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Sample records for network structures similar

  1. Validation of protein structure models using network similarity score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sambit; Gadiyaram, Vasundhara; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2017-09-01

    Accurate structural validation of proteins is of extreme importance in studies like protein structure prediction, analysis of molecular dynamic simulation trajectories and finding subtle changes in very similar structures. The benchmarks for today's structure validation are scoring methods like global distance test-total structure (GDT-TS), TM-score and root mean square deviations (RMSD). However, there is a lack of methods that look at both the protein backbone and side-chain structures at the global connectivity level and provide information about the differences in connectivity. To address this gap, a graph spectral based method (NSS-network similarity score) which has been recently developed to rigorously compare networks in diverse fields, is adopted to compare protein structures both at the backbone and at the side-chain noncovalent connectivity levels. In this study, we validate the performance of NSS by investigating protein structures from X-ray structures, modeling (including CASP models), and molecular dynamics simulations. Further, we systematically identify the local and the global regions of the structures contributing to the difference in NSS, through the components of the score, a feature unique to this spectral based scoring scheme. It is demonstrated that the method can quantify subtle differences in connectivity compared to a reference protein structure and can form a robust basis for protein structure comparison. Additionally, we have also introduced a network-based method to analyze fluctuations in side chain interactions (edge-weights) in an ensemble of structures, which can be an useful tool for the analysis of MD trajectories. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Common neighbour structure and similarity intensity in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Liu, Kecheng

    2017-10-01

    Complex systems as networks always exhibit strong regularities, implying underlying mechanisms governing their evolution. In addition to the degree preference, the similarity has been argued to be another driver for networks. Assuming a network is randomly organised without similarity preference, the present paper studies the expected number of common neighbours between vertices. A symmetrical similarity index is accordingly developed by removing such expected number from the observed common neighbours. The developed index can not only describe the similarities between vertices, but also the dissimilarities. We further apply the proposed index to measure of the influence of similarity on the wring patterns of networks. Fifteen empirical networks as well as artificial networks are examined in terms of similarity intensity and degree heterogeneity. Results on real networks indicate that, social networks are strongly governed by the similarity as well as the degree preference, while the biological networks and infrastructure networks show no apparent similarity governance. Particularly, classical network models, such as the Barabási-Albert model, the Erdös-Rényi model and the Ring Lattice, cannot well describe the social networks in terms of the degree heterogeneity and similarity intensity. The findings may shed some light on the modelling and link prediction of different classes of networks.

  3. Measure the structure similarity of nodes in complex networks based on relative entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Meizhu; Deng, Yong

    2018-02-01

    Similarity of nodes is a basic structure quantification in complex networks. Lots of methods in research on complex networks are based on nodes' similarity such as node's classification, network's community structure detection, network's link prediction and so on. Therefore, how to measure nodes' similarity is an important problem in complex networks. In this paper, a new method is proposed to measure nodes' structure similarity based on relative entropy and each node's local structure. In the new method, each node's structure feature can be quantified as a special kind of information. The quantification of similarity between different pair of nodes can be replaced as the quantification of similarity in structural information. Then relative entropy is used to measure the difference between each pair of nodes' structural information. At last the value of relative entropy between each pair of nodes is used to measure nodes' structure similarity in complex networks. Comparing with existing methods the new method is more accuracy to measure nodes' structure similarity.

  4. A graph spectral analysis of the structural similarity network of protein chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnadev, O; Brinda, K V; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2005-10-01

    We present a simple method for the analysis of large networks based on their graph spectral properties. One of the advantages of this method is that it uses a single numerical computation to identify subclusters in a connected graph, which can significantly simplify the complexity involved in analyzing large graphs. This is illustrated using a network of protein chains constructed on the basis of their structural similarities. The large-scale network properties and the cluster and subcluster organization of the protein chain network are presented. We summarize the results of structural and functional analyses of the nodes present in these clusters and elucidate the implications of structural similarity in the protein chain universe. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Protein Similarity Networks Reveal Relationships among Sequence, Structure, and Function within the Cupin Superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Uberto; Moomaw, Ellen W.

    2013-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs) to visualize trends of sequence and structur...

  6. Protein similarity networks reveal relationships among sequence, structure, and function within the Cupin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberto, Richard; Moomaw, Ellen W

    2013-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs) to visualize trends of sequence and structure in order to make functional inferences in this remarkably diverse superfamily. PSNs provide a way to visualize relatedness of structure and sequence among a given set of proteins. Structure- and sequence-based clustering of cupin members reflects functional clustering. Networks based only on cupin domains and networks based on the whole proteins provide complementary information. Domain-clustering supports phylogenetic conclusions that the N- and C-terminal domains of bicupin proteins evolved independently. Interestingly, although many functionally similar enzymatic cupin members bind the same active site metal ion, the structure and sequence clustering does not correlate with the identity of the bound metal. It is anticipated that the application of PSNs to this superfamily will inform experimental work and influence the functional annotation of databases.

  7. Protein similarity networks reveal relationships among sequence, structure, and function within the Cupin superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Uberto

    Full Text Available The cupin superfamily is extremely diverse and includes catalytically inactive seed storage proteins, sugar-binding metal-independent epimerases, and metal-dependent enzymes possessing dioxygenase, decarboxylase, and other activities. Although numerous proteins of this superfamily have been structurally characterized, the functions of many of them have not been experimentally determined. We report the first use of protein similarity networks (PSNs to visualize trends of sequence and structure in order to make functional inferences in this remarkably diverse superfamily. PSNs provide a way to visualize relatedness of structure and sequence among a given set of proteins. Structure- and sequence-based clustering of cupin members reflects functional clustering. Networks based only on cupin domains and networks based on the whole proteins provide complementary information. Domain-clustering supports phylogenetic conclusions that the N- and C-terminal domains of bicupin proteins evolved independently. Interestingly, although many functionally similar enzymatic cupin members bind the same active site metal ion, the structure and sequence clustering does not correlate with the identity of the bound metal. It is anticipated that the application of PSNs to this superfamily will inform experimental work and influence the functional annotation of databases.

  8. A Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Structural and Attribute Similarities for Community Detection in Attributed Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhangtao; Liu, Jing; Wu, Kai

    2017-08-16

    Most of the existing community detection algorithms are based on vertex connectivity. While in many real networks, each vertex usually has one or more attributes describing its properties which are often homogeneous in a cluster. Such networks can be modeled as attributed graphs, whose attributes sometimes are equally important to topological structure in graph clustering. One important challenge is to detect communities considering both topological structure and vertex properties simultaneously. To this propose, a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm based on structural and attribute similarities (MOEA-SA) is first proposed to solve the attributed graph clustering problems in this paper. In MOEA-SA, a new objective named as attribute similarity SA is proposed and another objective employed is the modularity Q. A hybrid representation is used and a neighborhood correction strategy is designed to repair the wrongly assigned genes through making balance between structural and attribute information. Moreover, an effective multi-individual-based mutation operator is designed to guide the evolution toward the good direction. The performance of MOEA-SA is validated on several real Facebook attributed graphs and several ego-networks with multiattribute. Two measurements, namely density T and entropy E, are used to evaluate the quality of communities obtained. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of MOEA-SA and the systematic comparisons with existing methods show that MOEA-SA can get better values of T and E in each graph and find more relevant communities with practical meanings. Knee points corresponding to the best compromise solutions are calculated to guide decision makers to make convenient choices.

  9. Function prediction from networks of local evolutionary similarity in protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Annotating protein function with both high accuracy and sensitivity remains a major challenge in structural genomics. One proven computational strategy has been to group a few key functional amino acids into templates and search for these templates in other protein structures, so as to transfer function when a match is found. To this end, we previously developed Evolutionary Trace Annotation (ETA) and showed that diffusing known annotations over a network of template matches on a structural genomic scale improved predictions of function. In order to further increase sensitivity, we now let each protein contribute multiple templates rather than just one, and also let the template size vary. Retrospective benchmarks in 605 Structural Genomics enzymes showed that multiple templates increased sensitivity by up to 14% when combined with single template predictions even as they maintained the accuracy over 91%. Diffusing function globally on networks of single and multiple template matches marginally increased the area under the ROC curve over 0.97, but in a subset of proteins that could not be annotated by ETA, the network approach recovered annotations for the most confident 20-23 of 91 cases with 100% accuracy. We improve the accuracy and sensitivity of predictions by using multiple templates per protein structure when constructing networks of ETA matches and diffusing annotations.

  10. From epidemics to information propagation: striking differences in structurally similar adaptive network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajanovski, Stojan; Guo, Dongchao; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-09-01

    The continuous-time adaptive susceptible-infected-susceptible (ASIS) epidemic model and the adaptive information diffusion (AID) model are two adaptive spreading processes on networks, in which a link in the network changes depending on the infectious state of its end nodes, but in opposite ways: (i) In the ASIS model a link is removed between two nodes if exactly one of the nodes is infected to suppress the epidemic, while a link is created in the AID model to speed up the information diffusion; (ii) a link is created between two susceptible nodes in the ASIS model to strengthen the healthy part of the network, while a link is broken in the AID model due to the lack of interest in informationless nodes. The ASIS and AID models may be considered as first-order models for cascades in real-world networks. While the ASIS model has been exploited in the literature, we show that the AID model is realistic by obtaining a good fit with Facebook data. Contrary to the common belief and intuition for such similar models, we show that the ASIS and AID models exhibit different but not opposite properties. Most remarkably, a unique metastable state always exists in the ASIS model, while there an hourglass-shaped region of instability in the AID model. Moreover, the epidemic threshold is a linear function in the effective link-breaking rate in the AID model, while it is almost constant but noisy in the AID model.

  11. From epidemics to information propagation: Striking differences in structurally similar adaptive network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajanovski, Stojan; Guo, Dongchao; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-09-01

    The continuous-time adaptive susceptible-infected-susceptible (ASIS) epidemic model and the adaptive information diffusion (AID) model are two adaptive spreading processes on networks, in which a link in the network changes depending on the infectious state of its end nodes, but in opposite ways: (i) In the ASIS model a link is removed between two nodes if exactly one of the nodes is infected to suppress the epidemic, while a link is created in the AID model to speed up the information diffusion; (ii) a link is created between two susceptible nodes in the ASIS model to strengthen the healthy part of the network, while a link is broken in the AID model due to the lack of interest in informationless nodes. The ASIS and AID models may be considered as first-order models for cascades in real-world networks. While the ASIS model has been exploited in the literature, we show that the AID model is realistic by obtaining a good fit with Facebook data. Contrary to the common belief and intuition for such similar models, we show that the ASIS and AID models exhibit different but not opposite properties. Most remarkably, a unique metastable state always exists in the ASIS model, while there an hourglass-shaped region of instability in the AID model. Moreover, the epidemic threshold is a linear function in the effective link-breaking rate in the AID model, while it is almost constant but noisy in the AID model.

  12. Predicting drug-drug interactions through drug structural similarities and interaction networks incorporating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takako; Hao, Ming; Cheng, Tiejun; Bryant, Stephen H; Wang, Yanli

    2017-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may lead to adverse effects and potentially result in drug withdrawal from the market. Predicting DDIs during drug development would help reduce development costs and time by rigorous evaluation of drug candidates. The primary mechanisms of DDIs are based on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). This study examines the effects of 2D structural similarities of drugs on DDI prediction through interaction networks including both PD and PK knowledge. Our assumption was that a query drug (Dq) and a drug to be examined (De) likely have DDI if the drugs in the interaction network of De are structurally similar to Dq. A network of De describes the associations between the drugs and the proteins relating to PK and PD for De. These include target proteins, proteins interacting with target proteins, enzymes, and transporters for De. We constructed logistic regression models for DDI prediction using only 2D structural similarities between each Dq and the drugs in the network of De. The results indicated that our models could effectively predict DDIs. It was found that integrating structural similarity scores of the drugs relating to both PK and PD of De was crucial for model performance. In particular, the combination of the target- and enzyme-related scores provided the largest increase of the predictive power.Graphical abstract.

  13. From epidemics to information propagation : Striking differences in structurally similar adaptive network models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trajanovski, S.; Guo, D.; Van Mieghem, P.F.A.

    2015-01-01

    The continuous-time adaptive susceptible-infected-susceptible (ASIS) epidemic model and the adaptive information diffusion (AID) model are two adaptive spreading processes on networks, in which a link in the network changes depending on the infectious state of its end nodes, but in opposite ways:

  14. Clustering of 3D-Structure Similarity Based Network of Secondary Metabolites Reveals Their Relationships with Biological Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtana, Yuki; Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Huang, Ming; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Horai, Hisayuki; Nakamura, Yukiko; Morita Hirai, Aki; Lange, Klaus W; Kibinge, Nelson K; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-12-01

    Developing database systems connecting diverse species based on omics is the most important theme in big data biology. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Family Databases, which are utilized in a number of researches in metabolomics. In the present study, we have developed a network-based approach to analyze relationships between 3D structure and biological activity of metabolites consisting of four steps as follows: construction of a network of metabolites based on structural similarity (Step 1), classification of metabolites into structure groups (Step 2), assessment of statistically significant relations between structure groups and biological activities (Step 3), and 2-dimensional clustering of the constructed data matrix based on statistically significant relations between structure groups and biological activities (Step 4). Applying this method to a data set consisting of 2072 secondary metabolites and 140 biological activities reported in KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB, we obtained 983 statistically significant structure group-biological activity pairs. As a whole, we systematically analyzed the relationship between 3D-chemical structures of metabolites and biological activities. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Percolation in Self-Similar Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Krioukov, Dmitri; Boguñá, Marián

    2011-01-01

    We provide a simple proof that graphs in a general class of self-similar networks have zero percolation threshold. The considered self-similar networks include random scale-free graphs with given expected node degrees and zero clustering, scale-free graphs with finite clustering and metric structure, growing scale-free networks, and many real networks. The proof and the derivation of the giant component size do not require the assumption that networks are treelike. Our results rely only on the observation that self-similar networks possess a hierarchy of nested subgraphs whose average degree grows with their depth in the hierarchy. We conjecture that this property is pivotal for percolation in networks.

  16. Structure-semantics interplay in complex networks and its effects on the predictability of similarity in texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amancio, Diego R.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N., Jr.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2012-09-01

    The classification of texts has become a major endeavor with so much electronic material available, for it is an essential task in several applications, including search engines and information retrieval. There are different ways to define similarity for grouping similar texts into clusters, as the concept of similarity may depend on the purpose of the task. For instance, in topic extraction similar texts mean those within the same semantic field, whereas in author recognition stylistic features should be considered. In this study, we introduce ways to classify texts employing concepts of complex networks, which may be able to capture syntactic, semantic and even pragmatic features. The interplay between various metrics of the complex networks is analyzed with three applications, namely identification of machine translation (MT) systems, evaluation of quality of machine translated texts and authorship recognition. We shall show that topological features of the networks representing texts can enhance the ability to identify MT systems in particular cases. For evaluating the quality of MT texts, on the other hand, high correlation was obtained with methods capable of capturing the semantics. This was expected because the golden standards used are themselves based on word co-occurrence. Notwithstanding, the Katz similarity, which involves semantic and structure in the comparison of texts, achieved the highest correlation with the NIST measurement, indicating that in some cases the combination of both approaches can improve the ability to quantify quality in MT. In authorship recognition, again the topological features were relevant in some contexts, though for the books and authors analyzed good results were obtained with semantic features as well. Because hybrid approaches encompassing semantic and topological features have not been extensively used, we believe that the methodology proposed here may be useful to enhance text classification considerably, as it

  17. Comparison of topological clustering within protein networks using edge metrics that evaluate full sequence, full structure, and active site microenvironment similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthaeuser, Janelle B; Knutson, Stacy T; Kumar, Kiran; Babbitt, Patricia C; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2015-09-01

    The development of accurate protein function annotation methods has emerged as a major unsolved biological problem. Protein similarity networks, one approach to function annotation via annotation transfer, group proteins into similarity-based clusters. An underlying assumption is that the edge metric used to identify such clusters correlates with functional information. In this contribution, this assumption is evaluated by observing topologies in similarity networks using three different edge metrics: sequence (BLAST), structure (TM-Align), and active site similarity (active site profiling, implemented in DASP). Network topologies for four well-studied protein superfamilies (enolase, peroxiredoxin (Prx), glutathione transferase (GST), and crotonase) were compared with curated functional hierarchies and structure. As expected, network topology differs, depending on edge metric; comparison of topologies provides valuable information on structure/function relationships. Subnetworks based on active site similarity correlate with known functional hierarchies at a single edge threshold more often than sequence- or structure-based networks. Sequence- and structure-based networks are useful for identifying sequence and domain similarities and differences; therefore, it is important to consider the clustering goal before deciding appropriate edge metric. Further, conserved active site residues identified in enolase and GST active site subnetworks correspond with published functionally important residues. Extension of this analysis yields predictions of functionally determinant residues for GST subgroups. These results support the hypothesis that active site similarity-based networks reveal clusters that share functional details and lay the foundation for capturing functionally relevant hierarchies using an approach that is both automatable and can deliver greater precision in function annotation than current similarity-based methods. © 2015 The Authors Protein Science

  18. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Mollgaard

    Full Text Available The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships.

  19. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    university.Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with customdata collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The networkof social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructedfrom different channels of telecommunication as well as data......The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of thenodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarityof nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure toanalyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large...... might bepresent in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent inthe other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals atransition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively lowweight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest...

  20. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of thenodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarityof nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure toanalyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large...... university.Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with customdata collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The networkof social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructedfrom different channels of telecommunication as well as data...

  1. Trajectory similarity join in spatial networks

    KAUST Repository

    Shang, Shuo

    2017-09-07

    The matching of similar pairs of objects, called similarity join, is fundamental functionality in data management. We consider the case of trajectory similarity join (TS-Join), where the objects are trajectories of vehicles moving in road networks. Thus, given two sets of trajectories and a threshold θ, the TS-Join returns all pairs of trajectories from the two sets with similarity above θ. This join targets applications such as trajectory near-duplicate detection, data cleaning, ridesharing recommendation, and traffic congestion prediction. With these applications in mind, we provide a purposeful definition of similarity. To enable efficient TS-Join processing on large sets of trajectories, we develop search space pruning techniques and take into account the parallel processing capabilities of modern processors. Specifically, we present a two-phase divide-and-conquer algorithm. For each trajectory, the algorithm first finds similar trajectories. Then it merges the results to achieve a final result. The algorithm exploits an upper bound on the spatiotemporal similarity and a heuristic scheduling strategy for search space pruning. The algorithm\\'s per-trajectory searches are independent of each other and can be performed in parallel, and the merging has constant cost. An empirical study with real data offers insight in the performance of the algorithm and demonstrates that is capable of outperforming a well-designed baseline algorithm by an order of magnitude.

  2. Reading network in dyslexia: Similar, yet different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldie, Karen E; Wilson, Anna J; Roberts, Reece P; Moreau, David

    2017-11-01

    Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterized by reading and phonological difficulties, yet important questions remain regarding its underlying neural correlates. In this study, we used partial least squares (PLS), a multivariate analytic technique, to investigate the neural networks used by dyslexics while performing a word-rhyming task. Although the overall reading network was largely similar in dyslexics and typical readers, it did not correlate with behavior in the same way in the two groups. In particular, there was a positive association between reading performance and both right superior temporal gyrus and bilateral insula activation in dyslexic readers but a negative correlation in typical readers. Together with differences in lateralization unique to dyslexics, this suggests that the combination of poor reading performance with high insula activity and atypical laterality is a consistent marker of dyslexia. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding right-hemisphere activation in dyslexia and provide promising directions for the remediation of reading disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Network similarity and statistical analysis of earthquake seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyasi, Krishanu; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Banerjee, Anirban

    2017-09-01

    We study the structural similarity of earthquake networks constructed from seismic catalogs of different geographical regions. A hierarchical clustering of underlying undirected earthquake networks is shown using Jensen-Shannon divergence in graph spectra. The directed nature of links indicates that each earthquake network is strongly connected, which motivates us to study the directed version statistically. Our statistical analysis of each earthquake region identifies the hub regions. We calculate the conditional probability of the forthcoming occurrences of earthquakes in each region. The conditional probability of each event has been compared with their stationary distribution.

  4. On the Development and Use of Large Chemical Similarity Networks, Informatics Best Practices and Novel Chemical Descriptors Towards Materials Quantitative Structure Property Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Michael

    After decades of development and use in a variety of application areas, Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPRs) and related descriptor-based statistical learning methods have achieved a level of infamy due to their misuse. The field is rife with past examples of overtrained models, overoptimistic performance assessment, and outright cheating in the form of explicitly removing data to fit models. These actions do not serve the community well, nor are they beneficial to future predictions based on established models. In practice, in order to select combinations of descriptors and machine learning methods that might work best, one must consider the nature and size of the training and test datasets, be aware of existing hypotheses about the data, and resist the temptation to bias structure representation and modeling to explicitly fit the hypotheses. The definition and application of these best practices is important for obtaining actionable modeling outcomes, and for setting user expectations of modeling accuracy when predicting the endpoint values of unknowns. A wide variety of statistical learning approaches, descriptor types, and model validation strategies are explored herein, with the goals of helping end users understand the factors involved in creating and using QSPR models effectively, and to better understand relationships within the data, especially by looking at the problem space from multiple perspectives. Molecular relationships are commonly envisioned in a continuous high-dimensional space of numerical descriptors, referred to as chemistry space. Descriptor and similarity metric choice influence the partitioning of this space into regions corresponding to local structural similarity. These regions, known as domains of applicability, are most likely to be successfully modeled by a QSPR. In Chapter 2, the network topology and scaling relationships of several chemistry spaces are thoroughly investigated. Chemistry spaces studied include the

  5. Similarities and Dissimilarities in Coauthorship Networks: Gestalt Theory as Explanation for Well-Ordered Collaboration Structures and Production of Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Hildrun

    2002-01-01

    Based on Gestalt theory, the author assumes the existence of a field-force equilibrium to explain how, according to the conciseness principle, mathematically precise gestalts could exist in coauthorship networks. Develops a mathematical function to describe these gestalts in scientific literature and discusses structural characteristics of…

  6. Protein structural similarity search by Ramachandran codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chih-Hung

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structural data has increased exponentially, such that fast and accurate tools are necessary to access structure similarity search. To improve the search speed, several methods have been designed to reduce three-dimensional protein structures to one-dimensional text strings that are then analyzed by traditional sequence alignment methods; however, the accuracy is usually sacrificed and the speed is still unable to match sequence similarity search tools. Here, we aimed to improve the linear encoding methodology and develop efficient search tools that can rapidly retrieve structural homologs from large protein databases. Results We propose a new linear encoding method, SARST (Structural similarity search Aided by Ramachandran Sequential Transformation. SARST transforms protein structures into text strings through a Ramachandran map organized by nearest-neighbor clustering and uses a regenerative approach to produce substitution matrices. Then, classical sequence similarity search methods can be applied to the structural similarity search. Its accuracy is similar to Combinatorial Extension (CE and works over 243,000 times faster, searching 34,000 proteins in 0.34 sec with a 3.2-GHz CPU. SARST provides statistically meaningful expectation values to assess the retrieved information. It has been implemented into a web service and a stand-alone Java program that is able to run on many different platforms. Conclusion As a database search method, SARST can rapidly distinguish high from low similarities and efficiently retrieve homologous structures. It demonstrates that the easily accessible linear encoding methodology has the potential to serve as a foundation for efficient protein structural similarity search tools. These search tools are supposed applicable to automated and high-throughput functional annotations or predictions for the ever increasing number of published protein structures in this post-genomic era.

  7. Discovering Music Structure via Similarity Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Parrado-Hernandez, Emilio; Meng, Anders

    Automatic methods for music navigation and music recommendation exploit the structure in the music to carry out a meaningful exploration of the “song space”. To get a satisfactory performance from such systems, one should incorporate as much information about songs similarity as possible; however...... semantics”, in such a way that all observed similarities can be satisfactorily explained using the latent semantics. Therefore, one can think of these semantics as the real structure in music, in the sense that they can explain the observed similarities among songs. The suitability of the PLSA model...... for representing music structure is studied in a simplified scenario consisting of 4412 songs and two similarity measures among them. The results suggest that the PLSA model is a useful framework to combine different sources of information, and provides a reasonable space for song representation....

  8. Discovering Music Structure via Similarity Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , how to do so is not obvious. In this paper, we build on the ideas of the Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis (PLSA) that have been successfully used in the document retrieval community. Under this probabilistic framework, any song will be projected into a relatively low dimensional space of “latent...... semantics”, in such a way that all observed similarities can be satisfactorily explained using the latent semantics. Therefore, one can think of these semantics as the real structure in music, in the sense that they can explain the observed similarities among songs. The suitability of the PLSA model...

  9. Unveiling Music Structure Via PLSA Similarity Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Meng, Anders; Petersen, Kaare Brandt

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing interest in developing methods for building music recommendation systems. In order to get a satisfactory performance from such a system, one needs to incorporate as much information about songs similarity as possible; however, how to do so is not obvious...... observed similarities can be satisfactorily explained using the latent semantics. Additionally, this approach significantly simplifies the song retrieval phase, leading to a more practical system implementation. The suitability of the PLSA model for representing music structure is studied in a simplified...

  10. A community detection algorithm based on structural similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuchao; Hao, Xia; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lu

    2017-09-01

    In order to further improve the efficiency and accuracy of community detection algorithm, a new algorithm named SSTCA (the community detection algorithm based on structural similarity with threshold) is proposed. In this algorithm, the structural similarities are taken as the weights of edges, and the threshold k is considered to remove multiple edges whose weights are less than the threshold, and improve the computational efficiency. Tests were done on the Zachary’s network, Dolphins’ social network and Football dataset by the proposed algorithm, and compared with GN and SSNCA algorithm. The results show that the new algorithm is superior to other algorithms in accuracy for the dense networks and the operating efficiency is improved obviously.

  11. Discovering Music Structure via Similarity Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Automatic methods for music navigation and music recommendation exploit the structure in the music to carry out a meaningful exploration of the “song space”. To get a satisfactory performance from such systems, one should incorporate as much information about songs similarity as possible; however, how to do so is not obvious. In this paper, we build on the ideas of the Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis (PLSA) that have been successfully used in the document retrieval community. Under thi...

  12. Structural similarity and category-specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, Ian; Paulson, Olaf B

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that category-specific recognition disorders for natural objects may reflect that natural objects are more structurally (visually) similar than artefacts and therefore more difficult to recognize following brain damage. On this account one might expect a positive relationship...... range of candidate integral units will be activated and compete for selection, thus explaining the higher error rate associated with animals. We evaluate the model based on previous evidence from both normal subjects and patients with category-specific disorders and argue that this model can help...

  13. Self-similarity in explosive synchronization of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Kurovskaya, Maria K.; Moskalenko, Olga I.; Hramov, Alexander; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    We report that explosive synchronization of networked oscillators (a process through which the transition to coherence occurs without intermediate stages but is rather characterized by a sudden and abrupt jump from the network's asynchronous to synchronous motion) is related to self-similarity of synchronous clusters of different size. Self-similarity is revealed by destructing the network synchronous state during the backward transition and observed with the decrease of the coupling strength between the nodes of the network. As illustrative examples, networks of Kuramoto oscillators with different topologies of links have been considered. For each one of such topologies, the destruction of the synchronous state goes step by step with self-similar configurations of interacting oscillators. At the critical point, the invariance of the phase distribution in the synchronized cluster with respect to the cluster size is reported.

  14. Sensor Network Information Analytical Methods: Analysis of Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Sensor Network information engineering literature, few references focus on the definition and design of Sensor Network information analytical methods. Among those that do are Munson, et al. and the ISO standards on functional size analysis. To avoid inconsistent vocabulary and potentially incorrect interpretation of data, Sensor Network information analytical methods must be better designed, including definitions, analysis principles, analysis rules, and base units. This paper analyzes the similarities and differences across three different views of analytical methods, and uses a process proposed for the design of Sensor Network information analytical methods to analyze two examples of such methods selected from the literature.

  15. Self-similarity of complex networks and hidden metric spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M Angeles; Krioukov, Dmitri; Boguñá, Marián

    2008-02-22

    We demonstrate that the self-similarity of some scale-free networks with respect to a simple degree-thresholding renormalization scheme finds a natural interpretation in the assumption that network nodes exist in hidden metric spaces. Clustering, i.e., cycles of length three, plays a crucial role in this framework as a topological reflection of the triangle inequality in the hidden geometry. We prove that a class of hidden variable models with underlying metric spaces are able to accurately reproduce the self-similarity properties that we measured in the real networks. Our findings indicate that hidden geometries underlying these real networks are a plausible explanation for their observed topologies and, in particular, for their self-similarity with respect to the degree-based renormalization.

  16. Identifying multiple influential spreaders via local structural similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.-G.; Wang, Z.-Y.; Guo, Q.; Guo, L.; Chen, Q.; Ni, Y.-Z.

    2017-07-01

    Identifying the nodes with largest spreading influence is of significance for information diffusion, product exposure and contagious disease detection. In this letter, based on the local structural similarity, we present a method (LSS) to identify the multiple influential spreaders. Firstly, we choose the node with the largest degree as the first spreader. Then the new spreaders would be selected if they belong to the first- or second-order-neighbor node set of the spreaders and their local structural similarities with other spreaders are smaller than the threshold parameter r. Comparing with the susceptible-infected-recovered model, the experimental results for four empirical networks show that the spreading influences of spreaders selected by the local structural similarity method are larger than that of the color method, the degree, betweenness and closeness centralities. The further experimental results for the Barabàsi-Albert and random networks show that the LSS method could identify the multiple influential spreaders more accurately, which suggests that the local structural property plays a more important role than the distance for identifying multiple influential spreaders.

  17. On the Development and Use of Large Chemical Similarity Networks, Informatics Best Practices and Novel Chemical Descriptors towards Materials Quantitative Structure Property Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Michael

    2011-01-01

    After decades of development and use in a variety of application areas, Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPRs) and related descriptor-based statistical learning methods have achieved a level of infamy due to their misuse. The field is rife with past examples of overtrained models, overoptimistic performance assessment, and outright…

  18. Coupling effect of nodes popularity and similarity on social network persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaogang; Jin, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxuan; Min, Yong

    2017-02-21

    Network robustness represents the ability of networks to withstand failures and perturbations. In social networks, maintenance of individual activities, also called persistence, is significant towards understanding robustness. Previous works usually consider persistence on pre-generated network structures; while in social networks, the network structure is growing with the cascading inactivity of existed individuals. Here, we address this challenge through analysis for nodes under a coevolution model, which characterizes individual activity changes under three network growth modes: following the descending order of nodes' popularity, similarity or uniform random. We show that when nodes possess high spontaneous activities, a popularity-first growth mode obtains highly persistent networks; otherwise, with low spontaneous activities, a similarity-first mode does better. Moreover, a compound growth mode, with the consecutive joining of similar nodes in a short period and mixing a few high popularity nodes, obtains the highest persistence. Therefore, nodes similarity is essential for persistent social networks, while properly coupling popularity with similarity further optimizes the persistence. This demonstrates the evolution of nodes activity not only depends on network topology, but also their connective typology.

  19. Coupling effect of nodes popularity and similarity on social network persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaogang; Jin, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxuan; Min, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Network robustness represents the ability of networks to withstand failures and perturbations. In social networks, maintenance of individual activities, also called persistence, is significant towards understanding robustness. Previous works usually consider persistence on pre-generated network structures; while in social networks, the network structure is growing with the cascading inactivity of existed individuals. Here, we address this challenge through analysis for nodes under a coevolution model, which characterizes individual activity changes under three network growth modes: following the descending order of nodes’ popularity, similarity or uniform random. We show that when nodes possess high spontaneous activities, a popularity-first growth mode obtains highly persistent networks; otherwise, with low spontaneous activities, a similarity-first mode does better. Moreover, a compound growth mode, with the consecutive joining of similar nodes in a short period and mixing a few high popularity nodes, obtains the highest persistence. Therefore, nodes similarity is essential for persistent social networks, while properly coupling popularity with similarity further optimizes the persistence. This demonstrates the evolution of nodes activity not only depends on network topology, but also their connective typology.

  20. Similarity Structure of Wave-Collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, Kristoffer; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    Similarity transformations of the cubic Schrödinger equation (CSE) are investigated. The transformations are used to remove the explicit time variation in the CSE and reduce it to differential equations in the spatial variables only. Two different methods for similarity reduction are employed and...

  1. Networks at their Limits: Software, Similarity, and Continuity in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Lilly Uyen

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the social worlds of pirated software discs and free/open source software in Vietnam to describe the practices of copying, evangelizing, and translation. This dissertation also reveals the cultural logics of similarity and continuity that sustain these social worlds. Taken together, this dissertation argues that the logics of similarity and continuity are expressions of Vietnam's distance from global networks. Vietnam is currently in a period of rapid economic trans...

  2. Similar Others in Same-Sex Couples' Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Allen J; Frost, David M; Alston-Stepnitz, Eli; Bauermeister, Jose; Stephenson, Rob; Woodyatt, Cory R; de Vries, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Same-sex couples experience unique minority stressors. It is known that strong social networks facilitate access to psychosocial resources that help people reduce and manage stress. However, little is known about the social networks of same-sex couples, in particular their connections to other same-sex couples, which is important to understand given that the presence of similar others in social networks can ameliorate social stress for stigmatized populations. In this brief report, we present data from a diverse sample of 120 same-sex couples in Atlanta and San Francisco. The median number of other same-sex couples known was 12; couples where one partner was non-Hispanic White and the other a person of color knew relatively few other same-sex couples; and there was a high degree of homophily within the social networks of same-sex couples. These data establish a useful starting point for future investigations of couples' social networks, especially couples whose relationships are stigmatized or marginalized in some way. Better understandings of the size, composition, and functions of same-sex couples' social networks are critically needed.

  3. Representational Similarity Analysis Reveals Heterogeneous Networks Supporting Speech Motor Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zane; Cusack, Rhodri; Johnsrude, Ingrid

    The everyday act of speaking involves the complex processes of speech motor control. One important feature of such control is regulation of articulation when auditory concomitants of speech do not correspond to the intended motor gesture. While theoretical accounts of speech monitoring posit...... is supported by a complex neural network that is involved in linguistic, motoric and sensory processing. With the aid of novel real-time acoustic analyses and representational similarity analyses of fMRI signals, our data show functionally differentiated networks underlying auditory feedback control of speech....... multiple functional components required for detection of errors in speech planning (e.g., Levelt, 1983), neuroimaging studies generally indicate either single brain regions sensitive to speech production errors, or small, discrete networks. Here we demonstrate that the complex system controlling speech...

  4. Improvement of water distribution networks analysis by topological similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahavir Singh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper a methodology based on topological similarity is used to obtain starting point of iteration for solving reservoir and pipe network problems. As of now initial starting point for iteration is based on pure guess work which may be supported by experience. Topological similarity concept comes from the Principle of Quasi Work (PQW. In PQW the solution of any one problem of a class is used to solve other complex problems of the same class. This paves way for arriving at a unique concept of reference system the solution of which is used to obtain the starting point for starting the iteration process in reservoir and pipe network problems.

  5. Correlation-based similarity networks for unequally sampled data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Kira; Donges, Jonathan F.; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Complex networks present a promising and increasingly popular paradigm for the description and analysis of interactions within complex spatially extended systems in the geosciences. Typically, a network is constructed by thresholding a similarity matrix which is based on a set of time series representing the system's dynamics at different locations. In geoscientific applications such as paleoclimate records derived from ice and sediment cores or speleothems, however, researchers are inherently faced with irregularly and heterogenously sampled time series. For this type of data, standard similarity measures, e.g., Pearson correlation or mutual information, must fail. Most attention has been placed on frequency-based methods focussing on the derivation of power spectra, such as the Lomb-Scargle periodogram. In the context of paleoscientific network research correlation estimation is of high interest, but available methods require interpolation prior to analysis. Here we present a generalization of the Pearson correlation coefficient adapted to irregularly sampled time series and show that it has advantages over the standard approach. Characterizing the method in the application to model systems we further extend our scope to real world data and show that it offers new options for network research and provide novel insights into the functioning of the earth system.

  6. Evolving production network structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunow, Martin; Gunther, H.O.; Burdenik, H.

    2007-01-01

    When deciding about future production network configurations, the current structures have to be taken into account. Further, core issues such as the maturity of the products and the capacity requirements for test runs and ramp-ups must be incorporated. Our approach is based on optimization...... modelling and assigns products and capacity expansions to production sites under the above constraints. It also considers the production complexity at the individual sites and the flexibility of the network. Our implementation results for a large manufacturing network reveal substantial possible cost...... reductions compared to the traditional manual planning results of our industrial partner....

  7. Exploring the underlying structure of mental disorders: cross-diagnostic differences and similarities from a network perspective using both a top-down and a bottom-up approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, J.T.W.; van Os, J.; Borsboom, D.; Wardenaar, K.J.; Epskamp, S.; Klippel, A.; Viechtbauer, W.; Myin-Germeys, I.; Wichers, M.

    Background: It has been suggested that the structure of psychopathology is best described as a complex network of components that interact in dynamic ways. The goal of the present paper was to examine the concept of psychopathology from a network perspective, combining complementary top-down and

  8. Exploring the underlying structure of mental disorders : cross-diagnostic differences and similarities from a network perspective using both a top-down and a bottom-up approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, J. T. W.; van Os, J.; Borsboom, D.; Wardenaar, K. J.; Epskamp, S.; Klippel, A.; Viechtbauer, W.; Myin-Germeys, I.; Wichers, M.

    Background. It has been suggested that the structure of psychopathology is best described as a complex network of components that interact in dynamic ways. The goal of the present paper was to examine the concept of psychopathology from a network perspective, combining complementary top-down and

  9. Taxonomies of networks from community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Fenn, Daniel J.; Reid, Stephen; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.; Fricker, Mark D.; Jones, Nick S.

    2012-09-01

    The study of networks has become a substantial interdisciplinary endeavor that encompasses myriad disciplines in the natural, social, and information sciences. Here we introduce a framework for constructing taxonomies of networks based on their structural similarities. These networks can arise from any of numerous sources: They can be empirical or synthetic, they can arise from multiple realizations of a single process (either empirical or synthetic), they can represent entirely different systems in different disciplines, etc. Because mesoscopic properties of networks are hypothesized to be important for network function, we base our comparisons on summaries of network community structures. Although we use a specific method for uncovering network communities, much of the introduced framework is independent of that choice. After introducing the framework, we apply it to construct a taxonomy for 746 networks and demonstrate that our approach usefully identifies similar networks. We also construct taxonomies within individual categories of networks, and we thereby expose nontrivial structure. For example, we create taxonomies for similarity networks constructed from both political voting data and financial data. We also construct network taxonomies to compare the social structures of 100 Facebook networks and the growth structures produced by different types of fungi.

  10. Classification of complex networks based on similarity of topological network features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Niousha; Aliakbary, Sadegh

    2017-09-01

    Over the past few decades, networks have been widely used to model real-world phenomena. Real-world networks exhibit nontrivial topological characteristics and therefore, many network models are proposed in the literature for generating graphs that are similar to real networks. Network models reproduce nontrivial properties such as long-tail degree distributions or high clustering coefficients. In this context, we encounter the problem of selecting the network model that best fits a given real-world network. The need for a model selection method reveals the network classification problem, in which a target-network is classified into one of the candidate network models. In this paper, we propose a novel network classification method which is independent of the network size and employs an alignment-free metric of network comparison. The proposed method is based on supervised machine learning algorithms and utilizes the topological similarities of networks for the classification task. The experiments show that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art methods with respect to classification accuracy, time efficiency, and robustness to noise.

  11. Walking on a user similarity network towards personalized recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxin Gan

    Full Text Available Personalized recommender systems have been receiving more and more attention in addressing the serious problem of information overload accompanying the rapid evolution of the world-wide-web. Although traditional collaborative filtering approaches based on similarities between users have achieved remarkable success, it has been shown that the existence of popular objects may adversely influence the correct scoring of candidate objects, which lead to unreasonable recommendation results. Meanwhile, recent advances have demonstrated that approaches based on diffusion and random walk processes exhibit superior performance over collaborative filtering methods in both the recommendation accuracy and diversity. Building on these results, we adopt three strategies (power-law adjustment, nearest neighbor, and threshold filtration to adjust a user similarity network from user similarity scores calculated on historical data, and then propose a random walk with restart model on the constructed network to achieve personalized recommendations. We perform cross-validation experiments on two real data sets (MovieLens and Netflix and compare the performance of our method against the existing state-of-the-art methods. Results show that our method outperforms existing methods in not only recommendation accuracy and diversity, but also retrieval performance.

  12. Walking on a user similarity network towards personalized recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Mingxin

    2014-01-01

    Personalized recommender systems have been receiving more and more attention in addressing the serious problem of information overload accompanying the rapid evolution of the world-wide-web. Although traditional collaborative filtering approaches based on similarities between users have achieved remarkable success, it has been shown that the existence of popular objects may adversely influence the correct scoring of candidate objects, which lead to unreasonable recommendation results. Meanwhile, recent advances have demonstrated that approaches based on diffusion and random walk processes exhibit superior performance over collaborative filtering methods in both the recommendation accuracy and diversity. Building on these results, we adopt three strategies (power-law adjustment, nearest neighbor, and threshold filtration) to adjust a user similarity network from user similarity scores calculated on historical data, and then propose a random walk with restart model on the constructed network to achieve personalized recommendations. We perform cross-validation experiments on two real data sets (MovieLens and Netflix) and compare the performance of our method against the existing state-of-the-art methods. Results show that our method outperforms existing methods in not only recommendation accuracy and diversity, but also retrieval performance.

  13. Walking on a User Similarity Network towards Personalized Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Mingxin

    2014-01-01

    Personalized recommender systems have been receiving more and more attention in addressing the serious problem of information overload accompanying the rapid evolution of the world-wide-web. Although traditional collaborative filtering approaches based on similarities between users have achieved remarkable success, it has been shown that the existence of popular objects may adversely influence the correct scoring of candidate objects, which lead to unreasonable recommendation results. Meanwhile, recent advances have demonstrated that approaches based on diffusion and random walk processes exhibit superior performance over collaborative filtering methods in both the recommendation accuracy and diversity. Building on these results, we adopt three strategies (power-law adjustment, nearest neighbor, and threshold filtration) to adjust a user similarity network from user similarity scores calculated on historical data, and then propose a random walk with restart model on the constructed network to achieve personalized recommendations. We perform cross-validation experiments on two real data sets (MovieLens and Netflix) and compare the performance of our method against the existing state-of-the-art methods. Results show that our method outperforms existing methods in not only recommendation accuracy and diversity, but also retrieval performance. PMID:25489942

  14. EFFECTIVE BANDWIDTH FOR SELF-SIMILAR TRAFFIC IN ATM NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linawati Linawati

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new approach to estimate the effective bandwidth for self-similar traffic in ATM network. In this approach we use the tail distribution of queue length based on FBM model. This approach is derived from the inequalities for Mills’ ratio. Then a comparison with Norros and Trinh&Miki schemes are analysed. The results demonstrate reasonable agreement between numerical and simulation results and between all schemes. Their bandwidth estimation tends closer for CLP improvement.

  15. Geographical variation in mutualistic networks: similarity, turnover and partner fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trøjelsgaard, Kristian; Jordano, Pedro; Carstensen, Daniel W; Olesen, Jens M

    2015-03-07

    Although species and their interactions in unison represent biodiversity and all the ecological and evolutionary processes associated with life, biotic interactions have, contrary to species, rarely been integrated into the concepts of spatial β-diversity. Here, we examine β-diversity of ecological networks by using pollination networks sampled across the Canary Islands. We show that adjacent and distant communities are more and less similar, respectively, in their composition of plants, pollinators and interactions than expected from random distributions. We further show that replacement of species is the major driver of interaction turnover and that this contribution increases with distance. Finally, we quantify that species-specific partner compositions (here called partner fidelity) deviate from random partner use, but vary as a result of ecological and geographical variables. In particular, breakdown of partner fidelity was facilitated by increasing geographical distance, changing abundances and changing linkage levels, but was not related to the geographical distribution of the species. This highlights the importance of space when comparing communities of interacting species and may stimulate a rethinking of the spatial interpretation of interaction networks. Moreover, geographical interaction dynamics and its causes are important in our efforts to anticipate effects of large-scale changes, such as anthropogenic disturbances. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Unsupervised User Similarity Mining in GSM Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafqat Ali Shad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility data has attracted the researchers for the past few years because of its rich context and spatiotemporal nature, where this information can be used for potential applications like early warning system, route prediction, traffic management, advertisement, social networking, and community finding. All the mentioned applications are based on mobility profile building and user trend analysis, where mobility profile building is done through significant places extraction, user’s actual movement prediction, and context awareness. However, significant places extraction and user’s actual movement prediction for mobility profile building are a trivial task. In this paper, we present the user similarity mining-based methodology through user mobility profile building by using the semantic tagging information provided by user and basic GSM network architecture properties based on unsupervised clustering approach. As the mobility information is in low-level raw form, our proposed methodology successfully converts it to a high-level meaningful information by using the cell-Id location information rather than previously used location capturing methods like GPS, Infrared, and Wifi for profile mining and user similarity mining.

  17. Unsupervised user similarity mining in GSM sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shad, Shafqat Ali; Chen, Enhong

    2013-01-01

    Mobility data has attracted the researchers for the past few years because of its rich context and spatiotemporal nature, where this information can be used for potential applications like early warning system, route prediction, traffic management, advertisement, social networking, and community finding. All the mentioned applications are based on mobility profile building and user trend analysis, where mobility profile building is done through significant places extraction, user's actual movement prediction, and context awareness. However, significant places extraction and user's actual movement prediction for mobility profile building are a trivial task. In this paper, we present the user similarity mining-based methodology through user mobility profile building by using the semantic tagging information provided by user and basic GSM network architecture properties based on unsupervised clustering approach. As the mobility information is in low-level raw form, our proposed methodology successfully converts it to a high-level meaningful information by using the cell-Id location information rather than previously used location capturing methods like GPS, Infrared, and Wifi for profile mining and user similarity mining.

  18. Social Networks and Network Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Research in Command & Control • Latent Semantic Analysis – Team communication – Emergent team dynamics – Shared situation awareness • Dynamic Network...requirements – Information technology requirements 28 LSA Essentials of Latent Semantic Analysis 29 Communication Analysis • Goal: Automatically monitor and

  19. Protein structure similarity from principle component correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou James

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to rapid expansion of protein structure databases in recent years, methods of structure comparison are becoming increasingly effective and important in revealing novel information on functional properties of proteins and their roles in the grand scheme of evolutionary biology. Currently, the structural similarity between two proteins is measured by the root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD in their best-superimposed atomic coordinates. RMSD is the golden rule of measuring structural similarity when the structures are nearly identical; it, however, fails to detect the higher order topological similarities in proteins evolved into different shapes. We propose new algorithms for extracting geometrical invariants of proteins that can be effectively used to identify homologous protein structures or topologies in order to quantify both close and remote structural similarities. Results We measure structural similarity between proteins by correlating the principle components of their secondary structure interaction matrix. In our approach, the Principle Component Correlation (PCC analysis, a symmetric interaction matrix for a protein structure is constructed with relationship parameters between secondary elements that can take the form of distance, orientation, or other relevant structural invariants. When using a distance-based construction in the presence or absence of encoded N to C terminal sense, there are strong correlations between the principle components of interaction matrices of structurally or topologically similar proteins. Conclusion The PCC method is extensively tested for protein structures that belong to the same topological class but are significantly different by RMSD measure. The PCC analysis can also differentiate proteins having similar shapes but different topological arrangements. Additionally, we demonstrate that when using two independently defined interaction matrices, comparison of their maximum

  20. User recommendation in healthcare social media by assessing user similarity in heterogeneous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ling; Yang, Christopher C

    2017-09-01

    The rapid growth of online health social websites has captured a vast amount of healthcare information and made the information easy to access for health consumers. E-patients often use these social websites for informational and emotional support. However, health consumers could be easily overwhelmed by the overloaded information. Healthcare information searching can be very difficult for consumers, not to mention most of them are not skilled information searcher. In this work, we investigate the approaches for measuring user similarity in online health social websites. By recommending similar users to consumers, we can help them to seek informational and emotional support in a more efficient way. We propose to represent the healthcare social media data as a heterogeneous healthcare information network and introduce the local and global structural approaches for measuring user similarity in a heterogeneous network. We compare the proposed structural approaches with the content-based approach. Experiments were conducted on a dataset collected from a popular online health social website, and the results showed that content-based approach performed better for inactive users, while structural approaches performed better for active users. Moreover, global structural approach outperformed local structural approach for all user groups. In addition, we conducted experiments on local and global structural approaches using different weight schemas for the edges in the network. Leverage performed the best for both local and global approaches. Finally, we integrated different approaches and demonstrated that hybrid method yielded better performance than the individual approach. The results indicate that content-based methods can effectively capture the similarity of inactive users who usually have focused interests, while structural methods can achieve better performance when rich structural information is available. Local structural approach only considers direct connections

  1. [Network structures in biological systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleskin, A V

    2013-01-01

    Network structures (networks) that have been extensively studied in the humanities are characterized by cohesion, a lack of a central control unit, and predominantly fractal properties. They are contrasted with structures that contain a single centre (hierarchies) as well as with those whose elements predominantly compete with one another (market-type structures). As far as biological systems are concerned, their network structures can be subdivided into a number of types involving different organizational mechanisms. Network organization is characteristic of various structural levels of biological systems ranging from single cells to integrated societies. These networks can be classified into two main subgroups: (i) flat (leaderless) network structures typical of systems that are composed of uniform elements and represent modular organisms or at least possess manifest integral properties and (ii) three-dimensional, partly hierarchical structures characterized by significant individual and/or intergroup (intercaste) differences between their elements. All network structures include an element that performs structural, protective, and communication-promoting functions. By analogy to cell structures, this element is denoted as the matrix of a network structure. The matrix includes a material and an immaterial component. The material component comprises various structures that belong to the whole structure and not to any of its elements per se. The immaterial (ideal) component of the matrix includes social norms and rules regulating network elements' behavior. These behavioral rules can be described in terms of algorithms. Algorithmization enables modeling the behavior of various network structures, particularly of neuron networks and their artificial analogs.

  2. Similar pathogen targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and homo sapiens protein networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Shakarian

    Full Text Available We study the behavior of pathogens on host protein networks for humans and Arabidopsis - noting striking similarities. Specifically, we preform [Formula: see text]-shell decomposition analysis on these networks - which groups the proteins into various "shells" based on network structure. We observe that shells with a higher average degree are more highly targeted (with a power-law relationship and that highly targeted nodes lie in shells closer to the inner-core of the network. Additionally, we also note that the inner core of the network is significantly under-targeted. We show that these core proteins may have a role in intra-cellular communication and hypothesize that they are less attacked to ensure survival of the host. This may explain why certain high-degree proteins are not significantly attacked.

  3. Overload-based cascades on multiplex networks and effects of inter-similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Elmokashfi, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Although cascading failures caused by overload on interdependent/interconnected networks have been studied in the recent years, the effect of overlapping links (inter-similarity) on robustness to such cascades in coupled networks is not well understood. This is an important issue since shared links exist in many real-world coupled networks. In this paper, we propose a new model for load-based cascading failures in multiplex networks. We leverage it to compare different network structures, coupling schemes, and overload rules. More importantly, we systematically investigate the impact of inter-similarity on the robustness of the whole system under an initial intentional attack. Surprisingly, we find that inter-similarity can have a negative impact on robustness to overload cascades. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report the competition between the positive and the negative impacts of overlapping links on the robustness of coupled networks. These results provide useful suggestions for designing robust coupled traffic systems.

  4. Overload-based cascades on multiplex networks and effects of inter-similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhou

    Full Text Available Although cascading failures caused by overload on interdependent/interconnected networks have been studied in the recent years, the effect of overlapping links (inter-similarity on robustness to such cascades in coupled networks is not well understood. This is an important issue since shared links exist in many real-world coupled networks. In this paper, we propose a new model for load-based cascading failures in multiplex networks. We leverage it to compare different network structures, coupling schemes, and overload rules. More importantly, we systematically investigate the impact of inter-similarity on the robustness of the whole system under an initial intentional attack. Surprisingly, we find that inter-similarity can have a negative impact on robustness to overload cascades. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report the competition between the positive and the negative impacts of overlapping links on the robustness of coupled networks. These results provide useful suggestions for designing robust coupled traffic systems.

  5. Do birds of a feather flock together? The relationship between similarity and altruism in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Oliver; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2013-09-01

    Cooperation requires that individuals are able to identify, and preferentially associate with, others who have compatible preferences and the shared background knowledge needed to solve interpersonal coordination problems. The present study investigates the nature of such similarity within social networks, asking: What do friends have in common? And what is the relationship between similarity and altruism? The results show that similarity declines with frequency of contact; similarity in general is a significant predictor of altruism and emotional closeness; and, specifically, sharing a sense of humor, hobbies and interests, moral beliefs, and being from the same area are the best predictors. These results shed light on the structure of relationships within networks and provide a possible checklist for predicting attitudes toward strangers, and in-group identification.

  6. Self-similarity and quasi-idempotence in neural networks and related dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Winkel, Julia; Bifone, Angelo; Oświecimka, Paweł; Jovicich, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    Self-similarity across length scales is pervasively observed in natural systems. Here, we investigate topological self-similarity in complex networks representing diverse forms of connectivity in the brain and some related dynamical systems, by considering the correlation between edges directly connecting any two nodes in a network and indirect connection between the same via all triangles spanning the rest of the network. We note that this aspect of self-similarity, which is distinct from hierarchically nested connectivity (coarse-grain similarity), is closely related to idempotence of the matrix representing the graph. We introduce two measures, ι ( 1 ) and ι ( ∞ ) , which represent the element-wise correlation coefficients between the initial matrix and the ones obtained after squaring it once or infinitely many times, and term the matrices which yield large values of these parameters "quasi-idempotent". These measures delineate qualitatively different forms of "shallow" and "deep" quasi-idempotence, which are influenced by nodal strength heterogeneity. A high degree of quasi-idempotence was observed for partially synchronized mean-field Kuramoto oscillators with noise, electronic chaotic oscillators, and cultures of dissociated neurons, wherein the expression of quasi-idempotence correlated strongly with network maturity. Quasi-idempotence was also detected for macro-scale brain networks representing axonal connectivity, synchronization of slow activity fluctuations during idleness, and co-activation across experimental tasks, and preliminary data indicated that quasi-idempotence of structural connectivity may decrease with ageing. This initial study highlights that the form of network self-similarity indexed by quasi-idempotence is detectable in diverse dynamical systems, and draws attention to it as a possible basis for measures representing network "collectivity" and pattern formation.

  7. Automatic classification of protein structures relying on similarities between alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santini Guillaume

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein structural cores requires isolation of sets of proteins all sharing a same subset of structural motifs. In the context of an ever growing number of available 3D protein structures, standard and automatic clustering algorithms require adaptations so as to allow for efficient identification of such sets of proteins. Results When considering a pair of 3D structures, they are stated as similar or not according to the local similarities of their matching substructures in a structural alignment. This binary relation can be represented in a graph of similarities where a node represents a 3D protein structure and an edge states that two 3D protein structures are similar. Therefore, classifying proteins into structural families can be viewed as a graph clustering task. Unfortunately, because such a graph encodes only pairwise similarity information, clustering algorithms may include in the same cluster a subset of 3D structures that do not share a common substructure. In order to overcome this drawback we first define a ternary similarity on a triple of 3D structures as a constraint to be satisfied by the graph of similarities. Such a ternary constraint takes into account similarities between pairwise alignments, so as to ensure that the three involved protein structures do have some common substructure. We propose hereunder a modification algorithm that eliminates edges from the original graph of similarities and gives a reduced graph in which no ternary constraints are violated. Our approach is then first to build a graph of similarities, then to reduce the graph according to the modification algorithm, and finally to apply to the reduced graph a standard graph clustering algorithm. Such method was used for classifying ASTRAL-40 non-redundant protein domains, identifying significant pairwise similarities with Yakusa, a program devised for rapid 3D structure alignments. Conclusions We show that filtering

  8. Similarity-based Regularized Latent Feature Model for Link Prediction in Bipartite Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Chen, Xue; Jiao, Pengfei; Jin, Di

    2017-12-05

    Link prediction is an attractive research topic in the field of data mining and has significant applications in improving performance of recommendation system and exploring evolving mechanisms of the complex networks. A variety of complex systems in real world should be abstractly represented as bipartite networks, in which there are two types of nodes and no links connect nodes of the same type. In this paper, we propose a framework for link prediction in bipartite networks by combining the similarity based structure and the latent feature model from a new perspective. The framework is called Similarity Regularized Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (SRNMF), which explicitly takes the local characteristics into consideration and encodes the geometrical information of the networks by constructing a similarity based matrix. We also develop an iterative scheme to solve the objective function based on gradient descent. Extensive experiments on a variety of real world bipartite networks show that the proposed framework of link prediction has a more competitive, preferable and stable performance in comparison with the state-of-art methods.

  9. Modeling the self-similarity in complex networks based on Coulomb's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haixin; Wei, Daijun; Hu, Yong; Lan, Xin; Deng, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Recently, self-similarity of complex networks have attracted much attention. Fractal dimension of complex network is an open issue. Hub repulsion plays an important role in fractal topologies. This paper models the repulsion among the nodes in the complex networks in calculation of the fractal dimension of the networks. Coulomb's law is adopted to represent the repulse between two nodes of the network quantitatively. A new method to calculate the fractal dimension of complex networks is proposed. The Sierpinski triangle network and some real complex networks are investigated. The results are illustrated to show that the new model of self-similarity of complex networks is reasonable and efficient.

  10. MS/MS similarity networking accelerated target profiling of triterpene saponins in Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yue-Wei; Zhu, Shu; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2017-07-15

    The targeted mass information of compounds accelerated their discovery in a large volume of untargeted MS data. An MS/MS similarity networking is advanced in clustering the structural analogues, which benefits the collection of mass information of similar compounds. The triterpene saponins extracted from Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves (ESL), a kind of functional tea, have shown promise in the relief of Alzheimer's disease. In this work, a target-precursor list (TPL) generated using MS/MS similarity networking was employed to rapidly trace 106 triterpene saponins from the aqueous extracts of ESL, of which 49 were tentatively identified as potentially new triterpene saponins. Moreover, a compound database of triterpene saponins was established and successfully applied to uncover their distribution features in ESL samples collected from different areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring the structural regularities in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Guo, Jia-Feng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of exploring structural regularities of networks by dividing the nodes of a network into groups such that the members of each group have similar patterns of connections to other groups. Specifically, we propose a general statistical model to describe network structure. In this model, group is viewed as hidden or unobserved quantity and it is learned by fitting the observed network data using the expectation-maximization algorithm. Compared with existing models, the most prominent strength of our model is the high flexibility. This strength enables it to possess the advantages of existing models and overcomes their shortcomings in a unified way. As a result, not only broad types of structure can be detected without prior knowledge of what type of intrinsic regularities exist in the network, but also the type of identified structure can be directly learned from data. Moreover, by differentiating outgoing edges from incoming edges, our model can detect several types of stru...

  12. Systems chemistry : using thermodynamically controlled networks to assess molecular similarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saggiomo, Vittorio; Hristova, Yana R.; Ludlow, R. Frederick; Otto, Sijbren

    2013-01-01

    Background: The assessment of mol. similarity is a key step in the drug discovery process that has thus far relied almost exclusively on computational approaches. We now report an exptl. method for similarity assessment based on dynamic combinatorial chem. Results: In order to assess mol. similarity

  13. Multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdel-Salam Nasr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The most recent approach for measuring the image quality is the structural similarity index (SSI. This paper presents a novel algorithm based on the multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection (MS-SSIM in videos. The MS-SSIM approach is based on modeling of image luminance, contrast and structure at multiple scales. The MS-SSIM has resulted in much better performance than the single scale SSI approach but at the cost of relatively lower processing speed. The major advantages of the presented algorithm are both: the higher detection accuracy and the quasi real-time processing speed.

  14. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  15. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Shweta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Results Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics. Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. Conclusion ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in

  16. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Shweta; Khandelwal, Shashank; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2009-12-09

    Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions) and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected) are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks) provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics.Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural

  17. Network structure of production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Enghin; Hortaçsu, Ali; Roberts, James; Syverson, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Complex social networks have received increasing attention from researchers. Recent work has focused on mechanisms that produce scale-free networks. We theoretically and empirically characterize the buyer–supplier network of the US economy and find that purely scale-free models have trouble matching key attributes of the network. We construct an alternative model that incorporates realistic features of firms’ buyer–supplier relationships and estimate the model’s parameters using microdata on firms’ self-reported customers. This alternative framework is better able to match the attributes of the actual economic network and aids in further understanding several important economic phenomena. PMID:21402924

  18. Analyzing self-similar and fractal properties of the C. elegans neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Reese

    Full Text Available The brain is one of the most studied and highly complex systems in the biological world. While much research has concentrated on studying the brain directly, our focus is the structure of the brain itself: at its core an interconnected network of nodes (neurons. A better understanding of the structural connectivity of the brain should elucidate some of its functional properties. In this paper we analyze the connectome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Consisting of only 302 neurons, it is one of the better-understood neural networks. Using a Laplacian Matrix of the 279-neuron "giant component" of the network, we use an eigenvalue counting function to look for fractal-like self similarity. This matrix representation is also used to plot visualizations of the neural network in eigenfunction coordinates. Small-world properties of the system are examined, including average path length and clustering coefficient. We test for localization of eigenfunctions, using graph energy and spacial variance on these functions. To better understand results, all calculations are also performed on random networks, branching trees, and known fractals, as well as fractals which have been "rewired" to have small-world properties. We propose algorithms for generating Laplacian matrices of each of these graphs.

  19. A fingerprint based metric for measuring similarities of crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Amsler, Maximilian; Fuhrer, Tobias; Schaefer, Bastian; Faraji, Somayeh; Rostami, Samare; Ghasemi, S Alireza; Sadeghi, Ali; Grauzinyte, Migle; Wolverton, Chris; Goedecker, Stefan

    2016-01-21

    Measuring similarities/dissimilarities between atomic structures is important for the exploration of potential energy landscapes. However, the cell vectors together with the coordinates of the atoms, which are generally used to describe periodic systems, are quantities not directly suitable as fingerprints to distinguish structures. Based on a characterization of the local environment of all atoms in a cell, we introduce crystal fingerprints that can be calculated easily and define configurational distances between crystalline structures that satisfy the mathematical properties of a metric. This distance between two configurations is a measure of their similarity/dissimilarity and it allows in particular to distinguish structures. The new method can be a useful tool within various energy landscape exploration schemes, such as minima hopping, random search, swarm intelligence algorithms, and high-throughput screenings.

  20. A fingerprint based metric for measuring similarities of crystalline structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Li; Fuhrer, Tobias; Schaefer, Bastian; Grauzinyte, Migle; Goedecker, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.goedecker@unibas.ch [Department of Physics, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Amsler, Maximilian [Department of Physics, Universität Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Faraji, Somayeh; Rostami, Samare; Ghasemi, S. Alireza [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Ali [Physics Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, 19839 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wolverton, Chris [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Measuring similarities/dissimilarities between atomic structures is important for the exploration of potential energy landscapes. However, the cell vectors together with the coordinates of the atoms, which are generally used to describe periodic systems, are quantities not directly suitable as fingerprints to distinguish structures. Based on a characterization of the local environment of all atoms in a cell, we introduce crystal fingerprints that can be calculated easily and define configurational distances between crystalline structures that satisfy the mathematical properties of a metric. This distance between two configurations is a measure of their similarity/dissimilarity and it allows in particular to distinguish structures. The new method can be a useful tool within various energy landscape exploration schemes, such as minima hopping, random search, swarm intelligence algorithms, and high-throughput screenings.

  1. A fingerprint based metric for measuring similarities of crystalline structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Amsler, Maximilian; Fuhrer, Tobias; Schaefer, Bastian; Faraji, Somayeh; Rostami, Samare; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Sadeghi, Ali; Grauzinyte, Migle; Wolverton, Chris; Goedecker, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Measuring similarities/dissimilarities between atomic structures is important for the exploration of potential energy landscapes. However, the cell vectors together with the coordinates of the atoms, which are generally used to describe periodic systems, are quantities not directly suitable as fingerprints to distinguish structures. Based on a characterization of the local environment of all atoms in a cell, we introduce crystal fingerprints that can be calculated easily and define configurational distances between crystalline structures that satisfy the mathematical properties of a metric. This distance between two configurations is a measure of their similarity/dissimilarity and it allows in particular to distinguish structures. The new method can be a useful tool within various energy landscape exploration schemes, such as minima hopping, random search, swarm intelligence algorithms, and high-throughput screenings.

  2. Advanced Polymer Network Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    characteristic time 02 /UmaLJ =τ . Topologically bound monomers interact through the sum of the purely repulsive LJ potential ( arc 6/12= ) or so-called Weeks...3 Content of the simulated polymer double network. Self- attraction coefficient between particles within a network (first or second) is fixed at 1...technique to the study the microscopic topology and dynamics of a wide variety of polymer networks and gels.5–8 The pair interaction between

  3. Similarity boosted quantitative structure-activity relationship--a systematic study of enhancing structural descriptors by molecular similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girschick, Tobias; Almeida, Pedro R; Kramer, Stefan; Stålring, Jonna

    2013-05-24

    The concept of molecular similarity is one of the most central in the fields of predictive toxicology and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) research. Many toxicological responses result from a multimechanistic process and, consequently, structural diversity among the active compounds is likely. Combining this knowledge, we introduce similarity boosted QSAR modeling, where we calculate molecular descriptors using similarities with respect to representative reference compounds to aid a statistical learning algorithm in distinguishing between different structural classes. We present three approaches for the selection of reference compounds, one by literature search and two by clustering. Our experimental evaluation on seven publicly available data sets shows that the similarity descriptors used on their own perform quite well compared to structural descriptors. We show that the combination of similarity and structural descriptors enhances the performance and that a simple stacking approach is able to use the complementary information encoded by the different descriptor sets to further improve predictive results. All software necessary for our experiments is available within the cheminformatics software framework AZOrange.

  4. Structural similarity and category-specificity: a refined account

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, Ian; Law, Ian

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that category-specific recognition disorders for natural objects may reflect that natural objects are more structurally (visually) similar than artefacts and therefore more difficult to recognize following brain damage. On this account one might expect a positive relationshi...

  5. Recognition of handwritten similar Chinese characters by self-growing probabilistic decision-based neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H C; Xu, Y Y; Chang, H Y

    1999-12-01

    Recognition of similar (confusion) characters is a difficult problem in optical character recognition (OCR). In this paper, we introduce a neural network solution that is capable of modeling minor differences among similar characters, and is robust to various personal handwriting styles. The Self-growing Probabilistic Decision-based Neural Network (SPDNN) is a probabilistic type neural network, which adopts a hierarchical network structure with nonlinear basis functions and a competitive credit-assignment scheme. Based on the SPDNN model, we have constructed a three-stage recognition system. First, a coarse classifier determines a character to be input to one of the pre-defined subclasses partitioned from a large character set, such as Chinese mixed with alphanumerics. Then a character recognizer determines the input image which best matches the reference character in the subclass. Lastly, the third module is a similar character recognizer, which can further enhance the recognition accuracy among similar or confusing characters. The prototype system has demonstrated a successful application of SPDNN to similar handwritten Chinese recognition for the public database CCL/HCCR1 (5401 characters x200 samples). Regarding performance, experiments on the CCL/HCCR1 database produced 90.12% recognition accuracy with no rejection, and 94.11% accuracy with 6.7% rejection, respectively. This recognition accuracy represents about 4% improvement on the previously announced performance. As to processing speed, processing before recognition (including image preprocessing, segmentation, and feature extraction) requires about one second for an A4 size character image, and recognition consumes approximately 0.27 second per character on a Pentium-100 based personal computer, without use of any hardware accelerator or co-processor.

  6. Networks at Their Limits: Software, Similarity, and Continuity in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lilly Uyen

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the social worlds of pirated software discs and free/open source software in Vietnam to describe the practices of copying, evangelizing, and translation. This dissertation also reveals the cultural logics of similarity and continuity that sustain these social worlds. Taken together, this dissertation argues that the…

  7. Structural similarity and category-specificity: a refined account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Christian; Law, Ian; Paulson, Olaf B

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that category-specific recognition disorders for natural objects may reflect that natural objects are more structurally (visually) similar than artefacts and therefore more difficult to recognize following brain damage. On this account one might expect a positive relationship between blood flow and structural similarity in areas involved in visual object recognition. Contrary to this expectation we report a negative relationship in that identification of articles of clothing cause more extensive activation than identification of vegetables/fruit and animals even though items from the categories of animals and vegetables/fruit are rated as more structurally similar than items from the category of articles of clothing. Given that this pattern cannot be explained in terms of a tradeoff between activation and accuracy, we interpret these findings within a model where the matching of visual forms to memory incorporates two operations: (i) the integration of stored object features into whole object representations (integral units), and (ii) the competition between activated integral units for selection (i.e. identification). In addition, we suggest that these operations are differentially affected by structural similarity in that high structural similarity may be beneficial for the integration of stored features into integral units, thus explaining the greater activation found with articles of clothing, whereas it may be harmful for the selection process proper because a greater range of candidate integral units will be activated and compete for selection, thus explaining the higher error rate associated with animals. We evaluate the model based on previous evidence from both normal subjects and patients with category-specific disorders and argue that this model can help reconcile otherwise conflicting data.

  8. Distance metric learning for complex networks: Towards size-independent comparison of network structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbary, Sadegh; Motallebi, Sadegh; Rashidian, Sina; Habibi, Jafar; Movaghar, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Real networks show nontrivial topological properties such as community structure and long-tail degree distribution. Moreover, many network analysis applications are based on topological comparison of complex networks. Classification and clustering of networks, model selection, and anomaly detection are just some applications of network comparison. In these applications, an effective similarity metric is needed which, given two complex networks of possibly different sizes, evaluates the amount of similarity between the structural features of the two networks. Traditional graph comparison approaches, such as isomorphism-based methods, are not only too time consuming but also inappropriate to compare networks with different sizes. In this paper, we propose an intelligent method based on the genetic algorithms for integrating, selecting, and weighting the network features in order to develop an effective similarity measure for complex networks. The proposed similarity metric outperforms state of the art methods with respect to different evaluation criteria.

  9. Methods and applications for detecting structure in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Elizabeth A.

    The use of networks to represent systems of interacting components is now common in many fields including the biological, physical, and social sciences. Network models are widely applicable due to their relatively simple framework of vertices and edges. Network structure, patterns of connection between vertices, impacts both the functioning of networks and processes occurring on networks. However, many aspects of network structure are still poorly understood. This dissertation presents a set of network analysis methods and applications to real-world as well as simulated networks. The methods are divided into two main types: linear algebra formulations and probabilistic mixture model techniques. Network models lend themselves to compact mathematical representation as matrices, making linear algebra techniques useful probes of network structure. We present methods for the detection of two distinct, but related, network structural forms. First, we derive a measure of vertex similarity based upon network structure. The method builds on existing ideas concerning calculation of vertex similarity, but generalizes and extends the scope to large networks. Second, we address the detection of communities or modules in a specific class of networks, directed networks. We propose a method for detecting community structure in directed networks, which is an extension of a community detection method previously only known for undirected networks. Moving away from linear algebra formulations, we propose two methods for network structure detection based on probabilistic techniques. In the first method, we use the machinery of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to probe patterns of connection among vertices in static networks. The technique allows for the detection of a broad range of types of structure in networks. The second method focuses on time evolving networks. We propose an application of the EM algorithm to evolving networks that can reveal significant structural

  10. Semantic Similarity versus Co-authorship Networks: A Detailed Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paraschiv, Ionut Cristian; Dascalu, Mihai; Trausan-Matu, Stefan; Nistor, Nicolae; Montes de Oca, Ambar Murillo; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2017-01-01

    Whether interested in personal work, in learning about trending topics, or in finding the structure of a specific domain, individuals' work of staying up-to-date has become more and more difficult due to the increasing information overflow. ln our previous work our focus has been to create a

  11. Detecting Hierarchical Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    a generative Bayesian model that is able to infer whether hierarchies are present or not from a hypothesis space encompassing all types of hierarchical tree structures. For efficient inference we propose a collapsed Gibbs sampling procedure that jointly infers a partition and its hierarchical structure......Many real-world networks exhibit hierarchical organization. Previous models of hierarchies within relational data has focused on binary trees; however, for many networks it is unknown whether there is hierarchical structure, and if there is, a binary tree might not account well for it. We propose....... On synthetic and real data we demonstrate that our model can detect hierarchical structure leading to better link-prediction than competing models. Our model can be used to detect if a network exhibits hierarchical structure, thereby leading to a better comprehension and statistical account the network....

  12. Discovering network structure beyond communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes characterized by common network properties, including but not limited to communities of densely connected nodes. Without any prior information about the nature of the groups, the method simultaneously identifies the number of groups, the group assignment, and the properties that define these groups. The results of applying our method to real networks suggest the possibility that most group structures lurk undiscovered in the fast-growing inventory of social, biological, and technological networks of scientific interest.

  13. Strategic Planning Process and Organizational Structure: Impacts, Confluence and Similarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyogo Felype Neis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the relationship between the strategic planning process and organizational structure in the reality of a complex organization: the Public Prosecutor’s Office of Santa Catarina (MPSC. The research is set by the single case study research strategy and data were collected through the following instruments: bibliographical research, documentary research, semi-structured interviews and systematic observation. The conclusion indicates that the phases of the strategic planning process influence and are influenced by the elements of the organizational structure and highlights the confluences, the impacts and similarities between the stages of formulation and implementation of the strategic process with the various constituent elements of the organizational structure.

  14. Discovering Network Structure Beyond Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the formation, evolution, and function of complex systems, it is crucial to understand the internal organization of their interaction networks. Partly due to the impossibility of visualizing large complex networks, resolving network structure remains a challenging problem. Here we overcome this difficulty by combining the visual pattern recognition ability of humans with the high processing speed of computers to develop an exploratory method for discovering groups of nodes chara...

  15. Collective network for computer structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumrich, Matthias A [Ridgefield, CT; Coteus, Paul W [Yorktown Heights, NY; Chen, Dong [Croton On Hudson, NY; Gara, Alan [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Hoenicke, Dirk [Ossining, NY; Takken, Todd E [Brewster, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D [Wernau, DE; Vranas, Pavlos M [Bedford Hills, NY

    2011-08-16

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global collective communications among interconnected processing nodes. The global collective network optimally enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices ate included that interconnect the nodes of the network via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual network and class structures. The global collective network may be configured to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner. When implemented in a massively-parallel supercomputing structure, the global collective network is physically and logically partitionable according to needs of a processing algorithm.

  16. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...significantly attacked. Citation: Shakarian P, Wickiser JK (2012) Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks...to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Inferring network structure from cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonge, Sushrut; Vural, Dervis Can

    2017-07-01

    Many physical, biological, and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we offer three topological methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for several different cascade models.

  18. Confidence sets for network structure

    CERN Document Server

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Wolfe, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Latent variable models are frequently used to identify structure in dichotomous network data, in part because they give rise to a Bernoulli product likelihood that is both well understood and consistent with the notion of exchangeable random graphs. In this article we propose conservative confidence sets that hold with respect to these underlying Bernoulli parameters as a function of any given partition of network nodes, enabling us to assess estimates of 'residual' network structure, that is, structure that cannot be explained by known covariates and thus cannot be easily verified by manual inspection. We demonstrate the proposed methodology by analyzing student friendship networks from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health that include race, gender, and school year as covariates. We employ a stochastic expectation-maximization algorithm to fit a logistic regression model that includes these explanatory variables as well as a latent stochastic blockmodel component and additional node-specific...

  19. Co-expression Network Approach Reveals Functional Similarities among Diseases Affecting Human Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha Mukund; Shankar Subramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Diseases affecting skeletal muscle exhibit considerable heterogeneity in intensity, etiology, phenotypic manifestation and gene expression. Systems biology approaches using network theory, allows for a holistic understanding of functional similarities amongst diseases. Here we propose a co-expression based, network theoretic approach to extract functional similarities from 20 heterogeneous diseases comprising of dystrophinopathies, inflammatory myopathies, neuromuscular, and muscle metabolic ...

  20. Song trait similarity in great tits varies with social structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysanne Snijders

    Full Text Available For many animals, long-range signalling is essential to maintain contact with conspecifics. In territorial species, individuals often have to balance signalling towards unfamiliar potential competitors (to solely broadcast territory ownership with signalling towards familiar immediate neighbours (to also maintain so-called "dear enemy" relations. Hence, to understand how signals evolve due to these multilevel relationships, it is important to understand how general signal traits vary in relation to the overall social environment. For many territorial songbirds dawn is a key signalling period, with several neighbouring individuals singing simultaneously without immediate conflict. In this study we tested whether sharing a territory boundary, rather than spatial proximity, is related to similarity in dawn song traits between territorial great tits (Parus major in a wild personality-typed population. We collected a large dataset of automatized dawn song recordings from 72 unique male great tits, during the fertile period of their mate, and compared specific song traits between neighbours and non-neighbours. We show here that both song rate and start time of dawn song were repeatable song traits. Moreover, neighbours were significantly more dissimilar in song rate compared to non-neighbours, while there was no effect of proximity on song rate similarity. Additionally, similarity in start time of dawn song was unrelated to sharing a territory boundary, but birds were significantly more similar in start time of dawn song when they were breeding in close proximity of each other. We suggest that the dissimilarity in dawn song rate between neighbours is either the result of neighbouring great tits actively avoiding similar song rates to possibly prevent interference, or a passive consequence of territory settlement preferences relative to the types of neighbours. Neighbourhood structuring is therefore likely to be a relevant selection pressure shaping

  1. Syntactic computations in the language network: Characterising dynamic network properties using representational similarity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Komisarjevsky Tyler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The core human capacity of syntactic analysis involves a left hemisphere network involving left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG and posterior middle temporal gyrus (LMTG and the anatomical connections between them. Here we use MEG to determine the spatio-temporal properties of syntactic computations in this network. Listeners heard spoken sentences containing a local syntactic ambiguity (e.g. …landing planes…, at the offset of which they heard a disambiguating verb and decided whether it was an acceptable/unacceptable continuation of the sentence. We charted the time-course of processing and resolving syntactic ambiguity by measuring MEG responses from the onset of each word in the ambiguous phrase and the disambiguating word. We used representational similarity analysis (RSA to characterize syntactic information represented in the LIFG and LpMTG over time and to investigate their relationship to each other. Testing a variety of lexico-syntactic and ambiguity models against the MEG data, our results suggest early lexico-syntactic responses in the LpMTG and later effects of ambiguity in the LIFG, pointing to a clear differentiation in the functional roles of these two regions. Our results suggest the LpMTG represents and transmits lexical information to the LIFG, which responds to and resolves the ambiguity.

  2. Structurally Dynamic Spin Market Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Denis; Kuscsik, Zoltán

    The agent-based model of stock price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. The inherent structure of node agent "brain" is modeled by a recursive neural network with local and global inputs and feedback connections. For specific parametric combination the complex network displays small-world phenomenon combined with scale-free behavior. The identification of a local leader (network hub, agent whose strategies are frequently adapted by its neighbors) is carried out by repeated random walk process through network. The simulations show empirically relevant dynamics of price returns and volatility clustering. The additional emerging aspects of stylized market statistics are Zipfian distributions of fitness.

  3. Controlling congestion on complex networks: fairness, efficiency and network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzna, Ľuboš; Carvalho, Rui

    2017-08-22

    We consider two elementary (max-flow and uniform-flow) and two realistic (max-min fairness and proportional fairness) congestion control schemes, and analyse how the algorithms and network structure affect throughput, the fairness of flow allocation, and the location of bottleneck edges. The more realistic proportional fairness and max-min fairness algorithms have similar throughput, but path flow allocations are more unequal in scale-free than in random regular networks. Scale-free networks have lower throughput than their random regular counterparts in the uniform-flow algorithm, which is favoured in the complex networks literature. We show, however, that this relation is reversed on all other congestion control algorithms for a region of the parameter space given by the degree exponent γ and average degree 〈k〉. Moreover, the uniform-flow algorithm severely underestimates the network throughput of congested networks, and a rich phenomenology of path flow allocations is only present in the more realistic α-fair family of algorithms. Finally, we show that the number of paths passing through an edge characterises the location of a wide range of bottleneck edges in these algorithms. Such identification of bottlenecks could provide a bridge between the two fields of complex networks and congestion control.

  4. Predictive structural dynamic network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H

    2015-04-30

    Classifying individuals based on magnetic resonance data is an important task in neuroscience. Existing brain network-based methods to classify subjects analyze data from a cross-sectional study and these methods cannot classify subjects based on longitudinal data. We propose a network-based predictive modeling method to classify subjects based on longitudinal magnetic resonance data. Our method generates a dynamic Bayesian network model for each group which represents complex spatiotemporal interactions among brain regions, and then calculates a score representing that subject's deviation from expected network patterns. This network-derived score, along with other candidate predictors, are used to construct predictive models. We validated the proposed method based on simulated data and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study, we built a predictive model based on the baseline biomarker characterizing the baseline state and the network-based score which was constructed based on the state transition probability matrix. We found that this combined model achieved 0.86 accuracy, 0.85 sensitivity, and 0.87 specificity. For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study, the model based on the baseline biomarkers achieved 0.77 accuracy. The accuracy of our model is significantly better than the model based on the baseline biomarkers (p-value=0.002). We have presented a method to classify subjects based on structural dynamic network model based scores. This method is of great importance to distinguish subjects based on structural network dynamics and the understanding of the network architecture of brain processes and disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quaternion structural similarity: a new quality index for color images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaman, Amir; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important issues for researchers developing image processing algorithms is image quality. Methodical quality evaluation, by showing images to several human observers, is slow, expensive, and highly subjective. On the other hand, a visual quality matrix (VQM) is a fast, cheap, and objective tool for evaluating image quality. Although most VQMs are good in predicting the quality of an image degraded by a single degradation, they poorly perform for a combination of two degradations. An example for such degradation is the color crosstalk (CTK) effect, which introduces blur with desaturation. CTK is expected to become a bigger issue in image quality as the industry moves toward smaller sensors. In this paper, we will develop a VQM that will be able to better evaluate the quality of an image degraded by a combined blur/desaturation degradation and perform as well as other VQMs on single degradations such as blur, compression, and noise. We show why standard scalar techniques are insufficient to measure a combined blur/desaturation degradation and explain why a vectorial approach is better suited. We introduce quaternion image processing (QIP), which is a true vectorial approach and has many uses in the fields of physics and engineering. Our new VQM is a vectorial expansion of structure similarity using QIP, which gave it its name-Quaternion Structural SIMilarity (QSSIM). We built a new database of a combined blur/desaturation degradation and conducted a quality survey with human subjects. An extensive comparison between QSSIM and other VQMs on several image quality databases-including our new database-shows the superiority of this new approach in predicting visual quality of color images.

  6. Nek1 shares structural and functional similarities with NIMA kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feige, Erez; Shalom, Ohad; Tsuriel, Shlomo; Yissachar, Nissan; Motro, Benny

    2006-03-01

    The Aspergillus NIMA serine/threonine kinase plays a pivotal role in controlling entrance into mitosis. A major function attributed to NIMA is the induction of chromatin condensation. We show here that the founder murine NIMA-related kinase, Nek1, is larger than previously reported, and that the full-length protein conserves the structural hallmarks of NIMA. Even though Nek1 bears two classical nuclear localization signals (NLS), the endogenous protein localizes to the cytoplasm. Ectopic overexpression of various Nek1 constructs suggests that the C-terminus of Nek1 bears cytoplasmic localization signal(s). Overexpression of nuclear constructs of Nek1 resulted in abnormal chromatin condensation, with the DNA mainly confined to the periphery of the nucleus. Advanced condensation phenotype was associated with nuclear pore complex dispersal. The condensation was not accompanied by up-regulation of mitotic or apoptotic markers. A similar phenotype has been described following NIMA overexpression, strengthening the notion that the mammalian Nek1 kinase has functional similarity to NIMA.

  7. Efficient Algorithm for Computing Link-based Similarity in Real World Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yuanzhe; Cong, Gao; Xu, Jia

    2009-01-01

    Similarity calculation has many applications, such as information retrieval, and collaborative filtering, among many others. It has been shown that link-based similarity measure, such as SimRank, is very effective in characterizing the object similarities in networks, such as the Web, by exploiti...

  8. Community structure discovery method based on the Gaussian kernel similarity matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chonghui; Zhao, Haipeng

    2012-03-01

    Community structure discovery in complex networks is a popular issue, and overlapping community structure discovery in academic research has become one of the hot spots. Based on the Gaussian kernel similarity matrix and spectral bisection, this paper proposes a new community structure discovery method. First, by adjusting the Gaussian kernel parameter to change the scale of similarity, we can find the corresponding non-overlapping community structure when the value of the modularity is the largest relatively. Second, the changes of the Gaussian kernel parameter would lead to the unstable nodes jumping off, so with a slight change in method of non-overlapping community discovery, we can find the overlapping community nodes. Finally, synthetic data, karate club and political books datasets are used to test the proposed method, comparing with some other community discovery methods, to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this method.

  9. Global analysis of the human pathophenotypic similarity gene network merges disease module components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Rodríguez-López, Rocío; Ranea, Juan A G; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Sánchez Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The molecular complexity of genetic diseases requires novel approaches to break it down into coherent biological modules. For this purpose, many disease network models have been created and analyzed. We highlight two of them, "the human diseases networks" (HDN) and "the orphan disease networks" (ODN). However, in these models, each single node represents one disease or an ambiguous group of diseases. In these cases, the notion of diseases as unique entities reduces the usefulness of network-based methods. We hypothesize that using the clinical features (pathophenotypes) to define pathophenotypic connections between disease-causing genes improve our understanding of the molecular events originated by genetic disturbances. For this, we have built a pathophenotypic similarity gene network (PSGN) and compared it with the unipartite projections (based on gene-to-gene edges) similar to those used in previous network models (HDN and ODN). Unlike these disease network models, the PSGN uses semantic similarities. This pathophenotypic similarity has been calculated by comparing pathophenotypic annotations of genes (human abnormalities of HPO terms) in the "Human Phenotype Ontology". The resulting network contains 1075 genes (nodes) and 26197 significant pathophenotypic similarities (edges). A global analysis of this network reveals: unnoticed pairs of genes showing significant pathophenotypic similarity, a biological meaningful re-arrangement of the pathological relationships between genes, correlations of biochemical interactions with higher similarity scores and functional biases in metabolic and essential genes toward the pathophenotypic specificity and the pleiotropy, respectively. Additionally, pathophenotypic similarities and metabolic interactions of genes associated with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) have been used to merge into a coherent pathological module.Our results indicate that pathophenotypes contribute to identify underlying co-dependencies among disease

  10. Global analysis of the human pathophenotypic similarity gene network merges disease module components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Reyes-Palomares

    Full Text Available The molecular complexity of genetic diseases requires novel approaches to break it down into coherent biological modules. For this purpose, many disease network models have been created and analyzed. We highlight two of them, "the human diseases networks" (HDN and "the orphan disease networks" (ODN. However, in these models, each single node represents one disease or an ambiguous group of diseases. In these cases, the notion of diseases as unique entities reduces the usefulness of network-based methods. We hypothesize that using the clinical features (pathophenotypes to define pathophenotypic connections between disease-causing genes improve our understanding of the molecular events originated by genetic disturbances. For this, we have built a pathophenotypic similarity gene network (PSGN and compared it with the unipartite projections (based on gene-to-gene edges similar to those used in previous network models (HDN and ODN. Unlike these disease network models, the PSGN uses semantic similarities. This pathophenotypic similarity has been calculated by comparing pathophenotypic annotations of genes (human abnormalities of HPO terms in the "Human Phenotype Ontology". The resulting network contains 1075 genes (nodes and 26197 significant pathophenotypic similarities (edges. A global analysis of this network reveals: unnoticed pairs of genes showing significant pathophenotypic similarity, a biological meaningful re-arrangement of the pathological relationships between genes, correlations of biochemical interactions with higher similarity scores and functional biases in metabolic and essential genes toward the pathophenotypic specificity and the pleiotropy, respectively. Additionally, pathophenotypic similarities and metabolic interactions of genes associated with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD have been used to merge into a coherent pathological module.Our results indicate that pathophenotypes contribute to identify underlying co

  11. Stability from Structure : Metabolic Networks Are Unlike Other Biological Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nes, P.; Bellomo, D.; Reinders, M.J.T.; De Ridder, D.

    2009-01-01

    In recent work, attempts have been made to link the structure of biochemical networks to their complex dynamics. It was shown that structurally stable network motifs are enriched in such networks. In this work, we investigate to what extent these findings apply to metabolic networks. To this end, we

  12. Functional enrichment analyses and construction of functional similarity networks with high confidence function prediction by PFP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihara Daisuke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new paradigm of biological investigation takes advantage of technologies that produce large high throughput datasets, including genome sequences, interactions of proteins, and gene expression. The ability of biologists to analyze and interpret such data relies on functional annotation of the included proteins, but even in highly characterized organisms many proteins can lack the functional evidence necessary to infer their biological relevance. Results Here we have applied high confidence function predictions from our automated prediction system, PFP, to three genome sequences, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria. The number of annotated genes is increased by PFP to over 90% for all of the genomes. Using the large coverage of the function annotation, we introduced the functional similarity networks which represent the functional space of the proteomes. Four different functional similarity networks are constructed for each proteome, one each by considering similarity in a single Gene Ontology (GO category, i.e. Biological Process, Cellular Component, and Molecular Function, and another one by considering overall similarity with the funSim score. The functional similarity networks are shown to have higher modularity than the protein-protein interaction network. Moreover, the funSim score network is distinct from the single GO-score networks by showing a higher clustering degree exponent value and thus has a higher tendency to be hierarchical. In addition, examining function assignments to the protein-protein interaction network and local regions of genomes has identified numerous cases where subnetworks or local regions have functionally coherent proteins. These results will help interpreting interactions of proteins and gene orders in a genome. Several examples of both analyses are highlighted. Conclusion The analyses demonstrate that applying high confidence predictions from PFP

  13. The effects of familiarity and similarity on compliance in social networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Nass, C.; Markopoulos, P.

    2014-01-01

    Advertisers on social network sites often use recommendations by others in a user's networks to endorse products. While these familiar others are hypothesised to be more effective in influencing users than unfamiliar others, there is a catch: familiarity does not necessarily ensure similarity to the

  14. Attributional Confidence, Perceived Similarity, and Network Involvement in Chinese and American Romantic Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Gudykunst, William B.

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the influence of stage of romantic relationship and culture (American or Chinese) on attributional confidence, perceived similarity, and network involvement. Uses multivariate analysis of variance (both summation and dispersion), revealing that stage of relationship influenced social networks, and that culture influenced high-context…

  15. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  16. Information Diversity in Structure and Dynamics of Simulated Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo eMäki-Marttunen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance (NCD. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviours are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses.We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  17. Constructing an integrated gene similarity network for the identification of disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Guo, Maozu; Wang, Chunyu; Xing, LinLin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yin

    2017-09-20

    Discovering novel genes that are involved human diseases is a challenging task in biomedical research. In recent years, several computational approaches have been proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Most of these methods are mainly based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. However, since these PPI networks contain false positives and only cover less half of known human genes, their reliability and coverage are very low. Therefore, it is highly necessary to fuse multiple genomic data to construct a credible gene similarity network and then infer disease genes on the whole genomic scale. We proposed a novel method, named RWRB, to infer causal genes of interested diseases. First, we construct five individual gene (protein) similarity networks based on multiple genomic data of human genes. Then, an integrated gene similarity network (IGSN) is reconstructed based on similarity network fusion (SNF) method. Finally, we employee the random walk with restart algorithm on the phenotype-gene bilayer network, which combines phenotype similarity network, IGSN as well as phenotype-gene association network, to prioritize candidate disease genes. We investigate the effectiveness of RWRB through leave-one-out cross-validation methods in inferring phenotype-gene relationships. Results show that RWRB is more accurate than state-of-the-art methods on most evaluation metrics. Further analysis shows that the success of RWRB is benefited from IGSN which has a wider coverage and higher reliability comparing with current PPI networks. Moreover, we conduct a comprehensive case study for Alzheimer's disease and predict some novel disease genes that supported by literature. RWRB is an effective and reliable algorithm in prioritizing candidate disease genes on the genomic scale. Software and supplementary information are available at http://nclab.hit.edu.cn/~tianzhen/RWRB/ .

  18. Social networks of experientially similar others: formation, activation, and consequences of network ties on the health care experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    Research documents that interactions among experientially similar others (individuals facing a common stressor) shape health care behavior and ultimately health outcomes. However, we have little understanding of how ties among experientially similar others are formed, what resources and information flows through these networks, and how network embeddedness shapes health care behavior. This paper uses in-depth interviews with 76 parents of pediatric cancer patients to examine network ties among experientially similar others after a serious medical diagnosis. Interviews were conducted between August 2009 and May 2011. Findings demonstrate that many parents formed ties with other families experiencing pediatric cancer, and that information and resources were exchanged during the everyday activities associated with their child's care. Network flows contained emotional support, caregiving strategies, information about second opinions, health-related knowledge, and strategies for navigating the health care system. Diffusion of information, resources, and support occurred through explicit processes (direct information and support exchanges) and implicit processes (parents learning through observing other families). Network flows among parents shaped parents' perceptions of the health care experience and their role in their child's care. These findings contribute to the social networks and social support literatures by elucidating the mechanisms through which network ties among experientially similar others influence health care behavior and experiences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  20. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality.

  1. Structural Determinants of Criticality in Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eValverde

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behaviour in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organisation can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system towards criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality.

  2. Epidemic spreading on complex networks with community structures

    CERN Document Server

    Stegehuis, Clara; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S H

    2016-01-01

    Many real-world networks display a community structure. We study two random graph models that create a network with similar community structure as a given network. One model preserves the exact community structure of the original network, while the other model only preserves the set of communities and the vertex degrees. These models show that community structure is an important determinant of the behavior of percolation processes on networks, such as information diffusion or virus spreading: the community structure can both \\textit{enforce} as well as \\textit{inhibit} diffusion processes. Our models further show that it is the mesoscopic set of communities that matters. The exact internal structures of communities barely influence the behavior of percolation processes across networks. This insensitivity is likely due to the relative denseness of the communities.

  3. Community structure of complex networks based on continuous neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ting-ting; Shan, Chang-ji; Dong, Yan-shou

    2017-09-01

    As a new subject, the research of complex networks has attracted the attention of researchers from different disciplines. Community structure is one of the key structures of complex networks, so it is a very important task to analyze the community structure of complex networks accurately. In this paper, we study the problem of extracting the community structure of complex networks, and propose a continuous neural network (CNN) algorithm. It is proved that for any given initial value, the continuous neural network algorithm converges to the eigenvector of the maximum eigenvalue of the network modularity matrix. Therefore, according to the stability of the evolution of the network symbol will be able to get two community structure.

  4. 3D Facial Similarity Measure Based on Geodesic Network and Curvatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated 3D facial similarity measure is a challenging and valuable research topic in anthropology and computer graphics. It is widely used in various fields, such as criminal investigation, kinship confirmation, and face recognition. This paper proposes a 3D facial similarity measure method based on a combination of geodesic and curvature features. Firstly, a geodesic network is generated for each face with geodesics and iso-geodesics determined and these network points are adopted as the correspondence across face models. Then, four metrics associated with curvatures, that is, the mean curvature, Gaussian curvature, shape index, and curvedness, are computed for each network point by using a weighted average of its neighborhood points. Finally, correlation coefficients according to these metrics are computed, respectively, as the similarity measures between two 3D face models. Experiments of different persons’ 3D facial models and different 3D facial models of the same person are implemented and compared with a subjective face similarity study. The results show that the geodesic network plays an important role in 3D facial similarity measure. The similarity measure defined by shape index is consistent with human’s subjective evaluation basically, and it can measure the 3D face similarity more objectively than the other indices.

  5. Structural Analysis of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Filling a gap in literature, this self-contained book presents theoretical and application-oriented results that allow for a structural exploration of complex networks. The work focuses not only on classical graph-theoretic methods, but also demonstrates the usefulness of structural graph theory as a tool for solving interdisciplinary problems. Applications to biology, chemistry, linguistics, and data analysis are emphasized. The book is suitable for a broad, interdisciplinary readership of researchers, practitioners, and graduate students in discrete mathematics, statistics, computer science,

  6. Analysis of topological and nontopological structural similarities in the PDB: new examples with old structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, N N; Fischer, D

    1996-07-01

    We have developed a new method and program, SARF2, for fast comparison of protein structures, which can detect topological as well as nontopological similarities. The method searches for large ensembles of secondary structure elements, which are mutually compatible in two proteins. These ensembles consist of small fragments of C alpha-trace, similarly arranged in three-dimensional space in two proteins, but not necessarily equally-ordered along the polypeptide chains. The program SARF2 is available for everyone through the World-Wide Web (WWW). We have performed an exhaustive pairwise comparison of all the entries from a recent issue of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and report here on the results of an automated hierarchical cluster analysis. In addition, we report on several new cases of significant structural resemblance between proteins. To this end, a new definition of the significance of structural similarity is introduced, which effectively distinguishes the biologically meaningful equivalences from those occurring by chance. Analyzing the distribution of sequence similarity in significant structural matches, we show that sequence similarity as low as 20% in structurally-prealigned proteins can be a strong indication for the biological relevance of structural similarity.

  7. Co-location and Self-Similar Topologies of Urban Infrastructure Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhamer, Christopher; Zhan, Xianyuan; Ukkusuri, Satish; Elisabeth, Krueger; Paik, Kyungrock; Rao, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    The co-location of urban infrastructure is too obvious to be easily ignored. For reasons of practicality, reliability, and eminent domain, the spatial locations of many urban infrastructure networks, including drainage, sanitary sewers, and road networks, are well correlated. However, important questions dealing with correlations in the network topologies of differing infrastructure types remain unanswered. Here, we have extracted randomly distributed, nested subnets from the urban drainage, sanitary sewer, and road networks in two distinctly different cities: Amman, Jordan; and Indianapolis, USA. Network analyses were performed for each randomly chosen subnet (location and size), using a dual-mapping approach (Hierarchical Intersection Continuity Negotiation). Topological metrics for each infrastructure type were calculated and compared for all subnets in a given city. Despite large differences in the climate, governance, and populace of the two cities, and functional properties of the different infrastructure types, these infrastructure networks are shown to be highly spatially homogenous. Furthermore, strong correlations are found between topological metrics of differing types of surface and subsurface infrastructure networks. Also, the network topologies of each infrastructure type for both cities are shown to exhibit self-similar characteristics (i.e., power law node-degree distributions, [p(k) = ak-γ]. These findings can be used to assist city planners and engineers either expanding or retrofitting existing infrastructure, or in the case of developing countries, building new cities from the ground up. In addition, the self-similar nature of these infrastructure networks holds significant implications for the vulnerability of these critical infrastructure networks to external hazards and ways in which network resilience can be improved.

  8. On the topological structure of multinationals network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyez, Charlie

    2017-05-01

    This paper uses a weighted network analysis to examine the structure of multinationals' implantation countries network. Based on French firm-level dataset of multinational enterprises (MNEs) the network analysis provides information on each country position in the network and in internationalization strategies of French MNEs through connectivity preferences among the nodes. The paper also details network-wide features and their recent evolution toward a more decentralized structure. While much has been said on international trade network, this paper shows that multinational firms' studies would also benefit from network analysis, notably by investigating the sensitivity of the network construction to firm heterogeneity.

  9. Visualizing Article Similarities via Sparsified Article Network and Map Projection for Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaonan; Machiraju, Raghu; Ritter, Alan; Yen, Po-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Systematic Reviews (SRs) of biomedical literature summarize evidence from high-quality studies to inform clinical decisions, but are time and labor intensive due to the large number of article collections. Article similarities established from textual features have been shown to assist in the identification of relevant articles, thus facilitating the article screening process efficiently. In this study, we visualized article similarities to extend its utilization in practical settings for SR researchers, aiming to promote human comprehension of article distributions and hidden patterns. To prompt an effective visualization in an interpretable, intuitive, and scalable way, we implemented a graph-based network visualization with three network sparsification approaches and a distance-based map projection via dimensionality reduction. We evaluated and compared three network sparsification approaches and the visualization types (article network vs. article map). We demonstrated the effectiveness in revealing article distribution and exhibiting clustering patterns of relevant articles with practical meanings for SRs.

  10. Strategic Planning Process and Organizational Structure: Impacts, Confluence and Similarities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyogo Felype Neis; Maurício Fernandes Pereira; Emerson Antonio Maccari

    2017-01-01

    .... The conclusion indicates that the phases of the strategic planning process influence and are influenced by the elements of the organizational structure and highlights the confluences, the impacts...

  11. Using Expectation Maximization and Resource Overlap Techniques to Classify Species According to Their Niche Similarities in Mutualistic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Fort

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutualistic networks in nature are widespread and play a key role in generating the diversity of life on Earth. They constitute an interdisciplinary field where physicists, biologists and computer scientists work together. Plant-pollinator mutualisms in particular form complex networks of interdependence between often hundreds of species. Understanding the architecture of these networks is of paramount importance for assessing the robustness of the corresponding communities to global change and management strategies. Advances in this problem are currently limited mainly due to the lack of methodological tools to deal with the intrinsic complexity of mutualisms, as well as the scarcity and incompleteness of available empirical data. One way to uncover the structure underlying complex networks is to employ information theoretical statistical inference methods, such as the expectation maximization (EM algorithm. In particular, such an approach can be used to cluster the nodes of a network based on the similarity of their node neighborhoods. Here, we show how to connect network theory with the classical ecological niche theory for mutualistic plant-pollinator webs by using the EM algorithm. We apply EM to classify the nodes of an extensive collection of mutualistic plant-pollinator networks according to their connection similarity. We find that EM recovers largely the same clustering of the species as an alternative recently proposed method based on resource overlap, where one considers each party as a consuming resource for the other party (plants providing food to animals, while animals assist the reproduction of plants. Furthermore, using the EM algorithm, we can obtain a sequence of successfully-refined classifications that enables us to identify the fine-structure of the ecological network and understand better the niche distribution both for plants and animals. This is an example of how information theoretical methods help to systematize and

  12. Are American rivers Tokunaga self-similar? New results on fluvial network topology and its climatic dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardo, S.; Zaliapin, I.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-03-01

    The topology of river networks has been a subject of intense research in hydro-geomorphology, with special attention to self-similar (SS) structures that allow one to develop concise representations and scaling frameworks for hydrological fluxes. Tokunaga self-similar (TSS) networks represent a particularly popular two-parameter class of self-similar models, commonly accepted in hydrology but rarely tested rigorously. In this paper we (a) present a statistical framework for testing the TSS assumption and estimating the Tokunaga parameters; (b) present an improved method for estimating the Horton ratios using the Tokunaga parameters; (c) evaluate the proposed testing and estimation frameworks using synthetic TSS networks with a broad range of parameters; (d) perform self-similar analysis of 408 river networks of maximum order Ω ≥ 6 from 50 catchments across the US; and (e) use the Tokunaga parameters as discriminatory metrics to explore climate effects on network topology. We find that the TSS assumption cannot be rejected in the majority of the examined river networks. The theoretical expression for the Horton ratios based on the estimated Tokunaga parameters in the TSS networks provides a significantly better approximation to the true ratios than the conventional linear regression approach. A correlation analysis shows that the Tokunaga parameter c, which determines the degree of side-branching, exhibits significant dependence on the hydroclimatic variables of the basin: storm frequency, storm duration, and mean annual rainfall, offering the possibility of relating climate to landscape dissection. While other possible physical controls have been neglected in this study, this result is intriguing and warrants further analysis.

  13. Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity Database Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) Database Network provides a public forum for search and publishing downloadable, structure-searchable,...

  14. Social structure of Facebook networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

    2012-08-01

    We study the social structure of Facebook “friendship” networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes-gender, class year, major, high school, and residence-at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to network partitions based on user characteristics. We thereby examine the relative importance of different characteristics at different institutions, finding for example that common high school is more important to the social organization of large institutions and that the importance of common major varies significantly between institutions. Our calculations illustrate how microscopic and macroscopic perspectives give complementary insights on the social organization at universities and suggest future studies to investigate such phenomena further.

  15. Exploring the Community Structure of Complex Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Drago, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Regarding complex networks, one of the most relevant problems is to understand and to explore community structure. In particular it is important to define the network organization and the functions associated to the different network partitions. In this context, the idea is to consider some new approaches based on interval data in order to represent the different relevant network components as communities. The method is also useful to represent the network community structure, especially the ...

  16. RScan: fast searching structural similarities for structured RNAs in large databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Ping

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many RNAs have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures instead of primary sequences. Recently, there are an increasing number of methods being developed with focus on the structural alignments for finding conserved secondary structures as well as common structural motifs in pair-wise or multiple sequences. A challenging task is to search similar structures quickly for structured RNA sequences in large genomic databases since existing methods are too slow to be used in large databases. Results An implementation of a fast structural alignment algorithm, RScan, is proposed to fulfill the task. RScan is developed by levering the advantages of both hashing algorithms and local alignment algorithms. In our experiment, on the average, the times for searching a tRNA and an rRNA in the randomized A. pernix genome are only 256 seconds and 832 seconds respectively by using RScan, but need 3,178 seconds and 8,951 seconds respectively by using an existing method RSEARCH. Remarkably, RScan can handle large database queries, taking less than 4 minutes for searching similar structures for a microRNA precursor in human chromosome 21. Conclusion These results indicate that RScan is a preferable choice for real-life application of searching structural similarities for structured RNAs in large databases. RScan software is freely available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/member/cxue/rscan/RScan.htm.

  17. Strategic Planning Process and Organizational Structure: Impacts, Confluence and Similarities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyogo Felype Neis; Maurício Fernandes Pereira; Emerson Antonio Maccari

    2017-01-01

    ... it may not be formally defined. Based on this understanding, we evaluated the relationship between the formulation and implementation phases of the strategic planning process with the elements of the organizational structure...

  18. HIV and influenza share a similar structural blueprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV uses a protein called the envelope glycoprotein spike to attach itself and fuse with the cell membrane; NCI scientists have now defined the structure of this spike in its pre-fusion state using cryo-electron microscopy

  19. Testing statistical self-similarity in the topology of river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, Brent M.; Mantilla, Ricardo; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the topological properties of real river networks deviate significantly from predictions of Shreve's random model. At the same time the property of mean self-similarity postulated by Tokunaga's model is well supported by data. Recently, a new class of network model called random self-similar networks (RSN) that combines self-similarity and randomness has been introduced to replicate important topological features observed in real river networks. We investigate if the hypothesis of statistical self-similarity in the RSN model is supported by data on a set of 30 basins located across the continental United States that encompass a wide range of hydroclimatic variability. We demonstrate that the generators of the RSN model obey a geometric distribution, and self-similarity holds in a statistical sense in 26 of these 30 basins. The parameters describing the distribution of interior and exterior generators are tested to be statistically different and the difference is shown to produce the well-known Hack's law. The inter-basin variability of RSN parameters is found to be statistically significant. We also test generator dependence on two climatic indices, mean annual precipitation and radiative index of dryness. Some indication of climatic influence on the generators is detected, but this influence is not statistically significant with the sample size available. Finally, two key applications of the RSN model to hydrology and geomorphology are briefly discussed.

  20. Testing statistical self-similarity in the topology of river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Ricardo; Troutman, Brent M.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2010-09-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that the topological properties of real river networks deviate significantly from predictions of Shreve's random model. At the same time the property of mean self-similarity postulated by Tokunaga's model is well supported by data. Recently, a new class of network model called random self-similar networks (RSN) that combines self-similarity and randomness has been introduced to replicate important topological features observed in real river networks. We investigate if the hypothesis of statistical self-similarity in the RSN model is supported by data on a set of 30 basins located across the continental United States that encompass a wide range of hydroclimatic variability. We demonstrate that the generators of the RSN model obey a geometric distribution, and self-similarity holds in a statistical sense in 26 of these 30 basins. The parameters describing the distribution of interior and exterior generators are tested to be statistically different and the difference is shown to produce the well-known Hack's law. The inter-basin variability of RSN parameters is found to be statistically significant. We also test generator dependence on two climatic indices, mean annual precipitation and radiative index of dryness. Some indication of climatic influence on the generators is detected, but this influence is not statistically significant with the sample size available. Finally, two key applications of the RSN model to hydrology and geomorphology are briefly discussed.

  1. Network-level structural covariance in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Brandon A; Gennatas, Efstathios D; Zhou, Juan; Seeley, William W

    2010-10-19

    Intrinsic or resting state functional connectivity MRI and structural covariance MRI have begun to reveal the adult human brain's multiple network architectures. How and when these networks emerge during development remains unclear, but understanding ontogeny could shed light on network function and dysfunction. In this study, we applied structural covariance MRI techniques to 300 children in four age categories (early childhood, 5-8 y; late childhood, 8.5-11 y; early adolescence, 12-14 y; late adolescence, 16-18 y) to characterize gray matter structural relationships between cortical nodes that make up large-scale functional networks. Network nodes identified from eight widely replicated functional intrinsic connectivity networks served as seed regions to map whole-brain structural covariance patterns in each age group. In general, structural covariance in the youngest age group was limited to seed and contralateral homologous regions. Networks derived using primary sensory and motor cortex seeds were already well-developed in early childhood but expanded in early adolescence before pruning to a more restricted topology resembling adult intrinsic connectivity network patterns. In contrast, language, social-emotional, and other cognitive networks were relatively undeveloped in younger age groups and showed increasingly distributed topology in older children. The so-called default-mode network provided a notable exception, following a developmental trajectory more similar to the primary sensorimotor systems. Relationships between functional maturation and structural covariance networks topology warrant future exploration.

  2. Assessment of Vegetation Structural Diversity and Similarity Index of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The forest reserve of IITA shows a high diversity (alpha, gamma and beta diversity) of plants and have multiplicity of species, therefore, adequate protection of the reserve should be a priority to maintain and prevent loss of plant biodiversity. Keywords: Vegetation, structural diversity, IITA forest reserve, plant biodiversity, ...

  3. A Linkage Matching Method for Road Networks Considering the Similarity of Upper and Lower Spatial Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Chuang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Existing road network matching methods mostly use the characteristics of the road's own nodes and arcs to carry on the matching process, while less attention is focused on the importance of the road neighborhood elements in the road network matching, thus affecting further improvement of the matching efficiency and accuracy. In response to these problems, a linkage matching method for road network considering the similarity of upper and lower spatial relation is proposed. The linkage matching imitates the human thinking process of searching for target objects by the signal features and spatial correlation when reading maps, regarding matching as a reasoning process of goal feature searching and information association transmitting. Firstly, classify the complex road network by using Stroke technology. Secondly, establish the road network linkage matching model based on road skeleton relation tree. Finally, select the high-level road in the classifying results of the source data as the reference road to start matching, calculate the road between the upper and lower levels of the spatial relationship similarity, and through a step-by-step iteration, make the matching information transmit in the road network linkage matching model thus to obtain the final matching results. Experiment shows that the mentioned algorithm can narrow the search range of the data to be matched, effectively improving the match efficiency and accuracy, especially applicable to the data with large non systematic geometric location deviation.

  4. Structurally Similar but Functionally Diverse ZU5 Domains in Human Erythrocyte Ankyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasunaga, Mai; Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Mondragón, Alfonso (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    The metazoan cell membrane is highly organized. Maintaining such organization and preserving membrane integrity under different conditions are accomplished through intracellular tethering to an extensive, flexible protein network. Spectrin, the principal component of this network, is attached to the membrane through the adaptor protein ankyrin, which directly bridges the interaction between {beta}-spectrin and membrane proteins. Ankyrins have a modular structure that includes two tandem ZU5 domains. The first domain, ZU5A, is directly responsible for binding {beta}-spectrin. Here, we present a structure of the tandem ZU5 repeats of human erythrocyte ankyrin. Structural and biophysical experiments show that the second ZU5 domain, ZU5B, does not participate in spectrin binding. ZU5B is structurally similar to the ZU5 domain found in the netrin receptor UNC5b supramodule, suggesting that it could interact with other domains in ankyrin. Comparison of several ZU5 domains demonstrates that the ZU5 domain represents a compact and versatile protein interaction module.

  5. Structural similarities between brain and linguistic data provide evidence of semantic relations in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen E Crangle

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method of analysis by which structural similarities between brain data and linguistic data can be assessed at the semantic level. It shows how to measure the strength of these structural similarities and so determine the relatively better fit of the brain data with one semantic model over another. The first model is derived from WordNet, a lexical database of English compiled by language experts. The second is given by the corpus-based statistical technique of latent semantic analysis (LSA, which detects relations between words that are latent or hidden in text. The brain data are drawn from experiments in which statements about the geography of Europe were presented auditorily to participants who were asked to determine their truth or falsity while electroencephalographic (EEG recordings were made. The theoretical framework for the analysis of the brain and semantic data derives from axiomatizations of theories such as the theory of differences in utility preference. Using brain-data samples from individual trials time-locked to the presentation of each word, ordinal relations of similarity differences are computed for the brain data and for the linguistic data. In each case those relations that are invariant with respect to the brain and linguistic data, and are correlated with sufficient statistical strength, amount to structural similarities between the brain and linguistic data. Results show that many more statistically significant structural similarities can be found between the brain data and the WordNet-derived data than the LSA-derived data. The work reported here is placed within the context of other recent studies of semantics and the brain. The main contribution of this paper is the new method it presents for the study of semantics and the brain and the focus it permits on networks of relations detected in brain data and represented by a semantic model.

  6. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to predict protein functions. Results The domain context similarity can be a useful index to predict protein function similarity. The prediction accuracy of our method in yeast is between 63%-67%, which outperforms the other methods in terms of ROC curves. Conclusion This paper presents a novel protein function prediction method that combines protein domain composition information and PPI networks. Performance evaluations show that this method outperforms existing methods.

  7. POSTER: Privacy-Preserving Profile Similarity Computation in Online Social Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeckmans, Arjan; Tang, Qiang; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, none of the existing online social networks (OSNs) enables its users to make new friends without revealing their private information. This leaves the users in a vulnerable position when searching for new friends. We propose a solution which enables a user to compute her profile similarity

  8. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A general model for metabolic scaling in self-similar asymmetric networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Alexander Byers; Savage, Van M; Enquist, Brian J

    2017-03-01

    How a particular attribute of an organism changes or scales with its body size is known as an allometry. Biological allometries, such as metabolic scaling, have been hypothesized to result from selection to maximize how vascular networks fill space yet minimize internal transport distances and resistances. The West, Brown, Enquist (WBE) model argues that these two principles (space-filling and energy minimization) are (i) general principles underlying the evolution of the diversity of biological networks across plants and animals and (ii) can be used to predict how the resulting geometry of biological networks then governs their allometric scaling. Perhaps the most central biological allometry is how metabolic rate scales with body size. A core assumption of the WBE model is that networks are symmetric with respect to their geometric properties. That is, any two given branches within the same generation in the network are assumed to have identical lengths and radii. However, biological networks are rarely if ever symmetric. An open question is: Does incorporating asymmetric branching change or influence the predictions of the WBE model? We derive a general network model that relaxes the symmetric assumption and define two classes of asymmetrically bifurcating networks. We show that asymmetric branching can be incorporated into the WBE model. This asymmetric version of the WBE model results in several theoretical predictions for the structure, physiology, and metabolism of organisms, specifically in the case for the cardiovascular system. We show how network asymmetry can now be incorporated in the many allometric scaling relationships via total network volume. Most importantly, we show that the 3/4 metabolic scaling exponent from Kleiber's Law can still be attained within many asymmetric networks.

  10. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Networks are widely used to represent interaction pattern among the components in complex systems. Structures of real networks from different domains may vary quite significantly. As there is an interplay between network architecture and dynamics, structure plays an impor- tant role in communication and ...

  11. Structure of the clinical and geriatric depression: Similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Zdenka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies demonstrating the uniqueness of depression in old age are numerous, but conclusions on the fact if the problems of the elderly people cause depression or if they are a part of depression are not unique. The aim of this paper is to compare the structure of depression of old people without the history of mental illness and middle-aged people treated for depression. The sample consists of 82 healthy inmates of different Homes for the Aged and 78 patients diagnosed with some sort of affective disorder. A depression has been assessed with the shorten version of the MMPI D-scale. The structure of the geriatric and clinical depression has been compared with the method of maximum likelihood, over the matrix of co-variances of answers on the items on the depression scale. The results point out to the statistically significant difference in the structure of depression of the old and clinically depressed individuals. However, half of the items of the D-scale have significant loadings on the factor of depression in both groups. The essence of the depression in both samples is made of cognitive subject matters, depressive affect, decline of motivation and a negative estimate of one's basic abilities. Symptoms concerning low self-esteem, experiencing cognitive deficit, energy and impaired physical health have been significant in describing the clinical depression, while a feeling of reduced positive stimulation and the affective liability is typical for the depression of geriatric sample. The conclusion is that, despite the differences, there is a common core of symptoms that makes the essence of depression, apart from the samples.

  12. True Nature of Supply Network Communication Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokhman Hakim bin Osman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Globalization of world economy has altered the definition of organizational structure. Global supply chain can no longer be viewed as an arm-length structure. It has become more complex. The complexity demands deeper research and understanding. This research analyzed a structure of supply network in an attempt to elucidate the true structure of the supply network. Using the quantitative Social Network Analysis methodology, findings of this study indicated that, the structure of the supply network differs depending on the types of network relations. An important implication of these findings would be a more focus resource management upon network relationship development that is based on firms’ positions in the different network structure. This research also contributes to the various strategies of effective and efficient supply chain management.

  13. Synthesis of resorcinolic lipids bearing structural similarities to cytosporone A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson dos Anjos dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the structure and biological activities of resorcinolic lipids and, particularly cytosporone A- a potent inhibitor of plantule germination and growth, we have performed the synthesis of the analogs 3-heptyl-3-hydroxy-5,7-dimethoxy-2-benzofuran-1(3H-one (1 and 3-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-2-benzofuran-1(3H-one (2. The intermediates and products were submitted to allelopathic test using Lactuca sativa L. seeds. Target compound 1 showed an inhibitory effect on germination and growth of hypocotyl and radicle in milimolar range.

  14. Synthesis of resorcinolic lipids bearing structural similarities to cytosporone A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Edson dos Anjos dos; Beatriz, Adilson; Lima, Denis Pires de [Universidade Federal Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica], e-mail: dlima@nin.ufms.br; Marques, Maria Rita; Leite, Carla Braga [Universidade Federal Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Morfofisiologia

    2009-07-01

    Inspired by the structure and biological activities of resorcinolic lipids and, particularly cytosporone A- a potent inhibitor of plantule germination and growth, we have performed the synthesis of the analogs 3-heptyl-3-hydroxy-5,7-dimethoxy-2-benzofuran-1(3H)-one (1) and 3-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-2-benzofuran-1(3H)-one (2). The intermediates and products were submitted to allelopathic test using Lactuca sativa L. seeds. Target compound 1 showed an inhibitory effect on germination and growth of hypocotyl and radicle in millimolar range. (author)

  15. Stochastic margin-based structure learning of Bayesian network classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The margin criterion for parameter learning in graphical models gained significant impact over the last years. We use the maximum margin score for discriminatively optimizing the structure of Bayesian network classifiers. Furthermore, greedy hill-climbing and simulated annealing search heuristics are applied to determine the classifier structures. In the experiments, we demonstrate the advantages of maximum margin optimized Bayesian network structures in terms of classification performance compared to traditionally used discriminative structure learning methods. Stochastic simulated annealing requires less score evaluations than greedy heuristics. Additionally, we compare generative and discriminative parameter learning on both generatively and discriminatively structured Bayesian network classifiers. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve similar classification performance as support vector machines. Moreover, missing feature values during classification can be handled by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where purely discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first.

  16. Zooplankton structure in two interconnected ponds: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špoljar Maria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of zooplankton diversity, abundance and trophic structure was conducted during the summer period in pelagial zone on the longitudinal profile of the Sutla River Backwater. Investigated site consists of two interconnected basins: transparent Upper Basin with submerged macrophytes and turbid Lower Basin without macrophytes in the littoral zone. In the Upper Basin, abundance and diversity of zooplankton in the pelagial was higher in comparison to the Lower Basin, with prevailing species of genus Keratella as microfilter-feeder, and genera of Polyartha and Trihocerca as macrofilter-feeder rotifers. On the contrary, in the Lower Basin, crustaceans dominated in abundance. Microfilter-feeder cladoceran (Bosmina longirostris and larval and adult stages of macrofilter-feeder copepod (Macrocyclops albidus prevailed in the Lower Basin. Fish predation pressure was more pronounced in the pelagial of the Upper Basin, indicated by low cladoceran abundance in the surface layer. Although the studied basins were interconnected, results indicate significant (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05 differences in the zooplankton structure as a potential result of the macrophyte impact on environmental conditions and fish predation pressure.

  17. Frequency-based similarity detection of structures in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Dave I.; Siadat, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-03-01

    Advancements in 3D scanning and volumetric imaging methods have motivated researchers to tackle new challenges related to storing, retrieving and comparing 3D models, especially in medical domain. Comparing natural rigid shapes and detecting subtle changes in 3D models of brain structures is of great importance. Precision in capturing surface details and insensitivity to shape orientation are highly desirable properties of good shape descriptors. In this paper, we propose a new method, Spherical Harmonics Distance (SHD), which leverages the power of spherical harmonics to provide more accurate representation of surface details. At the same time, the proposed method incorporates the features of a shape distribution method (D2) and inherits its insensitivity to shape orientation. Comparing SHD to a spherical harmonics based method (SPHARM) shows that the performance of the proposed method is less sensitive to rotation. Also, comparing SHD to D2 shows that the proposed method is more accurate in detecting subtle changes. The performance of the proposed method is verified by calculating the Fisher measure (FM) of extracted feature vectors. The FM of the vectors generated by SHD on average shows 27 times higher values than that of D2. Our preliminary results show that SHD successfully combines desired features from two different methods and paves the way towards better detection of subtle dissimilarities among natural rigid shapes (e.g. structures of interest in human brain). Detecting these subtle changes can be instrumental in more accurate diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning.

  18. Core-Periphery Structure in Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Rombach, M. Puck; Porter, Mason A.; Fowler, James H.; Mucha, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Intermediate-scale (or `meso-scale') structures in networks have received considerable attention, as the algorithmic detection of such structures makes it possible to discover network features that are not apparent either at the local scale of nodes and edges or at the global scale of summary statistics. Numerous types of meso-scale structures can occur in networks, but investigations of such features have focused predominantly on the identification and study of community structure. In this p...

  19. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions. PMID:27504825

  20. Global Electricity Trade Network: Structures and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ling; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S F; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Nations increasingly trade electricity, and understanding the structure of the global power grid can help identify nations that are critical for its reliability. This study examines the global grid as a network with nations as nodes and international electricity trade as links. We analyze the structure of the global electricity trade network and find that the network consists of four sub-networks, and provide a detailed analysis of the largest network, Eurasia. Russia, China, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan have high betweenness measures in the Eurasian sub-network, indicating the degrees of centrality of the positions they hold. The analysis reveals that the Eurasian sub-network consists of seven communities based on the network structure. We find that the communities do not fully align with geographical proximity, and that the present international electricity trade in the Eurasian sub-network causes an approximately 11 million additional tons of CO2 emissions.

  1. Distributed Similarity based Clustering and Compressed Forwarding for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunraja, Muruganantham; Malathi, Veluchamy; Sakthivel, Erulappan

    2015-11-01

    Wireless sensor networks are engaged in various data gathering applications. The major bottleneck in wireless data gathering systems is the finite energy of sensor nodes. By conserving the on board energy, the life span of wireless sensor network can be well extended. Data communication being the dominant energy consuming activity of wireless sensor network, data reduction can serve better in conserving the nodal energy. Spatial and temporal correlation among the sensor data is exploited to reduce the data communications. Data similar cluster formation is an effective way to exploit spatial correlation among the neighboring sensors. By sending only a subset of data and estimate the rest using this subset is the contemporary way of exploiting temporal correlation. In Distributed Similarity based Clustering and Compressed Forwarding for wireless sensor networks, we construct data similar iso-clusters with minimal communication overhead. The intra-cluster communication is reduced using adaptive-normalized least mean squares based dual prediction framework. The cluster head reduces the inter-cluster data payload using a lossless compressive forwarding technique. The proposed work achieves significant data reduction in both the intra-cluster and the inter-cluster communications, with the optimal data accuracy of collected data. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Robustness and structure of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shuai

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my PhD research on statistical physics and complex networks: i) modeling a new type of attack -- localized attack, and investigating robustness of complex networks under this type of attack; ii) discovering the clustering structure in complex networks and its influence on the robustness of coupled networks. Complex networks appear in every aspect of our daily life and are widely studied in Physics, Mathematics, Biology, and Computer Science. One important property of complex networks is their robustness under attacks, which depends crucially on the nature of attacks and the structure of the networks themselves. Previous studies have focused on two types of attack: random attack and targeted attack, which, however, are insufficient to describe many real-world damages. Here we propose a new type of attack -- localized attack, and study the robustness of complex networks under this type of attack, both analytically and via simulation. On the other hand, we also study the clustering structure in the network, and its influence on the robustness of a complex network system. In the first part, we propose a theoretical framework to study the robustness of complex networks under localized attack based on percolation theory and generating function method. We investigate the percolation properties, including the critical threshold of the phase transition pc and the size of the giant component Pinfinity. We compare localized attack with random attack and find that while random regular (RR) networks are more robust against localized attack, Erdoḧs-Renyi (ER) networks are equally robust under both types of attacks. As for scale-free (SF) networks, their robustness depends crucially on the degree exponent lambda. The simulation results show perfect agreement with theoretical predictions. We also test our model on two real-world networks: a peer-to-peer computer network and an airline network, and find that the real-world networks

  3. Immunization of networks with community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Naoki [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)], E-mail: masuda@mist.i.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-12-15

    In this study, an efficient method to immunize modular networks (i.e. networks with community structure) is proposed. The immunization of networks aims at fragmenting networks into small parts with a small number of removed nodes. Its applications include prevention of epidemic spreading, protection against intentional attacks on networks, and conservation of ecosystems. Although preferential immunization of hubs is efficient, good immunization strategies for modular networks have not been established. On the basis of an immunization strategy based on eigenvector centrality, we develop an analytical framework for immunizing modular networks. To this end, we quantify the contribution of each node to the connectivity in a coarse-grained network among modules. We verify the effectiveness of the proposed method by applying it to model and real networks with modular structure.

  4. Airline network structure in competitive market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Danica D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airline's network is the key element of its business strategy and selected network structure will not have influence only on the airline's costs but could gain some advantage in revenues, too. Network designing implies that an airline has to make decisions about markets that it will serve and how to serve those markets. Network choice raises the following questions for an airline: a what markets to serve, b how to serve selected markets, c what level of service to offer, d what are the benefits/cost of the that decisions and e what is the influence of the competition. We analyzed the existing airline business models and corresponding network structure. The paper highlights the relationship between the network structures and the airline business strategies. Using a simple model we examine the relationship between the network structure and service quality in deregulated market.

  5. Network Structure, Collaborative Context, and Individual Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Soda, Giuseppe; Pedersen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    outcomes often assumes that different network structures embody specific individual behaviors. This paper challenges the widespread assumption that dense, heavily bonded network structures imply a collaborative attitude on the part of network actors. We propose that collaboration can also be contextual......Network research has yet to determine whether bonding ties or bridging ties are more beneficial for individual creativity, but the debate has mostly overlooked the organizational context in which such ties are formed. In particular, the causal chain connecting network structures and individual...... and exogenous to a network’s structural characteristics, such that it moderates the effects of both dense and brokered networks on individual creativity. Specifically, we argue that knowledge acquisition and, in turn, individual creativity are more likely when an individual’s network position has a good fit...

  6. PARALLEL ALGORITHM FOR BAYESIAN NETWORK STRUCTURE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Arustamov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with implementation of a scalable parallel algorithm for structure learning of Bayesian network. Comparative analysis of sequential and parallel algorithms is done.

  7. Co-expression Network Approach Reveals Functional Similarities among Diseases Affecting Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Mukund

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases affecting skeletal muscle exhibit considerable heterogeneity in intensity, etiology, phenotypic manifestation and gene expression. Systems biology approaches using network theory, allows for a holistic understanding of functional similarities amongst diseases. Here we propose a co-expression based, network theoretic approach to extract functional similarities from 20 heterogeneous diseases comprising of dystrophinopathies, inflammatory myopathies, neuromuscular, and muscle metabolic diseases. Utilizing this framework we identified seven closely associated disease clusters with 20 disease pairs exhibiting significant correlation (p < 0.05. Mapping the diseases onto a human protein-protein interaction network enabled the inference of a common program of regulation underlying more than half the muscle diseases considered here and referred to as the “protein signature.” Enrichment analysis of 17 protein modules identified as part of this signature revealed a statistically non-random dysregulation of muscle bioenergetic pathways and calcium homeostasis. Further, analysis of mechanistic similarities of less explored significant disease associations [such as between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and cerebral palsy (CP] using a proposed “functional module” framework revealed adaptation of the calcium signaling machinery. Integrating drug-gene information into the quantitative framework highlighted the presence of therapeutic opportunities through drug repurposing for diseases affecting the skeletal muscle.

  8. Improving link prediction in complex networks by adaptively exploiting multiple structural features of networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Bao, Zhong-Kui; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2017-10-01

    So far, many network-structure-based link prediction methods have been proposed. However, these methods only highlight one or two structural features of networks, and then use the methods to predict missing links in different networks. The performances of these existing methods are not always satisfied in all cases since each network has its unique underlying structural features. In this paper, by analyzing different real networks, we find that the structural features of different networks are remarkably different. In particular, even in the same network, their inner structural features are utterly different. Therefore, more structural features should be considered. However, owing to the remarkably different structural features, the contributions of different features are hard to be given in advance. Inspired by these facts, an adaptive fusion model regarding link prediction is proposed to incorporate multiple structural features. In the model, a logistic function combing multiple structural features is defined, then the weight of each feature in the logistic function is adaptively determined by exploiting the known structure information. Last, we use the "learnt" logistic function to predict the connection probabilities of missing links. According to our experimental results, we find that the performance of our adaptive fusion model is better than many similarity indices.

  9. Sensitive Dependence of Optimal Network Dynamics on Network Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nishikawa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The relation between network structure and dynamics is determinant for the behavior of complex systems in numerous domains. An important long-standing problem concerns the properties of the networks that optimize the dynamics with respect to a given performance measure. Here, we show that such optimization can lead to sensitive dependence of the dynamics on the structure of the network. Specifically, using diffusively coupled systems as examples, we demonstrate that the stability of a dynamical state can exhibit sensitivity to unweighted structural perturbations (i.e., link removals and node additions for undirected optimal networks and to weighted perturbations (i.e., small changes in link weights for directed optimal networks. As mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, we identify discontinuous transitions occurring in the complement of undirected optimal networks and the prevalence of eigenvector degeneracy in directed optimal networks. These findings establish a unified characterization of networks optimized for dynamical stability, which we illustrate using Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems, synchronization in power-grid networks, network diffusion, and several other network processes. Our results suggest that the network structure of a complex system operating near an optimum can potentially be fine-tuned for a significantly enhanced stability compared to what one might expect from simple extrapolation. On the other hand, they also suggest constraints on how close to the optimum the system can be in practice. Finally, the results have potential implications for biophysical networks, which have evolved under the competing pressures of optimizing fitness while remaining robust against perturbations.

  10. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among all biological networks studied here, the undirected structure of neuronal networks not only possesses the small-world property but the same is also expressed remarkably to a higher degree compared to any randomly generated network which possesses the same degree sequence. A relatively high percentage of ...

  11. Network quotients: structural skeletons of complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanghua; MacArthur, Ben D; Wang, Hui; Xiong, Momiao; Wang, Wei

    2008-10-01

    A defining feature of many large empirical networks is their intrinsic complexity. However, many networks also contain a large degree of structural repetition. An immediate question then arises: can we characterize essential network complexity while excluding structural redundancy? In this article we utilize inherent network symmetry to collapse all redundant information from a network, resulting in a coarse graining which we show to carry the essential structural information of the "parent" network. In the context of algebraic combinatorics, this coarse-graining is known as the "quotient." We systematically explore the theoretical properties of network quotients and summarize key statistics of a variety of "real-world" quotients with respect to those of their parent networks. In particular, we find that quotients can be substantially smaller than their parent networks yet typically preserve various key functional properties such as complexity (heterogeneity and hub vertices) and communication (diameter and mean geodesic distance), suggesting that quotients constitute the essential structural skeletons of their parent networks. We summarize with a discussion of potential uses of quotients in analysis of biological regulatory networks and ways in which using quotients can reduce the computational complexity of network algorithms.

  12. Structure of triadic relations in multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzo, Emanuele; Kivelä, Mikko; De Domenico, Manlio; Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Arenas, Alex; Gómez, Sergio; Porter, Mason A.; Moreno, Yamir

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in the study of networked systems have highlighted that our interconnected world is composed of networks that are coupled to each other through different ‘layers’ that each represent one of many possible subsystems or types of interactions. Nevertheless, it is traditional to aggregate multilayer networks into a single weighted network in order to take advantage of existing tools. This is admittedly convenient, but it is also extremely problematic, as important information can be lost as a result. It is therefore important to develop multilayer generalizations of network concepts. In this paper, we analyze triadic relations and generalize the idea of transitivity to multiplex networks. By focusing on triadic relations, which yield the simplest type of transitivity, we generalize the concept and computation of clustering coefficients to multiplex networks. We show how the layered structure of such networks introduces a new degree of freedom that has a fundamental effect on transitivity. We compute multiplex clustering coefficients for several real multiplex networks and illustrate why one must take great care when generalizing standard network concepts to multiplex networks. We also derive analytical expressions for our clustering coefficients for ensemble averages of networks in a family of random multiplex networks. Our analysis illustrates that social networks have a strong tendency to promote redundancy by closing triads at every layer and that they thereby have a different type of multiplex transitivity from transportation networks, which do not exhibit such a tendency. These insights are invisible if one only studies aggregated networks.

  13. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging have become the most important noninvasive windows to the human brain. A major challenge in the analysis of brain networks is to establish the similarities and dissimilarities between functional and structural connectivity. We formulate a non......-parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration....

  14. Network repair based on community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyu; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Xiaoqian; Wandelt, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    Real-world complex systems are often fragile under disruptions. Accordingly, research on network repair has been studied intensively. Recently proposed efficient strategies for network disruption, based on collective influence, call for more research on efficient network repair strategies. Existing strategies are often designed to repair networks with local information only. However, the absence of global information impedes the creation of efficient repairs. Motivated by this limitation, we propose a concept of community-level repair, which leverages the community structure of the network during the repair process. Moreover, we devise a general framework of network repair, with in total six instances. Evaluations on real-world and random networks show the effectiveness and efficiency of the community-level repair approaches, compared to local and random repairs. Our study contributes to a better understanding of repair processes, and reveals that exploitation of the community structure improves the repair process on a disrupted network significantly.

  15. STRUCTURE AND COOPTATION IN ORGANIZATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Riscarolli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Business executive are rethinking business concept, based on horizontalization principles. As so, most organizational functions are outsourced, leading the enterprise to build business through a network of organizations. Here we study the case of Cia Hering’s network of organizations, a leader in knit apparel segment in Latin America (IEMI, 2004, looking at the network’s structure and levels of cooptation. A theoretical model was used using Quinn et al. (2001 “sun ray” network structure as basis to analyze the case study. Main results indicate higher degree of structural conformity, but incipient degree of coopetation in the network.

  16. Network structure of inter-industry flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerney, James; Fath, Brian D.; Silverberg, Gerald

    2013-12-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 45 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community structure. The community structure is hierarchical, with the top level of the hierarchy comprising five industry communities: food industries, chemical industries, manufacturing industries, service industries, and extraction industries.

  17. Network structure of inter-industry flows

    CERN Document Server

    McNerney, James; Silverberg, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 20 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community structure. The community structure is hierarchical, with the top level of the hierarchy comprising five industry communities: food industries, chemical industries, manufacturing industries, service industries, and extraction industries.

  18. Network structure of inter-industry flows

    OpenAIRE

    McNerney, J.; Fath, B.D.; G. Silverberg

    2012-01-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 20 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community structure. The community structure is hierarchical, with the top level of the hierarchy comprising five industry communities: food industries, chemical industries, manufacturing industries, servic...

  19. Does structural-typological similarity affect borrowability?: A quantitative study on affix borrowing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifart, F.; Wichmann, S.; Good, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question whether the borrowability of linguistic forms, in particular affixes, is constrained by structural properties of the donor and recipient languages involved. According to some claims, structural similarity favors affix borrowing. On some accounts, structural

  20. Does structural-typological similarity affect borrowability?: A quantitative study on affix borrowing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifart, F.

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the question whether the borrowability of linguistic forms, in particular affixes, is constrained by structural properties of the donor and recipient languages involved. According to some claims, structural similarity favors affix borrowing. On some accounts, structural

  1. Network Structure of Inter-Industry Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McNerney, J.; Fath, B.D.; Silverberg, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    We study the structure of inter-industry relationships using networks of money flows between industries in 45 national economies. We find these networks vary around a typical structure characterized by a Weibull link weight distribution, exponential industry size distribution, and a common community

  2. Optimized null model for protein structure networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Tijana; Filippis, Ioannis; Lappe, Michael; Przulj, Natasa

    2009-06-26

    Much attention has recently been given to the statistical significance of topological features observed in biological networks. Here, we consider residue interaction graphs (RIGs) as network representations of protein structures with residues as nodes and inter-residue interactions as edges. Degree-preserving randomized models have been widely used for this purpose in biomolecular networks. However, such a single summary statistic of a network may not be detailed enough to capture the complex topological characteristics of protein structures and their network counterparts. Here, we investigate a variety of topological properties of RIGs to find a well fitting network null model for them. The RIGs are derived from a structurally diverse protein data set at various distance cut-offs and for different groups of interacting atoms. We compare the network structure of RIGs to several random graph models. We show that 3-dimensional geometric random graphs, that model spatial relationships between objects, provide the best fit to RIGs. We investigate the relationship between the strength of the fit and various protein structural features. We show that the fit depends on protein size, structural class, and thermostability, but not on quaternary structure. We apply our model to the identification of significantly over-represented structural building blocks, i.e., network motifs, in protein structure networks. As expected, choosing geometric graphs as a null model results in the most specific identification of motifs. Our geometric random graph model may facilitate further graph-based studies of protein conformation space and have important implications for protein structure comparison and prediction. The choice of a well-fitting null model is crucial for finding structural motifs that play an important role in protein folding, stability and function. To our knowledge, this is the first study that addresses the challenge of finding an optimized null model for RIGs, by

  3. Optimized null model for protein structure networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Much attention has recently been given to the statistical significance of topological features observed in biological networks. Here, we consider residue interaction graphs (RIGs as network representations of protein structures with residues as nodes and inter-residue interactions as edges. Degree-preserving randomized models have been widely used for this purpose in biomolecular networks. However, such a single summary statistic of a network may not be detailed enough to capture the complex topological characteristics of protein structures and their network counterparts. Here, we investigate a variety of topological properties of RIGs to find a well fitting network null model for them. The RIGs are derived from a structurally diverse protein data set at various distance cut-offs and for different groups of interacting atoms. We compare the network structure of RIGs to several random graph models. We show that 3-dimensional geometric random graphs, that model spatial relationships between objects, provide the best fit to RIGs. We investigate the relationship between the strength of the fit and various protein structural features. We show that the fit depends on protein size, structural class, and thermostability, but not on quaternary structure. We apply our model to the identification of significantly over-represented structural building blocks, i.e., network motifs, in protein structure networks. As expected, choosing geometric graphs as a null model results in the most specific identification of motifs. Our geometric random graph model may facilitate further graph-based studies of protein conformation space and have important implications for protein structure comparison and prediction. The choice of a well-fitting null model is crucial for finding structural motifs that play an important role in protein folding, stability and function. To our knowledge, this is the first study that addresses the challenge of finding an optimized null model

  4. A method for identifying hierarchical sub-networks / modules and weighting network links based on their similarity in sub-network / module affiliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Some networks, including biological networks, consist of hierarchical sub-networks / modules. Based on my previous study, in present study a method for both identifying hierarchical sub-networks / modules and weighting network links is proposed. It is based on the cluster analysis in which between-node similarity in sets of adjacency nodes is used. Two matrices, linkWeightMat and linkClusterIDs, are achieved by using the algorithm. Two links with both the same weight in linkWeightMat and the same cluster ID in linkClusterIDs belong to the same sub-network / module. Two links with the same weight in linkWeightMat but different cluster IDs in linkClusterIDs belong to two sub-networks / modules at the same hirarchical level. However, a link with an unique cluster ID in linkClusterIDs does not belong to any sub-networks / modules. A sub-network / module of the greater weight is the more connected sub-network / modules. Matlab codes of the algorithm are presented.

  5. Prediction and characterization of enzymatic activities guided by sequence similarity and genome neighborhood networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Suwen; Sakai, Ayano; Zhang, Xinshuai; Vetting, Matthew W; Kumar, Ritesh; Hillerich, Brandan; San Francisco, Brian; Solbiati, Jose; Steves, Adam; Brown, Shoshana; Akiva, Eyal; Barber, Alan; Seidel, Ronald D; Babbitt, Patricia C; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2014-06-30

    Metabolic pathways in eubacteria and archaea often are encoded by operons and/or gene clusters (genome neighborhoods) that provide important clues for assignment of both enzyme functions and metabolic pathways. We describe a bioinformatic approach (genome neighborhood network; GNN) that enables large scale prediction of the in vitro enzymatic activities and in vivo physiological functions (metabolic pathways) of uncharacterized enzymes in protein families. We demonstrate the utility of the GNN approach by predicting in vitro activities and in vivo functions in the proline racemase superfamily (PRS; InterPro IPR008794). The predictions were verified by measuring in vitro activities for 51 proteins in 12 families in the PRS that represent ∼85% of the sequences; in vitro activities of pathway enzymes, carbon/nitrogen source phenotypes, and/or transcriptomic studies confirmed the predicted pathways. The synergistic use of sequence similarity networks3 and GNNs will facilitate the discovery of the components of novel, uncharacterized metabolic pathways in sequenced genomes.

  6. Spatial Structure and Scaling of Agricultural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Considering agricultural landscapes as networks can provide information about spatial connectivity relevant for a wide range of applications including pollination, pest management, and ecology. Global agricultural networks are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. However, regional analyses capture only a subset of the total global network. Most analyses are regional. In this paper, we seek to address the following questions: Does the globally observed scale-free property of agricultural networks hold over smaller spatial domains? Can similar properties be observed at kilometer to meter scales? We analyze 9 intensively cultivated Landsat scenes on 5 continents with a wide range of vegetation distributions. We find that networks of vegetation fraction within the domain of each of these Landsat scenes exhibit substantial variability - but still possess similar scaling properties to the global distribution of agriculture. We also find similar results using a 39 km2 IKONOS image. To illustrate an a...

  7. Learning Latent Structure in Complex Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    Latent structure in complex networks, e.g., in the form of community structure, can help understand network dynamics, identify heterogeneities in network properties, and predict ‘missing’ links. While most community detection algorithms are based on optimizing heuristic clustering objectives...... prediction performance of the learning based approaches and other widely used link prediction approaches in 14 networks ranging from medium size to large networks with more than a million nodes. While link prediction is typically well above chance for all networks, we find that the learning based mixed...... membership stochastic block model of Airoldi et al., performs well and often best in our experiments. The added complexity of the LD model improves link predictions for four of the 14 networks....

  8. Scaling of peak flows with constant flow velocity in random self-similar networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mantilla

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A methodology is presented to understand the role of the statistical self-similar topology of real river networks on scaling, or power law, in peak flows for rainfall-runoff events. We created Monte Carlo generated sets of ensembles of 1000 random self-similar networks (RSNs with geometrically distributed interior and exterior generators having parameters pi and pe, respectively. The parameter values were chosen to replicate the observed topology of real river networks. We calculated flow hydrographs in each of these networks by numerically solving the link-based mass and momentum conservation equation under the assumption of constant flow velocity. From these simulated RSNs and hydrographs, the scaling exponents β and φ characterizing power laws with respect to drainage area, and corresponding to the width functions and flow hydrographs respectively, were estimated. We found that, in general, φ > β, which supports a similar finding first reported for simulations in the river network of the Walnut Gulch basin, Arizona. Theoretical estimation of β and φ in RSNs is a complex open problem. Therefore, using results for a simpler problem associated with the expected width function and expected hydrograph for an ensemble of RSNs, we give heuristic arguments for theoretical derivations of the scaling exponents β(E and φ(E that depend on the Horton ratios for stream lengths and areas. These ratios in turn have a known dependence on the parameters of the geometric distributions of RSN generators. Good agreement was found between the analytically conjectured values of β(E and φ(E and the values estimated by the simulated ensembles of RSNs and hydrographs. The independence of the scaling exponents φ(E and φ with respect to the value of flow velocity and runoff intensity implies an interesting connection between unit

  9. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Steeg, E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Computer Science; Farber, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  10. Network structure and travel time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time.

  11. Predicting behavior change from persuasive messages using neural representational similarity and social network analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegors, Teresa K; Tompson, Steven; O'Donnell, Matthew Brook; Falk, Emily B

    2017-08-15

    Neural activity in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), identified as engaging in self-related processing, predicts later health behavior change. However, it is unknown to what extent individual differences in neural representation of content and lived experience influence this brain-behavior relationship. We examined whether the strength of content-specific representations during persuasive messaging relates to later behavior change, and whether these relationships change as a function of individuals' social network composition. In our study, smokers viewed anti-smoking messages while undergoing fMRI and we measured changes in their smoking behavior one month later. Using representational similarity analyses, we found that the degree to which message content (i.e. health, social, or valence information) was represented in a self-related processing MPFC region was associated with later smoking behavior, with increased representations of negatively valenced (risk) information corresponding to greater message-consistent behavior change. Furthermore, the relationship between representations and behavior change depended on social network composition: smokers who had proportionally fewer smokers in their network showed increases in smoking behavior when social or health content was strongly represented in MPFC, whereas message-consistent behavior (i.e., less smoking) was more likely for those with proportionally more smokers in their social network who represented social or health consequences more strongly. These results highlight the dynamic relationship between representations in MPFC and key outcomes such as health behavior change; a complete understanding of the role of MPFC in motivation and action should take into account individual differences in neural representation of stimulus attributes and social context variables such as social network composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural Networks for protein Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This is a review about neural network applications in bioinformatics. Especially the applications to protein structure prediction, e.g. prediction of secondary structures, prediction of surface structure, fold class recognition and prediction of the 3-dimensional structure of protein backbones...

  13. Network Structure, Collaborative Context, and Individual Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stea, Diego; Soda, Giuseppe; Pedersen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    and exogenous to a network’s structural characteristics, such that it moderates the effects of both dense and brokered networks on individual creativity. Specifically, we argue that knowledge acquisition and, in turn, individual creativity are more likely when an individual’s network position has a good fit...... with the network’s organizational context. Thus, actors in dense network structures acquire more knowledge and eventually become more creative in organizational contexts where collaboration is high. Conversely, brokers who arbitrage information across disconnected network contacts acquire more valuable knowledge...

  14. Structural similarity based kriging for quantitative structure activity and property relationship modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana L; Falcao, Andre O

    2014-07-28

    Structurally similar molecules tend to have similar properties, i.e. closer molecules in the molecular space are more likely to yield similar property values while distant molecules are more likely to yield different values. Based on this principle, we propose the use of a new method that takes into account the high dimensionality of the molecular space, predicting chemical, physical, or biological properties based on the most similar compounds with measured properties. This methodology uses ordinary kriging coupled with three different molecular similarity approaches (based on molecular descriptors, fingerprints, and atom matching) which creates an interpolation map over the molecular space that is capable of predicting properties/activities for diverse chemical data sets. The proposed method was tested in two data sets of diverse chemical compounds collected from the literature and preprocessed. One of the data sets contained dihydrofolate reductase inhibition activity data, and the second molecules for which aqueous solubility was known. The overall predictive results using kriging for both data sets comply with the results obtained in the literature using typical QSPR/QSAR approaches. However, the procedure did not involve any type of descriptor selection or even minimal information about each problem, suggesting that this approach is directly applicable to a large spectrum of problems in QSAR/QSPR. Furthermore, the predictive results improve significantly with the similarity threshold between the training and testing compounds, allowing the definition of a confidence threshold of similarity and error estimation for each case inferred. The use of kriging for interpolation over the molecular metric space is independent of the training data set size, and no reparametrizations are necessary when more compounds are added or removed from the set, and increasing the size of the database will consequentially improve the quality of the estimations. Finally it is shown

  15. Sequence similarity network reveals the imprints of major diversification events in the evolution of microbial life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu eCheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ancient transitions, such as between life that evolved in a reducing versus an oxidizing atmosphere precipitated by the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE ca. 2.4 billion years ago, fundamentally altered the space in which prokaryotes could derive metabolic energy. Despite fundamental changes in Earth’s redox state, there are very few comprehensive, proteome-wide analyses about the effects of these changes on gene content and evolution. Here, using a pan-proteome sequence similarity network applied to broadly sampled lifestyles of 84 prokaryotes that were categorized into four different redox groups (i.e., methanogens, obligate anaerobes, facultative anaerobes, and obligate aerobes, we reconstructed the genetic inventory of major respiratory communities. We show that a set of putative core homologs that is highly conserved in prokaryotic proteomes is characterized by the loss of canonical network connections and low conductance that correlates with differences in respiratory phenotypes. We suggest these different network patterns observed for different respiratory communities could be explained by two major evolutionary diversification events in the history of microbial life. The first event (M is a divergence between methanogenesis and other anaerobic lifestyles in prokaryotes (archaebacteria and eubacteria. The second diversification event (OX is from anaerobic to aerobic lifestyles that left a proteome-wide footprint among prokaryotes. Additional analyses revealed that oxidoreductase evolution played a central role in these two diversification events. Distinct cofactor binding domains were frequently recombined, allowing these enzymes to utilize increasingly oxidized substrates with high specificity.

  16. Unfolding stabilities of two structurally similar proteins as probed by temperature-induced and force-induced molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Biswajit; Prabhavadhni, Arasu; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2015-09-01

    Unfolding stabilities of two homologous proteins, cardiotoxin III and short-neurotoxin (SNTX) belonging to three-finger toxin (TFT) superfamily, have been probed by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined analysis of data obtained from steered MD and all-atom MD simulations at various temperatures in near physiological conditions on the proteins suggested that overall structural stabilities of the two proteins were different from each other and the MD results are consistent with experimental data of the proteins reported in the literature. Rationalization for the differential structural stabilities of the structurally similar proteins has been chiefly attributed to the differences in the structural contacts between C- and N-termini regions in their three-dimensional structures, and the findings endorse the 'CN network' hypothesis proposed to qualitatively analyse the thermodynamic stabilities of proteins belonging to TFT superfamily of snake venoms. Moreover, the 'CN network' hypothesis has been revisited and the present study suggested that 'CN network' should be accounted in terms of 'structural contacts' and 'structural strengths' in order to precisely describe order of structural stabilities of TFTs.

  17. Self-Similarity Superresolution for Resource-Constrained Image Sensor Node in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehai Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks, in combination with image sensors, open up a grand sensing application field. It is a challenging problem to recover a high resolution (HR image from its low resolution (LR counterpart, especially for low-cost resource-constrained image sensors with limited resolution. Sparse representation-based techniques have been developed recently and increasingly to solve this ill-posed inverse problem. Most of these solutions are based on an external dictionary learned from huge image gallery, consequently needing tremendous iteration and long time to match. In this paper, we explore the self-similarity inside the image itself, and propose a new combined self-similarity superresolution (SR solution, with low computation cost and high recover performance. In the self-similarity image super resolution model (SSIR, a small size sparse dictionary is learned from the image itself by the methods such as KSVD. The most similar patch is searched and specially combined during the sparse regulation iteration. Detailed information, such as edge sharpness, is preserved more faithfully and clearly. Experiment results confirm the effectiveness and efficiency of this double self-learning method in the image super resolution.

  18. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé Ribalta, Albert; Granell, Clara; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-08-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer networks with community structure. The final goal is to understand and quantify, if the existence of well-defined community structure at the level of individual layers, together with the multilayer structure of the whole network, enhances or deteriorates the diffusion of packets of information.

  19. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert eSolé Ribalta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.. The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer networks with community structure. The final goal is to understand and quantify, if the existence of well-defined community structure at the level of individual layers, together with the multilayer structure of the whole network, enhances or deteriorates the diffusion of packets of information.

  20. Some structural determinants of Pavlovian conditioning in artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, José M; Galeazzi, Juan M; Burgos, José E

    2010-05-01

    This paper investigates the possible role of neuroanatomical features in Pavlovian conditioning, via computer simulations with layered, feedforward artificial neural networks. The networks' structure and functioning are described by a strongly bottom-up model that takes into account the roles of hippocampal and dopaminergic systems in conditioning. Neuroanatomical features were simulated as generic structural or architectural features of neural networks. We focused on the number of units per hidden layer and connectivity. The effect of the number of units per hidden layer was investigated through simulations of resistance to extinction in fully connected networks. Large networks were more resistant to extinction than small networks, a stochastic effect of the asynchronous random procedure used in the simulator to update activations and weights. These networks did not simulate second-order conditioning because weight competition prevented conditioning to a stimulus after conditioning to another. Partially connected networks simulated second-order conditioning and devaluation of the second-order stimulus after extinction of a similar first-order stimulus. Similar stimuli were simulated as nonorthogonal input-vectors. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Different measures of structural similarity tap different aspects of visual object processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The structural similarity of objects has been an important variable in explaining why some objects are easier to categorize at a superordinate level than to individuate, and also why some patients with brain injury have more difficulties in recognizing natural (structurally similar) objects than...... artifacts (structurally distinct objects). In spite of its merits as an explanatory variable, structural similarity is not a unitary construct, and it has been operationalized in different ways. Furthermore, even though measures of structural similarity have been successful in explaining task and category......-effects, this has been based more on implication than on direct empirical demonstrations. Here, the direct influence of two different measures of structural similarity, contour overlap and within-item structural diversity, on object individuation (object decision) and superordinate categorization performance...

  2. Information transfer in community structured multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The study of complex networks that account for different types of interactions has become a subject of interest in the last few years, specially because its representational power in the description of users interactions in diverse online social platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.). The mathematical description of these interacting networks has been coined under the name of multilayer networks, where each layer accounts for a type of interaction. It has been shown that diffusive processes on top of these networks present a phenomenology that cannot be explained by the naive superposition of single layer diffusive phenomena but require the whole structure of interconnected layers. Nevertheless, the description of diffusive phenomena on multilayer networks has obviated the fact that social networks have strong mesoscopic structure represented by different communities of individuals driven by common interests, or any other social aspect. In this work, we study the transfer of information in multilayer ...

  3. Disentangling the co-structure of multilayer interaction networks: degree distribution and module composition in two-layer bipartite networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astegiano, Julia; Altermatt, Florian; Massol, François

    2017-11-13

    Species establish different interactions (e.g. antagonistic, mutualistic) with multiple species, forming multilayer ecological networks. Disentangling network co-structure in multilayer networks is crucial to predict how biodiversity loss may affect the persistence of multispecies assemblages. Existing methods to analyse multilayer networks often fail to consider network co-structure. We present a new method to evaluate the modular co-structure of multilayer networks through the assessment of species degree co-distribution and network module composition. We focus on modular structure because of its high prevalence among ecological networks. We apply our method to two Lepidoptera-plant networks, one describing caterpillar-plant herbivory interactions and one representing adult Lepidoptera nectaring on flowers, thereby possibly pollinating them. More than 50% of the species established either herbivory or visitation interactions, but not both. These species were over-represented among plants and lepidopterans, and were present in most modules in both networks. Similarity in module composition between networks was high but not different from random expectations. Our method clearly delineates the importance of interpreting multilayer module composition similarity in the light of the constraints imposed by network structure to predict the potential indirect effects of species loss through interconnected modular networks.

  4. Industrial entrepreneurial network: Structural and functional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, M. A.; Davletbaev, R. H.; Berg, D. B.; Nazarova, J. J.; Parusheva, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Structure and functioning of two model industrial entrepreneurial networks are investigated in the present paper. One of these networks is forming when implementing an integrated project and consists of eight agents, which interact with each other and external environment. The other one is obtained from the municipal economy and is based on the set of the 12 real business entities. Analysis of the networks is carried out on the basis of the matrix of mutual payments aggregated over the certain time period. The matrix is created by the methods of experimental economics. Social Network Analysis (SNA) methods and instruments were used in the present research. The set of basic structural characteristics was investigated: set of quantitative parameters such as density, diameter, clustering coefficient, different kinds of centrality, and etc. They were compared with the random Bernoulli graphs of the corresponding size and density. Discovered variations of random and entrepreneurial networks structure are explained by the peculiarities of agents functioning in production network. Separately, were identified the closed exchange circuits (cyclically closed contours of graph) forming an autopoietic (self-replicating) network pattern. The purpose of the functional analysis was to identify the contribution of the autopoietic network pattern in its gross product. It was found that the magnitude of this contribution is more than 20%. Such value allows using of the complementary currency in order to stimulate economic activity of network agents.

  5. THE COMMERCIAL BANK AS NETWORK STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Dyl

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the problems of the modern enterprise as a network structure that meets the increasing processes of globalization and the rise of postmodern trends. The definition of the term «a network of commercial bank» and the main characteristics of such a definition are given.

  6. Similarity of High-Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectra of Structurally Related Micropollutants and Transformation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollée, Jennifer E.; Schymanski, Emma L.; Stravs, Michael A.; Gulde, Rebekka; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S.; Hollender, Juliane

    2017-12-01

    High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS2) with electrospray ionization is frequently applied to study polar organic molecules such as micropollutants. Fragmentation provides structural information to confirm structures of known compounds or propose structures of unknown compounds. Similarity of HRMS2 spectra between structurally related compounds has been suggested to facilitate identification of unknown compounds. To test this hypothesis, the similarity of reference standard HRMS2 spectra was calculated for 243 pairs of micropollutants and their structurally related transformation products (TPs); for comparison, spectral similarity was also calculated for 219 pairs of unrelated compounds. Spectra were measured on Orbitrap and QTOF mass spectrometers and similarity was calculated with the dot product. The influence of different factors on spectral similarity [e.g., normalized collision energy (NCE), merging fragments from all NCEs, and shifting fragments by the mass difference of the pair] was considered. Spectral similarity increased at higher NCEs and highest similarity scores for related pairs were obtained with merged spectra including measured fragments and shifted fragments. Removal of the monoisotopic peak was critical to reduce false positives. Using a spectral similarity score threshold of 0.52, 40% of related pairs and 0% of unrelated pairs were above this value. Structural similarity was estimated with the Tanimoto coefficient and pairs with higher structural similarity generally had higher spectral similarity. Pairs where one or both compounds contained heteroatoms such as sulfur often resulted in dissimilar spectra. This work demonstrates that HRMS2 spectral similarity may indicate structural similarity and that spectral similarity can be used in the future to screen complex samples for related compounds such as micropollutants and TPs, assisting in the prioritization of non-target compounds. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Activation Patterns throughout the Word Processing Network of L1-dominant Bilinguals Reflect Language Similarity and Language Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganian, Yulia; Conrad, Markus; Aryani, Arash; Spalek, Katharina; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2015-11-01

    A crucial aspect of bilingual communication is the ability to identify the language of an input. Yet, the neural and cognitive basis of this ability is largely unknown. Moreover, it cannot be easily incorporated into neuronal models of bilingualism, which posit that bilinguals rely on the same neural substrates for both languages and concurrently activate them even in monolingual settings. Here we hypothesized that bilinguals can employ language-specific sublexical (bigram frequency) and lexical (orthographic neighborhood size) statistics for language recognition. Moreover, we investigated the neural networks representing language-specific statistics and hypothesized that language identity is encoded in distributed activation patterns within these networks. To this end, German-English bilinguals made speeded language decisions on visually presented pseudowords during fMRI. Language attribution followed lexical neighborhood sizes both in first (L1) and second (L2) language. RTs revealed an overall tuning to L1 bigram statistics. Neuroimaging results demonstrated tuning to L1 statistics at sublexical (occipital lobe) and phonological (temporoparietal lobe) levels, whereas neural activation in the angular gyri reflected sensitivity to lexical similarity to both languages. Analysis of distributed activation patterns reflected language attribution as early as in the ventral stream of visual processing. We conclude that in language-ambiguous contexts visual word processing is dominated by L1 statistical structure at sublexical orthographic and phonological levels, whereas lexical search is determined by the structure of both languages. Moreover, our results demonstrate that language identity modulates distributed activation patterns throughout the reading network, providing a key to language identity representations within this shared network.

  8. Learning Bayesian Network Model Structure from Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Margaritis, Dimitris

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis I address the important problem of the determination of the structure of directed statistical models, with the widely used class of Bayesian network models as a concrete vehicle of my ideas...

  9. Nonparametric inference of network structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    The network structure of complex systems determine their function and serve as evidence for the evolutionary mechanisms that lie behind them. Despite considerable effort in recent years, it remains an open challenge to formulate general descriptions of the large-scale structure of network systems, and how to reliably extract such information from data. Although many approaches have been proposed, few methods attempt to gauge the statistical significance of the uncovered structures, and hence the majority cannot reliably separate actual structure from stochastic fluctuations. Due to the sheer size and high-dimensionality of many networks, this represents a major limitation that prevents meaningful interpretations of the results obtained with such nonstatistical methods. In this talk, I will show how these issues can be tackled in a principled and efficient fashion by formulating appropriate generative models of network structure that can have their parameters inferred from data. By employing a Bayesian description of such models, the inference can be performed in a nonparametric fashion, that does not require any a priori knowledge or ad hoc assumptions about the data. I will show how this approach can be used to perform model comparison, and how hierarchical models yield the most appropriate trade-off between model complexity and quality of fit based on the statistical evidence present in the data. I will also show how this general approach can be elegantly extended to networks with edge attributes, that are embedded in latent spaces, and that change in time. The latter is obtained via a fully dynamic generative network model, based on arbitrary-order Markov chains, that can also be inferred in a nonparametric fashion. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the application of the methods with many empirical networks such as the internet at the autonomous systems level, the global airport network, the network of actors and films, social networks, citations among

  10. Network Structure, Collaborative Context, and Individual Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soda, Giuseppe; Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    attitude on the part of the embedded actors and propose that the level of collaboration in a network can be independent from that network’s structural characteristics, such that it moderates the effects of closed and brokering network positions on the acquisition of knowledge that supports creativity....... Individuals embedded in closed networks acquire more knowledge and become more creative when the level of collaboration in their network is high. Brokers who arbitrage information across disconnected contacts acquire more knowledge and become more creative when collaboration is low. An analysis of employee...

  11. Different measures of structural similarity tap different aspects of visual object processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The structural similarity of objects has been an important variable in explaining why some objects are easier to categorize at a superordinate level than to individuate, and also why some patients with brain injury have more difficulties in recognizing natural (structurally similar) objects than ...

  12. The default mode network in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) is similar to that of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barks, Sarah K; Parr, Lisa A; Rilling, James K

    2015-02-01

    The human default mode network (DMN), comprising medial prefrontal cortex, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, lateral parietal cortex, and medial temporal cortex, is highly metabolically active at rest but deactivates during most focused cognitive tasks. The DMN and social cognitive networks overlap significantly in humans. We previously demonstrated that chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) show highest resting metabolic brain activity in the cortical midline areas of the human DMN. Human DMN is defined by task-induced deactivations, not absolute resting metabolic levels; ergo, resting activity is insufficient to define a DMN in chimpanzees. Here, we assessed the chimpanzee DMN's deactivations relative to rest during cognitive tasks and the effect of social content on these areas' activity. Chimpanzees performed a match-to-sample task with conspecific behavioral stimuli of varying sociality. Using [(18)F]-FDG PET, brain activity during these tasks was compared with activity during a nonsocial task and at rest. Cortical midline areas in chimpanzees deactivated in these tasks relative to rest, suggesting a chimpanzee DMN anatomically and functionally similar to humans. Furthermore, when chimpanzees make social discriminations, these same areas (particularly precuneus) are highly active relative to nonsocial tasks, suggesting that, as in humans, the chimpanzee DMN may play a role in social cognition. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The Deep Structure of Organizational Online Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Matthias; Richter, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    While research on organizational online networking recently increased significantly, most studies adopt quantitative research designs with a focus on the consequences of social network configurations. Very limited attention is paid to comprehensive theoretical conceptions of the complex phenomenon...... of organizational online networking. We address this gap by adopting a theoretical framework of the deep structure of organizational online networking with a focus on their emerging meaning for the employees. We apply and assess the framework in a qualitative case study of a large-scale implementation...... of a corporate social network site (SNS) in a global organization. We reveal organizational online networking as a multi-dimensional phenomenon with multiplex relationships that are unbalanced, primarily consist of weak ties and are subject to temporal change. Further, we identify discourse drivers...

  14. Modelling the structure of complex networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue

    networks has been independently studied as mathematical objects in their own right. As such, there has been both an increased demand for statistical methods for complex networks as well as a quickly growing mathematical literature on the subject. In this dissertation we explore aspects of modelling complex......A complex network is a systems in which a discrete set of units interact in a quantifiable manner. Representing systems as complex networks have become increasingly popular in a variety of scientific fields including biology, social sciences and economics. Parallel to this development complex....... The next chapters will treat some of the various symmetries, representer theorems and probabilistic structures often deployed in the modelling complex networks, the construction of sampling methods and various network models. The introductory chapters will serve to provide context for the included written...

  15. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    , and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals...... and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection...... a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework...

  16. Structural measures for multiplex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Federico; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Many real-world complex systems consist of a set of elementary units connected by relationships of different kinds. All such systems are better described in terms of multiplex networks, where the links at each layer represent a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes rather than in terms of (single-layer) networks. In this paper we present a general framework to describe and study multiplex networks, whose links are either unweighted or weighted. In particular, we propose a series of measures to characterize the multiplexicity of the systems in terms of (i) basic node and link properties such as the node degree, and the edge overlap and reinforcement, (ii) local properties such as the clustering coefficient and the transitivity, and (iii) global properties related to the navigability of the multiplex across the different layers. The measures we introduce are validated on a genuinely multiplex data set of Indonesian terrorists, where information among 78 individuals are recorded with respect to mutual trust, common operations, exchanged communications, and business relationships.

  17. Optimizing and Understanding Network Structure for Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Given a population contact network and electronic medical records of patients, how to distribute vaccines to individuals to effectively control a flu epidemic? Similarly, given the Twitter following network and tweets, how to choose the best communities/groups to stop rumors from spreading? How to find the best accounts that bridge celebrities and ordinary users? These questions are related to diffusion (aka propagation) phenomena. Diffusion can be treated as a behavior of spreading contagion...

  18. Finding community structure in networks using the eigenvectors of matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, M E J

    2006-09-01

    We consider the problem of detecting communities or modules in networks, groups of vertices with a higher-than-average density of edges connecting them. Previous work indicates that a robust approach to this problem is the maximization of the benefit function known as "modularity" over possible divisions of a network. Here we show that this maximization process can be written in terms of the eigenspectrum of a matrix we call the modularity matrix, which plays a role in community detection similar to that played by the graph Laplacian in graph partitioning calculations. This result leads us to a number of possible algorithms for detecting community structure, as well as several other results, including a spectral measure of bipartite structure in networks and a centrality measure that identifies vertices that occupy central positions within the communities to which they belong. The algorithms and measures proposed are illustrated with applications to a variety of real-world complex networks.

  19. Self-similar optical transmittance for a deterministic aperiodic multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña, X. I.; López-Cruz, E.; Contreras-Solorio, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    We study theoretically the spectral transmission properties of a multilayer structure in which the refractive index of the layers follows a self-similar arithmetical sequence named 'The 1s-counting sequence', which is related to the Pascal's triangle. The transmittance spectrum is intermediate between that of a periodic structure and that of a random structure, and shows clearly properties of scaling and self-similarity for all incident angles and TE and TM polarizations.

  20. Structure and function of complex brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of theoretical and empirical studies approach the function of the human brain from a network perspective. The analysis of brain networks is made feasible by the development of new imaging acquisition methods as well as new tools from graph theory and dynamical systems. This review surveys some of these methodological advances and summarizes recent findings on the architecture of structural and functional brain networks. Studies of the structural connectome reveal several modules or network communities that are interlinked by hub regions mediating communication processes between modules. Recent network analyses have shown that network hubs form a densely linked collective called a “rich club,” centrally positioned for attracting and dispersing signal traffic. In parallel, recordings of resting and task-evoked neural activity have revealed distinct resting-state networks that contribute to functions in distinct cognitive domains. Network methods are increasingly applied in a clinical context, and their promise for elucidating neural substrates of brain and mental disorders is discussed. PMID:24174898

  1. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Pernice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks.

  2. Structural Connectivity Networks of Transgender People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Küblböck, Martin; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF)

  3. A Topological Perspective of Neural Network Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Ann; Giusti, Chad; Cieslak, Matthew; Grafton, Scott; Bassett, Danielle

    The wiring patterns of white matter tracts between brain regions inform functional capabilities of the neural network. Indeed, densely connected and cyclically arranged cognitive systems may communicate and thus perform distinctly. However, previously employed graph theoretical statistics are local in nature and thus insensitive to such global structure. Here we present an investigation of the structural neural network in eight healthy individuals using persistent homology. An extension of homology to weighted networks, persistent homology records both circuits and cliques (all-to-all connected subgraphs) through a repetitive thresholding process, thus perceiving structural motifs. We report structural features found across patients and discuss brain regions responsible for these patterns, finally considering the implications of such motifs in relation to cognitive function.

  4. Structure formation in active networks

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation and constant reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton are key requirements for the function of living cells. Here we show that a minimal reconstituted system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular-motor filaments exhibits a generic mechanism of structure formation, characterized by a broad distribution of cluster sizes. We demonstrate that the growth of the structures depends on the intricate balance between crosslinker-induced stabilization and simultaneous destabilization by molecular motors, a mechanism analogous to nucleation and growth in passive systems. We also show that the intricate interplay between force generation, coarsening and connectivity is responsible for the highly dynamic process of structure formation in this heterogeneous active gel, and that these competing mechanisms result in anomalous transport, reminiscent of intracellular dynamics.

  5. Inter-relationship between scaling exponents for describing self-similar river networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Soohyun; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Natural river networks show well-known self-similar characteristics. Such characteristics are represented by various power-law relationships, e.g., between upstream length and drainage area (exponent h) (Hack, 1957), and in the exceedance probability distribution of upstream area (exponent ɛ) (Rodriguez-Iturbe et al., 1992). It is empirically revealed that these power-law exponents are within narrow ranges. Power-law is also found in the relationship between drainage density (the total stream length divided by the total basin area) and specified source area (the minimum drainage area to form a stream head) (exponent η) (Moussa and Bocquillon, 1996). Considering that above three scaling relationships all refer to fundamental measures of 'length' and 'area' of a given drainage basin, it is natural to hypothesize plausible inter-relationship between these three scaling exponents. Indeed, Rigon et al. (1996) demonstrated the relationship between ɛ and h. In this study, we expand this to a more general ɛ-η-h relationship. We approach ɛ-η relationship in an analytical manner while η-h relationship is demonstrated for six study basins in Korea. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Hack, J. T. (1957). Studies of longitudinal river profiles in Virginia and Maryland. US, Geological Survey Professional Paper, 294. Moussa, R., & Bocquillon, C. (1996). Fractal analyses of tree-like channel networks from digital elevation model data. Journal of Hydrology, 187(1), 157-172. Rigon, R., Rodriguez-Iturbe, I., Maritan, A., Giacometti. A., Tarboton, D. G., & Rinaldo, A. (1996). On Hack's Law. Water Resources Research, 32(11), 3367-3374. Rodríguez-Iturbe, I., Ijjasz-Vasquez, E. J., Bras, R. L., & Tarboton, D. G. (1992). Power law distributions of discharge mass and energy in river basins. Water Resources Research, 28(4), 1089-1093.

  6. Identifying community structure in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chenxi; Duan, Yubing

    2015-07-01

    A wide variety of applications could be formulated to resolve the problem of finding all communities from a given network, ranging from social and biological network analysis to web mining and searching. In this study, we propose the concept of virtual attractive strength between each pair of node in networks, and then give the definition of community structure based on the proposed attractive strength. Furthermore, we present a community detection method by moving vertices to the clusters that produce the largest attractive strengths to them until the division of network reaches unchanged. Experimental results on synthetic and real networks indicate that the proposed approach has favorite effectiveness and fast convergence speed, which provides an efficient method for exploring and analyzing complex systems.

  7. Comparison and validation of community structures in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Mika; Hörnquist, Michael; Lombardi, Anna

    2006-07-01

    The issue of partitioning a network into communities has attracted a great deal of attention recently. Most authors seem to equate this issue with the one of finding the maximum value of the modularity, as defined by Newman. Since the problem formulated this way is believed to be NP-hard, most effort has gone into the construction of search algorithms, and less to the question of other measures of community structures, similarities between various partitionings and the validation with respect to external information. Here we concentrate on a class of computer generated networks and on three well-studied real networks which constitute a bench-mark for network studies; the karate club, the US college football teams and a gene network of yeast. We utilize some standard ways of clustering data (originally not designed for finding community structures in networks) and show that these classical methods sometimes outperform the newer ones. We discuss various measures of the strength of the modular structure, and show by examples features and drawbacks. Further, we compare different partitions by applying some graph-theoretic concepts of distance, which indicate that one of the quality measures of the degree of modularity corresponds quite well with the distance from the true partition. Finally, we introduce a way to validate the partitionings with respect to external data when the nodes are classified but the network structure is unknown. This is here possible since we know everything of the computer generated networks, as well as the historical answer to how the karate club and the football teams are partitioned in reality. The partitioning of the gene network is validated by use of the Gene Ontology database, where we show that a community in general corresponds to a biological process.

  8. Invading a mutualistic network: to be or not to be similar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minoarivelo, Henintsoa Onivola; Hui, Cang

    2016-01-01

    ...‐evolutionary model of bipartite mutualistic networks with trait‐mediated interactions, we explore invader trait, propagule pressure, and network features of recipient community that contribute importantly to the success and impact of an invasion...

  9. Functional annotation by identification of local surface similarities: a novel tool for structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanzoni Andreas

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein function is often dependent on subsets of solvent-exposed residues that may exist in a similar three-dimensional configuration in non homologous proteins thus having different order and/or spacing in the sequence. Hence, functional annotation by means of sequence or fold similarity is not adequate for such cases. Results We describe a method for the function-related annotation of protein structures by means of the detection of local structural similarity with a library of annotated functional sites. An automatic procedure was used to annotate the function of local surface regions. Next, we employed a sequence-independent algorithm to compare exhaustively these functional patches with a larger collection of protein surface cavities. After tuning and validating the algorithm on a dataset of well annotated structures, we applied it to a list of protein structures that are classified as being of unknown function in the Protein Data Bank. By this strategy, we were able to provide functional clues to proteins that do not show any significant sequence or global structural similarity with proteins in the current databases. Conclusion This method is able to spot structural similarities associated to function-related similarities, independently on sequence or fold resemblance, therefore is a valuable tool for the functional analysis of uncharacterized proteins. Results are available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/surface/structuralGenomics.html

  10. Structural Changes in Online Discussion Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yang; Medaglia, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Social networking platforms in China provide a hugely interesting and relevant source for understanding dynamics of online discussions in a unique socio-cultural and institutional environment. This paper investigates the evolution of patterns of similar-minded and different-minded interactions over...

  11. Community Structure in Online Collegiate Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traud, Amanda; Kelsic, Eric; Mucha, Peter; Porter, Mason

    2009-03-01

    Online social networking sites have become increasingly popular with college students. The networks we studied are defined through ``friendships'' indicated by Facebook users from UNC, Oklahoma, Caltech, Georgetown, and Princeton. We apply the tools of network science to study the Facebook networks from these five different universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure, which we obtain through partitioning the graph using an eigenvector method. We use both graphical and quantitative tools, including pair-counting methods, which we interpret through statistical analysis and permutation tests to measure the correlations between the network communities and a set of characteristics given by each user (residence, class year, major, and high school). We also analyze the single gender subsets of these networks, and the impact of missing demographical data. Our study allows us to compare the online social networks for the five schools as well as infer differences in offline social interactions. At the schools studied, we were able to define which characteristics of the Facebook users correlate best with friendships.

  12. INGA: protein function prediction combining interaction networks, domain assignments and sequence similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Damiano; Giollo, Manuel; Leonardi, Emanuela; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-07-01

    Identifying protein functions can be useful for numerous applications in biology. The prediction of gene ontology (GO) functional terms from sequence remains however a challenging task, as shown by the recent CAFA experiments. Here we present INGA, a web server developed to predict protein function from a combination of three orthogonal approaches. Sequence similarity and domain architecture searches are combined with protein-protein interaction network data to derive consensus predictions for GO terms using functional enrichment. The INGA server can be queried both programmatically through RESTful services and through a web interface designed for usability. The latter provides output supporting the GO term predictions with the annotating sequences. INGA is validated on the CAFA-1 data set and was recently shown to perform consistently well in the CAFA-2 blind test. The INGA web server is available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/inga. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Similarity Analysis of EEG Data Based on Self Organizing Map Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Salem Jahan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electroencephalography (EEG is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp. This recorded data are very complex. EEG has a big role in several applications such as in the diagnosis of human brain diseases and epilepsy. Also, we can use the EEG signals to control an external device via Brain Computer Interface (BCI by our mind. There are many algorithms to analyse the recorded EEG data, but it still remains one of the big challenges in the world. In this article, we extended our previous proposed method. Our extended method uses Self-organizing Map (SOM as an EEG data classifier. The proposed method we can divide in following steps: capturing EEG raw data from the sensors, applying filters on this data, we will use the frequencies in the range from 0.5~Hz to 60~Hz, smoothing the data with 15-th order of Polynomial Curve Fitting, converting filtered data into text using Turtle Graphic, Lempel-Ziv complexity for measuring similarity between two EEG data trials and Self-Organizing Map Neural Network as a final classifiers. The experiment results show that our model is able to detect up to 96% finger movements correctly.

  14. Rumor propagation on networks with community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruixia; Li, Deyu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, based on growth and preferential attachment mechanism, we give a network generation model aiming at generating networks with community structure. There are three characteristics for the networks generated by the generation model. The first is that the community sizes can be nonuniform. The second is that there are bridge hubs in each community. The third is that the strength of community structure is adjustable. Next, we investigate rumor propagation behavior on the generated networks by performing Monte Carlo simulations to reveal the influence of bridge hubs, nonuniformity of community sizes and the strength of community structure on the dynamic behavior of the rumor propagation. We find that bridge hubs have outstanding performance in propagation speed and propagation size, and larger modularity can reduce rumor propagation. Furthermore, when the decay rate of rumor spreading β is large, the final density of the stiflers is larger if the rumor originates in larger community. Additionally, when on networks with different strengths of community structure, rumor propagation exhibits greater difference in the density of stiflers and in the peak prevalence if the decay rate β is larger.

  15. Structural systems identification of genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hao; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2008-02-15

    Reverse engineering of genetic regulatory networks from experimental data is the first step toward the modeling of genetic networks. Linear state-space models, also known as linear dynamical models, have been applied to model genetic networks from gene expression time series data, but existing works have not taken into account available structural information. Without structural constraints, estimated models may contradict biological knowledge and estimation methods may over-fit. In this report, we extended expectation-maximization (EM) algorithms to incorporate prior network structure and to estimate genetic regulatory networks that can track and predict gene expression profiles. We applied our method to synthetic data and to SOS data and showed that our method significantly outperforms the regular EM without structural constraints. The Matlab code is available upon request and the SOS data can be downloaded from http://www.weizmann.ac.il/mcb/UriAlon/Papers/SOSData/, courtesy of Uri Alon. Zak's data is available from his website, http://www.che.udel.edu/systems/people/zak.

  16. Structural health monitoring using wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreevallabhan, K.; Nikhil Chand, B.; Ramasamy, Sudha

    2017-11-01

    Monitoring and analysing health of large structures like bridges, dams, buildings and heavy machinery is important for safety, economical, operational, making prior protective measures, and repair and maintenance point of view. In recent years there is growing demand for such larger structures which in turn make people focus more on safety. By using Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Accelerometer we can perform Structural Health Monitoring by studying the dynamic response through measure of ambient vibrations and strong motion of such structures. By using Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) we can embed these sensors in wireless networks which helps us to transmit data wirelessly thus we can measure the data wirelessly at any remote location. This in turn reduces heavy wiring which is a cost effective as well as time consuming process to lay those wires. In this paper we developed WSN based MEMS-accelerometer for Structural to test the results in the railway bridge near VIT University, Vellore campus.

  17. A Feature-Based Structural Measure: An Image Similarity Measure for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Abdalrazak Shnain

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Facial recognition is one of the most challenging and interesting problems within the field of computer vision and pattern recognition. During the last few years, it has gained special attention due to its importance in relation to current issues such as security, surveillance systems and forensics analysis. Despite this high level of attention to facial recognition, the success is still limited by certain conditions; there is no method which gives reliable results in all situations. In this paper, we propose an efficient similarity index that resolves the shortcomings of the existing measures of feature and structural similarity. This measure, called the Feature-Based Structural Measure (FSM, combines the best features of the well-known SSIM (structural similarity index measure and FSIM (feature similarity index measure approaches, striking a balance between performance for similar and dissimilar images of human faces. In addition to the statistical structural properties provided by SSIM, edge detection is incorporated in FSM as a distinctive structural feature. Its performance is tested for a wide range of PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratio, using ORL (Olivetti Research Laboratory, now AT&T Laboratory Cambridge and FEI (Faculty of Industrial Engineering, São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil databases. The proposed measure is tested under conditions of Gaussian noise; simulation results show that the proposed FSM outperforms the well-known SSIM and FSIM approaches in its efficiency of similarity detection and recognition of human faces.

  18. Robustness in Weighted Networks with Cluster Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vulnerability of complex systems induced by cascade failures revealed the comprehensive interaction of dynamics with network structure. The effect on cascade failures induced by cluster structure was investigated on three networks, small-world, scale-free, and module networks, of which the clustering coefficient is controllable by the random walk method. After analyzing the shifting process of load, we found that the betweenness centrality and the cluster structure play an important role in cascading model. Focusing on this point, properties of cascading failures were studied on model networks with adjustable clustering coefficient and fixed degree distribution. In the proposed weighting strategy, the path length of an edge is designed as the product of the clustering coefficient of its end nodes, and then the modified betweenness centrality of the edge is calculated and applied in cascade model as its weights. The optimal region of the weighting scheme and the size of the survival components were investigated by simulating the edge removing attack, under the rule of local redistribution based on edge weights. We found that the weighting scheme based on the modified betweenness centrality makes all three networks have better robustness against edge attack than the one based on the original betweenness centrality.

  19. The network structure of city-firm relations

    CERN Document Server

    Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    How are economic activities linked to geographic locations? To answer this question, we use a data-driven approach that builds on the information about location, ownership and economic activities of the world's 3,000 largest firms and their almost one million subsidiaries. From this information we generate a bipartite network of cities linked to economic activities. Analysing the structure of this network, we find striking similarities with nested networks observed in ecology, where links represent mutualistic interactions between species. This motivates us to apply ecological indicators to identify the unbalanced deployment of economic activities. Such deployment can lead to an over-representation of specific economic sectors in a given city, and poses a significant thread for the city's future especially in times when the over-represented activities face economic uncertainties. If we compare our analysis with external rankings about the quality of life in a city, we find that the nested structure of the cit...

  20. Composition and Structure of a Large Online Social Network in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, Rense

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in data collection have long been an obstacle in research on friendship networks. Most earlier studies use either a sample of ego-networks, or complete network data on a relatively small group (e.g., a single organization). The rise of online social networking services such as Friendster and Facebook, however, provides researchers with opportunities to study friendship networks on a much larger scale. This study uses complete network data from Hyves, a popular online social networking service in the Netherlands, comprising over eight million members and over 400 million online friendship relations. In the first study of its kind for the Netherlands, I examine the structure of this network in terms of the degree distribution, characteristic path length, clustering, and degree assortativity. Results indicate that this network shares features of other large complex networks, but also deviates in other respects. In addition, a comparison with other online social networks shows that these networks show remarkable similarities. PMID:22523557

  1. Composition and structure of a large online social network in The Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rense Corten

    Full Text Available Limitations in data collection have long been an obstacle in research on friendship networks. Most earlier studies use either a sample of ego-networks, or complete network data on a relatively small group (e.g., a single organization. The rise of online social networking services such as Friendster and Facebook, however, provides researchers with opportunities to study friendship networks on a much larger scale. This study uses complete network data from Hyves, a popular online social networking service in The Netherlands, comprising over eight million members and over 400 million online friendship relations. In the first study of its kind for The Netherlands, I examine the structure of this network in terms of the degree distribution, characteristic path length, clustering, and degree assortativity. Results indicate that this network shares features of other large complex networks, but also deviates in other respects. In addition, a comparison with other online social networks shows that these networks show remarkable similarities.

  2. Track-to-Track Association Based on Structural Similarity in the Presence of Sensor Biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of track-to-track association in the presence of sensor biases. In some challenging scenarios, it may be infeasible to implement bias estimation and compensation in time due to the computational intractability or weak observability about sensor biases. In this paper, we introduce the structural feature for each local track, which describes the spatial relationship with its neighboring targets. Although the absolute coordinates of local tracks from the same target are severely different in the presence of sensor biases, their structural features may be similar. As a result, instead of using the absolute kinematic states only, we employee the structural similarity to define the association cost. When there are missed detections, the structural similarity between local tracks is evaluated by solving another 2D assignment subproblem. Simulation results demonstrated the power of the proposed approach.

  3. An Evaluation Framework for Large-Scale Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    An evaluation framework for large-scale network structures is presented, which facilitates evaluations and comparisons of different physical network structures. A number of quantitative and qualitative parameters are presented, and their importance to networks discussed. Choosing a network...... is closed by an example of how the framework can be used. The framework supports network planners in decision-making and researchers in evaluation and development of network structures....

  4. Identification of similar regions of protein structures using integrated sequence and structure analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiland Randy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding protein function from its structure is a challenging problem. Sequence based approaches for finding homology have broad use for annotation of both structure and function. 3D structural information of protein domains and their interactions provide a complementary view to structure function relationships to sequence information. We have developed a web site http://www.sblest.org/ and an API of web services that enables users to submit protein structures and identify statistically significant neighbors and the underlying structural environments that make that match using a suite of sequence and structure analysis tools. To do this, we have integrated S-BLEST, PSI-BLAST and HMMer based superfamily predictions to give a unique integrated view to prediction of SCOP superfamilies, EC number, and GO term, as well as identification of the protein structural environments that are associated with that prediction. Additionally, we have extended UCSF Chimera and PyMOL to support our web services, so that users can characterize their own proteins of interest. Results Users are able to submit their own queries or use a structure already in the PDB. Currently the databases that a user can query include the popular structural datasets ASTRAL 40 v1.69, ASTRAL 95 v1.69, CLUSTER50, CLUSTER70 and CLUSTER90 and PDBSELECT25. The results can be downloaded directly from the site and include function prediction, analysis of the most conserved environments and automated annotation of query proteins. These results reflect both the hits found with PSI-BLAST, HMMer and with S-BLEST. We have evaluated how well annotation transfer can be performed on SCOP ID's, Gene Ontology (GO ID's and EC Numbers. The method is very efficient and totally automated, generally taking around fifteen minutes for a 400 residue protein. Conclusion With structural genomics initiatives determining structures with little, if any, functional characterization

  5. Identification of similar regions of protein structures using integrated sequence and structure analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brandon; Moad, Charles; Youn, Eunseog; Buffington, Kris; Heiland, Randy; Mooney, Sean

    2006-03-09

    Understanding protein function from its structure is a challenging problem. Sequence based approaches for finding homology have broad use for annotation of both structure and function. 3D structural information of protein domains and their interactions provide a complementary view to structure function relationships to sequence information. We have developed a web site http://www.sblest.org/ and an API of web services that enables users to submit protein structures and identify statistically significant neighbors and the underlying structural environments that make that match using a suite of sequence and structure analysis tools. To do this, we have integrated S-BLEST, PSI-BLAST and HMMer based superfamily predictions to give a unique integrated view to prediction of SCOP superfamilies, EC number, and GO term, as well as identification of the protein structural environments that are associated with that prediction. Additionally, we have extended UCSF Chimera and PyMOL to support our web services, so that users can characterize their own proteins of interest. Users are able to submit their own queries or use a structure already in the PDB. Currently the databases that a user can query include the popular structural datasets ASTRAL 40 v1.69, ASTRAL 95 v1.69, CLUSTER50, CLUSTER70 and CLUSTER90 and PDBSELECT25. The results can be downloaded directly from the site and include function prediction, analysis of the most conserved environments and automated annotation of query proteins. These results reflect both the hits found with PSI-BLAST, HMMer and with S-BLEST. We have evaluated how well annotation transfer can be performed on SCOP ID's, Gene Ontology (GO) ID's and EC Numbers. The method is very efficient and totally automated, generally taking around fifteen minutes for a 400 residue protein. With structural genomics initiatives determining structures with little, if any, functional characterization, development of protein structure and function analysis tools are a

  6. THE GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE OF COOPERATIVE NETWORKS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosileia Milagres

    2014-01-01

    .... The analysis shows that the governance structure is influenced by the objectives established, the partners' experience, the types of knowledge and the context where network is inserted. The case highlights the importance of learning during the process, but, although present, it can be negatively influenced by the context and the possibility of future partnerships.

  7. Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

  8. Structural network efficiency predicts conversion to dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, A.; van Uden, I.W.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; van der Holst, H.; van Norden, A.; de Laat, K.; Dijk, E.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Markus, H.S.; Norris, David Gordon; de Leeuw, F.E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether structural network connectivity at baseline predicts incident all-cause dementia in a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly participants with MRI evidence of small vessel disease (SVD). Methods: A total of 436 participants from the Radboud University Nijmegen

  9. Structures and Statistics of Citation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    assignment procedure ( QAP ) (14) and its regression counterpart MRQAP (15) have been used to detect structural significance and compare networks in...Correcting Codes. Hamming, R.W. 2, s.l. : Bell System Technical Journal, 1950, Vol. 29, pp. 147--160. 14. QAP Partialling as a Test of Spuriousness* 1

  10. Identifying the Critical Links in Road Transportation Networks: Centrality-based approach utilizing structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinthavali, Supriya [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Surface transportation road networks share structural properties similar to other complex networks (e.g., social networks, information networks, biological networks, and so on). This research investigates the structural properties of road networks for any possible correlation with the traffic characteristics such as link flows those determined independently. Additionally, we define a criticality index for the links of the road network that identifies the relative importance in the network. We tested our hypotheses with two sample road networks. Results show that, correlation exists between the link flows and centrality measures of a link of the road (dual graph approach is followed) and the criticality index is found to be effective for one test network to identify the vulnerable nodes.

  11. Information diffusion in structured online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Yini; Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, due to the word-of-mouth effect, online social networks have been considered to be efficient approaches to conduct viral marketing, which makes it of great importance to understand the diffusion dynamics in online social networks. However, most research on diffusion dynamics in epidemiology and existing social networks cannot be applied directly to characterize online social networks. In this paper, we propose models to characterize the information diffusion in structured online social networks with push-based forwarding mechanism. We introduce the term user influence to characterize the average number of times that messages are browsed which is incurred by a given type user generating a message, and study the diffusion threshold, above which the user influence of generating a message will approach infinity. We conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly. These results are of use in understanding the diffusion dynamics in online social networks and also critical for advertisers in viral marketing who want to estimate the user influence before posting an advertisement.

  12. Tensegrity II. How structural networks influence cellular information processing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    The major challenge in biology today is biocomplexity: the need to explain how cell and tissue behaviors emerge from collective interactions within complex molecular networks. Part I of this two-part article, described a mechanical model of cell structure based on tensegrity architecture that explains how the mechanical behavior of the cell emerges from physical interactions among the different molecular filament systems that form the cytoskeleton. Recent work shows that the cytoskeleton also orients much of the cell's metabolic and signal transduction machinery and that mechanical distortion of cells and the cytoskeleton through cell surface integrin receptors can profoundly affect cell behavior. In particular, gradual variations in this single physical control parameter (cell shape distortion) can switch cells between distinct gene programs (e.g. growth, differentiation and apoptosis), and this process can be viewed as a biological phase transition. Part II of this article covers how combined use of tensegrity and solid-state mechanochemistry by cells may mediate mechanotransduction and facilitate integration of chemical and physical signals that are responsible for control of cell behavior. In addition, it examines how cell structural networks affect gene and protein signaling networks to produce characteristic phenotypes and cell fate transitions during tissue development.

  13. A Robust Method for Inferring Network Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Luo, Tingjin; Li, Zhoujun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yu, Philip S

    2017-07-12

    Inferring the network structure from limited observable data is significant in molecular biology, communication and many other areas. It is challenging, primarily because the observable data are sparse, finite and noisy. The development of machine learning and network structure study provides a great chance to solve the problem. In this paper, we propose an iterative smoothing algorithm with structure sparsity (ISSS) method. The elastic penalty in the model is introduced for the sparse solution, identifying group features and avoiding over-fitting, and the total variation (TV) penalty in the model can effectively utilize the structure information to identify the neighborhood of the vertices. Due to the non-smoothness of the elastic and structural TV penalties, an efficient algorithm with the Nesterov's smoothing optimization technique is proposed to solve the non-smooth problem. The experimental results on both synthetic and real-world networks show that the proposed model is robust against insufficient data and high noise. In addition, we investigate many factors that play important roles in identifying the performance of ISSS.

  14. Network structure of multivariate time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of a variety of phenomena in physics, biology and economics crucially depends on the analysis of multivariate time series. While a wide range tools and techniques for time series analysis already exist, the increasing availability of massive data structures calls for new approaches for multidimensional signal processing. We present here a non-parametric method to analyse multivariate time series, based on the mapping of a multidimensional time series into a multilayer network, which allows to extract information on a high dimensional dynamical system through the analysis of the structure of the associated multiplex network. The method is simple to implement, general, scalable, does not require ad hoc phase space partitioning, and is thus suitable for the analysis of large, heterogeneous and non-stationary time series. We show that simple structural descriptors of the associated multiplex networks allow to extract and quantify nontrivial properties of coupled chaotic maps, including the transition between different dynamical phases and the onset of various types of synchronization. As a concrete example we then study financial time series, showing that a multiplex network analysis can efficiently discriminate crises from periods of financial stability, where standard methods based on time-series symbolization often fail.

  15. The fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sekara, Vedran; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing the structure and dynamics of complex systems (1-3). The study of group behavior has deep roots in the social science literature (4,5) and community detection is a central part of modern network science. Network communities have been found to be highly overlapping and organized in a hierarchical structure (6-9). Recent technological advances have provided a toolset for measuring the detailed social dynamics at scale (10,11). In spite of great progress, a quantitative description of the complex temporal behavior of social groups-with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns expressed on the timescale of years-is still absent. Here we uncover a class of fundamental structures embedded within highly dynamic social networks. On the shortest time-scale, we find that social gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. We show that cores represent social contexts (9), with recur...

  16. Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer: substructure and similarity searching of molecules from Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Patiny, Luc; Sander, Thomas; Rufener, Christian; Zasso, Michaël

    2015-01-01

    Wikipedia, the world's largest and most popular encyclopedia is an indispensable source of chemistry information. It contains among others also entries for over 15,000 chemicals including metabolites, drugs, agrochemicals and industrial chemicals. To provide an easy access to this wealth of information we decided to develop a substructure and similarity search tool for chemical structures referenced in Wikipedia. We extracted chemical structures from entries in Wikipedia and implemented a web system allowing structure and similarity searching on these data. The whole search as well as visualization system is written in JavaScript and therefore can run locally within a web page and does not require a central server. The Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer is accessible on-line at www.cheminfo.org/wikipedia and is available also as an open source project from GitHub for local installation. The web-based Wikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer provides a useful resource for research as well as for chemical education enabling both researchers and students easy and user friendly chemistry searching and identification of relevant information in Wikipedia. The tool can also help to improve quality of chemical entries in Wikipedia by providing potential contributors regularly updated list of entries with problematic structures. And last but not least this search system is a nice example of how the modern web technology can be applied in the field of cheminformatics. Graphical abstractWikipedia Chemical Structure Explorer allows substructure and similarity searches on molecules referenced in Wikipedia.

  17. Clustering and Visualizing Functionally Similar Regions in Large-Scale Spatial Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fushimi, Takayasu; Saito, Kazumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Kazama, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    .... For this purpose, based on our previous algorithm called the FCE method that extracted functional clusters for each network, we propose a new method that efficiently deals with several large-scale...

  18. The shareholding similarity of the shareholders of the worldwide listed energy companies based on a two-mode primitive network and a one-mode derivative holding-based network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajiao; Fang, Wei; An, Haizhong; Yan, LiLi

    2014-12-01

    on the two-mode network, and it provides a means to discover the similarity of the shareholding behavior among the shareholders; in addition, this study will be useful for further research studies regarding the stability of the structure of the energy institutes and the level of risk in the energy stock market.

  19. Assessment of structural and functional similarity of biosimilar products: Rituximab as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nupur, Neh; Chhabra, Nidhi; Dash, Rozaleen; Rathore, Anurag S

    2017-12-04

    Biosimilars are products that are similar in terms of quality, safety, and efficacy to an already licensed reference/ innovator product and are expected to offer improved affordability. The most significant source of reduction in the cost of development of a biosimilar is the reduced clinical examination that it is expected to undergo as compared to the innovator product. However, this clinical relief is predicated on the assumption that there is analytical similarity between the biosimilar and the innovator product. As a result, establishing analytical similarity is arguably the most important step towards successful development of a biosimilar. Here, we present results from an analytical similarity exercise that was performed with five biosimilars of rituximab (Ristova®, Roche), a chimeric mouse/ human monoclonal antibody biotherapeutic, that are available on the Indian market. The results show that, while the biosimilars exhibited similarity with respect to protein structure and function, there were significant differences with respect to size heterogeneity, charge heterogeneity and glycosylation pattern.

  20. Detecting Local Residue Environment Similarity for Recognizing Near-Native Structure Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungrae; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    We developed a new representation of local amino acid environments in protein structures called the Side-chain Depth Environment (SDE). An SDE defines a local structural environment of a residue considering the coordinates and the depth of amino acids that locate in the vicinity of the side-chain centroid of the residue. SDEs are general enough that similar SDEs are found in protein structures with globally different folds. Using SDEs, we developed a procedure called PRESCO (Protein Residue Environment SCOre) for selecting native or near-native models from a pool of computational models. The procedure searches similar residue environments observed in a query model against a set of representative native protein structures to quantify how native-like SDEs in the model are. When benchmarked on commonly used computational model datasets, our PRESCO compared favorably with the other existing scoring functions in selecting native and near-native models. PMID:25132526

  1. Similar Ring Structures on Mars and Tibetan Plateau confirm recent tectonism on Martian Northern polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglés, A.; Li, Y. L.

    2017-10-01

    The polar regions of Mars feature layered deposits, some of which exist as enclosed zoning structures. These deposits raised strong interest since their discovery and still remain one of the most controversial features on Mars. Zoning structures that are enclosed only appear in the Northern polar region, where the disappearance of water bodies may have left behind huge deposits of evaporate salts. The origin of the layered deposits has been widely debated. Here we propose that the enclosed nature of the zoning structures indicates the result of recent tectonism. We compared similar structures at an analogue site located in the western Qaidam Basin of Tibetan Plateau, a unique tectonic setting with abundant saline deposits. The enclosed structures, which we term Ring Structures, in both the analogue site and in the Northern polar region of Mars, were formed by uplift induced pressurization and buoyancy of salts as the result of recent tectonic activity.

  2. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hao; He, Yuehan; Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biologi...

  3. Community structure in the phonological network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia S. Q. Siew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Community structure, which refers to the presence of densely connected groups within a larger network, is a common feature of several real-world networks from a variety of domains such as the human brain, social networks of hunter-gatherers and business organizations, and the World Wide Web (Porter et al., 2009. Using a community detection technique known as the Louvain optimization method, 17 communities were extracted from the giant component of the phonological network described in Vitevitch (2008. Additional analyses comparing the lexical and phonological characteristics of words in these communities against words in randomly generated communities revealed several novel discoveries. Larger communities tend to consist of short, frequent words of high degree and low age of acquisition ratings, and smaller communities tend to consist of longer, less frequent words of low degree and high age of acquisition ratings. Real communities also contained fewer different phonological segments compared to random communities, although the number of occurrences of phonological segments found in real communities was much higher than that of the same phonological segments in random communities. Interestingly, the observation that relatively few biphones occur very frequently and a large number of biphones occur rarely within communities mirrors the pattern of the overall frequency of words in a language (Zipf, 1935. The present findings have important implications for understanding the dynamics of activation spread among words in the phonological network that are relevant to lexical processing, as well as understanding the mechanisms that underlie language acquisition and the evolution of language.

  4. Comparative analysis of chemical similarity methods for modular natural products with a hypothetical structure enumeration algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinnider, Michael A; Dejong, Chris A; Franczak, Brian C; McNicholas, Paul D; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2017-08-16

    Natural products represent a prominent source of pharmaceutically and industrially important agents. Calculating the chemical similarity of two molecules is a central task in cheminformatics, with applications at multiple stages of the drug discovery pipeline. Quantifying the similarity of natural products is a particularly important problem, as the biological activities of these molecules have been extensively optimized by natural selection. The large and structurally complex scaffolds of natural products distinguish their physical and chemical properties from those of synthetic compounds. However, no analysis of the performance of existing methods for molecular similarity calculation specific to natural products has been reported to date. Here, we present LEMONS, an algorithm for the enumeration of hypothetical modular natural product structures. We leverage this algorithm to conduct a comparative analysis of molecular similarity methods within the unique chemical space occupied by modular natural products using controlled synthetic data, and comprehensively investigate the impact of diverse biosynthetic parameters on similarity search. We additionally investigate a recently described algorithm for natural product retrobiosynthesis and alignment, and find that when rule-based retrobiosynthesis can be applied, this approach outperforms conventional two-dimensional fingerprints, suggesting it may represent a valuable approach for the targeted exploration of natural product chemical space and microbial genome mining. Our open-source algorithm is an extensible method of enumerating hypothetical natural product structures with diverse potential applications in bioinformatics.

  5. Structure and mechanics of aegagropilae fiber network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhille, Gautier; Moulinet, Sébastien; Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Le Gal, Patrice

    2017-05-02

    Fiber networks encompass a wide range of natural and manmade materials. The threads or filaments from which they are formed span a wide range of length scales: from nanometers, as in biological tissues and bundles of carbon nanotubes, to millimeters, as in paper and insulation materials. The mechanical and thermal behavior of these complex structures depends on both the individual response of the constituent fibers and the density and degree of entanglement of the network. A question of paramount importance is how to control the formation of a given fiber network to optimize a desired function. The study of fiber clustering of natural flocs could be useful for improving fabrication processes, such as in the paper and textile industries. Here, we use the example of aegagropilae that are the remains of a seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) found on Mediterranean beaches. First, we characterize different aspects of their structure and mechanical response, and second, we draw conclusions on their formation process. We show that these natural aggregates are formed in open sea by random aggregation and compaction of fibers held together by friction forces. Although formed in a natural environment, thus under relatively unconstrained conditions, the geometrical and mechanical properties of the resulting fiber aggregates are quite robust. This study opens perspectives for manufacturing complex fiber network materials.

  6. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  7. Enhancing adverse drug event detection in electronic health records using molecular structure similarity: application to pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vilar

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events (ADEs detection and assessment is at the center of pharmacovigilance. Data mining of systems, such as FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS and more recently, Electronic Health Records (EHRs, can aid in the automatic detection and analysis of ADEs. Although different data mining approaches have been shown to be valuable, it is still crucial to improve the quality of the generated signals.To leverage structural similarity by developing molecular fingerprint-based models (MFBMs to strengthen ADE signals generated from EHR data.A reference standard of drugs known to be causally associated with the adverse event pancreatitis was used to create a MFBM. Electronic Health Records (EHRs from the New York Presbyterian Hospital were mined to generate structured data. Disproportionality Analysis (DPA was applied to the data, and 278 possible signals related to the ADE pancreatitis were detected. Candidate drugs associated with these signals were then assessed using the MFBM to find the most promising candidates based on structural similarity.The use of MFBM as a means to strengthen or prioritize signals generated from the EHR significantly improved the detection accuracy of ADEs related to pancreatitis. MFBM also highlights the etiology of the ADE by identifying structurally similar drugs, which could follow a similar mechanism of action.The method proposed in this paper provides evidence of being a promising adjunct to existing automated ADE detection and analysis approaches.

  8. Lewis Structure Representation of Free Radicals Similar to ClO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Warren; Kobrak, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The study describes the Lewis structure representation of various free radicals, which are quite similar to the ClO radical and its isoelectronic analogues. The analysis of the periodic trends of these radicals shows that oxygen is the most electronegative atom among them.

  9. Effects of landscape structure and land-use intensity on similarity of plant and animal communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormann, C.; Schweiger, O.; Augenstein, I.; Bailey, D.; Billeter, R.; Blust, de G.; DeFilippi, R.; Frenzel, M.; Hendrickx, F.; Herzog, F.; Klotz, S.; Liira, J.; Maelfait, J.P.; Schmidt, T.; Speelmans, M.; Wingerden, van W.K.R.E.; Zobel, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim Species richness in itself is not always sufficient to evaluate land management strategies for nature conservation. The exchange of species between local communities may be affected by landscape structure and land-use intensity. Thus, species turnover, and its inverse, community similarity, may

  10. The Graphic Representation of Structure in Similarity/Dissimilarity Matrices: Alternative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitsky, Alan N.

    Three approaches to the graphic representation of similarity and dissimilarity matrices are compared and contrasted. Specifically, Kruskal's multidimensional scaling, Johnson's hierarchical clustering, and Waern's graphing techniques are employed to depict, in two dimensions, data representing the structure of a set of botanical concepts. Each of…

  11. Improving the Robustness of Complex Networks with Preserving Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Zhoujun; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Senzhang

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks are everywhere, such as the power grid network, the airline network, the protein-protein interaction network, and the road network. The networks are ‘robust yet fragile’, which means that the networks are robust against random failures but fragile under malicious attacks. The cascading failures, system-wide disasters and intentional attacks on these networks are deserving of in-depth study. Researchers have proposed many solutions to improve the robustness of these networks. However whilst many solutions preserve the degree distribution of the networks, little attention is paid to the community structure of these networks. We argue that the community structure of a network is a defining characteristic of a network which identifies its functionality and thus should be preserved. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between robustness and the community structure. Then we propose a 3-step strategy to improve the robustness of a network, while retaining its community structure, and also its degree distribution. With extensive experimentation on representative real-world networks, we demonstrate that our method is effective and can greatly improve the robustness of networks, while preserving community structure and degree distribution. Finally, we give a description of a robust network, which is useful not only for improving robustness, but also for designing robust networks and integrating networks. PMID:25674786

  12. Coherent structures of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The turbulence statistics and structures are studied in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL). The self-similar APG-TBL at the verged of separation is achieved by a modification of the far-field boundary condition to produce the desired pressure gradient. The turbulence statistics in the self-similar region collapse by using the scaling of the external velocity and the displacement thickness. The coherent structures of the APG-TBL are investigated and compared to those of zero-pressure gradient case and homogeneous shear flow. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Community structure in introductory physics course networks

    CERN Document Server

    Traxler, Adrienne L

    2015-01-01

    Student-to-student interactions are foundational to many active learning environments, but are most often studied using qualitative methods. Network analysis tools provide a quantitative complement to this picture, allowing researchers to describe the social interactions of whole classrooms as systems. Past results from introductory physics courses have suggested a sharp division in the formation of social structure between large lecture sections and small studio classroom environments. Extending those results, this study focuses on calculus-based introductory physics courses at a large public university with a heavily commuter and nontraditional student population. Community detection network methods are used to characterize pre- and post-course collaborative structure in several sections, and differences are considered between small and large classes. These results are compared with expectations from earlier findings, and comment on implications for instruction and further study.

  14. Finding local community structure in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauset, Aaron

    2005-08-01

    Although the inference of global community structure in networks has recently become a topic of great interest in the physics community, all such algorithms require that the graph be completely known. Here, we define both a measure of local community structure and an algorithm that infers the hierarchy of communities that enclose a given vertex by exploring the graph one vertex at a time. This algorithm runs in time O(k2d) for general graphs when d is the mean degree and k is the number of vertices to be explored. For graphs where exploring a new vertex is time consuming, the running time is linear, O(k) . We show that on computer-generated graphs the average behavior of this technique approximates that of algorithms that require global knowledge. As an application, we use this algorithm to extract meaningful local clustering information in the large recommender network of an online retailer.

  15. Hierarchical Neural Network Structures for Phoneme Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, Daniel; Minker, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    In this book, hierarchical structures based on neural networks are investigated for automatic speech recognition. These structures are evaluated on the phoneme recognition task where a  Hybrid Hidden Markov Model/Artificial Neural Network paradigm is used. The baseline hierarchical scheme consists of two levels each which is based on a Multilayered Perceptron. Additionally, the output of the first level serves as a second level input. The computational speed of the phoneme recognizer can be substantially increased by removing redundant information still contained at the first level output. Several techniques based on temporal and phonetic criteria have been investigated to remove this redundant information. The computational time could be reduced by 57% whilst keeping the system accuracy comparable to the baseline hierarchical approach.

  16. Electronic neural network for solving traveling salesman and similar global optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Anilkumar P. (Inventor); Moopenn, Alexander W. (Inventor); Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor); Eberhardt, Silvio P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a novel high-speed neural network based processor for solving the 'traveling salesman' and other global optimization problems. It comprises a novel hybrid architecture employing a binary synaptic array whose embodiment incorporates the fixed rules of the problem, such as the number of cities to be visited. The array is prompted by analog voltages representing variables such as distances. The processor incorporates two interconnected feedback networks, each of which solves part of the problem independently and simultaneously, yet which exchange information dynamically.

  17. Walk modularity and community structure in networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrle, David; Strosser, Amy; Harkin, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Modularity maximization has been one of the most widely used approaches in the last decade for discovering community structure in networks of practical interest in biology, computing, social science, statistical mechanics, and more. Modularity is a quality function that measures the difference between the number of edges found within clusters minus the number of edges one would statistically expect to find based on random chance. We present a natural generalization of modularity based on the ...

  18. Power-Management Techniques for Wireless Sensor Networks and Similar Low-Power Communication Devices Based on Nonrechargeable Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnelo Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-known advantages of communication solutions based on energy harvesting, there are scenarios where the absence of batteries (supercapacitor only or the use of rechargeable batteries is not a realistic option. Therefore, the alternative is to extend as much as possible the lifetime of primary cells (nonrechargeable batteries. By assuming low duty-cycle applications, three power-management techniques are combined in a novel way to provide an efficient energy solution for wireless sensor networks nodes or similar communication devices powered by primary cells. Accordingly, a customized node is designed and long-term experiments in laboratory and outdoors are realized. Simulated and empirical results show that the battery lifetime can be drastically enhanced. However, two trade-offs are identified: a significant increase of both data latency and hardware/software complexity. Unattended nodes deployed in outdoors under extreme temperatures, buried sensors (underground communication, and nodes embedded in the structure of buildings, bridges, and roads are some of the target scenarios for this work. Part of the provided guidelines can be used to extend the battery lifetime of communication devices in general.

  19. Omokage search: shape similarity search service for biomolecular structures in both the PDB and EMDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hirofumi; Kawabata, Takeshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-02-15

    Omokage search is a service to search the global shape similarity of biological macromolecules and their assemblies, in both the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB). The server compares global shapes of assemblies independent of sequence order and number of subunits. As a search query, the user inputs a structure ID (PDB ID or EMDB ID) or uploads an atomic model or 3D density map to the server. The search is performed usually within 1 min, using one-dimensional profiles (incremental distance rank profiles) to characterize the shapes. Using the gmfit (Gaussian mixture model fitting) program, the found structures are fitted onto the query structure and their superimposed structures are displayed on the Web browser. Our service provides new structural perspectives to life science researchers. Omokage search is freely accessible at http://pdbj.org/omokage/. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. The family feud: do proteins with similar structures fold via the same pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Larson, Stefan M; Davidson, Alan R

    2005-02-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of protein folding have suggested that the topology of the native state may be the most important factor determining the folding pathway of a protein, independent of its specific amino acid sequence. To test this concept, many experimental studies have been carried out with the aim of comparing the folding pathways of proteins that possess similar tertiary structures, but divergent sequences. Many of these studies focus on quantitative comparisons of folding transition state structures, as determined by Phi(f) value analysis of folding kinetic data. In some of these studies, folding transition state structures are found to be highly conserved, whereas in others they are not. We conclude that folds displaying more conserved transition state structures may have the most restricted number of possible folding pathways and that folds displaying low transition state structural conservation possess many potential pathways for reaching the native state.

  1. Structure and dynamics in network-forming materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark

    2016-12-21

    The study of the structure and dynamics of network-forming materials is reviewed. Experimental techniques used to extract key structural information are briefly considered. Strategies for building simulation models, based on both targeting key (experimentally-accessible) materials and on systematically controlling key model parameters, are discussed. As an example of the first class of materials, a key target system, SiO2, is used to highlight how the changing structure with applied pressure can be effectively modelled (in three dimensions) and used to link to both experimental results and simple structural models. As an example of the second class the topology of networks of tetrahedra in the MX2 stoichiometry are controlled using a single model parameter linked to the M-X-M bond angles. The evolution of ordering on multiple length-scales is observed as are the links between the static structure and key dynamical properties. The isomorphous relationship between the structures of amorphous Si and SiO2 is discussed as are the similarities and differences in the phase diagrams, the latter linked to potential polyamorphic and 'anomalous' (e.g. density maxima) behaviour. Links to both two-dimensional structures for C, Si and Ge and near-two-dimensional bilayers of SiO2 are discussed. Emerging low-dimensional structures in low temperature molten carbonates are also uncovered.

  2. Structure and dynamics of core-periphery networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter; Wu, Ling-Yun; Uzzi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered important core/periphery network structures characterizing complex sets of cooperative and competitive interactions between network nodes, be they proteins, cells, species or humans. Better characterization of the structure, dynamics and function of core/periphery networks is a key step of our understanding cellular functions, species adaptation, social and market changes. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and dynamics of "traditional" core/periphery networks, rich-clubs, nested, bow-tie and onion networks. Comparing core/periphery structures with network modules, we discriminate between global and local cores. The core/periphery network organization lies in the middle of several extreme properties, such as random/condensed structures, clique/star configurations, network symmetry/asymmetry, network assortativity/disassortativity, as well as network hierarchy/anti-hierarchy. These properties of high complexity together with the large degeneracy of core pathways e...

  3. Complex network perspective on structure and function of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , uncovering complex network structure and function from these networks is becoming one of the most important topics in system biology. This work aims at studying the structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) metabolic ...

  4. Self-similar log-periodic structures in western stock markets from 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Bartolozzi; S. Drozdz; D. B. Leinweber; J. Speth; A. W. Thomas

    2005-09-01

    The presence of log-periodic structures before and after stock market crashes is considered to be an imprint of an intrinsic discrete scale invariance (DSI) in this complex system. The fractal framework of the theory leaves open the possibility of observing self-similar log-periodic structures at different time scales. In the present work, we analyze the daily closures of four of the most important indices worldwide since 2000: the DAX for Germany and the NASDAQ-100, the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones for the United States. The qualitative behavior of these different markets is similar during the temporal frame studied. Evidence is found for decelerating log-periodic oscillations of duration about two years and starting in September 2000. Moreover, a nested sub-structure starting in May 2002 is revealed, bringing more evidence to support the hypothesis of self-similar, log-periodic behavior. Ongoing log-periodic oscillations are also revealed. A Lomb analysis over the aforementioned periods indicates a preferential scaling factor lambda~2. Higher order harmonics are also present. The spectral pattern of the data has been found to be similar to that of a Weierstrass-type function, used as a prototype of a log-periodic fractal function.

  5. Self-Similar Log-Periodic Structures in Western STOCK Markets from 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolozzi, M.; Drożdż, S.; Leinweber, D. B.; Speth, J.; Thomas, A. W.

    The presence of log-periodic structures before and after stock market crashes is considered to be an imprint of an intrinsic discrete scale invariance (DSI) in this complex system. The fractal framework of the theory leaves open the possibility of observing self-similar log-periodic structures at different time scales. In the present work, we analyze the daily closures of four of the most important indices worldwide since 2000: the DAX for Germany and the NASDAQ-100, the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones for the United States. The qualitative behavior of these different markets is similar during the temporal frame studied. Evidence is found for decelerating log-periodic oscillations of duration about two years and starting in September 2000. Moreover, a nested sub-structure starting in May 2002 is revealed, bringing more evidence to support the hypothesis of self-similar, log-periodic behavior. Ongoing log-periodic oscillations are also revealed. A Lomb analysis over the aforementioned periods indicates a preferential scaling factor λ~2. Higher order harmonics are also present. The spectral pattern of the data has been found to be similar to that of a Weierstrass-type function, used as a prototype of a log-periodic fractal function.

  6. Parallel implementation of 3D protein structure similarity searches using a GPU and the CUDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Brożek, Miłosz; Małysiak-Mrozek, Bożena

    2014-02-01

    Searching for similar 3D protein structures is one of the primary processes employed in the field of structural bioinformatics. However, the computational complexity of this process means that it is constantly necessary to search for new methods that can perform such a process faster and more efficiently. Finding molecular substructures that complex protein structures have in common is still a challenging task, especially when entire databases containing tens or even hundreds of thousands of protein structures must be scanned. Graphics processing units (GPUs) and general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) can perform many time-consuming and computationally demanding processes much more quickly than a classical CPU can. In this paper, we describe the GPU-based implementation of the CASSERT algorithm for 3D protein structure similarity searching. This algorithm is based on the two-phase alignment of protein structures when matching fragments of the compared proteins. The GPU (GeForce GTX 560Ti: 384 cores, 2GB RAM) implementation of CASSERT ("GPU-CASSERT") parallelizes both alignment phases and yields an average 180-fold increase in speed over its CPU-based, single-core implementation on an Intel Xeon E5620 (2.40GHz, 4 cores). In this paper, we show that massive parallelization of the 3D structure similarity search process on many-core GPU devices can reduce the execution time of the process, allowing it to be performed in real time. GPU-CASSERT is available at: http://zti.polsl.pl/dmrozek/science/gpucassert/cassert.htm.

  7. Effect of synapse dilution on the memory retrieval in structured attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, N.

    1993-08-01

    We investigate a simple model of structured attractor neural network (ANN). In this network a module codes for the category of the stored information, while another group of neurons codes for the remaining information. The probability distribution of stabilities of the patterns and the prototypes of the categories are calculated, for two different synaptic structures. The stability of the prototypes is shown to increase when the fraction of neurons coding for the category goes down. Then the effect of synapse destruction on the retrieval is studied in two opposite situations : first analytically in sparsely connected networks, then numerically in completely connected ones. In both cases the behaviour of the structured network and that of the usual homogeneous networks are compared. When lesions increase, two transitions are shown to appear in the behaviour of the structured network when one of the patterns is presented to the network. After the first transition the network recognizes the category of the pattern but not the individual pattern. After the second transition the network recognizes nothing. These effects are similar to syndromes caused by lesions in the central visual system, namely prosopagnosia and agnosia. In both types of networks (structured or homogeneous) the stability of the prototype is greater than the stability of individual patterns, however the first transition, for completely connected networks, occurs only when the network is structured.

  8. Structural host-microbiota interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2017-10-01

    Hundreds of different species colonize multicellular organisms making them "metaorganisms". A growing body of data supports the role of microbiota in health and in disease. Grasping the principles of host-microbiota interactions (HMIs) at the molecular level is important since it may provide insights into the mechanisms of infections. The crosstalk between the host and the microbiota may help resolve puzzling questions such as how a microorganism can contribute to both health and disease. Integrated superorganism networks that consider host and microbiota as a whole-may uncover their code, clarifying perhaps the most fundamental question: how they modulate immune surveillance. Within this framework, structural HMI networks can uniquely identify potential microbial effectors that target distinct host nodes or interfere with endogenous host interactions, as well as how mutations on either host or microbial proteins affect the interaction. Furthermore, structural HMIs can help identify master host cell regulator nodes and modules whose tweaking by the microbes promote aberrant activity. Collectively, these data can delineate pathogenic mechanisms and thereby help maximize beneficial therapeutics. To date, challenges in experimental techniques limit large-scale characterization of HMIs. Here we highlight an area in its infancy which we believe will increasingly engage the computational community: predicting interactions across kingdoms, and mapping these on the host cellular networks to figure out how commensal and pathogenic microbiota modulate the host signaling and broadly cross-species consequences.

  9. Higher-order structure and epidemic dynamics in clustered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Martin; Berthouze, Luc; House, Thomas; Kiss, Istvan Z

    2014-05-07

    Clustering is typically measured by the ratio of triangles to all triples regardless of whether open or closed. Generating clustered networks, and how clustering affects dynamics on networks, is reasonably well understood for certain classes of networks (Volz et al., 2011; Karrer and Newman, 2010), e.g. networks composed of lines and non-overlapping triangles. In this paper we show that it is possible to generate networks which, despite having the same degree distribution and equal clustering, exhibit different higher-order structure, specifically, overlapping triangles and other order-four (a closed network motif composed of four nodes) structures. To distinguish and quantify these additional structural features, we develop a new network metric capable of measuring order-four structure which, when used alongside traditional network metrics, allows us to more accurately describe a network׳s topology. Three network generation algorithms are considered: a modified configuration model and two rewiring algorithms. By generating homogeneous networks with equal clustering we study and quantify their structural differences, and using SIS (Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible) and SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Recovered) dynamics we investigate computationally how differences in higher-order structure impact on epidemic threshold, final epidemic or prevalence levels and time evolution of epidemics. Our results suggest that characterising and measuring higher-order network structure is needed to advance our understanding of the impact of network topology on dynamics unfolding on the networks. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Gold Nanoparticle Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by DNA Origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Baoquan; Deng, Zhengtao; Yan, Hao; Cabrini, Stefano; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2010-03-17

    Here we demonstrate Au nanoparticle self-similar chain structure organized by triangle DNA origami with well-controlled orientation and <10 nm spacing. We show for the first time that a large DNA complex (origami) and multiple AuNP conjugates can be well-assembled and purified with reliable yields. The assembled structure could be used to generate high local-field enhancement. The same method can be used to precisely localize multiple components on a DNA template for potential applications in nanophotonic, nanomagnetic, and nanoelectronic devices.

  11. Improvement of training set structure in fusion data cleaning using Time-Domain Global Similarity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Lan, T.; Qin, H.

    2017-10-01

    Traditional data cleaning identifies dirty data by classifying original data sequences, which is a class-imbalanced problem since the proportion of incorrect data is much less than the proportion of correct ones for most diagnostic systems in Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) devices. When using machine learning algorithms to classify diagnostic data based on class-imbalanced training set, most classifiers are biased towards the major class and show very poor classification rates on the minor class. By transforming the direct classification problem about original data sequences into a classification problem about the physical similarity between data sequences, the class-balanced effect of Time-Domain Global Similarity (TDGS) method on training set structure is investigated in this paper. Meanwhile, the impact of improved training set structure on data cleaning performance of TDGS method is demonstrated with an application example in EAST POlarimetry-INTerferometry (POINT) system.

  12. Promoting similarity of model sparsity structures in integrative analysis of cancer genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Liu, Jin; Yi, Huangdi; Shia, Ben-Chang; Ma, Shuangge

    2017-02-10

    In profiling studies, the analysis of a single dataset often leads to unsatisfactory results because of the small sample size. Multi-dataset analysis utilizes information of multiple independent datasets and outperforms single-dataset analysis. Among the available multi-dataset analysis methods, integrative analysis methods aggregate and analyze raw data and outperform meta-analysis methods, which analyze multiple datasets separately and then pool summary statistics. In this study, we conduct integrative analysis and marker selection under the heterogeneity structure, which allows different datasets to have overlapping but not necessarily identical sets of markers. Under certain scenarios, it is reasonable to expect some similarity of identified marker sets - or equivalently, similarity of model sparsity structures - across multiple datasets. However, the existing methods do not have a mechanism to explicitly promote such similarity. To tackle this problem, we develop a sparse boosting method. This method uses a BIC/HDBIC criterion to select weak learners in boosting and encourages sparsity. A new penalty is introduced to promote the similarity of model sparsity structures across datasets. The proposed method has a intuitive formulation and is broadly applicable and computationally affordable. In numerical studies, we analyze right censored survival data under the accelerated failure time model. Simulation shows that the proposed method outperforms alternative boosting and penalization methods with more accurate marker identification. The analysis of three breast cancer prognosis datasets shows that the proposed method can identify marker sets with increased similarity across datasets and improved prediction performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Primary structure similarity analysis of proteins sequences by a new graphical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S C; Li, Z; Zhang, S P; Hu, J L

    2014-01-01

    A new graphical description of the primary structure of protein sequences is introduced. First, a three-dimensional space discrete point set of a protein sequence is created based on the three main physicochemical properties of the amino acids. Secondly, a continuous cubic B-spline curve interpolating the amino acid points is constructed to represent the shape of the protein sequence. Then the geometric properties (curvature and torsion) of the continuous curve are extracted for the purpose of analyzing the similarity between protein sequences. Finally, an improved Canberra distance comparison is introduced for the similarity analysis of protein sequences with different lengths. Experimental results show that our method is effective for the similarity comparison of protein sequences.

  14. Hit expansion approaches using multiple similarity methods and virtualized query structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Andreas; Parel, Serge P

    2013-05-24

    Ligand-based virtual screening and computational hit expansion methods undoubtedly facilitate the finding of novel active chemical entities, utilizing already existing knowledge of active compounds. It has been demonstrated that the parallel execution of complementary similarity search methods enhances the performance of such virtual screening campaigns. In this article, we examine the use of virtualized template (query, seed) structures as an extension to common search methods, such as fingerprint and pharmacophore graph-based similarity searches. We demonstrate that template virtualization by bioisosteric enumeration and other rule-based methods, in combination with standard similarity search techniques, represents a powerful approach for hit expansion following high-throughput screening campaigns. The reliability of the methods is demonstrated by four different test data sets representing different target classes and two hit finding case studies on the epigenetic targets G9a and LSD1.

  15. Does similarity in call structure or foraging ecology explain interspecific information transfer in wild Myotis bats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügel, Theresa; van Meir, Vincent; Muñoz-Meneses, Amanda; Clarin, B-Markus; Siemers, Björn M; Goerlitz, Holger R

    2017-01-01

    Animals can gain important information by attending to the signals and cues of other animals in their environment, with acoustic information playing a major role in many taxa. Echolocation call sequences of bats contain information about the identity and behaviour of the sender which is perceptible to close-by receivers. Increasing evidence supports the communicative function of echolocation within species, yet data about its role for interspecific information transfer is scarce. Here, we asked which information bats extract from heterospecific echolocation calls during foraging. In three linked playback experiments, we tested in the flight room and field if foraging Myotis bats approached the foraging call sequences of conspecifics and four heterospecifics that were similar in acoustic call structure only (acoustic similarity hypothesis), in foraging ecology only (foraging similarity hypothesis), both, or none. Compared to the natural prey capture rate of 1.3 buzzes per minute of bat activity, our playbacks of foraging sequences with 23-40 buzzes/min simulated foraging patches with significantly higher profitability. In the flight room, M. capaccinii only approached call sequences of conspecifics and of the heterospecific M. daubentonii with similar acoustics and foraging ecology. In the field, M. capaccinii and M. daubentonii only showed a weak positive response to those two species. Our results confirm information transfer across species boundaries and highlight the importance of context on the studied behaviour, but cannot resolve whether information transfer in trawling Myotis is based on acoustic similarity only or on a combination of similarity in acoustics and foraging ecology. Animals transfer information, both voluntarily and inadvertently, and within and across species boundaries. In echolocating bats, acoustic call structure and foraging ecology are linked, making echolocation calls a rich source of information about species identity, ecology and

  16. Searching the protein structure database for ligand-binding site similarities using CPASS v.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caprez Adam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent analysis of protein sequences deposited in the NCBI RefSeq database indicates that ~8.5 million protein sequences are encoded in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, where ~30% are explicitly annotated as "hypothetical" or "uncharacterized" protein. Our Comparison of Protein Active-Site Structures (CPASS v.2 database and software compares the sequence and structural characteristics of experimentally determined ligand binding sites to infer a functional relationship in the absence of global sequence or structure similarity. CPASS is an important component of our Functional Annotation Screening Technology by NMR (FAST-NMR protocol and has been successfully applied to aid the annotation of a number of proteins of unknown function. Findings We report a major upgrade to our CPASS software and database that significantly improves its broad utility. CPASS v.2 is designed with a layered architecture to increase flexibility and portability that also enables job distribution over the Open Science Grid (OSG to increase speed. Similarly, the CPASS interface was enhanced to provide more user flexibility in submitting a CPASS query. CPASS v.2 now allows for both automatic and manual definition of ligand-binding sites and permits pair-wise, one versus all, one versus list, or list versus list comparisons. Solvent accessible surface area, ligand root-mean square difference, and Cβ distances have been incorporated into the CPASS similarity function to improve the quality of the results. The CPASS database has also been updated. Conclusions CPASS v.2 is more than an order of magnitude faster than the original implementation, and allows for multiple simultaneous job submissions. Similarly, the CPASS database of ligand-defined binding sites has increased in size by ~ 38%, dramatically increasing the likelihood of a positive search result. The modification to the CPASS similarity function is effective in reducing CPASS similarity scores

  17. Structure Learning in Power Distribution Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deka, Deepjyoti [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-13

    Traditionally power distribution networks are either not observable or only partially observable. This complicates development and implementation of new smart grid technologies, such as these related to demand response, outage detection and management, and improved load-monitoring. Here, inspired by proliferation of the metering technology, we discuss statistical estimation problems in structurally loopy but operationally radial distribution grids consisting in learning operational layout of the network from measurements, e.g. voltage data, which are either already available or can be made available with a relatively minor investment. Our newly suggested algorithms apply to a wide range of realistic scenarios. The algorithms are also computationally efficient – polynomial in time – which is proven theoretically and illustrated computationally on a number of test cases. The technique developed can be applied to detect line failures in real time as well as to understand the scope of possible adversarial attacks on the grid.

  18. The complex channel networks of bone structure

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Beletti, Marcelo E

    2006-01-01

    Bone structure in mammals involves a complex network of channels (Havers and Volkmann channels) required to nourish the bone marrow cells. This work describes how three-dimensional reconstructions of such systems can be obtained and represented in terms of complex networks. Three important findings are reported: (i) the fact that the channel branching density resembles a power law implies the existence of distribution hubs; (ii) the conditional node degree density indicates a clear tendency of connection between nodes with degrees 2 and 4; and (iii) the application of the recently introduced concept of hierarchical clustering coefficient allows the identification of typical scales of channel redistribution. A series of important biological insights is drawn and discussed

  19. RxnFinder: biochemical reaction search engines using molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian-Nan; Deng, Zhe; Hu, Huanan; Cao, Dong-Sheng; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions play a key role to help sustain life and allow cells to grow. RxnFinder was developed to search biochemical reactions from KEGG reaction database using three search criteria: molecular structures, molecular fragments and reaction similarity. RxnFinder is helpful to get reference reactions for biosynthesis and xenobiotics metabolism. RxnFinder is freely available via: http://sdd.whu.edu.cn/rxnfinder. qnhu@whu.edu.cn.

  20. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans made by different basement-membrane-producing tumors have immunological and structural similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R; Hassell, J R

    1985-01-01

    Using immunological assays, we determined the relationship between the heparan sulfate proteoglycans produced by two different murine basement-membrane-producing tumors, i.e., the mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) tumor and the L2 rat yolk-sac tumor. Antibodies prepared against the heparan sulfat...... an immunologically and structurally similar type of high-molecular-weight heparan sulfate proteoglycan which subsequently becomes incorporated into basement-membrane-like material....

  1. Self-similarities of periodic structures for a discrete model of a two-gene system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, S.L.T. de, E-mail: thomaz@ufsj.edu.br [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Lima, A.A. [Escola de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Medrano-T, R.O. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Guimarães-Filho, Z.O. [Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS PIIM UMR6633, International Institute for Fusion Science, Marseille (France)

    2012-03-12

    We report self-similar properties of periodic structures remarkably organized in the two-parameter space for a two-gene system, described by two-dimensional symmetric map. The map consists of difference equations derived from the chemical reactions for gene expression and regulation. We characterize the system by using Lyapunov exponents and isoperiodic diagrams identifying periodic windows, denominated Arnold tongues and shrimp-shaped structures. Period-adding sequences are observed for both periodic windows. We also identify Fibonacci-type series and Golden ratio for Arnold tongues, and period multiple-of-three windows for shrimps. -- Highlights: ► The existence of noticeable periodic windows has been reported recently for several nonlinear systems. ► The periodic window distributions appear highly organized in two-parameter space. ► We characterize self-similar properties of Arnold tongues and shrimps for a two-gene model. ► We determine the period of the Arnold tongues recognizing a Fibonacci-type sequence. ► We explore self-similar features of the shrimps identifying multiple period-three structures.

  2. The network structure of human personality according to the NEO-PI-R: matching network community structure to factor structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Goekoop

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. AIM: To directly compare the ability of network community detection (NCD and principal component factor analysis (PCA to examine modularity in multidimensional datasets such as the neuroticism-extraversion-openness personality inventory revised (NEO-PI-R. METHODS: 434 healthy subjects were tested on the NEO-PI-R. PCA was performed to extract factor structures (FS of the current dataset using both item scores and facet scores. Correlational network graphs were constructed from univariate correlation matrices of interactions between both items and facets. These networks were pruned in a link-by-link fashion while calculating the network community structure (NCS of each resulting network using the Wakita Tsurumi clustering algorithm. NCSs were matched against FS and networks of best matches were kept for further analysis. RESULTS: At facet level, NCS showed a best match (96.2% with a 'confirmatory' 5-FS. At item level, NCS showed a best match (80% with the standard 5-FS and involved a total of 6 network clusters. Lesser matches were found with 'confirmatory' 5-FS and 'exploratory' 6-FS of the current dataset. Network analysis did not identify facets as a separate level of organization in between items and clusters. A small-world network structure was found in both item- and facet level networks. CONCLUSION: We present the first optimized network graph of personality traits according to the NEO-PI-R: a 'Personality Web'. Such a web may represent the possible routes that subjects can take during personality development. NCD outperforms PCA by producing plausible modularity at item level in non-standard datasets, and can identify the key roles of individual items and clusters in the network.

  3. The Network Structure of Human Personality According to the NEO-PI-R: Matching Network Community Structure to Factor Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekoop, Rutger; Goekoop, Jaap G.; Scholte, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions) found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. Aim To directly compare the ability of network community detection (NCD) and principal component factor analysis (PCA) to examine modularity in multidimensional datasets such as the neuroticism-extraversion-openness personality inventory revised (NEO-PI-R). Methods 434 healthy subjects were tested on the NEO-PI-R. PCA was performed to extract factor structures (FS) of the current dataset using both item scores and facet scores. Correlational network graphs were constructed from univariate correlation matrices of interactions between both items and facets. These networks were pruned in a link-by-link fashion while calculating the network community structure (NCS) of each resulting network using the Wakita Tsurumi clustering algorithm. NCSs were matched against FS and networks of best matches were kept for further analysis. Results At facet level, NCS showed a best match (96.2%) with a ‘confirmatory’ 5-FS. At item level, NCS showed a best match (80%) with the standard 5-FS and involved a total of 6 network clusters. Lesser matches were found with ‘confirmatory’ 5-FS and ‘exploratory’ 6-FS of the current dataset. Network analysis did not identify facets as a separate level of organization in between items and clusters. A small-world network structure was found in both item- and facet level networks. Conclusion We present the first optimized network graph of personality traits according to the NEO-PI-R: a ‘Personality Web’. Such a web may represent the possible routes that subjects can take during personality development. NCD outperforms PCA by producing plausible modularity at item level in non-standard datasets, and can identify the key roles of individual items and clusters in the network. PMID:23284713

  4. The network structure of human personality according to the NEO-PI-R: matching network community structure to factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekoop, Rutger; Goekoop, Jaap G; Scholte, H Steven

    2012-01-01

    Human personality is described preferentially in terms of factors (dimensions) found using factor analysis. An alternative and highly related method is network analysis, which may have several advantages over factor analytic methods. To directly compare the ability of network community detection (NCD) and principal component factor analysis (PCA) to examine modularity in multidimensional datasets such as the neuroticism-extraversion-openness personality inventory revised (NEO-PI-R). 434 healthy subjects were tested on the NEO-PI-R. PCA was performed to extract factor structures (FS) of the current dataset using both item scores and facet scores. Correlational network graphs were constructed from univariate correlation matrices of interactions between both items and facets. These networks were pruned in a link-by-link fashion while calculating the network community structure (NCS) of each resulting network using the Wakita Tsurumi clustering algorithm. NCSs were matched against FS and networks of best matches were kept for further analysis. At facet level, NCS showed a best match (96.2%) with a 'confirmatory' 5-FS. At item level, NCS showed a best match (80%) with the standard 5-FS and involved a total of 6 network clusters. Lesser matches were found with 'confirmatory' 5-FS and 'exploratory' 6-FS of the current dataset. Network analysis did not identify facets as a separate level of organization in between items and clusters. A small-world network structure was found in both item- and facet level networks. We present the first optimized network graph of personality traits according to the NEO-PI-R: a 'Personality Web'. Such a web may represent the possible routes that subjects can take during personality development. NCD outperforms PCA by producing plausible modularity at item level in non-standard datasets, and can identify the key roles of individual items and clusters in the network.

  5. Mesoscopic structures reveal the network between the layers of multiplex data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Wu, Zhihao; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-10-01

    Multiplex networks describe a large variety of complex systems, whose elements (nodes) can be connected by different types of interactions forming different layers (networks) of the multiplex. Multiplex networks include social networks, transportation networks, or biological networks in the cell or in the brain. Extracting relevant information from these networks is of crucial importance for solving challenging inference problems and for characterizing the multiplex networks microscopic and mesoscopic structure. Here we propose an information theory method to extract the network between the layers of multiplex data sets, forming a "network of networks." We build an indicator function, based on the entropy of network ensembles, to characterize the mesoscopic similarities between the layers of a multiplex network, and we use clustering techniques to characterize the communities present in this network of networks. We apply the proposed method to study the Multiplex Collaboration Network formed by scientists collaborating on different subjects and publishing in the American Physical Society journals. The analysis of this data set reveals the interplay between the collaboration networks and the organization of knowledge in physics.

  6. The High Security Mechanisms Algorithm of Similarity Metrics for Wireless and Mobile Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of human society and the development of Internet of things, wireless and mobile networking have been applied to every field of scientific research and social production. In this scenario, security and privacy have become the decisive factors. The traditional safety mechanisms give criminals an opportunity to exploit. Association rules are an important topic in data mining, and they have a broad application prospect in wireless and mobile networking as they can discover interesting correlations between items hidden in a large number of data. Apriori, the most influential algorithm of association rules mining, needs to scan a database many times, and the efficiency is low when the database is huge. To solve the security mechanisms problem and improve the efficiency, this paper proposes a new algorithm. The new algorithm scans the database only one time and the scale of data to deal with is getting smaller and smaller with the algorithm running. Experiment results show that the new algorithm can efficiently discover useful association rules when applied to data.

  7. MOCASSIN-prot: A multi-objective clustering approach for protein similarity networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteins often include multiple conserved domains. Various evolutionary events including duplication and loss of domains, domain shuffling, as well as sequence divergence contribute to generating complexities in protein structures. A large variation exists, for example, in the numbers, combinations,...

  8. Stable Matching with Incomplete Information in Structured Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Ying; Wan, Tao; Qin, Zengchang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate stable matching in structured networks. Consider case of matching in social networks where candidates are not fully connected. A candidate on one side of the market gets acquaintance with which one on the heterogeneous side depends on the structured network. We explore four well-used structures of networks and define the social circle by the distance between each candidate. When matching within social circle, we have equilibrium distinguishes from each other sinc...

  9. New product forecasting demand by using neural networks and similar product analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso T. Sarmiento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación presenta una metodología para pronosticar productos nuevos que combina el pronóstico de productos similares. La parte cuantitativa del método usa una red neuronal artificial para calcular el pronóstico de cada producto similar. Estos pronósticos individuales son combinados usando una técnica cualitativa basada en un factor que mide la similaridad entre los productos análogos y el producto nuevo. Para ilustrar la metodología se presenta un caso de estudio de dos grandes compañías multinacionales en el sector de alimentos. Los resultados de este estudio mostraron en el 86 por ciento de los casos analizados pronósticos más exactos usando el método propuesto.

  10. Investigation of Time Series Representations and Similarity Measures for Structural Damage Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the time series representation methods and similarity measures for sensor data feature extraction and structural damage pattern recognition. Both model-based time series representation and dimensionality reduction methods are studied to compare the effectiveness of feature extraction for damage pattern recognition. The evaluation of feature extraction methods is performed by examining the separation of feature vectors among different damage patterns and the pattern recognition success rate. In addition, the impact of similarity measures on the pattern recognition success rate and the metrics for damage localization are also investigated. The test data used in this study are from the System Identification to Monitor Civil Engineering Structures (SIMCES Z24 Bridge damage detection tests, a rigorous instrumentation campaign that recorded the dynamic performance of a concrete box-girder bridge under progressively increasing damage scenarios. A number of progressive damage test case datasets and damage test data with different damage modalities are used. The simulation results show that both time series representation methods and similarity measures have significant impact on the pattern recognition success rate.

  11. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit...... a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework......Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships...

  12. Dynamics and control of diseases in networks with community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Salathé

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of infectious diseases spread via direct person-to-person transmission (such as influenza, smallpox, HIV/AIDS, etc. depends on the underlying host contact network. Human contact networks exhibit strong community structure. Understanding how such community structure affects epidemics may provide insights for preventing the spread of disease between communities by changing the structure of the contact network through pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical interventions. We use empirical and simulated networks to investigate the spread of disease in networks with community structure. We find that community structure has a major impact on disease dynamics, and we show that in networks with strong community structure, immunization interventions targeted at individuals bridging communities are more effective than those simply targeting highly connected individuals. Because the structure of relevant contact networks is generally not known, and vaccine supply is often limited, there is great need for efficient vaccination algorithms that do not require full knowledge of the network. We developed an algorithm that acts only on locally available network information and is able to quickly identify targets for successful immunization intervention. The algorithm generally outperforms existing algorithms when vaccine supply is limited, particularly in networks with strong community structure. Understanding the spread of infectious diseases and designing optimal control strategies is a major goal of public health. Social networks show marked patterns of community structure, and our results, based on empirical and simulated data, demonstrate that community structure strongly affects disease dynamics. These results have implications for the design of control strategies.

  13. Structural Similarity between Defense Peptide from Wheat and Scorpion Neurotoxin Permits Rational Functional Design*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkut, Antonina A.; Usmanova, Dinara R.; Peigneur, Steve; Oparin, Peter B.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Odintsova, Tatyana I.; Tytgat, Jan; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Grishin, Eugene V.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present the spatial structure of the wheat antimicrobial peptide (AMP) Tk-AMP-X2 studied using NMR spectroscopy. This peptide was found to adopt a disulfide-stabilized α-helical hairpin fold and therefore belongs to the α-hairpinin family of plant defense peptides. Based on Tk-AMP-X2 structural similarity to cone snail and scorpion potassium channel blockers, a mutant molecule, Tk-hefu, was engineered by incorporating the functionally important residues from κ-hefutoxin 1 onto the Tk-AMP-X2 scaffold. The designed peptide contained the so-called essential dyad of amino acid residues significant for channel-blocking activity. Electrophysiological studies showed that although the parent peptide Tk-AMP-X2 did not present any activity against potassium channels, Tk-hefu blocked Kv1.3 channels with similar potency (IC50 ∼ 35 μm) to κ-hefutoxin 1 (IC50 ∼ 40 μm). We conclude that α-hairpinins are attractive in their simplicity as structural templates, which may be used for functional engineering and drug design. PMID:24671422

  14. Structural similarity between defense peptide from wheat and scorpion neurotoxin permits rational functional design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkut, Antonina A; Usmanova, Dinara R; Peigneur, Steve; Oparin, Peter B; Mineev, Konstantin S; Odintsova, Tatyana I; Tytgat, Jan; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2014-05-16

    In this study, we present the spatial structure of the wheat antimicrobial peptide (AMP) Tk-AMP-X2 studied using NMR spectroscopy. This peptide was found to adopt a disulfide-stabilized α-helical hairpin fold and therefore belongs to the α-hairpinin family of plant defense peptides. Based on Tk-AMP-X2 structural similarity to cone snail and scorpion potassium channel blockers, a mutant molecule, Tk-hefu, was engineered by incorporating the functionally important residues from κ-hefutoxin 1 onto the Tk-AMP-X2 scaffold. The designed peptide contained the so-called essential dyad of amino acid residues significant for channel-blocking activity. Electrophysiological studies showed that although the parent peptide Tk-AMP-X2 did not present any activity against potassium channels, Tk-hefu blocked Kv1.3 channels with similar potency (IC50 ∼ 35 μm) to κ-hefutoxin 1 (IC50 ∼ 40 μm). We conclude that α-hairpinins are attractive in their simplicity as structural templates, which may be used for functional engineering and drug design. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Structural similarity index family for image quality assessment in radiological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renieblas, Gabriel Prieto; Nogués, Agustín Turrero; González, Alberto Muñoz; Gómez-Leon, Nieves; Del Castillo, Eduardo Guibelalde

    2017-07-01

    The structural similarity index (SSIM) family is a set of metrics that has demonstrated good agreement with human observers in tasks using reference images. These metrics analyze the viewing distance, edge information between the reference and the test images, changed and preserved edges, textures, and structural similarity of the images. Eight metrics based on that family are proposed. This new set of metrics, together with another eight well-known SSIM family metrics, was tested to predict human performance in some specific tasks closely related to the evaluation of radiological medical images. We used a database of radiological images, comprising different acquisition techniques (MRI and plain films). This database was distorted with different types of distortions (Gaussian blur, noise, etc.) and different levels of degradation. These images were analyzed by a board of radiologists with a double-stimulus methodology, and their results were compared with those obtained from the 16 metrics analyzed and proposed in this research. Our experimental results showed that the readings of human observers were sensitive to the changes and preservation of the edge information between the reference and test images, changes and preservation in the texture, structural component of the images, and simulation of multiple viewing distances. These results showed that several metrics that apply this multifactorial approach (4-G-SSIM, 4-MS-G-SSIM, [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) can be used as good surrogates of a radiologist to analyze the medical quality of an image in an environment with a reference image.

  16. Identification of Non-Linear Structures using Recurrent Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Hansen, H. I.

    1995-01-01

    Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure.......Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure....

  17. Identification of Non-Linear Structures using Recurrent Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Hansen, H. I.

    Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure.......Two different partially recurrent neural networks structured as Multi Layer Perceptrons (MLP) are investigated for time domain identification of a non-linear structure....

  18. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application.

  19. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application. PMID:26030186

  20. Predicting the Risk of Biological Invasions Using Environmental Similarity and Transport Network Connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Robert C; Ross, Joshua V; Wittmann, Talia A; Watts, Michael J; Cassey, Phillip

    2017-08-10

    Understanding the risk of biological invasions associated with particular transport pathways and source regions is critical for implementing effective biosecurity management. This may require both a model for physical connectedness between regions, and a measure of environmental similarity, so as to quantify the potential for a species to be transported from a given region and to survive at a destination region. We present an analysis of integrated biosecurity risk into Australia, based on flights and shipping data from each global geopolitical region, and an adaptation of the "range bagging" method to determine environmental matching between regions. Here, we describe global patterns of environmental matching and highlight those regions with many physical connections. We classify patterns of global invasion risk (high to low) into Australian states and territories. We validate our analysis by comparison with global presence data for 844 phytophagous insect pest species, and produce a list of high-risk species not previously known to be present in Australia. We determined that, of the insect pest species used for validation, the species most likely to be present in Australia were those also present in geopolitical regions with high transport connectivity to Australia, and those regions that were geographically close, and had similar environments. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Similar Endothelial Glycocalyx Structures in Microvessels from a Range of Mammalian Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arkill, K P; Knupp, C; Michel, C C

    2011-01-01

    , with a center-to-center fiber spacing of 20 nm and a fiber width of 12 nm, which might explain the observed macromolecular filtering properties. In this study, we used electron micrographs of tissues prepared using perfusion fixation and tannic acid treatment. The digitized images were analyzed using...... lateral spacings at ~19.5 nm (possibly in a quasitetragonal lattice) and longer spacings above 100 nm. Individual glycocalyx tufts above fenestrations in the first three of these tissues and also in stomach fundus and jejunum showed evidence for similar short-range structural regularity, but with more...

  2. Macroblock Layer Rate Control Based on Structural Similarity and Mean Absolute Difference for H.264

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of the H.264 video coding, special attention should be paid to the subjective quality of the image. This paper applies the structural similarity (SSIM based subjective evaluation to the rate control in the H.264 coding and proposes to combine the SSIM and the mean absolute difference (MAD to perform the macroblock layer bit allocation instead of the MAD. Experimental results show that the proposed method is correlating better with the human visual system and thus achieves better subjective image quality.

  3. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pernice, Volker; Staude, Benjamin; Cardanobile, Stefano; Rotter, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting...

  4. Towards structural controllability of local-world networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shiwen, E-mail: sunsw80@126.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Intelligence Computing and Novel Software Technology, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Computer Vision and System (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China); Ma, Yilin; Wu, Yafang; Wang, Li; Xia, Chengyi [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Intelligence Computing and Novel Software Technology, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Computer Vision and System (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Controlling complex networks is of vital importance in science and engineering. Meanwhile, local-world effect is an important ingredient which should be taken into consideration in the complete description of real-world complex systems. In this letter, structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. Through extensive numerical simulations, firstly, effects of local world size M and network size N on structural controllability are examined. For local-world networks with sparse topological configuration, compared to network size, local-world size can induce stronger influence on controllability, however, for dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and local-world effect can be neglected. Secondly, relationships between controllability and topological properties are analyzed. Lastly, the robustness of local-world networks under targeted attacks regarding structural controllability is discussed. These results can help to deepen the understanding of structural complexity and connectivity patterns of complex systems. - Highlights: • Structural controllability of a class of local-world networks is investigated. • For sparse local-world networks, compared to network size, local-world size can bring stronger influence on controllability. • For dense networks, controllability is greatly affected by network size and the effect of local-world size can be neglected. • Structural controllability against targeted node attacks is discussed.

  5. On the Structural Similarity of Stable Forms of Spiral-Vortex Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanova, O. V.

    2017-09-01

    On the basis of the thermodynamic approach, inferences of the stability theory, and the method of dimensional analysis, we have obtained analytical dependences defining the relations between geometric sizes and rotation frequencies in three-dimensional spiral-vortex formations. To describe the vortex structure of the swirling flow of viscous and nonviscous fluids, we propose to introduce into consideration the notion the order parameter. It has been shown that helicity as a characteristic of the measure of decrease in the symmetry of a moving medium connected with its order is not only an invariant of the vortex flow of nonviscous media, but can also be used as the order parameter for describing the geometrical similarity of spiral-vortex structures in real fluids.

  6. Environmental complexity influences association network structure and network-based diffusion of foraging information in fish shoals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Mike M; Atton, Nicola; Hoppitt, William J E; Laland, Kevin N

    2013-02-01

    Socially transmitted information can significantly affect the ways in which animals interact with their environments. We used network-based diffusion analysis, a novel and powerful tool for exploring information transmission, to model the rate at which sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) discovered prey patches, comparing shoals foraging in open and structured environments. We found that for groups in the open environment, individuals tended to recruit to both the prey patch and empty comparison patches at similar times, suggesting that patch discovery was not greatly affected by direct social transmission. In contrast, in structured environments we found strong evidence that information about prey patch location was socially transmitted and moreover that the pathway of information transmission followed the shoals' association network structures. Our findings highlight the importance of considering habitat structure when investigating the diffusion of information through populations and imply that association networks take on greater ecological significance in structured than open environments.

  7. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance. PMID:27352101

  8. Social inheritance can explain the structure of animal social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Akçay, Erol

    2016-06-28

    The social network structure of animal populations has major implications for survival, reproductive success, sexual selection and pathogen transmission of individuals. But as of yet, no general theory of social network structure exists that can explain the diversity of social networks observed in nature, and serve as a null model for detecting species and population-specific factors. Here we propose a simple and generally applicable model of social network structure. We consider the emergence of network structure as a result of social inheritance, in which newborns are likely to bond with maternal contacts, and via forming bonds randomly. We compare model output with data from several species, showing that it can generate networks with properties such as those observed in real social systems. Our model demonstrates that important observed properties of social networks, including heritability of network position or assortative associations, can be understood as consequences of social inheritance.

  9. PROSPECTS OF REGIONAL NETWORK STRUCTURES IN THE SOUTHERN FEDERAL DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Morozov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the possibility of the Southern Federal District to form regional network structures. The prospects for the formation of networks in the region in relation to the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014.

  10. Effect of edge pruning on structural controllability and observability of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengiste, Simachew Abebe; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-12-01

    Controllability and observability of complex systems are vital concepts in many fields of science. The network structure of the system plays a crucial role in determining its controllability and observability. Because most naturally occurring complex systems show dynamic changes in their network connectivity, it is important to understand how perturbations in the connectivity affect the controllability of the system. To this end, we studied the control structure of different types of artificial, social and biological neuronal networks (BNN) as their connections were progressively pruned using four different pruning strategies. We show that the BNNs are more similar to scale-free networks than to small-world networks, when comparing the robustness of their control structure to structural perturbations. We introduce a new graph descriptor, ‘the cardinality curve’, to quantify the robustness of the control structure of a network to progressive edge pruning. Knowing the susceptibility of control structures to different pruning methods could help design strategies to destroy the control structures of dangerous networks such as epidemic networks. On the other hand, it could help make useful networks more resistant to edge attacks.

  11. Finding the Sweet Spot: Network Structures and Processes for Increased Knowledge Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Briscoe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of networks in public education is one of a number of knowledge mobilization (KMb strategies utilized to promote evidence-based research into practice. However, challenges exist in the ability to effectively mobilizing knowledge through external partnership networks. The purpose of this paper is to further explore how networks work. Data was collected from virtual discussions for an interim report for a province-wide government initiative. A secondary analysis of the data was performed. The findings present network structures and processes that partners were engaged in when building a network within education. The implications of this study show that building a network for successful outcomes is complex and metaphorically similar to finding the “sweet spot.” It is challenging but networks that used strategies to align structures and processes proved to achieve more success in mobilizing research to practice.

  12. The parietal memory network activates similarly for true and associative false recognition elicited via the DRM procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Kathleen B; Gilmore, Adrian W; Nelson, Steven M; Watson, Jason M; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2017-02-01

    Neuroimaging investigations of human memory encoding and retrieval have revealed that multiple regions of parietal cortex contribute to memory. Recently, a sparse network of regions within parietal cortex has been identified using resting state functional connectivity (MRI techniques). The regions within this network exhibit consistent task-related responses during memory formation and retrieval, leading to its being called the parietal memory network (PMN). Among its signature patterns are: deactivation during initial experience with an item (e.g., encoding); activation during subsequent repetitions (e.g., at retrieval); greater activation for successfully retrieved familiar words than novel words (e.g., hits relative to correctly-rejected lures). The question of interest here is whether novel words that are subjectively experienced as having been recently studied would elicit PMN activation similar to that of hits. That is, we compared old items correctly recognized to two types of novel items on a recognition test: those correctly identified as new and those incorrectly labeled as old due to their strong associative relation to the studied words (in the DRM false memory protocol). Subjective oldness plays a strong role in driving activation, as hits and false alarms activated similarly (and greater than correctly-rejected lures). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting and validating protein interactions using network structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yang Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions play a vital part in the function of a cell. As experimental techniques for detection and validation of protein interactions are time consuming, there is a need for computational methods for this task. Protein interactions appear to form a network with a relatively high degree of local clustering. In this paper we exploit this clustering by suggesting a score based on triplets of observed protein interactions. The score utilises both protein characteristics and network properties. Our score based on triplets is shown to complement existing techniques for predicting protein interactions, outperforming them on data sets which display a high degree of clustering. The predicted interactions score highly against test measures for accuracy. Compared to a similar score derived from pairwise interactions only, the triplet score displays higher sensitivity and specificity. By looking at specific examples, we show how an experimental set of interactions can be enriched and validated. As part of this work we also examine the effect of different prior databases upon the accuracy of prediction and find that the interactions from the same kingdom give better results than from across kingdoms, suggesting that there may be fundamental differences between the networks. These results all emphasize that network structure is important and helps in the accurate prediction of protein interactions. The protein interaction data set and the program used in our analysis, and a list of predictions and validations, are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/bioinfo/resources/PredictingInteractions.

  14. Community Structure in Time-Dependent, Multiscale, and Multiplex Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mucha, Peter J; Richardson, Thomas; Macon, Kevin; Porter, Mason A.; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2009-01-01

    Network science is an interdisciplinary endeavor, with methods and applications drawn from across the natural, social, and information sciences. A prominent problem in network science is the algorithmic detection of tightly-connected groups of nodes known as communities. We developed a generalized framework of network quality functions that allowed us to study the community structure of arbitrary multislice networks, which are combinations of individual networks coupled through links that con...

  15. Parton Distribution Functions and models of proton structure functions with self-similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D. K.; Saikia, Baishali

    2016-11-01

    Sometime back, a self-similarity based model of the proton structure function at small x was proposed by Lastovicka. We make reanalysis of this model with most recent HERA data. No significance difference with the earlier analysis is found. Both the analyses have singularity within the kinematical range of x: 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. We therefore study the model with the additional assumption that it should be singularity free, imposing positivity conditions on the model parameters. This results in a new model which is, however, phenomenologically valid only in a limited low Q2 range. We therefore make further generalization of the defining self-similar unintegrated Parton Density Function (uPDF) and show that the with proper generalizations and initial conditions on them not only remove the undesired singularity but also results in a structure function with logarithmic growth in Q2 closer to QCD. The phenomenological range of validity is then found to be much larger than the earlier versions. We also extrapolate the models to large x in a parameter-free way. The possibility of incorporation of Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) PDF in this approach is explored as well.

  16. A Decomposition Algorithm for Learning Bayesian Network Structures from Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Cordero Hernandez, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    It is a challenging task of learning a large Bayesian network from a small data set. Most conventional structural learning approaches run into the computational as well as the statistical problems. We propose a decomposition algorithm for the structure construction without having to learn...... the complete network. The new learning algorithm firstly finds local components from the data, and then recover the complete network by joining the learned components. We show the empirical performance of the decomposition algorithm in several benchmark networks....

  17. Wake structure and similar behavior of wake profiles downstream of a plunging airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. DAVARI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Very limited attention has already been paid to the velocity behavior in the wake region in unsteady aerodynamic problems. A series of tests has been performed on a flapping airfoil in a subsonic wind tunnel to study the wake structure for different sets of mean angle of attack, plunging amplitude and reduced frequency. In this study, the velocity profiles in the wake for various oscillation parameters have been measured using a wide shoulder rake, especially designed for the present experiments. The airfoil under consideration was a critical section of a 660 kW wind turbine. The results show that for a flapping airfoil the wake structure can be of drag producing type, thrust producing or neutral, depending on the mean angle of attack, oscillation amplitude and reduced frequency. In a thrust producing wake, a high-momentum high-velocity jet flow is formed in the core region of the wake instead of the conventional low-momentum flow. As a result, the drag force normally experienced by the body due to the momentum deficit would be replaced by a thrust force. According to the results, the momentum loss in the wake decreases as the reduced frequency increases. The thrust producing wake pattern for the flapping airfoil has been observed for sufficiently low angles of attack in the absence of the viscous effects. This phenomenon has also been observed for either high oscillation amplitudes or high reduced frequencies. According to the results, for different reduced frequencies and plunging amplitudes, such that the product of them be a constant, the velocity profiles exhibit similar behavior and coalesce on each other. This similarity parameter works excellently at small angles of attack. However, at near stall boundaries, the similarity is not as evident as before.

  18. Seismodynamics of extended underground structures and soils: Statement of the problem and self-similar solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgievskii, D. V.; Israilov, M. Sh.

    2015-07-01

    In the problems of common vibrations of extended underground structures (pipelines and tunnels) and soil, an approach of the one-dimensional deformation of the medium is developed; this approach is based on the assumption that the soil deformation in the direction of seismic wave propagation coinciding with the pipeline axis is prevailing. The analytic solutions are obtained in the cases where the wave velocity in the soil is respectively less or greater than the wave velocity in the pipeline. The parameters influencing the pipeline fracture are revealed and methods for increasing the seismic stability of such structures are given. The possibility of the pipeline fatigue fracture is pointed out. The statements and solutions of parabolic problems modeling the physical phenomena in soils in the case of discontinuous velocity on the boundaries at the initial time are given. The notion of generalized vorticity diffusion is introduced and the cases of self-similarity existence are classified. A detailed analysis is performed for the non-Newtonian polynomial fluid, the medium close in properties to the rigidly ideally plastic body, and the viscoplastic Shvedov—Bingham body. In the case of physically linear medium, new self-similar solutions are obtained which describe the process of unsteady axially symmetric shear in spherical coordinates. The first approximation to the asymptotic solution of the problem of the vortex sheet diffusion is constructed in a medium with small polynomial nonlinearity. The solutions polynomially decreasing to zero as the self-similar variable increases are proposed in the class of two-constant fluids.

  19. Fracture network topology and characterization of structural permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, Rowan; King, Rosalind; Holford, Simon

    2017-04-01

    There are two fundamental requirements for successful geothermal development: elevated temperatures at accessible depths, and a reservoir from which fluids can be extracted. The Australian geothermal sector has successfully targeted shallow heat, however, due in part to the inherent complexity of targeting permeability, obtaining adequate flow rates for commercial production has been problematic. Deep sedimentary aquifers are unlikely to be viable geothermal resources due to the effects of diagenetic mineral growth on rock permeability. Therefore, it is likely structural permeability targets, exploiting natural or induced fracture networks will provide the primary means for fluid flow in geothermal, as well as unconventional gas, reservoirs. Recent research has focused on the pattern and generation of crustal stresses across Australia, while less is known about the resultant networks of faults, joints, and veins that can constitute interconnected sub-surface permeability pathways. The ability of a fracture to transmit fluid is controlled by the orientation and magnitude of the in-situ stress field that acts on the fracture walls, rock strength, and pore pressure, as well as fracture properties such as aperture, orientation, and roughness. Understanding the distribution, orientation and character of fractures is key to predicting structural permeability. This project focuses on extensive mapping of fractures over various scales in four key Australian basins (Cooper, Otway, Surat and Perth) with the potential to host geothermal resources. Seismic attribute analysis is used in concert with image logs from petroleum wells, and field mapping to identify fracture networks that are usually not resolved in traditional seismic interpretation. We use fracture network topology to provide scale-invariant characterisation of fracture networks from multiple data sources to assess similarity between data sources, and fracture network connectivity. These results are compared with

  20. Phenology drives mutualistic network structure and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Encinas Viso, Francisco; Revilla, Tomas A; Etienne, Rampal S.

    Several network properties have been identified as determinants of the stability and complexity of mutualistic networks. However, it is unclear which mechanisms give rise to these network properties. Phenology seems important, because it shapes the topology of mutualistic networks, but its effects

  1. Analysis of Ego Network Structure in Online Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaboldi, Valerio; Conti, Marco; Passarella, Andrea; Pezzoni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Results about offline social networks demonstrated that the social relationships that an individual (ego) maintains with other people (alters) can be organised into different groups according to the ego network model. In this model the ego can be seen as the centre of a series of layers of increasing size. Social relationships between ego and alters in layers close to ego are stronger than those belonging to more external layers. Online Social Networks are becoming a fundamental medium for hu...

  2. Development of Scaffold-Free Elastic Cartilaginous Constructs with Structural Similarities to Auricular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini-Rosa, Renata; Joazeiro, Paulo P.; Thomas, Kathryn; Collavino, Kristina; Weber, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    External ear reconstruction with autologous cartilage still remains one of the most difficult problems in the fields of plastic and reconstructive surgery. As the absence of tissue vascularization limits the ability to stimulate new tissue growth, relatively few surgical approaches are currently available (alloplastic implants or sculpted autologous cartilage grafts) to repair or reconstruct the auricle (or pinna) as a result of traumatic loss or congenital absence (e.g., microtia). Alternatively, tissue engineering can offer the potential to grow autogenous cartilage suitable for implantation. While tissue-engineered auricle cartilage constructs can be created, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for reconstruction. Similarly, as routine cell expansion can elicit negative effects on chondrocyte function, we have developed an approach to generate large-sized engineered auricle constructs (≥3 cm2) directly from a small population of donor cells (20,000–40,000 cells/construct). Using rabbit donor cells, the developed bioreactor-cultivated constructs adopted structural-like characteristics similar to native auricular cartilage, including the development of distinct cartilaginous and perichondrium-like regions. Both alterations in media composition and seeding density had profound effects on the formation of engineered elastic tissue constructs in terms of cellularity, extracellular matrix accumulation, and tissue structure. Higher seeding densities and media containing sodium bicarbonate produced tissue constructs that were closer to the native tissue in terms of structure and composition. Future studies will be aimed at improving the accumulation of specific tissue constituents and determining the clinical effectiveness of this approach using a reconstructive animal model. PMID:24124666

  3. Structural equation models from paths to networks

    CERN Document Server

    Westland, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This compact reference surveys the full range of available structural equation modeling (SEM) methodologies.  It reviews applications in a broad range of disciplines, particularly in the social sciences where many key concepts are not directly observable.  This is the first book to present SEM’s development in its proper historical context–essential to understanding the application, strengths and weaknesses of each particular method.  This book also surveys the emerging path and network approaches that complement and enhance SEM, and that will grow in importance in the near future.  SEM’s ability to accommodate unobservable theory constructs through latent variables is of significant importance to social scientists.  Latent variable theory and application are comprehensively explained, and methods are presented for extending their power, including guidelines for data preparation, sample size calculation, and the special treatment of Likert scale data.  Tables of software, methodologies and fit st...

  4. Trichomes: different regulatory networks lead to convergent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Laura; Martin, Cathie

    2006-06-01

    Sometimes, proteins, biological structures or even organisms have similar functions and appearances but have evolved through widely divergent pathways. There is experimental evidence to suggest that different developmental pathways have converged to produce similar outgrowths of the aerial plant epidermis, referred to as trichomes. The emerging picture suggests that trichomes in Arabidopsis thaliana and, perhaps, in cotton develop through a transcriptional regulatory network that differs from those regulating trichome formation in Antirrhinum and Solanaceous species. Several lines of evidence suggest that the duplication of a gene controlling anthocyanin production and subsequent divergence might be the major force driving trichome formation in Arabidopsis, whereas the multicellular trichomes of Antirrhinum and Solanaceous species appear to have a different regulatory origin.

  5. Ancient Structure in Africa Unlikely to Explain Neanderthal and Non-African Genetic Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Melinda A.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Durand, Eric Y.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-01-01

    Neanderthals have been shown to share more genetic variants with present-day non-Africans than Africans. Recent admixture between Neanderthals and modern humans outside of Africa was proposed as the most parsimonious explanation for this observation. However, the hypothesis of ancient population structure within Africa could not be ruled out as an alternative explanation. We use simulations to test whether the site frequency spectrum, conditioned on a derived Neanderthal and an ancestral Yoruba (African) nucleotide (the doubly conditioned site frequency spectrum [dcfs]), can distinguish between models that assume recent admixture or ancient population structure. We compare the simulations to the dcfs calculated from data taken from populations of European, Chinese, and Japanese descent in the Complete Genomics Diversity Panel. Simulations under a variety of plausible demographic parameters were used to examine the shape of the dcfs for both models. The observed shape of the dcfs cannot be explained by any set of parameter values used in the simulations of the ancient structure model. The dcfs simulations for the recent admixture model provide a good fit to the observed dcfs for non-Africans, thereby supporting the hypothesis that recent admixture with Neanderthals accounts for the greater similarity of Neanderthals to non-Africans than Africans. PMID:22513287

  6. Improving Separability of Structures with Similar Attributes in 2D Transfer Function Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shouren; Wang, Lisheng; Song, Yipeng; Wang, Yu-Ping; Yao, Liping; Sun, Kun; Xia, Bin; Xu, Zongben

    2017-05-01

    The 2D transfer function based on scalar value and gradient magnitude (SG-TF) is popularly used in volume rendering. However, it is plagued by the boundary-overlapping problem: different structures with similar attributes have the same region in SG-TF space, and their boundaries are usually connected. The SG-TF thus often fails in separating these structures (or their boundaries) and has limited ability to classify different objects in real-world 3D images. To overcome such a difficulty, we propose a novel method for boundary separation by integrating spatial connectivity computation of the boundaries and set operations on boundary voxels into the SG-TF. Specifically, spatial positions of boundaries and their regions in the SG-TF space are computed, from which boundaries can be well separated and volume rendered in different colors. In the method, the boundaries are divided into three classes and different boundary-separation techniques are applied to them, respectively. The complex task of separating various boundaries in 3D images is then simplified by breaking it into several small separation problems. The method shows good object classification ability in real-world 3D images while avoiding the complexity of high-dimensional transfer functions. Its effectiveness and validation is demonstrated by many experimental results to visualize boundaries of different structures in complex real-world 3D images.

  7. Ancient structure in Africa unlikely to explain Neanderthal and non-African genetic similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Melinda A; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Durand, Eric Y; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2012-10-01

    Neanderthals have been shown to share more genetic variants with present-day non-Africans than Africans. Recent admixture between Neanderthals and modern humans outside of Africa was proposed as the most parsimonious explanation for this observation. However, the hypothesis of ancient population structure within Africa could not be ruled out as an alternative explanation. We use simulations to test whether the site frequency spectrum, conditioned on a derived Neanderthal and an ancestral Yoruba (African) nucleotide (the doubly conditioned site frequency spectrum [dcfs]), can distinguish between models that assume recent admixture or ancient population structure. We compare the simulations to the dcfs calculated from data taken from populations of European, Chinese, and Japanese descent in the Complete Genomics Diversity Panel. Simulations under a variety of plausible demographic parameters were used to examine the shape of the dcfs for both models. The observed shape of the dcfs cannot be explained by any set of parameter values used in the simulations of the ancient structure model. The dcfs simulations for the recent admixture model provide a good fit to the observed dcfs for non-Africans, thereby supporting the hypothesis that recent admixture with Neanderthals accounts for the greater similarity of Neanderthals to non-Africans than Africans.

  8. Structure similarity-guided image binarization for automatic segmentation of epidermis surface microstructure images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y; Lei, B; Dong, F; Xu, G; Sun, S; Xia, P

    2017-05-01

    Partitioning epidermis surface microstructure (ESM) images into skin ridge and skin furrow regions is an important preprocessing step before quantitative analyses on ESM images. Binarization segmentation is a potential technique for partitioning ESM images because of its computational simplicity and ease of implementation. However, even for some state-of-the-art binarization methods, it remains a challenge to automatically segment ESM images, because the grey-level histograms of ESM images have no obvious external features to guide automatic assessment of appropriate thresholds. Inspired by human visual perceptual functions of structural feature extraction and comparison, we propose a structure similarity-guided image binarization method. The proposed method seeks for the binary image that best approximates the input ESM image in terms of structural features. The proposed method is validated by comparing it with two recently developed automatic binarization techniques as well as a manual binarization method on 20 synthetic noisy images and 30 ESM images. The experimental results show: (1) the proposed method possesses self-adaption ability to cope with different images with same grey-level histogram; (2) compared to two automatic binarization techniques, the proposed method significantly improves average accuracy in segmenting ESM images with an acceptable decrease in computational efficiency; (3) and the proposed method is applicable for segmenting practical EMS images. (Matlab code of the proposed method can be obtained by contacting with the corresponding author.). © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. A mathematical model for networks with structures in the mesoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Criado, Regino; Flores, Julio; Gacia Del Amo, Alejandro Jose; Gómez, Jesus; Romance, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The new concept of multilevel network is introduced in order to embody some topological properties of complex systems with structures in the mesoscale which are not completely captured by the classical models. This new model, which generalizes the hyper-network and hyper-structure models, fits perfectly with several real-life complex systems, including social and public transportation networks. We present an analysis of the structural properties of the mu...

  10. Evolving networks-Using past structure to predict the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Yan, Wei-sheng; Small, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies on link prediction have focused on using common neighbors to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. More broadly, research into the structural properties of evolving temporal networks and temporal link prediction methods have recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, for the first time, we examine the use of links between a pair of nodes to predict their common neighbors and analyze the relationship between the weight and the structure in static networks, evolving networks, and in the corresponding randomized networks. We propose both new unweighted and weighted prediction methods and use six kinds of real networks to test our algorithms. In unweighted networks, we find that if a pair of nodes connect to each other in the current network, they will have a higher probability to connect common nodes both in the current and the future networks-and the probability will decrease with the increase of the number of neighbors. Furthermore, we find that the original networks have their particular structure and statistical characteristics which benefit link prediction. In weighted networks, the prediction algorithm performance of networks which are dominated by human factors decrease with the decrease of weight and are in general better in static networks. Furthermore, we find that geographical position and link weight both have significant influence on the transport network. Moreover, the evolving financial network has the lowest predictability. In addition, we find that the structure of non-social networks has more robustness than social networks. The structure of engineering networks has both best predictability and also robustness.

  11. Network nestedness as generalized core-periphery structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The concept of nestedness, in particular for ecological and economical networks, has been introduced as a structural characteristic of real interacting systems. We suggest that the nestedness is in fact another way to express a mesoscale network property called the core-periphery structure. With real ecological mutualistic networks and synthetic model networks, we reveal the strong correlation between the nestedness and core-peripheriness, by defining the network-level measures for nestedness and core-peripheriness in case of weighted and bipartite networks. However, at the same time, via more sophisticated null-model analysis, we also discover that the degree (the number of connected neighbors of a node) distribution poses quite severe restrictions on the possible nestedness and core-peripheriness parameter space. Therefore, there must exist structurally interwoven properties in more fundamental levels of network formation, behind this seemingly obvious relation between nestedness and core-periphery structur...

  12. Structural similarities between the tradition of moral philosophy and Durkheim’s social theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marta González

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The first sociological theories are indebted to Enlightenment philosophy of history, which first appeared to provide a framework of meaning for moral action once moral theory had renounced the metaphysical commitments of early modern moral philosophy. While defending the autonomy of sociology from philosophy, Durkheim prescribed a specific task for sociological thought, namely: develop a moral science which, by keeping together the two features with which moral facts appear before conscience —solidarity and coercion— could account for the moral sense of the division of labour, a phenomenon previously considered almost a natural process. The purpose of this article is to show how Durkheim’s approach makes room for us to establish a structural similarity between sociological analysis and the perspective of mutual obligations characteristic of the moral philosophical tradition.

  13. Combining neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1995-01-01

    In this paper structured neural networks are applied to the problem of predicting the secondary structure of proteins. A hierarchical approach is used where specialized neural networks are designed for each structural class and then combined using another neural network. The submodels are designed...... by using a priori knowledge of the mapping between protein building blocks and the secondary structure and by using weight sharing. Since none of the individual networks have more than 600 adjustable weights over-fitting is avoided. When ensembles of specialized experts are combined the performance...

  14. Kinematic Structural Modelling in Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Alexander; de la Varga, Miguel; Florian Wellmann, J.

    2017-04-01

    We commonly capture our knowledge about the spatial distribution of distinct geological lithologies in the form of 3-D geological models. Several methods exist to create these models, each with its own strengths and limitations. We present here an approach to combine the functionalities of two modeling approaches - implicit interpolation and kinematic modelling methods - into one framework, while explicitly considering parameter uncertainties and thus model uncertainty. In recent work, we proposed an approach to implement implicit modelling algorithms into Bayesian networks. This was done to address the issues of input data uncertainty and integration of geological information from varying sources in the form of geological likelihood functions. However, one general shortcoming of implicit methods is that they usually do not take any physical constraints into consideration, which can result in unrealistic model outcomes and artifacts. On the other hand, kinematic structural modelling intends to reconstruct the history of a geological system based on physically driven kinematic events. This type of modelling incorporates simplified, physical laws into the model, at the cost of a substantial increment of usable uncertain parameters. In the work presented here, we show an integration of these two different modelling methodologies, taking advantage of the strengths of both of them. First, we treat the two types of models separately, capturing the information contained in the kinematic models and their specific parameters in the form of likelihood functions, in order to use them in the implicit modelling scheme. We then go further and combine the two modelling approaches into one single Bayesian network. This enables the direct flow of information between the parameters of the kinematic modelling step and the implicit modelling step and links the exclusive input data and likelihoods of the two different modelling algorithms into one probabilistic inference framework. In

  15. Reverse Logistics Network Structures and Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fleischmann (Moritz)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractLogistics network design is commonly recognized as a strategic supply chain issue of prime importance. The location of production facilities, storage concepts, and transportation strategies are major determinants of supply chain performance. This chapter considers logistics network

  16. The structure of replicating kinetoplast DNA networks

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), the mitochondrial DNA of Crithidia fasciculata and related trypanosomatids, is a network containing approximately 5,000 covalently closed minicircles which are topologically interlocked. kDNA synthesis involves release of covalently closed minicircles from the network, and, after replication of the free minicircles, reattachment of the nicked or gapped progeny minicircles to the network periphery. We have investigated this process by electron microscopy of networks at ...

  17. Network-based elucidation of human disease similarities reveals common functional modules enriched for pluripotent drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silpa Suthram

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Current work in elucidating relationships between diseases has largely been based on pre-existing knowledge of disease genes. Consequently, these studies are limited in their discovery of new and unknown disease relationships. We present the first quantitative framework to compare and contrast diseases by an integrated analysis of disease-related mRNA expression data and the human protein interaction network. We identified 4,620 functional modules in the human protein network and provided a quantitative metric to record their responses in 54 diseases leading to 138 significant similarities between diseases. Fourteen of the significant disease correlations also shared common drugs, supporting the hypothesis that similar diseases can be treated by the same drugs, allowing us to make predictions for new uses of existing drugs. Finally, we also identified 59 modules that were dysregulated in at least half of the diseases, representing a common disease-state "signature". These modules were significantly enriched for genes that are known to be drug targets. Interestingly, drugs known to target these genes/proteins are already known to treat significantly more diseases than drugs targeting other genes/proteins, highlighting the importance of these core modules as prime therapeutic opportunities.

  18. Structural Antecedents of Corporate Network Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H. Wijen (Frank); N. Noorderhaven (Niels); W. Vanhaverbeke (Wim)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: While most network studies adopt a static view, we argue that corporate social networks are subject to endogenous dynamics of cognitive path dependence and self-reinforcing power relations. Over time, these dynamics drive corporate networks to become increasingly focused (i.e.,

  19. Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

  20. Stable and emergent network topologies : A structural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herman Monsuur

    2007-01-01

    Economic, social and military networks have at least one thing in common: they change over time. For various reasons, nodes form and terminate links, thereby rearranging the network. In this paper, we present a structural network mechanism that formalizes a possible incentive that guides nodes in

  1. Structural Behavioral Study on the General Aviation Network Based on Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Na

    2017-12-01

    The general aviation system is an open and dissipative system with complex structures and behavioral features. This paper has established the system model and network model for general aviation. We have analyzed integral attributes and individual attributes by applying the complex network theory and concluded that the general aviation network has influential enterprise factors and node relations. We have checked whether the network has small world effect, scale-free property and network centrality property which a complex network should have by applying degree distribution of functions and proved that the general aviation network system is a complex network. Therefore, we propose to achieve the evolution process of the general aviation industrial chain to collaborative innovation cluster of advanced-form industries by strengthening network multiplication effect, stimulating innovation performance and spanning the structural hole path.

  2. The National Biomedical Communications Network as a Developing Structure *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ruth M.

    1971-01-01

    The National Biomedical Communications Network has evolved both from a set of conceptual recommendations over the last twelve years and an accumulation of needs manifesting themselves in the requests of members of the medical community. With a short history of three years this network and its developing structure have exhibited most of the stresses of technology interfacing with customer groups, and of a structure attempting to build itself upon many existing fragmentary unconnected segments of a potentially viable resourcesharing capability. In addition to addressing these topics, the paper treats a design appropriate to any network devoted to information transfer in a special interest user community. It discusses fundamentals of network design, highlighting that network structure most appropriate to a national information network. Examples are given of cost analyses of information services and certain conjectures are offered concerning the roles of national networks. PMID:5542912

  3. Random field Ising model and community structure in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S.-W.; Jeong, H.; Noh, J. D.

    2006-04-01

    We propose a method to determine the community structure of a complex network. In this method the ground state problem of a ferromagnetic random field Ising model is considered on the network with the magnetic field Bs = +∞, Bt = -∞, and Bi≠s,t=0 for a node pair s and t. The ground state problem is equivalent to the so-called maximum flow problem, which can be solved exactly numerically with the help of a combinatorial optimization algorithm. The community structure is then identified from the ground state Ising spin domains for all pairs of s and t. Our method provides a criterion for the existence of the community structure, and is applicable equally well to unweighted and weighted networks. We demonstrate the performance of the method by applying it to the Barabási-Albert network, Zachary karate club network, the scientific collaboration network, and the stock price correlation network. (Ising, Potts, etc.)

  4. Structural factoring approach for analyzing stochastic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Shier, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of finding the distribution of the shortest path length through a stochastic network is investigated. A general algorithm for determining the exact distribution of the shortest path length is developed based on the concept of conditional factoring, in which a directed, stochastic network is decomposed into an equivalent set of smaller, generally less complex subnetworks. Several network constructs are identified and exploited to reduce significantly the computational effort required to solve a network problem relative to complete enumeration. This algorithm can be applied to two important classes of stochastic path problems: determining the critical path distribution for acyclic networks and the exact two-terminal reliability for probabilistic networks. Computational experience with the algorithm was encouraging and allowed the exact solution of networks that have been previously analyzed only by approximation techniques.

  5. Exploring community structure in biological networks with random graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Pratha; Singh, Lisa O; Clauset, Aaron; Bansal, Shweta

    2014-06-25

    Community structure is ubiquitous in biological networks. There has been an increased interest in unraveling the community structure of biological systems as it may provide important insights into a system's functional components and the impact of local structures on dynamics at a global scale. Choosing an appropriate community detection algorithm to identify the community structure in an empirical network can be difficult, however, as the many algorithms available are based on a variety of cost functions and are difficult to validate. Even when community structure is identified in an empirical system, disentangling the effect of community structure from other network properties such as clustering coefficient and assortativity can be a challenge. Here, we develop a generative model to produce undirected, simple, connected graphs with a specified degrees and pattern of communities, while maintaining a graph structure that is as random as possible. Additionally, we demonstrate two important applications of our model: (a) to generate networks that can be used to benchmark existing and new algorithms for detecting communities in biological networks; and (b) to generate null models to serve as random controls when investigating the impact of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and modularity in empirical biological networks. Our model allows for the systematic study of the presence of community structure and its impact on network function and dynamics. This process is a crucial step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural properties of biological systems and uncovering the mechanisms that drive these systems.

  6. Towards a chromatographic similarity index to establish localised quantitative structure-retention relationships for retention prediction. II Use of Tanimoto similarity index in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo Hyun; Talebi, Mohammad; Amos, Ruth I J; Tyteca, Eva; Haddad, Paul R; Szucs, Roman; Pohl, Christopher A; Dolan, John W

    2017-11-10

    Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationships (QSRR) are used to predict retention times of compounds based only on their chemical structures encoded by molecular descriptors. The main concern in QSRR modelling is to build models with high predictive power, allowing reliable retention prediction for the unknown compounds across the chromatographic space. With the aim of enhancing the prediction power of the models, in this work, our previously proposed QSRR modelling approach called "federation of local models" is extended in ion chromatography to predict retention times of unknown ions, where a local model for each target ion (unknown) is created using only structurally similar ions from the dataset. A Tanimoto similarity (TS) score was utilised as a measure of structural similarity and training sets were developed by including ions that were similar to the target ion, as defined by a threshold value. The prediction of retention parameters (a- and b-values) in the linear solvent strength (LSS) model in ion chromatography, log k=a - blog[eluent], allows the prediction of retention times under all eluent concentrations. The QSRR models for a- and b-values were developed by a genetic algorithm-partial least squares method using the retention data of inorganic and small organic anions and larger organic cations (molecular mass up to 507) on four Thermo Fisher Scientific columns (AS20, AS19, AS11HC and CS17). The corresponding predicted retention times were calculated by fitting the predicted a- and b-values of the models into the LSS model equation. The predicted retention times were also plotted against the experimental values to evaluate the goodness of fit and the predictive power of the models. The application of a TS threshold of 0.6 was found to successfully produce predictive and reliable QSRR models (Qext(F2)2>0.8 and Mean Absolute Error<0.1), and hence accurate retention time predictions with an average Mean Absolute Error of 0.2min. Crown Copyright © 2017

  7. Experimental Study of the Structure of a Social Network and Human Dynamics in a Virtual Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Andrzej; Kruszewska, Natalia

    We study a large social network consisting of 3 × 104 individuals, who interact in a large virtual world of Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPGs). On the basis of the players' list of friends and the playing time received from the on-line game server, we investigate the structure of the network and human dynamics. We try to show that the structure of this friendship network is very similar to the structure of different social networks. In order to investigate the relation between networks of acquaintances in virtual and real worlds, we carried out a survey among the players. We found very interesting scaling laws concerning human dynamics. Our research has shown how long people are interested in a single task, and how much time they devote to it. It is surprising that exponent values in both cases are close to minus one.

  8. Influence of Choice of Null Network on Small-World Parameters of Structural Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. M. Hadi; Kesler, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coordinated variations in brain morphology (e.g., volume, thickness) have been employed as a measure of structural association between brain regions to infer large-scale structural correlation networks. Recent evidence suggests that brain networks constructed in this manner are inherently more clustered than random networks of the same size and degree. Thus, null networks constructed by randomizing topology are not a good choice for benchmarking small-world parameters of these networks. In the present report, we investigated the influence of choice of null networks on small-world parameters of gray matter correlation networks in healthy individuals and survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Three types of null networks were studied: 1) networks constructed by topology randomization (TOP), 2) networks matched to the distributional properties of the observed covariance matrix (HQS), and 3) networks generated from correlation of randomized input data (COR). The results revealed that the choice of null network not only influences the estimated small-world parameters, it also influences the results of between-group differences in small-world parameters. In addition, at higher network densities, the choice of null network influences the direction of group differences in network measures. Our data suggest that the choice of null network is quite crucial for interpretation of group differences in small-world parameters of structural correlation networks. We argue that none of the available null models is perfect for estimation of small-world parameters for correlation networks and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the selected model should be carefully considered with respect to obtained network measures. PMID:23840672

  9. Horton Ratios Link Self-Similarity with Maximum Entropy of Eco-Geomorphological Properties in Stream Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce T. Milne

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Stream networks are branched structures wherein water and energy move between land and atmosphere, modulated by evapotranspiration and its interaction with the gravitational dissipation of potential energy as runoff. These actions vary among climates characterized by Budyko theory, yet have not been integrated with Horton scaling, the ubiquitous pattern of eco-hydrological variation among Strahler streams that populate river basins. From Budyko theory, we reveal optimum entropy coincident with high biodiversity. Basins on either side of optimum respond in opposite ways to precipitation, which we evaluated for the classic Hubbard Brook experiment in New Hampshire and for the Whitewater River basin in Kansas. We demonstrate that Horton ratios are equivalent to Lagrange multipliers used in the extremum function leading to Shannon information entropy being maximal, subject to constraints. Properties of stream networks vary with constraints and inter-annual variation in water balance that challenge vegetation to match expected resource supply throughout the network. The entropy-Horton framework informs questions of biodiversity, resilience to perturbations in water supply, changes in potential evapotranspiration, and land use changes that move ecosystems away from optimal entropy with concomitant loss of productivity and biodiversity.

  10. Topological properties of four networks in protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seungsik; Kim, Kyungsik; Chang, Ki-Ho; Ha, Deok-Ho; Lee, Jun-Ho

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the complex networks of interacting amino acids in protein structures. The cellular networks and their random controls are treated for the four threshold distances between atoms. The numerical simulation and analysis are relevant to the topological properties of the complex networks in the structural classification of proteins, and we mainly estimate the network's metrics from the resultant network. The cellular network is shown to exhibit a small-world feature regardless of their structural class. The protein structure presents the positive assortative coefficients, when the topological property is described as a tendency for connectivity of high-degree nodes. We particularly show that both the modularity and the small-wordness are significantly followed the increasing function against nodes.

  11. Network cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  12. Network Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  13. Using structural equation modeling for network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yu-Kang; Wu, Yun-Chun

    2017-07-14

    Network meta-analysis overcomes the limitations of traditional pair-wise meta-analysis by incorporating all available evidence into a general statistical framework for simultaneous comparisons of several treatments. Currently, network meta-analyses are undertaken either within the Bayesian hierarchical linear models or frequentist generalized linear mixed models. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a statistical method originally developed for modeling causal relations among observed and latent variables. As random effect is explicitly modeled as a latent variable in SEM, it is very flexible for analysts to specify complex random effect structure and to make linear and nonlinear constraints on parameters. The aim of this article is to show how to undertake a network meta-analysis within the statistical framework of SEM. We used an example dataset to demonstrate the standard fixed and random effect network meta-analysis models can be easily implemented in SEM. It contains results of 26 studies that directly compared three treatment groups A, B and C for prevention of first bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis. We also showed that a new approach to network meta-analysis based on the technique of unrestricted weighted least squares (UWLS) method can also be undertaken using SEM. For both the fixed and random effect network meta-analysis, SEM yielded similar coefficients and confidence intervals to those reported in the previous literature. The point estimates of two UWLS models were identical to those in the fixed effect model but the confidence intervals were greater. This is consistent with results from the traditional pairwise meta-analyses. Comparing to UWLS model with common variance adjusted factor, UWLS model with unique variance adjusted factor has greater confidence intervals when the heterogeneity was larger in the pairwise comparison. The UWLS model with unique variance adjusted factor reflects the difference in heterogeneity within each comparison

  14. Measuring the robustness of network community structure using assortativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuka, Daizaburo; Farine, Damien R.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of discrete social clusters, or ‘communities’, is a common feature of social networks in human and nonhuman animals. The level of such community structure in networks is typically measured using an index of modularity, Q. While modularity quantifies the degree to which individuals associate within versus between social communities and provides a useful measure of structure in the social network, it assumes that the network has been well sampled. However, animal social network data is typically subject to sampling errors. In particular, the associations among individuals are often not sampled equally, and animal social network studies are often based on a relatively small set of observations. Here, we extend an existing framework for bootstrapping network metrics to provide a method for assessing the robustness of community assignment in social networks using a metric we call community assortativity (rcom). We use simulations to demonstrate that modularity can reliably detect the transition from random to structured associations in networks that differ in size and number of communities, while community assortativity accurately measures the level of confidence based on the detectability of associations. We then demonstrate the use of these metrics using three publicly available data sets of avian social networks. We suggest that by explicitly addressing the known limitations in sampling animal social network, this approach will facilitate more rigorous analyses of population-level structural patterns across social systems. PMID:26949266

  15. Exploring network structure, dynamics, and function using networkx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swart, Pieter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; S Chult, Daniel [COLGATE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    NetworkX is a Python language package for exploration and analysis of networks and network algorithms. The core package provides data structures for representing many types of networks, or graphs, including simple graphs, directed graphs, and graphs with parallel edges and self loops. The nodes in NetworkX graphs can be any (hashable) Python object and edges can contain arbitrary data; this flexibility mades NetworkX ideal for representing networks found in many different scientific fields. In addition to the basic data structures many graph algorithms are implemented for calculating network properties and structure measures: shortest paths, betweenness centrality, clustering, and degree distribution and many more. NetworkX can read and write various graph formats for eash exchange with existing data, and provides generators for many classic graphs and popular graph models, such as the Erdoes-Renyi, Small World, and Barabasi-Albert models, are included. The ease-of-use and flexibility of the Python programming language together with connection to the SciPy tools make NetworkX a powerful tool for scientific computations. We discuss some of our recent work studying synchronization of coupled oscillators to demonstrate how NetworkX enables research in the field of computational networks.

  16. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks Outperform Feature-Based But Not Categorical Models in Explaining Object Similarity Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwik, Kamila M.; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Storrs, Katherine R.; Mur, Marieke

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in Deep convolutional Neural Networks (DNNs) have enabled unprecedentedly accurate computational models of brain representations, and present an exciting opportunity to model diverse cognitive functions. State-of-the-art DNNs achieve human-level performance on object categorisation, but it is unclear how well they capture human behavior on complex cognitive tasks. Recent reports suggest that DNNs can explain significant variance in one such task, judging object similarity. Here, we extend these findings by replicating them for a rich set of object images, comparing performance across layers within two DNNs of different depths, and examining how the DNNs’ performance compares to that of non-computational “conceptual” models. Human observers performed similarity judgments for a set of 92 images of real-world objects. Representations of the same images were obtained in each of the layers of two DNNs of different depths (8-layer AlexNet and 16-layer VGG-16). To create conceptual models, other human observers generated visual-feature labels (e.g., “eye”) and category labels (e.g., “animal”) for the same image set. Feature labels were divided into parts, colors, textures and contours, while category labels were divided into subordinate, basic, and superordinate categories. We fitted models derived from the features, categories, and from each layer of each DNN to the similarity judgments, using representational similarity analysis to evaluate model performance. In both DNNs, similarity within the last layer explains most of the explainable variance in human similarity judgments. The last layer outperforms almost all feature-based models. Late and mid-level layers outperform some but not all feature-based models. Importantly, categorical models predict similarity judgments significantly better than any DNN layer. Our results provide further evidence for commonalities between DNNs and brain representations. Models derived from visual features

  17. Comparing Community Structure to Characteristics in Online Collegiate Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Traud, Amanda L.; Kelsic, Eric D.; Mucha, Peter J; Porter, Mason A.

    2008-01-01

    We study the structure of social networks of students by examining the graphs of Facebook "friendships" at five American universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure and employ graphical and quantitative tools, including standardized pair-counting methods, to measure the correlations between the network communities and a set of self-identified user characteristics (residence, class year, major, and high school). We review the bas...

  18. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms.

  19. Network versus portfolio structure in financial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Teruyoshi

    2013-10-01

    The question of how to stabilize financial systems has attracted considerable attention since the global financial crisis of 2007-2009. Recently, Beale et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 12647 (2011)] demonstrated that higher portfolio diversity among banks would reduce systemic risk by decreasing the risk of simultaneous defaults at the expense of a higher likelihood of individual defaults. In practice, however, a bank default has an externality in that it undermines other banks’ balance sheets. This paper explores how each of these different sources of risk, simultaneity risk and externality, contributes to systemic risk. The results show that the allocation of external assets that minimizes systemic risk varies with the topology of the financial network as long as asset returns have negative correlations. In the model, a well-known centrality measure, PageRank, reflects an appropriately defined “infectiveness” of a bank. An important result is that the most infective bank needs not always to be the safest bank. Under certain circumstances, the most infective node should act as a firewall to prevent large-scale collective defaults. The introduction of a counteractive portfolio structure will significantly reduce systemic risk.

  20. Wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    This brief covers the emerging area of wireless sensor network (WSN)-based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems, and introduces the authors’ WSN-based platform called SenetSHM. It helps the reader differentiate specific requirements of SHM applications from other traditional WSN applications, and demonstrates how these requirements are addressed by using a series of systematic approaches. The brief serves as a practical guide, explaining both the state-of-the-art technologies in domain-specific applications of WSNs, as well as the methodologies used to address the specific requirements for a WSN application. In particular, the brief offers instruction for problem formulation and problem solving based on the authors’ own experiences implementing SenetSHM. Seven concise chapters cover the development of hardware and software design of SenetSHM, as well as in-field experiments conducted while testing the platform. The brief’s exploration of the SenetSHM platform is a valuable feature for civil engine...

  1. Online Social Networks: Essays on Membership, Privacy, and Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, B.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of social networks is crucial for obtaining social support, for meaningful connections to unknown social groups, and to overcome prejudice. Yet, we know little about the structure of social networks beyond those contacts that stand closest to us. This lack of knowledge results from a

  2. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub

  3. Robustness and modular structure in networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagrow, James P.; Lehmann, Sune; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks have recently attracted much interest due to their prevalence in nature and our daily lives [1, 2]. A critical property of a network is its resilience to random breakdown and failure [3-6], typically studied as a percolation problem [7-9] or by modeling cascading failures[10....... If overlapping modular organization plays a role in overall functionality, networks may be far more vulnerable than predicted by conventional percolation theory....

  4. Compression-based classification of biological sequences and structures via the Universal Similarity Metric: experimental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzini Giovanni

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similarity of sequences is a key mathematical notion for Classification and Phylogenetic studies in Biology. It is currently primarily handled using alignments. However, the alignment methods seem inadequate for post-genomic studies since they do not scale well with data set size and they seem to be confined only to genomic and proteomic sequences. Therefore, alignment-free similarity measures are actively pursued. Among those, USM (Universal Similarity Metric has gained prominence. It is based on the deep theory of Kolmogorov Complexity and universality is its most novel striking feature. Since it can only be approximated via data compression, USM is a methodology rather than a formula quantifying the similarity of two strings. Three approximations of USM are available, namely UCD (Universal Compression Dissimilarity, NCD (Normalized Compression Dissimilarity and CD (Compression Dissimilarity. Their applicability and robustness is tested on various data sets yielding a first massive quantitative estimate that the USM methodology and its approximations are of value. Despite the rich theory developed around USM, its experimental assessment has limitations: only a few data compressors have been tested in conjunction with USM and mostly at a qualitative level, no comparison among UCD, NCD and CD is available and no comparison of USM with existing methods, both based on alignments and not, seems to be available. Results We experimentally test the USM methodology by using 25 compressors, all three of its known approximations and six data sets of relevance to Molecular Biology. This offers the first systematic and quantitative experimental assessment of this methodology, that naturally complements the many theoretical and the preliminary experimental results available. Moreover, we compare the USM methodology both with methods based on alignments and not. We may group our experiments into two sets. The first one, performed via ROC

  5. Topological effects of network structure on long-term social network dynamics in a wild mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Amiyaal; Booms, Andrew S; Holekamp, Kay E

    2015-07-01

    Social structure influences ecological processes such as dispersal and invasion, and affects survival and reproductive success. Recent studies have used static snapshots of social networks, thus neglecting their temporal dynamics, and focused primarily on a limited number of variables that might be affecting social structure. Here, instead we modelled effects of multiple predictors of social network dynamics in the spotted hyena, using observational data collected during 20 years of continuous field research in Kenya. We tested the hypothesis that the current state of the social network affects its long-term dynamics. We employed stochastic agent-based models that allowed us to estimate the contribution of multiple factors to network changes. After controlling for environmental and individual effects, we found that network density and individual centrality affected network dynamics, but that social bond transitivity consistently had the strongest effects. Our results emphasise the significance of structural properties of networks in shaping social dynamics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  6. Do friends share similar body image and eating problems? The role of social networks and peer influences in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Delyse M; Rapee, Ronald M

    2007-07-01

    This study examined the role of friendship networks and peer influences in body image concern, dietary restraint, extreme weight loss behaviours (EWLBs) and binge eating in a large community sample of young adolescent females. Based on girls' self-reported friendship groups, social network analysis was used to identify 173 friendship cliques. Results indicated that clique members shared similar scores on measures of dieting, EWLB and binge eating, but not body image concern. Average clique scores for dieting, EWLB and binge eating, were also correlated significantly with clique averages on measures of perceived peer influence, body mass index and psychological variables. Multiple regression analyses indicated that perceived peer influences in weight-related attitudes and behaviours were predictive of individual girls' level of body image concern, dieting, EWLB use and binge eating. Notably, an individual girl's dieting and EWLB use could be predicted from her friends' respective dieting and EWLB scores. Findings highlight the significance of the peer environment in body image and eating problems during early adolescence.

  7. Learning and structure of neuronal networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the effect of learning dynamics on network topology. Firstly, a network of discrete dynamical systems is considered for this purpose and the coupling strengths are made to evolve according to a temporal learning rule that is based on the paradigm of spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). This incorporates ...

  8. Learning and structure of neuronal networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corresponding author. E-mail: Kiran.Kolwankar@gmail.com. Abstract. We study the effect of learning dynamics on network topology. Firstly, a network of dis- crete dynamical systems is considered for this purpose and the coupling strengths are made to evolve according to a temporal learning rule that is based on the ...

  9. Wireless Sensor Networks : Structure and Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841293

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we look at various problems in wireless networking. First we consider two problems in physical-model networks. We introduce a new model for localisation. The model is based on a range-free model of radio transmissions. The first scheme is randomised and we analyse its expected

  10. How the dynamics and structure of sexual contact networks shape pathogen phylogenies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Robinson

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the host contact network over which a pathogen is transmitted affect both epidemic spread and the projected effectiveness of control strategies. Given the importance of understanding these contact networks, it is unfortunate that they are very difficult to measure directly. This challenge has led to an interest in methods to infer information about host contact networks from pathogen phylogenies, because in shaping a pathogen's opportunities for reproduction, contact networks also shape pathogen evolution. Host networks influence pathogen phylogenies both directly, through governing opportunities for evolution, and indirectly by changing the prevalence and incidence. Here, we aim to separate these two effects by comparing pathogen evolution on different host networks that share similar epidemic trajectories. This approach allows use to examine the direct effects of network structure on pathogen phylogenies, largely controlling for confounding differences arising from population dynamics. We find that networks with more heterogeneous degree distributions yield pathogen phylogenies with more variable cluster numbers, smaller mean cluster sizes, shorter mean branch lengths, and somewhat higher tree imbalance than networks with relatively homogeneous degree distributions. However, in particular for dynamic networks, we find that these direct effects are relatively modest. These findings suggest that the role of the epidemic trajectory, the dynamics of the network and the inherent variability of metrics such as cluster size must each be taken into account when trying to use pathogen phylogenies to understand characteristics about the underlying host contact network.

  11. Structure and properties of triolein-based polyurethane networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanić, Alisa; Petrović, Zoran S; Dusek, Karel

    2002-01-01

    Polyurethane networks based on vegetable oils have very heterogeneous composition, and it is difficult to find a close correlation between their structure and properties. To establish benchmark structure-properties relationships, we have prepared model polyurethane networks based on triolein and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). Cross-linking in the middle of fatty acid chains leaves significant parts of the triglyceride as dangling chains. To examine their effect on properties, we have synthesized another polyurethane network using triolein without dangling chains (removed by metathesis). The structure of polyols was studied in detail since it affects the structure of polyurethane networks. The network structure was analyzed from swelling and mechanical measurements and by applying network and rubber elasticity theories. The cross-linking density in both networks was found to be close to theoretical. The triolein-based model network displayed modulus (around 6 MPa), tensile strength (8.7 MPa), and elongation at break (136%), characteristic of hard rubbers. Glass transition temperatures of the networks from triolein and its metathesis analogue were 25 and 31.5 degrees C, respectively.

  12. The relevance of network micro-structure for neural dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker ePernice

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity of cortical neurons is determined by the input they receive from presynaptic neurons. Many previousstudies have investigated how specific aspects of the statistics of the input affect the spike trains of single neurons and neuronsin recurrent networks. However, typically very simple random network models are considered in such studies. Here weuse a recently developed algorithm to construct networks based on a quasi-fractal probability measure which are much morevariable than commonly used network models, and which therefore promise to sample the space of recurrent networks ina more exhaustive fashion than previously possible. We use the generated graphs as the underlying network topology insimulations of networks of integrate-and-fire neurons in an asynchronous and irregular state. Based on an extensive datasetof networks and neuronal simulations we assess statistical relations between features of the network structure and the spikingactivity. Our results highlight the strong influence that some details of the network structure have on the activity dynamics ofboth single neurons and populations, even if some global network parameters are kept fixed. We observe specific and consistentrelations between activity characteristics like spike-train irregularity or correlations and network properties, for example thedistributions of the numbers of in- and outgoing connections or clustering. Exploiting these relations, we demonstrate that itis possible to estimate structural characteristics of the network from activity data. We also assess higher order correlationsof spiking activity in the various networks considered here, and find that their occurrence strongly depends on the networkstructure. These results provide directions for further theoretical studies on recurrent networks, as well as new ways to interpretspike train recordings from neural circuits.

  13. Multilayer network of language: A unified framework for structural analysis of linguistic subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinčić-Ipšić, Sanda; Margan, Domagoj; Meštrović, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the focus of complex networks' research has shifted from the analysis of isolated properties of a system toward a more realistic modeling of multiple phenomena - multilayer networks. Motivated by the prosperity of multilayer approach in social, transport or trade systems, we introduce the multilayer networks for language. The multilayer network of language is a unified framework for modeling linguistic subsystems and their structural properties enabling the exploration of their mutual interactions. Various aspects of natural language systems can be represented as complex networks, whose vertices depict linguistic units, while links model their relations. The multilayer network of language is defined by three aspects: the network construction principle, the linguistic subsystem and the language of interest. More precisely, we construct a word-level (syntax and co-occurrence) and a subword-level (syllables and graphemes) network layers, from four variations of original text (in the modeled language). The analysis and comparison of layers at the word and subword-levels are employed in order to determine the mechanism of the structural influences between linguistic units and subsystems. The obtained results suggest that there are substantial differences between the networks' structures of different language subsystems, which are hidden during the exploration of an isolated layer. The word-level layers share structural properties regardless of the language (e.g. Croatian or English), while the syllabic subword-level expresses more language dependent structural properties. The preserved weighted overlap quantifies the similarity of word-level layers in weighted and directed networks. Moreover, the analysis of motifs reveals a close topological structure of the syntactic and syllabic layers for both languages. The findings corroborate that the multilayer network framework is a powerful, consistent and systematic approach to model several linguistic subsystems

  14. Adapting Bayes Network Structures to Non-stationary Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Holbech; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2006-01-01

    When an incremental structural learning method gradually modifies a Bayesian network (BN) structure to fit observations, as they are read from a database, we call the process structural adaptation. Structural adaptation is useful when the learner is set to work in an unknown environment, where a BN...

  15. Adapting Bayes Network Structures to Non-stationary Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Holbech; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2008-01-01

    When an incremental structural learning method gradually modifies a Bayesian network (BN) structure to fit a sequential stream of observations, we call the process structural adaptation. Structural adaptation is useful when the learner is set to work in an unknown environment, where a BN...

  16. Social Network Analysis of a Supply Network Structural Investigation of the South Korean Automotive Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin-Baek

    2015-01-01

    Part 3: Knowledge Based Production Management; International audience; In this paper, we analyzed the structure of the South Korean automotive industry using social network analysis (SNA) metrics. Based on the data collected from 275 companies, a social network model of the supply network was constructed. Centrality measures in the SNA field were used to interpret the result and identify key companies. The results show that SNA metrics can be useful to understand the structure of a supply net...

  17. Testing statistical significance scores of sequence comparison methods with structure similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leunissen Jack AM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past years the Smith-Waterman sequence comparison algorithm has gained popularity due to improved implementations and rapidly increasing computing power. However, the quality and sensitivity of a database search is not only determined by the algorithm but also by the statistical significance testing for an alignment. The e-value is the most commonly used statistical validation method for sequence database searching. The CluSTr database and the Protein World database have been created using an alternative statistical significance test: a Z-score based on Monte-Carlo statistics. Several papers have described the superiority of the Z-score as compared to the e-value, using simulated data. We were interested if this could be validated when applied to existing, evolutionary related protein sequences. Results All experiments are performed on the ASTRAL SCOP database. The Smith-Waterman sequence comparison algorithm with both e-value and Z-score statistics is evaluated, using ROC, CVE and AP measures. The BLAST and FASTA algorithms are used as reference. We find that two out of three Smith-Waterman implementations with e-value are better at predicting structural similarities between proteins than the Smith-Waterman implementation with Z-score. SSEARCH especially has very high scores. Conclusion The compute intensive Z-score does not have a clear advantage over the e-value. The Smith-Waterman implementations give generally better results than their heuristic counterparts. We recommend using the SSEARCH algorithm combined with e-values for pairwise sequence comparisons.

  18. Emergence of scale-free close-knit friendship structure in online social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Xiang Cui

    Full Text Available Although the structural properties of online social networks have attracted much attention, the properties of the close-knit friendship structures remain an important question. Here, we mainly focus on how these mesoscale structures are affected by the local and global structural properties. Analyzing the data of four large-scale online social networks reveals several common structural properties. It is found that not only the local structures given by the indegree, outdegree, and reciprocal degree distributions follow a similar scaling behavior, the mesoscale structures represented by the distributions of close-knit friendship structures also exhibit a similar scaling law. The degree correlation is very weak over a wide range of the degrees. We propose a simple directed network model that captures the observed properties. The model incorporates two mechanisms: reciprocation and preferential attachment. Through rate equation analysis of our model, the local-scale and mesoscale structural properties are derived. In the local-scale, the same scaling behavior of indegree and outdegree distributions stems from indegree and outdegree of nodes both growing as the same function of the introduction time, and the reciprocal degree distribution also shows the same power-law due to the linear relationship between the reciprocal degree and in/outdegree of nodes. In the mesoscale, the distributions of four closed triples representing close-knit friendship structures are found to exhibit identical power-laws, a behavior attributed to the negligible degree correlations. Intriguingly, all the power-law exponents of the distributions in the local-scale and mesoscale depend only on one global parameter, the mean in/outdegree, while both the mean in/outdegree and the reciprocity together determine the ratio of the reciprocal degree of a node to its in/outdegree. Structural properties of numerical simulated networks are analyzed and compared with each of the four

  19. Completely random measures for modelling block-structured sparse networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Mørup, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Many statistical methods for network data parameterize the edge-probability by attributing latent traits to the vertices such as block structure and assume exchangeability in the sense of the Aldous-Hoover representation theorem. Empirical studies of networks indicate that many real-world networks...... [2014] proposed the use of a different notion of exchangeability due to Kallenberg [2006] and obtained a network model which admits power-law behaviour while retaining desirable statistical properties, however this model does not capture latent vertex traits such as block-structure. In this work we re......-introduce the use of block-structure for network models obeying allenberg’s notion of exchangeability and thereby obtain a model which admits the inference of block-structure and edge inhomogeneity. We derive a simple expression for the likelihood and an efficient sampling method. The obtained model...

  20. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biological background, 1 PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets were identified, 21 of which were verified by literatures to be associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS. 42 drugs targeting to 13 PCOS potential drug targets were investigated experimentally or clinically for PCOS. Evaluated by independent datasets, the whole PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets could not only reveal the drug response, but also distinguish the statuses between normal and disease. Our identified PPDT-Module and PCOS potential drug targets would shed light on the treatment of PCOS. And our approach would provide valuable insights to research on the pathogenesis and drug response of other diseases. PMID:27191267

  1. Proposing an Integrative Approach for Efficiency Evaluation of Network Structures Including Tour and Allocation Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza hejazi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Data envelopment analysis (DEA is known as one of the most common approaches for efficiency evaluation. Network models are new subjects in which, a DMU with all its subunits and links is considered as a network structure. One of the most widely used DEA methods for network data is the suggested approach of Lewis and Sexton. In this approach, performance of each DMU is measured compared to a similar DMU by moving on the effective paths and then computing the final outputs and classic primary inputs . In reality, many cases can be found that an original input or an intermediate product allocates to several subunits or forms a tour in a network. In such networks, the approach of Lewis and Sexton is not able to calculate efficiency. Therefore, in this paper, an approach has been proposed for solving such problems and computing the efficiency of such networks.

  2. Reverse Logistics Network Structures and Design

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Moritz

    2001-01-01

    textabstractLogistics network design is commonly recognized as a strategic supply chain issue of prime importance. The location of production facilities, storage concepts, and transportation strategies are major determinants of supply chain performance. This chapter considers logistics network design for the particular case of closed-loop supply chains. We highlight key issues that companies are facing when deciding upon the logistics implementation of a product recovery initiative. In partic...

  3. Leveraging Structure to Improve Classification Performance in Sparsely Labeled Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2007-10-22

    We address the problem of classification in a partially labeled network (a.k.a. within-network classification), with an emphasis on tasks in which we have very few labeled instances to start with. Recent work has demonstrated the utility of collective classification (i.e., simultaneous inferences over class labels of related instances) in this general problem setting. However, the performance of collective classification algorithms can be adversely affected by the sparseness of labels in real-world networks. We show that on several real-world data sets, collective classification appears to offer little advantage in general and hurts performance in the worst cases. In this paper, we explore a complimentary approach to within-network classification that takes advantage of network structure. Our approach is motivated by the observation that real-world networks often provide a great deal more structural information than attribute information (e.g., class labels). Through experiments on supervised and semi-supervised classifiers of network data, we demonstrate that a small number of structural features can lead to consistent and sometimes dramatic improvements in classification performance. We also examine the relative utility of individual structural features and show that, in many cases, it is a combination of both local and global network structure that is most informative.

  4. Supervised neural networks for the classification of structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperduti, A; Starita, A

    1997-01-01

    Standard neural networks and statistical methods are usually believed to be inadequate when dealing with complex structures because of their feature-based approach. In fact, feature-based approaches usually fail to give satisfactory solutions because of the sensitivity of the approach to the a priori selection of the features, and the incapacity to represent any specific information on the relationships among the components of the structures. However, we show that neural networks can, in fact, represent and classify structured patterns. The key idea underpinning our approach is the use of the so called "generalized recursive neuron", which is essentially a generalization to structures of a recurrent neuron. By using generalized recursive neurons, all the supervised networks developed for the classification of sequences, such as backpropagation through time networks, real-time recurrent networks, simple recurrent networks, recurrent cascade correlation networks, and neural trees can, on the whole, be generalized to structures. The results obtained by some of the above networks (with generalized recursive neurons) on the classification of logic terms are presented.

  5. Graphs, Ideal Flow, and the Transportation Network

    OpenAIRE

    Teknomo, Kardi

    2016-01-01

    This lecture discusses the mathematical relationship between network structure and network utilization of transportation network. Network structure means the graph itself. Network utilization represent the aggregation of trajectories of agents in using the network graph. I show the similarity and relationship between the structural pattern of the network and network utilization.

  6. Structure of Retail Services in the Brazilian Hosting Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Zancan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available this research has identified Brazilian hosting networks through infrastructure services indicators that it was sold to tourists in organizations that form these networks. The theory consulted the discussion of structural techniques present in Social Network Analysis. The study has three stages: documental research, creation of Tourism database and interviews. The results identified three networks with the highest expression in Brazil formed by hotels, lodges, and resorts. Different char-acteristics of infrastructure and services were observed between hosting networks. Future studies suggest a comparative analysis of structural indicators present in other segments of tourism services, as well as the existing international influ-ence on the development of the Brazilian hosting networks.

  7. Agent-patient similarity affects sentence structure in language production: evidence from subject omissions in Mandarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yaling; Gao, Yannan; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2014-01-01

    Interference effects from semantically similar items are well-known in studies of single word production, where the presence of semantically similar distractor words slows picture naming. This article examines the consequences of this interference in sentence production and tests the hypothesis that in situations of high similarity-based interference, producers are more likely to omit one of the interfering elements than when there is low semantic similarity and thus low interference. This work investigated language production in Mandarin, which allows subject noun phrases to be omitted in discourse contexts in which the subject entity has been previously mentioned in the discourse. We hypothesize that Mandarin speakers omit the subject more often when the subject and the object entities are conceptually similar. A corpus analysis of simple transitive sentences found higher rates of subject omission when both the subject and object were animate (potentially yielding similarity-based interference) than when the subject was animate and object was inanimate. A second study manipulated subject-object animacy in a picture description task and replicated this result: participants omitted the animate subject more often when the object was also animate than when it was inanimate. These results suggest that similarity-based interference affects sentence forms, particularly when the agent of the action is mentioned in the sentence. Alternatives and mechanisms for this effect are discussed. PMID:25278915

  8. Self-organization in neural networks - Applications in structural optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajela, Prabhat; Fu, B.; Berke, Laszlo

    1993-01-01

    The present paper discusses the applicability of ART (Adaptive Resonance Theory) networks, and the Hopfield and Elastic networks, in problems of structural analysis and design. A characteristic of these network architectures is the ability to classify patterns presented as inputs into specific categories. The categories may themselves represent distinct procedural solution strategies. The paper shows how this property can be adapted in the structural analysis and design problem. A second application is the use of Hopfield and Elastic networks in optimization problems. Of particular interest are problems characterized by the presence of discrete and integer design variables. The parallel computing architecture that is typical of neural networks is shown to be effective in such problems. Results of preliminary implementations in structural design problems are also included in the paper.

  9. Modular structure of functional networks in olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, David; Fonlupt, Pierre; Saive, Anne-Lise; Plailly, Jane; Ravel, Nadine; Royet, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-15

    Graph theory enables the study of systems by describing those systems as a set of nodes and edges. Graph theory has been widely applied to characterize the overall structure of data sets in the social, technological, and biological sciences, including neuroscience. Modular structure decomposition enables the definition of sub-networks whose components are gathered in the same module and work together closely, while working weakly with components from other modules. This processing is of interest for studying memory, a cognitive process that is widely distributed. We propose a new method to identify modular structure in task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) networks. The modular structure was obtained directly from correlation coefficients and thus retained information about both signs and weights. The method was applied to functional data acquired during a yes-no odor recognition memory task performed by young and elderly adults. Four response categories were explored: correct (Hit) and incorrect (False alarm, FA) recognition and correct and incorrect rejection. We extracted time series data for 36 areas as a function of response categories and age groups and calculated condition-based weighted correlation matrices. Overall, condition-based modular partitions were more homogeneous in young than elderly subjects. Using partition similarity-based statistics and a posteriori statistical analyses, we demonstrated that several areas, including the hippocampus, caudate nucleus, and anterior cingulate gyrus, belonged to the same module more frequently during Hit than during all other conditions. Modularity values were negatively correlated with memory scores in the Hit condition and positively correlated with bias scores (liberal/conservative attitude) in the Hit and FA conditions. We further demonstrated that the proportion of positive and negative links between areas of different modules (i.e., the proportion of correlated and anti-correlated areas

  10. Similarities and differences between the brain networks underlying allocentric and egocentric spatial learning in rat revealed by cytochrome oxidase histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, S; Begega, A; Méndez, M; Méndez-López, M; Arias, J L

    2012-10-25

    The involvement of different brain regions in place- and response-learning was examined using a water cross-maze. Rats were trained to find the goal from the initial arm by turning left at the choice point (egocentric strategy) or by using environmental cues (allocentric strategy). Although different strategies were required, the same maze and learning conditions were used. Using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry as a marker of cellular activity, the function of the 13 diverse cortical and subcortical regions was assessed in rats performing these two tasks. Our results show that allocentric learning depends on the recruitment of a large functional network, which includes the hippocampal CA3, dentate gyrus, medial mammillary nucleus and supramammillary nucleus. Along with the striatum, these last three structures are also related to egocentric spatial learning. The present study provides evidence for the contribution of these regions to spatial navigation and supports a possible functional interaction between the two memory systems, as their structural convergence may facilitate functional cooperation in the behaviours guided by more than one strategy. In summary, it can be argued that spatial learning is based on dynamic functional systems in which the interaction of brain regions is modulated by task requirements. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural dimensions of knowledge-action networks for sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischa A. Munoz; B.B. Cutts

    2016-01-01

    Research on the influence of social network structure over flows of knowledge in support of sustainability governance and action has recently flourished. These studies highlight three challenges to evaluating knowledge-action networks: first, defining boundaries; second, characterizing power distributions; and third, identifying obstacles to knowledge sharing and...

  12. Structural and Infrastructural Underpinnings of International R&D Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niang, Mohamed; Sørensen, Brian Vejrum

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the process of globally distributing R&D activities with an emphasis on the effects of network maturity. It discusses emerging configurations by asking how the structure and infrastructure of international R&D networks evolve along with the move from a strong R&D center...

  13. The National Biomedical Communications Network as a Developing Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ruth M.

    The National Biomedical Communications Network has evolved both from a set of conceptual recommendations over the last twelve years and an accumulation of needs manifesting themselves in the requests of members of the medical community. With a short history of three years this Network and its developing structure have exhibited most of the…

  14. Information Propagation in Complex Networks : Structures and Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Märtens, M.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis is a contribution to a deeper understanding of how information propagates and what this process entails. At its very core is the concept of the network: a collection of nodes and links, which describes the structure of the systems under investigation. The network is a mathematical model

  15. Chinese lexical networks: The structure, function and formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyu; Zhou, Jie; Luo, Xiaoyue; Yang, Zhanxin

    2012-11-01

    In this paper Chinese phrases are modeled using complex networks theory. We analyze statistical properties of the networks and find that phrase networks display some important features: not only small world and the power-law distribution, but also hierarchical structure and disassortative mixing. These statistical traits display the global organization of Chinese phrases. The origin and formation of such traits are analyzed from a macroscopic Chinese culture and philosophy perspective. It is interesting to find that Chinese culture and philosophy may shape the formation and structure of Chinese phrases. To uncover the structural design principles of networks, network motif patterns are studied. It is shown that they serve as basic building blocks to form the whole phrase networks, especially triad 38 (feed forward loop) plays a more important role in forming most of the phrases and other motifs. The distinct structure may not only keep the networks stable and robust, but also be helpful for information processing. The results of the paper can give some insight into Chinese language learning and language acquisition. It strengthens the idea that learning the phrases helps to understand Chinese culture. On the other side, understanding Chinese culture and philosophy does help to learn Chinese phrases. The hub nodes in the networks show the close relationship with Chinese culture and philosophy. Learning or teaching the hub characters, hub-linking phrases and phrases which are meaning related based on motif feature should be very useful and important for Chinese learning and acquisition.

  16. Pronounced differences in genetic structure despite overall ecological similarity for two Ambystoma salamanders in the same landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew R. Whiteley; Kevin McGarigal; Michael K. Schwartz

    2014-01-01

    Studies linking genetic structure in amphibian species with ecological characteristics have focused on large differences in dispersal capabilities. Here, we test whether two species with similar dispersal potential but subtle differences in other ecological characteristics also exhibit strong differences in genetic structure in the same landscape. We examined eight...

  17. The missing part of seed dispersal networks: structure and robustness of bat-fruit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Marco Aurelio Ribeiro; Marquitti, Flávia Maria Darcie; Guimarães, Paulo Roberto; Kalko, Elisabeth Klara Viktoria; Jordano, Pedro; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2011-02-28

    Mutualistic networks are crucial to the maintenance of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, what we know about seed dispersal networks is based only on bird-fruit interactions. Therefore, we aimed at filling part of this gap by investigating bat-fruit networks. It is known from population studies that: (i) some bat species depend more on fruits than others, and (ii) that some specialized frugivorous bats prefer particular plant genera. We tested whether those preferences affected the structure and robustness of the whole network and the functional roles of species. Nine bat-fruit datasets from the literature were analyzed and all networks showed lower complementary specialization (H(2)' = 0.37±0.10, mean ± SD) and similar nestedness (NODF = 0.56±0.12) than pollination networks. All networks were modular (M = 0.32±0.07), and had on average four cohesive subgroups (modules) of tightly connected bats and plants. The composition of those modules followed the genus-genus associations observed at population level (Artibeus-Ficus, Carollia-Piper, and Sturnira-Solanum), although a few of those plant genera were dispersed also by other bats. Bat-fruit networks showed high robustness to simulated cumulative removals of both bats (R = 0.55±0.10) and plants (R = 0.68±0.09). Primary frugivores interacted with a larger proportion of the plants available and also occupied more central positions; furthermore, their extinction caused larger changes in network structure. We conclude that bat-fruit networks are highly cohesive and robust mutualistic systems, in which redundancy is high within modules, although modules are complementary to each other. Dietary specialization seems to be an important structuring factor that affects the topology, the guild structure and functional roles in bat-fruit networks.

  18. The missing part of seed dispersal networks: structure and robustness of bat-fruit interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Ribeiro Mello

    Full Text Available Mutualistic networks are crucial to the maintenance of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, what we know about seed dispersal networks is based only on bird-fruit interactions. Therefore, we aimed at filling part of this gap by investigating bat-fruit networks. It is known from population studies that: (i some bat species depend more on fruits than others, and (ii that some specialized frugivorous bats prefer particular plant genera. We tested whether those preferences affected the structure and robustness of the whole network and the functional roles of species. Nine bat-fruit datasets from the literature were analyzed and all networks showed lower complementary specialization (H(2' = 0.37±0.10, mean ± SD and similar nestedness (NODF = 0.56±0.12 than pollination networks. All networks were modular (M = 0.32±0.07, and had on average four cohesive subgroups (modules of tightly connected bats and plants. The composition of those modules followed the genus-genus associations observed at population level (Artibeus-Ficus, Carollia-Piper, and Sturnira-Solanum, although a few of those plant genera were dispersed also by other bats. Bat-fruit networks showed high robustness to simulated cumulative removals of both bats (R = 0.55±0.10 and plants (R = 0.68±0.09. Primary frugivores interacted with a larger proportion of the plants available and also occupied more central positions; furthermore, their extinction caused larger changes in network structure. We conclude that bat-fruit networks are highly cohesive and robust mutualistic systems, in which redundancy is high within modules, although modules are complementary to each other. Dietary specialization seems to be an important structuring factor that affects the topology, the guild structure and functional roles in bat-fruit networks.

  19. Mesoscopic structure conditions the emergence of cooperation on social networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, S.; Arenas, A.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma on two social networks substrates obtained from actual relational data. We find very different cooperation levels on each of them that cannot be easily understood in terms of global statistical properties of both networks. We claim that the result can be understood at the mesoscopic scale, by studying the community structure of the networks. We explain the dependence of the cooperation level on the temptation parameter in terms of the internal structure of the communities and their interconnections. We then test our results on community-structured, specifically designed artificial networks, finding a good agreement with the observations in both real substrates. Our results support the conclusion that studies of evolutionary games on model networks and their interpretation in terms of global properties may not be sufficient to study specific, real social systems. Further, the study allows us to define new quantitative parameters that summarize the mesoscopic structure of any network. In addition, the community perspective may be helpful to interpret the origin and behavior of existing networks as well as to design structures that show resilient cooperative behavior.

  20. Hartley and Itokawa: small comet and asteroid with similar morphologies and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2011-10-01

    at the convex bulge, from the antipodean side (Fig. 5). The smaller rocky asteroid Itokawa (0.5 km long, Fig. 2) is surprisingly similar in shape and structure to the icy core of Hart ley. It is also bent and rich in cross-cutting lineations o 4 direct ions marked by small holes-craters. But here they are ext inct and lack of gas -dust jets. One sees a transition from a volat ile rich comet core to an ext inct mostly rocky mass - asteroid. In both cases (comet core and as teroid) in the middle develops a smooth "wais t". The bulged convex and antipodal concave segments -hemispheres in rotating bodies require somewhat different densities of composing them masses to equilibrate angular momentum of two halves (compare with the Ea rth's hemis pheres : the eas tern continental "granitic" and wes tern Pacific "bas altic"). The near-IR images of two asteroids (Fig.6-7) confirm this. The concave and convex s ides are co mpos itionally d ifferent. In the Eros ' cas e the concave s ide is rich er in pyroxene, thus denser.

  1. Neural Network Algorithm for Prediction of Secondary Protein Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zikrija Avdagic; Elvir Purisevic; Emir Buza; Zlatan Coralic

    2009-01-01

    .... In this paper we describe the method and results of using CB513 as a dataset suitable for development of artificial neural network algorithms for prediction of secondary protein structure with MATLAB...

  2. Blow-up in nonlinear Schroedinger equations. II. Similarity structure of the blow-up singularity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, K.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    A critical review of the literature on similarity solutions of nonlinear Schroedinger equations is presented. We demonstrate that the self-similar blow-up solutions discovered hitherto are all associated either with a simple stretching invariance, or with a slightly more complicated conformal...... invariance and generalizations of the latter. This generalized "quasi-invariance" reveals the nature of the blow-up singularity and resolves an old controversy. Most of the previous work has been done on the cubic nonlinearity. We generalize the results to an arbitrary power nonlinearity....

  3. The effects of traffic structure on application and network performance

    CERN Document Server

    Aikat, Jay; Smith, F Donelson

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the Internet's rapid growth has spurred the development of new applications in mobile computing, digital music, online video, gaming and social networks. These applications rely heavily upon various underlying network protocols and mechanisms to enable, maintain and enhance their Internet functionalityThe Effects of Traffic Structure on Application and Network Performance provides the necessary tools for maximizing the network efficiency of any Internet application, and presents ground-breaking research that will influence how these applications are built in the fu

  4. Detecting community structure in networks via consensus dynamics and spatial transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; He, He; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel clustering algorithm for community detection, based on the dynamics towards consensus and spatial transformation. The community detection problem is translated to a clustering problem in the N-dimensional Euclidean space by three stages: (1) the dynamics running on a network is emulated to a procedure of gas diffusion in a finite space; (2) the pressure distribution vectors are used to describe the influence that each node exerts on the whole network; (3) the similarity measures between two nodes are quantified in the N-dimensional Euclidean space by k-Nearest Neighbors method. After such steps, we could merge clusters according to their similarity distances and show the community structure of a network by a hierarchical clustering tree. Tests on several benchmark networks are presented and the results show the effectiveness and reliability of our algorithm.

  5. Structural optimisation of district heating networks; Strukturoptimierung von Fernwaermenetzen. Expansionsplaner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackner, J. [Energie-Versorgung Niederoesterreich AG (EVN), Maria Enzersdorf (Austria)

    2003-05-01

    More and more communities are opting for district heating supply. But many projects fail due to an apparent lack of feasibility - more precisely: due to a lack of planning quality. An initially optimal expansion strategy helps to save on investment costs and guarantees high profitability. If we look at a possible district heating area, it turns out that the most profitable - choice of consumers to supply, - location of the heating station and - choice of street-sections in which to lay pipes is a very complex combinatorial maximisation problem. Structural optimisation of district heating networks, in contrast to layout optimisation of one spatial solution, is not very well studied. Various problem formulations are available, but no program on the market is able to optimise network structures based on a micro model. Profit as a target function is defined as the cumulated discounted revenues minus the discounted costs for heat generation and transport. Transport costs comprise those costs of trenching, pipes, laying, reconditioning as well as costs for service, maintenance, heat loss and pump work. The overall transport cost function is concave with respect to heat flow (assuming constant system temperatures). Heating stations can be integrated using a similar function which represents discounted total costs. On this basis a consistent model can be formulated, either using the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problem or the Fixed Charge Transshipment Problem. Please refer to further work in [-]. These problems are NP-hard1 and thus common optimisation techniques rapidly run into difficulties. (orig.) [German] Durch Zeit- und Kostendruck werden bei vielen Fernwaermeprojekten oft nur wenig raeumliche Ausbauvarianten kalkuliert; die energiewirtschaftlich optimale Netzstruktur wird nicht gefunden. Der Autor entwickelte das entscheidungsunterstuetzende System 'exPLAN' zur raeumlichen Optimierung von Fernwaermenetzen. Die Suche nach der gewinnmaximierten

  6. Identifying Similar Patterns of Structural Flexibility in Proteins by Disorder Prediction and Dynamic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan Petrovich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods are prevailing in identifying protein intrinsic disorder. The results from predictors are often given as per-residue disorder scores. The scores describe the disorder propensity of amino acids of a protein and can be further represented as a disorder curve. Many proteins share similar patterns in their disorder curves. The similar patterns are often associated with similar functions and evolutionary origins. Therefore, finding and characterizing specific patterns of disorder curves provides a unique and attractive perspective of studying the function of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this study, we developed a new computational tool named IDalign using dynamic programming. This tool is able to identify similar patterns among disorder curves, as well as to present the distribution of intrinsic disorder in query proteins. The disorder-based information generated by IDalign is significantly different from the information retrieved from classical sequence alignments. This tool can also be used to infer functions of disordered regions and disordered proteins. The web server of IDalign is available at (http://labs.cas.usf.edu/bioinfo/service.html.

  7. Identifying Similar Patterns of Structural Flexibility in Proteins by Disorder Prediction and Dynamic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Aidan; Borne, Adam; Uversky, Vladimir N; Xue, Bin

    2015-06-16

    Computational methods are prevailing in identifying protein intrinsic disorder. The results from predictors are often given as per-residue disorder scores. The scores describe the disorder propensity of amino acids of a protein and can be further represented as a disorder curve. Many proteins share similar patterns in their disorder curves. The similar patterns are often associated with similar functions and evolutionary origins. Therefore, finding and characterizing specific patterns of disorder curves provides a unique and attractive perspective of studying the function of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this study, we developed a new computational tool named IDalign using dynamic programming. This tool is able to identify similar patterns among disorder curves, as well as to present the distribution of intrinsic disorder in query proteins. The disorder-based information generated by IDalign is significantly different from the information retrieved from classical sequence alignments. This tool can also be used to infer functions of disordered regions and disordered proteins. The web server of IDalign is available at (http://labs.cas.usf.edu/bioinfo/service.html).

  8. Community structure from spectral properties in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servedio, V. D. P.; Colaiori, F.; Capocci, A.; Caldarelli, G.

    2005-06-01

    We analyze the spectral properties of complex networks focusing on their relation to the community structure, and develop an algorithm based on correlations among components of different eigenvectors. The algorithm applies to general weighted networks, and, in a suitably modified version, to the case of directed networks. Our method allows to correctly detect communities in sharply partitioned graphs, however it is useful to the analysis of more complex networks, without a well defined cluster structure, as social and information networks. As an example, we test the algorithm on a large scale data-set from a psychological experiment of free word association, where it proves to be successful both in clustering words, and in uncovering mental association patterns.

  9. Ranking influential nodes in complex networks with structural holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ping; Mei, Ting

    2018-01-01

    Ranking influential nodes in complex networks is of great theoretical and practical significance to ensure the safe operations of networks. In view of the important role structural hole nodes usually play in information spreading in complex networks, we propose a novel ranking method of influential nodes using structural holes called E-Burt method, which can be applied to weighted networks. This method fully takes into account the total connectivity strengths of the node in its local scope, the number of the connecting edges and the distributions of the total connectivity strengths on its connecting edges. The simulation results on the susceptible-infectious-recovered (SIR) dynamics suggest that the proposed E-Burt method can rank influential nodes more effectively and accurately in complex networks.

  10. Exponential random graph models for networks with community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Piotr; Fronczak, Agata; Bujok, Maksymilian

    2013-09-01

    Although the community structure organization is an important characteristic of real-world networks, most of the traditional network models fail to reproduce the feature. Therefore, the models are useless as benchmark graphs for testing community detection algorithms. They are also inadequate to predict various properties of real networks. With this paper we intend to fill the gap. We develop an exponential random graph approach to networks with community structure. To this end we mainly built upon the idea of blockmodels. We consider both the classical blockmodel and its degree-corrected counterpart and study many of their properties analytically. We show that in the degree-corrected blockmodel, node degrees display an interesting scaling property, which is reminiscent of what is observed in real-world fractal networks. A short description of Monte Carlo simulations of the models is also given in the hope of being useful to others working in the field.

  11. Maps of random walks on complex networks reveal community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosvall, Martin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2008-01-29

    To comprehend the multipartite organization of large-scale biological and social systems, we introduce an information theoretic approach that reveals community structure in weighted and directed networks. We use the probability flow of random walks on a network as a proxy for information flows in the real system and decompose the network into modules by compressing a description of the probability flow. The result is a map that both simplifies and highlights the regularities in the structure and their relationships. We illustrate the method by making a map of scientific communication as captured in the citation patterns of >6,000 journals. We discover a multicentric organization with fields that vary dramatically in size and degree of integration into the network of science. Along the backbone of the network-including physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine-information flows bidirectionally, but the map reveals a directional pattern of citation from the applied fields to the basic sciences.

  12. Realization of Broadband Matched Filter Structures Based on Dual Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the basic electrical properties of dual networks and with their application in broadband matched filter structures. Starting with the main characteristics and different realization methods of dual networks, a filter structure is presented, which is based on a combination of dual networks and which provides a broadband matched input and two decoupled output ports. This filter synthesis focuses on the design of high pass filters, which are suitable to be used as differentiating stages in electrical pulse generators as a part of the so-called pulse shaping network. In order to achieve a proper pulse shape and for the prevention of multiple reflections between the switching circuit and the differentiating network, a broadband matched filter is a basic requirement.

  13. The structure of complex networks theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    This book deals with the analysis of the structure of complex networks by combining results from graph theory, physics, and pattern recognition. The book is divided into two parts. 11 chapters are dedicated to the development of theoretical tools for the structural analysis of networks, and 7 chapters are illustrating, in a critical way, applications of these tools to real-world scenarios. The first chapters provide detailed coverage of adjacency and metric and topologicalproperties of networks, followed by chapters devoted to the analysis of individual fragments and fragment-based global inva

  14. Modeling Temporal Evolution and Multiscale Structure in Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    -point model to account for the temporal evolution of each vertex. We demonstrate that our model is able to infer time-varying multiscale structure in synthetic as well as three real world time-evolving complex networks. Our modeling of the temporal evolution of hierarchies brings new insights......Many real-world networks exhibit both temporal evolution and multiscale structure. We propose a model for temporally correlated multifurcating hierarchies in complex networks which jointly capture both effects. We use the Gibbs fragmentation tree as prior over multifurcating trees and a change...

  15. Improving the Reliability of Network Metrics in Structural Brain Networks by Integrating Different Network Weighting Strategies into a Single Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros I. Dimitriadis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural brain networks estimated from diffusion MRI (dMRI via tractography have been widely studied in healthy controls and patients with neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, few studies have addressed the reliability of derived network metrics both node-specific and network-wide. Different network weighting strategies (NWS can be adopted to weight the strength of connection between two nodes yielding structural brain networks that are almost fully-weighted. Here, we scanned five healthy participants five times each, using a diffusion-weighted MRI protocol and computed edges between 90 regions of interest (ROI from the Automated Anatomical Labeling (AAL template. The edges were weighted according to nine different methods. We propose a linear combination of these nine NWS into a single graph using an appropriate diffusion distance metric. We refer to the resulting weighted graph as an Integrated Weighted Structural Brain Network (ISWBN. Additionally, we consider a topological filtering scheme that maximizes the information flow in the brain network under the constraint of the overall cost of the surviving connections. We compared each of the nine NWS and the ISWBN based on the improvement of: (a intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC of well-known network metrics, both node-wise and per network level; and (b the recognition accuracy of each subject compared to the remainder of the cohort, as an attempt to access the uniqueness of the structural brain network for each subject, after first applying our proposed topological filtering scheme. Based on a threshold where the network level ICC should be >0.90, our findings revealed that six out of nine NWS lead to unreliable results at the network level, while all nine NWS were unreliable at the node level. In comparison, our proposed ISWBN performed as well as the best performing individual NWS at the network level, and the ICC was higher compared to all individual NWS at the node

  16. Structure and Evolution of the Foreign Exchange Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, J.; Gworek, S.; Drożdż, S.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate topology and temporal evolution of the foreign currency exchange market viewed from a weighted network perspective. Based on exchange rates for a set of 46 currencies (including precious metals), we construct different representations of the FX network depending on a choice of the base currency. Our results show that the network structure is not stable in time, but there are main clusters of currencies, which persist for a long period of time despite the fact that their size and content are variable. We find a long-term trend in the network's evolution which affects the USD and EUR nodes. In all the network representations, the USD node gradually loses its centrality, while, on contrary, the EUR node has become slightly more central than it used to be in its early years. Despite this directional trend, the overall evolution of the network is noisy.

  17. Neural network structure for navigation using potential fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumer, Edward S.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid-network method for obstacle avoidance in the truck-backing system of D. Nguyen and B. Widrow (1989) is presented. A neural network technique for vehicle navigation and control in the presence of obstacles has been developed. A potential function which peaks at the surface of obstacles and has its minimum at the proper vehicle destination is computed using a network structure. The field is guaranteed not to have spurious local minima and does not have the property of flattening-out far from the goal. A feedforward neural network is used to control the steering of the vehicle using local field information. The network is trained in an obstacle-free space to follow the negative gradient of the field, after which the network is able to control and navigate the truck to its target destination in a space of obstacles which may be stationary or movable.

  18. Fragmented Romanian Sociology: Growth and Structure of the Collaboration Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hâncean, Marian-Gabriel; Perc, Matjaž; Vlăsceanu, Lazăr

    2014-01-01

    Structural patterns in collaboration networks are essential for understanding how new ideas, research practices, innovation or cooperation circulate and develop within academic communities and between and within university departments. In our research, we explore and investigate the structure of the collaboration network formed by the academics working full-time within all the 17 sociology departments across Romania. We show that the collaboration network is sparse and fragmented, and that it constitutes an environment that does not promote the circulation of new ideas and innovation within the field. Although recent years have witnessed an increase in the productivity of Romanian sociologists, there is still ample room for improvement in terms of the interaction infrastructure that ought to link individuals together so that they could maximize their potentials. We also fail to discern evidence in favor of the Matthew effect governing the growth of the network, which suggests scientific success and productivity are not rewarded. Instead, the structural properties of the collaboration network are partly those of a core-periphery network, where the spread of innovation and change can be explained by structural equivalence rather than by interpersonal influence models. We also provide support for the idea that, within the observed network, collaboration is the product of homophily rather than prestige effects. Further research on the subject based on data from other countries in the region is needed to place our results in a comparative framework, in particular to discern whether the behavior of the Romanian sociologist community is unique or rather common. PMID:25409180

  19. Fragmented Romanian sociology: growth and structure of the collaboration network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian-Gabriel Hâncean

    Full Text Available Structural patterns in collaboration networks are essential for understanding how new ideas, research practices, innovation or cooperation circulate and develop within academic communities and between and within university departments. In our research, we explore and investigate the structure of the collaboration network formed by the academics working full-time within all the 17 sociology departments across Romania. We show that the collaboration network is sparse and fragmented, and that it constitutes an environment that does not promote the circulation of new ideas and innovation within the field. Although recent years have witnessed an increase in the productivity of Romanian sociologists, there is still ample room for improvement in terms of the interaction infrastructure that ought to link individuals together so that they could maximize their potentials. We also fail to discern evidence in favor of the Matthew effect governing the growth of the network, which suggests scientific success and productivity are not rewarded. Instead, the structural properties of the collaboration network are partly those of a core-periphery network, where the spread of innovation and change can be explained by structural equivalence rather than by interpersonal influence models. We also provide support for the idea that, within the observed network, collaboration is the product of homophily rather than prestige effects. Further research on the subject based on data from other countries in the region is needed to place our results in a comparative framework, in particular to discern whether the behavior of the Romanian sociologist community is unique or rather common.

  20. Network structure classification and features of water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustolisi, Orazio; Simone, Antonietta; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The network connectivity structure of water distribution systems (WDSs) represents the domain where hydraulic processes occur, driving the emerging behavior of such systems, for example with respect to robustness and vulnerability. In complex network theory (CNT), a common way of classifying the network structure and connectivity is the association of the nodal degree distribution to specific probability distribution models, and during the last decades, researchers classified many real networks using the Poisson or Pareto distributions. In spite of the fact that degree-based network classification could play a crucial role to assess WDS vulnerability, this task is not easy because the network structure of WDSs is strongly constrained by spatial characteristics of the environment where they are constructed. The consequence of these spatial constraints is that the nodal degree spans very small ranges in WDSs hindering a reliable classification by the standard approach based on the nodal degree distribution. This work investigates the classification of the network structure of 22 real WDSs, built in different environments, demonstrating that the Poisson distribution generally models the degree distributions very well. In order to overcome the problem of the reliable classification based on the standard nodal degree, we define the "neighborhood" degree, equal to the sum of the nodal degrees of the nearest topological neighbors (i.e., the adjacent nodes). This definition of "neighborhood" degree is consistent with the fact that the degree of a single node is not significant for analysis of WDSs.

  1. Fragmented Romanian sociology: growth and structure of the collaboration network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hâncean, Marian-Gabriel; Perc, Matjaž; Vlăsceanu, Lazăr

    2014-01-01

    Structural patterns in collaboration networks are essential for understanding how new ideas, research practices, innovation or cooperation circulate and develop within academic communities and between and within university departments. In our research, we explore and investigate the structure of the collaboration network formed by the academics working full-time within all the 17 sociology departments across Romania. We show that the collaboration network is sparse and fragmented, and that it constitutes an environment that does not promote the circulation of new ideas and innovation within the field. Although recent years have witnessed an increase in the productivity of Romanian sociologists, there is still ample room for improvement in terms of the interaction infrastructure that ought to link individuals together so that they could maximize their potentials. We also fail to discern evidence in favor of the Matthew effect governing the growth of the network, which suggests scientific success and productivity are not rewarded. Instead, the structural properties of the collaboration network are partly those of a core-periphery network, where the spread of innovation and change can be explained by structural equivalence rather than by interpersonal influence models. We also provide support for the idea that, within the observed network, collaboration is the product of homophily rather than prestige effects. Further research on the subject based on data from other countries in the region is needed to place our results in a comparative framework, in particular to discern whether the behavior of the Romanian sociologist community is unique or rather common.

  2. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

  3. Unifying Inference of Meso-Scale Structures in Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkan Tunç

    Full Text Available Networks are among the most prevalent formal representations in scientific studies, employed to depict interactions between objects such as molecules, neuronal clusters, or social groups. Studies performed at meso-scale that involve grouping of objects based on their distinctive interaction patterns form one of the main lines of investigation in network science. In a social network, for instance, meso-scale structures can correspond to isolated social groupings or groups of individuals that serve as a communication core. Currently, the research on different meso-scale structures such as community and core-periphery structures has been conducted via independent approaches, which precludes the possibility of an algorithmic design that can handle multiple meso-scale structures and deciding which structure explains the observed data better. In this study, we propose a unified formulation for the algorithmic detection and analysis of different meso-scale structures. This facilitates the investigation of hybrid structures that capture the interplay between multiple meso-scale structures and statistical comparison of competing structures, all of which have been hitherto unavailable. We demonstrate the applicability of the methodology in analyzing the human brain network, by determining the dominant organizational structure (communities of the brain, as well as its auxiliary characteristics (core-periphery.

  4. Unifying Inference of Meso-Scale Structures in Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunç, Birkan; Verma, Ragini

    2015-01-01

    Networks are among the most prevalent formal representations in scientific studies, employed to depict interactions between objects such as molecules, neuronal clusters, or social groups. Studies performed at meso-scale that involve grouping of objects based on their distinctive interaction patterns form one of the main lines of investigation in network science. In a social network, for instance, meso-scale structures can correspond to isolated social groupings or groups of individuals that serve as a communication core. Currently, the research on different meso-scale structures such as community and core-periphery structures has been conducted via independent approaches, which precludes the possibility of an algorithmic design that can handle multiple meso-scale structures and deciding which structure explains the observed data better. In this study, we propose a unified formulation for the algorithmic detection and analysis of different meso-scale structures. This facilitates the investigation of hybrid structures that capture the interplay between multiple meso-scale structures and statistical comparison of competing structures, all of which have been hitherto unavailable. We demonstrate the applicability of the methodology in analyzing the human brain network, by determining the dominant organizational structure (communities) of the brain, as well as its auxiliary characteristics (core-periphery).

  5. Conversation practices and network structure in Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Luca; Magnani, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    the participation in the same hashtag based conversation change the follower list of the participants? Is it possible to point out specific social behaviors that would produce a major gain of followers? Our conclusions are based on real data concerning the popular TV show Xfactor, that largely used Twitter......The public by default nature of Twitter messages, together with the adoption of the #hashtag convention led, in few years, to the creation of a digital space able to host worldwide conversation on almost every kind of topic. From major TV shows to Natural disasters there is no contemporary event...... that does not have its own #hashtag to gather together the ongoing Twitter conversation. These topical discussions take place outside of the Twitter network made of followers and friends. Nevertheless this topical network is where many of the most studied phenomena take place. Therefore Twitter based...

  6. Predicting network structure using unlabeled interaction information

    OpenAIRE

    Nasim, Mehwish; Brandes, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    We are interested in the question whether interactions in online social networks (OSNs) can serve as a proxy for more persistent social relation. With Facebook as the context of our analysis, we look at commenting on wall posts as a form of interaction, and friendship ties as social relations. Findings from a pretest suggest that others’ joint commenting patterns on someone’s status posts are indeed indicative of friendship ties between them, independent of the contents. This would have impli...

  7. Network structure impacts global commodity trade growth and resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenskaya, Elena; Fath, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    Global commodity trade networks are critical to our collective sustainable development. Their increasing interconnectedness pose two practical questions: (i) Do the current network configurations support their further growth? (ii) How resilient are these networks to economic shocks? We analyze the data of global commodity trade flows from 1996 to 2012 to evaluate the relationship between structural properties of the global commodity trade networks and (a) their dynamic growth, as well as (b) the resilience of their growth with respect to the 2009 global economic shock. Specifically, we explore the role of network efficiency and redundancy using the information theory-based network flow analysis. We find that, while network efficiency is positively correlated with growth, highly efficient systems appear to be less resilient, losing more and gaining less growth following an economic shock. While all examined networks are rather redundant, we find that network redundancy does not hinder their growth. Moreover, systems exhibiting higher levels of redundancy lose less and gain more growth following an economic shock. We suggest that a strategy to support making global trade networks more efficient via, e.g., preferential trade agreements and higher specialization, can promote their further growth; while a strategy to increase the global trade networks’ redundancy via e.g., more abundant free-trade agreements, can improve their resilience to global economic shocks. PMID:28207790

  8. Structural Quality of Service in Large-Scale Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    , telephony and data. To meet the requirements of the different applications, and to handle the increased vulnerability to failures, the ability to design robust networks providing good Quality of Service is crucial. However, most planning of large-scale networks today is ad-hoc based, leading to highly......Digitalization has created the base for co-existence and convergence in communications, leading to an increasing use of multi service networks. This is for example seen in the Fiber To The Home implementations, where a single fiber is used for virtually all means of communication, including TV...... complex networks lacking predictability and global structural properties. The thesis applies the concept of Structural Quality of Service to formulate desirable global properties, and it shows how regular graph structures can be used to obtain such properties....

  9. Math Anxiety Questionnaire: Similar Latent Structure in Brazilian and German School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Wood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Math anxiety is a relatively frequent phenomenon often related to low mathematics achievement and dyscalculia. In the present study, the German and the Brazilian versions of the Mathematics Anxiety Questionnaire (MAQ were examined. The two-dimensional structure originally reported for the German MAQ, that includes both affective and cognitive components of math anxiety was reproduced in the Brazilian version. Moreover, mathematics anxiety also was found to increase with age in both populations and was particularly associated with basic numeric competencies and more complex arithmetics. The present results suggest that mathematics anxiety as measured by the MAQ presents the same internal structure in culturally very different populations.

  10. Quantifying structural uncertainty on fault networks using a marked point process within a Bayesian framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Orhun; Caers, Jef Karel

    2017-08-01

    Faults are one of the building-blocks for subsurface modeling studies. Incomplete observations of subsurface fault networks lead to uncertainty pertaining to location, geometry and existence of faults. In practice, gaps in incomplete fault network observations are filled based on tectonic knowledge and interpreter's intuition pertaining to fault relationships. Modeling fault network uncertainty with realistic models that represent tectonic knowledge is still a challenge. Although methods that address specific sources of fault network uncertainty and complexities of fault modeling exists, a unifying framework is still lacking. In this paper, we propose a rigorous approach to quantify fault network uncertainty. Fault pattern and intensity information are expressed by means of a marked point process, marked Strauss point process. Fault network information is constrained to fault surface observations (complete or partial) within a Bayesian framework. A structural prior model is defined to quantitatively express fault patterns, geometries and relationships within the Bayesian framework. Structural relationships between faults, in particular fault abutting relations, are represented with a level-set based approach. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler is used to sample posterior fault network realizations that reflect tectonic knowledge and honor fault observations. We apply the methodology to a field study from Nankai Trough & Kumano Basin. The target for uncertainty quantification is a deep site with attenuated seismic data with only partially visible faults and many faults missing from the survey or interpretation. A structural prior model is built from shallow analog sites that are believed to have undergone similar tectonics compared to the site of study. Fault network uncertainty for the field is quantified with fault network realizations that are conditioned to structural rules, tectonic information and partially observed fault surfaces. We show the proposed

  11. Discrete self-similarity in thin films with van der Waals interactions and the formation of iterated structures

    CERN Document Server

    Dallaston, Michael C; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-01-01

    The formation of iterated structures, such as satellite and sub-satellite drops, filaments, bubbles, etc is a common phenomenon in free surface flows. We provide a computational and theoretical study of the origin of these patterns in the case of thin films of viscous fluids subject to long-range molecular forces. Iterated structures appear as a consequence of discrete self-similarity, where patterns repeat themselves, subject to rescaling, periodically in a logarithmic time scale. The result is an infinite sequence of ridges and filaments with similarity properties. The character of these discretely self-similar solutions as the result of a Hopf bifurcation from ordinarily self-similar solutions is also described.

  12. Exploring the Link between Genetic Relatedness r and Social Contact Structure k in Animal Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Traulsen, Arne; James, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of how cooperation can arise in a population of selfish individuals has been greatly advanced by theory. More than one approach has been used to explore the effect of population structure. Inclusive fitness theory uses genetic relatedness r to express the role of population structure. Evolutionary graph theory models the evolution of cooperation on network structures and focuses on the number of interacting partners k as a quantity of interest. Here we use empirical data from a hierarchically structured animal contact network to examine the interplay between independent, measurable proxies for these key parameters. We find strong inverse correlations between estimates of r and k over three levels of social organization, suggesting that genetic relatedness and social contact structure capture similar structural information in a real population.

  13. SCPRED: Accurate prediction of protein structural class for sequences of twilight-zone similarity with predicting sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure prediction methods provide accurate results when a homologous protein is predicted, while poorer predictions are obtained in the absence of homologous templates. However, some protein chains that share twilight-zone pairwise identity can form similar folds and thus determining structural similarity without the sequence similarity would be desirable for the structure prediction. The folding type of a protein or its domain is defined as the structural class. Current structural class prediction methods that predict the four structural classes defined in SCOP provide up to 63% accuracy for the datasets in which sequence identity of any pair of sequences belongs to the twilight-zone. We propose SCPRED method that improves prediction accuracy for sequences that share twilight-zone pairwise similarity with sequences used for the prediction. Results SCPRED uses a support vector machine classifier that takes several custom-designed features as its input to predict the structural classes. Based on extensive design that considers over 2300 index-, composition- and physicochemical properties-based features along with features based on the predicted secondary structure and content, the classifier's input includes 8 features based on information extracted from the secondary structure predicted with PSI-PRED and one feature computed from the sequence. Tests performed with datasets of 1673 protein chains, in which any pair of sequences shares twilight-zone similarity, show that SCPRED obtains 80.3% accuracy when predicting the four SCOP-defined structural classes, which is superior when compared with over a dozen recent competing methods that are based on support vector machine, logistic regression, and ensemble of classifiers predictors. Conclusion The SCPRED can accurately find similar structures for sequences that share low identity with sequence used for the prediction. The high predictive accuracy achieved by SCPRED is

  14. Different histories but similar genetic diversity and structure for black walnut in Indiana and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin R. Victory; Jeffrey C. Glaubitz; Jennifer A. Fike; Olin E. Rhodes; Keith E. Woeste

    2008-01-01

    Missouri and Indiana have markedly different histories of glaciation and recolonization by forest trees. These states also differ in land use patterns and degree of anthropogenic landscape change such as forest fragmentation. To determine the overall effects of these and other demographic differences on the levels of genetic diversity and structure in black walnut (...

  15. Panarchy: discontinuities reval similarities in the dynamic system structure of ecological and social systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debates on the organization, structure and dynamics of ecosystems across scales of space and time have waxed and waned in the literature for a century. From successional theory to ecosystem theories of resilience and robustness, from hierarchy to ascendency to panarchy theory, e...

  16. Is Word-Order Similarity Necessary for Cross-Linguistic Structural Priming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baoguo; Jia, Yuefang; Wang, Zhu; Dunlap, Susan; Shin, Jeong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    This article presents two experiments employing two structural priming paradigms that investigated whether cross-linguistic syntactic priming occurred in Chinese and English passive sentences that differ in word order (production-to-production priming in Experiment 1 and comprehension-to-production priming in Experiment 2). Results revealed that…

  17. Multi-objective clustering technique based on k-nodes update policy and similarity matrix for mining communities in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ronghua; Liu, Huan; Jiao, Licheng

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a relatively all-purpose network clustering technique based on the framework of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, which can effectively dispose the issue of community detection in unsigned social networks, as well as in signed social networks. Firstly, we formulate a generalized similarity function to construct a similarity matrix, and then a pre-partitioning strategy is projected according to the similarity matrix. The pre-partitioning strategy merely considers nodes with high similarity values, which avoids the interference of noise nodes during the label update phase. In this way, at the initial phase of the algorithm, nodes with strong connections are fleetly gathered into sub-communities. Secondly, we elaborately devise a crossover operator, called cross-merging operator, to merge sub-communities generated by the pre-partitioning technique. Moreover, a special mutation operator, based on the similarity matrix of nodes, is implemented to adjust boundary nodes connecting different communities. Finally, to handle different types of networks, we, therefore, have presented the novel multi-objective optimization models for this issue. Through a bulk of rigorous experiments on both unsigned and signed social networks, the preeminent clustering performance illustrate that the proposed algorithm is capable of mining communities effectively.

  18. Structural similarity causes different category-effects depending on task characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that category-specific impairments for natural objects may reflect that natural objects are more globally visually similar than artefacts and therefore more difficult to recognize following brain damage [Aphasiology 13 (1992) 169]. This account has been challenged...... whether category effects could be found on object decision tasks (deciding whether pictures represented real objects or not), when the stimulus material was matched across categories. In experiment 1, a disadvantage for natural objects was found on difficult object decision tasks whereas no category...

  19. Self-Similar Structure and Experimental Signatures of Suprathermal Ion Distribution in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Grigory; Svyatskiy, D; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Huang, C-K; McDevitt, C J

    2015-09-04

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydrodynamic instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. The ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT at the National Ignition Facility.

  20. Self-similar structure and experimental signatures of suprathermal ion distribution in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Grigory; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Huang, C -K

    2015-01-01

    The distribution function of suprathermal ions is found to be self-similar under conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion hot-spots. By utilizing this feature, interference between the hydro-instabilities and kinetic effects is for the first time assessed quantitatively to find that the instabilities substantially aggravate the fusion reactivity reduction. The ion tail depletion is also shown to lower the experimentally inferred ion temperature, a novel kinetic effect that may explain the discrepancy between the exploding pusher experiments and rad-hydro simulations and contribute to the observation that temperature inferred from DD reaction products is lower than from DT at National Ignition Facility.

  1. A local immunization strategy for networks with overlapping community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavian, Fatemeh; Salehi, Mostafa; Teimouri, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Since full coverage treatment is not feasible due to limited resources, we need to utilize an immunization strategy to effectively distribute the available vaccines. On the other hand, the structure of contact network among people has a significant impact on epidemics of infectious diseases (such as SARS and influenza) in a population. Therefore, network-based immunization strategies aim to reduce the spreading rate by removing the vaccinated nodes from contact network. Such strategies try to identify more important nodes in epidemics spreading over a network. In this paper, we address the effect of overlapping nodes among communities on epidemics spreading. The proposed strategy is an optimized random-walk based selection of these nodes. The whole process is local, i.e. it requires contact network information in the level of nodes. Thus, it is applicable to large-scale and unknown networks in which the global methods usually are unrealizable. Our simulation results on different synthetic and real networks show that the proposed method outperforms the existing local methods in most cases. In particular, for networks with strong community structures, high overlapping membership of nodes or small size communities, the proposed method shows better performance.

  2. Structure of Small World Innovation Network and Learning Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the differences of learning performance of 5 MNCs (multinational corporations that filed the largest number of patents in China. We establish the innovation network with the patent coauthorship data by these 5 MNCs and classify the networks by the tail of distribution curve of connections. To make a comparison of the learning performance of these 5 MNCs with differing network structures, we develop an organization learning model by regarding the reality as having m dimensions, which denotes the heterogeneous knowledge about the reality. We further set n innovative individuals that are mutually interactive and own unique knowledge about the reality. A longer (shorter distance between the knowledge of the individual and the reality denotes a lower (higher knowledge level of that individual. Individuals interact with and learn from each other within the small-world network. By making 1,000 numerical simulations and averaging the simulated results, we find that the differing structure of the small-world network leads to the differences of learning performance between these 5 MNCs. The network monopolization negatively impacts and network connectivity positively impacts learning performance. Policy implications in the conclusion section suggest that to improve firm learning performance, it is necessary to establish a flat and connective network.

  3. Impact of constrained rewiring on network structure and node dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattana, P; Berthouze, L; Kiss, I Z

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we study an adaptive spatial network. We consider a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic on the network, with a link or contact rewiring process constrained by spatial proximity. In particular, we assume that susceptible nodes break links with infected nodes independently of distance and reconnect at random to susceptible nodes available within a given radius. By systematically manipulating this radius we investigate the impact of rewiring on the structure of the network and characteristics of the epidemic. We adopt a step-by-step approach whereby we first study the impact of rewiring on the network structure in the absence of an epidemic, then with nodes assigned a disease status but without disease dynamics, and finally running network and epidemic dynamics simultaneously. In the case of no labeling and no epidemic dynamics, we provide both analytic and semianalytic formulas for the value of clustering achieved in the network. Our results also show that the rewiring radius and the network's initial structure have a pronounced effect on the endemic equilibrium, with increasingly large rewiring radiuses yielding smaller disease prevalence.

  4. Neural Schematics as a unified formal graphical representation of large-scale Neural Network Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eEhrlich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major outcomes of neuroscientific research are models of Neural Network Structures. Descriptions of these models usually consist of a non-standardized mixture of text, figures, and other means of visual information communication in print media. However, as neuroscience is an interdisciplinary domain by nature, a standardized way of consistently representing models of Neural Network Structures is required. While generic descriptions of such models in textual form have recently been developed, a formalized way of schematically expressing them does not exist to date. Hence, in this paper we present Neural Schematics as a concept inspired by similar approaches from other disciplines for a generic two dimensional representation of said structures. After introducing Neural Network Structures in general, a set of current visualizations of models of Neural Network Structures is reviewed and analyzed for what information they convey and how their elements are rendered. This analysis then allows for the definition of general items and symbols to consistently represent these models as Neural Schematics on a two dimensional plane. We will illustrate the possibilities an agreed upon standard can yield on sampled diagrams transformed into Neural Schematics and an example application for the design and modeling of large-scale Neural Network Structures.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structures of oxovanadium(V complexes derived from similar aroylhydrazone ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X-Z Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of [VO(acac2] (acac = acetylacetonate with N’-(5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene-3-methoxybenzohydrazide (H2L1 and N’-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzylidene-4-nitrobenzohydrazide (H2L2 in methanol affords methanol-coordinated mononuclear oxovanadium(V complexes, [VOL1(OMe(MeOH] (1 and [VOL2(OMe(MeOH] (2, respectively. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. Crystal and molecular structures of the complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. Single crystal X-ray structural studies indicate that the hydrazone ligands coordinate to the VO core through enolate oxygen, phenolate oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. The V atoms in the complexes are in octahedral coordination. Thermal stabilities of the complexes have also been studied. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v29i3.10

  6. Comparing and Selecting Generalized Double Ring Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    N2R(p;q) network structures were introduced recently as a generalization of double rings, and they were shown to be superior compared to double rings in terms of average distance and diameter. For a given number of nodes, there is only one double ring, but often more different N2R(p;q) structures...

  7. Bayesian network structure learning using chaos hybrid genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiajie; Lin, Feng; Sun, Wei; Chang, KC

    2012-06-01

    A new Bayesian network (BN) learning method using a hybrid algorithm and chaos theory is proposed. The principles of mutation and crossover in genetic algorithm and the cloud-based adaptive inertia weight were incorporated into the proposed simple particle swarm optimization (sPSO) algorithm to achieve better diversity, and improve the convergence speed. By means of ergodicity and randomicity of chaos algorithm, the initial network structure population is generated by using chaotic mapping with uniform search under structure constraints. When the algorithm converges to a local minimal, a chaotic searching is started to skip the local minima and to identify a potentially better network structure. The experiment results show that this algorithm can be effectively used for BN structure learning.

  8. Structural parameter identifiability analysis for dynamic reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidescu, Florin Paul; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2008-01-01

    where for a given set of measured variables it is desirable to investigate which parameters may be estimated prior to spending computational effort on the actual estimation. This contribution addresses the structural parameter identifiability problem for the typical case of reaction network models....... The proposed analysis is performed in two phases. The first phase determines the structurally identifiable reaction rates based on reaction network stoichiometry. The second phase assesses the structural parameter identifiability of the specific kinetic rate expressions using a generating series expansion...... method based on Lie derivatives. The proposed systematic two phase methodology is illustrated on a mass action based model for an enzymatically catalyzed reaction pathway network where only a limited set of variables is measured. The methodology clearly pinpoints the structurally identifiable parameters...

  9. Research on energy stock market associated network structure based on financial indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xian; An, Haizhong

    2018-01-01

    A financial market is a complex system consisting of many interacting units. In general, due to the various types of information exchange within the industry, there is a relationship between the stocks that can reveal their clear structural characteristics. Complex network methods are powerful tools for studying the internal structure and function of the stock market, which allows us to better understand the stock market. Applying complex network methodology, a stock associated network model based on financial indicators is created. Accordingly, we set threshold value and use modularity to detect the community network, and we analyze the network structure and community cluster characteristics of different threshold situations. The study finds that the threshold value of 0.7 is the abrupt change point of the network. At the same time, as the threshold value increases, the independence of the community strengthens. This study provides a method of researching stock market based on the financial indicators, exploring the structural similarity of financial indicators of stocks. Also, it provides guidance for investment and corporate financial management.

  10. Social structures in Russia : cells and networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yefimov, Vladimir

    2001-01-01

    Russian companies heirs of Soviet enterprises are not Western-style companies, a significant difference is that they represent the basic structures of social life in the USSR : cells. The Soviet cellular system itself has deep roots in the history of Russia. The principal social structure of pre-revolutionary Russia was the rural community. In the late 1950s, Soviet society began to move away from the classic model. Cells gradually lose their exclusive role in the functioning of society. New ...

  11. Structural properties of the Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lav R Varshney

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent interest in reconstructing neuronal networks, complete wiring diagrams on the level of individual synapses remain scarce and the insights into function they can provide remain unclear. Even for Caenorhabditis elegans, whose neuronal network is relatively small and stereotypical from animal to animal, published wiring diagrams are neither accurate nor complete and self-consistent. Using materials from White et al. and new electron micrographs we assemble whole, self-consistent gap junction and chemical synapse networks of hermaphrodite C. elegans. We propose a method to visualize the wiring diagram, which reflects network signal flow. We calculate statistical and topological properties of the network, such as degree distributions, synaptic multiplicities, and small-world properties, that help in understanding network signal propagation. We identify neurons that may play central roles in information processing, and network motifs that could serve as functional modules of the network. We explore propagation of neuronal activity in response to sensory or artificial stimulation using linear systems theory and find several activity patterns that could serve as substrates of previously described behaviors. Finally, we analyze the interaction between the gap junction and the chemical synapse networks. Since several statistical properties of the C. elegans network, such as multiplicity and motif distributions are similar to those found in mammalian neocortex, they likely point to general principles of neuronal networks. The wiring diagram reported here can help in understanding the mechanistic basis of behavior by generating predictions about future experiments involving genetic perturbations, laser ablations, or monitoring propagation of neuronal activity in response to stimulation.

  12. Coherent Structures in the Similarity Region of a Two-Dimensional Turbulent Jet: A Vortex Street,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Kolmogoroff length (m) tmin Minimum interface length scale (m) I Structural pattern wavelength (m) L its/D S M(Xo,X) Integrated vortex count defined in Eq. 5.24...a vortex centered coordinate system in Figure 5-2 T Time delay (s) Th Hold time applied to G(r,t) (s) Tpeak Time delay yielding the maximum space -time...eddies to the smaller ones. This, in turn, requires increasingly smaller scales for the viscous dissipation of energy as described by the Kolmogoroff

  13. Enriching regulatory networks by bootstrap learning using optimised GO-based gene similarity and gene links mined from PubMed abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; McDermott, Jason E.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Jensen, Russell S.; Verhagen, Marc; Pustejovsky, James

    2011-02-18

    Transcriptional regulatory networks are being determined using “reverse engineering” methods that infer connections based on correlations in gene state. Corroboration of such networks through independent means such as evidence from the biomedical literature is desirable. Here, we explore a novel approach, a bootstrapping version of our previous Cross-Ontological Analytic method (XOA) that can be used for semi-automated annotation and verification of inferred regulatory connections, as well as for discovery of additional functional relationships between the genes. First, we use our annotation and network expansion method on a biological network learned entirely from the literature. We show how new relevant links between genes can be iteratively derived using a gene similarity measure based on the Gene Ontology that is optimized on the input network at each iteration. Second, we apply our method to annotation, verification, and expansion of a set of regulatory connections found by the Context Likelihood of Relatedness algorithm.

  14. Resistance and Security Index of Networks: Structural Information Perspective of Network Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angsheng; Hu, Qifu; Liu, Jun; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-06-03

    Recently, Li and Pan defined the metric of the K-dimensional structure entropy of a structured noisy dataset G to be the information that controls the formation of the K-dimensional structure of G that is evolved by the rules, order and laws of G, excluding the random variations that occur in G. Here, we propose the notion of resistance of networks based on the one- and two-dimensional structural information of graphs. Given a graph G, we define the resistance of G, written , as the greatest overall number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible via random walks with stationary distribution in G, from which the random walks cannot escape. We show that the resistance of networks follows the resistance law of networks, that is, for a network G, the resistance of G is , where and are the one- and two-dimensional structure entropies of G, respectively. Based on the resistance law, we define the security index of a network G to be the normalised resistance of G, that is, . We show that the resistance and security index are both well-defined measures for the security of the networks.

  15. Variability and similarities in the structural properties of two related Laminaria kelp species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves

    2018-01-01

    Kelps of the genus Laminaria have long been studied and shown to exhibit a seasonal shift in growth and morphology, as nutrients and light levels change during the year. However, the variation of kelp biomechanical properties has been little explored despite the importance of these properties for the interaction of kelp with the flow. Previous research showed that aging does influence the algae biomechanical properties, so this study further investigates the variability of kelp biomechanical properties and morphological characteristics at a given site as a function of the season (growth phase), species, and different kelp parts. Mechanical parameters and morphological characteristics were measured on kelps sampled in winter and summer, and DNA sequencing was used to identify the two related species, L. digitata and L. hyperborea. Descriptive statistics and statistical analysis were used to detect trends in the modulation of kelp mechanical design. Although two distinct species were identified, only minor structural differences were observed between them. The biomechanical properties varied significantly along the kelp, and significant seasonal shifts occurred at the blade level, in relation to the different morphological changes during blade renewal. In general, the variations of the structural properties were mostly linked to the blade growth activity. The absence of significant variation in the mechanical design of the two species highlights the significance of the adaptation to the same local environmental conditions, this adaptation being a key process in vegetation-flow interactions and having implications on the interaction between kelp and hydrodynamics.

  16. Structural similarity of E. coli 5S rRNA in solution and within the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinska, Lidia; Banachowicz, Ewa; Gapiński, Jacek; Patkowski, Adam; Barciszewski, Jan

    2004-02-15

    The article presents translational and rotational diffusion coefficients of 5S rRNA determined experimentally by the method of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and its comparison with the values predicted for different models of this molecule. The tertiary structure of free 5S rRNA was proposed on the basis of the atomic structures of the 5S rRNA from E. coli and H. marismortui extracted from the ribosome. A comparison of the values of DT, tauR, and Rg predicted for different models with experimental results for the free molecule in solution suggests that free 5S rRNA is less compact than that in the complex with ribosomal proteins. In general, the molecules of 5S rRNA consist of three domains: a short one and two longer ones. As follows from a comparison of the results of our simulations with experimental values, in the molecule in solution the two closest helical fragments of the longer domains remain collinear, whereas the short domain takes a position significantly deviated from them. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Structured learning via convolutional neural networks for vehicle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Ana I.; del Blanco, Carlos R.; Jaureguizar, Fernando; García, Narciso

    2017-05-01

    One of the main tasks in a vision-based traffic monitoring system is the detection of vehicles. Recently, deep neural networks have been successfully applied to this end, outperforming previous approaches. However, most of these works generally rely on complex and high-computational region proposal networks. Others employ deep neural networks as a segmentation strategy to achieve a semantic representation of the object of interest, which has to be up-sampled later. In this paper, a new design for a convolutional neural network is applied to vehicle detection in highways for traffic monitoring. This network generates a spatially structured output that encodes the vehicle locations. Promising results have been obtained in the GRAM-RTM dataset.

  18. Modeling structure and resilience of the dark network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2017-02-01

    While the statistical and resilience properties of the Internet are no longer changing significantly across time, the Darknet, a network devoted to keep anonymous its traffic, still experiences rapid changes to improve the security of its users. Here we study the structure of the Darknet and find that its topology is rather peculiar, being characterized by a nonhomogeneous distribution of connections, typical of scale-free networks; very short path lengths and high clustering, typical of small-world networks; and lack of a core of highly connected nodes. We propose a model to reproduce such features, demonstrating that the mechanisms used to improve cybersecurity are responsible for the observed topology. Unexpectedly, we reveal that its peculiar structure makes the Darknet much more resilient than the Internet (used as a benchmark for comparison at a descriptive level) to random failures, targeted attacks, and cascade failures, as a result of adaptive changes in response to the attempts of dismantling the network across time.

  19. Modeling structure and resilience of the dark network

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Domenico, Manlio; Arenas, Alex

    2017-02-01

    While the statistical and resilience properties of the Internet are no longer changing significantly across time, the Darknet, a network devoted to keep anonymous its traffic, still experiences rapid changes to improve the security of its users. Here we study the structure of the Darknet and find that its topology is rather peculiar, being characterized by a nonhomogeneous distribution of connections, typical of scale-free networks; very short path lengths and high clustering, typical of small-world networks; and lack of a core of highly connected nodes. We propose a model to reproduce such features, demonstrating that the mechanisms used to improve cybersecurity are responsible for the observed topology. Unexpectedly, we reveal that its peculiar structure makes the Darknet much more resilient than the Internet (used as a benchmark for comparison at a descriptive level) to random failures, targeted attacks, and cascade failures, as a result of adaptive changes in response to the attempts of dismantling the network across time.

  20. Offspring social network structure predicts fitness in families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, Nick J; Pike, Thomas W; Heeb, Philipp; Richner, Heinz; Kölliker, Mathias

    2012-12-22

    Social structures such as families emerge as outcomes of behavioural interactions among individuals, and can evolve over time if families with particular types of social structures tend to leave more individuals in subsequent generations. The social behaviour of interacting individuals is typically analysed as a series of multiple dyadic (pair-wise) interactions, rather than a network of interactions among multiple individuals. However, in species where parents feed dependant young, interactions within families nearly always involve more than two individuals simultaneously. Such social networks of interactions at least partly reflect conflicts of interest over the provision of costly parental investment. Consequently, variation in family network structure reflects variation in how conflicts of interest are resolved among family members. Despite its importance in understanding the evolution of emergent properties of social organization such as family life and cooperation, nothing is currently known about how selection acts on the structure of social networks. Here, we show that the social network structure of broods of begging nestling great tits Parus major predicts fitness in families. Although selection at the level of the individual favours large nestlings, selection at the level of the kin-group primarily favours families that resolve conflicts most effectively.

  1. Brain networks that track musical structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, Petr

    2005-12-01

    As the functional neuroimaging literature grows, it becomes increasingly apparent that music and musical activities engage diverse regions of the brain. In this paper I discuss two studies to illustrate that exactly which brain areas are observed to be responsive to musical stimuli and tasks depends on the tasks and the methods used to describe the tasks and the stimuli. In one study, subjects listened to polyphonic music and were asked to either orient their attention selectively to individual instruments or in a divided or holistic manner across multiple instruments. The network of brain areas that was recruited changed subtly with changes in the task instructions. The focus of the second study was to identify brain regions that follow the pattern of movement of a continuous melody through the tonal space defined by the major and minor keys of Western tonal music. Such an area was identified in the rostral medial prefrontal cortex. This observation is discussed in the context of other neuroimaging studies that implicate this region in inwardly directed mental states involving decisions about the self, autobiographical memory, the cognitive regulation of emotion, affective responses to musical stimuli, and familiarity judgments about musical stimuli. Together with observations that these regions are among the last to atrophy in Alzheimer disease, and that these patients appear to remain responsive to autobiographically salient musical stimuli, very early evidence is emerging from the literature for the hypothesis that the rostral medial prefrontal cortex is a node that is important for binding music with memories within a broader music-responsive network.

  2. From Microactions to Macrostructure and Back : A Structurational Approach to the Evolution of Organizational Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whitbred, Robert; Fonti, Fabio; Steglich, Christian; Contractor, Noshir

    Structuration theory (ST) and network analysis are promising approaches for studying the emergence of communication networks. We offer a model that integrates the conceptual richness of structuration with the precision of relevant concepts and mechanisms offered from communication network research.

  3. Similarities and differences in structure, expression, and functions of VLDLR and ApoER2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeber Edwin J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (VLDLR and Apolipoprotein E Receptor 2 (ApoER2 are important receptors in the brain for mediating the signaling effects of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin, affecting neuronal function in development and in the adult brain. VLDLR and ApoER2 are members of the low density lipoprotein family, which also mediates the effects of numerous other extracellular ligands, including apolipoprotein E. Although VLDLR and ApoER2 are highly homologous, they differ in a number of ways, including structural differences, expression patterns, alternative splicing, and binding of extracellular and intracellular proteins. This review aims to summarize important aspects of VLDLR and ApoER2 that may account for interesting recent findings that highlight the unique functions of each receptor.

  4. Dependency structure matrix modelling for stakeholder value networks

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Wen; Crawley, Edward F.; de Weck, Olivier L.; Keller, Rene; Robinson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a qualitative/quantitative network approach, namely a “Stakeholder Value Network”, to understand the impacts of both direct and indirect relationships between stakeholders on the success of large engineering projects. Specifically, this paper explores the feasibility and benefit of applying the Dependency Structure Matrix (DSM) as the modelling platform for Stakeholder Value Networks. Further, an efficient algorithm is designed for computing indirect stakeholder influence ...

  5. Functional and structural comparison of visual lateralization in birds – similar but still different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eManns

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate brains display physiological and anatomical left-right differences, which are related to hemispheric dominances for specific functions. Functional lateralizations likely rely on structural left-right differences in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity patterns that develop in tight gene-environment interactions. The visual systems of chickens and pigeons show that asymmetrical light stimulation during ontogeny induces a dominance of the left hemisphere for visuomotor control that is paralleled by projection asymmetries within the ascending visual pathways. But structural asymmetries vary essentially between both species concerning the affected pathway (thalamo- vs. tectofugal system, constancy of effects (transient vs. permanent, and the hemisphere receiving stronger bilateral input (right vs. left. These discrepancies suggest that at least two aspects of visual processes are influenced by asymmetric light stimulation: 1. Visuomotor dominance develops within the ontogenetically stronger stimulated hemisphere but not necessarily in the one receiving stronger bottom-up input. As a secondary consequence of asymmetrical light experience, lateralized top-down mechanisms play a critical role in the emergence of hemispheric dominance. 2. Ontogenetic light experiences may affect the dominant use of left- and right-hemispheric strategies. Evidences from social and spatial cognition tasks indicate that chickens rely more on a right-hemispheric global strategy whereas pigeons display a dominance of the left hemisphere. Thus, behavioural asymmetries are linked to a stronger bilateral input to the right hemisphere in chickens but to the left one in pigeons. The degree of bilateral visual input may determine the dominant visual processing strategy when redundant encoding is possible. This analysis supports that environmental stimulation affects the balance between hemispheric-specific processing by lateralized interactions of bottom-up and top

  6. Motif structure and cooperation in real-world complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mostafa; Rabiee, Hamid R.; Jalili, Mahdi

    2010-12-01

    Networks of dynamical nodes serve as generic models for real-world systems in many branches of science ranging from mathematics to physics, technology, sociology and biology. Collective behavior of agents interacting over complex networks is important in many applications. The cooperation between selfish individuals is one of the most interesting collective phenomena. In this paper we address the interplay between the motifs’ cooperation properties and their abundance in a number of real-world networks including yeast protein-protein interaction, human brain, protein structure, email communication, dolphins’ social interaction, Zachary karate club and Net-science coauthorship networks. First, the amount of cooperativity for all possible undirected subgraphs with three to six nodes is calculated. To this end, the evolutionary dynamics of the Prisoner’s Dilemma game is considered and the cooperativity of each subgraph is calculated as the percentage of cooperating agents at the end of the simulation time. Then, the three- to six-node motifs are extracted for each network. The significance of the abundance of a motif, represented by a Z-value, is obtained by comparing them with some properly randomized versions of the original network. We found that there is always a group of motifs showing a significant inverse correlation between their cooperativity amount and Z-value, i.e. the more the Z-value the less the amount of cooperativity. This suggests that networks composed of well-structured units do not have good cooperativity properties.

  7. Mapping human whole-brain structural networks with diffusion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Hagmann

    Full Text Available Understanding the large-scale structural network formed by neurons is a major challenge in system neuroscience. A detailed connectivity map covering the entire brain would therefore be of great value. Based on diffusion MRI, we propose an efficient methodology to generate large, comprehensive and individual white matter connectional datasets of the living or dead, human or animal brain. This non-invasive tool enables us to study the basic and potentially complex network properties of the entire brain. For two human subjects we find that their individual brain networks have an exponential node degree distribution and that their global organization is in the form of a small world.

  8. Sampling from complex networks with high community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mostafa; Rabiee, Hamid R; Rajabi, Arezo

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel link-tracing sampling algorithm, based on the concepts from PageRank vectors, to sample from networks with high community structures. Our method has two phases; (1) Sampling the closest nodes to the initial nodes by approximating personalized PageRank vectors and (2) Jumping to a new community by using PageRank vectors and unknown neighbors. Empirical studies on several synthetic and real-world networks show that the proposed method improves the performance of network sampling compared to the popular link-based sampling methods in terms of accuracy and visited communities.

  9. Acoustical properties of nonwoven fiber network structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tascan, Mevlut

    Sound insulation is one of the most important issues for the automotive and building industries. Because they are porous fibrous structures, textile materials can be used as sound insulating and sound absorbing materials. Very high-density materials such as steel can insulate sound very effectively but these rigid materials reflect most of the sound back to the environment, causing sound pollution. Additionally, because high-density, rigid materials are also heavy and high cost, they cannot be used for sound insulation for the automotive and building industries. Nonwoven materials are more suitable for these industries, and they can also absorb sound in order to decrease sound pollution in the environment. Therefore, nonwoven materials are one of the most important materials for sound insulation and absorption applications materials. Insulation and absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics depend on fiber geometry and fiber arrangement within the fabric structure. Because of their complex structure, it is very difficult to define the microstructure of nonwovens. The structure of nonwovens only has fibers and voids that are filled by air. Because of the complexity of fiber-void geometry, there is still not a very accurate theory or model that defines the structural arrangement. A considerable amount of modeling has been reported in literature [1--19], but most models are not accurate due to the assumptions made. Voids that are covered by fibers are called pores in nonwoven structures and their geometry is very important, especially for the absorption properties of nonwovens. In order to define the sound absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics, individual pore structure and the number of pores per unit thickness of the fabric should be determined. In this research, instead of trying to define pores, the properties of the fibers are investigated and the number of fibers per volume of fabric is taken as a parameter in the theory. Then the effect of the nonwoven

  10. Neural networks for harmonic structure in music perception and action

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, R.; Novembre, G.; Keller, P. E.; Kim, S G; Scharf, F.; Friederici, A. D.; Villringer, A; Sammler, D.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict upcoming structured events based on long-term knowledge and contextual priors is a fundamental principle of human cognition. Tonal music triggers predictive processes based on structural properties of harmony, i.e., regularities defining the arrangement of chords into well-formed musical sequences. While the neural architecture of structure-based predictions during music perception is well described, little is known about the neural networks for analogous predictions in...

  11. Influence and structural balance in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P.; Sreenivasan, S.; Szymanski, B.; Korniss, G.

    2012-02-01

    Models on structural balance have been studied in the past with links being categorized as friendly or antagonistic [Ref- T. Antal et al., Phys. Rev. E 72, 036121 (2005)]. However no connection between the nature of the links and states of the nodes they connect has been made. We introduce a model which combines the dynamics of the structural balance with spread of social influence. In this model, every node is in one of the three possible states (e.g. leftist, centrist and rightist) [Ref- F. Vazquez, S. Redner, J. Phys A, 37 (2004) 8479-8494] where links between leftists and rightists are antagonistic while all other links are friendly. The evolution of the system is governed by the rules of structural balance and opinion spread takes place as a result of structural balance process. The dynamics can lead the system to a number of fixed points (absorbing states). We study how the initial density of centrists nc affects the dynamics and probabilities of ending up in different absorbing states. We also study the scaling behavior of the expected time to converge to one of the absorbing states as a function of the initial density of centrists and under some variations of our basic model.

  12. Electrical network method for the thermal or structural characterization of a conducting material sample or structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Marco G.

    1993-01-01

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure system, as an electrical network of resistances in which each resistance of the network is representative of a specific physical region of the system. The method encompasses measuring a resistance between two external leads and using this measurement in a series of equations describing the network to solve for the network resistances for a specified region and temperature. A calibration system is then developed using the calculated resistances at specified temperatures. This allows for the translation of the calculated resistances to a region temperature. The method can also be used to detect and quantify structural defects in the system.

  13. Conformational similarity in the activation of caspase-3 and -7 revealed by the unliganded and inhibited structures of caspase-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Fang, Bin; Weber, Irene T.; (GSU)

    2009-09-08

    Caspase-mediated apoptosis has important roles in normal cell differentiation and aging and in many diseases including cancer, neuromuscular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, modulation of caspase activity and conformational states is of therapeutic importance. We report crystal structures of a new unliganded conformation of caspase-7 and the inhibited caspase-7 with the tetrapeptide Ac-YVAD-Cho. Different conformational states and mechanisms for substrate recognition have been proposed based on unliganded structures of the redundant apoptotic executioner caspase-3 and -7. The current study shows that the executioner caspase-3 and -7 have similar conformations for the unliganded active site as well as the inhibitor-bound active site. The new unliganded caspase-7 structure exhibits the tyrosine flipping mechanism in which the Tyr230 has rotated to block entry to the S2 binding site similar to the active site conformation of unliganded caspase-3. The inhibited structure of caspase-7/YVAD shows that the P4 Tyr binds the S4 region specific to polar residues at the expense of a main chain hydrogen bond between the P4 amide and carbonyl oxygen of caspase-7 Gln 276, which is similar to the caspase-3 complex. This new knowledge of the structures and conformational states of unliganded and inhibited caspases will be important for the design of drugs to modulate caspase activity and apoptosis.

  14. SO2 Emissions in China - Their Network and Hierarchical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2017-04-01

    SO2 emissions lead to various harmful effects on environment and human health. The SO2 emission in China has significant contribution to the global SO2 emission, so it is necessary to employ various methods to study SO2 emissions in China with great details in order to lay the foundation for policymaking to improve environmental conditions in China. Network analysis is used to analyze the SO2 emissions from power generation, industrial, residential and transportation sectors in China for 2008 and 2010, which are recently available from 1744 ground surface monitoring stations. The results show that the SO2 emissions from power generation sector were highly individualized as small-sized clusters, the SO2 emissions from industrial sector underwent an integration process with a large cluster contained 1674 places covering all industrial areas in China, the SO2 emissions from residential sector was not impacted by time, and the SO2 emissions from transportation sector underwent significant integration. Hierarchical structure is obtained by further combining SO2 emissions from all four sectors and is potentially useful to find out similar patterns of SO2 emissions, which can provide information on understanding the mechanisms of SO2 pollution and on designing different environmental measure to combat SO2 emissions.

  15. The scaling structure of the global road network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Emanuele; Giometto, Andrea; Shai, Saray; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mucha, Peter J; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Because of increasing global urbanization and its immediate consequences, including changes in patterns of food demand, circulation and land use, the next century will witness a major increase in the extent of paved roads built worldwide. To model the effects of this increase, it is crucial to understand whether possible self-organized patterns are inherent in the global road network structure. Here, we use the largest updated database comprising all major roads on the Earth, together with global urban and cropland inventories, to suggest that road length distributions within croplands are indistinguishable from urban ones, once rescaled to account for the difference in mean road length. Such similarity extends to road length distributions within urban or agricultural domains of a given area. We find two distinct regimes for the scaling of the mean road length with the associated area, holding in general at small and at large values of the latter. In suitably large urban and cropland domains, we find that mean and total road lengths increase linearly with their domain area, differently from earlier suggestions. Scaling regimes suggest that simple and universal mechanisms regulate urban and cropland road expansion at the global scale. As such, our findings bear implications for global road infrastructure growth based on land-use change and for planning policies sustaining urban expansions.

  16. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  17. Brain connectivity dynamics during social interaction reflect social network structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmälzle, Ralf; Brook O'Donnell, Matthew; Garcia, Javier O; Cascio, Christopher N; Bayer, Joseph; Bassett, Danielle S; Vettel, Jean M; Falk, Emily B

    2017-05-16

    Social ties are crucial for humans. Disruption of ties through social exclusion has a marked effect on our thoughts and feelings; however, such effects can be tempered by broader social network resources. Here, we use fMRI data acquired from 80 male adolescents to investigate how social exclusion modulates functional connectivity within and across brain networks involved in social pain and understanding the mental states of others (i.e., mentalizing). Furthermore, using objectively logged friendship network data, we examine how individual variability in brain reactivity to social exclusion relates to the density of participants' friendship networks, an important aspect of social network structure. We find increased connectivity within a set of regions previously identified as a mentalizing system during exclusion relative to inclusion. These results are consistent across the regions of interest as well as a whole-brain analysis. Next, examining how social network characteristics are associated with task-based connectivity dynamics, we find that participants who showed greater changes in connectivity within the mentalizing system when socially excluded by peers had less dense friendship networks. This work provides insight to understand how distributed brain systems respond to social and emotional challenges and how such brain dynamics might vary based on broader social network characteristics.

  18. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; He, Jia-Lin; Kapoor, Komal; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  19. Scalable, ultra-resistant structural colors based on network metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Galinski, Henning; Dong, Hao; Gongora, Juan S Totero; Favaro, Grégory; Döbeli, Max; Spolenak, Ralph; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Structural colours have drawn wide attention for their potential as a future printing technology for various applications, ranging from biomimetic tissues to adaptive camouflage materials. However, an efficient approach to realise robust colours with a scalable fabrication technique is still lacking, hampering the realisation of practical applications with this platform. Here we develop a new approach based on large scale network metamaterials, which combine dealloyed subwavelength structures at the nanoscale with loss-less, ultra-thin dielectrics coatings. By using theory and experiments, we show how sub-wavelength dielectric coatings control a mechanism of resonant light coupling with epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) regions generated in the metallic network, manifesting the formation of highly saturated structural colours that cover a wide portion of the spectrum. Ellipsometry measurements report the efficient observation of these colours even at angles of $70$ degrees. The network-like architecture of these nanoma...

  20. Structure analysis of growing network based on partial differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo JIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The topological structure is one of the most important contents in the complex network research. Therein the node degree and the degree distribution are the most basic characteristic quantities to describe topological structure. In order to calculate the degree distribution, first of all, the node degree is considered as a continuous variable. Then, according to the Markov Property of growing network, the cumulative distribution function's evolution equation with time can be obtained. Finally, the partial differential equation (PDE model can be established through distortion processing. Taking the growing network with preferential and random attachment mechanism as an example, the PDE model is obtained. The analytic expression of degree distribution is obtained when this model is solved. Besides, the degree function over time is the same as the characteristic line of PDE. At last, the model is simulated. This PDE method of changing the degree distribution calculation into problem of solving PDE makes the structure analysis more accurate.