks are the sources of distributed generation (combustion turbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic installations, mini-hydro, etc.. The patterns and problems of information traceability of a traditional urban networks of the unified energy system of Belarus have been analyzed, and it is demonstrated that in the conditions of the SMART GRID most of the problems of the control mode that are characteristic for traditional distribution networks 6–10 kV and 0.38 kV, lose their relevance. Therefore, the present article presents and features the main directions of development of automatic control modes of the SMART GRID.

  13. Prognostic significance of social network, social support and loneliness for course of major depressive disorder in adulthood and old age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, R H S; Schutter, N; Hanssen, D. J. C.; Elzinga, B. M.; Rabeling-Keus, I M; Stek, M L; Comijs, H C; Penninx, B W J H; Oude Voshaar, R C

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Poor recovery from depressive disorder has been shown to be related to low perceived social support and loneliness, but not to social network size or frequency of social interactions. Some studies suggest that the significance of social relationships for depression course may be greater in

  14. Enhancing Use of Learning Sciences Research in Planning for and Supporting Educational Change: Leveraging and Building Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Bell, Philip; Bevan, Bronwyn; Buffington, Pam; Falk, Joni

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores practical ways to engage two areas of educational scholarship--research on science learning and research on social networks--to inform efforts to plan and support implementation of new standards. The standards, the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS; NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: For…

  15. Experiences with using information and communication technology to build a multi-municipal support network for informal carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen; Bing-Jonsson, Pia C; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This multi-municipal intervention study explored whether informal carers of frail older people and disabled children living at home made use of information and communication technology (ICT) to gain knowledge about caring and to form informal support networks, thereby improving their health. Seventy-nine informal carers accessed web-based information about caring and an e-based discussion forum via their personal computers. They were able to maintain contact with each other using a web camera and via normal group meetings. After the first 12 months, 17 informal carers participated in focus group interviews and completed a short questionnaire. Four staff members were also interviewed. Participant carers who had prior experiences with a similar ICT-based support network reported greater satisfaction and more extensive use of the network than did participants with no such prior experience. It seems that infrequent usage of the service may be explained by too few other carers to identify with and inappropriate recruitment procedures. Nevertheless, carers of disabled children reported that the intervention had resulted in improved services across the participant municipalities. To achieve optimal effects of an ICT-based support network due attention must be given to recruitment processes and social environment building for which care practitioners require training and support.

  16. Social Networking and Social Support in Tourism Experience: The Moderating Role of Online Self-Presentation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jeongmi; Tussyadiah, Iis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an understanding of how tourists' self-presentation is managed on social networking sites (SNS). Specifically, the study investigated the effects of SNS use on social support and tourism experience and the moderating role of the different tourists' self-pre...

  17. Curriculum Assessment Using Artificial Neural Network and Support Vector Machine Modeling Approaches: A Case Study. IR Applications. Volume 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chau-Kuang

    2010-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) approaches have been on the cutting edge of science and technology for pattern recognition and data classification. In the ANN model, classification accuracy can be achieved by using the feed-forward of inputs, back-propagation of errors, and the adjustment of connection weights. In…

  18. The Social Networks of People with Intellectual Disabilities during the On-Campus Supported Adult Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Minna K.; Jahnukainen, Markku T.; Pirttimaa, Raija A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the social networks of four young people with intellectual disabilities in supported adult education, focusing on their inclusion in school and leisure environments. A multiple case study approach with content analysis was used. Data were collected through interviews with young people and their family members, relationship…

  19. Social Network Support and Decreased Risk of Seroconversion in Black MSM: Results of the Brothers (HPTN 061) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanstyne, Keith A; Green, Harold D; Cook, Ryan; Tieu, Hong-Van; Dyer, Typhanye V; Hucks-Ortiz, Christopher; Wilton, Leo; Latkin, Carl; Shoptaw, Steven

    2018-02-07

    and SettingBlack men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States (U.S.) have disproportionately high HIV infection rates. Social networks have been shown to influence HIV risk behavior; however, little is known about whether they affect the risk of HIV seroconversion. This study uses data from the BROTHERS (HPTN 061) study to test whether contextual factors related to social networks are associated with HIV seroconversion among black MSM.MethodsWe analyzed data from the BROTHERS study (2009-2011), which examined a multi-component intervention for black MSM in 6 U.S. cities. We ran a series of Cox regression analyses to examine associations between time-dependent measures of network support (personal/emotional, financial, medical, and social participation) and time to HIV seroconversion. We ran unadjusted models followed by models adjusted for participant age at enrollment and study location.ResultsA total of 1000 black MSM tested HIV negative at baseline and were followed at 6- and 12-month study visits. Twenty-eight men tested HIV positive. In adjusted hazard ratio models, study participants who remained HIV negative had higher proportions of social network members who provided personal/emotional (0.92 [95% CI = (0.85, 0.99)]), medical (0.92 [95% CI = (0.85, 0.99)]), or social participation (0.91 [95% CI = (0.86, 0.97)]) support.ConclusionFindings suggest that the increased presence of social network support can be protective against HIV acquisition. Future research should explore the processes that link social network support with sexual and other transmission risk behaviors as a basis to inform HIV prevention efforts.

  20. From complex questionnaire and interviewing data to intelligent Bayesian network models for medical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Anthony Costa; Fenton, Norman; Marsh, William; Radlinski, Lukasz

    2016-02-01

    (1) To develop a rigorous and repeatable method for building effective Bayesian network (BN) models for medical decision support from complex, unstructured and incomplete patient questionnaires and interviews that inevitably contain examples of repetitive, redundant and contradictory responses; (2) To exploit expert knowledge in the BN development since further data acquisition is usually not possible; (3) To ensure the BN model can be used for interventional analysis; (4) To demonstrate why using data alone to learn the model structure and parameters is often unsatisfactory even when extensive data is available. The method is based on applying a range of recent BN developments targeted at helping experts build BNs given limited data. While most of the components of the method are based on established work, its novelty is that it provides a rigorous consolidated and generalised framework that addresses the whole life-cycle of BN model development. The method is based on two original and recent validated BN models in forensic psychiatry, known as DSVM-MSS and DSVM-P. When employed with the same datasets, the DSVM-MSS demonstrated competitive to superior predictive performance (AUC scores 0.708 and 0.797) against the state-of-the-art (AUC scores ranging from 0.527 to 0.705), and the DSVM-P demonstrated superior predictive performance (cross-validated AUC score of 0.78) against the state-of-the-art (AUC scores ranging from 0.665 to 0.717). More importantly, the resulting models go beyond improving predictive accuracy and into usefulness for risk management purposes through intervention, and enhanced decision support in terms of answering complex clinical questions that are based on unobserved evidence. This development process is applicable to any application domain which involves large-scale decision analysis based on such complex information, rather than based on data with hard facts, and in conjunction with the incorporation of expert knowledge for decision support

  1. Modelling the Steady State of Sewage Networks as a Support Tool for Their Planning and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Petriczek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental questions connected with the modelling of communal sewage networks have been considered and formulas used to model the functioning of the basic network have been analyzed. The problem described concerns gravitational sewage networks divided by nodes into branches and sectors. Simulation of the steady state functioning of sewage networks is commonly carried out on the basis of nomograms in the form of charts, in which the relations between network parameters like channel diameters, flow rates, hydraulic slopes and flow velocities are described. In traditional design, the values of such parameters are simply read from such nomogram chart tables. Another way of simulating the functioning of a network is the use of professional software, like SWMM, that models sewage flows along the channels by means of differential equations de-scribing the movement of fluids. In both approaches, the user is a mechanical operator of a "black box" procedure. In this paper, another way of simulating the functioning of sewage net-works has been presented. Numerical solutions of nonlinear equations describing the physical phenomena of sewage flows are applied and explained. The presented algorithms were developed to model the steady state of a sewage network enabling a quick analysis of the network parameters and the possibility of fast, simple and comprehensible network modeling and design. (original abstract

  2. From Social Integration to Social Isolation: The Relationship Between Social Network Types and Perceived Availability of Social Support in a National Sample of Older Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasemiw, Oksana; Newall, Nancy; Shooshtari, Shahin; Mackenzie, Corey; Menec, Verena

    2017-01-01

    It is well-documented that social isolation is detrimental to health and well-being. What is less clear is what types of social networks allow older adults to get the social support they need to promote health and well-being. In this study, we identified social network types in a national sample of older Canadians and explored whether they are associated with perceived availability of different types of social support (affectionate, emotional, or tangible, and positive social interactions). Data were drawn from the baseline questionnaire of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging for participants aged 65-85 (unweighted n = 8,782). Cluster analyses revealed six social network groups. Social support generally declined as social networks became more restricted; however, different patterns of social support availability emerged for different social network groups. These findings suggest that certain types of social networks place older adults at risk of not having met specific social support needs.

  3. Design of zone-based bandwidth management scheme in IEEE 802.16 multi-hop relay networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Kuo-Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract IEEE 802.16 Wireless Network technology is a hot research issue in recent years. It provides wider coverage of radio and higher speed wireless access, and Quality-of-Service plays an important part in the standard. For mobile multi-hop wireless network, IEEE 802.16j/MR network not only can supply large area wireless deployment, but also can provide high quality network service to mobile users. Although Mobile QoS supporting has been extensively investigated, Mobile QoS supporting in the IEEE 802.16-MR network is relatively unexplored. In this article, the probability of a mobile user who visits a Relay Station (RS is known beforehand. With the visiting probability at each RS and the system specified size of the range for bandwidth allocation, Base Station (BS can calculate the required bandwidth to meet the mobile user's demand and allocate appropriate bandwidth for a mobile user roaming in the range of the bandwidth allocation. The range of bandwidth allocation for mobile users is called the Zone in this article, which includes the user's current RS and the nearby RSs. The proposed scheme is therefore called Zone-based bandwidth management scheme. The simulation results demonstrate that Zone-based bandwidth management scheme can reduce QoS degradation and bandwidth re-allocation overhead.

  4. Getting support in polarized societies: income, social networks, and socioeconomic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letki, Natalia; Mieriņa, Inta

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how unequal resources and social and economic polarization affects the size of social networks and their use to access resources. We argue that individual resource position generates divergent expectations with regard to the impact of polarization on the size of networks on one hand, and their usefulness for accessing resources on the other. Social and economic polarization encourages reliance on informal networks, but those at the bottom of the social structure are forced to rely on more extensive networks than the wealthy to compensate for their isolated and underprivileged position. At the same time, social and economic polarization limits the resources the poor can access through their networks. We provide evidence consistent with these propositions, based on data derived from the International Social Survey Programme 2001 "Social Networks" dataset combined with contextual information on the levels of economic inequality in particular countries along with whether they experienced postcommunism. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facebook friends with (health) benefits? Exploring social network site use and perceptions of social support, stress, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Robin L; Prestin, Abby; So, Jiyeon

    2013-10-01

    There is clear evidence that interpersonal social support impacts stress levels and, in turn, degree of physical illness and psychological well-being. This study examines whether mediated social networks serve the same palliative function. A survey of 401 undergraduate Facebook users revealed that, as predicted, number of Facebook friends associated with stronger perceptions of social support, which in turn associated with reduced stress, and in turn less physical illness and greater well-being. This effect was minimized when interpersonal network size was taken into consideration. However, for those who have experienced many objective life stressors, the number of Facebook friends emerged as the stronger predictor of perceived social support. The "more-friends-the-better" heuristic is proposed as the most likely explanation for these findings.

  6. A Stochastic After-Taxes Optimisation Model to Support Distribution Network Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Rui; Hvolby, Hans-Henrik; Gouveia, Borges

    2012-01-01

    The paper proposes a stochastic model to integrate tax issues into strategic distribution network decisions. Specifically, this study will explore the role of distribution models in business profitability, and how to use the network design to deliver additional bottom-line results, using distribu......The paper proposes a stochastic model to integrate tax issues into strategic distribution network decisions. Specifically, this study will explore the role of distribution models in business profitability, and how to use the network design to deliver additional bottom-line results, using...

  7. Regional initiatives in support of surveillance in East Africa: The East Africa Integrated Disease Surveillance Network (EAIDSNet) Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ope, Maurice; Sonoiya, Stanley; Kariuki, James; Mboera, Leonard E G; Gandham, Ramana N V; Schneidman, Miriam; Kimura, Mwihaki

    2013-01-01

    The East African Integrated Disease Surveillance Network (EAIDSNet) was formed in response to a growing frequency of cross-border malaria outbreaks in the 1990s and a growing recognition that fragmented disease interventions, coupled with weak laboratory capacity, were making it difficult to respond in a timely manner to the outbreaks of malaria and other infectious diseases. The East Africa Community (EAC) partner states, with financial support from the Rockefeller Foundation, established EAIDSNet in 2000 to develop and strengthen the communication channels necessary for integrated cross-border disease surveillance and control efforts. The objective of this paper is to review the regional EAIDSNet initiative and highlight achievements and challenges in its implementation. Major accomplishments of EAIDSNet include influencing the establishment of a Department of Health within the EAC Secretariat to support a regional health agenda; successfully completing a regional field simulation exercise in pandemic influenza preparedness; and piloting a web-based portal for linking animal and human health disease surveillance. The strategic direction of EAIDSNet was shaped, in part, by lessons learned following a visit to the more established Mekong Basin Disease Surveillance (MBDS) regional network. Looking to the future, EAIDSNet is collaborating with the East, Central and Southern Africa Health Community (ECSA-HC), EAC partner states, and the World Health Organization to implement the World Bank-funded East Africa Public Health Laboratory Networking Project (EAPHLNP). The network has also begun lobbying East African countries for funding to support EAIDSNet activities.

  8. Evidence of the paradoxical effect of social network support: A study among Filipino domestic workers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Norman B; Mordeno, Imelu G; Latkin, Carl A; Hall, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    Labor migrants are at an increased risk for poor mental health. Post-migration stressors contribute significantly to this risk. Social network supports are vitally important to protect health but little is known about the role of social network supports among labor migrants. The current study evaluated the role of migration stressors on poor mental health among Filipino female domestic workers (FDW) and whether family and friend social network support (SNS) modified this relationship. Data were collected from 261 FDWs in Macau, China from May to September 2013. Hierarchical multiple regression was conducted to test for direct and moderating effects of social networks on psychological distress. Post-migration stress was associated with increased anxiety, depression, somatization, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. SNS from family was not associated with the four psychological symptoms nor did it modify the association between stress and these symptoms. SNS from friends was positively associated with these symptoms, and significantly moderated the relationship between stress and these symptoms. Counterintuitive to the known buffering effects of SNS, greater SNS was associated with greater psychological symptoms among FDWs exposed to post-migration stressors. The present findings suggest that reliance on SNS to cope with post-migration stressors may worsen psychological distress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Enhanced structural connectivity within a brain sub-network supporting working memory and engagement processes after cognitive training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Francisco J; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Martínez, Kenia; Karama, Sherif; Burgaleta, Miguel; Evans, Alan C; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Colom, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    The structural connectome provides relevant information about experience and training-related changes in the brain. Here, we used network-based statistics (NBS) and graph theoretical analyses to study structural changes in the brain as a function of cognitive training. Fifty-six young women were divided in two groups (experimental and control). We assessed their cognitive function before and after completing a working memory intervention using a comprehensive battery that included fluid and crystallized abilities, working memory and attention control, and we also obtained structural MRI images. We acquired and analyzed diffusion-weighted images to reconstruct the anatomical connectome and we computed standardized changes in connectivity as well as group differences across time using NBS. We also compared group differences relying on a variety of graph-theory indices (clustering, characteristic path length, global and local efficiency and strength) for the whole network as well as for the sub-network derived from NBS analyses. Finally, we calculated correlations between these graph indices and training performance as well as the behavioral changes in cognitive function. Our results revealed enhanced connectivity for the training group within one specific network comprised of nodes/regions supporting cognitive processes required by the training (working memory, interference resolution, inhibition, and task engagement). Significant group differences were also observed for strength and global efficiency indices in the sub-network detected by NBS. Therefore, the connectome approach is a valuable method for tracking the effects of cognitive training interventions across specific sub-networks. Moreover, this approach allowsfor the computation of graph theoretical network metricstoquantifythetopological architecture of the brain networkdetected. The observed structural brain changes support the behavioral results reported earlier (see Colom, Román, et al., 2013

  10. A Bloom Filter-Powered Technique Supporting Scalable Semantic Discovery in Data Service Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Shi, R.; Bao, Q.; Lee, T. J.; Ramachandran, R.

    2016-12-01

    More and more Earth data analytics software products are published onto the Internet as a service, in the format of either heavyweight WSDL service or lightweight RESTful API. Such reusable data analytics services form a data service network, which allows Earth scientists to compose (mashup) services into value-added ones. Therefore, it is important to have a technique that is capable of helping Earth scientists quickly identify appropriate candidate datasets and services in the global data service network. Most existing services discovery techniques, however, mainly rely on syntax or semantics-based service matchmaking between service requests and available services. Since the scale of the data service network is increasing rapidly, the run-time computational cost will soon become a bottleneck. To address this issue, this project presents a way of applying network routing mechanism to facilitate data service discovery in a service network, featuring scalability and performance. Earth data services are automatically annotated in Web Ontology Language for Services (OWL-S) based on their metadata, semantic information, and usage history. Deterministic Annealing (DA) technique is applied to dynamically organize annotated data services into a hierarchical network, where virtual routers are created to represent semantic local network featuring leading terms. Afterwards Bloom Filters are generated over virtual routers. A data service search request is transformed into a network routing problem in order to quickly locate candidate services through network hierarchy. A neural network-powered technique is applied to assure network address encoding and routing performance. A series of empirical study has been conducted to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Decision Support System for Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Langarizadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the major causes of visual loss among the elderly. It causes degeneration of cells in the macula. Early diagnosis can be helpful in preventing blindness. Drusen are the initial symptoms of AMD. Since drusen have a wide variety, locating them in screening images is difficult and time-consuming. An automated digital fundus photography-based screening system help overcome such drawbacks. The main objective of this study was to suggest a novel method to classify AMD and normal retinal fundus images. Materials and Methods: The suggested system was developed using convolutional neural networks. Several methods were adopted for increasing data such as horizontal reflection, random crop, as well as transfer and combination of such methods. The suggested system was evaluated using images obtained from STARE database and a local dataset. Results: The local dataset contained 3195 images (2070 images of AMD suspects and 1125 images of healthy retina and the STARE dataset comprised of 201 images (105 images of AMD suspects and 96 images of healthy retina. According to the results, the accuracies of the local and standard datasets were 0.95 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion: Diagnosis and screening of AMD is a time-consuming task for specialists. To overcome this limitation, we attempted to design an intelligent decision support system for the diagnosis of AMD fundus using retina images. The proposed system is an important step toward providing a reliable tool for supervising patients. Early diagnosis of AMD can lead to timely access to treatment.

  12. Admission into a Nursing Home. Delay or prevention with the use of a complete support network?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihl, Ralf; Cujai, Nadine; Krah, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    Becoming older in Germany often leads to admission into a nursing home. The aim of this study was to investigate if a complete support network (CSN) can contribute to preventing admission into a nursing home. Organizational and financial prerequisites of a CSN were documented. In this study 32 patients with psychiatric disorders diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases 10 (ICD 10, 16 as F00 dementia in Alzheimer disease and 16 as F31-33 bipolar affective disorder, depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder) were observed over a period of 2 years. The intervention consisted of participation in a defined CSN, which was developed by the Alexian Research Centre in Krefeld (ARCK). A cooperation of all persons and institutions involved in the care of elderly patients with psychiatric disorders was initiated. An individualized help plan was compiled for each patient. The primary outcome was admittance to a nursing home or remaining at home. The duration of staying at home was measured in days. User satisfaction was assessed with a 5‑step Likert scale questionnaire. The steering process and the financial efforts necessary to run the CSN were descriptively evaluated. At the end of the observation period 28 out of 32 patients were not admitted to a nursing home. During the observational period one patient dropped out, one died and two were admitted to a nursing home. User satisfaction achieved a median score of 5 (very satisfied). No additional funding was necessary to run the CSN. The CSN can prevent admission to a nursing home without needing additional funding and the whole process can be guided by the patient.

  13. Eating of the pudding : supporting the development of life-cycle of wireless sensor networks for environmental monitoring scientists and ecologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Kui

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present design and tooling solutions as well as network protocols to support application experts in the entire development life-cycle of wireless sensor networks. The complete life-cycle of wireless sensor networks starts with the user/application requirement analysis. It then goes

  14. A systematic review of the impact of stroke on social support and social networks: associated factors and patterns of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Sarah; Moss, Becky; Harrison, Kirsty; Hilari, Katerina

    2016-08-01

    Identify what factors are associated with functional social support and social network post stroke; explore stroke survivors' perspectives on what changes occur and how they are perceived. The following electronic databases were systematically searched up to May 2015: Academic Search Complete; CINAHL Plus; E-journals; Health Policy Reference Centre; MEDLINE; PsycARTICLES; PsycINFO; and SocINDEX. PRISMA guidelines were followed in the conduct and reporting of this review. All included studies were critically appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program tools. Meta-ethnographic techniques were used to integrate findings from the qualitative studies. Given the heterogeneous nature of the quantitative studies, data synthesis was narrative. Seventy research reports met the eligibility criteria: 22 qualitative and 48 quantitative reporting on 4,816 stroke survivors. The qualitative studies described a contraction of the social network, with non-kin contact being vulnerable. Although family were more robust network members, significant strain was observed within the family unit. In the quantitative studies, poor functional social support was associated with depression (13/14 studies), reduced quality of life (6/6 studies) and worse physical recovery (2/2 studies). Reduced social network was associated with depression (7/8 studies), severity of disability (2/2 studies) and aphasia (2/2 studies). Although most indicators of social network reduced post stroke (for example, contact with friends, 5/5 studies), the perception of feeling supported remained relatively stable (4/4 studies). Following a stroke non-kin contact is vulnerable, strain is observed within the family unit, and poor social support is associated with depressive symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Leveraging Social Networks to Support Reproductive Health and Economic Wellbeing among Guatemalan Maya Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Alexandra S.; Luippold-Roge, Genevieve P.; Gurman, Tilly A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Maya women in Guatemala are disproportionately affected by poverty and negative reproductive health outcomes. Although social networks are valued in many Indigenous cultures, few studies have explored whether health education programmes can leverage these networks to improve reproductive health and economic wellbeing. Design: This…

  16. Loneliness, social support networks, mood and wellbeing in community-dwelling elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jeannette; Conroy, Ronán M; Bruce, Irene; Denihan, Aisling; Greene, Elaine; Kirby, Michael; Lawlor, Brian A

    2009-07-01

    Both loneliness and social networks have been linked with mood and wellbeing. However, few studies have examined these factors simultaneously in community-dwelling participants. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between social network, loneliness, depression, anxiety and quality of life in community dwelling older people living in Dublin. One thousand two hundred and ninety-nine people aged 65 and over, recruited through primary care practices, were interviewed in their own homes using the GMS-AGECAT. Social network was assessed using Wenger's typology. 35% of participants were lonely, with 9% describing it as painful and 6% as intrusive. Similarly, 34% had a non-integrated social network. However, the two constructs were distinct: 32% of participants with an integrated social network reported being lonely. Loneliness was higher in women, the widowed and those with physical disability and increased with age, but when age-related variables were controlled for this association was non-significant. Wellbeing, depressed mood and hopelessness were all independently associated with both loneliness and non-integrated social network. In particular, loneliness explained the excess risk of depression in the widowed. The population attributable risk (PAR) associated with loneliness was 61%, compared with 19% for non-integrated social network. Taken together they had a PAR of 70% Loneliness and social networks both independently affect mood and wellbeing in the elderly, underlying a very significant proportion of depressed mood.

  17. The Role of Social Support and Social Networks in Health Information Seeking Behavior among Korean Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonsun

    2013-01-01

    Access to health information appears to be a crucial piece of the racial and ethnic health disparities puzzle among immigrants. There are a growing number of scholars who are investigating the role of social networks that have shown that the number and even types of social networks among minorities and lower income groups differ (Chatman, 1991;…

  18. Technologies That Support Marketing and Market Development in SMEs—Evidence from Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggers, Fabian; Hatak, Isabella; Kraus, Sascha; Niemand, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This study builds on previous research on information technology implementation and usage in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and applies a special focus on social networks. Specifically, this research investigates antecedents of social network usage in SMEs and respective performance

  19. High catalytic activity of palladium nanoparticle clusters supported on a spherical polymer network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanova, Elza D; Salnikov, Vadim V; Mukhitova, Rezeda K; Zuev, Yuriy F; Osin, Yuriy N; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Ziganshina, Albina Y; Konovalov, Alexander I

    2015-09-04

    In this communication we report the synthesis of Pd nanoparticle clusters achieved via the assembly of Pd nanoparticles on the surface of a spherical polymer network. The network exhibits flexibility and adapts to the cluster formation. The nanoclusters display high catalytic activity toward p-nitrophenol reduction and the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction.

  20. A Metropolitan Optical Network with support for multicasting in the optical domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, D.; Koonen, A.M.J.; van Bochove, A.C.; Geuzebroek, D.H.; Salvador, M.R.; Thienpont, H.; Berghmans, F.; Danckaert, J.; Desmet, L.

    2001-01-01

    We present the FLAMINGO1 network architecture, an all-optical wavelength-and-timeslotted Metropolitan Optical Network based on a multiple-ring topology. A couple of important aspects of this architecture include all-optical packet switching at intermediate nodes on a ring and the ability to put IP

  1. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: The multilevel case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1998-01-01

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Forum Contributions 97-0766 and 97-0933. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. A previous contribution (97-1073) covered the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all resided at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. This contribution covers the more general case wherein those top-most LGNs may reside at different PNNI hierarchy levels. Both of the SNL contributions consider flat ad hoc network architectures in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the pre-configured level of its top-most LGN.

  2. Evaluation of Data Transfer Performance Between Moving Sender and Receiver in Mobile Communication Networks for Heterogeneous Service Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalė Dzemydienė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular communication networks are acquiring more and more commercial relevance because of recent advances in inter-vehicular communications via the DSRC/WAVE standard, which stimulates a brand new family of visionary services for vehicles, from road safety to entertainment and multimedia applications. After deep analysis of the literature it was decided to investigate evaluation of data transfer performance between moving sender and receiver in mobile communication network for heterogeneous service support. After careful analysis of the simulation tools the NCTUns 6.0 software package was chosen for planned investigations. The results illustrate that the longest communication can be maintained at the maximum number of vehicles participating on the network, but the quality of communication is inversely proportional to the number of vehicles. On this changing topology network when growing number of nodes (vehicles increases flooding of network with the data packages and it determines many collisions. The number of rejected packages increases directly in proportion to the number of vehicles. When the number of nodes (vehicle increases—it is increasing the number of the received same packages which are received from different nodes in the recipient node. On the sender node, the packages are rejected because the collisions occur due to improperly functioning access channel allocation mechanisms. It can be concluded that the routing protocols created for a normal MANET networks is useless in a fast-changing topology large-scale vehicle communication network. To provide heterogeneous services new routing protocols and channel access methods are needed, specifically for vehicle communication networks.

  3. Evaluation of Data Transfer Performance Between Moving Sender and Receiver in Mobile Communication Networks for Heterogeneous Service Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalė Dzemydienė

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular communication networks are acquiring more and more commercial relevance because of recent advances in inter-vehicular communications via the DSRC/WAVE standard, which stimulates a brand new family of visionary services for vehicles, from road safety to entertainment and multimedia applications. After deep analysis of the literature it was decided to investigate evaluation of data transfer performance between moving sender and receiver in mobile communication network for heterogeneous service support. After careful analysis of the simulation tools the NCTUns 6.0 software package was chosen for planned investigations. The results illustrate that the longest communication can be maintained at the maximum number of vehicles participating on the network, but the quality of communication is inversely proportional to the number of vehicles. On this changing topology network when growing number of nodes (vehicles increases flooding of network with the data packages and it determines many collisions. The number of rejected packages increases directly in proportion to the number of vehicles. When the number of nodes (vehicle increases—it is increasing the number of the received same packages which are received from different nodes in the recipient node. On the sender node, the packages are rejected because the collisions occur due to improperly functioning access channel allocation mechanisms. It can be concluded that the routing protocols created for a normal MANET networks is useless in a fast-changing topology large-scale vehicle communication network. To provide heterogeneous services new routing protocols and channel access methods are needed, specifically for vehicle communication networks.

  4. Building Community Partnerships: Using Social Network Analysis to Strengthen Service Networks Supporting a South Carolina Program for Pregnant and Parenting Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Elizabeth; Hale, Nathan; Browder, Jennifer; Cartledge, Claudia

    2017-09-01

    In 2013, South Carolina implemented a multi-year program providing support services for pregnant and parenting teens. Local lead sites were responsible for coordinating service delivery in partnership with other multidisciplinary community-based organizations. We used social network theory and analyses (SNA) to examine changes in partnerships over time. Using two-stage purposeful sampling, we identified three lead sites and their self-reported community partners. We administered two web-based surveys grounded in social network theory that included questions about partnership relationships and organizational characteristics. We calculated selected whole-network measures (size, cohesion, equity, diversity). Following the Year 1 surveys, we reviewed our findings with the lead sites and suggested opportunities to strengthen their respective partnerships. Following the Year 3 surveys, we observed changes across the networks. Survey response rates were 91.5% (43/47) in Year 1 and 68.2% (45/66) in Year 3. By Year 3, the average network size increased from 15.6 to 20.3 organizations. By Year 3, one lead site doubled its measure of network cohesion (connectedness); another lead site doubled in size (capacity). A third lead site, highly dense in Year 1, increased in size but decreased in cohesion by Year 3. Innovative use of SNA findings can help community partnerships identify gaps in capacity or services and organizations needed to fulfill program aims. SNA findings can also improve partnership function by identifying opportunities to improve connectedness or reduce redundancies in program work. The ability of lead sites to strategically reconfigure partnerships can be important to program success and sustainability.

  5. The potential of cellular technology to mediate social networks for support of chronic disease self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Douglas W

    2011-01-01

    Productive interactions among patients, friends/family, and health care providers, as outlined by the Chronic Care Model, are important for promoting adherence to recommended care and good health outcomes among adults with a chronic illness. Characteristics of these interactions--active participation, collaboration, and data sharing among constituents--are the same as those of social networks organized around Web 2.0 principles and technology. Thus, the Web 2.0 framework can be used to configure social networks without the inherent spatiotemporal constraints of face-to-face interactions that remain prevalent in health care delivery. In this article, the author outlines various design principles and decisions for a pilot study in which cellular technology was used to mediate interactions between adults with Type 2 diabetes and supporters (i.e., family members or friends selected by the patients who agree provide support) to motivate regular self-monitoring of blood glucose (among the diabetes participants). Participants generally found the network to be relatively easy to use. Some diabetes patients reported improved attention to self-monitoring; and, patient-selected supporters indicated improvements in emotional and instrumental support that should benefit diabetes patients' lifestyle and health.

  6. Potential benefits and harms of a peer support social network service on the internet for people with depressive tendencies: qualitative content analysis and social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Uchida, Chiyoko; Miyaki, Koichi; Sakai, Michi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nakayama, Takeo

    2009-07-23

    Internet peer support groups for depression are becoming popular and could be affected by an increasing number of social network services (SNSs). However, little is known about participant characteristics, social relationships in SNSs, and the reasons for usage. In addition, the effects of SNS participation on people with depression are rather unknown. The aim was to explore the potential benefits and harms of an SNS for depression based on a concurrent triangulation design of mixed methods strategy, including qualitative content analysis and social network analysis. A cross-sectional Internet survey of participants, which involved the collection of SNS log files and a questionnaire, was conducted in an SNS for people with self-reported depressive tendencies in Japan in 2007. Quantitative data, which included user demographics, depressive state, and assessment of the SNS (positive vs not positive), were statistically analyzed. Descriptive contents of responses to open-ended questions concerning advantages and disadvantages of SNS participation were analyzed using the inductive approach of qualitative content analysis. Contents were organized into codes, concepts, categories, and a storyline based on the grounded theory approach. Social relationships, derived from data of "friends," were analyzed using social network analysis, in which network measures and the extent of interpersonal association were calculated based on the social network theory. Each analysis and integration of results were performed through a concurrent triangulation design of mixed methods strategy. There were 105 participants. Median age was 36 years, and 51% (36/71) were male. There were 37 valid respondents; their number of friends and frequency of accessing the SNS were significantly higher than for invalid/nonrespondents (P = .008 and P = .003). Among respondents, 90% (28/31) were mildly, moderately, or severely depressed. Assessment of the SNS was performed by determining the access

  7. Social networks, social support and social negativity: A qualitative study of head and neck cancer caregivers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfe, M; Keohane, K; O'Brien, K; Sharp, L

    2017-11-01

    Head and neck cancer is a serious form of cancer that can generate substantial physical and psychosocial morbidity. Informal caregivers can help patients to manage head and neck cancer and its emotional impacts, both during and after treatment. Caregivers, however, can experience considerable stress as a result of their caring activities. Supportive relationships can protect caregivers from psychosocial strain. Thirty-one head and neck cancer caregivers were interviewed about their experiences of accessing social support from their social networks; difficulties that they experienced accessing this support; and strategies that they used to address these difficulties. Results suggest that head and neck cancer caregivers strongly value social support, but can find it difficult to obtain, and a number of them experience socially negative responses from their networks. Some carers attempt to answer or supplement support deficiencies by turning to non-human coping supports, such as pets, spiritual figures or medication. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Supporting Symmetric 128-bit AES in Networked Embedded Systems: An Elliptic Curve Key Establishment Protocol-on-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Duraisamy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The secure establishment of cryptographic keys for symmetric encryption via key agreement protocols enables nodes in a network of embedded systems and remote agents to communicate securely in an insecure environment. In this paper, we propose a pure hardware implementation of a key agreement protocol, which uses the elliptic curve Diffie-Hellmann and digital signature algorithms and enables two parties, a remote agent and a networked embedded system, to establish a 128-bit symmetric key for encryption of all transmitted data via the advanced encryption scheme (AES. The resulting implementation is a protocol-on-chip that supports full 128-bit equivalent security (PoC-128. The PoC-128 has been implemented in an FPGA, but it can also be used as an IP within different embedded applications. As 128-bit security is conjectured valid for the foreseeable future, the PoC-128 goes well beyond the state of art in securing networked embedded devices.

  9. Aligning everyday life priorities with people's self-management support networks: an exploration of the work and implementation of a needs-led telephone support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickem, Christian; Kennedy, Anne; Jariwala, Praksha; Morris, Rebecca; Bowen, Robert; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Brooks, Helen; Blakeman, Tom; Rogers, Anne

    2014-06-17

    Recent initiatives to target the personal, social and clinical needs of people with long-term health conditions have had limited impact within primary care. Evidence of the importance of social networks to support people with long-term conditions points to the need for self-management approaches which align personal circumstances with valued activities. The Patient-Led Assessment for Network Support (PLANS) intervention is a needs-led assessment for patients to prioritise their health and social needs and provide access to local community services and activities. Exploring the work and practices of patients and telephone workers are important for understanding and evaluating the workability and implementation of new interventions. Qualitative methods (interviews, focus group, observations) were used to explore the experience of PLANS from the perspectives of participants and the telephone support workers who delivered it (as part of an RCT) and the reasons why the intervention worked or not. Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) was used as a sensitising tool to evaluate: the relevance of PLANS to patients (coherence); the processes of engagement (cognitive participation); the work done for PLANS to happen (collective action); the perceived benefits and costs of PLANS (reflexive monitoring). 20 patients in the intervention arm of a clinical trial were interviewed and their telephone support calls were recorded and a focus group with 3 telephone support workers was conducted. Analysis of the interviews, support calls and focus group identified three themes in relation to the delivery and experience of PLANS. These are: formulation of 'health' in the context of everyday life; trajectories and tipping points: disrupting everyday routines; precarious trust in networks. The relevance of these themes are considered using NPT constructs in terms of the work that is entailed in engaging with PLANS, taking action, and who is implicated this process. PLANS gives scope to align

  10. An Inquiry of Children's Social Support Networks Using Eco-Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Jennifer; Burnett, Lauren; DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Buchanan, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children receive support for their learning and development from multiple sources and within various developmental contexts. The extant literature investigating children's social supports has uncovered multiple benefits to positive and complex social support system. However, the measurement of children's social supports has largely…

  11. The influence of neighbourhood socio-demographic factors on densities of free-roaming cat populations in an urban ecosystem in Israel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkler, H.; Hatna, E.; Terkel, J.

    2011-01-01

    Free-roaming cat populations are abundant in many urban ecosystems worldwide. Their management is necessary for reasons of public health, risk of wildlife predation and cat welfare related to their high densities. Trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs are now the main cat population control strategy in

  12. Ectoparasites of free-roaming and captive animals in South Carolina zoos and an assessment of their threat to animals welfare and public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ectoparasites were collected from free-roaming and captive animals in zoos to document the species present and to determine if they were associated with vertebrate pathogens. We examined 133 animals or their associated nesting and bedding materials for ectoparasites. Fifty-five species of ectoparasi...

  13. An energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme with temporary support nodes for cognitive radio sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman; Choi, Dongmin; Chung, Ilyong

    2014-08-11

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network whose sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio capability. Clustering is one of the most challenging issues in CRSNs, as all sensor nodes, including the cluster head, have to use the same frequency band in order to form a cluster. However, due to the nature of heterogeneous channels in cognitive radio, it is difficult for sensor nodes to find a cluster head. This paper proposes a novel energy-efficient and compact clustering scheme named clustering with temporary support nodes (CENTRE). CENTRE efficiently achieves a compact cluster formation by adopting two-phase cluster formation with fixed duration. By introducing a novel concept of temporary support nodes to improve the cluster formation, the proposed scheme enables sensor nodes in a network to find a cluster head efficiently. The performance study shows that not only is the clustering process efficient and compact but it also results in remarkable energy savings that prolong the overall network lifetime. In addition, the proposed scheme decreases both the clustering overhead and the average distance between cluster heads and their members.

  14. A Social Network Perspective on Turnover Intentions : The Role of Distributive Justice and Social Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltis, Scott M.; Agneessens, Filip; Sasovova, Zuzana; Labianca, Giuseppe (Joe)

    Organizations are increasingly concerned about retaining human talent, particularly within knowledge-based industries where turnover is expensive. Our study employs a social network perspective to explore the influence of employees' formal and informal workplace relationships on their turnover

  15. IDENTIFYING TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORK NEEDS TO SUPPORT THE DEPLOYMENT OF SMART METERS IN A WATER UTILITY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuel de Barros Moraes; Celi Langhi; Marcos Crivelaro

    2015-01-01

      This case study, based on interviews and technical analysis of a Brazilian water utility with more than 10 million clients, aims to understand what kind of adjusts on a telecommunications network...

  16. Undergraduate Social Support and Career Networking as a Result of Membership in the University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Allison P.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; McGraw, A. M.; Robertson, A.; Smith, C.; Biddle, L. I.; Turner, J.

    2013-06-01

    Membership in formal or informal groups of students with similar interests provides many benefits to undergraduate astronomy majors at the University of Arizona. First and foremost, members benefit from peer social and academic support within the major. These benefits are both tangible and intangible: students form friendships with like-minded peers, which can sustain them through difficult periods of study, but these social networks are the basis of later professional networks as well. Students in the U of A Astronomy Club have received both informal and formal research positions at other institutions as a direct result of the support, peer mentoring, and connections of club members, and at least six also hold paid, non-research positions within the department as a result of their connection to the club. Finally, most Astronomy Club members take their first steps into professional astronomy, such as attendance at a AAS Meeting, as a result of Club membership and the encouragement of older club members.

  17. [Social network and social support measures from the Pró-Saúde Study: pre-tests and pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, D; Griep, R H; Lopes, C S; Faerstein, E

    2001-01-01

    We describe methodological steps in the selection of questions on social networks and support for a cohort study of 4,030 employees from a public university in Rio de Janeiro. First, group discussions with volunteers were conducted to explore the adequacy of related concepts. Next, questions in the Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire were submitted to standard "forward-" and "back-translation" procedures. The questions were subsequently evaluated through five stages of pre-tests and a pilot study. No question had a proportion of non-response greater than 5%. Pearson correlation coefficients between questions were distant from both zero and unity; correlation between all items and their dimension score was higher than 0.80 in most cases. Finally, Cronbach Alpha coefficients were above 0.70 within each dimension. Results suggest that social networks and support will be adequately measured and will allow for the investigation of their associations with health outcomes in a Brazilian population.

  18. Development of a logic model to support a network approach in delivering 24/7 children's palliative care: part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Linda; Lynn, Deborah

    2016-04-02

    This research aimed to develop and evaluate a 24/7 symptom-management service for children with life-limiting conditions and a model for palliative care nursing. A combination of audit and qualitative and quantitative evaluation. A consultant nurse-led service (n=5 clinical nurse specialists) provided care and support to children and their families, which spanned a range of settings (home, hospital, hospice) supported by a managed clinical network of consultant paediatricians (n=4) with postgraduate expertise in palliative care. A pluralistic evaluation was conducted where the predefined service standards were audited and the predetermined service objectives were evaluated using daily diary data from the nursing team (micro), qualitative and quantitative survey data of stakeholders using the service (mezzo) and family assessment of children's palliative care (CPC) standards across the CPC network (macro).

  19. Energy Management Action Network (EMAK). A scoping study investigating the establishment and support of an international and domestic action network of energy management in industry. Information paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jollands, Nigel; Tanaka, Kanako; Gasc, Emilien

    2009-12-15

    The IEA has identified energy efficiency as essential to achieving a sustainable energy future. In order to improve energy efficiency in industry one of the priority areas for further action is the promotion of more and higher quality energy management (EM) activity. However, there are significant gaps in the current implementation of EM. One method of bridging these gaps would be the creation of an EM Action NetworK (EMAK) to bring practical support to energy managers, connect energy managers to energy policy makers, and interconnect these networks globally. The paper describes possible aims, activities, scope, structure, timelines and approaches related to EMAK and looks at specific tasks that would be important in the set-up and implementation.

  20. Understanding Challenges, Strategies, and the Role of Support Networks in Medication Self-management Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Gerda; Ose, Dominik; Baudendistel, Ines; Seidling, Hanna M; Stützle, Marion; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Wensing, Michel; Mahler, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the challenges and strategies of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) regarding daily management of their medication regimen focusing on the role of their support networks. Methods A purposeful sample of 25 patients with T2DM was recruited from local self-help groups, general practitioner practices, and a university hospital in southwestern Germany. Four semi-structured focus groups were conducted to identify the challenges patients experienced, the strategies they used, and their collaboration with support networks to assist them in self-managing their medication regimen. Sessions were audio- and video-recorded, fully transcribed, and subjected to computer-aided qualitative content analysis, guided by the Self- and Family Management Framework (SFMF). Results Patients with T2DM experienced numerous challenges affecting medication self-management arising from their personal situation, health status and resources, characteristics of their regimen, and how health care is currently organized. Patients' self-initiated strategies included activating health care, community, social, and online resources; taking ownership of medication-related needs; and integrating medication-taking into daily life. Patients drew on self-help groups, family, and friends to discuss concerns regarding medication safety and receive experience-based information and advice for navigating within the health care system as well as practical hands-on support with daily medication self-management. Conclusions Understanding the challenges and building on strategies patients with T2DM devised help diabetes educators to better address patients' needs and priorities and guide patient-centered interventions to support patients' self-management activities. Community and social support networks operating in patients' lives need to be engaged in the self-management support.