WorldWideScience

Sample records for network stealth worms

  1. Analyzing Worms and Network Traffic using Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Wehner, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    Internet worms have become a widespread threat to system and network operations. In order to fight them more efficiently, it is necessary to analyze newly discovered worms and attack patterns. This paper shows how techniques based on Kolmogorov Complexity can help in the analysis of internet worms and network traffic. Using compression, different species of worms can be clustered by type. This allows us to determine whether an unknown worm binary could in fact be a later version of an existin...

  2. Control Strategy on Worms Spread in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianmei, Fang

    First, a preliminary understanding of what is meant by complex network and its features, and network worm virus that understanding and analysis of the emergence and development of the worm, the worm to understand the current situation, focus on the worm propagation model (simple propagation model, Kermack-Mckendrick model, SIS model, two-factor model, BCM model - network worms against the model). Contact the characteristics of complex networks and the worm theory, detection and prevention of worms and an important node in the network-based control strategy (target immunity, virus containment) for a simple discussion.

  3. Network protection against worms and cascading failures using modularity partitioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omic, J.; Hernandez, J.M.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2010-01-01

    Communication networks are prone to virus and worms spreading and cascading failures. Recently, a number of social networking worms have spread over public Web sites. Another example is error propagation in routing tables, such as in BGP tables. The immunization and error curing applied to these

  4. Mathematical model for spreading dynamics of social network worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Liu, Yan-Heng; Li, Bin; Li, Jin; Han, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xue-Jie

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model for social network worm spreading is presented from the viewpoint of social engineering. This model consists of two submodels. Firstly, a human behavior model based on game theory is suggested for modeling and predicting the expected behaviors of a network user encountering malicious messages. The game situation models the actions of a user under the condition that the system may be infected at the time of opening a malicious message. Secondly, a social network accessing model is proposed to characterize the dynamics of network users, by which the number of online susceptible users can be determined at each time step. Several simulation experiments are carried out on artificial social networks. The results show that (1) the proposed mathematical model can well describe the spreading dynamics of social network worms; (2) weighted network topology greatly affects the spread of worms; (3) worms spread even faster on hybrid social networks.

  5. Self-Propagating Worms in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannetsos, Thanassis; Dimitriou, Tassos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2009-01-01

    Malicious code is defined as software designed to execute attacks on software systems. This work demonstrates the possibility of executing malware on wireless sensor nodes that are based on the von Neumann architecture. This is achieved by exploiting a buffer overflow vulnerability to smash the c...... the call stack, intrude a remote node over the radio channel and, eventually, completely take control of it. Then we show how the malware can be crafted to become a self-replicating worm that broadcasts itself and propagates over the network hop-by-hop, infecting all the nodes....

  6. Hop-by-HopWorm Propagation with Carryover Epidemic Model in Mobile Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Won Ho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the internet, a worm is usually propagated in a random multi-hop contact manner. However, the attacker will not likely select this random multi-hop propagation approach in a mobile sensor network. This is because multi-hop worm route paths to random vulnerable targets can be often breached due to node mobility, leading to failure of fast worm spread under this strategy. Therefore, an appropriate propagation strategy is needed for mobile sensor worms. To meet this need, we discuss a hop-by-hop worm propagation model in mobile sensor networks. In a hop-by-hop worm propagation model, benign nodes are infected by worm in neighbor-to-neighbor spread manner. Since worm infection occurs in hop-by-hop contact, it is not substantially affected by a route breach incurred by node mobility. We also propose the carryover epidemic model to deal with the worm infection quota deficiency that might occur when employing an epidemic model in a mobile sensor network. We analyze worm infection capability under the carryover epidemic model. Moreover, we simulate hop-by-hop worm propagation with carryover epidemic model by using an ns-2 simulator. The simulation results demonstrate that infection quota carryovers are seldom observed where a node’s maximum speed is no less than 20 m/s.

  7. Internet Worm Detection as part of a Distributed Network Inspection System

    OpenAIRE

    Linehan, Eamonn

    2004-01-01

    The most widely publicized, and arguably most damaging, types of malicious traffic on the Internet today include worms, spam, viruses and denial of service attacks. Internet worms self propagate across networks exploiting flaws in operating systems and services, spreading viruses and congesting network links. Worms constitute a significant security and performance threat and have recently been used to facilitate distributed denial of service (dDoS) attacks. It is the aim of thi...

  8. Design a Security Network System against Internet Worms

    OpenAIRE

    Rana Dhia'a Abdu-Aljabar

    2012-01-01

    Active worms have posed a major security threat to the Internet, and many research efforts have focused on them. This paper is interested in internet worm that spreads via TCP, which accounts for the majority of internet traffic. It presents an approach that use a hybrid solution between two detection algorithms: behavior base detection and signature base detection to have the features of each of them. The aim of this study is to have a good solution of detecting worm and stealthy worm with t...

  9. Performance Analysis of Cell-Phone Worm Spreading in Cellular Networks through Opportunistic Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAHUI, W.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Worms spreading directly between cell-phones over short-range radio (Bluetooth, WiFi, etc. are increasing rapidly. Communication by these technologies is opportunistic and has very close relation with the social characteristics of the phone carriers. In this paper, we try to evaluate the impact of different characteristics on the spreading performance of worms. On the other hand, the behaviors of worms may have certain impact, too. For example, worms may make phones be completely dysfunctional and these phones can be seen as killed. We study the impact of the killing speed. Using the Markov model, we propose some theoretical models to evaluate the spreading performance in different cases. Simulation results show the accuracy of our models. Numerical results show that if users do not believe the data coming from others easily, the worms may bring less damage. Surprisingly, if the users are more willing to install the anti-virus software, the worms may bring bigger damage when the software becomes to be outdated with high probability. Though the worms can bring big damage on the network temporarily by killing phones rapidly, numerical results show that this behavior may decrease the total damage in the long time. Therefore, killing nodes more rapidly may be not optimal for worms.

  10. Propagation Modeling and Defending of a Mobile Sensor Worm in Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Wu, Qun; Wen, Sheng; Cai, Yiqiao; Tian, Hui; Chen, Yonghong; Wang, Baowei

    2017-01-13

    WSANs (Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks) are derived from traditional wireless sensor networks by introducing mobile actuator elements. Previous studies indicated that mobile actuators can improve network performance in terms of data collection, energy supplementation, etc. However, according to our experimental simulations, the actuator's mobility also causes the sensor worm to spread faster if an attacker launches worm attacks on an actuator and compromises it successfully. Traditional worm propagation models and defense strategies did not consider the diffusion with a mobile worm carrier. To address this new problem, we first propose a microscopic mathematical model to describe the propagation dynamics of the sensor worm. Then, a two-step local defending strategy (LDS) with a mobile patcher (a mobile element which can distribute patches) is designed to recover the network. In LDS, all recovering operations are only taken in a restricted region to minimize the cost. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that our model estimations are rather accurate and consistent with the actual spreading scenario of the mobile sensor worm. Moreover, on average, the LDS outperforms other algorithms by approximately 50% in terms of the cost.

  11. Automatic defense against zero-day polymorphic worms in communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammed, Mohssen

    2013-01-01

    Able to propagate quickly and change their payload with each infection, polymorphic worms have been able to evade even the most advanced intrusion detection systems (IDS). And, because zero-day worms require only seconds to launch flooding attacks on your servers, using traditional methods such as manually creating and storing signatures to defend against these threats is just too slow. Bringing together critical knowledge and research on the subject, Automatic Defense Against Zero-day Polymorphic Worms in Communication Networks details a new approach for generating automated signatures for un

  12. Stealth multiboson signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Granada (Spain)

    2017-10-15

    We introduce the 'stealth bosons' S, light boosted particles with a decay S → AA → q anti qq anti q into two daughter bosons A, which subsequently decay into four quarks that are reconstructed as a single fat jet. Variables that measure the two-pronged structure of fat jets, which are used for diboson resonance searches in hadronic or semi-leptonic final states, classify the jets produced in stealth boson decays as QCD-like - actually, for these variables they may seem more background-like than the QCD background itself. The number of tracks in those jets can also be, on average, much higher than for the fat jets arising from the hadronic decay of boosted W and Z bosons. Therefore, these elusive particles are hard to spot in standard searches. Heavy resonances decaying into two such stealth bosons, or one plus a W/Z boson, could offer an explanation for the recurrent small excesses found in hadronic diboson resonance searches near an invariant mass of 2 TeV. (orig.)

  13. Stealth Disasters and Geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Susan W.

    2013-04-01

    Natural processes of the earth unleash energy in ways that are sometimes harmful or, at best, inconvenient, for humans: earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, landslides, floods. Ignoring the biological component of the geosphere, we have historically called such events "natural disasters." They are typically characterized by a sudden onset and relatively immediate consequences. There are many historical examples and our human societies have evolved various ways of coping with them logistically, economically, and psychologically. Preparation, co-existence, recovery, and remediation are possible, at least to some extent, even in the largest of events. Geoethical questions exist in each stage, but the limited local extent of these disasters allows the possibility of discussion and resolution. There are other disasters that involve the natural systems that support us. Rather than being driven primarily by natural non-biological processes, these are driven by human behavior. Examples are climate change, desertification, acidification of the oceans, and compaction and erosion of fertile soils. They typically have more gradual onsets than natural disasters and, because of this, I refer to these as "stealth disasters." Although they are unfolding unnoticed or ignored by many, they are having near-term consequences. At a global scale they are new to human experience. Our efforts at preparation, co-existence, recovery, and remediation lag far behind those that we have in place for natural disasters. Furthermore, these four stages in stealth disaster situations involve many ethical questions that typically must be solved in the context of much larger cultural and social differences than encountered in natural disaster settings. Four core ethical principles may provide guidelines—autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice (e.g., Jamais Cascio). Geoscientists can contribute to the solutions in many ways. We can work to ensure that as people take responsibility

  14. An analysis on the re-emergence of SQL Slammer worm using network telescope data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chindipha, SD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available geographically located in China, Vietnam and Mexico, with no one ready to take credit for the re-emergence of the worm [10]. Its reemergence now, 14 years later, makes it one of the most long-lived threats. In December 2016, researchers at Check Point confirmed... that Slammer worm is back online targeting the same ancient flaw in Microsoft SQL server 2000 buffer overflow vulnerability [8]. Whether the Slammer Worm is back to stay for good remains a question to be answered at this point. III. METHODOLOGY In this section...

  15. Behaviour Based Worm Detection and Signature Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Anbar; Selvakumar Manickam; Al-Samarraie Hosam; Kok-Soon Chai; Mohmoud Baklizi; Ammar Almomani

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: A worm is a malicious piece of code that self-propagates, often via network connections, to exploit security flaws in computers connected through the network. In general, worms do not need any human intervention to propagate and are considered a real threat to network assets and the properties of organizations. An Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) are employed to detect the presence of the worms in the network. Approach: This study proposed a new behaviourbased worm detect...

  16. Defense and detection strategies against Internet worms

    CERN Document Server

    Nazario, José

    2004-01-01

    This is the first book focused exclusively on Internet worms, offering you solid worm detection and mitigation strategies for your work in the field. This ground-breaking volume enables you to put rising worm trends into perspective with practical information in detection and defense techniques utilizing data from live networks, real IP addresses, and commercial tools. The book helps you understand the classifications and groupings of worms, and offers a deeper understanding of how they threaten network and system security.

  17. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Robert W; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Weizhong; Schroeder, Steven G

    2015-07-30

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of mucin 12 (MUC12) and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI), was significantly higher in resistant cattle. Novel splicing variants, exon skipping events, and gene fusion events, were also detected. An algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) was used to infer de novo regulatory molecular networks in the interactome between the parasite and host. Under a combined cutoff of an error tolerance (ϵ = 0.10) and a stringent P-value threshold of mutual information (1.0 × 10(-5)), a total of 229,100 direct interactions controlled by 20,288 hub genes were identified. Among these hub genes, 7651 genes had ≥ 100 direct neighbors while the top 9778 hub genes controlled more than 50% of total direct interactions. Three lysozyme genes (LYZ1, LYZ2, and LYZ3), which are co-located in bovine chromosome 5 in tandem and are strongly upregulated in resistant cattle, shared a common regulatory network of 55 genes. These ancient antimicrobials were likely involved in regulating host-parasite interactions by affecting host gut microbiome. Notably, ALPI, known as a gut mucosal defense factor, controlled a molecular network consisting 410 genes, including 14 transcription factors (TF) and 10 genes that were significantly regulated in resistant cattle. Several large regulatory networks were controlled by TF, such as STAT6, SREBF1, and ELF4. Gene ontology (GO) processes significantly enriched in the regulatory network controlled by STAT6 included lipid metabolism. Our findings provide insights into the immune regulation of host-parasite interactions and the molecular mechanisms of host resistance in cattle. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A Novel Approach to Worm Detection Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saawy, Yazed B.; Siewe, Francois; Cau, A. (Antonio)

    2015-01-01

    Computer worms are a type of malicious malware that prey on networked machines. A number of different detection mechanisms have been presented in the literature to detect worms. However, a common drawback of these mechanisms is that any failure to detect the worms results in damaging the real machines. This study proposes a new approach to detection that goes beyond the currently available signature and behavior-based approaches. In contrast to the traditional worm detect...

  19. Stability and Hopf Bifurcation in a Delayed SEIRS Worm Model in Computer Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zizhen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A delayed SEIRS epidemic model with vertical transmission in computer network is considered. Sufficient conditions for local stability of the positive equilibrium and existence of local Hopf bifurcation are obtained by analyzing distribution of the roots of the associated characteristic equation. Furthermore, the direction of the local Hopf bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions are determined by using the normal form theory and center manifold theorem. Finally, a numerical example is presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  20. Mimicking the LCDM model with stealths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico); Cardenas, Victor H. [Universidad de Valparaiso, Facultad de Ciencias, Instituto de Fisica y Astronomia, Valparaiso (Chile); Herrera, Ramon [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Avenida Brasil 2950, Casilla 4059, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2016-12-15

    We present a new cosmological model that mimics the Lambda Cold Dark Matter by using a stealth field. This kind of field is characterized as not coupling directly to gravity; however, it is connected to the underlying matter content of the universe model. As is well known, stealth fields do not back-react on the space-time; however, their mimicry skills show how this field and its self-interaction potential determines the cosmic evolution. We show the study of the simplest model that can be developed with the stealth field. (orig.)

  1. Modeling of Combined Phenomena Affecting an AUV Stealth Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Gerigk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper some results of research connected with modeling the basic stealth characteristics of an AUV vehicle are presented. First of all a general approach to design of the stealth AUV autonomous underwater vehicles under consideration is introduced. Then the AUV stealth vehicle concept is briefly described. Next a method of modeling of the stealth characteristics is briefly described. As an example of the stealth characteristics investigations some results of modeling the boundary layer and wake are presented. Some remarks regarding the behavior of the AUV stealth vehicle in the submerged conditions are given. The final conclusions are presented.

  2. GLOBOID WORM HOB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFTIMIE Dorin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new constructive solution of globoid worm hob in the globoid worm wheels gear cutting. This type of tool was created in full 3D. Technological difficulties have been overcome in the execution of this new type of hob that allow widespread use globoid worm gears.

  3. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  4. Worm It! (Videojuego)

    OpenAIRE

    Termenón Riera, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Worm it! is an adaptation to the three dimensions of Worm World, a free software developed by Kevin Ng in 1993. Thus, it is a puzzle game in which it requires some ingenuity to be overcoming the different levels that compose . The application is aimed at people of all ages and runs on Android devices and computers with Windows 7 or later operating system. Worm it! es una adaptación a las tres dimensiones de Worm World, un software gratuito desarrollado por Kevin Ng en el año 1993. Así pues...

  5. Development of functional radar stealth yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sainan; Shi, Bao; Hu, Yaning

    2017-04-01

    The flexible absorbing material is very important in nowadays stealth technology. In the production of flexible absorbing fabric, the successful yarns spinning is a key factor in flexible fabric's development. In this paper, the main spinning process of blended yarn with Ni-Fe fiber and flame-retardant polyester fiber had been discussed. Multi-mixture of Ni-Fe sliver and fiber and polyester sliver was used to spinning the blended yarn. Finally, four different ratios of 59tex fineness blended yarns were successfully developed.

  6. Interactions between worms and malaria: good worms or bad worms ?

    OpenAIRE

    Nacher Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    International audience; ABSTRACT: In the past decade, there has been an increasing number of studies on co-infections between worms and malaria. However, this increased interest has yielded results that have been at times conflicting and made it difficult to clearly grasp the outcome of this interaction. Despite the heterogeneity of study designs, reviewing the growing body of research may be synthesized into some broad trends: Ascaris emerges mostly as protective for malaria and its severe m...

  7. Stealth CMEs and Stealthy Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2016-10-01

    We sometimes encounter coronal mass ejections (CMEs) whose low coronal signatures are apparently missing, especially when viewed on the disk. They are called stealth CMEs, which are usually slow and diffuse. Some of them result in medium geomagnetic storms. Similarly, there are orphan interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) that lack a parent CME in coronagraph data but could cause geomagnetic storms when strong and sustained southward magnetic field is present. In addition, some geomagnetic storms may be attributable to a fast solar wind and stream interaction region, but it is often hard to rule out a trace of ICME (coming from a solar eruption) in in situ data. These events present a major challenge not only in heliophysics research but also in space weather prediction. We summarize our recent attempt to understand the origins of stealth CMEs and stealthy geomagnetic storms, making extensive use of SDO/AIA data in comparison with SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/EUVI/COR data. In situ data from Wind, ACE and STEREO are also examined. We discuss the relations of these events with coronal holes and sector boundaries.

  8. The implementation method and the development tendency of infrared stealth technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianhua; Wang, Ruifeng

    2015-10-01

    The infrared stealthy theory is introduced simply, the two kinds of methods for realization of infrared stealth are educed. Then, the measures of infrared stealth are described in detail all over the world. At the same time, it is pointed out that the development of the infrared stealth materials is the basis for the development of infrared stealth technology. And expounds the performance characteristics of the stealthy materials in detail. Finally, the development trend of infrared stealth technology are analyzed.

  9. Acquiring data in real time in Italy from the Antarctic Seismographic Argentinean Italian Network (ASAIN): testing the global capabilities of the EarthWorm and Antelope software suites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy Plasencia Linares, Milton; Russi, Marino; Pesaresi, Damiano; Cravos, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, OGS) is running the Antarctic Seismographic Argentinean Italian Network (ASAIN), made of 7 seismic stations located in the Scotia Sea region in Antarctica and in Tierra del Fuego - Argentina: data from these stations are transferred in real time to the OGS headquarters in Trieste (Italy) via satellite links provided by the Instituto Antártico Argentino (IAA). Data is collected and archived primarily in Güralp Compress Format (GCF) through the Scream! software at OGS and IAA, and transmitted also in real time to the Observatories and Research Facilities for European Seismology (ORFEUS). The main real time seismic data acquisition and processing system of the ASAIN network is based on the EarthWorm 7.3 (Open Source) software suite installed on a Linux server at the OGS headquarters in Trieste. It runs several software modules for data collection, data archiving, data publication on dedicated web servers: wave_serverV, Winston Wave Server, and data analysis and realtime monitoring through Swarm program. OGS is also running, in close cooperation with the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Civil Defense, the North East (NI) Italy seismic network, making use of the Antelope commercial software suite from BRTT as the main acquisition system. As a test to check the global capabilities of the Antelope software suite, we also set up an instance of Antelope acquiring data in real time from both the regional ASAIN seismic network in Antarctica and a subset of the Global Seismic Network (GSN) funded by the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS). The facilities of the IRIS Data Management System, and specifically the IRIS Data Management Center, were used for real time access to waveform required in this study. The first tests indicated that more than 80% of the earthquakes with magnitude M>5.0 listed in the Preliminary Determination

  10. WormBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible...

  11. Spread and Control of Mobile Benign Worm Based on Two-Stage Repairing Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both in traditional social network and in mobile network environment, the worm is a serious threat, and this threat is growing all the time. Mobile smartphones generally promote the development of mobile network. The traditional antivirus technologies have become powerless when facing mobile networks. The development of benign worms, especially active benign worms and passive benign worms, has become a new network security measure. In this paper, we focused on the spread of worm in mobile environment and proposed the benign worm control and repair mechanism. The control process of mobile benign worms is divided into two stages: the first stage is rapid repair control, which uses active benign worm to deal with malicious worm in the mobile network; when the network is relatively stable, it enters the second stage of postrepair and uses passive mode to optimize the environment for the purpose of controlling the mobile network. Considering whether the existence of benign worm, we simplified the model and analyzed the four situations. Finally, we use simulation to verify the model. This control mechanism for benign worm propagation is of guiding significance to control the network security.

  12. Polymeric nanotherapeutics: clinical development and advances in stealth functionalization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Che-Ming J; Fang, Ronnie H; Luk, Brian T; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-07

    Long-circulating polymeric nanotherapeutics have garnered increasing interest in research and in the clinic owing to their ability to improve the solubility and pharmacokinetics of therapeutic cargoes. Modulation of carrier properties promises more effective drug localization at the disease sites and can lead to enhanced drug safety and efficacy. In the present review, we highlight the current development of polymeric nanotherapeutics in the clinic. In light of the importance of stealth properties in therapeutic nanoparticles, we also review the advances in stealth functionalization strategies and examine the performance of different stealth polymers in the literature. In addition, we discuss the recent development of biologically inspired "self" nanoparticles, which present a differing stealth concept from conventional approaches.

  13. Concept, Characteristics and Defending Mechanism of Worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong; Luo, Jiaqing; Xiao, Bin; Wei, Guiyi

    Worms are a common phenomenon in today's Internet and cause tens of billions of dollars in damages to businesses around the world each year. This article first presents various concepts related to worms, and then classifies the existing worms into four types- Internet worms, P2P worms, email worms and IM (Instant Messaging) worms, based on the space in which a worm finds a victim target. The Internet worm is the focus of this article. We identify the characteristics of Internet worms in terms of their target finding strategy, propagation method and anti-detection capability. Then, we explore state-of-the-art worm detection and worm containment schemes. This article also briefly presents the characteristics, defense methods and related research work of P2P worms, email worms and IM worms. Nowadays, defense against worms remains largely an open problem. In the end of this article, we outline some future directions on the worm research.

  14. Rapid detection of worms using ICMP-T3 analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Robert S.; Berk, Vincent H.

    2004-09-01

    Identification of an active Internet worm is a manual process where security analysts must observe and analyze unusual activity on multiple firewalls, intrusion-detection systems or hosts. A worm might not be positively identified until it already has spread to most of the Internet, eliminating many defensive options. In previous work, we developed an automated system that can identify active worms seconds or minutes after they first begin to spread, a necessary precursor to halting the spread of the worm rather than simply cleaning up afterward. The system collects ICMP Destination Unreachable messages from instrumented network routers, identifies those patterns of unreachable messages that indicate malicious scanning activity, and then searches for patterns of scanning activity that indicate a propagating worm. In this paper, we compare the performance of two different detection strategies, our previous threshold approach and a new line-fit approach, for different worm-propagation techniques, noise environments, and system parameters. These techniques work for worms that generate at least some of their target addresses through a random process, a feature of most recent worms. Although both being powerful methods for fast worm identification, the new line-fit approach proves to be significantly more noise resistant.

  15. Is Host-Based Anomaly Detection + Temporal Correlation = Worm Causality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sekar, Vyas; Xie, Yinglian; Reiter, Michael K; Zhang, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Epidemic-spreading attacks (e.g., worm and botnet propagation) have a natural notion of attack causality - a single network flow causes a victim host to get infected and subsequently spread the attack...

  16. Polymorphic worm detection using strong token-pair signatures

    OpenAIRE

    BAYOĞLU, Burak; SOĞUKPINAR, İbrahim

    2009-01-01

    Malicious software has become a big threat to information systems, which are widely used to store, transfer and process information for many critical assets. Worms are one of the most harmful network-enabled malicious software that can threaten networks and applications. Two main characteristics of worms distinguish them from the well-known virus programs and as a result are much more dangerous than the virus programs. First, they do not need to attach themselves to an existing prog...

  17. Evolution of Scale Worms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

    ) caves, and the interstitium, recovering six monophyletic clades within Aphroditiformia: Acoetidae, Aphroditidae, Eulepethidae, Iphionidae, Polynoidae, and Sigalionidae (inclusive of the former ‘Pisionidae’ and ‘Pholoidae’), respectively. Tracing of morphological character evolution showed a high degree...... of adaptability and convergent evolution between relatively closely related scale worms. While some morphological and behavioral modifications in cave polynoids reflected troglomorphism, other modifications like eye loss were found to stem from a common ancestor inhabiting the deep sea, further corroborating...... the deep sea ancestry of scale worm cave fauna. In conclusion, while morphological characterization across Aphroditiformia appears deceptively easy due to the presence of elytra, convergent evolution during multiple early radiations across wide ranging habitats have confounded our ability to reconstruct...

  18. Stealth and Natural Disasters: Science, Policy and Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, S. W.

    2008-12-01

    Geophysicists, earth scientists, and other natural scientists play a key role in studying disasters, and are challenged to convey the science to the public and policy makers (including government and business). I have found it useful to introduce the concept of two general types of disasters to these audiences: natural and stealth. Natural disasters are geological phenomena over which we humans have some, but relatively little, control. Earthquakes, tsunamis, floods and volcanic eruptions are the most familiar examples, but exogenous events such as meteorite impacts, solar flares, and supernovae are also possibly disruptive. Natural disasters typically have an abrupt onset, cause immediate major change, are familiar from the historic record, and get much media and public attention. They cannot be prevented, but preplanning can ameliorate their effects. Natural disasters are increasingly amplified by us (humans), and we are increasingly affected by them due to our expanding presence on the planet. Less familiar disasters are unfolding in the near-term, but they are not happening in the minds of most people. They are approaching us stealthily, and for this reason I propose that we call them stealth disasters. They differ from natural disasters in several important ways: stealth disasters are primarily caused by, or driven by, the interaction of humans with complex cycles of processes on the planet. Examples are: fresh water shortages and contamination, soil degradation and loss, climate changes, ocean degradation. The onset of stealth disasters is incremental rather than abrupt. They may not unfold significantly during the course of one term of political office, but they are unfolding in our lifetime. We as individuals may or may not escape their consequences, but they will affect our children and grandchildren. If humans are familiar with stealth disasters at all, it is from a relatively local experience, e.g., flooding of the Mississippi or the Dust Bowl in the U

  19. Polymorphic Worms Collection in Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin, Ashraf A.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, computer worms are seen as one of significant challenges of cloud computing. Worms are rapidly changing and getting more sophisticated to evade detection. One major issue to defend against computer worms is collecting worms' payloads to generate their signature and study their behavior. To collect worms' payloads, we identified challenges for detecting and collecting worms' payloads and proposed high-interactive honeypot to collect payloads of zero-day polymorphic worms...

  20. Learning by Stealth--Robotics in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Teaching Robotics in the classroom involves the use of different strategies to a conventional classroom but yields exceptional outcomes: in most cases students are teaching themselves and may not even realise it! This is "learning by stealth" and produces effective knowledge. Students also develop many additional and complementary skills…

  1. Education and support for representative, direct and stealth democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, Hilde|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824186; Michels, Ank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/11124501X

    2014-01-01

    Using data collected within the scope of a Dutch internet panel survey (LISS) in 2011, this study tracks public support for direct, stealth and representative democracy according to educational level. Our findings indicate that, in terms of overall support for each specific type of democracy, lower

  2. DoWitcher: Effective Worm Detection and Containment in the Internet Core

    OpenAIRE

    Munafo', Maurizio Matteo

    2007-01-01

    Enterprise networks are increasingly offloading the responsibility for worm detection and containment to the carrier networks. However, current approaches to the zero-day worm detection problem such as those based on content similarity of packet payloads are not scalable to the carrier link speeds (OC-48 and up-wards). In this paper, we introduce a new system, namely DoWitcher, which in contrast to previous approaches is scalable as well as able to detect the stealthiest worms that employ low...

  3. EMI shielding performance study of tri-layer nano stealth composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Di; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a method for preparing tri-layer nano stealth composite film is proposed. Using H2SO4, HNO3 mixture for MWCNTs carboxylation, dispersant CTAB is added into surface-treated CNTs, nano Fe and nano Fe3O4 respectively. These three mixtures are dispersed by ultrasonic vibration so that they form homogeneous films in epoxy matrix. Vector network analyzer is utilized for EMI SE measurements. According to experiment data, EMI shielding performance curves are generated when CNTs vary from 5%-10%wt, nano Fe 10%-15%wt, nano Fe3O4 10%-15%wt respectively in the frequency bands of 3.22-40GHz. Simultaneously, variation trends of these curves are analyzed. A new type of multilayer nano stealth composite film is fabricated by superposing the three films prepared above. The tri-layer nanocomposites of which matching layer of is 15%wt nano Fe3O4 or 15%wt nano Fe, absorbing layer is 5%wt CNTs and reflecting layer is 10%wt CNTs has good EMI shielding performance. The peak values of the two layered material all achieve more than -100dB.

  4. Modal Analysis of Worm and Worm Gear Based on ANSYS Workbench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yichang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To establish the three-dimensional model of the worm and worm gear by using SolidWorks. On the worm and worm gear modal analysis is carried out by using finite element analysis software ANSYS Workbench. Obtain the first 6 order natural frequency and vibration mode characteristics of worm and worm gear. Modal analysis laid the foundation for further study on dynamics analysis, Also for the worm and worm gear structure optimization design provides a reference.

  5. Basic definitions for discrete modeling of computer worms epidemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Guevara López

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The information technologies have evolved in such a way that communication between computers or hosts has become common, so much that the worldwide organization (governments and corporations depends on it; what could happen if these computers stop working for a long time is catastrophic. Unfortunately, networks are attacked by malware such as viruses and worms that could collapse the system. This has served as motivation for the formal study of computer worms and epidemics to develop strategies for prevention and protection; this is why in this paper, before analyzing epidemiological models, a set of formal definitions based on set theory and functions is proposed for describing 21 concepts used in the study of worms. These definitions provide a basis for future qualitative research on the behavior of computer worms, and quantitative for the study of their epidemiological models.

  6. Detecting Stealth Dark Matter Directly through Electromagnetic Polarizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelquist, T; Berkowitz, E; Brower, R C; Buchoff, M I; Fleming, G T; Jin, X-Y; Kiskis, J; Kribs, G D; Neil, E T; Osborn, J C; Rebbi, C; Rinaldi, E; Schaich, D; Schroeder, C; Syritsyn, S; Vranas, P; Weinberg, E; Witzel, O

    2015-10-23

    We calculate the spin-independent scattering cross section for direct detection that results from the electromagnetic polarizability of a composite scalar "stealth baryon" dark matter candidate, arising from a dark SU(4) confining gauge theory-"stealth dark matter." In the nonrelativistic limit, electromagnetic polarizability proceeds through a dimension-7 interaction leading to a very small scattering cross section for dark matter with weak-scale masses. This represents a lower bound on the scattering cross section for composite dark matter theories with electromagnetically charged constituents. We carry out lattice calculations of the polarizability for the lightest "baryon" states in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories using the background field method on quenched configurations. We find the polarizabilities of SU(3) and SU(4) to be comparable (within about 50%) normalized to the stealth baryon mass, which is suggestive for extensions to larger SU(N) groups. The resulting scattering cross sections with a xenon target are shown to be potentially detectable in the dark matter mass range of about 200-700 GeV, where the lower bound is from the existing LUX constraint while the upper bound is the coherent neutrino background. Significant uncertainties in the cross section remain due to the more complicated interaction of the polarizablity operator with nuclear structure; however, the steep dependence on the dark matter mass, 1/m(B)(6), suggests the observable dark matter mass range is not appreciably modified. We briefly highlight collider searches for the mesons in the theory as well as the indirect astrophysical effects that may also provide excellent probes of stealth dark matter.

  7. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  8. New Multi-step Worm Attack Model

    OpenAIRE

    Robiah, Y.; Rahayu, S. Siti; Shahrin, S.; Faizal, M. A.; Zaki, M. Mohd; Marliza, R.

    2010-01-01

    The traditional worms such as Blaster, Code Red, Slammer and Sasser, are still infecting vulnerable machines on the internet. They will remain as significant threats due to their fast spreading nature on the internet. Various traditional worms attack pattern has been analyzed from various logs at different OSI layers such as victim logs, attacker logs and IDS alert log. These worms attack pattern can be abstracted to form worms' attack model which describes the process of worms' infection. Fo...

  9. Global dynamics of a novel multi-group model for computer worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yong-Wang; Song, Yu-Rong; Jiang, Guo-Ping

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we study worm dynamics in computer networks composed of many autonomous systems. A novel multi-group SIQR (susceptible-infected-quarantined-removed) model is proposed for computer worms by explicitly considering anti-virus measures and the network infrastructure. Then, the basic reproduction number of worm R0 is derived and the global dynamics of the model are established. It is shown that if R0 is less than or equal to 1, the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and the worm dies out eventually, whereas, if R0 is greater than 1, one unique endemic equilibrium exists and it is globally asymptotically stable, thus the worm persists in the network. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the theoretical results.

  10. Ladder Arrangement Method for Stealth Design of Vivaldi Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiaoXiang He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel stealth design method for X-band Vivaldi antenna arrays is proposed in this paper by ladder arrangement along radiation direction. Two-element array, eight-element array, and 3 × 7-element array are investigated in this paper. S parameters, RCSs, and radiation patterns are studied, respectively. According to the ladder arrangement of Vivaldi antennas presented, 16.3 dBsm maximal RCS reduction is achieved with satisfied radiation performance. As simulated and measured, results demonstrate that the effectiveness of the presented low RCS design method is validated.

  11. Stealth Advertising: The Commercialization of Television News Broadcasts in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Chernov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-phase study deals with the phenomenon of “stealth advertising” in Canada. This concept refers to the encroachment of commercially tinted messages into broadcast news segments. Different theories of commercial speech were used as a theoretical framework. The study combined mixed methods, content analysis and in-depth interviews. The first phase concentrated on the frequency and actual time spent airing commercially influenced messages in television newscast segments. The sample consisted of eight randomly selected English-language markets across Canada including news stations affiliated with CBC, CTV and Global. Seventy-five newscasts were recorded and content-analyzed. The analysis demonstrated that private television stations used more explicit and aggressive stealth advertising than publicly owned ones. In subsequent interviews, the news directors and sales managers of some of these stations denied that they yield to outside commercial pressures but admitted they may include messages with commercial content if these have public interest value. In the second phase thirty-nine newscasts of a news station affiliated with Global were recorded and content-analyzed, showing high numbers of commercially influenced messages and corroborating previous research findings. Subsequent interviews showed some news decision-makers accept the inclusion of commercially tinted news segments, thus eroding the divide between editorial and commercial contents. This study is intended to contribute to the empirical basis for pursuing the question of corruption of news by surreptitious commercial content.

  12. Hybrid epidemics--a case study on computer worm conficker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Chain, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Conficker is a computer worm that erupted on the Internet in 2008. It is unique in combining three different spreading strategies: local probing, neighbourhood probing, and global probing. We propose a mathematical model that combines three modes of spreading: local, neighbourhood, and global, to capture the worm's spreading behaviour. The parameters of the model are inferred directly from network data obtained during the first day of the Conficker epidemic. The model is then used to explore the tradeoff between spreading modes in determining the worm's effectiveness. Our results show that the Conficker epidemic is an example of a critically hybrid epidemic, in which the different modes of spreading in isolation do not lead to successful epidemics. Such hybrid spreading strategies may be used beneficially to provide the most effective strategies for promulgating information across a large population. When used maliciously, however, they can present a dangerous challenge to current internet security protocols.

  13. Hybrid epidemics--a case study on computer worm conficker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwang Zhang

    Full Text Available Conficker is a computer worm that erupted on the Internet in 2008. It is unique in combining three different spreading strategies: local probing, neighbourhood probing, and global probing. We propose a mathematical model that combines three modes of spreading: local, neighbourhood, and global, to capture the worm's spreading behaviour. The parameters of the model are inferred directly from network data obtained during the first day of the Conficker epidemic. The model is then used to explore the tradeoff between spreading modes in determining the worm's effectiveness. Our results show that the Conficker epidemic is an example of a critically hybrid epidemic, in which the different modes of spreading in isolation do not lead to successful epidemics. Such hybrid spreading strategies may be used beneficially to provide the most effective strategies for promulgating information across a large population. When used maliciously, however, they can present a dangerous challenge to current internet security protocols.

  14. Zoology: War of the Worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, Maximilian J; Copley, Richard R

    2016-04-25

    The phylogenetic affinities of Xenacoelomorpha - the phylum comprising Xenoturbella bocki and acoelomorph worms - are debated. Two recent studies conclude they represent the earliest branching bilaterally symmetrical animals, but additional tests may be needed to confirm this notion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Guinea Worm in a Frog

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-09

    Dr. Mark Eberhard, a retired parasitologist and CDC guest researcher, discusses Guinea worm infection in a wild-caught frog.  Created: 3/9/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/9/2017.

  16. Detection of worms in error diffusion halftoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marius; Albregtsen, Fritz; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2009-01-01

    Digital halftoning is used to reproduce a continuous tone image with a printer. One of these halftoning algorithms, error diffusion, suffers from certain artifacts. One of these artifacts is commonly denoted as worms. We propose a simple measure for detection of worm artifacts. The proposed measure is evaluated by a psychophysical experiment, where 4 images were reproduced using 5 different error diffusion algorithms. The results indicate a high correlation between the predicted worms and perceived worms.

  17. Defending against Internet worms using a phase space method from chaos theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Rao, Nageswara S.

    2007-04-01

    Enterprise networks are facing ever-increasing security threats from Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, worms, viruses, intrusions, Trojans, port scans, and network misuses, and thus effective monitoring approaches to quickly detect these activities are greatly needed. In this paper, we employ chaos theory and propose an interesting phase space method to detect Internet worms. An Internet worm is a self-propagating program that automatically replicates itself to vulnerable systems and spreads across the Internet. Most deployed worm-detection systems are signature-based. They look for specific byte sequences (called attack signatures) that are known to appear in the attack traffic. Conventionally, the signatures are manually identified by human experts through careful analysis of the byte sequence from captured attack traffic. We propose to embed the traffic sequence to a high-dimensional phase space using chaos theory. We have observed that the signature sequence of a specific worm will occupy specific regions in the phase space, which may be appropriately called the invariant subspace of the worm. The invariant subspace of the worm separates itself widely from the subspace of the normal traffic. This separation allows us to construct three simple metrics, each of which completely separates 100 normal traffic streams from 200 worm traffic streams, without training in the conventional sense. Therefore, the method is at least as accurate as any existing methods. More importantly, our method is much faster than existing methods, such as based on expectation maximization and hidden Markov models.

  18. Bartonella and Brucella—Weapons and Strategies for Stealth Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Tekaya, Houchaima; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Dehio, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella spp. and Brucella spp. are closely related α-proteobacterial pathogens that by distinct stealth-attack strategies cause chronic infections in mammals including humans. Human infections manifest by a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms, ranging from mild to fatal disease. Both pathogens establish intracellular replication niches and subvert diverse pathways of the host’s immune system. Several virulence factors allow them to adhere to, invade, proliferate, and persist within various host-cell types. In particular, type IV secretion systems (T4SS) represent essential virulence factors that transfer effector proteins tailored to recruit host components and modulate cellular processes to the benefit of the bacterial intruders. This article puts the remarkable features of these two pathogens into perspective, highlighting the mechanisms they use to hijack signaling and trafficking pathways of the host as the basis for their stealthy infection strategies. PMID:23906880

  19. ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS Collaboration has reported excesses in diboson invariant mass searches of new resonances around 2 TeV, which might be a prediction of new physics around that mass range. We interpret these results in the context of a modified stealth doublet model where the extra Higgs doublet has a Yukawa interaction with the first generation quarks, and show that the heavy CP-even Higgs boson can naturally explain the excesses in the WW and ZZ channels with a small Yukawa coupling, ξ∼0.15, and a tiny mixing angle with the SM Higgs boson, α∼0.05. Furthermore, the model satisfies constraints from colliders and electroweak precision measurements.

  20. One More Disguise in the Stealth Behavior of Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A. Fischetti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to hide in the animal kingdom is essential for survival; the same is true for bacteria. Streptococcus pyogenes is considered one of the more successful stealth bacteria in its production of a hyaluronic acid capsule that is chemically identical to the hyaluronic acid lining human joints. It has also acquired the capacity to enter eukaryotic cells to avoid the onslaught of the host’s immune defenses, as well as drugs. From this intracellular vantage point, it may remain dormant from days to weeks, only to cause disease again at a later time, perhaps causing a relapse in a drug-treated patient. We now learn that it is able to enter macrophages as well, enabling the Streptococcus to use this “Trojan horse” approach to be transported to distant sites in the body.

  1. [World Collections of Parasitic Worms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovieva, S V; Butorina, N N; Udalova, Zh V; Khasanova, S; Filimonova, L V; Petrosyan, V G; Pel'gunov, A N

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the depositories of parasitic worms in the scientific institutes and museums in the United States, Japan, and Europe (the total number of samples and the availability of types of helminths from various classes), as well as information on the availability of electronic catalogues of the collections in the continental, national, and regional centers for collective use. The extent of this material has determined the necessity of creating digital collections and libraries that would represent a new form of storing, displaying, and exchanging information for scientific research. An analysis was performed of the current state of approaches and methods of development of the specialized information retrieval system (IRS) and databases (DBs) on the parasitic worms in Russia on the basis of a common conceptual data model, taking into account their local use (as desktop systems of database management) and access by scientists worldwide via the Internet.

  2. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  3. Worm Infestation: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Bhavneet; Bharti, Sahul; Khurana, Sumeeta

    2017-11-11

    Worm infections continue to be among the most common diseases affecting children from low and middle income countries. Major worm infections of public health importance include Ascariasis, Trichuriasis, Hookworm, and Enterobiasis, which are transmitted through contaminated soil. In India, combined prevalence rates of worm infestation as per pooled data of 127 surveys is over 20%. Although most helminthic infections are mild and are often asymptomatic, but moderate to heavy worm infestations are generally associated with growth faltering, nutritional compromise, anemia and suboptimal academic performance among children from endemic regions. Migration of larval or adult worms also underpins pulmonary and gastrointestinal morbidity in affected children. Some of the distinctive life cycle and clinical features of various worms are discussed in the review. The gold standard diagnostic technique for evaluation of worm infestation includes stool microscopy for direct egg detection and species identification. Most of the community based surveys for detecting soil transmitted helminths (STH) use Kato-Katz technique. The drug armamentarium against worm infestation has evolved tremendously in last three to four decades with the availability of more efficacious and broad spectrum anthelminthics. The key strategies of a multi-component integrated management of worm infestation include individualized treatment, community management (mass drug administration) as well as preventive measures. Finally, barriers to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of worm infestations need to be identified and aggressively managed at individual, family and societal levels so that WHO's 75% coverage target can be achieved to eliminate soil transmitted helminthiasis in children by 2020.

  4. Detecting Internet Worms Using Data Mining Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Muazzam Siddiqui; Morgan C. Wang; Joohan Lee

    2008-01-01

    Internet worms pose a serious threat to computer security. Traditional approaches using signatures to detect worms pose little danger to the zero day attacks. The focus of malware research is shifting from using signature patterns to identifying the malicious behavior displayed by the malwares. This paper presents a novel idea of extracting variable length instruction sequences that can identify worms from clean programs using data mining techniques. The analysis is facilitated by the program...

  5. Infrared Cloaking, Stealth, and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Sheehan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Infrared signature management (IRSM has been a primary aeronautical concern for over 50 years. Most strategies and technologies are limited by the second law of thermodynamics. In this article, IRSM is considered in light of theoretical developments over the last 15 years that have put the absolute status of the second law into doubt and that might open the door to a new class of broadband IR stealth and cloaking techniques. Following a brief overview of IRSM and its current thermodynamic limitations, theoretical and experimental challenges to the second law are reviewed. One proposal is treated in detail: a high power density, solid-state power source to convert thermal energy into electrical or chemical energy. Next, second-law based infrared signature management (SL-IRSM strategies are considered for two representative military scenarios: an underground installation and a SL-based jet engine. It is found that SL-IRSM could be technologically disruptive across the full spectrum of IRSM modalities, including camouflage, surveillance, night vision, target acquisition, tracking, and homing.

  6. Stealth Properties to Improve Therapeutic Efficacy of Drug Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Salmaso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, nanocarriers for drug delivery have emerged as powerful tools with unquestionable potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Many colloidal drug delivery systems are underdevelopment to ameliorate the site specificity of drug action and reduce the systemic side effects. By virtue of their small size they can be injected intravenously and disposed into the target tissues where they release the drug. Nanocarriers interact massively with the surrounding environment, namely, endothelium vessels as well as cells and blood proteins. Consequently, they are rapidly removed from the circulation mostly by the mononuclear phagocyte system. In order to endow nanosystems with long circulation properties, new technologies aimed at the surface modification of their physicochemical features have been developed. In particular, stealth nanocarriers can be obtained by polymeric coating. In this paper, the basic concept underlining the “stealth” properties of drug nanocarriers, the parameters influencing the polymer coating performance in terms of opsonins/macrophages interaction with the colloid surface, the most commonly used materials for the coating process and the outcomes of this peculiar procedure are thoroughly discussed.

  7. Establishment of chronic infection: Brucella’s stealth strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas eAhmed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brucella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes zoonotic infection known as brucellosis which results in abortion and infertility in natural host. Humans, especially in low income countries, can acquire infection by direct contact with infected animal or by consumption of animal products and show high morbidity, severe economic losses and public health problems. However for survival, host cells develop complex immune mechanisms to defeat and battle against attacking pathogens and maintain a balance between host resistance and Brucella virulence. On the other hand as a successful intracellular pathogen, Brucella has evolved multiple strategies to evade immune response mechanisms to establish persistent infection and replication within host. In this review, we mainly summarize the Stealth strategies employed by Brucella to modulate innate and the adaptive immune systems, autophagy, apoptosis and possible role of small noncoding RNA in the establishment of chronic infection. The purpose of this review is to give an overview for recent understanding how this pathogen evades immune response mechanisms of host, which will facilitate to understanding the pathogenesis of brucellosis and the development of novel, more effective therapeutic approaches to treat brucellosis.

  8. Stealth configurations in vector-tensor theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagoya, Javier; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2018-01-01

    Studying the physics of compact objects in modified theories of gravity is important for understanding how future observations can test alternatives to General Relativity. We consider a subset of vector-tensor Galileon theories of gravity characterized by new symmetries, which can prevent the propagation of the vector longitudinal polarization, even in absence of Abelian gauge invariance. We investigate new spherically symmetric and slowly rotating solutions for these systems, including an arbitrary matter Lagrangian. We show that, under certain conditions, there always exist stealth configurations whose geometry coincides with solutions of Einstein gravity coupled with the additional matter. Such solutions have a non-trivial profile for the vector field, characterized by independent integration constants, which extends to asymptotic infinity. We interpret our findings in terms of the symmetries and features of the original vector-tensor action, and on the number of degrees of freedom that it propagates. These results are important to eventually describe gravitationally bound configurations in modified theories of gravity, such as black holes and neutron stars, including realistic matter fields forming or surrounding the object.

  9. A Novel Anti-Stealth Technique Based on Stratospheric Balloon-Borne Radar in Heterogeneous Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, Mohamed; Zong, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Radar cross section (RCS) of a stealth target model like F-117A can be improved by multichannel stratospheric balloon-borne bistatic radar at higher aspect angle. The potential problem is that the stealth target may produce range walk in clutter heterogeneous environments, thus it is difficult to determine the range ambiguity under quadratic range cell migration (QRCM). In this paper, a novel detection technique known as hybrid modified fractional-radon Fourier transform (MFrRFT) and knowledge-aided space-time adaptive processes (KA-STAP) is proposed to impact this kind of problem simultaneously. KA-STAP is applied to suppress the non-homogeneous clutter in the received data, and MFrRFT is used to eliminate the QRCM along with the second-order keystone transform (SOKT), so as to estimate the range ambiguity and compensate the stealth target's range walk. The hybrid MFrRFT/KA-STAP scheme is simple and applicable to the small RCS of fast stealth target with a long-time coherent integration. Finally, to achieve high accuracy of locating stealth target, a non-parametric detection technique based on Legendre orthogonal polynomials is applied to reconstruct the probability density function (pdf) of real RCS data predicted by physical optics (PO) approximation method.

  10. NEDAC: A worm countermeasure mechanism | Ahmad | Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents an Internet worm countermeasure mechanism that uses DNS activities as a behavioural technique to detect worm propagation. The mechanism also uses a data-link containment solution to block traffic from an infected host. The concept has been demonstrated using a developed prototype and tested in ...

  11. END THE OF HORROR WORM: Dracunculus medinensis.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the body of the human host. The worm inhabits the ... contact with water, the female worm emerges and releases her larvae. The larvae are then ingested by a copepod, and after two weeks. (and two molts) the larvae become infectious. Ingestion of the copepods in drinking water is the last stage that completes the cycle.

  12. Stealth voluntarism: an expectation of health professional work in underserviced areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Neil; Halseth, Greg; Ostry, Alec

    2011-01-01

    Voluntarism can take many forms, and its boundaries are not always straightforward. In this paper, we explore a particular type of voluntary activities carried out as an add-on to formal duties of health care professionals and administrators. We outline some impressions of what we term 'stealth voluntarism', which we situate at the interstices of health care professionalism, place integration, and welfare retrenchment. Our discussion draws on exploratory research looking at health care and social support in smaller urban centres in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. While stealth voluntarism can occur anywhere, we highlight its unique implications for systems of support in rural and small town places. We conclude by considering the wider implications of stealth voluntarism as an expectation of professional work in underserviced areas, particularly in the context of welfare retrenchment and the offloading of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved pharmacokinetics and reduced toxicity of brucine after encapsulation into stealth liposomes: role of phosphatidylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yan, Guo-jun; Hu, Rong-rong; Gu, Qian-wen; Chen, Ming-lei; Gu, Wei; Chen, Zhi-peng; Cai, Bao-chang

    2012-01-01

    Brucine was encapsulated into stealth liposomes using the ammonium sulfate gradient method to improve therapeutic index. Four brucine stealth liposomal formulations were prepared, which were made from different phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different phase transition temperatures (T(m)). The PCs used were soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine (HSPC), and distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC). The stabilities, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities of these liposomal formulations were evaluated and compared. Size, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency of brucine-loaded stealth liposomes (BSL) were not influenced by PC composition. In vitro release studies revealed that drug release rate increased with decreased T(m) of PCs, especially with the presence of rat plasma. After intravenous administration, the area under the curve (AUC) values of BSL-SPC, BSL-DPPC, BSL-HSPC, and BSL-DSPC in plasma were 7.71, 9.24, 53.83, and 56.83-fold as large as that of free brucine, respectively. The LD(50) values of brucine solution, BSL-SPC, BSL-DPPC, BSL-HSPC, and BSL-DSPC following intravenous injection were 13.17, 37.30, 37.69, 51.18, and 52.86 mg/kg, respectively. It was found in calcein retention experiments that the order of calcein retention in rat plasma was SPC < DPPC < HSPC < DSPC stealth liposomes. PC composition could exert significant influence on the stabilities, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities of brucine-loaded stealth liposomes. DSPC or HSPC with T(m) above 50°C should be used to prepare the stealth liposomal formulation for the intravenous delivery of brucine. However, it was found in the present paper that the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of BSL were not influenced by the PC composition when the T(m) of the PC was in the range of -20°C to 41°C.

  14. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  15. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  16. Comparison of conventional chemotherapy, stealth liposomes and temperature-sensitive liposomes in a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasselhuber, Astrid; Dreher, Matthew R; Rattay, Frank; Wood, Bradford J; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Various liposomal drug carriers have been developed to overcome short plasma half-life and toxicity related side effects of chemotherapeutic agents. We developed a mathematical model to compare different liposome formulations of doxorubicin (DOX): conventional chemotherapy (Free-DOX), Stealth liposomes (Stealth-DOX), temperature sensitive liposomes (TSL) with intra-vascular triggered release (TSL-i), and TSL with extra-vascular triggered release (TSL-e). All formulations were administered as bolus at a dose of 9 mg/kg. For TSL, we assumed locally triggered release due to hyperthermia for 30 min. Drug concentrations were determined in systemic plasma, aggregate body tissue, cardiac tissue, tumor plasma, tumor interstitial space, and tumor cells. All compartments were assumed perfectly mixed, and represented by ordinary differential equations. Contribution of liposomal extravasation was negligible in the case of TSL-i, but was the major delivery mechanism for Stealth-DOX and for TSL-e. The dominant delivery mechanism for TSL-i was release within the tumor plasma compartment with subsequent tissue- and cell uptake of released DOX. Maximum intracellular tumor drug concentrations for Free-DOX, Stealth-DOX, TSL-i, and TSL-e were 3.4, 0.4, 100.6, and 15.9 µg/g, respectively. TSL-i and TSL-e allowed for high local tumor drug concentrations with reduced systemic exposure compared to Free-DOX. While Stealth-DOX resulted in high tumor tissue concentrations compared to Free-DOX, only a small fraction was bioavailable, resulting in little cellular uptake. Consistent with clinical data, Stealth-DOX resulted in similar tumor intracellular concentrations as Free-DOX, but with reduced systemic exposure. Optimal release time constants for maximum cellular uptake for Stealth-DOX, TSL-e, and TSL-i were 45 min, 11 min, and constants were shorter for MDR cells, with ∼4 min for Stealth-DOX and for TSL-e. Tissue concentrations correlated well quantitatively with a prior in-vivo study

  17. Parasitic worms and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Parasitic worms have evolved strategies to manipulate the host immune system, some of which may lead to a reduction in inflammation. Characterisation of the ways in which these organisms mediate an anti-inflammatory response and identification of parasite-derived molecules involved in immune modulation paves the way to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of inflammatory disease. This review highlights recent findings in this field of research in the context of a broader overview. Some parasites and parasite derived products inhibit inflammatory responses through effects on both the innate and adaptive immune response. Considerable progress has been made in identifying parasite derived molecules, the ways in which they interact with the immune system and how they mediate immunomodulation. There is great interest in the potential usefulness of parasite-mediated immunomodulation for the treatment and prevention of a range of inflammatory disorders. Much remains to be resolved regarding characterisation of potential helminth-derived biomodulators, timing and dose of exposure to the agents as well as characterisation of the modes of action so that synthetic analogues that mimic the effects can be generated.

  18. Detecting Internet Worms Using Data Mining Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muazzam Siddiqui

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet worms pose a serious threat to computer security. Traditional approaches using signatures to detect worms pose little danger to the zero day attacks. The focus of malware research is shifting from using signature patterns to identifying the malicious behavior displayed by the malwares. This paper presents a novel idea of extracting variable length instruction sequences that can identify worms from clean programs using data mining techniques. The analysis is facilitated by the program control flow information contained in the instruction sequences. Based upon general statistics gathered from these instruction sequences we formulated the problem as a binary classification problem and built tree based classifiers including decision tree, bagging and random forest. Our approach showed 95.6% detection rate on novel worms whose data was not used in the model building process.

  19. Embedding Quantitative Methods by Stealth in Political Science: Developing a Pedagogy for Psephology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Student evaluations of quantitative methods courses in political science often reveal they are characterised by aversion, alienation and anxiety. As a solution to this problem, this paper describes a pedagogic research project with the aim of embedding quantitative methods by stealth into the first-year undergraduate curriculum. This paper…

  20. The potential of modern radar when stealth technology and active interference are used simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, V. V.

    1992-02-01

    The effect of stealth technology and the absence or presence of active interference on the range of the main types of modern radar is evaluated. Levels of reduction of the effective scattering areas in the case of which the radar is ineffective are determined.

  1. An Assessment of Media Coverage of the B-2 Stealth Bomber

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    89/Th 544 4-1 Denise Gellene Pentagon Probes Possible Fraud In Development Of3 Stealth Bombers 71 Jul 26, 89/W 1277 1-1 Sara Fritz Senate Backs...Surprises Few, Pleases Many I 133 Apr 20, 89/Th 758 4-6 Denise Gellene Northrop First-Quarter Profit Sharply Lower; * Weapons System Cited 134 Apr 15

  2. General principles of passive radar signature reducing – stealth technology and its applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Marius PANAIT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents passive radar signature reducing principles and technologies and discusses the ways to implement stealthy characteristics in general vehicle design. Stealth is a major requirement to all current-generation military vehicle designs and also a strong selling point for various aircraft and UAVs.

  3. Detection of worms in error diffusion halftoning

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Marius; Albregtsen, Fritz; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2009-01-01

    This is the copy of journal's version originally published in Proc. SPIE 7242. Reprinted with permission of SPIE: http://spie.org/x10.xml?WT.svl=tn7 Digital halftoning is used to reproduce a continuous tone image with a printer. One of these halftoning algorithms, error diffusion, suffers from certain artifacts. One of these artifacts is commonly denoted as worms. We propose a simple measure for detection of worm artifacts. The proposed measure is evaluated by a psychophysical experiment, ...

  4. Polygraph: Automatically Generating Signatures for Polymorphic Worms

    OpenAIRE

    Newsome, J.; Karp, B.; Song, D.

    2005-01-01

    It is widely believed that content-signature-based intrusion detection systems (IDSes) are easily evaded by polymorphic worms, which vary their payload on every infection attempt. In this paper, we present Polygraph, a signature generation system that successfully produces signatures that match polymorphic worms. Polygraph generates signatures that consist of multiple disjoint content substrings. In doing so, Polygraph leverages our insight that for a real-world exploit to function properly, ...

  5. Filarial worms reduce Plasmodium infectivity in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Aliota

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-occurrence of malaria and filarial worm parasites has been reported, but little is known about the interaction between filarial worm and malaria parasites with the same Anopheles vector. Herein, we present data evaluating the interaction between Wuchereria bancrofti and Anopheles punctulatus in Papua New Guinea (PNG. Our field studies in PNG demonstrated that An. punctulatus utilizes the melanization immune response as a natural mechanism of filarial worm resistance against invading W. bancrofti microfilariae. We then conducted laboratory studies utilizing the mosquitoes Armigeres subalbatus and Aedes aegypti and the parasites Brugia malayi, Brugia pahangi, Dirofilaria immitis, and Plasmodium gallinaceum to evaluate the hypothesis that immune activation and/or development by filarial worms negatively impact Plasmodium development in co-infected mosquitoes. Ar. subalbatus used in this study are natural vectors of P. gallinaceum and B. pahangi and they are naturally refractory to B. malayi (melanization-based refractoriness.Mosquitoes were dissected and Plasmodium development was analyzed six days after blood feeding on either P. gallinaceum alone or after taking a bloodmeal containing both P. gallinaceum and B. malayi or a bloodmeal containing both P. gallinaceum and B. pahangi. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence and mean intensity of Plasmodium infections in two species of mosquito that had dual infections as compared to those mosquitoes that were infected with Plasmodium alone, and was independent of whether the mosquito had a melanization immune response to the filarial worm or not. However, there was no reduction in Plasmodium development when filarial worms were present in the bloodmeal (D. immitis but midgut penetration was absent, suggesting that factors associated with penetration of the midgut by filarial worms likely are responsible for the observed reduction in malaria parasite infections.These results could have an

  6. Optimal design for an end face engagement worm gear with multiple worm-wheel meshing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xingqiao; Zhu, Weibing; Chen, Yonghong; Chen, Shouan; Wang, Jinge

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem for lacking a special mechanical transmission that could provide multiple outputs with high transmission efficiency and good lubrication in the modern industrial, a novel worm gear, named end face engagement worm gear, with multiple worm-wheel meshing is proposed for the first time. The essential parameters for the worm gear are optimized to enhance lubrication and meshing properties. Moreover, analysis of variance(ANOVA) is applied to determine the optimum levels and to determine the influence of parameters. The ANOVA results show that the novel end face engagement worm gear with multiple worm wheels provides high lubrication(the lubrication angle is more than 89°) and meshing performance(the induce normal curvature is less than 0.0002 mm-1). The interaction between center distance and roller slant distance most strongly influences the lubrication angle(contributed 51.6%), followed by the parameters of center distance(contributed 25.0%), roller slant distance(contributed 16.4%), tooth angle of gear, gear ratio, and roller radius. In addition, roller radius most strongly influences the induced normal curvature(contributed 39.4%), followed by roller slant distance(contributed 15.2%), tooth angle of the gear(contributed 9.0%), center distance, and gear ratio. The proposed worm gear helps to enrich the no-backlash high precision worm drive and the optimal design method can provide a useful reference on performance improvement of other worm gear.

  7. Hopf Bifurcation in an SEIDQV Worm Propagation Model with Quarantine Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Worms exploiting zero-day vulnerabilities have drawn significant attention owing to their enormous threats to the Internet. In general, users may immunize their computers with countermeasures in exposed and infectious state, which may take a period of time. Through theoretical analysis, time delay may lead to Hopf bifurcation phenomenon so that the worm propagation system will be unstable and uncontrollable. In view of the above factors, a quarantine strategy is thus proposed in the study. In real network, unknown worms and worm variants may lead to great risks, which misuse detection system fails to detect. However, anomaly detection is of help in detecting these kinds of worm. Consequently, our proposed quarantine strategy is built on the basis of anomaly intrusion detection system. Numerical experiments show that the quarantine strategy can diminish the infectious hosts sharply. In addition, the threshold τ0 is much larger after using our quarantine strategy, which implies that people have more time to remove worms so that the system is easier to be stable and controllable without Hopf bifurcation. Finally, simulation results match numerical ones well, which fully supports our analysis.

  8. The Relationship between Stealth CMEs and Coronal Holes: Origin, Interaction, and Geoeffectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan Skov, T.; Nitta, N.

    2016-12-01

    The current solar cycle is unique in that levels of activity are the lowest for any cycle since the space age in terms of a shortage of strong geomagnetic storms and high-energy particle events (e.g. ground-level events (GLEs)). This low level of activity has brought about unique challenges. One of these is the rise in "stealth CMEs," which are CMEs observed in coronagraph data but not in coronal images, especially in disk view. These events were identified during the deep minimum of cycle 23/24 and appear to be increasing. Since solar cycle 25 brings with it the possibility of yet another low activity cycle, it is very likely that the number of stealth CMEs will remain a significant fraction of ejecta. Thus a better understanding of their eruption mechanisms, the timescale over which on-disk observations must be made for unambiguous identification, and a reliable association with ICME events at 1 AU are of paramount importance to space weather prediction in the coming cycle. It is not yet clear if stealth CMEs represent a new class of CMEs that cannot not be explained in terms of standard models. However, they cannot be ignored. Under certain circumstances these events have been known to drive large geomagnetic storms. We investigate the existence of mismatched polarity reversals in the magnetic field and electron strahl measured in situ within ICMEs associated with stealth CMEs. We discuss the plausibility of interaction with solar wind emanating from coronal holes as a key element of stealth CME eruption as evidenced by expanding coronal hole boundaries during eruption and the presence of interchange reconnection within ICMEs.

  9. Aquatic worms eat sludge: Mass balances and processing of worm faeces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G., E-mail: tim.hendrickx@wur.nl [Wetsus - Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Temmink, H. [Wetsus - Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands); Elissen, H.J.H. [Wetsus - Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Buisman, C.J.N. [Wetsus - Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, P.O. Box 1113, 8900 CC Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    Reduction of the amount of waste sludge from waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) can be achieved with the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus in a new reactor concept. In addition to reducing the amount of waste sludge, further processing of produced worm faeces and released nutrients should also be considered. This study gives the mass balances for sludge consumed by L. variegatus, showing the fate of the consumed organic material, nutrients and heavy metals associated with the sludge. A distinction is made between conversion into worm biomass, release as dissolved metabolites and what remains in the worm faeces. The results showed that 39% of the nitrogen and 12% of the phosphorus in the sludge digested by the worms are used in the formation of new worm biomass, which has potential for reuse. Experiments showed that settling of the worm faeces leads to a factor 2.5 higher solids concentration, compared to settling of waste sludge. This could lead to a 67% reduction of the volumetric load on thickening equipment. The worm reactor is expected to be most interesting for smaller WWTPs where a decrease on the volumetric load on sludge handling operations will have most impact.

  10. Disulfide-Functionalized Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Nicholas J; Rosselgong, Julien; Madsen, Jeppe; Armes, Steven P

    2015-08-10

    Two strategies for introducing disulfide groups at the outer surface of RAFT-synthesized poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PGMA-PHPMA, or Gx-Hy for brevity) diblock copolymer worms are investigated. The first approach involved statistical copolymerization of GMA with a small amount of disulfide dimethacrylate (DSDMA, or D) comonomer to afford a G54-D0.50 macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA); this synthesis was conducted in relatively dilute solution in order to ensure mainly intramolecular cyclization and hence the formation of linear chains. Alternatively, a new disulfide-based bifunctional RAFT agent (DSDB) was used to prepare a G45-S-S-G45 (or (G45-S)2) macro-CTA. A binary mixture of a non-functionalized G55 macro-CTA was utilized with each of these two disulfide-based macro-CTAs in turn for the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). By targeting a PHPMA DP of 130 and systematically varying the molar ratio of the two macro-CTAs, a series of disulfide-functionalized diblock copolymer worm gels were obtained. For both formulations, oscillatory rheology studies confirmed that higher disulfide contents led to stronger gels, presumably as a result of inter-worm covalent bond formation via disulfide/thiol exchange. Using the DSDB-based macro-CTA led to the strongest worm gels, and this formulation also proved to be more effective in suppressing the thermosensitive behavior that is observed for the nondisulfide-functionalized control worm gel. However, macroscopic precipitation occurred when the proportion of DSDB-based macro-CTA was increased to 50 mol %, whereas the DSDMA-based macro-CTA could be utilized at up to 80 mol %. Finally, the worm gel modulus could be reduced to that of a nondisulfide-containing worm gel by reductive cleavage of the inter-worm disulfide bonds using excess tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) to yield thiol groups. These new biomimetic worm gels are

  11. Integrated analysis of aerodynamic/stealth characteristics of blended-wing-body lifting vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a blended-wing-body lifting vehicle is designed, with the cross section described by Class/Shape transformation method (CST, the outline controlled by an exponential function, and tail regulated by B-spline curve. Rapid estimation procedures of aerodynamic based on plane method and of radar cross section (RCS based on physical optics are developed and validated. A frame of integrated design and analysis of aerodynamic and stealth characteristics is constructed and applied to parameter sensitivity analysis. The results show that the parameters that affect the aerodynamic differ from those of RCS, which means the vehicle could be good at both aerodynamic and stealth, and the study followed should be focused on it.

  12. Experimental Research on Passive Millimeter Wave Radiometric Stealth Technology of Metal Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangfeng; Lou, Guowei; Li, Xingguo

    2012-12-01

    Working all day and all weather, a passive millimeter wave radiometer (PMMW) can be widely used in civil and military affairs. It can get some specific information about the material characteristics different from radar and infrared detectors. On basis of the radiometric operating range equation, the radiation cross section and stealth effect of metal objects are presented for the PMMW near-sensing application. The measurement experiments of metal solid models adopts 3 mm band Dicke radiometer with the outdoor calibration system. The sky temperature and other different surface metal objects are also measured as the contrastive experiments. The results show the radiometric temperature contrasts of solid models have remarkable difference in the bare and coated conditions, and the radiometric operating range can decrease to 60.8 %. In addition, the PMMW stealth methods through different surface treatment respectively reduce the radiometric antenna temperature contrast in some degree.

  13. Observing the Unobservable: identification and Characterization of Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke

    2016-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis we study stealth CMEs: solar coronal mass ejections that are clearly observed in coronagraph data but do not show significant low-coronal or on-disk signatures of eruption. This lack of coronal signatures makes it challenging to determine their source region and predict their trajectory throughout interplanetary space. Combining PROBA2/SWAP data with that of other instruments, we identify 40 such events and investigate their properties both observationally and statistically. We find that our sample size is insufficient to determine the scaling law for the CME angular width reliably. We therefore analyze in general what the effect is of a limited sample size on the estimation of a power law parameter. Armed with this knowledge, we return to our sample of stealth CMEs, re-analyze the power law for their angular widths and compare the results to the power law found for normal CMEs.

  14. Observing the Unobservable: Identification and Characterisation of Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke; Seaton, Daniel B.; Poedts, Stefaan; Berghmans, David

    2016-05-01

    I will present my doctoral thesis research on stealth CMEs: solar coronal mass ejections that are clearly observed in coronagraph data but do not show significant low-coronal or on-disk signatures of eruption. This lack of coronal signatures makes it challenging to determine their source region and predict their trajectory throughout interplanetary space. We identified 40 such events and investigated their properties both observationally and statistically. We found that our sample size was insufficient to determine the scaling law for the CME angular width reliably. We therefore analyzed in general what the effect is of a limited sample size on the estimation of a power law parameter. Armed with this knowledge, we returned to our sample of stealth CMEs, re-analyzed the power law for their angular widths and compared the results to the power law found for normal CMEs.

  15. Integrated analysis of aerodynamic/stealth characteristics of blended-wing-body lifting vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Ye; Ge Jianquan; Xu Qiangqiang; Huang Hao; Yang Tao

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a blended-wing-body lifting vehicle is designed, with the cross section described by Class/Shape transformation method (CST), the outline controlled by an exponential function, and tail regulated by B-spline curve. Rapid estimation procedures of aerodynamic based on plane method and of radar cross section (RCS) based on physical optics are developed and validated. A frame of integrated design and analysis of aerodynamic and stealth characteristics is constructed and applied to ...

  16. Ambiguous Imitations: DIY Hijacking the ‘Danish Mother Seeking’ Stealth Marketing Campaign on YouTube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Stage

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of imitation as a key dimension of online DIY and participatory cultures on YouTube. The empirical point of departure is the viral stealth marketing YouTube video entitled 'Danish Mother Seeking', produced by the official national tourist organisation (Visit Denmark, and selected extracts of the online responses to this video. Framed by the notion of participatory culture (Jenkins 2006; Burgess & Green 2009 and the concept of imitation (Tarde 1895/1903, we analyse how marketing initiatives buy into and borrow energy from engaged networked produsers, but also how these produsers can criticise marketing initiatives by 're-imitating' them. Following this, we argue that the case represents an interesting and fascinating example of consumer re-sistance and bottom-up voices insisting on being heard, rather than a simple ex-ample of the breakdown of a brand strategy. Looking at the response videos they furthermore reveal that imitation can be a rather ambiguous social strategy as it is used both to transfer energy from the imitated object and to deconstruct it. As part of this argument we replace the classical concept of 'mimicry' (Bhabha 1994 with the notion of 'ambiguous imitation' to be able to describe online imitation as both an act of critical voicing and energy transmission.

  17. Infrared radiation and stealth characteristics prediction for supersonic aircraft with uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoying; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Ruixing; Wang, Lei

    2015-11-01

    The infrared radiation (IR) intensity is generally used to embody the stealth characteristics of a supersonic aircraft, which directly affects its survivability in warfare. Under such circumstances, the research on IR signature as an important branch of stealth technology is significant to overcome this threat for survivability enhancement. Considering the existence of uncertainties in material and environment, the IR intensity is indeed a range rather than a specific value. In this paper, subjected to the properties of the IR, an analytic process containing the uncertainty propagation and the reliability evaluation is investigated when taking into account that the temperature of object, the atmospheric transmittance and the spectral emissivity of materials are all regarded as uncertain parameters. For one thing, the vertex method is used to analyze and estimate the dispersion of IR intensity; for another, the safety assessment of the stealth performance for aircraft is conducted by non-probabilistic reliability analysis. For the purpose of the comparison and verification, the Monte Carlo simulation is discussed as well. The validity, usage, and efficiency of the developed methodology are demonstrated by two application examples eventually.

  18. Facing Two Rapidly Spreading Internet Worms

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The Internet is currently facing a growing number of computer infections due to two rapidly spreading worms. The "Conficker" and "Downadup" worms have infected an estimated 1.1 million PCs in a 24-hour period, bringing the total number of infected computers to 3.5 million [1]. Via a single USB stick, these worms were also responsible for the infection of about 40 laptops at the last EGEE conference in Istanbul. In order to reduce the impact of these worms on CERN Windows computers, the Computer Security Team has suggested several preventive measures described here. Disabling the Windows AutoRun and AutoPlay Features The Computer Security Team and the IT/IS group have decided to disable the "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" functionality on all centrally-managed Windows computers at CERN. When inserting CDs, DVDs or USB sticks into a PC, "AutoRun" and "AutoPlay" are responsible for automatically playing music or films stored on these media, or ...

  19. Effects on Packed Cell Volume and Parasitic Worm Load from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the consequences of parasitic worm infestation in children is anaemia which is objectively measured by estimating the packed cell volume. This study carried out through four months was to examine the effects, (on packed cell volume and parasitic worm load) of de-worming pupils of a primary school in Rivers State.

  20. Not every worm wrapped around a stick is a guinea worm: a case of Onchocerca volvulus mimicking Dracunculus medinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbong, Eta Ngole; Sume, Gerald Etapelong; Danbe, Flaubert; Kum, Walter Kang; Mbi, Valeri Oben; Fouda, André Arsène Bita; Atem, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Despite being certified guinea worm free in 2007, Cameroon continues surveillance efforts to ensure rapid verification of any suspected reoccurrence. This includes the investigation of every rumor and confirmation of each suspicious expulsed worm. This paper presents fieldwork carried out to investigate a guinea worm rumor in Cameroon which turned out to be an Onchocerca volvulus mimicking Dracunculus medinensis. The investigation included a field visit to the subsistence farming community where the rumor was reported. During the visit, interviews were conducted with health staff who managed the case and the elderly farmer from whom the worm was retrieved. An investigation of any potential missed guinea worm cases was also conducted through interviews with community residents and reviews of the health facility's medical records. This was combined with laboratory analyses of water samples from the community's water sources and the retrieved worm which was removed from the patient via wrapping it around a stick. Microscopy and molecular analyses of the retrieved worm revealed a female Onchocerca volvulus whose expulsion strongly mimicked guinea worm. In addition to presenting findings of our investigation, this paper discusses distinguishing elements between the two parasites and gives an overview of guinea worm eradication efforts in Cameroon as well as current challenges to the worm's eradication globally. The investigation findings suggest the evolving Onchocerca volvulus worm tropisms' adaptive survival behavior worth further investigation. Strategies used to successfully control guinea worm in Cameroon could be adapted for Onchocerca volvulus control.

  1. Lack of effect of ivermectin on prepatent guinea-worm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issaka-Tinorgah, A.; Magnussen, P.; Bloch, P.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ivermectin on prepatent guinea-worm was tested in a single-blind placebo-controlled trial; 400 adults were randomly allocated to a single dose of ivermectin (150 µg/kg) or placebo. Fifty-four of the 385 participants who were followed for 15 months developed a total of 69 emergent...... guinea-worms. There was no significant differencein the proportion of persons with emergent guinea-worms between the 2 treatment groups; 58% appeared in males. 80% of emergent guinea-worms were located below the knee. Migration of guinea-worms in the tissues was not affected. It is concluded...

  2. Packet Payload Monitoring for Internet Worm Content Detection Using Deterministic Finite Automaton with Delayed Dictionary Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Packet content scanning is one of the crucial threats to network security and network monitoring applications. In monitoring applications, payload of packets in a network is matched against the set of patterns in order to detect attacks like worms, viruses, and protocol definitions. During network transfer, incoming and outgoing packets are monitored in depth to inspect the packet payload. In this paper, the regular expressions that are basically string patterns are analyzed for packet payloads in detecting worms. Then the grouping scheme for regular expression matching is rewritten using Deterministic Finite Automaton (DFA. DFA achieves better processing speed during regular expression matching. DFA requires more memory space for each state. In order to reduce memory utilization, decompression technique is used. Delayed Dictionary Compression (DDC is applied for achieving better speeds in the communication links. DDC achieves decoding latency during compression of payload packets in the network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach provides better time consumption and memory utilization during detection of Internet worm attacks.

  3. Detecting Computer Worms in the Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Biedermann, Sebastian; Katzenbeisser, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Part 2: Malware Detection; International audience; Computer worms are very active and new sophisticated versions continuously appear. Signature-based detection methods work with a low false-positive rate, but previously knowledge about the threat is needed. Anomaly-based intrusion detection methods are able to detect new and unknown threats, but meaningful information for correct results is necessary. We propose an anomaly-based intrusion detection mechanism for the cloud which directly profi...

  4. How the velvet worm squirts slime

    OpenAIRE

    Concha, Andrés; Mellado, Paula; Morera-Brenes, Bernal; Costa, Cristiano Sampaio; Mahadevan, L,; Monge-Nájera, Julián

    2014-01-01

    The rapid squirt of a proteinaceous slime jet endows the ancient velvet worms (Onychophora) with a unique mechanism for defense from predators and for capturing prey by entangling them in a disordered web that immobilizes their target. However, to date neither qualitative nor quantitative descriptions have been provided for this unique adaptation. Here we investigate the fast oscillatory motion of the oral papillae and the exiting liquid jet that oscillates with frequencies $f\\sim 30-60$ Hz. ...

  5. Hybrid Epidemics—A Case Study on Computer Worm Conficker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Chain, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Conficker is a computer worm that erupted on the Internet in 2008. It is unique in combining three different spreading strategies: local probing, neighbourhood probing, and global probing. We propose a mathematical model that combines three modes of spreading: local, neighbourhood, and global, to capture the worm’s spreading behaviour. The parameters of the model are inferred directly from network data obtained during the first day of the Conficker epidemic. The model is then used to explore the tradeoff between spreading modes in determining the worm’s effectiveness. Our results show that the Conficker epidemic is an example of a critically hybrid epidemic, in which the different modes of spreading in isolation do not lead to successful epidemics. Such hybrid spreading strategies may be used beneficially to provide the most effective strategies for promulgating information across a large population. When used maliciously, however, they can present a dangerous challenge to current internet security protocols. PMID:25978309

  6. Ingestion of Microplastics by Freshwater Tubifex Worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Rachel R; Woodward, Jamie C; Rothwell, James J

    2017-11-07

    Microplastic contamination of the aquatic environment is a global issue. Microplastics can be ingested by organisms leading to negative physiological impacts. The ingestion of microplastics by freshwater invertebrates has not been reported outside the laboratory. Here we demonstrate the ingestion of microplastic particles by Tubifex tubifex from bottom sediments in a major urban waterbody fed by the River Irwell, Manchester, UK. The host sediments had microplastic concentrations ranging from 56 to 2543 particles kg-1. 87% of the Tubifex-ingested microplastic particles were microfibers (55-4100 μm in length), while the remaining 13% were microplastic fragments (50-4500 μm in length). FT-IR analysis revealed ingestion of a range of polymers, including polyester and acrylic fibers. While microbeads were present in the host sediment matrix, they were not detected in Tubifex worm tissue. The mean concentration of ingested microplastics was 129 ± 65.4 particles g-1 tissue. We also show that Tubifex worms retain microplastics for longer than they retain other particulate components of the ingested sediment matrix. Microplastic ingestion by Tubifex worms poses a significant risk for trophic transfer and biomagnification of microplastics up the aquatic food chain.

  7. Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete: making a living as a stealth pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radolf, Justin D; Deka, Ranjit K; Anand, Arvind; Šmajs, David; Norgard, Michael V; Yang, X Frank

    2016-12-01

    The past two decades have seen a worldwide resurgence in infections caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis spirochete. The well-recognized capacity of the syphilis spirochete for early dissemination and immune evasion has earned it the designation 'the stealth pathogen'. Despite the many hurdles to studying syphilis pathogenesis, most notably the inability to culture and to genetically manipulate T. pallidum, in recent years, considerable progress has been made in elucidating the structural, physiological, and regulatory facets of T. pallidum pathogenicity. In this Review, we integrate this eclectic body of information to garner fresh insights into the highly successful parasitic lifestyles of the syphilis spirochete and related pathogenic treponemes.

  8. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier-stealth nanocomposites for in situ glioblastoma theranostics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Fong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy.The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00280c

  9. Development of a stealth carrier system for structural studies of membrane proteins in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma

    Structural studies of membrane proteins remain a great experimental challenge. Functional reconstitution into artificial carriers that mimic the native bilayer environment allows for the handling of membrane proteins in solution and enables the use of small-angle scattering techniques for fast...... and reliable structural analysis. The difficulty with this approach is that the carrier discs contribute to the measured scattering intensity in a highly non-trivial fashion, making subsequent data analysis challenging. This thesis presents the development of a specifically deuterated, stealth nanodisc system...

  10. Pin Worm Survey on Infant School Children in Gunma Prefecture

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 久美子; 阿部, 美幸; 伊藤, 恵美; 金田, 聡子; 関口, 直美; 深町, 容子; 松渕, ユカ子; 柳, 博美; 鈴木, 守

    1991-01-01

    Pin worms (Enterobius vermicularis) are the commonest intestinal parasite in Japan. Examination of this worm infection is usually made by microscopic observation on the swab taken on a scothch tape. We conducted a survey of pin worm infection among infant school children of 4-6 years old. Suitable days for swab examination were studied by comparing the detection rate according to the consecutive days tested. Results were summarized as follows: 1. Three hundred sixteen children (172 boys and 1...

  11. Worms Eat My Garbage. How To Set Up and Maintain a Worm Composting System. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhof, Mary

    This book is a resource for parents and teachers who want to teach about recycling and composting by setting up and maintaining a worm composting system. It is designed to be a detailed yet simple manual of vermicomposting. The manual covers the basics of vermicomposting and answers such questions as where to store a composting container, what…

  12. Worm-it: converting organic wastes into sustainable fish feed by using aquatic worms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, H.J.H.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, H.; Laarhoven, B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Due to overfishing and the use of one-third of wild fish catches for feeding farmed fish and livestock, there is a strong need for alternative sources of suitable proteins and lipids in fish feeds. Small freshwater worms of the species Lumbriculus variegatus can be such a source based on their high

  13. Tapping Indigenous Knowledge to Time Strategic De-worming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategic de-worming is a cost-effective management intervention to which farm animals are subjected at specific times in the year to prevent pasture contamination, reduce infestation rates and eliminate the negative effects of parasitosis to maximize production and economic gain. No studies, on which strategic de-worming ...

  14. Worm plot to diagnose fit in quantile regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    The worm plot is a series of detrended Q-Q plots, split by covariate levels. The worm plot is a diagnostic tool for visualizing how well a statistical model fits the data, for finding locations at which the fit can be improved, and for comparing the fit of different models. This paper shows how

  15. Worm plot to diagnose fit in quantile regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    The worm plot is a series of detrended Q-Q plots, split by covariate levels. The worm plot is a diagnostic tool for visualizing how well a statistical model fits the data, for finding locations at which the fit can be improved, and for comparing the fit of different models. This paper shows how the

  16. "Qupirruit": insects and worms in Inuit traditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugrand, Frédéric; Oosten, Jarich

    2010-01-01

    Although small beings such as the "qupirruit" (insects and worms) appear in many different contexts in Inuit culture, they have not received much attention from scholars. In this paper we examine the symbolism associated with these small animals. We show that their small size makes them suitable to operate on the level of the "tarniq," a miniature image of a being. We discuss how insects often connect different scales and easily transform into other beings. We first deal with the perceptions of insects as they take shape in narratives and practices, and their roles in the manufacture and use of amulets. Then we move to a more specific analysis of the distinctive features of the various "qupirruit".

  17. A radar-infrared bi-stealth structure based on metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shuomin; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Peipeng; Liu, Taijun; Huang, Jifu; Ma, Yungui

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the authors proposed a thin artificial structure that could give rise to the strong reduction of both radar wave reflection and infrared thermal emission. This is realized by the subtle combination of two specifically designed metasurface layers that control the infrared emission and microwave absorption, respectively. Our measurement shows that the fabricated sample could have wideband absorption from 3-8 GHz with attenuation efficiency larger than 90% up to incident angles of 30°. In the infrared atmosphere window, it gives a very low emission value of about 0.2. These results show that our sample is practically very promising for the application of a radar-infrared bi-stealth technology.

  18. [Clinical experience of image-guided neurosurgery with a frameless navigation system (StealthStation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T; Nishio, S; Ikezaki, K; Natori, Y; Inamura, T; Muratani, H; Muraishi, M; Hisada, K; Mihara, F; Matsushima, T; Fukui, M

    1999-01-01

    We have applied the frameless navigation system (StealthStation) to various neurosurgical procedures to examine its usefulness. The system consists of a UNIX based workstation that creates triplanar and 3-dimensional images; an infrared optical digitizer with camera array; a reference-light-emitting diode (LED) array (e.g., reference array); and pointer probe modified by the addition of LEDs. This system was used to assist in placing a minimal skin incision and craniotomy in 4 cases, to determine the tumor/brain interface in 2 cases, to target the subcortical lesion in one case, and to correlate bony structure with a skull base tumor in 3 cases. The combined use with magnetic source imaging of the somatosensory cortex allowed a fast orientation of eloquent areas in 2 cases with peri-Rolandic tumor. This system, thus, was proved to be a useful adjunct to open-tumor biopsy or resection.

  19. Design of "Eye Closure" system for the stealth of photo-electric equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Hua, W. S.; Li, G.

    2012-10-01

    Based on the optical activity of liquid crystal, a new approach for the stealth of "cat's eye" targets is proposed in this paper. It imitates the physiological close reaction of human eyes when strong light irradiates eyes. With this approach, the "cat's eye" effect will vanish, which is applied in restricting photo-electric equipments being detected and located by active laser detection system. The structure and working principle of the design are presented. The drive circuit is given to control the optical switch automatically. Feasibility of this design is demonstrated by experimental method. The measured data illustrate that the proposed approach is effective to eliminate the "cat's eye" effect, so as to enhancing the viability of photo-electric equipments on the battlefield.

  20. Zoo U: A Stealth Approach to Social Skills Assessment in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E. DeRosier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and evaluation of Zoo U, a novel computer game to assess children’s social skills development. Zoo U is an innovative product that combines theory-driven content and customized game mechanics. The game-like play creates the opportunity for stealth assessment, in which dynamic evidence of social skills is collected in real time and players’ choices during gameplay provide the needed data. To ensure the development of an engaging and valid game, we utilized an iterative data-driven validation process in which the game was created, tested, revised based on student performance and feedback, and retested until game play was statistically matched to independent ratings of social skills. We first investigated whether the data collected through extensive logging of student actions provided information that could be used to improve the assessment. We found that detailed game logs of socially relevant player behavior combined with external measures of player social skills provided an efficient vector to incrementally improve the accuracy of the embedded assessments. Next, we investigated whether the game performance correlated with teachers’ assessments of students’ social skills competencies. An evaluation of the final game showed (a significant correlations between in-game social skills assessments and independently obtained standard psychological assessments of the same students and (b high levels of engagement and likeability for students. These findings support the use of the interactive and engaging computer game format for the stealth assessment of children’s social skills. The created innovative design methodologies should prove useful in the design and improvement of computer games in education.

  1. Zwitterionic-Modified Starch-Based Stealth Micelles for Prolonging Circulation Time and Reducing Macrophage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Yang, Boguang; Zhou, Xin; Li, Junjie; Qin, Zhihui; Dong, Dianyu; Cui, Yuanlu; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-02-01

    Over the last few decades, nanoparticles have been emerging as useful means to improve the therapeutic efficacy of drug delivery and medical diagnoses. However, the heterogeneity and complexity of blood as a medium is a fundamental problem; large amounts of protein can be adsorbed onto the surface of nanoparticles and cause their rapid clearance before reaching their target sites, resulting in the failure of drug delivery. To overcome this challenge, we present a rationally designed starch derivative (SB-ST-OC) with both a superhydrophilic moiety of zwitterionic sulfobetaine (SB) and a hydrophobic segment of octane (OC) as functional groups, which can self-assemble into "stealth" micelles (SSO micelles). The superhydrophilic SB kept the micelles stable against aggregation in complex media and imbued them with "stealth" properties, eventually extending their circulation time in blood. In stability and hemolysis tests the SSO micelles showed excellent protein resistance properties and hemocompatibility. Moreover, a phagocytosis test and cytokine secretion assay confirmed that the SSO micelles had less potential to trigger the activation of macrophages and were more suitable as a drug delivery candidate in vivo. On the basis of these results, doxorubicin (DOX), a hydrophobic drug, was used to investigate the potential application of this novel starch derivative in vivo. The results of the pharmacokinetic study showed that the values of the plasma area under the concentration curve (AUC) and elimination half-life (T1/2) of the SSO micelles were higher than those of micelles without SB modifications. In conclusion, the combination of excellent protein resistance, lower macrophage activation, and longer circulation time in vivo makes this synthesized novel starch derivative a promising candidate as a hydrophobic drug carrier for long-term circulation in vivo.

  2. Balancing stealth and echogenic properties in an ultrasound contrast agent with drug delivery potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Lauren J; Alfego, David; Andorko, James I; Eisenbrey, John R; Teraphongphom, Nutte; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2016-10-01

    Contrast agents are currently being modified to combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. For ultrasound (US) imaging with polymeric contrast agents, it is necessary to modify the shell to create "stealth" microbubbles but without these modifications sacrificing the agent's ability to interact with the focused US beam. We hypothesize that addition of the classic immune shielding molecule polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a polylactide (PLA) microbubble shell will affect the acoustic and physical properties of the resulting agents. In an effort to determine the best formulation to achieve a balance between stealth and acoustic activity, we compared two PEGylation techniques; addition of increasing amounts of PEG-PLA copolymer and employing incorporation of a PEG lipid (LipidPEG) into the shell. Loss of acoustic enhancement occurred in a dose-dependent manner for both types of PEGylated agents (loss of signal occurred at >5 wt% PEG-PLA and >1 wt% LipidPEG), while immune activation was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner for the PEG-PLA agents. This study shows that the balance between acoustic behavior and improved immune avoidance was scalable and successful to different degrees with both PEGylation methods, and was best achieved using for PEG-PLA at 5 wt% and for LipidPEG at 1 wt%. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the best method for the targeting and drug delivery capabilities of these agents for applications in cancer treatment. This study represents the basis for understanding the consequences of making modifications to the native polymeric shell. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Polysarcosine-Based Lipids: From Lipopolypeptoid Micelles to Stealth-Like Lipids in Langmuir Blodgett Monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphiles and, in particular, PEGylated lipids or alkyl ethers represent an important class of non-ionic surfactants and have become key ingredients for long-circulating (“stealth” liposomes. While poly-(ethylene glycol (PEG can be considered the gold standard for stealth-like materials, it is known to be neither a bio-based nor biodegradable material. In contrast to PEG, polysarcosine (PSar is based on the endogenous amino acid sarcosine (N-methylated glycine, but has also demonstrated stealth-like properties in vitro, as well as in vivo. In this respect, we report on the synthesis and characterization of polysarcosine based lipids with C14 and C18 hydrocarbon chains and their end group functionalization. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS analysis reveals that lipopeptoids with a degree of polymerization between 10 and 100, dispersity indices around 1.1, and the absence of detectable side products are directly accessible by nucleophilic ring opening polymerization (ROP. The values for the critical micelle concentration for these lipopolymers are between 27 and 1181 mg/L for the ones with C18 hydrocarbon chain or even higher for the C14 counterparts. The lipopolypeptoid based micelles have hydrodynamic diameters between 10 and 25 nm, in which the size scales with the length of the PSar block. In addition, C18PSar50 can be incorporated in 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC monolayers up to a polymer content of 3%. Cyclic compression and expansion of the monolayer showed no significant loss of polymer, indicating a stable monolayer. Therefore, lipopolypeptoids can not only be synthesized under living conditions, but my also provide a platform to substitute PEG-based lipopolymers as excipients and/or in lipid formulations.

  4. Examination of the relationship between host worm community structure on transmission of the parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis by developing taxon-specific probes for multiplex qPCR to identify worm taxa in stream communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fytilis, N.; Lamb, R.; Kerans, B.; Stevens, L.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fish diseases are often caused by waterborne parasites, making them ideal systems for modeling the non-linear relationships between disease dynamics, stream dwelling oligochaete communities and geochemical features. Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease in salmonid fishes, has been a major contributor to the loss of wild rainbow trout populations in numerous streams within the Intermountain West. The parasite alternates between an invertebrate and vertebrate host, being transmitted between the sediment feeding worm Tubifex tubifex (T.tubifex) and salmonid fishes. Worm community biodiversity and abundance are influenced by biogeochemical features and have been linked to disease severity in fish. The worm (T.tubifex) lives in communities with 3-4 other types of worms in stream sediments. Unfortunately, taxonomic identification of oligochaetes is largely dependent on morphological characteristics of sexually mature adults. We have collected and identified ~700 worms from eight sites using molecular genetic probes and a taxonomic key. Additionally, ~1700 worms were identified using only molecular genetic probes. To facilitate distinguishing among tubificids, we developed two multiplex molecular genetic probe-based quantitative polymerase reaction (qPCR) assays to assess tubificid communities in the study area. Similar qPCR techniques specific for M.cerebralis used to determine if individual worms were infected with the parasite. We show how simple Bayesian analysis of the qPCR data can predict the worm community structure and reveal relationships between biodiversity of host communities and host-parasite dynamics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that combines molecular data of both the host and the parasite to examine the effects of host community structure on the transmission of a parasite. Our work can be extended to examine the links between worm community structure and biogeochemical features using molecular genetics and Bayesian

  5. A calibration mechanism based on worm drive for space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yaqin; Li, Chuang; Xia, Siyu; Zhong, Peifeng; Lei, Wang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a new type of calibration mechanism based on worm drive is presented for a space telescope. This calibration mechanism based on worm drive has the advantages of compact size and self-lock. The mechanism mainly consists of thirty-six LEDs as the light source for flat calibration, a diffuse plate, a step motor, a worm gear reducer and a potentiometer. As the main part of the diffuse plate, a PTFE tablet is mounted in an aluminum alloy frame. The frame is fixed on the shaft of the worm gear, which is driven by the step motor through the worm. The shaft of the potentiometer is connected to that of the worm gear to measure the rotation angle of the diffuse plate through a flexible coupler. Firstly, the calibration mechanism is designed, which includes the LEDs assembly design, the worm gear reducer design and the diffuse plate assembly design. The counterweight blocks and two end stops are also designed for the diffuse plate assembly. Then a modal analysis with finite element method for the diffuse plate assembly is completed.

  6. The theory and practice of worm gear drives

    CERN Document Server

    Dudás, Ilés

    2005-01-01

    Worm gears are special gears that resemble screws, and can be used to drive other gears. Worm gears, enable two non-touching shafts in a machine to mesh (join) together. This publication, unique in that it combines both theoretical and practical design aspects, including the latest results of research and development, provides detailed treatment of the theory and production of worm drives, as well as the overarching subject of production geometry of helicoidal surfaces.Included are mathematical models for a number of practical applications; a description of dressing equipment r

  7. Clusterin in the protein corona plays a key role in the stealth effect of nanoparticles against phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Michihiko; Hata, Katsutomo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Nagano, Kazuya; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-11-25

    In biological fluids, nanoparticles interact with biological components such as proteins, and a layer called the "protein corona" forms around the nanoparticles. It is believed that the composition of the protein corona affects the cellular uptake and in vivo biodistribution of nanoparticles; however, the key proteins of the protein corona that control the biological fate of nanoparticles remain unclear. Recently, it was reported that clusterin binding to pegylated nanoparticles is important for the stealth effect of pegylated nanoparticles in phagocytes. However, the effect of clusterin on non-pegylated nanoparticles is unknown, although it is known that clusterin is present in the protein corona of non-pegylated nanoparticles. Here, we assessed the stealth effect of clusterin in the corona of non-pegylated silver nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles. We found that serum- and plasma-protein corona inhibited the cellular uptake of silver nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles in phagocytes and that the plasma-protein corona showed a greater stealth effect compared with the serum-protein corona. Clusterin was present in both the serum- and plasma-protein corona, but was present at a higher level in the plasma-protein corona than in the serum-protein corona. Clusterin binding to silver nanoparticles and silica nanoparticles suppressed the cellular uptake of nanoparticles in human macrophage-like cells (THP-1 cells). Although further studies are required to determine how clusterin suppresses non-specific cellular uptake in phagocytes, our data suggest that clusterin plays a key role in the stealth effect of not only pegylated nanoparticles but also non-pegylated nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Velvet worm development links myriapods with chelicerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Georg; Whitington, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the advent of modern molecular and computational methods, the phylogeny of the four major arthropod groups (Chelicerata, Myriapoda, Crustacea and Hexapoda, including the insects) remains enigmatic. One particular challenge is the position of myriapods as either the closest relatives to chelicerates (Paradoxopoda/Myriochelata hypothesis), or to crustaceans and hexapods (Mandibulata hypothesis). While neither hypothesis receives conclusive support from molecular analyses, most morphological studies favour the Mandibulata concept, with the mandible being the most prominent feature of this group. Although no morphological evidence was initially available to support the Paradoxopoda hypothesis, a putative synapomorphy of chelicerates and myriapods has recently been put forward based on studies of neurogenesis. However, this and other morphological characters remain of limited use for phylogenetic systematics owing to the lack of data from an appropriate outgroup. Here, we show that several embryonic characters are synapomorphies uniting the chelicerates and myriapods, as revealed by an outgroup comparison with the Onychophora or velvet worms. Our findings, thus provide, to our knowledge, first morphological/embryological support for the monophyly of the Paradoxopoda and suggest that the mandible might have evolved twice within the arthropods. PMID:19640885

  9. The Worm Guide: A Vericomposting Guide for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    This guide focuses on vermicomposting of food waste. Contents include: (1) "Integrated Waste Management"; (2) "Basics of Vermicomposting"; (3) "Other Worm Bin Residents"; (4) "The Garden Connection"; (5) "Closing the Food Loop at Your School"; (6) "Fundraising"; (7) "Activities for…

  10. Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Symbionts in a Gutless Worm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman, Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver; Boeffelli, Dario; Barry, Kerrie W.; Shapiro, Harris J.; Anderson, Iain J.; Szeto, Ernest; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Bergin, Claudia; Ruehland, Caroline; Rubin, Edward M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2006-05-01

    Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here we use a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, thus providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model that describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments that it inhabits.

  11. Shrimp aquaculture in low salinity water feeded with worm flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenceslao Valenzuela Quiñónez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shrimp aquaculture in Sinaloa is one of the top economic enterprises, generating many jobs and earns significant incomes every year. Shrimp feed is an essential part of maintaining healthy production. In this initial approach of shrimp growth in low salinity water, were tested two formulas of animal protein composed of 40% (APL1 and 20% (APL2 worm protein, a commercial diet, and no supplementary feed. Physicochemical parameters did not have a direct influence in shrimpbehavior. After six weeks of experimentation, shrimp fed with commercial diet had a weight gain 20% higher than those feed with worm protein. There were no significantly differences between sizes with respect to 40% animal protein and 20% animal protein with the commercial diet (P  0.05. However, shrimp fed worm protein had lower mortality. The use of worm protein could be an option to maintain a high quantity of shrimp reared in low salinity waters.

  12. Navigating molecular worms inside chemical labyrinths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranczyk, M.; Sethian, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Predicting whether a molecule can traverse chemical labyrinths of channels, tunnels, and buried cavities usually requires performing computationally intensive molecular dynamics simulations. Often one wants to screen molecules to identify ones that can pass through a given chemical labyrinth or screen chemical labyrinths to identify those that allow a given molecule to pass. Because it is impractical to test each molecule/labyrinth pair using computationally expensive methods, faster, approximate methods are used to prune possibilities, “triaging” the ability of a proposed molecule to pass through the given chemical labyrinth. Most pruning methods estimate chemical accessibility solely on geometry, treating atoms or groups of atoms as hard spheres with appropriate radii. Here, we explore geometric configurations for a moving “molecular worm,” which replaces spherical probes and is assembled from solid blocks connected by flexible links. The key is to extend the fast marching method, which is an ordered upwind one-pass Dijkstra-like method to compute optimal paths by efficiently solving an associated Eikonal equation for the cost function. First, we build a suitable cost function associated with each possible configuration, and second, we construct an algorithm that works in ensuing high-dimensional configuration space: at least seven dimensions are required to account for translational, rotational, and internal degrees of freedom. We demonstrate the algorithm to study shortest paths, compute accessible volume, and derive information on topology of the accessible part of a chemical labyrinth. As a model example, we consider an alkane molecule in a porous material, which is relevant to designing catalysts for oil processing. PMID:20018716

  13. Mosquito infection responses to developing filarial worms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M Erickson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human lymphatic filariasis is a mosquito-vectored disease caused by the nematode parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. These are relatively large roundworms that can cause considerable damage in compatible mosquito vectors. In order to assess how mosquitoes respond to infection in compatible mosquito-filarial worm associations, microarray analysis was used to evaluate transcriptome changes in Aedes aegypti at various times during B. malayi development. Changes in transcript abundance in response to the different stages of B. malayi infection were diverse. At the early stages of midgut and thoracic muscle cell penetration, a greater number of genes were repressed compared to those that were induced (20 vs. 8. The non-feeding, intracellular first-stage larvae elicited few differences, with 4 transcripts showing an increased and 9 a decreased abundance relative to controls. Several cecropin transcripts increased in abundance after parasites molted to second-stage larvae. However, the greatest number of transcripts changed in abundance after larvae molted to third-stage larvae and migrated to the head and proboscis (120 induced, 38 repressed, including a large number of putative, immunity-related genes (approximately 13% of genes with predicted functions. To test whether the innate immune system of mosquitoes was capable of modulating permissiveness to the parasite, we activated the Toll and Imd pathway controlled rel family transcription factors Rel1 and Rel2 (by RNA interference knockdown of the pathway's negative regulators Cactus and Caspar during the early stages of infection with B. malayi. The activation of either of these immune signaling pathways, or knockdown of the Toll pathway, did not affect B. malayi in Ae. aegypti. The possibility of LF parasites evading mosquito immune responses during successful development is discussed.

  14. Bacterial Microbiota Associated with the Glacier Ice Worm Is Dominated by Both Worm-Specific and Glacier-Derived Facultative Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takumi; Segawa, Takahiro; Dial, Roman; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Kohshima, Shiro; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2017-03-31

    The community structure of bacteria associated with the glacier ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus was analyzed by amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and their transcripts. Ice worms were collected from two distinct glaciers in Alaska, Harding Icefield and Byron Glacier, and glacier surfaces were also sampled for comparison. Marked differences were observed in bacterial community structures between the ice worm and glacier surface samples. Several bacterial phylotypes were detected almost exclusively in the ice worms, and these bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with either animal-associated lineages or, interestingly, clades mostly consisting of glacier-indigenous species. The former included bacteria that belong to Mollicutes, Chlamydiae, Rickettsiales, and Lachnospiraceae, while the latter included Arcicella and Herminiimonas phylotypes. Among these bacteria enriched in ice worm samples, Mollicutes, Arcicella, and Herminiimonas phylotypes were abundantly and consistently detected in the ice worm samples; these phylotypes constituted the core microbiota associated with the ice worm. A fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that Arcicella cells specifically colonized the epidermis of the ice worms. Other bacterial phylotypes detected in the ice worm samples were also abundantly recovered from the respective habitat glaciers; these bacteria may be food for ice worms to digest or temporary residents. Nevertheless, some were overrepresented in the ice worm RNA samples; they may also function as facultative gut bacteria. Our results indicate that the community structure of bacteria associated with ice worms is distinct from that in the associated glacier and includes worm-specific and facultative, glacier-indigenous lineages.

  15. Using Arm and Hand Gestures to Command Robots during Stealth Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian; Assad, Chris; Wolf, Michael; You, Ki Sung; Pavone, Marco; Huntsberger, Terry; Iwashita, Yumi

    2012-01-01

    Command of support robots by the warfighter requires intuitive interfaces to quickly communicate high degree-of-freedom (DOF) information while leaving the hands unencumbered. Stealth operations rule out voice commands and vision-based gesture interpretation techniques, as they often entail silent operations at night or in other low visibility conditions. Targeted at using bio-signal inputs to set navigation and manipulation goals for the robot (say, simply by pointing), we developed a system based on an electromyography (EMG) "BioSleeve", a high density sensor array for robust, practical signal collection from forearm muscles. The EMG sensor array data is fused with inertial measurement unit (IMU) data. This paper describes the BioSleeve system and presents initial results of decoding robot commands from the EMG and IMU data using a BioSleeve prototype with up to sixteen bipolar surface EMG sensors. The BioSleeve is demonstrated on the recognition of static hand positions (e.g. palm facing front, fingers upwards) and on dynamic gestures (e.g. hand wave). In preliminary experiments, over 90% correct recognition was achieved on five static and nine dynamic gestures. We use the BioSleeve to control a team of five LANdroid robots in individual and group/squad behaviors. We define a gesture composition mechanism that allows the specification of complex robot behaviors with only a small vocabulary of gestures/commands, and we illustrate it with a set of complex orders.

  16. Selective dual-band metamaterial perfect absorber for infrared stealth technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jagyeong; Han, Kiwook; Hahn, Jae W

    2017-07-27

    We propose a dual-band metamaterial perfect absorber with a metal-insulator-metal structure (MIM) for use in infrared (IR) stealth technology. We designed the MIM structure to have surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and magnetic polariton (MP) resonance peaks at 1.54 μm and 6.2 μm, respectively. One peak suppresses the scattering signals used by laser-guided missiles, and the other matches the atmospheric absorption band, thereby enabling the suppression of long-wavelength IR (LWIR) and mid-wavelength IR (MWIR) signals from objects as they propagate through the air. We analysed the spectral properties of the resonance peaks by comparing the wavelength of the MP peak calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method with that obtained by utilizing an inductor-capacitor circuit model. We evaluated the dependence of the performance of the dual-band metamaterial perfect absorber on the incident angle of light at the surface. The proposed absorber was able to reduce the scattering of 1.54 μm IR laser light by more than 90% and suppress the MWIR and LWIR signatures by more than 92%, as well as maintain MWIR and LWIR signal reduction rates greater than 90% across a wide temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C.

  17. Stealth effect of biomolecular corona on nanoparticle uptake by immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Palchetti, Sara; Colapicchioni, Valentina; Digiacomo, Luca; Pozzi, Daniela; Capriotti, Anna Laura; La Barbera, Giorgia; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-10-06

    When injected in a biological milieu, a nanomaterial rapidly adsorbs biomolecules forming a biomolecular corona. The biomolecular corona changes the interfacial composition of a nanomaterial giving it a biological identity that determines the physiological response. Characterization of the biomolecular structure and composition has received increasing attention mostly due to its detrimental impact on the nanomaterial's metabolism in vivo. It is generally accepted that an opsonin-enriched biomolecular corona promotes immune system recognition and rapid clearance from circulation. Here we applied dynamic light scattering and nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to thoroughly characterize the biomolecular corona formed around lipid and silica nanoparticles (NPs). Incubation with human plasma resulted in the formation of NP-biomolecular coronas enriched with immunoglobulins, complement factors, and coagulation proteins that bind to surface receptors on immune cells and elicit phagocytosis. Conversely, we found that protein-coated NPs were protected from uptake by macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. This implies that the biomolecular corona formation provides a stealth effect on macrophage recognition. Our results suggest that correct prediction of the NP's fate in vivo will require more than just the knowledge of the biomolecular corona composition. Validation of efficient methods for mapping protein binding sites on the biomolecular corona of NPs is an urgent task for future research.

  18. An aerial-hawking bat uses stealth echolocation to counter moth hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerlitz, Holger R; ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Zeale, Matt R K; Jones, Gareth; Holderied, Marc W

    2010-09-14

    Ears evolved in many nocturnal insects, including some moths, to detect bat echolocation calls and evade capture [1, 2]. Although there is evidence that some bats emit echolocation calls that are inconspicuous to eared moths, it is difficult to determine whether this was an adaptation to moth hearing or originally evolved for a different purpose [2, 3]. Aerial-hawking bats generally emit high-amplitude echolocation calls to maximize detection range [4, 5]. Here we present the first example of an echolocation counterstrategy to overcome prey hearing at the cost of reduced detection distance. We combined comparative bat flight-path tracking and moth neurophysiology with fecal DNA analysis to show that the barbastelle, Barbastella barbastellus, emits calls that are 10 to 100 times lower in amplitude than those of other aerial-hawking bats, remains undetected by moths until close, and captures mainly eared moths. Model calculations demonstrate that only bats emitting such low-amplitude calls hear moth echoes before their calls are conspicuous to moths. This stealth echolocation allows the barbastelle to exploit food resources that are difficult to catch for other aerial-hawking bats emitting calls of greater amplitude. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Selection of suitable media and intervals of media inoculation for culturing Tubificid worms

    OpenAIRE

    Mollah, M.F.A; Mosharaf, K.; Mariom

    2012-01-01

    Tubificid worms are aquatic invertebrates, belonging to the class Oligochaeta and family Tubificidae, used as an important live food for fishes. The study was conducted to culture Tubificid worms under running water in order to develop a suitable culture media and an optimum duration of media inoculation for culturing Tubificid worms. The worms were cultured under two experiments in cemented culvert system (160×25×10 cm3 ) for 90 days. In the first experiment the worms were cultured in three ...

  20. Mosquito transcriptome profiles and filarial worm susceptibility in Armigeres subalbatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Aliota

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Armigeres subalbatus is a natural vector of the filarial worm Brugia pahangi, but it kills Brugia malayi microfilariae by melanotic encapsulation. Because B. malayi and B. pahangi are morphologically and biologically similar, comparing Ar. subalbatus-B. pahangi susceptibility and Ar. subalbatus-B. malayi refractoriness could provide significant insight into recognition mechanisms required to mount an effective anti-filarial worm immune response in the mosquito, as well as provide considerable detail into the molecular components involved in vector competence. Previously, we assessed the transcriptional response of Ar. subalbatus to B. malayi, and now we report transcriptome profiling studies of Ar. subalbatus in relation to filarial worm infection to provide information on the molecular components involved in B. pahangi susceptibility.Utilizing microarrays, comparisons were made between mosquitoes exposed to B. pahangi, B. malayi, and uninfected bloodmeals. The time course chosen facilitated an examination of key events in the development of the parasite, beginning with the very start of filarial worm infection and spanning to well after parasites had developed to the infective stage in the mosquito. At 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 h post infection and 2-3, 5-6, 8-9, and 13-14 days post challenge there were 31, 75, 113, 76, 54, 5, 3, 13, and 2 detectable transcripts, respectively, with significant differences in transcript abundance (increase or decrease as a result of parasite development.Herein, we demonstrate that filarial worm susceptibility in a laboratory strain of the natural vector Ar. subalbatus involves many factors of both known and unknown function that most likely are associated with filarial worm penetration through the midgut, invasion into thoracic muscle cells, and maintenance of homeostasis in the hemolymph environment. The data show that there are distinct and separate transcriptional patterns associated with filarial worm susceptibility

  1. Sludge reduction using aquatic worms under different aeration regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Gao, Ding; Wang, Kan; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wan, Xiao-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Adding aquatic worms to a wastewater treatment system can reduce sludge production through predation. The aeration level is crucial for success. To evaluate aeration impacts on sludge reduction and determine an optimal aeration regime, this study investigated the processes of in-situ sludge reduction, using aquatic worms exposed to different aeration levels. The experiment also compared treatment results between a conventional reactor and an aquatic worm reactor (WR). Results indicated that the recommended concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) was 2.5 mg L-1. The removal rate of chemical oxygen demand remained steady at 80% when the DO concentration was higher than 2.5 mg L-1, while the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen continued to moderately increase. Increasing the DO concentration to 5 mg L-1 did not improve sludge reduction, and consumed more power. With a DO concentration of 2.5 mg L-1 and a power of 0.19 kWh t-1 water, the absolute sludge reduction and relative sludge reduction rates in the WR were 60.0% and 45.7%, respectively, and the daily aquatic worm growth rate was 0.150 d-1 during the 17-d test. Therefore, at the recommended aeration regime, aquatic worms reduced the sludge without increasing the power consumption or deteriorating the effluent.

  2. Tracking movement behavior of multiple worms on food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemini, Eviatar; Kerr, Rex A; Schafer, William R

    2011-12-01

    Neurobiological research in genetically tractable organisms relies heavily on robust assays for behavioral phenotypes. The simple body plan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans makes it particularly amenable to the use of automated microscopy and image analysis to describe behavioral patterns quantitatively. Forward genetic screens and screens of drug libraries require high-throughput phenotyping, a task traditionally incompatible with manual scoring of quantitatively varying behaviors. High-throughput automated analysis of C. elegans movement behavior is now possible with several different tracking software packages. The Multiworm Tracker (MWT) described here is designed for high-throughput analysis: it can record dozens of worms simultaneously at 30 frames per second for hours or days at a time. This is accomplished by performing all image analysis in real time, saving only the worm centroid, bearing, and outline data to the disk. To simplify image processing, the system focuses only on worms that have moved, and detects and discards worms that are touching rather than trying to isolate them computationally. Because the software is entirely automated, protocols can run unattended once the worms have been placed and the software has been started. The MWT does not save images for later analysis, but behavior can be validated manually with a companion analysis tool that replays recorded body postures. This protocol describes a basic basal movement assay on food using the MWT; similar protocols apply to related assays and to similar multiple animal trackers. The protocol can be extended to a variety of assays ranging from tap response to chemotaxis.

  3. [Killing effect of sodium abietate on adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Hong-Jun; Wang, Ben-Jing; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Chen-Chen; Gong, Wei; Zhu-Ge, Hong-Xiang

    2011-06-01

    To observe the killing effect of sodium abietate on adult male and female worms of Schistosoma japonicum in vitro. The mice infected with cercariae of S. japonicum were sacrificed and perfused five weeks later, the adult worms obtained by the portal perfusion method, were cultivated in DMEM medium containing different concentrations of sodium abietate for 3 days, except the controls, then the worms were observed for the death and motility reducing. The worms were stained by hydrochloric acid carmine for the detection of the changes, and the protein of the worms was detected by using the ultraviolet ray-absorption and Bradford method. After the treatment of sodium abietate, the mortality and motility reducing rate of adult worms were higher significantly than the controls; the effect of sodium abietate on male worms was more obvious than on female worms. The male worms' intestinal canal enlarged and appeared black or brown bands or spots after the treatment. The contents of the intestine of female worms were distributed asymmetrically, and the shape of some worms' ovaries was anomalism and the coloring was asymmetrical. Compared with the control group, the protein of adult male and female worms were reduced (P worms of S. japonicum in vitro. It may affect the protein metabolism of the worms.

  4. Worms with a single functional sensory cilium generate proper neuron-specific behavioral output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senti, Gabriele; Ezcurra, Marina; Löbner, Jana; Schafer, William R; Swoboda, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Studying the development and mechanisms of sensory perception is challenging in organisms with complex neuronal networks. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple neuronal network of 302 neurons that includes 60 ciliated sensory neurons (CSNs) for detecting external sensory input. C. elegans is thus an excellent model in which to study sensory neuron development, function, and behavior. We have generated a genetic rescue system that allows in vivo analyses of isolated CSNs at both cellular and systemic levels. We used the RFX transcription factor DAF-19, a key regulator of ciliogenesis. Mutations in daf-19 result in the complete absence of all sensory cilia and thus of external sensory input. In daf-19 mutants, we used cell-specific rescue of DAF-19 function in selected neurons, thereby generating animals with single, fully functional CSNs. Otherwise and elsewhere these animals are completely devoid of any environmental input through cilia. We demonstrated the rescue of fully functional, single cilia using fluorescent markers, sensory behavioral assays, and calcium imaging. Our technique, functional rescue in single sensory cilia (FRISSC), can thus cell-autonomously and cell-specifically restore the function of single sensory neurons and their ability to respond to sensory input. FRISSC can be adapted to many different CSNs and thus constitutes an excellent tool for studying sensory behaviors, both in single animals and in populations of worms. FRISSC will be very useful for the molecular dissection of sensory perception in CSNs and for the analysis of the developmental aspects of ciliogenesis.

  5. The impact of various distance between axes of worm gear on torque value. Worm gear test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.

    2017-08-01

    Transferring both rotational and translational movements in systems used in the automotive industry is a very important and complex issue. In addition, the situation becomes much more difficult and complicated when the design of the transition system requires a high precision of operation as well as a well definite and long operating life. Such requirements are imposed on all components of today’s motor vehicles. However, particular attention is paid to the elements that directly or indirectly affect the safety of persons traveling in the vehicle. Such components are undoubtedly components included as parts of the steering system of the vehicle. Power steering systems have been present in motor vehicles for more than a century. They go through continuous metamorphosis and they are getting better and better. Current power steering systems are based on an electric motor and some kind of transmission. Depending on the position of the drive relative to the steering column, different configurations of the transmission are used. This article will cover issues related to tests of power steering gearing using a worm drive. The worm drive is a very specific example of a propulsion system that uses twisted axles. Normally, in this type of transition you can find two gear units with the axis mounted with a 90° angle between. The components of the worm drive are a worm and a worm gear, also called a worm wheel. In terms of the geometrical form, the worm resembles a helical spur gear. The shape of the worm is similar to the shape of a screw with a trapezoidal thread. A correct matching of these two components ensures proper operation of the entire transmission. Incorrect positioning of the components in relation to each other can significantly reduce the lifetime of the drive unit, and also lead to abnormal work, eg by raising the noise level. This article describes a test method of finding the appropriate distance between the axles of both worm drive units by testing the

  6. SU-F-T-582: Small Field Dosimetry in Radiosurgery Collimators with a Stealth Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, J; Barbes, B [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The extraction of a reference signal for measuring small fields in scanning mode can be problematic. In this work we describe the use of a transmission chamber in small field dosimetry for radiosurgery collimators and compare TMR curves obtained with stereotactic diode and microionization chamber. Methods: Four radiosurgery cones of diameters 5, 10, 12.5, and 15mm supplied by Elekta Medical were commissioned in a 6MV FFF beam from an Elekta Versa linac. A transmission chamber manufactured by IBA (Stealth chamber) was attached to the lower part of the collimators and used for PDD and profile measurements in scanning mode with a Scanditronix stereotactic diode. It was also used for centering the stereotactic diode in the water tank to measure TMR and output factors, by integrating the signal. TMR measurements for all collimators and the OF for the largest collimator were also acquired on a polystyrene PTW 29672 phantom with a PTW PinPoint 3D chamber 0.016 cm3 volume. Results: Measured TMR with diode and microionization chamber agreed very well with differences larger than 1% only for depths above 15cm, except the smaller collimator, for which differences were always smaller than 2%. Calculated TMR were significantly different (up to 7%) from measured TMR. The differences are attributed to the change in response of the diode with depth, because the effective field aperture varies with depth. Furthermore, neglecting the ratio of phantom-scatter factors in the conversion formula also contributes to this difference. OF measured with diode and chamber showed a difference of 3.5%. Conclusion: The transmission chamber overcomes the problem of extracting a reference signal and is of great help for small field commissioning. Calculating TMR from PDD is strongly discouraged. Good agreement was found when comparing measurements of TMR with stereotactic diode in water with measurements with microionization chamber in polystyrene.

  7. Logistics of Guinea worm disease eradication in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander H; Becknell, Steven; Withers, P Craig; Ruiz-Tiben, Ernesto; Hopkins, Donald R; Stobbelaar, David; Makoy, Samuel Yibi

    2014-03-01

    From 2006 to 2012, the South Sudan Guinea Worm Eradication Program reduced new Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis) cases by over 90%, despite substantial programmatic challenges. Program logistics have played a key role in program achievements to date. The program uses disease surveillance and program performance data and integrated technical-logistical staffing to maintain flexible and effective logistical support for active community-based surveillance and intervention delivery in thousands of remote communities. Lessons learned from logistical design and management can resonate across similar complex surveillance and public health intervention delivery programs, such as mass drug administration for the control of neglected tropical diseases and other disease eradication programs. Logistical challenges in various public health scenarios and the pivotal contribution of logistics to Guinea worm case reductions in South Sudan underscore the need for additional inquiry into the role of logistics in public health programming in low-income countries.

  8. Diet of Worms Emended: An Update of Polychaete Feeding Guilds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumars, Peter A.; Dorgan, Kelly M.; Lindsay, Sara M.

    2015-01-01

    Polychaetes are common in most marine habitats and dominate many infaunal communities. Functional guild classification based on taxonomic identity and morphology has linked community structure to ecological function. The functional guilds now include osmotrophic siboglinids as well as sipunculans, echiurans, and myzostomes, which molecular genetic analyses have placed within Annelida. Advances in understanding of encounter mechanisms explicitly relate motility to feeding mode. New analyses of burrowing mechanics explain the prevalence of bilateral symmetry and blur the boundary between surface and subsurface feeding. The dichotomy between microphagous deposit and suspension feeders and macrophagous carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores is further supported by divergent digestive strategies. Deposit feeding appears to be limited largely to worms longer than 1 cm, with juveniles and small worms in general restricted to ingesting highly digestible organic material and larger, rich food items, blurring the macrophage-microphage dichotomy that applies well to larger worms.

  9. Logistics of Guinea Worm Disease Eradication in South Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander H.; Becknell, Steven; Withers, P. Craig; Ruiz-Tiben, Ernesto; Hopkins, Donald R.; Stobbelaar, David; Makoy, Samuel Yibi

    2014-01-01

    From 2006 to 2012, the South Sudan Guinea Worm Eradication Program reduced new Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis) cases by over 90%, despite substantial programmatic challenges. Program logistics have played a key role in program achievements to date. The program uses disease surveillance and program performance data and integrated technical–logistical staffing to maintain flexible and effective logistical support for active community-based surveillance and intervention delivery in thousands of remote communities. Lessons learned from logistical design and management can resonate across similar complex surveillance and public health intervention delivery programs, such as mass drug administration for the control of neglected tropical diseases and other disease eradication programs. Logistical challenges in various public health scenarios and the pivotal contribution of logistics to Guinea worm case reductions in South Sudan underscore the need for additional inquiry into the role of logistics in public health programming in low-income countries. PMID:24445199

  10. Shai-Hulud: The quest for worm sign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Faucheux, Jeffery P.; Lamkin, Ken

    2005-03-01

    Successful worm detection at real-time OC-48 and OC-192 speed requires hardware to extract web based binary sequences at faster than these speeds, and software to process the incoming sequences to identify worms. Computer hardware advancement in the form of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) makes real-time extraction of these sequences possible. Lacking are mathematical algorithms for worm detection in the real time data sequence, and the ability to convert these algorithms into lookup tables (LUTs) that can be compiled into FPGAs. Data Modeling provides the theory and algorithms for an effective mathematical framework for real-time worm detection and conversion of algorithms into LUTs. Detection methods currently available such as pattern recognition algorithms are limited both by the amount of time to compare the current data sequence with a historical database of potential candidates, and by the inability to accurately classify information that was unseen in the training process. Data Modeling eliminates these limitations by training only on examples of nominal behavior. This results in a highly tuned and fast running equation model that is compiled in a FPGA as a LUT and used at real-time OC-48 and OC-192 speeds to detect worms and other anomalies. This paper provides an overview of our approach for generating these Data Change Models for detecting worms, and their subsequent conversion into LUTs. A proof of concept is given using binary data from a WEBDAV, SLAMMER packet, and RED PROBE attack, with BASIC source code for the detector and LUT provided.

  11. The Vicious Worm - A One Health cysticercosis advocacy information tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Trevisan, Chiara; Mejer, Helena

    The Vicious Worm: A computer-based program advocating for prevention and control of Taenia solium cysticercosis – a zoonotic tapeworm disease - widespread and emerging in many low income countries due to increased pork production and bad hygiene. Available at www.theviciousworm.org + Google Play...... & iTunes app stores for smartphones. The Vicious Worm provides information on how to diagnose and treat the disease in both pigs and humans and its impact on people’s livelihood. Possible control and intervention strategies are provided using different ways of communication according to the audience...

  12. [Comparison of fecal examinations and worm collection results in an investigation of Ascaris lumbricoides infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-Sheng; Zeng, Xiao-Jun; Li, Hua-Zhong; Chen, Ying-Dan; Hong, Xian-Lin; Hu, Sheng-Zhu; Lan, Wei-Min; Chen, Yi-Yang

    2012-10-01

    To explore the relationship between fecal examinations and worm collection results in a community investigation of Ascaris lumbricoides infection. A total of 1 019 residents in Zhangxi Village, Nanchang County, Jiangxi Province were investigated with the Kato-Katz technique and worm collection after deworming. Among 1 019 residents investigated, the actual prevalence of A. lumbricoides was 30.23%, and the egg and worm positive rates were 20.41% and 23.75%, respectively. The average burden was 2.64 worms per person, and the heavier worm burden accounted for less proportion. The heavier the worm burden, the higher the probability to got egg in the feces. If one person had 7 worms or more, the probability to got eggs in his feces was 100%. Among people of false negative fecal examination, 61.00% of them were infected with male worms only, whereas 7.00% were infected with immature female worms with or without male worms, and 32.00% were infected with mature female worms with or without male worms. Totally 32.47% of infected people were missed by fecal examination, including 22.08% without egg excreted, and 10.39% missed because of the method itself. The egg positive rate is obviously lower than the actual infection rate, and the egg detection rate is correlated with the worm burden.

  13. Technetium-99m-labeled stealth pH-sensitive liposomes: a new strategy to identify infection in experimental model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Vildete Aparecida Sousa; Oliveira, Monica Cristina de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade Farmacia. Dept. de Produtos Farmaceuticos; Mota, Luciene das Gracas; Freire, Luis Paulo; Ferreira, Raphael Ligorio Benedito; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Dept. de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas]. E-mail: cardosov@farmacia.ufmg.br

    2007-09-15

    The diagnosis of inflammatory and infectious processes is an important goal in medicine. The use of radiopharmaceuticals for identification of inflammation and infection foci has received considerable attention. The aim of this work was to evaluate the uptake and the imaging potential of stealth pH-sensitive liposomes radiolabelled with {sup 99m}Technetium ({sup 99m}Tc) to identify infection sites in mice. The liposomes containing glutathione were labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) complex. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled stealth pH-sensitive liposomes ({sup 99m}Tc-SpHL) were injected in mice bearing infection in the right thigh muscle induced by Staphylococcus aureus. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic imaging were performed at different times after injection of radiopharmaceutical. The {sup 99}'mTc-SpHL was significantly uptaken by abscess when compared to the respective control. The abscess was visualized as early as 0.5 hours after injection of {sup 99m}Tc-SpHL becoming more prominent with the time. These results indicate that {sup 99}'mTc-SpHL is a promising radiopharmaceutical for visualizing infection foci in patients. (author)

  14. Structure and flexibility of worm-like micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jerke, G.; Pedersen, J.S.; Egelhaaf, S.U.

    1997-01-01

    composition. The data analysis comprises an application from results of conformation space renormalization group theory and a non-linear least-squares fitting procedure based upon a recently developed numerical expression for the scattering function of a worm-like chain with excluded volume effects....

  15. Targeted treatment strategies for sustainable worm control in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, R B

    2008-02-01

    Sustainable worm control strategies are based largely on ensuring that a source of worms not exposed to anthelmintics ("in refugia") remains after treatments are given, so that resistant worms do not become a dominant part of the total population. In environments with seasonally poor survival of worm larvae on pasture, this may require withholding treatments from a proportion of animals when the whole group would normally be treated. The "targeted treatment" approach involves using anthelmintics on an individual animal basis according to indications of parasitic effects, regardless of parasite burdens. For Haemonchus contortus, the FAMACHA system, based on the easily-visualised index of anaemia, has proved effective provided that labour is available for frequent inspections. For non-haematophagous nematodes, recent research indicates the potential of production parameters such as body weight change (sheep) and milk yield (dairy goats), providing that parasitic effects can be differentiated from nutritional and other factors. Continuing investigations are necessary to indicate the most appropriate indices for different situations, so that the refugia effect is maximized for the least risk of disease and production loss. Of prime importance, targeted treatment strategies must be practical to implement if they are to achieve widespread adoption.

  16. A new reactor concept for sludge reduction using aquatic worms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, H.J.H.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2006-01-01

    Biological waste water treatment results in the production of waste sludge. The final treatment option in The Netherlands for this waste sludge is usually incineration. A biological approach to reduce the amount of waste sludge is through predation by aquatic worms. In this paper we test the

  17. Evaluation of community-based surveillance for Guinea worm, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... are at risk but the 14-45 year age group is most affected because of their greater mobility. [4]. ... 95% of global dracunculiasis. Methods and Materials: We used the Students field guide for surveillance evaluation to assess ... Surveillance Evaluation Student Guide [5] in selected endemic guinea worm areas.

  18. Evaluation of community-based surveillance for Guinea worm, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Guinea worm disease (dracunculiasis) is an ancient parasitic disease and is set to be the next disease eradicated from the world and the first to be overcome without a vaccine or treatment. South Sudan and Ghana account for more than 95% of global dracunculiasis. Methods and Materials: We used the ...

  19. SOME PARASITIC WORMS IN FRESHWATER FISHES AND FISH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appear that more studies on the parasitic worms from African freshwater fishes and amphibians might produce more evidence of their ancient zoogeography, particularly in relation to con- tinental drift. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The material described in this paper was obtained by Mr B. C. W. van der Waal from fishes.

  20. Ascaris Lumbricoides (Round Worm) in the Upper Airway of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serious airway obstruction occurs when the adult worm obstructs the bronchi or the vocal cords with attending sequaele. We hereby present a case of a 67 year old man with cerebrovascular accident (stroke) admitted and mechanically ventilated in the Intensive Care Unit. However, four days later, a 15cm long adult ascaris ...

  1. The relationships between faecal worm egg count and subjectively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-08-02

    Aug 2, 2014 ... globally has included the genetics of nematode resistance and resilience in sheep flocks, using faecal worm egg count ... 2007). Studies of the genetic correlation between FEC and other subjectively assessed wool and .... (2014). The model including only the direct additive genetic effect of animal (σ2 a).

  2. Guinea worm disease and its persistence in some rural communities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out in six villages of Ogun State, Nigeria, from January to December 2004 to identify the reasons for the persistence of guinea worm disease in spite of eradication measures. Pre-tested structured questionnaires were administered to 250 head of households in the endemic villages to assess their ...

  3. Metagenomics of the Methane Ice Worm, Hesiocaeca methanicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, K. D.; Edsall, L.; Xin, W.; Head, S. R.; Gelbart, T.; Wood, A. M.; Gaasterland, T.

    2012-12-01

    The methane ice worm (Hesiocaeca methanicola) is a polychaete found on methane hydrate deposits for which there appears to be no publically available genomic or metagenomic data. Methane ice worms were collected in 2009 by the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible (543m depth; N 27:44.7526 W 91:13.3168). Next-generation sequencing (HiSeq2000) was applied to samples of tissue and gut contents. A subset of the assembled data (40M reads, randomly selected) was run through MG-RAST. Preliminary results for the gut content (1,269,153 sequences, average length 202 bp) indicated that 0.1% of the sequences contained ribosomal RNA genes with the majority (67%) classified as Bacteria, a relatively small per cent (1.4%) as Archae, and 31% as Eukaryota. Campylobacterales was the predominant order (14%), with unclassified (7.5%) and Desulfobacterales (4%) being the next dominant. Preliminary results for the worm tissue (2,716,461 sequences, average length 241 bp) indicated that the majority of sequences were Eukaryota (73%), with 256 sequences classified as phylum Annelida and 58% of those belonging to class Polychaeta. For the bacterial sequences obtained from the tissue samples, the predominant order was Actinomycetales (2.7%). For both the tissue and gut content samples, the majority of proteins were classified as clustering-based subsystems. This preliminary analysis will be compared to an assembly consisting of 40M of the highest quality reads.; methane ice worms on methane hydrate

  4. Faeco-histological Method of Studying Worm Endemicity with the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worms are endemic in various parts of the world, the patterns varying from community to community, even in the same country. A rough index of those common among Nigerians of the Igbo ethnic group has been obtained using a histological study of the ova present in the luminal faeces of the vermiform appendix in 559 ...

  5. Life-cycle of the European compost worm Dendrobaena veneta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-06-05

    Jun 5, 1990 ... The life-cycle of Dendrobaena veneta was studied to assess the potential of this species in vermicuhure. The development, growth and reproduction were investigated by rearing worms at 25°C on urine-free cattle manure with a moisture content of 80% over a period of 200 days. It was found that cocoons ...

  6. Life-cycle of the European compost worm Dendrobaena veneta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The life-cycle of Dendrobaena veneta was studied to assess the potential of this species in vermiculture. The development, growth and reproduction were investigated by rearing worms at 25°C on urine-free cattle manure with a moisture content of 80% over a period of 200 days. It was found that cocoons are produced at a ...

  7. Genetic parameters and relationships of faecal worm egg count with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-07-09

    Jul 9, 2014 ... worm egg count (FEC) has been suggested as a suitable criterion for selection for resistance to nematode infestation in ... expense of treatment, increased level of management and vigilance, loss of production and even mortality in severe cases .... data did not change the significance of the fixed effects.

  8. The effect of chloroquine on the male worms of Onchocerca volvulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The viability of the worms was assessed using two techniques: (a) measurement of motility using a micromotility meter and (b) determination of the rate of reduction to the MTT tetrezolium salt to Formazan. Heat-killed male worms were used as control. The motility of the worms decreased significantly 24 hours after exposure ...

  9. Desenvolupament d'un joc per a dispositius Android : WhackaWorm

    OpenAIRE

    García Solsona, David

    2016-01-01

    Projecte de desenvolupament d'un joc per a Android: WhackaWorm, basat en la famosa màquina de recreatives, Whackamole. Proyecto de desarrollo de un juego para Android: Whack Worm, basado en la famosa máquina de recreativas, Whackamole. Project to develop a game for Android: Worm Whack based on famous arcade machine, Whackamole.

  10. The effect of operating conditions on aquatic worms eating waste sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, H.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques are available for dealing with the waste sludge produced in biological waste water treatment. A biological approach uses aquatic worms to consume and partially digest the waste sludge. In our concept for a worm reactor, the worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) are immobilised in a

  11. The worm's humus in the seedlings production of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill in a community of Cojedes State, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Liriano González

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work was developed with the aimed to evaluate the application of worm's humus in the production of seedlings of tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill cultivar Roma, in the rural settlement San Isidro-San Ignacio, municipality of Tinaquillo, State of Cojedes, Republic of Venezuela. Five treatments were studied: chemical fertilization (control, worm`s humus at 4 t ha-1 bottom, worm`s humus at 4 t ha-1 bottom + worm`s humus leaching above foliage at 15 days of seeds germination, worm`s humus at 6 t ha-1 bottom and worm`s humus at 6 t ha-1 bottom + worm`s humus leaching (1L per 50 L water above foliage at 15 days of seeds germination. The experimental design was a random block with three replications. After 25 days seed germination it was measured the plant height, number of leaves per plant, stem diameter, root length, fresh and dry mass of leaf and root. The higher values obtained in each one of the studied parameters during tomatoes plant growing were achieved with the application of 4 t ha-1 worm`s humus at bottom plus worm`s humus leaching (1L por 50 L water above foliage at 15 days after seed germination.

  12. Can Parasitic Worms Cure the Modern World's Ills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Margaret M; Harnett, William

    2017-09-01

    There has been increasing recognition that the alarming surge in allergy and autoimmunity in the industrialised and developing worlds shadows the rapid eradication of pathogens, such as parasitic helminths. Appreciation of this has fuelled an explosion in research investigating the therapeutic potential of these worms. This review considers the current state-of-play with a particular focus on exciting recent advances in the identification of potential novel targets for immunomodulation that can be exploited therapeutically. Furthermore, we contemplate the prospects for designing worm-derived immunotherapies for an ever-widening range of inflammatory diseases, including, for example, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and ageing as well as neurodevelopmental disorders like autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Achievements of Study Concerning Worm Face Gear Made in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Boloş

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Worm face gears are a relatively new category of gear failure in 50 years in the USA. They are composed of a conical or cylindrical worm to engage the front wheel of a conical or flat. Geometric configuration to ensure a great contact ratio and lubrication between the flanks favorable conditions which allow their implementation of hardened steel, gray iron, bronze. Also they will produce big rapport of transmission in a single stage. Originally conceived by Illinois Tool Works Company Chicago they were taken and developed at the Institute of Mechanical Izhevsk (Russia. Experimental and theoretical developments were made in Britain, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Bulgaria and Romania. In the present paper is highlighted the concerns and the achievements of researchers from Romania in the period 1980-2009.

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: hemichordates (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hemichordates (Acorn worm) Glandiceps hacksi Hemichordata Glandiceps_hacksi_L.png Glandiceps_hack...si_NL.png Glandiceps_hacksi_S.png Glandiceps_hacksi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=NS ...

  15. Can parasitic worms cure the modern world's ills?

    OpenAIRE

    Harnett, Margaret W.; Harnett, William

    2017-01-01

    There has been increasing recognition that the alarming surge in allergy and autoimmunity in the industrialised and developing worlds shadows the rapid eradication of pathogens, such as parasitic helminths. Appreciation of this has fuelled an explosion in research investigating the therapeutic potential of these worms. This review considers the current state-of-play with a particular focus on exciting recent advances in the identification of potential novel targets for immunomodulation that c...

  16. Worm Algorithm for CP(N-1) Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The CP(N-1) model in 2D is an interesting toy model for 4D QCD as it possesses confinement, asymptotic freedom and a non-trivial vacuum structure. Due to the lower dimensionality and the absence of fermions, the computational cost for simulating 2D CP(N-1) on the lattice is much lower than that for simulating 4D QCD. However, to our knowledge, no efficient algorithm for simulating the lattice CP(N-1) model has been tested so far, which also works at finite density. To this end we propose a new type of worm algorithm which is appropriate to simulate the lattice CP(N-1) model in a dual, flux-variables based representation, in which the introduction of a chemical potential does not give rise to any complications. In addition to the usual worm moves where a defect is just moved from one lattice site to the next, our algorithm additionally allows for worm-type moves in the internal variable space of single links, which accelerates the Monte Carlo evolution. We use our algorithm to compare the two popular CP(N-1) l...

  17. Worm algorithm for the CP N - 1 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias; de Forcrand, Philippe

    2017-05-01

    The CP N - 1 model in 2D is an interesting toy model for 4D QCD as it possesses confinement, asymptotic freedom and a non-trivial vacuum structure. Due to the lower dimensionality and the absence of fermions, the computational cost for simulating 2D CP N - 1 on the lattice is much lower than that for simulating 4D QCD. However, to our knowledge, no efficient algorithm for simulating the lattice CP N - 1 model for N > 2 has been tested so far, which also works at finite density. To this end we propose a new type of worm algorithm which is appropriate to simulate the lattice CP N - 1 model in a dual, flux-variables based representation, in which the introduction of a chemical potential does not give rise to any complications. In addition to the usual worm moves where a defect is just moved from one lattice site to the next, our algorithm additionally allows for worm-type moves in the internal variable space of single links, which accelerates the Monte Carlo evolution. We use our algorithm to compare the two popular CP N - 1 lattice actions and exhibit marked differences in their approach to the continuum limit.

  18. Distinct Polymer Architecture Mediates Switching of Complement Activation Pathways at the Nanosphere-Serum Interface: Implications for Stealth Nanoparticle Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamad, I.; Al-Hanbali, O.; Hunter, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles with surface projected polyethyleneoxide (PEO) chains in 'mushroom-brush' and "brush" configurations display stealth properties in systemic circulation and have numerous applications in site specific targeting for controlled drug delivery and release as well as diagnostic Imaging. We...... reactions in some individuals Conformational states of surface chains, arising from the block copolymer poloxamine 908 adsorption, on polystyrene nanoparticles trigger complement activation differently. Alteration of copolymer architecture on nanospheres from mushroom to brush configuration not only....... Notably, the role properdin mediated activation of alternative pathway was only restricted to particles displaying PEO chains in a transition mushroom-brush configuration Since nanoparticle-mediated complement activation is of clinical concern our findings provide a rational basis for improved surface...

  19. Correlation between discharged worms and fecal egg counts in human clonorchiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hwan Kim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stool examination by counting eggs per gram of feces (EPGs is the best method to estimate worm burden of Clonorchis sinensis in infected humans. The present study investigated a correlation between EPGs and worm burden in human clonorchiasis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 60 residents, 50 egg-positive and 10 egg-negative, in Sancheong-gun, Korea, participated in this worm collection trial in 2006-2009. They were diagnosed by egg positivity in feces using the Kato-Katz method. After administration of praziquantel, they were purged with cathartics on the next day, and then discharged adult worms were collected from their feces. Their EPGs ranged from 0 to 65,544. Adult worms of C. sinensis were collected from 17 egg-positive cases, and the number of worms ranged from 1 to 114 in each individual. A positive correlation between EPGs and numbers of worms was demonstrated (r = 0.681, P<0.001. Worm recovery rates were 9.7% in cases of EPGs 1-1,000 and 73.7% in those of EPGs over 1,000. No worms were detected from egg-negative subjects. Maximum egg count per worm per day was roughly estimated 3,770 in a subject with EPGs 2,664 and 106 collected worms. CONCLUSIONS: The numbers of the worms are significantly correlated with the egg counts in human clonorchiasis. It is estimated that at least 110 worms are infected in a human body with EPGs around 3,000, and egg productivity of a worm per day is around 4,000.

  20. Finished genome of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola reveals dispensome structure, chromosome plasticity, and stealth pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Goodwin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (asexual stage: Septoria tritici causes septoria tritici blotch, a disease that greatly reduces the yield and quality of wheat. This disease is economically important in most wheat-growing areas worldwide and threatens global food production. Control of the disease has been hampered by a limited understanding of the genetic and biochemical bases of pathogenicity, including mechanisms of infection and of resistance in the host. Unlike most other plant pathogens, M. graminicola has a long latent period during which it evades host defenses. Although this type of stealth pathogenicity occurs commonly in Mycosphaerella and other Dothideomycetes, the largest class of plant-pathogenic fungi, its genetic basis is not known. To address this problem, the genome of M. graminicola was sequenced completely. The finished genome contains 21 chromosomes, eight of which could be lost with no visible effect on the fungus and thus are dispensable. This eight-chromosome dispensome is dynamic in field and progeny isolates, is different from the core genome in gene and repeat content, and appears to have originated by ancient horizontal transfer from an unknown donor. Synteny plots of the M. graminicola chromosomes versus those of the only other sequenced Dothideomycete, Stagonospora nodorum, revealed conservation of gene content but not order or orientation, suggesting a high rate of intra-chromosomal rearrangement in one or both species. This observed "mesosynteny" is very different from synteny seen between other organisms. A surprising feature of the M. graminicola genome compared to other sequenced plant pathogens was that it contained very few genes for enzymes that break down plant cell walls, which was more similar to endophytes than to pathogens. The stealth pathogenesis of M. graminicola probably involves degradation of proteins rather than carbohydrates to evade host defenses during the biotrophic

  1. Bioaccumulation of mercury in a vestimentiferan worm living in Kagoshima Bay, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tetsuo; Yamamoto, Megumi; Tomiyasu, Takashi; Hashimoto, Jun; Miura, Tomoyuki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Akiba, Suminori

    2002-11-01

    The present study reports on the mercury concentrations of the vestimentiferan worm, Lamellibrachia satsuma, (Annelida: Pogonophora) found near hydrothermal vents at a depth of 80-100 m in the northern parts of Kagoshima Bay. The vestimentiferan worms had total mercury concentrations of 238 ng/g in the anterior muscle of the body and 164 ng/g in the posterior trophosome. Methylmercury constituted only 7.6% of total mercury detected anteriorly and 16.3% posteriorly. The mean total mercury concentration in filtrated ambient seawater of the worm habitat was 1.1 ng/l. The worm should accumulate mercury in seawater by a one-step into the anterior and posterior parts as 2.2 x 10(%) and 1.5 x 10(5) times those of the filtered ambient seawater, respectively. The bioaccumulation factor of mercury by the worms with only their respiration would be actually larger than that by other marine animals through food webs. The high bioaccumulation factor of mercury in the worms suggest the following two possibilities: (i) the biological half-life of organomercury in the worm could be exceptionally long; or (ii) the lifetime of vestimentiferan worms examined in the present study could be extremely long. Various metals in one specimen of the worm were analyzed by using ICP-MS, and then gold as well as silver were detected in the worm. Gold was detected for the first time from marine animals.

  2. Routes of uptake of diclofenac, fluoxetine, and triclosan into sediment-dwelling worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Maja V; Marshall, Stuart; Gouin, Todd; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the route and degree of uptake of 2 ionizable pharmaceuticals (diclofenac and fluoxetine) and 1 ionizable compound used in personal care products (triclosan) into the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Studies were done on complete worms ("feeding") and worms where the head was absent ("nonfeeding") using (14) C-labeled ingredients. Biota sediment accumulation factors (BSAF), based on uptake of (14) C, for feeding worms increased in the order fluoxetine (0.3) worms was not quantified. Although no significant differences were seen between the uptake of diclofenac and that of fluoxetine in feeding and nonfeeding worms, uptake of the more hydrophobic antimicrobial, triclosan, into the feeding worms was significantly greater than that in the nonfeeding worms, with the 48-h BSAF for feeding worms being 36% higher than that for the nonfeeding worms. The results imply that dietary uptake contributes to the uptake of triclosan, which may be a result of the high hydrophobicity of the compound. Models that estimate exposure of ionizable substances may need to consider uptake from both the water column and food, particularly when assessing risks from dynamic exposures to organic contaminants. © 2015 SETAC.

  3. The effect of operating conditions on aquatic worms eating waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, T L G; Temmink, H; Elissen, H J H; Buisman, C J N

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques are available for dealing with the waste sludge produced in biological waste water treatment. A biological approach uses aquatic worms to consume and partially digest the waste sludge. In our concept for a worm reactor, the worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) are immobilised in a carrier material. For correct sizing and operation of such a worm reactor, the effect of changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, ammonia concentration, temperature and light exposure were studied in sequencing batch experiments. DO concentration had an effect on both sludge consumption rate and sludge reduction efficiency. Sludge consumption rate was four times higher at DO concentrations above 8.1 mg/L, when compared to DO concentrations below 2.5 mg/L. Sludge reduction was 36 and 77% at these respective DO concentrations. The effect is most likely the result of a difference in gut residence time. An increase in unionised ammonia concentration drastically decreased the consumption rate. Ammonia is released by the worms at a rate of 0.02 mg N/mg TSS digested; therefore, replacing the effluent in the worm reactor is required to maintain a low ammonia concentration. The highest sludge consumption rates were measured at a temperature around 15 degrees C, whilst the highest TSS reduction was achieved at 10 degrees C. Not exposing the worms to light did not affect consumption or digestion rates. High temperatures (above 25 degrees C) as well as low DO concentrations (below 1 mg/L) in the worm reactor should be avoided as these lead to significant decreases in the number of worms. The main challenges for applying the worm reactor at a larger scale are the supply of oxygen to the worms and maintaining a low ammonia concentration in the worm reactor. Applying a worm reactor at a waste water treatment plant was estimated to increase the oxygen consumption and the ammonia load by 15-20% and 5% respectively.

  4. THE WORMS COMPOST - EFFECTIVE FERTILIZER FOR IMPROVING DEGRADED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa CREMENEAC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of organic waste is a difficult, complex and intractable in Moldova, according to international standards. Acute problem of organic matter from livestock sector waste is generated by storing them in unauthorized areas. Organic waste management strategies require different methods. One of them is organic waste bio conversion technology by worm’s cultivation. As the main natural wealth of the Republic of Moldova, soil requires a special care. Agriculture, in particular, should pay attention to the soil’s humus and nutrient status – and restore losses of humus and the nutrients used by crops. This requires measures to improve soil fertility. Land use provides, first of all return losses of humus and nutrients used by plants. Therefore measures required to improve soil fertility. The essence of the research was to highlight the role of worms compost improve the soil. To this end, in ETS "Maximovca" was organized an experiment that included three groups (two - experimental, to fund worms compost and one - control the natural background. Observations on soil fertility have been conducted over three years. The soil samples were collected by usual methods determined values of organic matter and humus. The results of the investigations, to determine the values of organic matter and humus samples collected from surface and depth 15 cm exceeded that of the sample control group to 29,7%; 11,4% and 34,3%; 37,1% in experimental group I and 9,3%; 11,6% and 45,5%; 45,5% in experimental group II. Therefore, worms compost embedded in a dose of 3-4 tons / ha during three years, has improved the fertility of the soil

  5. : acquired resistance in mice by implantation of young irradiated worms into the portal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcos Z. Coelho

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available In two distinct experiments, immature S. mansoni worms (LE strain, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, aged 20 days, obtained from the portal system of white outbred mice, were irradiated with 14 and 4 Krad, respectively. Afterwards, the worms were directly inoculated into the portal vein of normal mice. Inoculation was performed with 20 irradiated worms per animal. Fifty days after inoculation, the mice that received 4 and 14 Krad-irradiated worms and their respective controls were infected with S. mansoni cercariae (LE strain, by transcutaneous route. Twenty days after this challenge infection, the animals were sacrificed and perfused for mature irradiated (90-day-old and immature (20-day-old worm counts. Analysis of the results showed that statistically significant protection against cercariae occurred in both groups with irradiated worms.

  6. Electro-worming: The Behaviors of Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans in DC and AC Electric Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Han-Sheng; Dabbish, Nooreen; Bau, Haim

    2010-01-01

    The video showcases how C. elegans worms respond to DC and AC electrical stimulations. Gabel et al (2007) demonstrated that in the presence of DC and low frequency AC fields, worms of stage L2 and larger propel themselves towards the cathode. Rezai et al (2010) have demonstrated that this phenomenon, dubbed electrotaxis, can be used to control the motion of worms. In the video, we reproduce Rezai's experimental results. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, that worms can be trapped with high frequency, nonuniform electric fields. We studied the effect of the electric field on the nematode as a function of field intensity and frequency and identified a range of electric field intensities and frequencies that trap worms without apparent adverse effect on their viability. Worms tethered by dielectrophoresis (DEP) avoid blue light, indicating that at least some of the nervous system functions remain unimpaired in the presence of the electric field. DEP is useful to dynamically confine nematodes for observati...

  7. Ecdysone receptor homologs from mollusks, leeches and a polychaete worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguerre, Michel; Veenstra, Jan A

    2010-11-05

    The genomes of the mollusk Lottia gigantea, the leech Helobdella robusta and the polychaete worm Capitella teleta each have a gene encoding an ecdysone receptor homolog. Publicly available genomic and EST sequences also contain evidence for ecdysone receptors in the seahare Aplysia californica, the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes and the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis. Three-dimensional models of the ligand binding domains of these predicted ecdysone receptor homologs suggest that each of them could potentially bind an ecdysone-related steroid. Thus, ecdysone receptors are not limited to arthropods and nematodes. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pet roundworms and hookworms: A continuing need for global worming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traversa Donato

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ascarids and ancylostomatids are the most important parasites affecting dogs and cats worldwide, in terms of diffusion and risk for animal and human health. Different misconceptions have led the general public and pet owners to minimize the importance of these intestinal worms. A low grade of interest is also registered among veterinary professions, although there is a significant merit in keeping our guard up against these parasites. This article reviews current knowledge of ascarids and ancylostomatids, with a special focus on pathogenicity, epidemiology and control methods in veterinary and human medicine.

  9. Morphologic characterization of the ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, D H; Carter, M R; Murray, K P; Maleski, K A; Smith, N R; McBride, T R; Michalewicz, L A; Saidel, W M

    2000-12-01

    Ice worms occupy a unique position in metazoan phylogeny in that they are the only known annelid that completes its life cycle in ice. The mechanism(s) associated with this adaptation are likely to occur at different levels, ranging from modification of their metabolism to changes in morphology. In this study, we examined specimens of Mesenchytraeus solifugus by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in an effort to identify morphologic structures that may aid in its glacial habitation. We report that M. solifugus contains an elongated head pore at the tip of its prostomium, numerous sensory structures, and differentially oriented setae that curve abruptly at their distal end.

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) Ptychodera flava Hemichordata Ptychodera_flava..._L.png Ptychodera_flava_NL.png Ptychodera_flava_S.png Ptychodera_flava_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=161 ...

  11. The Yoruba farm market as a communication channel in guinea worm disease surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, W R; Kendall, C

    1996-01-01

    Disease eradication programmes are by definition time bound and require strategies that facilitate timely intervention. Surveillance, which undergirds eradication, also requires timely strategies. Finding such strategies is especially challenging when the target disease is endemic in remote areas, e.g. guinea worm disease, the focus of this study. A strategy of market based surveillance was pilot tested in Ifeloju Local Government Area (LGA) of Oyo State, Nigeria. The project goal was to design a surveillance system that both fit into the natural communication network of rural people, and also enlisted their active involvement. Ethnographic research methods were employed to learn about market location, structure, catchment area and attendance pattern. Four larger farm markets (serving 164 hamlets with 17,000 population) were chosen. Each hamlet was visited and a volunteer 'reporter' was recruited. Reporters were trained on case recognition and detection, first aid and prevention, with a sensitivity to distinguishing indigenous and clinical perceptions of guinea worm. The market cycle was based on the traditional four-day week. Field workers visited every second market 16 times between October 1990 and February 1991. The reporter was expected to identify correctly the first case of the season and thus label the village as endemic for the season. Reporters gave oral reports, and positive indications were followed up within 48 hr by field workers, who verified the case and administered first aid. All hamlets were visited once a month to verify negative reports. Reporter attendance was monitored. Those who had a formal role in the market, e.g. sales agents, had better attendance than ordinary farmers who came only to sell their own produce. Knowledge of market structure and attender roles offers a guide for adapting this surveillance approach to other cultural systems and health issues.

  12. Search for stealth supersymmetry in events with jets, either photons or leptons, and low missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

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Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; 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Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; 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Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; 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Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; 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Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; 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    2015-04-09

    The results of a search for new physics in final states with jets, either photons or leptons, and low missing transverse momentum are reported. The study is based on a sample of proton-proton collisions collected at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the CMS detector in 2012. The integrated luminosity of the sample is 19.71$~\\mathrm{fb^{-1} }$. Many models of new physics predict the production of events with jets, electroweak gauge bosons, and little or no missing transverse momentum. Examples include stealth models of supersymmetry (SUSY), which predict a hidden sector at the electroweak energy scale in which SUSY is approximately conserved. The data are used to search for stealth SUSY signatures in final states with either two photons or an oppositely charged electron and muon. No excess is observed with respect to the standard model expectation, and the results are used to set limits on squark pair production in the stealth SUSY framework.

  13. Search for stealth supersymmetry in events with jets, either photons or leptons, and low missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Khachatryan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of a search for new physics in final states with jets, either photons or leptons, and low missing transverse momentum are reported. The study is based on a sample of proton–proton collisions collected at a center-of-mass energy s=8 TeV with the CMS detector in 2012. The integrated luminosity of the sample is 19.7 fb−1. Many models of new physics predict the production of events with jets, electroweak gauge bosons, and little or no missing transverse momentum. Examples include stealth models of supersymmetry (SUSY, which predict a hidden sector at the electroweak energy scale in which SUSY is approximately conserved. The data are used to search for stealth SUSY signatures in final states with either two photons or an oppositely charged electron and muon. No excess is observed with respect to the standard model expectation, and the results are used to set limits on squark pair production in the stealth SUSY framework.

  14. Spatial and temporal differences in giant kidney worm, dictophyma renale, prevalence in Minnesota Mink, Mustela vison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    Examination of 110 Mink (Mustela vison) carcasses from 1998 through 2007 indicated that the giant kidney worm, Dioctophyma renale, occurred in Pine and Kanabec Counties of eastern Minnesota with annual prevalences of 0-92%. Worm prevalence increased from 20% in 1999 to 92% in 2001 and decreased to 6% in 2005. During 2000 to 2007, no worms were found in Mink from Anoka and Chisago Counties (n = 54), and in 2000, none in 107 Mink from LeSeur, Freeborn, Redwood, Brown and Watonwan Counties. Changes in kidney worm prevalence were positively related to trapping success, considered an index of Mink density.

  15. Worms on the spectrum - C. elegans models in autism research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Kathrin; Parker, J Alex

    2017-04-20

    The small non-parasitic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used in neuroscience thanks to its well-understood development and lineage of the nervous system. Furthermore, C. elegans has been used to model many human developmental and neurological conditions to better understand disease mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic strategies. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the most prevalent of all neurodevelopmental disorders, and the C. elegans system may provide opportunities to learn more about this complex disorder. Since basic cell biology and biochemistry of the C. elegans nervous system is generally very similar to mammals, cellular or molecular phenotypes can be investigated, along with a repertoire of behaviours. For instance, worms have contributed greatly to the understanding of mechanisms underlying mutations in genes coding for synaptic proteins such as neuroligin and neurexin. Using worms to model neurodevelopmental disorders like ASD is an emerging topic that harbours great, untapped potential. This review summarizes the numerous contributions of C. elegans to the field of neurodevelopment and introduces the nematode system as a potential research tool to study essential roles of genes associated with ASD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of yellow meal worm (Tenebrio molitor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Na; Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2014-11-18

    The yellow meal worm (Tenebrio molitor L.) is an important resource insect typically used as animal feed additive. It is also widely used for biological research. The first complete mitochondrial genome of T. molitor was determined for the first time by long PCR and conserved primer walking approaches. The results showed that the entire mitogenome of T. molitor was 15 785 bp long, with 72.35% A+T content [deposited in GenBank with accession number KF418153]. The gene order and orientation were the same as the most common type suggested as ancestral for insects. Two protein-coding genes used atypical start codons (CTA in ND2 and AAT in COX1), and the remaining 11 protein-coding genes started with a typical insect initiation codon ATN. All tRNAs showed standard clover-leaf structure, except for tRNA(Ser) (AGN), which lacked a dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. The newly added T. molitor mitogenome could provide information for future studies on yellow meal worm.

  17. Change Detection Algorithms for Information Assurance of Computer Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cardenas, Alvaro A

    2002-01-01

    .... In this thesis, the author will focus on the detection of three attack scenarios: the spreading of active worms throughout the Internet, distributed denial of service attacks, and routing attacks to wireless ad hoc networks...

  18. Layer-By-Layer Self-Assembly of Polyelectrolytic Block Copolymer Worms on a Planar Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Nicholas J W; Parnell, Andrew J; Molina, Marta; Verstraete, Pierre; Smets, Johan; Armes, Steven P

    2017-12-08

    Cationic and anionic block copolymer worms are prepared by polymerization-induced self-assembly via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion copolymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate (GlyMA), using a binary mixture of a nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) macromolecular RAFT agent and either a cationic poly([2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride) or an anionic poly(potassium 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate) macromolecular RAFT agent. In each case, covalent stabilization of the worm cores was achieved via reaction of the epoxide groups on the GlyMA repeat units with 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane. Aqueous electrophoresis studies indicated a pH-independent mean zeta potential of +40 mV and -39 mV for the cationic and anionic copolymer worms, respectively. These worms are expected to mimic the rigid rod behavior of water-soluble polyelectrolyte chains in the absence of added salt. The kinetics of adsorption of the cationic worms onto a planar anionic silicon wafer was examined at pH 5 and was found to be extremely fast at 1.0 w/w % copolymer concentration in the absence of added salt. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that a relatively constant worm surface coverage of 16% was achieved at 20 °C for adsorption times ranging from just 2 s up to 2 min. Furthermore, the successive layer-by-layer deposition of cationic and anionic copolymer worms onto planar surfaces was investigated using SEM, ellipsometry, and surface zeta potential measurements. These techniques confirmed that the deposition of oppositely charged worms resulted in a monotonic increase in the mean layer thickness, with a concomitant surface charge reversal occurring on addition of each new worm layer. Unexpectedly, two distinct linear regimes were observed when plotting the mean layer thickness against the total number of adsorbed worm layers, with a steeper gradient (corresponding to thicker layers) being

  19. A full scale worm reactor for efficient sludge reduction by predation in a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamis, J; van Schouwenburg, G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-15

    Sludge predation can be an effective solution to reduce sludge production at a wastewater treatment plant. Oligochaete worms are the natural consumers of biomass in benthic layers in ecosystems. In this study the results of secondary sludge degradation by the aquatic Oligochaete worm Aulophorus furcatus in a 125 m(3) reactor and further sludge conversion in an anaerobic tank are presented. The system was operated over a period of 4 years at WWTP Wolvega, the Netherlands and was fed with secondary sludge from a low loaded activated sludge process. It was possible to maintain a stable and active population of the aquatic worm species A. furcatus during the full period. Under optimal conditions a sludge conversion of 150-200 kg TSS/d or 1.2-1.6 kg TSS/m(3)/d was established in the worm reactor. The worms grew as a biofilm on carrier material in the reactor. The surface specific conversion rate reached 140-180 g TSS/m(2)d and the worm biomass specific conversion rate was 0.5-1 g TSS sludge/g dry weight worms per day. The sludge reduction under optimal conditions in the worm reactor was 30-40%. The degradation by worms was an order of magnitude larger than the endogenous conversion rate of the secondary sludge. Effluent sludge from the worm reactor was stored in an anaerobic tank where methanogenic processes became apparent. It appeared that besides reducing the sludge amount, the worms' activity increased anaerobic digestibility, allowing for future optimisation of the total system by maximising sludge reduction and methane formation. In the whole system it was possible to reduce the amount of sludge by at least 65% on TSS basis. This is a much better total conversion than reported for anaerobic biodegradability of secondary sludge of 20-30% efficiency in terms of TSS reduction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using accelerometer feedback to identify walking destinations, activity overestimates, and stealth exercise in obese and nonobese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barbara B; Werner, Carol M

    2008-11-01

    Accelerometer output feedback might enable assessment of recall biases for moderate bouts by obese and nonobese individuals; accelerometry might also help residents recall destinations for moderate-intensity walking bouts. Adult residents' 1-week accelerometer-measured physical activity and obesity status were measured before and after a new rail stop opened (n = 51 Time 1; n = 47 Time 2). Participants recalled the week's walking bouts, described them as brisk (moderate) or not, and reported a rail stop destination or not. At the end of the week, we provided accelerometry output to residents as a prompt. Recall of activity intensity was accurate for about 60% of bouts. Nonobese participants had more moderate bouts and more "stealth exercise" --moderate bouts recalled as not brisk--than did obese individuals. Obese participants had more overestimates--recalling light bouts as brisk walks--than did nonobese individuals. Compared with unprompted recall, accelerometry-prompted recalls allowed residents to describe where significantly more moderate bouts of activity occurred. Coupling accelerometry feedback with self-report improves research by measuring the duration, intensity, and destination of walking bouts. Recall errors and different patterns of errors by obese and nonobese individuals underscore the importance of validation by accelerometry.

  1. Optimization of the fabrication of novel stealth PLA-based nanoparticles by dispersion polymerization using D-optimal mixture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesina, Simeon K; Wight, Scott A; Akala, Emmanuel O

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticle size is important in drug delivery. Clearance of nanoparticles by cells of the reticuloendothelial system has been reported to increase with increase in particle size. Further, nanoparticles should be small enough to avoid lung or spleen filtering effects. Endocytosis and accumulation in tumor tissue by the enhanced permeability and retention effect are also processes that are influenced by particle size. We present the results of studies designed to optimize cross-linked biodegradable stealth polymeric nanoparticles fabricated by dispersion polymerization. Nanoparticles were fabricated using different amounts of macromonomer, initiators, crosslinking agent and stabilizer in a dioxane/DMSO/water solvent system. Confirmation of nanoparticle formation was by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Particle size was measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). D-optimal mixture statistical experimental design was used for the experimental runs, followed by model generation (Scheffe polynomial) and optimization with the aid of a computer software. Model verification was done by comparing particle size data of some suggested solutions to the predicted particle sizes. Data showed that average particle sizes follow the same trend as predicted by the model. Negative terms in the model corresponding to the cross-linking agent and stabilizer indicate the important factors for minimizing particle size.

  2. Realization of compatible stealth material for infrared, laser and radar based on one-dimensional doping-structure photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Kui; Shi, Jia-Ming; Zhao, Da-Peng; Wang, Qi-Chao; Wang, Cheng-Ming

    2017-09-01

    To inhibit the radiant infrared energy between 8 and 14 μm, which is the infrared atmospheric window, and decrease the echo power of detecting laser and radar, to achieve compatible stealth, a doping structural one-dimensional photonic crystal (1-D PC) with Ge, ZnSe and Si was fabricated; and then combine it with radar absorbing material (RAM) to make a compound. After that, the reflection spectra of this compound was tested, and the result shows a high average reflectance (89.5%) in 8-14 μm waveband, and a reflective valley (39.8%) in the wavelength of 10.6 μm, which is the wavelength of CO2 laser; and the reflectance in radar band shows that at high frequency, especially between 7.8 and 18 GHz, the radar power is strongly absorbed by this material and the reflected energy attenuate over 10 dB within the range from 11.1 GHz to 18.3 GHz, even 24.5 dB to the most in the frequency of 14.6 GHz.

  3. Operation of an aquatic worm reactor suitable for sludge reduction at large scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of domestic waste water results in the production of waste sludge, which requires costly further processing. A biological method to reduce the amount of waste sludge and its volume is treatment in an aquatic worm reactor. The potential of such a worm reactor with the oligochaete

  4. Worms in the College Classroom: More than Just a Composting Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Rebecca L.

    2010-01-01

    Although worm bins have been used by K-12 and nonformal educators for decades, there is little evidence of their use in postsecondary education. The ease of use, maintenance, affordability, portability, and diversity of scientific concepts that can be demonstrated with a worm bin make it a valuable tool in college science classrooms. The purpose…

  5.  Grunting for worms: reactions of Diplocardia to seismic vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Callaham

    2009-01-01

    Harvesting earthworms by a practice called 'worm grunting' is a widespread and profitable business in the southeastern USA. Although a variety of techniques are used, most involve rhythmically scraping a wooden stake driven into the ground, with a fiat metal object. A common assumption is that vibrations cause the worms to surface, but this phenomenon has not...

  6. Valorization of waste streams, "From food by-products to worm biomass"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, B.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    A new technology is investigated to produce a high quality animal feed source by converting safe industrial food wastes into worm biomass. The freshwater worm Lumbriculus variegatus (common name: blackworm) has been selected for this purpose. This species can be used to reduce and concentrate

  7. Elucidating the microbial community associated with the protein preference of sludge-degrading worms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valk, S.L.; Feng, C.; Khadem, A.F.; van Lier, J.B.; de Kreuk, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sludge predation by aquatic worms results in an increased sludge reduction rate, which is mainly due to the specific removal of a protein fraction from the sludge. As microorganisms play an essential role in sludge hydrolysis a better understanding of the microbial community involved in the worm

  8. An unusual foreign body in the urinary bladder mimicking a parasitic worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Bryan H; Feder, Marc T; Rokke, Denise L; Moyer, Thomas P; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2012-07-01

    We report an unusual case of a foreign body removed from the urinary bladder of a 63-year-old male which mimicked a parasitic worm. The foreign body was identified as an artificial fishing worm by morphological comparison to a similar commercially produced product and by infrared spectrum analysis.

  9. Accidental vaginal parasitism by oligochaete worms (Annelida: Oligochaeta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blakemore, R.J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two independent cases of oligochaete worms recovered from Korean women’s vaginas are reported. Both specimens were non-parasitic cosmopolitan exotics identified as: microdrile tubificid Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri Claparède, 1862 (Tubificidae and megadrile dichogastrid Dichogaster bolaui (Michaelsen, 1891 (Octochaetidae – a new record for Korea. The tubificid is a freshwater euryhaline species that may reach high numbers in organically rich water e.g. in a paddy field, whereas the earthworm is commonly intercepted by quarantine in plant or vegetable cargos and also appears in bathtubs when it inhabits drainage sys¬tems. Thus, bathing/douching, field working or picnicking without a blanket are suggested as possible modes of ingress. Oligo¬chaetes rarely occur in live human bodies but the few previous historical records are reviewed.

  10. Worm Control in Livestock: Bringing Science to the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Fiona; Hutchings, Fiona; Morgan-Davies, Claire; van Dijk, Jan; Bartley, Dave J

    2017-09-01

    Parasitic roundworm infections are ubiquitous in grazing livestock. Chemical control through the frequent 'blanket' administration of anthelmintics (wormers) has been, and remains, the cornerstone in controlling these infections, but this practice is unsustainable. Alternative strategies are available but, even with the plethora of best practice advice available, have yet to be integrated into routine farming practice. This is probably due to a range of factors, including contradictory advice from different sources, changes to advice following increased scientific understanding, and top-down knowledge exchange patterns. In this article, we discuss the worm control options available, the translation of new best practice advice from science bench to field, and ideas for future work and directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanics and statistics of the worm-like chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Mahadevan, L.

    2018-02-01

    The worm-like chain model is a simple continuum model for the statistical mechanics of a flexible polymer subject to an external force. We offer a tutorial introduction to it using three approaches. First, we use a mesoscopic view, treating a long polymer (in two dimensions) as though it were made of many groups of correlated links or "clinks," allowing us to calculate its average extension as a function of the external force via scaling arguments. We then provide a standard statistical mechanics approach, obtaining the average extension by two different means: the equipartition theorem and the partition function. Finally, we work in a probabilistic framework, taking advantage of the Gaussian properties of the chain in the large-force limit to improve upon the previous calculations of the average extension.

  12. Not whale-fall specialists, Osedax worms also consume fishbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Greg W; Goffredi, Shana K; Johnson, Shannon B; Vrijenhoek, Robert C

    2011-10-23

    Marine annelid worms of the genus Osedax exploit sunken vertebrate bones for food. To date, the named species occur on whale or other mammalian bones, and it is argued that Osedax is a whale-fall specialist. To assess whether extant Osedax species could obtain nutrition from non-mammalian resources, we deployed teleost bones and calcified shark cartilage at approximately 1000 m depth for five months. Although the evidence from shark cartilage was inconclusive, the teleost bones hosted three species of Osedax, each of which also lives off whalebones. This suggests that rather than being a whale-fall specialist, Osedax has exploited and continues to exploit a variety of food sources. The ability of Osedax to colonize and to grow on fishbone lends credibility to a hypothesis that it might have split from its siboglinid relatives to assume the bone-eating lifestyle during the Cretaceous, well before the origin of marine mammals.

  13. A GENERATIVE CAD MODEL OF A WORM GEAR MESHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika WRONKOWICZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the term of a generative CAD model, its origins and, thus, a need of creating such a type of models. A process of generative model creation as well as specific forms of knowledge recording applied in the implementation phase in various CAD systems are briefly discussed. The example of a worm gear meshing realized by the CATIA software encapsulates the methodology of generative model construction. Sources and types of knowledge for design and construction required for development of the aforementioned model as well as the UML language as a method of formal knowledge recording are presented. The concept of model creation, i.e. assumptions and the structure as well as logic of the model operation are described. Also, the paper addresses selected elements of the project that present the manner in which the model was constructed.

  14. Worm-like instability of a vibrated sessile drop

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmerle, Arnaud; Bergeron, Vance; Charitat, Thierry; Farago, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of vertical sinusoidal vibrations on a liquid droplet with a low surface tension (ethanol) deposited on a solid substrate. In a precise range of amplitudes and frequencies, the drop exhibits a dramatic worm-like shape instability with a strong symmetry breaking, comparable to the one observed by Pucci et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 024503) on a vibrated floating lens. However, the geometry of our system is much simpler since it does not involve the oscillation and deformation of a liquid-liquid-air contact line. We show that the Faraday waves appearing on the surface of the droplet control its shape and we draw a systematic phase diagram of the instability. A simple theoretical model allows us to derive a relation between the elongation of the droplet and the amplitude of the Faraday wave, in good agreement with measurements of both quantities.

  15. Early detection of Internet worm activity by metering ICMP destination unreachable messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, George; Berk, Vincent H.

    2002-08-01

    Early warning of active worm propagation over the Internet is of vital importance to first responders. Knowing an active worms characteristics very early in its propagation can significantly reduce the damage it may cause. In this paper we propose an early warning system that uses ICMP Destination Unreachable (ICMP-T3) messages to identify the random scanning behavior of worms. Participating routers across the Internet send Blind Carbon Copies of all their locally generated ICMP-T3 messages to a central collection point. There all the incoming messages are compared for similarities. Incoming messages are abstracted and patterns identified. Using the methods discussed in this paper we identify 'blooms' of activity that are a clear signature of worm propagation. Preliminary test results have shown that actively spreading worms can be identified in the first few minutes after they are launched. By using the characteristics gathered in those early stages, action can be taken and widespread damage might be avoided.

  16. Integumentary L-histidine transport in a euryhaline polychaete worm: Regulatory roles of calcium and cadmium in the transport event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahearn, Heather Rae Hammers; Ahearn, Gregory A.; Gomme, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    Epithelial transport, integument, polychaete worm, Nereis succinea, Annelida, transport regulation, calcium, cadmium, heavy metal......Epithelial transport, integument, polychaete worm, Nereis succinea, Annelida, transport regulation, calcium, cadmium, heavy metal...

  17. Technetium-99m-labeled stealth pH-sensitive liposomes: a new strategy to identify infection in experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildete Aparecida Sousa Carmo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of inflammatory and infectious processes is an important goal in medicine. The use of radiopharmaceuticals for identification of inflammation and infection foci has received considerable attention. The aim of this work was to evaluate the uptake and the imaging potential of stealth pH-sensitive liposomes radiolabelled with 99mTechnetium (99mTc to identify infection sites in mice. The liposomes containing glutathione were labeled with 99mTc-Hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO complex. The 99mTc-labeled stealth pH-sensitive liposomes (99mTc-SpHL were injected in mice bearing infection in the right thigh muscle induced by Staphylococcus aureus. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic imaging were performed at different times after injection of radiopharmaceutical. The 99mTc-SpHL was significantly uptaken by abscess when compared to the respective control. The abscess was visualized as early as 0.5 hours after injection of 99mTc-SpHL becoming more prominent with the time. These results indicate that 99mTc-SpHL is a promising radiopharmaceutical for visualizing infection foci in patients.O diagnóstico de processos inflamatórios e infecciosos é um objetivo importante em medicina. O uso de radiofármacos para identificação de focos de inflamação e infecção tem recebido considerável atenção. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a captação e o potencial de imagem de lipossomas pH-sensíveis furtivos radiomarcados com 99mTecnécio (99mTc para identificar sítios de infecção em camundongos. Os lipossomas contendo glutationa foram marcados com o complexo 99mTc-hexametilpropilenoamina oxima (HMPAO. Os lipossomas pH-sensíveis furtivos marcados com 99mTc (99mTc-LpHS foram injetados em camundongos com infecção induzida por Staphylococcus aureus no músculo da coxa direita. Estudos de biodistribuição e imagem cintilográfica foram realizados em diferentes tempos após injeção do radiofármaco. Os 99mTc-LpHS foram

  18. "Stealth cranioplasty:" A novel endeavor for symptomatic adult Chiari I patients with syringomyelia: Technical note, appraisal, and philosophical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Asifur; Rana, Md Sumon; Bhandari, Paawan Bahadur; Asif, Dewan Shamsul; Uddin, Abu Naim Wakil; Obaida, Abu Saleh Mohammad Abu; Rahman, Md Atikur; Alam, Md Shamsul

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe a novel technique of reconstruction of posterior fossa by cranioplasty with use of preshaped titanium mesh following posterior fossa decompression (PFD) for Chiari malformation type I (CMI) with syringomyelia (SM) in symptomatic adults. Eleven patients underwent limited PFD and expansive cranioplasty with preshaped titanium mesh, what we term as "Stealth Cranioplasty" (SCP), following arachnoid preserving duraplasty (APD) and hexagonal tenting of the duraplasty with the cranioplasty (HTDC) for the management of symptomatic adult CMI with SM. All these patients had syringes extending from 3 to >10 vertebral levels. Seven male and four female symptomatic CMI adult patients, between age ranges of 22 and 44 years (mean 29.45 years), presented with different neurological symptoms related to CMI and SM for 6-84 months (mean 37.09 months). All the patients underwent PFD, APD followed by SCP and HTDC and were followed up for 7-54 months (mean 35.90 months). Of 11 patients, 8 patients improved according to the Chicago Chiari Outcome Scale (CCOS) with score of 13-15 while 3 patients remained unchanged with CCOS of 12, and there was no worsening. There was no complication related to Chiari surgery in any of the patients. All the patients had good reestablishment of cisterna magna. Two patients had marked reduction of syrinx while eight patients had moderate-to-mild reduction and one patient had no change of syrinx. None of the patients needed redo surgery. SCP is an effective, fruitful, and cost-effective technique for the management of symptomatic adult CMI with SM. This technique has the advantages of preventing complications and recurrences in addition to the improvement of symptoms by addressing the basic pathology.

  19. The provision of potable water in eradication of Guinea worm infection in Ezza North, Southeastern, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Alison Okorie; Nwaokoro, Joakin Chidozie; Iwuala, C C; Amadi, A N; Akpelu, Ugochinyere Alvana

    2014-10-01

    Guinea worm is a parasite found in unprotected drinking water sources, causes considerable morbidity and loss of agricultural production among rural people. The study was to determine the current status of Guinea worm infection in Ezza North and to evaluate the impact of control measures on guinea worm infection. A total of 200 individuals in Ezza North Southeastern, Nigeria were examined for guinea worm infection. A standardized questionnaire was used to determine the effect of potable water on guinea worm eradication/control, the source of drinking water, information on the knowledge, attitude, symptom management practices, availability of health facilities and boreholes installation status. The instrument for data collection was well constructed, validated and reliable tested questionnaire by an expert. Data obtained was analyzed using Epi-Info model 3.4 versions. Results of a study indicated majority of the respondents 195 (97.5 %) have access to safe drinking water supply which indicated no case of Guinea worm infection. The active use of potable water supply was found among the age group of 20-30 years 71 (35.5 %) and higher in male (57.5 %) than females (42.5 %). The drastic reduction of Guinea worm infection to zero (0) level in Ezza North were due to multiple factors as health education, availability of functional boreholes, presence of health centers for immediate treatment if any case discovered.

  20. [Morphological observation on the adult worms of Taenia saginata in western China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Rong; Bao, Huai-En; Qiu, Xue-Li; Chen, Yan; Lang, Shu-Yuan; Huang, Jiang; Li, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Wu-Jun; Zhang, Ke; Ling-Hu, Yan

    2007-02-28

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of the adult worms of Taenia saginata from four areas of Western China. 42, 41, 7 and 18 integral worms of Taenia saginata were collected from Duyun and Congjiang of Guizhou Province, Wushi of Xinjiang, and Lhasa of Tibet respectively. The length of worms was measured and the segments were counted. The specimens of scolex, mature and gravid proglottids of the worms were stained, measured and photographed. The mean length of the worms from Duyun, Congjiang, Wushi and Lasa was (1.81+/-0.69) m, (3.84+/-1.32) m, (2.76+/-0.86) m and (3.72+/-1.12) m, and with (574.64+/-189.33), (913.84+/-317.41), (971.29+/-168.30) and (940.38+/-368.26) proglottids, respectively. The mean ratio of the distance between two lateral excretory vessels and the length of vitellarium of the mature proglottids was (1.71+/-0.13), (2.23+/-0.06), (2.03+/-0.21), (2.31+/-0.15) respectively. All the 3 parameters of the worms from Duyun were significantly less than those from other 3 areas (PTaenia saginata asiatica, while those of the worms from Congjiang, Wushi and Lhasa are alike to those of Taenia saginata saginata.

  1. Worm infestations and development of autoimmunity in children - The ABIS study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Ludvigsson

    Full Text Available Worm infestations influence the immune system and may therefore decrease the risk for autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to determine whether children who have developed autoimmune disease were less likely to have had worm infestations in childhood. The ABIS-study is a prospective population-based cohort study of children born in southeast Sweden 1997/99. 17.055 children participated. As of June 2014 116 individuals had developed Type 1 diabetes, 181 celiac disease, and 53 Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. The parents answered questions on worm infestations when the children were 1, 5 and 8 years of age. The ABIS registry was connected to the National Registry of Drug Prescriptions, and national registries for diagnosis of the studied diseases. We found no differences in incidence of worm infestations at 1, 5 or 8 years of age between children who developed autoimmune disease(s or healthy controls. At 8 years in total 20.0% of the general child population had experienced a worm infestation; children who developed Type 1 diabetes, 21,3%, celiac disease 19,5% and JRA 18,8%. There was no difference in prescriptions of drugs for treatment of worm infestations between those who had and who had not developed Type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. We found no associations indicating that worm infestations in childhood does not play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases in Sweden.

  2. Promoting positive health behaviours--'tooth worm' phenomenon and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X L; Hsu, C Y S; Xu, Y C; Loh, T; Koh, D; Hwarng, H B

    2012-03-01

    'Tooth worm' is a traditional belief about the pathogen of dental caries (tooth decay). Nevertheless, in our previous study, parental 'tooth worm' belief was linked to a reduced caries risk of their children. This study aimed to further characterize the impact of parental 'tooth worm' belief on their children's caries experience and its psychobehavioural mechanisms. analytic observational study. Thirteen randomly selected kindergartens in Singapore. 1,782 preschoolers aged 3-6 years. Each child received an oral examination and microbiological tests. Parents completed a self-administered questionnaire on their socio-demographic background, oral health knowledge/attitude and child's oral health habits. Multivariate analysis confirmed a reduced chance of 'high caries rate' (number of affected teeth > 2) among children whose parents held the 'tooth worm' belief (Odds Ratio = 0.41; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.19-0.89). With such perception among parents, children brushed their teeth more frequently (p = 0.042). Since no difference in oral hygiene was observed, the health benefit of the "tooth worm" perception may be acquired through the delivery of fluoride (an agent with proven anti-caries effect) during frequent toothbrushing episodes. This study revealed a 'tooth worm' phenomenon, indicating that parental 'tooth worm' belief is associated with early establishment of regular toothbrushing habit and reduction of dental caries in children. This phenomenon and its psychobehavioural mechanisms, enriching our understanding of oral health behaviours, have implications for effective health education.

  3. Viability of developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni quantified with xCELLigence worm real-time motility assay (xWORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rinaldi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection with helminth parasites causes morbidity and mortality in billions of people and livestock worldwide. Where anthelmintic drugs are available, drug resistance is a major problem in livestock parasites, and a looming threat to public health. Monitoring the efficacy of these medicines and screening for new drugs has been hindered by the lack of objective, high-throughput approaches. Several cell monitoring technologies have been adapted for parasitic worms, including video-, fluorescence-, metabolism enzyme- and impedance-based tools that minimize the screening bottleneck. Using the xCELLigence impedance-based system we previously developed a motility-viability assay that is applicable for a range of helminth parasites. Here we have improved substantially the assay by using diverse frequency settings, and have named it the xCELLigence worm real-time motility assay (xWORM. By utilizing strictly standardized mean difference analysis we compared the xWORM output measured with 10, 25 and 50 kHz frequencies to quantify the motility of schistosome adults (human blood flukes and hatching of schistosome eggs. Furthermore, we have described a novel application of xWORM to monitor movement of schistosome cercariae, the developmental stage that is infectious to humans. For all three stages, 25 kHz was either optimal or near-optimal for monitoring and quantifying schistosome motility. These improvements in methodology sensitivity should enhance the capacity to screen small compound libraries for new drugs both for schistosomes and other helminth pathogens at large.

  4. Chemistry and the worm: Caenorhabditis elegans as a platform for integrating chemical and biological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, S Elizabeth; Whitesides, George M

    2011-05-16

    This Review discusses the potential usefulness of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism for chemists interested in studying living systems. C. elegans, a 1 mm long roundworm, is a popular model organism in almost all areas of modern biology. The worm has several features that make it attractive for biology: it is small (biology, the Review provides examples of current research with C. elegans that is chemically relevant. It also describes tools-biological, chemical, and physical-that are available to researchers studying the worm. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Modeling and Analyzing the Spread of Flash Disk Worms via Multiple Subnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihua Li

    2015-01-01

    subnet is considered. Analytical result shows that the Flash Disk worm can self-perpetuate when Ri0>1 and will die out otherwise. When multiple subnets are considered, we get that once a computer is infected by the Flash Disk worms, other computers in that subnet will be infected in a short time. Thus, for any subnet, to contain the Flash Disk worms, the most effective way is to prevent the first infected individual by improving the users’ security awareness of using removed devices. Our results are illustrated by numerical simulation.

  6. Bioaccumulation and biological effects of cigarette litter in marine worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephanie L.; Rowe, Darren; Reid, Malcolm J.; Thomas, Kevin V.; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2015-01-01

    Marine debris is a global environmental issue. Smoked cigarette filters are the predominant coastal litter item; 4.5 trillion are littered annually, presenting a source of bioplastic microfibres (cellulose acetate) and harmful toxicants to marine environments. Despite the human health risks associated with smoking, little is known of the hazards cigarette filters present to marine life. Here we studied the impacts of smoked cigarette filter toxicants and microfibres on the polychaete worm Hediste diversicolor (ragworm), a widespread inhabitant of coastal sediments. Ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter toxicants in seawater at concentrations 60 fold lower than those reported for urban run-off exhibited significantly longer burrowing times, >30% weight loss, and >2-fold increase in DNA damage compared to ragworms maintained in control conditions. In contrast, ragworms exposed to smoked cigarette filter microfibres in marine sediment showed no significant effects. Bioconcentration factors for nicotine were 500 fold higher from seawater than from sediment. Our results illustrate the vulnerability of organisms in the water column to smoking debris and associated toxicants, and highlight the risks posed by smoked cigarette filter debris to aquatic life. PMID:26369692

  7. Serological Screening of the Schistosoma mansoni Adult Worm Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolf, Fernanda; Patrocínio, Paola R.; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Gazzinelli, Andréa; Falcone, Franco H.; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Perales, Jonas; Oliveira, Guilherme C.; Silva-Pereira, Rosiane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background New interventions tools are a priority for schistosomiasis control and elimination, as the disease is still highly prevalent. The identification of proteins associated with active infection and protective immune response may constitute the basis for the development of a successful vaccine and could also indicate new diagnostic candidates. In this context, post-genomic technologies have been progressing, resulting in a more rational discovery of new biomarkers of resistance and antigens for diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Two-dimensional electrophoresed Schistosoma mansoni adult worm protein extracts were probed with pooled sera of infected and non-infected (naturally resistant) individuals from a S. mansoni endemic area. A total of 47 different immunoreactive proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Although the different pooled sera shared most of the immunoreactive protein spots, nine protein spots reacted exclusively with the serum pool of infected individuals, which correspond to annexin, major egg antigen, troponin T, filamin, disulphide-isomerase ER-60 precursor, actin and reticulocalbin. One protein spot, corresponding to eukaryotic translation elongation factor, reacted exclusively with the pooled sera of non-infected individuals living in the endemic area. Western blotting of two selected recombinant proteins, major egg antigen and hemoglobinase, showed a similar recognition pattern of that of the native protein. Concluding/Significance Using a serological proteome analysis, a group of antigens related to the different infection status of the endemic area residents was identified and may be related to susceptibility or resistance to infection. PMID:24651847

  8. Monosaccharide transport into hemocytes of a sipunculan worm Themiste dyscrita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingermann, R.L.; Hall, R.E.; Bissonnette, J.M.; Terwilliger, R.C.

    1985-07-01

    The hemerythrin-containing blood cells, or hemocytes, of the sipunculan worm Themiste dyscrita were found to have a stereospecific and nonconcentrative monosaccharide transport system. The transport system transferred both D-glucose and 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3-OMG), and transport into cells by this system was rapid, reaching 50% equilibrium in approximately 20 s at 10 degrees C with an initial concentration gradient of 0.1 mM; the contribution to total uptake by simple diffusion was very small. 3-OMG uptake showed saturation kinetics with a low half-saturation constant (Km less than or equal to 0.1 mM). The uptake of labeled 3-OMG by the hemocytes was strongly inhibited by unlabeled 3-OMG, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, alpha- and beta-D-glucose, D-galactose, and D-mannose. It was moderately inhibited by D-xylose, only slightly by alpha-methyl-D-glucoside and D-fructose, and uninhibited by sucrose, L-glucose, or D-sorbitol. Phloretin was more potent than phloridzin in blocking entry of 3-OMG. Cytochalasin B did not bind tightly to the T. dyscrita transporter and was not a potent inhibitor of transport; it half-maximally inhibited 3-OMG transport at 0.1 mM. Therefore, despite some differences the data suggest functional similarities in the mechanism of monosaccharide transport into blood cells of mammals and this invertebrate.

  9. Methane Ice Worms: Hesiocaeca methanicola Colonizing Fossil Fuel Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, C. R.; MacDonald, I. R.; Sassen, R.; Young, C. M.; Macko, S. A.; Hourdez, S.; Carney, R. S.; Joye, S.; McMullin, E.

    During a research cruise in July 1997 in the Gulf of Mexico we discovered a gas hydrate approximately 1m thick and over 2m in diameter which had recently breached the sea floor at a depth of 540m. The hydrate surface visible from the submarine was considerably greater than that of any other reported hydrate. Two distinct color bands of hydrate were present in the same mound, and the entire exposed surface of the hydrate was infested (2500 individuals/m2) with 2 to 4 cm-long worms, since described as a new species, Hesiocaecamethanicola, in the polychaete family Hesionidae (Desbruyères and Toulmond 1998). H.methanicola tissue stable isotope values are consistent with a chemoautotrophic food source. No evidence of chemoautotrophic symbionts was detected, but geochemical data support the presence of abundant free living bacteria on the hydrate. The activities of the polychaetes, grazing on the hydrate bacteria and supplying oxygen to their habitats, appears to contribute to the dissolution of hydrates in surface sediments.

  10. Do We Need Worms to Promote Immune Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Joel V

    2015-10-01

    Many immune-mediated diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, asthma, and food allergy appeared to have increased in frequency in developed countries in the latter part of the twentieth century. Reports from less developed countries suggest that the "epidemic" of immune-mediated diseases now is spreading into these regions as well. The "hygiene hypothesis" was developed to partly explain this phenomenon. It has been proposed that modern-day sanitary living has altered our exposure to organisms that provided protection from these diseases in the past. Alternations in the composition of our intestinal flora and fauna could play a role. Helminths are a group of worm-like parasitic organisms that have adapted to live in various regions of their hosts. Epidemiological and some clinical data suggest that these organisms can protect people from developing immune-mediated diseases. Animal experimentation has shown that helminths stimulate the production of regulatory cytokines, activate regulatory T cells, and induce regulatory dendritic cells and macrophages. This could be the mechanism by which they protect the host from these diseases. Early clinical studies also suggest that helminths may prove useful for treating immunological diseases. More sophisticated clinical studies are underway, testing live helminth agents as therapeutic agents. Also, a strong effort is ongoing to discover the agents produced by helminths that modulate host immune responses with an eye on developing new, highly effective immune modulatory therapeutic agent.

  11. Worm domains and Fefferman space-time singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Elisabetta; Dragomir, Sorin; Peloso, Marco M.

    2017-10-01

    Let W be a smoothly bounded worm domain in C2 and let A = Null(Lθ) be the set of Levi-flat points on the boundary ∂W of W. We study the relationship between pseudohermitian geometry of the strictly pseudoconvex locus M = ∂W ∖ A and the theory of space-time singularities associated to the Fefferman metric Fθ on the total space of the canonical circle bundle S1 → C(M) ⟶ π M. Given any point (0 ,w0) ∈ A, we show that every lift Γ(φ) ∈ C(M) , 0 ≤ φ - log|w0 | 2 frames O(1 , 1) → O(Σ) → Σ and adapted Lorentzian frames O(1 , 1) × O(2) → O(C(M) , Σ) → Σ, endowed with Schmidt metrics, descending to a map of bundle completions which maps the b-boundary of Σ into the adapted bundle boundary of C(M) , i.e. j(Σ ˙) ⊂∂adt C(M) .

  12. Functional brain regeneration in the acoel worm Symsagittifera roscoffensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon G. Sprecher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of some animals to regrow their head and brain after decapitation provides a striking example of the regenerative capacity within the animal kingdom. The acoel worm Symsagittifera roscoffensis can regrow its head, brain and sensory head organs within only a few weeks after decapitation. How rapidly and to what degree it also reacquires its functionality to control behavior however remains unknown. We provide here a neuroanatomical map of the brain neuropils of the adult S. roscoffensis and show that after decapitation a normal neuroanatomical organization of the brain is restored in the majority of animals. By testing different behaviors we further show that functionality of both sensory perception and the underlying brain architecture are restored within weeks after decapitation. Interestingly not all behaviors are restored at the same speed and to the same extent. While we find that phototaxis recovered rapidly, geotaxis is not restored within 7 weeks. Our findings show that regeneration of the head, sensory organs and brain result in the restoration of directed navigation behavior, suggesting a tight coordination in the regeneration of certain sensory organs with that of their underlying neural circuits. Thus, at least in S. roscoffensis, the regenerative capacity of different sensory modalities follows distinct paths.

  13. Swimming behavior of the spoon worm Urechis unicinctus (Annelida, Echiura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hirokazu; Sato-Okoshi, Waka; Tanaka, Masaatsu; Okoshi, Kenji; Teramoto, Wataru; Kondoh, Tomohiko; Nishitani, Goh; Endo, Yoshinari

    2014-06-01

    Large numbers of swimming and stranding Urechis unicinctus were observed at night during low tide in Sasuhama, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan, during the periods from January to February in 2012 and 2013. Worms did not drift passively but swam actively, therefore hinting at a certain purpose for such behavior. As trochophore larvae of U. unicinctus were observed to occur simultaneously in the plankton, we infer the possibility that this is an event of reproductive swarming. Anatomical observations of both swimming and stranding U. unicinctus showed that none of the specimens had gametes, which may suggest that these were completely spent after spawning. Urechis unicinctus seemed to begin swimming after dusk and the observed swimming behavior occurred during the evening ebb tide throughout the night low tide during winter time. Stranding U. unicinctus have long been known in Japan and have been attributed to sea storms. The present study shows for the first time the possibility that U. unicinctus swims in order to reproduce at night and that this swimming behavior is closely linked to the stranding of U. unicinctus individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Serological screening of the Schistosoma mansoni adult worm proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ludolf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New interventions tools are a priority for schistosomiasis control and elimination, as the disease is still highly prevalent. The identification of proteins associated with active infection and protective immune response may constitute the basis for the development of a successful vaccine and could also indicate new diagnostic candidates. In this context, post-genomic technologies have been progressing, resulting in a more rational discovery of new biomarkers of resistance and antigens for diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two-dimensional electrophoresed Schistosoma mansoni adult worm protein extracts were probed with pooled sera of infected and non-infected (naturally resistant individuals from a S. mansoni endemic area. A total of 47 different immunoreactive proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Although the different pooled sera shared most of the immunoreactive protein spots, nine protein spots reacted exclusively with the serum pool of infected individuals, which correspond to annexin, major egg antigen, troponin T, filamin, disulphide-isomerase ER-60 precursor, actin and reticulocalbin. One protein spot, corresponding to eukaryotic translation elongation factor, reacted exclusively with the pooled sera of non-infected individuals living in the endemic area. Western blotting of two selected recombinant proteins, major egg antigen and hemoglobinase, showed a similar recognition pattern of that of the native protein. CONCLUDING/SIGNIFICANCE: Using a serological proteome analysis, a group of antigens related to the different infection status of the endemic area residents was identified and may be related to susceptibility or resistance to infection.

  15. Functional brain regeneration in the acoel worm Symsagittifera roscoffensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprecher, Simon G; Bernardo-Garcia, F Javier; van Giesen, Lena; Hartenstein, Volker; Reichert, Heinrich; Neves, Ricardo; Bailly, Xavier; Martinez, Pedro; Brauchle, Michael

    2015-11-18

    The ability of some animals to regrow their head and brain after decapitation provides a striking example of the regenerative capacity within the animal kingdom. The acoel worm Symsagittifera roscoffensis can regrow its head, brain and sensory head organs within only a few weeks after decapitation. How rapidly and to what degree it also reacquires its functionality to control behavior however remains unknown. We provide here a neuroanatomical map of the brain neuropils of the adult S. roscoffensis and show that after decapitation a normal neuroanatomical organization of the brain is restored in the majority of animals. By testing different behaviors we further show that functionality of both sensory perception and the underlying brain architecture are restored within weeks after decapitation. Interestingly not all behaviors are restored at the same speed and to the same extent. While we find that phototaxis recovered rapidly, geotaxis is not restored within 7 weeks. Our findings show that regeneration of the head, sensory organs and brain result in the restoration of directed navigation behavior, suggesting a tight coordination in the regeneration of certain sensory organs with that of their underlying neural circuits. Thus, at least in S. roscoffensis, the regenerative capacity of different sensory modalities follows distinct paths. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. A SEM study of the reindeer sinus worm (Linguatula arctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Nikander

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentastomids are a group of peculiar parasitic arthropods, often referred to as tongue worms due to the resemblance of some species to a tongue. Linguatula arctica is the sinus worm of the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, being the only pentastomid to have a direct life cycle and an ungulate as a definite host. Here, the surface structures and internal anatomy of adult L. arctica are described as seen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Sinus worms were collected in the winter 1991-92 in Finnish Lapland. Paranasal cavities of about 80 reindeer were examined and 30 sinus worms were found. The sinus worms had typical Linguatula sp. morphology, being paddle-shaped, transparent, pale yellow, dorsoventrally flattened and pseudosegmented with a long tapering end. Present at the anteroventral part of the cephalothorax was an oral opening with a large, conspicuous, head-like papillar structure. Bilaterally, on both sides of this opening, was a pair of strong curved hooks. The cephalothorax and abdomen had a segmented appearance, as they showed distinct annulation. There was a small cup-shaped sensory organ present at the lateral margin on each annula. The posterior edge of each annula was roughened by tiny spines projecting backwards. Throughout the cuticular surface, small, circular depressions that represented the apical portion of chloride cells. The genital opening of the male was located medioventrally between the tips of the posterior pair of hooks, and that of the female posteroventrally and subterminally. In both sexes, the genital opening was bilaterally flanked by papillar (in males or leaf-like (in females structures. One copulating couple was present, with the male attached to the posteroventral part of the female with its anteroventral hooks and papillae. Several structures typical of arthropods and other pentastomids were identified. Because SEM allows only surfaces to be studied, the morphology and especially the sense organs of L. arctica

  17. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  18. Methods and strategies for gene structure curation in WormBase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, G W; Davis, P A; Rogers, A S; Bieri, T; Ozersky, P; Spieth, J

    2011-01-01

    .... In one of its roles as a central repository for nematode biology, WormBase continues to refine the gene structure annotations using sequence similarity and other computational methods, as well...

  19. Thermal limit for metazoan life in question: in vivo heat tolerance of the Pompeii worm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravaux, Juliette; Hamel, Gérard; Zbinden, Magali; Tasiemski, Aurélie A; Boutet, Isabelle; Léger, Nelly; Tanguy, Arnaud; Jollivet, Didier; Shillito, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The thermal limit for metazoan life, expected to be around 50°C, has been debated since the discovery of the Pompeii worm Alvinella pompejana, which colonizes black smoker chimney walls at deep-sea vents...

  20. School based mass de-worming initiative in south-west Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At enrolment 19.6% of children with and 11.8% without helminth infections had BMI below the 5-percentile. ... No effect of de-worming was seen on longitudinal growth. ... Keywords: Helminthes, Absenteeism, Preventive Chemotherapy ...

  1. Windows Based Data Sets for Evaluation of Robustness of Host Based Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS to Zero-Day and Stealth Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Haider

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Windows Operating System (OS is the most popular desktop OS in the world, as it has the majority market share of both servers and personal computing necessities. However, as its default signature-based security measures are ineffectual for detecting zero-day and stealth attacks, it needs an intelligent Host-based Intrusion Detection System (HIDS. Unfortunately, a comprehensive data set that reflects the modern Windows OS’s normal and attack surfaces is not publicly available. To fill this gap, in this paper two open data sets generated by the cyber security department of the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA are introduced, namely: Australian Defence Force Academy Windows Data Set (ADFA-WD; and Australian Defence Force Academy Windows Data Set with a Stealth Attacks Addendum (ADFA-WD: SAA. Statistical analysis results based on these data sets show that, due to the low foot prints of modern attacks and high similarity of normal and attacked data, both these data sets are complex, and highly intelligent Host based Anomaly Detection Systems (HADS design will be required.

  2. COMMUNITY KNOWLEDGE AND PERCEPTIONS ON NATIONAL SCHOOL-BASED DE-WORMING PROGRAMME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karani, F; Muthami, L; Kihara, J H; Mberia, H K

    2013-12-01

    To determine the community level of knowledge, attitude and perception of soil transmitted helminthes and the national school-based de-worming programme in selected villages of Busia County in Kenya. A cross-sectional survey. Busia and Bunyala districts in Busia County. A total of 384 participants were studied. Socio-demographic characteristics, then knowledge, causes and effects of Soil Transmitted Infections on health and education, prevention strategies, knowledge of national school-based de-worming programs, implementing strategies of the programme, benefits of the programme, community satisfaction and health seeking behaviour. Eating the uncooked food as a cause for soil transmitted infections constituted 27.16% (63) followed by 16.38% (38) notusing latrines, 15.95% (37) eating left over foods, 12.93% (30) eating cold food, 10.78% (25) eating not well cooked pork, 9.48% (22) eating contaminated soil, and 7.33% (17) changing of diet. One head teacher interviewed stated that "One can be able to notice if his/her child has worm infection if the child eats without getting satisfied, eating all the time and yet his belly is big."Community Health Extension Worker in the FGD stated that: "During flood seasons most of the areas in Budalangi become flooded and all latrines are filled with water and the excreta start overflowing. Most of the residents don't have shoes especially the children and therefore they are prone to the worm infection."99.57% of the parents were aware of the national school based de-worming programme of which (92%) learnt about the programme after their children were de-wormed in their various schools. Seventy five percent (174) were satisfied about the programme; 65.1% (151) and 10.3% indicated that the programme improves the children's health and student's school performance respectively. Most of the parents do not have adequate knowledge on worms, their causes, and signs and symptoms of the intestinal worms. Low educational levels and poverty

  3. Sago worms as a nutritious traditional and alternative food for rural children in Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, Intan R; Trees; Suwarni; Pramono, Mochammad S

    2017-06-01

    The sago worm Rhynchophorus ferrugineus is a nutritious food source found in the remaining parts of a sago palm trunk after the removal of sago starch by farmers. The effort to increase sago worm consumption is investigated in an intervention study among children aged sago worm inclusive diet (n=10) and to a control group eating a usual diet, but without sago worms (n=13). Snacks were served once per day (100 g) for 45 days and designed to contain similar amounts of vegetables (carrots and long beans) and other ingredients including rice, sticky rice, cassava, sweet potato, banana, or tofu with or without sago worms. Food preference was ascertained by interview. Anthropometric measurements were taken at baseline and the endpoint. After mixing all food stuffs into one product for instance nasi gurih, protein and fat content in the intervention group was higher compared to control group (8.8 g and 7.3 g vs 4.7 g and 0.5 g respectively). In the intervention group receiving complementary feeding with sago worms, children's height changed minimally as did the control group (0.3 vs 0.2 cm); no difference was observed between the groups regarding weight or height. Sago worm consumption can diversify the diet through usage in various dishes, so improving its overall nutritional quality. Worm addition in an intervention program does not compromise, but maintains nutritional value. Local use adds affordability and sustainability to the food and health systems in a sago-consuming culture, so contributing to food security.

  4. Modeling and Bifurcation Research of a Worm Propagation Dynamical System with Time Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Xiang, Wenlong; Yang, Wei; Gao, Fuxiang

    2014-01-01

    Both vaccination and quarantine strategy are adopted to control the Internet worm propagation. By considering the interaction infection between computers and external removable devices, a worm propagation dynamical system with time delay under quarantine strategy is constructed based on anomaly intrusion detection system (IDS). By regarding the time delay caused by time window of anomaly IDS as the bifurcation parameter, local asymptotic stability at the positive equilibrium and local Hopf bi...

  5. Exotic food anaphylaxis and the broken heart: sago worm and takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, K L; Kok, V S L

    2012-10-01

    There is increasing consumption of exotic food in Malaysia. Animals such as insects, worms and wild life animals also form part of the staple food of the local population. This practice may lead to more incidence of food allergy and anaphylaxis. We report a non-indigenous man who developed food anaphylaxis after consuming fried sago worms and consequently Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We postulate that certain food allergy and anaphylaxis could be another causative trigger for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  6. Red worm behavior (Eisenia spp. in vermicomposting systems of organic residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamani-Mamani Gladys

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the behavior of the vermicomposting red worm (Eisenia spp. in two environments (greenhouse and unsheltered and with two solid organic substrates (cow manure=CM and kitchen waste=KW in the zone of Carmen Pampa, Nor Yungas Province, Department of La Paz – Bolivia, using a factorial design with two factors and three repetitions (ANOVA analysis. The largest number of cocoons was found in the greenhouse treatment, with 64 in CM and 41 in KW. Cocoon viability was also greatest in the greenhouse treatment, at 100% for CM and 96% for KW. Similarly, the greatest number of worms hatched from cocoons was in the greenhouse treatment, with 2 immature worms for CM and 3.5 for KW, and the greatest number of immature worms was registered in the greenhouse treatment with 123 individuals in CM and 16 in KW. The lowest mortality rate due to environment was in the greenhouse treatment, with 3.90% mortality with CM and 88.64% with KW. The greatest number of mature worms (with clitella was in the unsheltered treatment, with 15 in CM and 21 in KW. The greatest biomass of immature worms was found in the greenhouse treatment, with 1.41 g of worms for CM and 0.185 g for KW; however, the greatest biomass of mature worms was in the KW treatment, with 7.98 g for the greenhouse treatment and 6.93 g for the unsheltered treatment. The phytotoxicity from CM vermicompost in the two environments was lowest, exhibiting a 66.6% rate of germination, and the opposite was true for KW, which was the most toxic in both environments. Macronutrient content in vermicompost obtained was: nitrogen at 2.45% and 2.31%, phosphorus at 500 mg kg-1 and 220 mg kg-1 and potassium at 27.43 and 2.76 cmol(+ kg-1 of dry substrate in KW and CM respectively.

  7. PRODUCTION OF BIMETALLIC SLUGS OF WORM WHEELS BY METHOD OF ELECTROSLAG REMELTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Thе technology of worm-wheel production, based on mechanical amalgamation of bronze crown with hub is described. The technology of production of the worm-wheel bimetallic ingots in chill and by means of liquid forging is considered. The technology of production of bimetallic ingots by means of electroslag melting (ESM is described and advantages of this method in comparison to the previous one are indicated.

  8. Optimal synthesis of the worm-lever mechanism for humanoid robots shrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penčić Marko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotions represent a significant means of nonverbal communication and their expression represents an important aspect of social robots functionality. There are two basic ways of expressing emotions. The first one is based on facial expressions that can be realized by moving a particular part of face or by displaying a picture on the screen that represents a face with characteristic features such as eyebrows, eyes, nose and mouth. Combining them is also possible. The second way of nonverbal communication is based on gestures, especially using arms. This paper presents an optimal synthesis of shrug mechanism for humanoid robots. Based on the set requirements the worm-lever mechanism is proposed. It has 1 DOF and enables simultaneous shrug of both shoulders. It consists of a worm which is meshed with two worm gears having different directions of rotation and two four-bar lever mechanisms whose input links are rigidly connected to the worm gears. Based on the kinematic-dynamic analysis the dynamic model is formed, the objective function is defined, the constraints are prescribed and the optimal synthesis is performed. The maximum torque on the input link of the lever mechanism, the driving torque of the complete worm-lever mechanism, the range of transmission angle and the rotation range of the worm gears are determined. The lever mechanism has high efficiency in all positions because the transmission angle has a high value during the whole movement. The worm mechanism enables a significant reduction of driving torque and has acceptable efficiency. The rotation range of the worm gear is small – the mechanism movement is very quick and therefore the shrug speed is large, which was the basic requirement for realization. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III44008

  9. Adhesive complex coacervate inspired by the sandcastle worm as a sealant for fetoscopic defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sarbjit

    Inspired by the Sandcastle Worm, biomimetic of the water-borne adhesive was developed by complex coacervation of the synthetic copolyelectrolytes, mimicking the chemistries of the worm glue. The developed underwater adhesive was designed for sealing fetal membranes after fetoscopic surgery in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and sealing neural tissue of a fetus in aminiotic sac for spina bifida condition. Complex coacervate with increased bond strength was created by entrapping polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-dA) monomer within the cross-linked coacervate network. Maximum shear bond strength of ~ 1.2 MPa on aluminum substrates was reached. The monomer-filled coacervate had complex flow behavior, thickening at low shear rates and then thinning suddenly with a 16-fold drop in viscosity at shear rates near 6 s-1. The microscale structure of the complex coacervates resembled a three-dimensional porous network of interconnected tubules. This complex coacervate adhesive was used in vitro studies to mimic the uterine wall-fetal membrane interface using a water column with one end and sealed with human fetal membranes and poultry breast, and a defect was created with an 11 French trocar. The coacervate adhesive in conjunction with the multiphase adhesive was used to seal the defect. The sealant withstood an additional traction of 12 g for 30-60 minutes and turbulence of the water column without leakage of fluid or slippage. The adhesive is nontoxic when in direct contact with human fetal membranes in an organ culture setting. A stable complex coacervate adhesive for long-term use in TTTS and spina bifida application was developed by methacrylating the copolyelectrolytes. The methacrylated coacervate was crosslinked chemically for TTTS and by photopolymerization for spina bifida. Tunable mechanical properties of the adhesive were achieved by varying the methacrylation of the polymers. Varying the amine to phosphate (A/P) ratio in the coacervate formation

  10. Durability Characteristics Analysis of Plastic Worm Wheel with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polyamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Il Seo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plastic worm wheel is widely used in the vehicle manufacturing field because it is favorable for weight lightening, vibration and noise reduction, as well as corrosion resistance. However, it is very difficult for general plastics to secure the mechanical properties that are required for vehicle gears. If the plastic resin is reinforced by glass fiber in the fabrication process of plastic worm wheel, it is possible to achieve the mechanical properties of metallic material levels. In this study, the mechanical characteristic analysis of the glass-reinforced plastic worm wheel, according to the contents of glass fiber, is performed by analytic and experimental methods. In the case of the glass fiber-reinforced resin, the orientation and contents of glass fibers can influence the mechanical properties. For the characteristic prediction of plastic worm wheel, computer-aided engineering (CAE analysis processes such as structural and injection molding analysis were executed with the polyamide resin reinforcement glass fiber (25 wt %, 50 wt %. The injection mold for fabricating the prototype plastic worm wheel was designed and made to reflect the CAE analysis results. Finally, the durability of prototype plastic worm wheel fabricated by the injection molding process was evaluated by the experimental method and the characteristics according to the glass fiber contents.

  11. Influence of ecological factors on prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis infection in South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Christopher N.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Grovenburg, Troy W.; Klaver, Robert W.; Dubay, Shelli A.

    2015-01-01

    The meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) is a nematode parasite that commonly infects white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; WTD) throughout the deciduous forest biome and deciduous-coniferous ecotone of eastern and central North America; the species is not known to occur west of the grassland biome of central North America. We used county-specific prevalence data to evaluate potential effects of landscape and climatologic factors on the spatial distribution of meningeal worm infection in South Dakota, US. Probability of infection increased 4-fold between eastern and western South Dakota and 1.3-fold for each 1-cm increase in summer precipitation. Sixty-three percent of WTD had only a single worm in the cranium. Expansion of meningeal worm infection across western South Dakota may be inherently low due to the combined effects of arid climate and potential attributes of the Missouri River that limit regional movements by infected WTD. Use of landscape genetic analyses to identify potential relationships between landscape features and population genetic structure of infected deer and parasites may contribute to a greater understanding of regional heterogeneity in meningeal worm infection rates across South Dakota, particularly in counties adjacent to the Missouri River. Future research evaluating heterogeneity in prevalence and intensity of infection between fawn and yearling deer, and the potential role of yearling male deer as dispersal agents of meningeal worms across the Missouri River, also is warranted.

  12. Elimination of Schistosoma mansoni Adult Worms by Rhesus Macaques: Basis for a Therapeutic Vaccine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Alan Wilson

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Among animal models of schistosomiasis, the rhesus macaque is unique in that an infection establishes but egg excretion rapidly diminishes, potentially due to loss of adult worms from the portal system via shunts or death by immune attack.To investigate this, six rhesus macaques were exposed to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and the infection monitored until portal perfusion at 18 weeks. Despite a wide variation in worm numbers recovered, fecal egg output and circulating antigen levels indicated that a substantial population had established in all animals. Half the macaques had portal hypertension but only one had portacaval shunts, ruling out translocation to the lungs as the reason for loss of adult burden. Many worms had a shrunken and pallid appearance, with degenerative changes in intestines and reproductive organs. Tegument, gut epithelia and muscles appeared cytologically intact but the parenchyma was virtually devoid of content. An early and intense IgG production correlated with low worm burden at perfusion, and blood-feeding worms cultured in the presence of serum from these animals had stunted growth. Using immunoproteomics, gut digestive enzymes, tegument surface hydrolases and antioxidant enzymes were identified as targets of IgG in the high responder animals.It appears that worms starve to death after cessation of blood feeding, as a result of antibody-mediated processes. We suggest that proteins in the three categories above, formulated to trigger the appropriate mechanisms operating in rhesus macaques, would have both prophylactic and therapeutic potential as a human vaccine.

  13. Flavonoids and Sesquiterpene Lactones from Artemisia absinthium and Tanacetum parthenium against Schistosoma mansoni Worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Luísa Maria Silveira; de Carvalho, Lara Soares Aleixo; Gazolla, Matheus Coutinho; Silva Pinto, Pedro Luiz; da Silva, Marcos Paulo Nascimento; de Moraes, Josué; Da Silva Filho, Ademar A

    2016-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis, caused by trematode worms of the genus Schistosoma, is one of the most significant neglected tropical diseases, affecting more than 200 million individuals worldwide and praziquantel is the only available drug to treat this disease. Artemisia absinthium L. and Tanacetum parthenium L. are species popularly used as anthelmintics. We investigated the in vitro schistosomicidal activity of crude extracts of A. absinthium (AA) and T. parthenium (TP) and their isolated compounds. AA and TP, at 200 μg/mL, were active, causing 100% mortality of all adult worms. Chromatographic fractionation of AA leads to isolation of artemetin and hydroxypelenolide, while santin, apigenin, and parthenolide were isolated from TP. Artemetin, hydroxypelenolide, santin, and apigenin, at 100 μM, were inactive against adult worms. Parthenolide (12.5 to 100 μM) caused 100% mortality, tegumental alterations, and reduction of motor activity of all adult worms of S. mansoni, without affecting mammalian cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed tegumental morphological alterations and changes on the numbers of tubercles of S. mansoni worms. This report provides the first evidence for the in vitro activity of parthenolide against adult worms of S. mansoni, opening the route to further schistosomicidal studies with this compound.

  14. Census of bacterial microbiota associated with the glacier ice worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takumi; Segawa, Takahiro; Bodington, Dylan; Dial, Roman; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Kohshima, Shiro; Hongoh, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    The glacier ice worm, Mesenchytraeus solifugus, is a unique annelid, inhabiting only snow and ice in North American glaciers. Here, we analyzed the taxonomic composition of bacteria associated with M. solifugus based on the 16S rRNA gene. We analyzed four fixed-on-site and 10 starved ice worm individuals, along with glacier surface samples. In total, 1341 clones of 16S rRNA genes were analyzed for the ice worm samples, from which 65 bacterial phylotypes (99.0% cut-off) were identified. Of these, 35 phylotypes were closely related to sequences obtained from their habitat glacier and/or other components of cryosphere; whereas three dominant phylotypes were affiliated with animal-associated lineages of the class Mollicutes. Among the three, phylotype Ms-13 shared less than 89% similarity with database sequences and was closest to a gut symbiont of a terrestrial earthworm. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, Ms-13 was located on the gut wall surface of the ice worms. We propose a novel genus and species, 'Candidatus Vermiplasma glacialis', for this bacterium. Our results raise the possibility that the ice worm has exploited indigenous glacier bacteria, while several symbiotic bacterial lineages have maintained their association with the ice worm during the course of adaptive evolution to the permanently cold environment. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Flavonoids and Sesquiterpene Lactones from Artemisia absinthium and Tanacetum parthenium against Schistosoma mansoni Worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Maria Silveira de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human schistosomiasis, caused by trematode worms of the genus Schistosoma, is one of the most significant neglected tropical diseases, affecting more than 200 million individuals worldwide and praziquantel is the only available drug to treat this disease. Artemisia absinthium L. and Tanacetum parthenium L. are species popularly used as anthelmintics. We investigated the in vitro schistosomicidal activity of crude extracts of A. absinthium (AA and T. parthenium (TP and their isolated compounds. AA and TP, at 200 μg/mL, were active, causing 100% mortality of all adult worms. Chromatographic fractionation of AA leads to isolation of artemetin and hydroxypelenolide, while santin, apigenin, and parthenolide were isolated from TP. Artemetin, hydroxypelenolide, santin, and apigenin, at 100 μM, were inactive against adult worms. Parthenolide (12.5 to 100 μM caused 100% mortality, tegumental alterations, and reduction of motor activity of all adult worms of S. mansoni, without affecting mammalian cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed tegumental morphological alterations and changes on the numbers of tubercles of S. mansoni worms. This report provides the first evidence for the in vitro activity of parthenolide against adult worms of S. mansoni, opening the route to further schistosomicidal studies with this compound.

  16. Mitigating Malicious Attacks Using Trust Based Secure-BEFORE Routing Strategy in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shah, Rutuja; Subramaniam, Sumathy; Lekala Dasarathan, Dhinesh Babu

    2016-01-01

    Mobile ad hoc Networks (MANET), being infrastructureless and dynamic in nature, are predominantly susceptible to attacks such as black hole, worm hole, cunning gray hole attack at source or destination...

  17. Optimizing Targeting of Intrusion Detection Systems in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzis, Rami; Tubi, Meytal; Elovici, Yuval

    Internet users communicate with each other in various ways: by Emails, instant messaging, social networking, accessing Web sites, etc. In the course of communicating, users may unintentionally copy files contaminated with computer viruses and worms [1, 2] to their computers and spread them to other users [3]. (Hereafter we will use the term "threats", rather than computer viruses and computer worms). The Internet is the chief source of these threats [4].

  18. In vitro and in vivo effects of hesperidin treatment on adult worms of Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, G; Abuelsaad, A S A

    2014-09-01

    Hesperidin has been reported to exert a wide range of pharmacological effects, including antifungal, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. Herein, the schistosomicidal activity of this compound was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Using an in vitro assay, a concentration of 200 μg/ml of hesperidin resulted in the mortality of 100% adult worms of Schistosoma (S.) mansoni within 72 h and a partial tegumental alteration in 10% of worms. However, after 144 h incubation, 50 and 100 μg/ml concentrations showed 0% and 10% mortality in adult worms, respectively, without any changes to the tegument. Sublethal doses did not influence egg output nor the development of eggs deposited by pairs of adult worms. In an in vivo study, mice infected with S. mansoni and treated with 600 mg hesperidin/kg body weight showed a respective reduction of 50, 45.2, 50 and 47.5% of males, females, worm pairs and total worm burden. In addition, a respective reduction, based on the number of eggs/g tissue, of 41.5, 63.7 and 58.6% was observed in the liver, intestine and liver/intestinal tissue combined. Furthermore, S. mansoni-specific IgG level significantly increased with hesperidin treatment, whereas IgA and IgE levels were not significantly changed. IgM levels decreased in response to cercarial antigen preparation but were not altered in response to soluble worm or soluble egg antigen. As in hesperidin-treated mice, praziquantel-treated mice showed a similar pattern of specific antibody response to S. mansoni antigens. The present study represents the first report on the effects of the schistosomicidal activity of hesperidin.

  19. Mopane worm allergy in a 36-year-old woman: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letswiti Mavis M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The increasing incidence of new diseases as well as changing features of known diseases has partly been attributed to the impact of environmental changes. As a result, there have been calls from health experts for proper surveillance and monitoring of these changes. This is a report of mopane worm allergy in a 36 year old female from the Tswana tribe in Botswana. Mopane worm, the caterpillar stage of Gonimbrasia belina moths, is a seasonal delicacy to people in many communities in southern Africa. As a result, by adulthood, many residents of these communities have had substantial exposure to the worm. Gonimbrasia belina moths belong to the Lepidoptera order of insects. Though some members of this order are known to induce contact allergy, there is no reported incidence of ingestion allergy from mopane worm. Therefore, it is important to track this case for its epidemiological significance and to alert both clinicians and the vulnerable public on the incidence of mopane worm allergy in this region. Case presentation This is a case of a 36 year old woman from the Tswana ethnic group in Botswana, who was diagnosed with food allergy. She presented with itchy skin rash, facial swelling, and mild hypotension after eating mopane worm. She had no previous history of allergic reaction following contact or ingestion of mopane worm and had no atopic illness in the past. She was treated and her symptoms resolved after 4 days. Conclusion The proper management of allergy involves patients' avoidance and clinicians' predictability. Though hypothetical, this report is expected to sensitize clinicians to anticipate and properly manage subsequent occurrence, as well as educate the public in these communities. In addition, tracking new disease patterns, with relationship to environmental changes, will compliment existing evidence in validating the importance of proper environmental surveillance and management.

  20. The Stealth Creationists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the book 'Icons of Evolution; Science or Myth? Why Much of What We Teach About Evolution Is Wrong?,' by Jonathan Wells.......Reviews the book 'Icons of Evolution; Science or Myth? Why Much of What We Teach About Evolution Is Wrong?,' by Jonathan Wells....

  1. Senses made for Stealth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirtschin, Peter; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Weinstein, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Australia’s terrestrial snake species have acute senses designed for a cryptic, limbless life in the undergrowth. Sea snakes, on the other hand, have developed specialised scale sensilla that help them detect even slight vibrations underwater. From ‘air-tasting’ tongues, to jawbones that ‘hear...

  2. Associations among habitat characteristics and meningeal worm prevalence in eastern South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Christopher N.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Klaver, Robert W.; Dubay, Shelli A.

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated how wetland and forest characteristics influence the prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) infection of deer throughout the grassland biome of central North America. We used previously collected, county-level prevalence data to evaluate associations between habitat characteristics and probability of meningeal worm infection in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) across eastern South Dakota, US. The highest-ranked binomial regression model for detecting probability of meningeal worm infection was spring temperature + summer precipitation + percent wetland; weight of evidence (wi=0.71) favored this model over alternative models, though predictive capability was low (Receiver operating characteristic=0.62). Probability of meningeal worm infection increased by 1.3- and 1.6-fold for each 1-cm and 1-C increase in summer precipitation and spring temperature, respectively. Similarly, probability of infection increased 1.2-fold for each 1% increase in wetland habitat. Our findings highlight the importance of wetland habitat in predicting meningeal worm infection across eastern South Dakota. Future research is warranted to evaluate the relationships between climatic conditions (e.g., drought, wet cycles) and deer habitat selection in maintaining P. tenuis along the western boundary of the parasite.

  3. WormGender - Open-Source Software for Automatic Caenorhabditis elegans Sex Ratio Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K Labocha

    Full Text Available Fast and quantitative analysis of animal phenotypes is one of the major challenges of current biology. Here we report the WormGender open-source software, which is designed for accurate quantification of sex ratio in Caenorhabditis elegans. The software functions include, i automatic recognition and counting of adult hermaphrodites and males, ii a manual inspection feature that enables manual correction of errors, and iii flexibility to use new training images to optimize the software for different imaging conditions. We evaluated the performance of our software by comparing manual and automated assessment of sex ratio. Our data showed that the WormGender software provided overall accurate sex ratio measurements. We further demonstrated the usage of WormGender by quantifying the high incidence of male (him phenotype in 27 mutant strains. Mutants of nine genes (brc-1, C30G12.6, cep-1, coh-3, him-3, him-5, him-8, skr-1, unc-86 showed significant him phenotype. The WormGender is written in Java and can be installed and run on both Windows and Mac platforms. The source code is freely available together with a user manual and sample data at http://www.QuantWorm.org/. The source code and sample data are also available at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1541248.

  4. Preliminary analysis of Sm14 in distinct fractions of Schistosoma mansoni adult worm extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Thaumaturgo

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies it was shown that the recombinant molecule, r-Sm14, induces high levels of protection against Schistosoma mansoni infection in two outbred animal models and immune crossprotection against infection by Fasciola hepatica in Swiss outbred mice. r-Sm14 was derived from a living worm extract, called SE, and is being developed as the molecular basis of an anti-helminth bivalent vaccine against the two parasites, for medical and veterinary application. Present data refer to SDS-PAGE and Western Blotting analysis of four different preparations of S. mansoni adult worms focusing Sm14 identification. The extracts correspond to the initial fraction of the SE extraction process, containing products released by living worms (SEi; SE2, reextraction of adult worms in PBS; and SE of separated male and female adult worms. In all extracts it was possible to detect the component of 14 kDa, that was recognized by specific anti-rSm14 antibody raised in rabbits.

  5. Elucidating the microbial community associated with the protein preference of sludge-degrading worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Valk, Steef; Feng, Cuijie; Khadem, Ahmad F; van Lier, Jules B; de Kreuk, Merle K

    2017-10-09

    Sludge predation by aquatic worms results in an increased sludge reduction rate, which is mainly due to the specific removal of a protein fraction from the sludge. As microorganisms play an essential role in sludge hydrolysis a better understanding of the microbial community involved in the worm predation process will provide more insight into the relations between the aquatic worms, their associated microbiome and the efficient sludge reduction. In this study, the microbial community associated with predation by the Tubifex tubifex was investigated. The microbial diversity in the samples of the worm faeces (WF), predated activated sludge and protein-rich substrates were compared. The results indicated that predation on sludge resulted in a microbial change from Actinobacteria (44%) in the sludge, to Proteobacteria (64%) and Bacteriodites (36%) in the WF. Interestingly, the faecal microbial community was more related to the community in (predated) protein-rich substrates than to the community in predated or endogenously respirated activated sludge samples. This similar microbial community could be due to microbial utilisation of protein hydrolysis products. Alternatively, conditions in the worm gut could facilitate a protein hydrolysing community which assists in protein hydrolysis. The genera Burkholderiales, Chryseobacterium and Flavobacterium were found to be associated with predation by T. tubifex.

  6. Divergence of AMP Deaminase in the Ice Worm Mesenchytraeus solifugus (Annelida, Clitellata, Enchytraeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Marotta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glacier ice worms, Mesenchytraeus solifugus and related species, are the largest glacially obligate metazoans. As one component of cold temperature adaptation, ice worms maintain atypically high energy levels in an apparent mechanism to offset cold temperature-induced lethargy and death. To explore this observation at a mechanistic level, we considered the putative contribution of 5′ adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD, a key regulator of energy metabolism in eukaryotes. We cloned cDNAs encoding ice worm AMPD, generating a fragment encoding 543 amino acids that included a short N-terminal region and complete C-terminal catalytic domain. The predicted ice worm AMPD amino acid sequence displayed conservation with homologues from other mesophilic eukaryotes with notable exceptions. In particular, an ice worm-specific K188E substitution proximal to the AMP binding site likely alters the architecture of the active site and negatively affects the enzyme's activity. Paradoxically, this would contribute to elevated intracellular ATP levels, which appears to be a signature of cold adapted taxa.

  7. Pyrosequencing of prey DNA in reptile faeces: analysis of earthworm consumption by slow worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David S; Jarman, Simon N; Symondson, William O C

    2012-03-01

    Little quantitative ecological information exists on the diets of most invertebrate feeding reptiles, particularly nocturnal or elusive species that are difficult to observe. In the UK and elsewhere, reptiles are legally required to be relocated before land development can proceed, but without knowledge of their dietary requirements, the suitability of receptor sites cannot be known. Here, we tested the ability of non-invasive DNA-based molecular diagnostics (454 pyrosequencing) to analyse reptile diets, with the specific aims of determining which earthworm species are exploited by slow worms (the legless lizard Anguis fragilis) and whether they feed on the deeper-living earthworm species that only come to the surface at night. Slow worm faecal samples from four different habitats were analysed using earthworm-specific PCR primers. We found that 86% of slow worms (N=80) had eaten earthworms. In lowland heath and marshy/acid grassland, Lumbricus rubellus, a surface-dwelling epigeic species, dominated slow worm diet. In two other habitats, riverside pasture and calciferous coarse grassland, diet was dominated by deeper-living anecic and endogeic species. We conclude that all species of earthworm are exploited by these reptiles and lack of specialization allows slow worms to thrive in a wide variety of habitats. Pyrosequencing of prey DNA in faeces showed promise as a practical, rapid and relatively inexpensive means of obtaining detailed and valuable ecological information on the diets of reptiles. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. In Vitro Cestocidal Activity of Thymol on Mesocestoides corti Tetrathyridia and Adult Worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maggiore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nothing is known about the possible effect of thymol or other compounds of essential oils against the adult worms of cestodes. The aim of the present work was to determine in vitro cestodicidal activity of thymol against Mesocestoides corti adult worms. Moreover, the in vitro effect on tetrathyridia was also demonstrated. Tetrathyridia exposed to different concentrations of thymol showed a concentration and time-dependent effect. At lower concentrations, the main change observed was mainly in morphology, with larvae exhibiting an elongation of the body. When tetrathyridia were exposed to higher concentrations, increased surface alterations and damage were detected. The body appeared elongated and flattened, and a complete loss of morphology and microtriches was observed. Thymol was able to kill M. corti tetrathyridia, since following inoculation of treated parasites in mice no parasites could be recovered. The effect on M. corti adult worms was dose and time-dependent. Changes in motility coincide with the tissue damage were observed at the structural and ultrastructural level. Thymol caused severe damages to both developmental stages analyzed. Damages were more significant in fully segmented worms. The data reported in this paper demonstrate a clear in vitro effect of thymol against M. corti tetrathyridia and adult worms.

  9. Toward adaptive stereotactic robotic brachytherapy for prostate cancer: Demonstration of an adaptive workflow incorporating inverse planning and an MR stealth robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUNHA, J. ADAM; HSU, I-CHOW; POULIOT, JEAN; ROACH, MACK; SHINOHARA, KATSUTO; KURHANEWICZ, JOHN; REED, GALEN; STOIANOVICI, DAN

    2011-01-01

    To translate any robot into a clinical environment, it is critical that the robot can seamlessly integrate with all the technology of a modern clinic. MRBot, an MR-stealth brachytherapy delivery device, was used in a closed-bore 3T MRI and a clinical brachytherapy cone beam CT suite. Targets included ceramic dummy seeds, MR-Spectroscopy-sensitive metabolite, and a prostate phantom. Acquired DICOM images were exported to planning software to register the robot coordinates in the imager’s frame, contour and verify target locations, create dose plans, and export needle and seed positions to the robot. The coordination of each system element (imaging device, brachytherapy planning system, robot control, robot) was validated with a seed delivery accuracy of within 2 mm in both a phantom and soft tissue. An adaptive workflow was demonstrated by acquiring images after needle insertion and prior to seed deposition. This allows for adjustment if the needle is in the wrong position. Inverse planning (IPSA) was used to generate a seed placement plan and coordinates for ten needles and 29 seeds were transferred to the robot. After every two needles placed, an image was acquired. The placed seeds were identified and validated prior to placing the seeds in the next two needles. The ability to robotically deliver seeds to locations determined by IPSA and the ability of the system to incorporate novel needle patterns were demonstrated. Shown here is the ability to overcome this critical step. An adaptive brachytherapy workflow is demonstrated which integrates a clinical anatomy-based seed location optimization engine and a robotic brachytherapy device. Demonstration of this workflow is a key element of a successful translation to the clinic of the MRI stealth robotic delivery system, MRBot. PMID:20642386

  10. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy for the analysis of the biochemical composition of C. elegans worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ming; Gorzsás, András; Tuck, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Changes in intermediary metabolism have profound effects on many aspects of C. elegans biology including growth, development and behavior. However, many traditional biochemical techniques for analyzing chemical composition require relatively large amounts of starting material precluding the analysis of mutants that cannot be grown in large amounts as homozygotes. Here we describe a technique for detecting changes in the chemical compositions of C. elegans worms by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy. We demonstrate that the technique can be used to detect changes in the relative levels of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in one and the same worm. We suggest that Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy represents a useful addition to the arsenal of techniques for metabolic studies of C. elegans worms.

  11. Modeling and Bifurcation Research of a Worm Propagation Dynamical System with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both vaccination and quarantine strategy are adopted to control the Internet worm propagation. By considering the interaction infection between computers and external removable devices, a worm propagation dynamical system with time delay under quarantine strategy is constructed based on anomaly intrusion detection system (IDS. By regarding the time delay caused by time window of anomaly IDS as the bifurcation parameter, local asymptotic stability at the positive equilibrium and local Hopf bifurcation are discussed. Through theoretical analysis, a threshold τ0 is derived. When time delay is less than τ0, the worm propagation is stable and easy to predict; otherwise, Hopf bifurcation occurs so that the system is out of control and the containment strategy does not work effectively. Numerical analysis and discrete-time simulation experiments are given to illustrate the correctness of theoretical analysis.

  12. OpenWorm: an open-science approach to modelling Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs eSzigeti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available OpenWorm is an international collaboration with the aim of understanding how the behaviour of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans emerges through the underlying biophysical processes. The project has developed a modular simulation engine to create computational models of the worm. The modularity of the engine makes it possible to easily modify the model, incorporate new experimental data and test hypotheses. The modelling framework incorporates both biophysical neuronal simulations and a novel fluid-dynamics-based soft-tissue simulation for physical environment-body interactions. The project's open-science approach is aimed at overcoming the difficulties of integrative modelling within a traditional academic environment. In this article the rationale is presented for creating the OpenWorm collaboration, the tools and resources developed thus far are outlined and the unique challenges associated with the project are discussed.

  13. WormBase: a comprehensive data resource for Caenorhabditis biology and genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nansheng; Harris, Todd W.; Antoshechkin, Igor; Bastiani, Carol; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Blasiar, Darin; Bradnam, Keith; Canaran, Payan; Chan, Juancarlos; Chen, Chao-Kung; Chen, Wen J.; Cunningham, Fiona; Davis, Paul; Kenny, Eimear; Kishore, Ranjana; Lawson, Daniel; Lee, Raymond; Muller, Hans-Michael; Nakamura, Cecilia; Pai, Shraddha; Ozersky, Philip; Petcherski, Andrei; Rogers, Anthony; Sabo, Aniko; Schwarz, Erich M.; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wang, Qinghua; Durbin, Richard; Spieth, John; Sternberg, Paul W.; Stein, Lincoln D.

    2005-01-01

    WormBase (http://www.wormbase.org), the model organism database for information about Caenorhabditis elegans and related nematodes, continues to expand in breadth and depth. Over the past year, WormBase has added multiple large-scale datasets including SAGE, interactome, 3D protein structure datasets and NCBI KOGs. To accommodate this growth, the International WormBase Consortium has improved the user interface by adding new features to aid in navigation, visualization of large-scale datasets, advanced searching and data mining. Internally, we have restructured the database models to rationalize the representation of genes and to prepare the system to accept the genome sequences of three additional Caenorhabditis species over the coming year. PMID:15608221

  14. Protecting against network infections : A game theoretic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omic, J.; Orda, A.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2009-01-01

    Security breaches and attacks are critical problems in today’s networking. A key-point is that the security of each host depends not only on the protection strategies it chooses to adopt but also on those chosen by other hosts in the network. The spread of Internet worms and viruses is only one

  15. Evaluation of existing EPRI and INEL test data to determine the worm to worm gear coefficient of friction in Limitorque actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, I.A.

    1996-12-01

    About the last sizing parameter for motor operated valves which has not been determined by utility or NRC sponsored testing is actuator efficiency. A by-product of EPRI testing for valve factors is the measurement of the actuator efficiencies. Motor sizing in this testing provides efficiency testing for motors running near synchronous speed. INEL testing, sponsored by the NRC, for stem factors and rate of loading provides complimentary data for motors loaded down to zero speed. This paper analyzes the data from these two test programs to determine the coefficient of friction for the worm to worm gear interface. This allowed the development of an algorithm for determining the efficiency of actuators which have not been tested. This paper compares the results of this algorithm to the test data to provide a measure of the accuracy of this method for calculating actuator efficiency.

  16. Highly Toxic Ribbon Worm Cephalothrix simula Containing Tetrodotoxin in Hiroshima Bay, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Asakawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1998, during a toxicological surveillance of various marine fouling organisms in Hiroshima Bay, Japan, specimens of the ribbon worm, Cephalothrix simula (Nemertea: Palaeonemertea were found. These ribbon worms contained toxins with extremely strong paralytic activity. The maximum toxicity in terms of tetrodotoxin (TTX was 25,590 mouse units (MU per gram for the whole worm throughout the monitoring period. The main toxic component was isolated and recrystallized from an acidified methanolic solution. The crystalline with a specific toxicity of 3520 MU/mg was obtained and identified as TTX by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescent detection (FLD (HPLC-FLD, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, infrared (IR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The highest toxicity of C. simula exceeded the human lethal dose per a single worm. A toxicological surveillance of C. simula from 1998 to 2005 indicated approximately 80% of the individuals were ranked as “strongly toxic” (≥1000 MU/g. Forty-eight percent of the specimens possessed toxicity scores of more than 2000 MU/g. Seasonal variations were observed in the lethal potency of C. simula. Specimens collected on January 13, 2000 to December 26, 2000 showed mean toxicities of 665–5300 MU/g (n = 10. These data prompted a toxicological surveillance of ribbon worms from other localities with different habitats in Japan, including Akkeshi Bay (Hokkaido under stones on rocky intertidal beaches, as well as Otsuchi (Iwate among calcareous tubes of serpulid polychaetes on rocky shores. Within twelve species of ribbon worms examined, only C. simula possessed extremely high toxicity. Therefore, C. simula appears to show generally high toxicity irrespective of their locality and habitat.

  17. A proteomic approach to the identification of tegumental proteins of male and female Schistosoma bovis worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Valero, María Luz; Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Oleaga, Ana

    2008-10-01

    Schistosoma bovis, a parasite of ruminants, can live for years in the bloodstream in spite of the immune response of its host. The parasite tegument covers the entire surface of the worm and plays a key role in the host-parasite relationship. The parasite molecules involved in host immune response evasion mechanisms must be expressed on the tegument surface and are potential targets for immune or drug intervention. The purpose of the present work was to identify the tegumental proteomes of male and female S. bovis worms, in particular the proteins expressed on the outermost layers of the tegument structure. Adult worms of each sex were treated separately with trypsin in order to digest their tegumental proteins, after which the peptides released were analysed by LC-MS/MS for identification. This experimental approach afforded valuable information about the protein composition of the tegument of adult S. bovis worms. A range of tegumental proteins was identified, most of which had not been identified previously in this species. Although an absolute purification of the proteins expressed on the outermost layers of the tegument structure was not achieved, it is likely that present among the proteins identified are some of the molecules most closely associated with the tegument surface. Our study also suggests that there may be differences in the protein composition of the tegument of male and female schistosomes. Finally, the presence of actin and GAPDH on the surface of male and female worms and the presence of enolase exclusively on the surface of male worms were verified by confocal microscopy.

  18. Threats and countermeasures for network security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    In the late 1980's, the traditional threat of anonymous break-ins to networked computers was joined by viruses and worms, multiplicative surrogates that carry out the bidding of their authors. Technologies for authentication and secrecy, supplemented by good management practices, are the principal countermeasures. Four articles on these subjects are presented.

  19. In vivo intravascular biotinylation of Schistosoma bovis adult worms and proteomic analysis of tegumental surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana

    2013-12-06

    Schistosoma bovis is a blood-dwelling fluke of ruminants that lives for years inside the vasculature of their hosts. The parasite tegument covers the surface of the worms and plays a key role in the host-parasite relationship. The parasite molecules expressed at the tegument surface are potential targets for immune or drug intervention. The purpose of this work was the identification of the proteins expressed in vivo on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms. To accomplish this we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. The biotinylation of parasite inside blood vessels prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. Trypsin digestion of biotinylated proteins and subsequent liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) resulted in the identification on the S. bovis tegument of 80 parasite proteins and 28 host proteins. The proteins identified were compared with the findings from other proteomic studies of the schistosome surface. The experimental approach used in this work is a reliable method for selective investigation of the surface of the worms and provides valuable information about the exposed protein repertoire of the tegument of S. bovis in the environmental conditions that the parasite faces inside the blood vessels. To identify the proteins expressed on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion, with biotin, of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. This methodology prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. This work is the first in which vascular perfusion

  20. Incidental detection of two adult gravid filarial worms in breast: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummidi, Santosh; Kothari, Kanchan; Patil, Roshni; Singhal, Shruti S; Keshan, Pooja

    2017-08-16

    Microfilaria is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries and is an endemic problem in India. Wuchereria bancrofti is the commonest filarial infection. In some lesions, microfilariae and adult filarial worm have been incidentally detected in fine-needle aspirates. A 35 year old hindu female presented with lump in upper outer quadrant of left breast. Fine needle aspiration revealed two adult gravid female filarial worms. To our knowledge this is the first ever case report to demonstrate two live gravid female and embryoid forms in wet mount preparation.

  1. Distribution, abundance and trail characteristics of acorn worms at Australian continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Przeslawski, R.; Tran, M.

    2011-04-01

    Acorn worms (Enteropneusta), which were previously thought to be a missing link in understanding the evolution of chordates, are an unusual and potentially important component of many deep-sea benthic environments, particularly for nutrient cycling. Very little is known about their distribution, abundance, or behaviour in deep-sea environments around the world, and almost nothing is known about their distribution within Australian waters. In this study, we take advantage of two large-scale deep-sea mapping surveys along the eastern (northern Lord Howe Rise) and western continental margins of Australia to quantify the distribution, abundance and trail-forming behaviour of this highly unusual taxon. This is the first study to quantify the abundance and trail behaviour of acorn worms within Australian waters and provides the first evidence of strong depth-related distributions. Acorn worm densities and trail activity were concentrated between transect-averaged depths of 1600 and 3000 m in both eastern and western continental margins. The shallow limit of their depth distribution was 1600 m. The deeper limit was less well-defined, as individuals were found in small numbers below 3000 down to 4225 m. This distributional pattern may reflect a preference for these depths, possibly due to higher availability of nutrients, rather than a physiological constraint to greater depths. Sediment characteristics alone were poor predictors of acorn worm densities and trail activity. High densities of acorn worms and trails were associated with sandy-mud sediments, but similar sediment characteristics in either shallower or deeper areas did not support similar densities of acorn worms or trails. Trail shapes varied between eastern and western margins, with proportionally more meandering trails recorded in the east, while spiral and meandering trails were both common in the west. Trail shape varied by depth, with spiral-shaped trails dominant in areas of high acorn worm densities

  2. Novel mechanism of network protection against the new generation of cyber attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, Alexander; Bukshpun, Leonid; Pradhan, Ranjit

    2012-06-01

    A new intelligent mechanism is presented to protect networks against the new generation of cyber attacks. This mechanism integrates TCP/UDP/IP protocol stack protection and attacker/intruder deception to eliminate existing TCP/UDP/IP protocol stack vulnerabilities. It allows to detect currently undetectable, highly distributed, low-frequency attacks such as distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks, coordinated attacks, botnet, and stealth network reconnaissance. The mechanism also allows insulating attacker/intruder from the network and redirecting the attack to a simulated network acting as a decoy. As a result, network security personnel gain sufficient time to defend the network and collect the attack information. The presented approach can be incorporated into wireless or wired networks that require protection against known and the new generation of cyber attacks.

  3. Can the restrictive harvest period policy conserve the mopane worms in southern Africa. A bioeconomic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpalu, W.; Muchapondwa, E.; Zikhali, P.

    2009-01-01

    The mopane worm, which is the caterpillar form of the Saturnid moth Imbrasia belina Westwood, is like other edible insects and caterpillars a vital source of protein in southern African countries. The worms live and graze on mopane trees, which have alternative uses. With increasing

  4. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H.J.H.; Temmink, H.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water

  5. Application of a widely-used tropical anti-worm agent, mebendazole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of a widely-used tropical anti-worm agent, mebendazole, in modern oncology. Dušica J Popović, Mihalj Poša, Kosta J Popović, Jovanka Kolarović, Jovan K. Popović, Pavle Z. Banović ...

  6. The life-cycle of the compost worm Eisenia ietida (Oligochaeta)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-01-29

    Jan 29, 1987 ... The life-cycle of the compost worm Eisenia ietida (Oligochaeta). J.M. Venter* and A.J. Reinecke. Department of ... protein, the life-cycle of this species had to be studied thoroughly. The development, growth and .... medium (cattle manure of the same origin as that with which the experiment was begun, and ...

  7. Histamine 1 Receptor Blockade Enhances Eosinophil-Mediated Clearance of Adult Filarial Worms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ellen Mueller; Morris, Christopher P.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are tissue-invasive nematodes that cause diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of histamine during Litomosoides sigmodontis infection of BALB/c mice, a murine model of filariasis. Time course studies demonstrated that while expression of histidine decarboxylase mRNA increases throughout 12 weeks of infection, serum levels of histamine exhibit two peaks—one 30 minutes after primary infection and one 8 weeks later. Interestingly, mice treated with fexofenadine, a histamine receptor 1 inhibitor, demonstrated significantly reduced worm burden in infected mice compared to untreated infected controls. Although fexofenadine-treated mice had decreased antigen-specific IgE levels as well as lower splenocyte IL-5 and IFNγ production, they exhibited a greater than fourfold rise in eosinophil numbers at the tissue site where adult L. sigmodontis worms reside. Fexofenadine-mediated clearance of L. sigmodontis worms was dependent on host eosinophils, as fexofenadine did not decrease worm burdens in eosinophil-deficient dblGATA mice. These findings suggest that histamine release induced by tissue invasive helminths may aid parasite survival by diminishing eosinophilic responses. Further, these results raise the possibility that combining H1 receptor inhibitors with current anthelmintics may improve treatment efficacy for filariae and other tissue-invasive helminths. PMID:26204515

  8. The World of the Worm-2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. The World of the Worm - 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine ... Author Affiliations. S Mahadevan1. Department of Molecular Reproduction, Development and Genetics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, India.

  9. Sex-specific aging in flies, worms, and missing great-granddads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caleb E; Tower, John

    2014-01-30

    Two recent studies identify how sex-specific pheromonal factors in flies and worms alter lifespan through metabolic pathways that are shared with mammals. Sex differences in human lifespans imply nonautonomous effects modulated by sex-specific gene-environment interactions that could still include pheromonal mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Vesicle-to-Worm Transition Provides a New High-Temperature Oil Thickening Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Matthew J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P

    2017-02-06

    Diblock copolymer vesicles are prepared via RAFT dispersion polymerization directly in mineral oil. Such vesicles undergo a vesicle-to-worm transition on heating to 150 °C, as judged by TEM and SAXS. Variable-temperature 1 H NMR spectroscopy indicates that this transition is the result of surface plasticization of the membrane-forming block by hot solvent, effectively increasing the volume fraction of the stabilizer block and so reducing the packing parameter for the copolymer chains. The rheological behavior of a 10 % w/w copolymer dispersion in mineral oil is strongly temperature-dependent: the storage modulus increases by five orders of magnitude on heating above the critical gelation temperature of 135 °C, as the non-interacting vesicles are converted into weakly interacting worms. SAXS studies indicate that, on average, three worms are formed per vesicle. Such vesicle-to-worm transitions offer an interesting new mechanism for the high-temperature thickening of oils. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cold-adapted tubulins in the glacier ice worm, Mesenchytraeus solifugus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Lawrence J; Shain, Daniel H

    2008-11-01

    Glacier ice worms, Mesenchytraeus solifugus and related species, are the only known annelids that survive obligately in glacier ice and snow. One fundamental component of cold temperature adaptation is the ability to polymerize tubulin, which typically depolymerizes at low physiological temperatures (e.g., <10 degrees C) in most temperate species. In this study, we isolated two alpha-tubulin (Msalpha1, Msalpha2) and two beta-tubulin (Msbeta1, Msbeta2) subunits from an ice worm cDNA library, and compared their predicted amino acid sequences with homologues from other cold-adapted organisms (e.g., Antarctic fish, ciliate) in an effort to identify species-specific amino acid substitutions that contribute to cold temperature-dependent tubulin polymerization. Our comparisons and predicted protein structures suggest that ice worm-specific amino acid substitutions stabilize lateral contact associations, particularly between beta-tubulin protofilaments, but these substitutions occur at different positions in comparison with other cold-adapted tubulins. The ice worm tubulin gene family appears relatively small, comprising one primary alpha- and one primary beta-tubulin monomers, though minor isoforms and pseudogenes were identified. Our analyses suggest that variation occurs in the strategies (i.e., species-specific amino acid substitutions, gene number) by which cold-adapted taxa have evolved the ability to polymerize tubulin at low physiological temperatures.

  12. Glycogen metabolism in Schistosoma mansoni worms after their isolation from the host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiolens, A.G.M.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    Adult Schistosoma mansoni worms rapidly degrade their endogenous glycogen stores immediately after isolation from the host. In NCTC 109 or in a diphasic culture medium the glycogen levels slowly recovered again after the initial decrease. The rapid degradation of glycogen could be prevented, even in

  13. Schistosomicidal Activity of Alkyl-phenols from the Cashew Anacardium occidentale against Schistosoma mansoni Adult Worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Tavane A; de Oliveira, Pollyanna F; de Souza, Julia M; Tavares, Denise C; Andrade E Silva, Márcio L; Cunha, Wilson R; Groppo, Milton; Januário, Ana H; Magalhães, Lizandra G; Pauletti, Patrícia M

    2016-11-23

    Bioassay-guided study of the ethanol extract from the cashew Anacardium occidentale furnished cardol triene (1), cardol diene (2), anacardic acid triene (3), cardol monoene (4), anacardic acid diene (5), 2-methylcardol triene (6), and 2-methylcardol diene (7). 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments and HRMS analysis confirmed the structures of compounds 1-7. Compounds 2 and 7 were active against Schistosoma mansoni adult worms in vitro, with LC50 values of 32.2 and 14.5 μM and selectivity indices of 6.1 and 21.2, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy of the tegument of male worms in the presence of compound 7 at 25 μM after 24 h of incubation showed severe damage as well as peeling and reduction in the number of spine tubercles. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed swollen mitochondrial membrane, vacuoles, and altered tegument in worms incubated with compound 2 (25 μM after 24 h). Worms incubated with compound 7 (25 μM after 24 h) had lysed interstitial tissue, degenerated mitochondria, and drastically altered tegument. Together, the results indicated that compound 7 presents promising in vitro schistosomicidal activity.

  14. Worms under stress: C. elegans stress response and its relevance to complex human disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Snoek, L.B.; Bono, de M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms have stress response pathways, components of which share homology with players in complex human disease pathways. Research on stress response in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has provided detailed insights into the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying complex human

  15. In-vitro antihelmintic effects of two Kenyan plant extracts against Heamonchus contortus adult worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Gachoki Kareru

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was on evidence based information that Entada leptostachya Harms and Rapanea rhododendroides (Gil Mez were used by the herbalists in Mbeere County, Kenya, for the treatment of gastrointestinal worms. The plants’ aqueous and solvent extracts were tested for their in-vitro antihelmintic activity against Haemonchus contortus adult worms. Of the eight plant extracts investigated, four extracts exhibited adult worm mortality greater than 50% while the other four afforded mortality ranging between 60-77%. E. leptostachya methanol extract was the most active (77%. Albendazole was used as a positive control drug while Goodwin’s physiological solution was used as negative control. Methanol extracts for both plants exhibited the highest anthelmintic activity at the test concentrations of 25mg/ml. Although R. rhododendroides was ranked third in general usage by the herbalists, E. leptostachya was solely used for the treatment of intestinal worms. The present results demonstrated that E. leptostachya and R. rhododendroides plant extracts had antihelmintic agents, and justified their traditional use as alternative drugs for the treatment of heamonchosis in ruminants.

  16. Observations on worm population dynamics in calves naturally infected with Schistosoma mattheei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bont, J; Vercruysse, J; Sabbe, F; Ysebaert, M T

    1995-11-01

    The evolution of faecal egg output, worm burdens and tissue egg counts in young calves was monitored during the first year of natural exposure to Schistosoma mattheei infection on a Zambian farm. According to the duration of their stay on the farm, these calves were classified into 2 groups of 14 temporary tracers (TT calves) which were introduced on a 2-monthly basis for residential periods of 2 months, and 12 permanent tracers (PT calves) introduced either at the beginning of the experiment (Group A) or 2 months later (Group B) and gradually removed after residential periods of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 months on the farm. Worm counts in the TT calves showed that infection occurred throughout the year on the farm and that levels of infection acquired during each period of 8 weeks correlated well with the respective infected snail densities observed at the main transmission site. Marked differences in worm population dynamics were recorded between the 2 groups of PT calves. In Group B animals which apparently were initially exposed to heavy transmission, according to the results from TT calves, much higher worm counts and greater susceptibility to reinfection were observed than in Group A animals initially exposed to lighter exposure. These results suggest that the development of resistance to natural infection with S. mattheei may depend on the initial exposure to the parasite. Low initial exposures may lead to resistance whereas high initial exposures may result in decreased immune responses resulting in susceptibility to infection.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of echiuran worms (Phylum: Annelida reveals evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Goto

    Full Text Available The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of echiuran worms and their evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism, by performing molecular phylogenetic analyses using four genes (18S, 28S, H3, and COI of representatives of all extant echiuran families. Our results suggest that Echiura is monophyletic and comprises two unexpected groups: [Echiuridae+Urechidae+Thalassematidae] and [Bonelliidae+Ikedidae]. This grouping agrees with the presence/absence of marked sexual dimorphism involving dwarf males and the paired/non-paired configuration of the gonoducts (genital sacs. Furthermore, the data supports the sister group relationship of Echiuridae and Urechidae. These two families share the character of having anal chaetae rings around the posterior trunk as a synapomorphy. The analyses also suggest that deposit feeding is a basal feeding mode in echiurans and that filter feeding originated once in the common ancestor of Urechidae. Overall, our results contradict the currently accepted order-level classification, especially in that Echiuroinea is polyphyletic, and provide novel insights into the evolution of echiuran worms.

  18. Molecular phylogeny of echiuran worms (Phylum: Annelida) reveals evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Ryutaro; Okamoto, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Yoichi; Kato, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of echiuran worms and their evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism, by performing molecular phylogenetic analyses using four genes (18S, 28S, H3, and COI) of representatives of all extant echiuran families. Our results suggest that Echiura is monophyletic and comprises two unexpected groups: [Echiuridae+Urechidae+Thalassematidae] and [Bonelliidae+Ikedidae]. This grouping agrees with the presence/absence of marked sexual dimorphism involving dwarf males and the paired/non-paired configuration of the gonoducts (genital sacs). Furthermore, the data supports the sister group relationship of Echiuridae and Urechidae. These two families share the character of having anal chaetae rings around the posterior trunk as a synapomorphy. The analyses also suggest that deposit feeding is a basal feeding mode in echiurans and that filter feeding originated once in the common ancestor of Urechidae. Overall, our results contradict the currently accepted order-level classification, especially in that Echiuroinea is polyphyletic, and provide novel insights into the evolution of echiuran worms.

  19. Molecular Phylogeny of Echiuran Worms (Phylum: Annelida) Reveals Evolutionary Pattern of Feeding Mode and Sexual Dimorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Ryutaro; Okamoto, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Yoichi; Kato, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The Echiura, or spoon worms, are a group of marine worms, most of which live in burrows in soft sediments. This annelid-like animal group was once considered as a separate phylum because of the absence of segmentation, although recent molecular analyses have placed it within the annelids. In this study, we elucidate the interfamily relationships of echiuran worms and their evolutionary pattern of feeding mode and sexual dimorphism, by performing molecular phylogenetic analyses using four genes (18S, 28S, H3, and COI) of representatives of all extant echiuran families. Our results suggest that Echiura is monophyletic and comprises two unexpected groups: [Echiuridae+Urechidae+Thalassematidae] and [Bonelliidae+Ikedidae]. This grouping agrees with the presence/absence of marked sexual dimorphism involving dwarf males and the paired/non-paired configuration of the gonoducts (genital sacs). Furthermore, the data supports the sister group relationship of Echiuridae and Urechidae. These two families share the character of having anal chaetae rings around the posterior trunk as a synapomorphy. The analyses also suggest that deposit feeding is a basal feeding mode in echiurans and that filter feeding originated once in the common ancestor of Urechidae. Overall, our results contradict the currently accepted order-level classification, especially in that Echiuroinea is polyphyletic, and provide novel insights into the evolution of echiuran worms. PMID:23457618

  20. Proteomic analysis of the somatic and surface compartments from Dirofilaria immitis adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morchón, R; González-Miguel, J; Carretón, E; Kramer, L H; Valero, L; Montoya-Alonso, J A; Simón, F; Siles-Lucas, M

    2014-06-16

    Dirofilaria immitis (hearthworm) is a filarial roundworm transmitted by mosquitoes to different vertebrate hosts (dogs, cats and humans, among others), causing dirofilariosis. The adult worms reside in the pulmonary arteries affecting vessels and tissues and resulting in different pathological manifestations. Worms migrate to the heart and surrounding major vessels in heavy infections. Dirofilariosis can result in serious damage to affected hosts. In the last few years, a re-emergence of the disease driven by the climate change has been pointed out. Very recently, the knowledge at molecular level of this parasite has been extended by the published studies on its genome and transcriptome. Nevertheless, studies on the expression of defined protein sets in different parasite compartments and the corresponding role of those proteins in the host-parasite relationship have been relatively scarce to date. These include the description of the adult worm secretome, and some of the proteins eliciting humoural immune responses and those related with plasminogen binding in secreted and surface extracts of the parasite. Here, we investigate by proteomics the somatic and surface compartments of the D. immitis adult worm, adding new information on protein expression and localization that would facilitate a deeper understanding of the host-parasite relationships in dirofilariosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A new worm infiltrating the human cornea: A report of 3 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: To characterize a new species of parasitic nematode that triggers uveitis. Observations: Three previously healthy, relatively young people each contracted a corneal stromal nematode that, upon surgical removal and examination of one of the worms, did not match any known nematodes. Clinical...

  2. Prevalence of giant kidney worm (Dioctophyma renale) in wild mink (Mustela vison) in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Tracy, Shawn P.

    2001-01-01

    Of 138 wild mink (Mustela vison) from eastern Minnesota, 27% contained Dioctophyma renale, primarily in the right kidney. No significant difference between prevalence in adult male and immature male mink was found, nor between the prevalence in males versus female mink. Thirteen worms were found in one male mink, representing the highest documented infection intensity of a single wild mink.

  3. The life-cycle of the compost worm (Oligochaeta) | Venter | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the full potential of the compost worm Eisenia fetida as waste processor and as source of protein, the life-cycle of this species had to be studied thoroughly. The development, growth and reproduction of Eisenia fetida were studied on cattle manure under favourable conditions of moisture, temperature and ...

  4. Modeling the Dynamics of Compromised Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soper, B; Merl, D M

    2011-09-12

    Accurate predictive models of compromised networks would contribute greatly to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the detection and control of network attacks. Compartmental epidemiological models have been applied to modeling attack vectors such as viruses and worms. We extend the application of these models to capture a wider class of dynamics applicable to cyber security. By making basic assumptions regarding network topology we use multi-group epidemiological models and reaction rate kinetics to model the stochastic evolution of a compromised network. The Gillespie Algorithm is used to run simulations under a worst case scenario in which the intruder follows the basic connection rates of network traffic as a method of obfuscation.

  5. Diversity of Polychaeta (Annelida) and other worm taxa in mangrove habitats of Darwin Harbour, northern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, K. N.; Glasby, C. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper data on the diversity, distribution and abundance of polychaetes and other worm taxa in the mangroves of Darwin Harbour, northern Australia, are presented and compared with those of other tropical mangrove areas. Aspects of the feeding guild ecology and the effects of disturbance on mangrove worms are also examined. Data were collected over a period of four years, across four mangrove assemblages. Samples were obtained using three sampling techniques: 1 m × 1 m quadrat searches, epifauna searches and a new infaunal sampling technique, the anoxic mat. A total of 76 species (68 polychaetes, 1 oligochaete, 1 echiuran, 3 sipunculans, 2 nemerteans, 1 turbellarian) were recorded from the four main mangrove assemblages. Of these, 30 species are widespread, occurring in mangrove and non-mangrove habitats throughout the Indo-west Pacific. Only seven species (all polychaetes) appear to be restricted to the mangroves of Darwin Harbour and northern Australia. Polychaetes are predominant, comprising 80-96% of all worms sampled, with three families—Nereididae, Capitellidae and Spionidae—accounting for 46% of all species. The highest diversity and abundance was recorded in the soft, unconsolidated substrates of the seaward assemblage, with diversity and abundance decreasing progressively in the landward assemblages. Most of the worm fauna was infaunal (70%), but the intensive sampling regime revealed a hitherto unknown significant percentage of epifaunal species (18%) and species occurring as both infauna and epifauna (12%). Univariate analyses showed annual and seasonal differences in worm species richness and abundance—presumably associated with the intensity of the monsoon and recruitment success. The worm fauna differed between mangrove assemblages but the proportion of species in each feeding guild was relatively consistent across the four assemblages studied. Herbivores were the most species-rich and abundant, followed by carnivores and sub

  6. Virulence of serotype M3 Group A Streptococcus strains in wax worms (Galleria mellonella larvae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, M Ebru; Cantu, Concepcion C; Beres, Stephen B; Musser, James M

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes human infections that range in severity from pharyngitis (“strep-throat”) to necrotizing fasciitis (“flesh-eating disease”). To facilitate investigation of the molecular basis of host-pathogen interactions, infection models capable of rapidly screening for differences in GAS strain virulence are needed. To this end, we developed a Galleria mellonella larvae (wax worm) model of invasive GAS infection and used it to compare the virulence of serotype M3 GAS strains. We found that GAS causes severe tissue damage and kills wax worms in a dose-dependent manner. The virulence of genetically distinct GAS strains was compared by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and determining 50% lethal doses (LD50). Host-pathogen interactions were further characterized using quantitative culture, histopathology and TaqMan assays. GAS strains known to be highly pathogenic in mice and monkeys caused significantly lower survival and had significantly lower LD50s in wax worms than GAS strains associated with attenuated virulence or asymptomatic carriage. Furthermore, isogenic inactivation of proven virulence factors resulted in a significantly increased LD50 and decreased lesion size compared to the wild-type strain, a finding that also strongly correlates with animal studies. Importantly, survival analysis and LD50 determination in wax worms supported our hypothesis that a newly emerged GAS subclone that is epidemiologically associated with more human necrotizing fasciitis cases than its progenitor lineage has significantly increased virulence. We conclude that GAS virulence in wax worms strongly correlates with the data obtained in vertebrate models, and thus, the Galleria mellonella larva is a useful host organism to study GAS pathogenesis. PMID:21258213

  7. WormSizer: high-throughput analysis of nematode size and shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad T Moore

    Full Text Available The fundamental phenotypes of growth rate, size and morphology are the result of complex interactions between genotype and environment. We developed a high-throughput software application, WormSizer, which computes size and shape of nematodes from brightfield images. Existing methods for estimating volume either coarsely model the nematode as a cylinder or assume the worm shape or opacity is invariant. Our estimate is more robust to changes in morphology or optical density as it only assumes radial symmetry. This open source software is written as a plugin for the well-known image-processing framework Fiji/ImageJ. It may therefore be extended easily. We evaluated the technical performance of this framework, and we used it to analyze growth and shape of several canonical Caenorhabditis elegans mutants in a developmental time series. We confirm quantitatively that a Dumpy (Dpy mutant is short and fat and that a Long (Lon mutant is long and thin. We show that daf-2 insulin-like receptor mutants are larger than wild-type upon hatching but grow slow, and WormSizer can distinguish dauer larvae from normal larvae. We also show that a Small (Sma mutant is actually smaller than wild-type at all stages of larval development. WormSizer works with Uncoordinated (Unc and Roller (Rol mutants as well, indicating that it can be used with mutants despite behavioral phenotypes. We used our complete data set to perform a power analysis, giving users a sense of how many images are needed to detect different effect sizes. Our analysis confirms and extends on existing phenotypic characterization of well-characterized mutants, demonstrating the utility and robustness of WormSizer.

  8. Genetic variation for worm burdens in laying hens naturally infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongrak, K; Daş, G; von Borstel, U König; Gauly, M

    2015-01-01

    1. Genetic parameters were determined for the worm burden of the most common gastro-intestinal nematodes in two chicken genotypes after being exposed to free-range farming conditions for a laying period. 2. Seventeen-week-old hens of 2 brown genotypes, Lohmann Brown (LB) plus (n = 230) and LB classic (n = 230), were reared for a laying period and subjected to post-mortem parasitological examinations at 79 weeks (LB plus) or 88 weeks (LB classic) of age. 3. There was no significant difference in faecal egg counts between the genotypes. Almost all hens (>99%) were infected with at least one nematode species. Species-specific nematode prevalence ranged from 85.8% to 99.1% between the two genotypes. Heterakis gallinarum was the most prevalent nematode (98.5%), followed by Ascaridia galli (96.2%) and Capillaria spp. (86.1%). Capillaria spp. were composed of C. obsignata (79%), C. caudinflata (16%) and C. bursata (5%). 4. All phenotypic and genetic correlations among worm counts of different parasite species were positive in combined genotypes (rP ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 and rG ranged from 0.29 to 0.88). A strong genetic correlation (rG = 0.88 ± 0.34) between counts of A. galli and H. gallinarum was quantified. Heritability for total worm burden for LB plus and LB classic, respectively, were 0.55 ± 0.18 and 0.55 ± 0.34. Across both genotypes, the heritability of total worm burden was 0.56 ± 0.16. 5. In conclusion, there is a high variation attributable to genetic background of chickens in their responses to naturally acquired nematode infections. The high positive genetic correlation between counts of closely related worm species (e.g. A. galli and H. gallinarum) may indicate existence of similar genetically determined mechanism(s) in chickens for controlling these nematodes.

  9. Gravity worms in the prospecting of epigenetic gold deposits: Example from the Northern Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Ilkka; Nykänen, Vesa; Niiranen, Tero

    2010-05-01

    Mapping of mineralized geologic structures using geophysical potential field datasets has become an essential part of present-day exploration projects. Various geophysical processing and semiautomatic interpretation techniques have provided new tools into the field of conventional exploration process. Such is the multiscale edge detection or "worming-technique" introduced by Hornby et al., (1999). Worms are representations of the maxima of potential field horizontal gradients. They are calculated at different upward continuation levels providing an alternative view into potential field anomalies and geometry of the anomaly sources. In this work we use the worming-technique on the regional gravity dataset collected by the Geological Survey of Finland during the last four decades in the northern Finland. The dataset consists of more than 19 000 ground gravity observations covering an area of about 15000 km2 with an average site separation of 0.5 - 1 km. The study area covers the central part of the 2.4-2.0 Ga Central Lapland Greenstone belt (CLGB) which is one of the largest Proterozoic greenstone terrains in the world. The CLGB hosts numerous gold occurrences of varying type and size. The majority of the gold occurrences fall into the orogenic gold category but also Iron Oxide-Copper-Gold (IOCG) and paleoplacer types are known within the region (e.g. Eilu et al., 2007). Currently the largest known deposit in the area is the Suurikuusikko orogenic gold deposit with current resources exceeding 5 million ounces Au. The largest known gold resources in IOCG type deposit is in the Hannukainen deposit with ca. 200 000 ounces of gold. All the known orogenic gold and IOCG deposits in the CLGB show intimate spatial correlation to shear zones of varying scale. Processed gravity worms display striking spatial correlation with the known orogenic gold and IOCG deposits. In some cases the gold hosting shear zones are outlined by gravity worms either completely (Sirkka shear zone

  10. Cuticular surface damage of Ascaridia galli adult worms treated with Veitchia merrillii betel nuts extract in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balqis, Ummu; Hambal, Muhammad; Rinidar; Athaillah, Farida; Ismail; Azhar; Vanda, Henni; Darmawi

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this research was to in vitro evaluate the cuticular surface damage of Ascaridia galli adult worms treated with ethanolic extract of betel nuts Veitchia merrillii. Phytochemical screening was done using FeCl3, Wagner and Dragendorff reagents, NaOH, MgHCl, and Liebermann-Burchard reaction test. Amount of 16 worms were segregated into four groups with three replicates. Four worms of each group submerged into phosphate buffered saline, 25 mg/ml, and 75 mg/ml crude ethanolic extract of V. merrillii, and 15 mg/ml albendazole. The effect of these extract was observed 40 h after incubation as soon as worms death. The worms were sectioned transversally and were explored for any cuticular histopathological changes in their body surface under microscope. We found that the ethanolic extract of V. merrillii betel nuts contains tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids, and saponins. The ethanolic extract of betel nuts V. merrillii induces surface alterations caused cuticular damage of A. galli adult worms. We concluded that ethanolic extract of betel nuts V. merrillii possess anthelmintic activity caused cuticular damage of A. galli adult worms.

  11. Cuticular surface damage of Ascaridia galli adult worms treated with Veitchia merrillii betel nuts extract in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummu Balqis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this research was to in vitro evaluate the cuticular surface damage of Ascaridia galli adult worms treated with ethanolic extract of betel nuts Veitchia merrillii. Materials and Methods: Phytochemical screening was done using FeCl3, Wagner and Dragendorff reagents, NaOH, MgHCl, and Liebermann-Burchard reaction test. Amount of 16 worms were segregated into four groups with three replicates. Four worms of each group submerged into phosphate buffered saline, 25 mg/ml, and 75 mg/ml crude ethanolic extract of V. merrillii, and 15 mg/ml albendazole. The effect of these extract was observed 40 h after incubation as soon as worms death. The worms were sectioned transversally and were explored for any cuticular histopathological changes in their body surface under microscope. Results: We found that the ethanolic extract of V. merrillii betel nuts contains tannins, alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids, and saponins. The ethanolic extract of betel nuts V. merrillii induces surface alterations caused cuticular damage of A. galli adult worms. Conclusion: We concluded that ethanolic extract of betel nuts V. merrillii possess anthelmintic activity caused cuticular damage of A. galli adult worms.

  12. Spatial analysis of targeted surveillance for screw-worm fly (Chrysomya bezziana or Cochliomyia hominivorax) in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruean, Sn; East, Ij

    2014-07-01

    To assess Australia's targeted surveillance to detect an incursion of screw-worm fly (Chrysomya bezziana). A multi-criteria analysis shell was used to combine data on potential pathways of entry, availability of host species and environmental factors affecting survival of screw-worm fly in order to map spatial variation in the relative likelihood of a screw-worm fly incursion into Australia. Australia's current screw-worm fly surveillance activities were reviewed to determine whether they are located in the areas of highest likelihood of an incursion. Under average environmental conditions, an incursion of screw-worm fly in Australia is relatively more likely to occur along the north coast, down the eastern seaboard or in the south-east. Cold winter temperatures would limit the environmental suitability for screw-worm fly survival to the north and north-east coast and adjacent inland areas. Australia's current targeted surveillance conducted by the Northern Australia Quarantine Strategy program of the Australian Department of Agriculture (adult screw-worm fly trapping and myiasis sampling) correlated well with areas considered to have a high relative likelihood of an incursion of screw-worm fly. Adult fly trapping conducted at sea ports was less well correlated. Changes to surveillance at sea ports are proposed to better target areas considered to have a higher relative likelihood of screw-worm fly incursion. These include increasing the trapping intensity along the north and north-east coasts and shifting surveillance activity from the west coast to the south-east. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  13. Thermochromic properties of W-doped VO2 thin films deposited by aqueous sol-gel method for adaptive infrared stealth application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongqing; Cheng, Haifeng; Xing, Xin; Zhang, Chaoyang; Zheng, Wenwei

    2016-07-01

    The W doped VO2 thin films with various W contents were successfully deposited by aqueous sol-gel method followed by a post annealing process. The derived thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Besides, the resistance-temperature relationship and infrared emissivity in the waveband 7.5-14 μm were analyzed, and the effects of W doping on the thermochromic properties of VO2 thin films were studied. The results show that W atoms enter the crystal lattice of VO2 and the transition temperature decreases gradually with increasing doping amount of W. The emissivity of VO2-W-4% thin films has dropped to 0.4 when its real temperature is above 30 °C. The thermal infrared images were also examined under different temperature by thermal imager. The results indicate that the temperature under which W doped VO2 thin films begin to have lower emissivity decreases gradually with increasing doping amount of W. W doped VO2 thin films can control its infrared radiation intensity actively at a lower temperature level of 30 °C, which has great application prospects in the adaptive infrared stealth technology.

  14. The architecture of a network level intrusion detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heady, R.; Luger, G.; Maccabe, A.; Servilla, M. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1990-08-15

    This paper presents the preliminary architecture of a network level intrusion detection system. The proposed system will monitor base level information in network packets (source, destination, packet size, and time), learning the normal patterns and announcing anomalies as they occur. The goal of this research is to determine the applicability of current intrusion detection technology to the detection of network level intrusions. In particular, the authors are investigating the possibility of using this technology to detect and react to worm programs.

  15. A rare cause of asymptomatic solitary pulmonary nodule: adult Schistosoma worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Ikram Ulhaq; Manah, Wejdan; Alghamdi, Mohammed; Mutairi, Hadi

    2014-03-10

    Solitary pulmonary nodule due to various pathologies has been reported in the medical literature. We report a case of solitary pulmonary nodule in an asymptomatic 60-year-old male smoker, who had a positive family history of pulmonary tuberculosis. His routine screening chest X-ray revealed a 2 × 1.5 cm nodule in the right lung upper zone. A CT scan of the thorax confirmed the finding. Bronchoscopy, lavage, biopsy and screening for tuberculosis were negative. Owing to its technical difficulty, a CT-guided biopsy was deferred by the radiologist, hence we decided to perform segmentectomy that showed granuloma harbouring an adult Schistosoma worm. This is the first case of asymptomatic solitary pulmonary nodule due to adult Schistosoma worm 26 years after the exposure.

  16. Sensitivity of the immunochromatographic card test relative to detection of adult Wuchereria bancrofti worms by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Gerusa; Lins, Renato; Norões, Joaquim; Rizzo, José Angelo; Figueredo-Silva, José

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of active infection in bancroftian filariasis continues to pose an important and continuously evolving challenge to filariasis-endemic countries and to health personnel. Sensitivity of the immunochromatographic card test (ICT) relative to detection of adult Wuchereria bancrofti worms by ultrasound was evaluated in a retrospective study conducted in the Center for Teaching, Research and Tertiary Referral Hospital for bancroftian filariasis (Federal University of Pernambuco) in Recife, Brazil. The results showed that among 408 persons tested, the overall sensitivity of the ICT was 84.5% and varied from 52% to 100% when patients were grouped by different criteria (age, sex, presence or absence of living adult worms by ultrasound, microfilaremia status/density). The present study provides evidence that a negative antigen result should be interpreted cautiously and may help to explain the different sensitivities of the antigen test found by different investigators in settings with different transmission intensities.

  17. Tongue worm (Pentastomida) infection in ball pythons (Python regius) – a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałęcki, Remigiusz; Sokół, Rajmund; Dudek, Agnieszka

    Tongue worms (Pentastomida) are endoparasites causing pentastomiasis, an invasive disease representing a threat to exotic animals and humans. Animals acquire infection via the alimentary tract. In reptiles, the parasite is present in the lungs, resulting in symptoms from the respiratory system. Pentastomiasis may be asymptomatic, but nonspecific symptoms may occur at high parasite concentrations. Due to the harmful effects of many antiparasitic substances, tongue worm invasion in reptiles remains not fully treatable. Although pentasomiasis is rarely diagnosed in Poland, pentastomids were diagnosed in two ball pythons, who were patients of the “Poliklinika Weterynaryjna” veterinary clinic. They demonstrated problems with the respiratory system and a significant deterioration of health. Fenbendazole at a dose of 100 mg/kg b.w., repeated after 7 days was shown to be effective.

  18. Acute phase proteins in dogs naturally infected with the Giant Kidney Worm (Dioctophyme renale)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Elizabeth M. S.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Thomas, Funmilola

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dioctophyme renale is a nematode parasite of dogs, usually found in the right kidney, causing severe damage to the renal parenchyma. Objectives: The objective was to evaluate the acute phase response in dogs naturally infected with this Giant Kidney Worm and the possible effects...... of nephrectomy on circulating concentrations of select acute phase proteins (APP) such as serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haptoglobin(HP). Methods: Nephrectomy was performed in infected dogs and the worms were collected for identification. Blood samples were taken 24 hours before surgery......, and 4, 8, and 12 hours postoperatively on the following 10 consecutive days, and 28 days after surgery. Acute phase protein concentrations were determined at all time points. Cortisol concentrations were determined 24 hours before surgery and at recovery (28 days after surgery).One-way ANOVA...

  19. CAD AND CAE METHODS IN COMPUTER ASSISTED DESIGN OF WORM MESHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk SABINIAK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One important feature of worm gear meshes is their complex geometry and now the application of computer aided design allows for mapping their real construction patterns with great affinity. Modelling of worm meshes with the use of CAD (Computer Aided Design and CAE (Computer Aided Engineering methods enables tracking the design process from the very beginning, i.e. from the concept or specific assumptions, until the final stage only by using appropriate software, thereby lowering the costs and eliminating common errors. Owing to this, just before the manufacturing process of the first meshing elements begins, one can conduct geometric analysis and correct or modify working profiles of the teeth in order to improve the operation properties of future gear. Visualizing such a geometric modelling process can also serve didactic purposes when used in education of future engineers, technologists and operators of this type of gears.

  20. Anthelmintic activity in vivo of epiisopiloturine against juvenile and adult worms of Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Guimarães

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a serious disease currently estimated to affect more that 207 million people worldwide. Due to the intensive use of praziquantel, there is increasing concern about the development of drug-resistant strains. Therefore, it is necessary to search for and investigate new potential schistosomicidal compounds. This work reports the in vivo effect of the alkaloid epiisopiloturine (EPI against adults and juvenile worms of Schistosoma mansoni. EPI was first purified its thermal behavior and theoretical solubility parameters charaterised. In the experiment, mice were treated with EPI over the 21 days post-infection with the doses of 40 and 200 mg/kg, and 45 days post-infection with single doses of 40, 100 and 300 mg/kg. The treatment with EPI at 40 mg/kg was more effective in adult worms when compared with doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg. The treatment with 40 mg/kg in adult worms reduced parasite burden significantly, lead to reduction in hepatosplenomegaly, reduced the egg burden in faeces, and decreased granuloma diameter. Scanning electron microscopy revealed morphological changes to the parasite tegument after treatment, including the loss of important features. Additionally, the in vivo treatment against juvenile with 40 mg/kg showed a reduction of the total worm burden of 50.2%. Histopathological studies were performed on liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain and EPI was shown to have a DL50 of 8000 mg/kg. Therefore EPI shows potential to be used in schistosomiasis treatment. This is the first time that schistosomicidal in vivo activity of EPI has been reported.

  1. Carolus Linnaeus, the ash, worm-wood and other anti-malarial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin-Schmidt, Berit; Thorsell, Walborg; Wahlgren, Mats

    2010-12-01

    In 1735 Carolus Linnaeus wrote that quinine was the preferred treatment for malaria but that the bark of the ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and worm-wood (Artemisia absinthium) also had effects on the disease. We here report that lipo- and hydrophilic extracts of the bark of the ash inhibit the in vitro growth of the asexual stages of P. falciparum. The data suggests that the knowledge of the treatment of malaria was already available in Europe some 300 years ago.

  2. Proteome adaptation to high temperatures in the ectothermic hydrothermal vent Pompeii worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jollivet, Didier; Mary, Jean; Gagnière, Nicolas; Tanguy, Arnaud; Fontanillas, Eric; Boutet, Isabelle; Hourdez, Stéphane; Segurens, Béatrice; Weissenbach, Jean; Poch, Olivier; Lecompte, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Taking advantage of the massive genome sequencing effort made on thermophilic prokaryotes, thermal adaptation has been extensively studied by analysing amino acid replacements and codon usage in these unicellular organisms. In most cases, adaptation to thermophily is associated with greater residue hydrophobicity and more charged residues. Both of these characteristics are positively correlated with the optimal growth temperature of prokaryotes. In contrast, little information has been collected on the molecular 'adaptive' strategy of thermophilic eukaryotes. The Pompeii worm A. pompejana, whose transcriptome has recently been sequenced, is currently considered as the most thermotolerant eukaryote on Earth, withstanding the greatest thermal and chemical ranges known. We investigated the amino-acid composition bias of ribosomal proteins in the Pompeii worm when compared to other lophotrochozoans and checked for putative adaptive changes during the course of evolution using codon-based Maximum likelihood analyses. We then provided a comparative analysis of codon usage and amino-acid replacements from a greater set of orthologous genes between the Pompeii worm and Paralvinella grasslei, one of its closest relatives living in a much cooler habitat. Analyses reveal that both species display the same high GC-biased codon usage and amino-acid patterns favoring both positively-charged residues and protein hydrophobicity. These patterns may be indicative of an ancestral adaptation to the deep sea and/or thermophily. In addition, the Pompeii worm displays a set of amino-acid change patterns that may explain its greater thermotolerance, with a significant increase in Tyr, Lys and Ala against Val, Met and Gly. Present results indicate that, together with a high content in charged residues, greater proportion of smaller aliphatic residues, and especially alanine, may be a different path for metazoans to face relatively 'high' temperatures and thus a novelty in thermophilic

  3. Proteome adaptation to high temperatures in the ectothermic hydrothermal vent Pompeii worm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Jollivet

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of the massive genome sequencing effort made on thermophilic prokaryotes, thermal adaptation has been extensively studied by analysing amino acid replacements and codon usage in these unicellular organisms. In most cases, adaptation to thermophily is associated with greater residue hydrophobicity and more charged residues. Both of these characteristics are positively correlated with the optimal growth temperature of prokaryotes. In contrast, little information has been collected on the molecular 'adaptive' strategy of thermophilic eukaryotes. The Pompeii worm A. pompejana, whose transcriptome has recently been sequenced, is currently considered as the most thermotolerant eukaryote on Earth, withstanding the greatest thermal and chemical ranges known. We investigated the amino-acid composition bias of ribosomal proteins in the Pompeii worm when compared to other lophotrochozoans and checked for putative adaptive changes during the course of evolution using codon-based Maximum likelihood analyses. We then provided a comparative analysis of codon usage and amino-acid replacements from a greater set of orthologous genes between the Pompeii worm and Paralvinella grasslei, one of its closest relatives living in a much cooler habitat. Analyses reveal that both species display the same high GC-biased codon usage and amino-acid patterns favoring both positively-charged residues and protein hydrophobicity. These patterns may be indicative of an ancestral adaptation to the deep sea and/or thermophily. In addition, the Pompeii worm displays a set of amino-acid change patterns that may explain its greater thermotolerance, with a significant increase in Tyr, Lys and Ala against Val, Met and Gly. Present results indicate that, together with a high content in charged residues, greater proportion of smaller aliphatic residues, and especially alanine, may be a different path for metazoans to face relatively 'high' temperatures and thus a novelty

  4. Host resistance and tolerance of parasitic gut worms depend on resource availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutie, Sarah A; Wilkinson, Christina L; Wu, Qiu Chang; Ortega, C Nicole; Rohr, Jason R

    2017-04-01

    Resource availability can significantly alter host-parasite dynamics. Abundant food can provide more resources for hosts to resist infections, but also increase host tolerance of infections by reducing competition between hosts and parasites for food. Whether abundant food favors host resistance or tolerance (or both) might depend on the type of resource that the parasite exploits (e.g., host tissue vs. food), which can vary based on the stage of infection. In our study, we evaluated how low and high resource diets affect Cuban tree frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) resistance and tolerance of a skin-penetrating, gut nematode Aplectana sp. at each stage of the infection. Compared to a low resource diet, a high resource diet enhanced frog resistance to worm penetration and tolerance while worms traveled to the gut. In contrast, a low resource diet increased resistance to establishment of the infection. After the infection established and worms could access food resources in the gut, a high resource diet enhanced host tolerance of parasites. On a high resource diet, parasitized frogs consumed significantly more food than non-parasitized frogs; when food was then restricted, mass of non-parasitized frogs did not change, whereas mass of parasitized frogs decreased significantly. Thus, a high resource diet increased frog tolerance of established worms because frogs could fully compensate for energy lost to the parasites. Our study shows that host-parasite dynamics are influenced by the effect of resource availability on host resistance and tolerance, which depends on when parasites have access to food and the stage of infection.

  5. Oscillation of the velvet worm slime jet by passive hydrodynamic instability

    OpenAIRE

    Concha, Andrés; Mellado, Paula; Morera-Brenes, Bernal; Sampaio Costa, Cristiano; Mahadevan, L,; Monge-Nájera, Julián

    2015-01-01

    The rapid squirt of a proteinaceous slime jet endows velvet worms (Onychophora) with a unique mechanism for defence from predators and for capturing prey by entangling them in a disordered web that immobilizes their target. However, to date, neither qualitative nor quantitative descriptions have been provided for this unique adaptation. Here we investigate the fast oscillatory motion of the oral papillae and the exiting liquid jet that oscillates with frequencies f~30–60 Hz. Using anatomical ...

  6. ABC Triblock Copolymer Worms: Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation as Pickering Emulsifiers for Millimeter-Sized Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mable, C J; Thompson, K L; Derry, M J; Mykhaylyk, O O; Binks, B P; Armes, S P

    2016-10-25

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) is used to prepare linear poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate)-poly(benzyl methacrylate) [PGMA-PHPMA-PBzMA] triblock copolymer nano-objects in the form of a concentrated aqueous dispersion via a three-step synthesis based on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. First, GMA is polymerized via RAFT solution polymerization in ethanol, then HPMA is polymerized via RAFT aqueous solution polymerization, and finally BzMA is polymerized via "seeded" RAFT aqueous emulsion polymerization. For certain block compositions, highly anisotropic worm-like particles are obtained, which are characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The design rules for accessing higher order morphologies (i.e., worms or vesicles) are briefly explored. Surprisingly, vesicular morphologies cannot be accessed by targeting longer PBzMA blocks-instead, only spherical nanoparticles are formed. SAXS is used to rationalize these counterintuitive observations, which are best explained by considering subtle changes in the relative enthalpic incompatibilities between the three blocks during the growth of the PBzMA block. Finally, the PGMA-PHPMA-PBzMA worms are evaluated as Pickering emulsifiers for the stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions. Millimeter-sized oil droplets can be obtained using low-shear homogenization (hand-shaking) in the presence of 20 vol % n-dodecane. In contrast, control experiments performed using PGMA-PHPMA diblock copolymer worms indicate that these more delicate nanostructures do not survive even these mild conditions.

  7. The mitochondrial genomes of the acoelomorph worms Paratomella rubra, Isodiametra pulchra and Archaphanostoma ylvae

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Helen E.; François Lapraz; Bernhard Egger; Telford, Maximilian J.; Schiffer, Philipp H.

    2017-01-01

    Acoels are small, ubiquitous - but understudied - marine worms with a very simple body plan. Their internal phylogeny is still not fully resolved, and the position of their proposed phylum Xenacoelomorpha remains debated. Here we describe mitochondrial genome sequences from the acoels Paratomella rubra and Isodiametra pulchra, and the complete mitochondrial genome of the acoel Archaphanostoma ylvae. The P. rubra and A. ylvae sequences are typical for metazoans in size and gene content. The la...

  8. Daily feeding of fresh Neem leaves (Azadirachta indica) for worm control in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrawathani, P; Chang, K W; Nurulaini, R; Waller, P J; Adnan, M; Zaini, C M; Jamnah, O; Khadijah, S; Vincent, N

    2006-06-01

    This study was Conducted To Evaluate The Anthelmintic Effect Of Neem (azadirachta Indica) On Nematode Parasites Of Sheep. Twelve Santa Ines Cross Bred Sheep From A Government Farm were randomly selected and equally divided into control (n = 6) and treated groups (n =6). Faecal egg counts (FEC) using the modified McMaster technique and the FAMACHA score for assessing clinical anaemia were carried out daily and recorded for 6 weeks. At the end of the study all the animals were slaughtered and the total worm count (TWC) was done. The results of FEC showed that there was no significant difference between the control and treated group (p = 0.081). However, worm burden estimations showed that the number of parasites was significantly higher in the control group compared to the treated group (p < 0.05). This result indicated that feeding Neem had an effect on worm numbers in sheep, but was not reflected in their faecal egg counts. Further work is needed to reconfirm the effect of Neem on helminth infections of sheep.

  9. Effects of Schistosoma mansoni worms and eggs on circulating cholesterol and liver lipids in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ronald G; Jackson, Christopher L; Griffiths, Keith; Doenhoff, Michael J

    2009-11-01

    It has previously been shown that experimental infections of the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni, the adult worms of which reside in the blood stream of the mammalian host, significantly reduced atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E gene knockout (apoE(-/-)) mice. These effects occurred in tandem with a lowering of serum total cholesterol levels in both apoE(-/-) and random-bred laboratory mice and a beneficial increase in the proportion of HDL to LDL cholesterol. To better understand how the parasitic infections induce these effects we have here investigated the involvement of adult worms and their eggs on lipids in the host. Our results indicate that the serum cholesterol-lowering effect is mediated by factors released from S. mansoni eggs, while the presence of adult worms seemed to have had little or no effect. It was also observed that high levels of lipids, particularly triacylglycerols and cholesteryl esters, present in the uninfected livers of both random-bred and apoE(-/-)mice fed a high-fat diet were not present in livers of the schistosome-infected mice.

  10. Edible peanut worm ( Sipunculus nudus) in the Beibu Gulf: Resource, aquaculture, ecological impact and counterplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junwei; Xie, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Changbo; Guo, Yongjian; Chen, Suwen

    2017-10-01

    Sipunculus nudus is an important economic species because of its high nutritional and medicinal values. The exploitation and utilization of S. nudus primarily occur in the coastal regions of the Beibu Gulf. However, wild resource of S. nudus is rapidly decreasing because of the overexploitation, which has led to considerable developments of artificial breeding techniques. The cultivation scale of S. nudus has increased in response to successful artificial breeding; however, methods for culturing S. nudus in tidal flats or ponds require further study. Most studies have focused on the breeding, nutrition, medical value and ecological impact of these worms. Studies on the distribution, sediment requirements, nutrition characteristics, breeding techniques and aquaculture ecology of this species are summarized in this paper to promote the development of the aquaculture industry for S. nudus. The high biomass of S. nudus in the Beibu Gulf is positively correlated with the sediment characteristics and water quality of the region. The production of peanut worm has improved to some extent through culturing; however, the nutrient value and ecological environment problems have been observed, which reflect the over exploitation of trace elements and the sediment. These problems will worsen unless they are resolved, and the release of organic materials, nitrogen and phosphorus during harvesting impacts the coastal environment. Moreover, genetic erosion is a potential risk for larvae in artificial breeding programs in tidal flats. Therefore, culturing and collecting methods should be improved and the wild resource conservation should be implemented to promote the sustainable development of the peanut worm.

  11. Radiolar Eyes of Serpulid Worms (Annelida, Serpulidae): Structures, Function, and Phototransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Michael J; Porter, Megan L; Ten Hove, Harry A; Smith, Richard; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2017-08-01

    Fan worms, represented by sabellid and serpulid polychaetes, have an astonishing array of unusual eyes and photoreceptors located on their eponymous feeding appendages. Here we organize the previous descriptions of these eyes in serpulids and report new anatomical, molecular, and physiological data regarding their structure, function, and evolution and the likely identity of their phototransduction machinery. We report that, as in sabellids, serpulids display a broad diversity of radiolar eye arrangements and ocellar structures. Furthermore, the visual pigment expressed in the eyes of Spirobranchus corniculatus, a species of the charismatic Christmas tree worms, absorbs light maximally at 464 nm in wavelength. This visual pigment closely matches the spectrum of downwelling irradiance in shallow coral reef habitats and lends support to the hypothesis that these radiolar photoreceptors function as a silhouette-detecting "burglar alarm" that triggers a rapid withdrawal response when the worm is threatened by potential predators. Finally, we report on the transcriptomic sequencing results for the radiolar eyes of S. corniculatus, which express invertebrate c-type opsins in their ciliary radiolar photoreceptors, closely related to the opsin found in the radiolar eyes of the sabellid Acromegalomma interruptum. We explore the potential for a shared evolutionary lineage between the radiolar photoreceptors of serpulids and sabellids and consider these unique innovations in the broader context of metazoan eye evolution.

  12. Investigation on application of synthetic nutrients for augmenting worm growth rate in vermicomposting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanimani Thiruganasambadam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to scan the influence of synthetic nutrients on Vermicomposting. A mixture of six nutrients (Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Molybdenum and Boron was introduced to augment the growth of worms (Lumbricus rubellus and to ensure the higher digestion rate of the pre-composted bio-degradable organic waste. Initially green waste was collected from the local vegetable market and pre-composted for about three weeks. Then the pre-composted waste was placed in two identical glass vermireactors. Each reactor was loaded with equal volume of waste (0.024 m³ and worms (40 gm. The pre-composted waste was vermicomposted for a period of 21 days by applying nutrients in one reactor and the other was kept as control (without nutrient. The nutrients were applied in liquid form while moistening the reactor beds and the characteristics of the pre-composted waste, vermicasts and vermi growth rate were studied. Results revealed that the reactor added by nutrients performed better by achieving 41.34% higher waste volume reduction and 42% increase in the worm growth rate.

  13. INVESTIGATION ON APPLICATION OF SYNTHETIC NUTRIENTS FOR AUGMENTING WORM GROWTH RATE IN VERMICOMPOSTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Palaniappan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to scan the influence of synthetic nutrients on Vermicomposting. A mixture of six nutrients (Iron, Manganese, Zinc, Copper, Molybdenum and Boron was introduced to augment the growth of worms (Lumbricus rubellus and to ensure the higher digestion rate of the pre-composted bio-degradable organic waste. Initially green waste was collected from the local vegetable market and pre-composted for about three weeks. Then the pre-composted waste was placed in two identical glass vermireactors. Each reactor was loaded with equal volume of waste (0.024 m³ and worms (40 gm. The pre-composted waste was vermicomposted for a period of 21 days by applying nutrients in one reactor and the other was kept as control (without nutrient. The nutrients were applied in liquid form while moistening the reactor beds and the characteristics of the pre-composted waste, vermicasts and vermi growth rate were studied. Results revealed that the reactor added by nutrients performed better by achieving 41.34% higher waste volume reduction and 42% increase in the worm growth rate.

  14. Anisakis simplex: from obscure infectious worm to inducer of immune hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audicana, M Teresa; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2008-04-01

    Infection of humans with the nematode worm parasite Anisakis simplex was first described in the 1960s in association with the consumption of raw or undercooked fish. During the 1990s it was realized that even the ingestion of dead worms in food fish can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions, that these may be more prevalent than infection itself, and that this outcome could be associated with food preparations previously considered safe. Not only may allergic symptoms arise from infection by the parasites ("gastroallergic anisakiasis"), but true anaphylactic reactions can also occur following exposure to allergens from dead worms by food-borne, airborne, or skin contact routes. This review discusses A. simplex pathogenesis in humans, covering immune hypersensitivity reactions both in the context of a living infection and in terms of exposure to its allergens by other routes. Over the last 20 years, several studies have concentrated on A. simplex antigen characterization and innate as well as adaptive immune response to this parasite. Molecular characterization of Anisakis allergens and isolation of their encoding cDNAs is now an active field of research that should provide improved diagnostic tools in addition to tools with which to enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and controversial aspects of A. simplex allergy. We also discuss the potential relevance of parasite products such as allergens, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors and the activation of basophils, eosinophils, and mast cells in the induction of A. simplex-related immune hypersensitivity states induced by exposure to the parasite, dead or alive.

  15. Infeksi Cacing pada Ular Kobra (Naja sputatrix di Bali (WORM INFECTION ON SPITTING COBRA SNAKE (Naja Sputatrix IN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Sismami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been done the survey for study about worm infection on spitting cobra snake (Naja sputatrix inBali. There were 15 fecal samples from wild spitting cobra snake in Bali. The examination was usingconcentration cediment method. The result of examination showed that from all 15 fecal samples containedthe worm egg. From the result it could be conclude that the prevalent worm infection on spitting cobrasnake in Bali is capability 100% . From this study it means that infectioned could be happen more than 1(multiple infection on 1 splitting cobra snake. The kind and prevalent of worm infected snake wereRhabdias sp (60,03%, Strongyloides sp (60,03%, Oxyuris sp (53,3%, Kalicephalus spp (20,01%, danCapilaria sp (6,67%. For enrich the information of another kind of parasitic infection should be done theresearch with variable and more collected samples.

  16. Mercury and methylmercury bioaccumulation by polychaete worms is governed by both feeding ecology and mercury bioavailability in coastal mudflats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizmur, Tom; Canário, João; Gerwing, Travis G; Mallory, Mark L; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2013-05-01

    Polychaete worms are abundant in many mudflats but their importance to coastal food web Hg biomagnification is not known. We sampled sediments and polychaete worms from mudflats in the Bay of Fundy to investigate the bioaccumulation of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in the coastal invertebrate food web. Hg concentrations in the sediments were low (worms. Worms feeding on deeper sediments contained the greatest MeHg concentrations (69.6 μg kg(-1)). Polychaetes are an important vector for Hg biomagnification to the coastal avian food web. This research demonstrates that feeding depth and method of feeding are more important than trophic position or sediment Hg concentrations for predicting Hg bioaccumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. AFSC/RACE/FBEP/Laurel: Effects of natural and anthropogenic disturbance on polychaete worm tubes and age-0 flatfish distribution

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is from a field experiment that examined how juvenile flatfish distribution changed with worm tube heterogeneity, i.e. density and patchiness.

  18. The costs and cost-effectiveness of mass treatment for intestinal nematode worm infections using different treatment thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is estimated that almost a half of all of people living in developing countries today are infected with roundworms, hookworms, or whipworms or combinations of these types of intestinal nematode worms. They can all be treated using safe, effective, and inexpensive single-dose generic drugs costing as little as USD 0.03 per person treated when bought in bulk. The disease caused by intestinal nematodes is strongly related to the number of worms in the gut, and it is typical to find that worms tend to be aggregated or clumped in their distribution so that 80% of all worms. This clumping of worms is greatest when the prevalence is low. When the prevalence rises above 50%, the mean worm burden increases exponentially, worms are less clumped, and more people are likely to have moderate to heavy infections and may be diseased. Children are most at risk. For these reasons, the World Health Organization (WHO currently recommends mass treatment of children > or =1 year old without prior diagnosis when the prevalence is > or =20% and treatment twice a year when the prevalence is > or =50%. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The risk of moderate to heavy infections with intestinal nematodes was estimated by applying the negative binomial probability distribution, then the drug cost of treating diseased individuals was calculated based on different threshold numbers of worms. Based on this cost analysis, a new three-tier treatment regime is proposed: if the combined prevalence is >40%, treat all children once a year; >60% treat twice a year; and >80% treat three times a year. Using average data on drug and delivery costs of USD 0.15 to treat a school-age child and USD 0.25 to treat a pre-school child (with provisos the cost of treating children aged 2-14 years was calculated for 105 low- and low-middle-income countries and for constituent regions of India and China based on estimates of the combined prevalence of intestinal nematode worms therein. The

  19. Disease Modeling via Large-Scale Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-20

    plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), mouse (Mus musculus), yeast ( Saccharomyces ... cerevisiae ), Escherichia coli, zebrafish (Danio rerio), and chicken (Gallus gallus). We use two kinds of human gene interactions: (a) Human Net, a large... characteristics of the heterogeneous network suggest that the kernel can be computed more efficiently than what the state-of- the-art methods imply

  20. In vitro effects of amodiaquine on paired Schistosoma mansoni adult worms at concentrations of less than 5 µg/mL

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    Kentaro Kato

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the in vitro effects of amodiaquine (AQ monotherapy on the egg output of paired adult Schistosoma mansoni worms and their survival during in vitro culture were assessed. In addition, the gross morphological alterations of male and female worms caused by AQ were visually observed under a dissecting microscope. AQ significantly reduced the daily egg output of paired adult S. mansoni worms following incubation for 14 days at 1-5 µg/mL, but not at 0.5 µg/mL, compared with the control group. AQ also reduced the survival of male and female worms at concentrations of 2 and 5 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, exposure to 5 µg/mL AQ caused severe swelling and/or localisation of black content in the body of all male and female worms within one or two days of incubation; subsequently, shrinkage in the male worms and elongation in the female worms were observed. The initial morphological alterations caused by AQ occurred along the intestinal tract of the male and female worms. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report not only the efficacy of AQ at concentrations lower than 5 µg/mL on paired adult S. mansoni worms, but also the effects of AQ on the intestinal tracts of worms in in vitro culture.

  1. D-Optimal mixture experimental design for stealth biodegradable crosslinked docetaxel-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticles manufactured by dispersion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunwuyi, O; Adesina, S; Akala, E O

    2015-03-01

    We report here our efforts on the development of stealth biodegradable crosslinked poly-ε-caprolactone nanoparticles by free radical dispersion polymerization suitable for the delivery of bioactive agents. The uniqueness of the dispersion polymerization technique is that it is surfactant free, thereby obviating the problems known to be associated with the use of surfactants in the fabrication of nanoparticles for biomedical applications. Aided by a statistical software for experimental design and analysis, we used D-optimal mixture statistical experimental design to generate thirty batches of nanoparticles prepared by varying the proportion of the components (poly-ε-caprolactone macromonomer, crosslinker, initiators and stabilizer) in acetone/water system. Morphology of the nanoparticles was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Particle size and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Scheffe polynomial models were generated to predict particle size (nm) and particle surface zeta potential (mV) as functions of the proportion of the components. Solutions were returned from simultaneous optimization of the response variables for component combinations to (a) minimize nanoparticle size (small nanoparticles are internalized into disease organs easily, avoid reticuloendothelial clearance and lung filtration) and (b) maximization of the negative zeta potential values, as it is known that, following injection into the blood stream, nanoparticles with a positive zeta potential pose a threat of causing transient embolism and rapid clearance compared to negatively charged particles. In vitro availability isotherms show that the nanoparticles sustained the release of docetaxel for 72 to 120 hours depending on the formulation. The data show that nanotechnology platforms for controlled delivery of bioactive agents can be developed based on the nanoparticles.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha augmented tumor response in B16BL6 melanoma-bearing mice treated with stealth liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) correlates with altered Doxil pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouckaert, Peter; Takahashi, Nozomi; van Tiel, Sandra T; Hostens, Jeroen; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Fiers, Walter; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2004-04-10

    The application of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) for the treatment of solid tumors is limited by its severe, life-threatening, toxicity. Therefore, only low dosages of this cytokine can be applied systemically, which results in poor tumor response. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of high-dose TNF in a so-called isolated perfusion system markedly improved tumor response when combined with chemotherapy. It appeared that TNF had a major impact specifically on the tumor-associated vasculature. At these high concentrations, endothelial cell death is induced by TNF, resulting in complete collapse of the tumor vascular bed. Strikingly, this effect alone is not enough to induce a tumor response, but addition of a chemotherapeutic drug is mandatory to obtain an anti-tumor effect. We showed that TNF has no anti-tumor effect by itself but augmented drug accumulation mainly in the tumor, most likely by enhancing vascular leakage. It seems that enhanced vascular leakage, but not endothelial cell death, explains the interaction between TNF and the co-administered drug. We hypothesized that in a low-dose setting TNF could induce tumor accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs and consequently improve tumor response. We demonstrate that free TNF has a strong effect on the pharmacokinetics of co-administered Doxil in B16BL6 melanoma-bearing mice, resulting in strongly augmented drug accumulation in the tumor and improved tumor response. Co-injection of Stealth liposomal TNF with Doxil resulted in comparable or less pronounced tumor responses as compared to free TNF. These results imply that systemic application of clinically tolerable doses of TNF may improve drug distribution and tumor response and could be useful in a number of anti-cancer therapies. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Worm peptidomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Husson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are present in all metazoan species where they orchestrate diverse functions. In the last decade, high-throughput approaches based on mass spectrometry helped the identification of endogenously occurring peptides in different species. We here review biochemical strategies to obtain sequence information of natural (non-tryptic peptides in Caenorhabditis elegans and in the related nematodes Caenorhabditis briggsae and Ascaris suum with particular attention for sample preparation and methodology. In addition, we describe seven new C. elegans neuropeptides that we recently discovered by sequencing additional peptides. Finally, we explain how differential peptidomics approaches were used to characterize key neuropeptide processing enzymes.

  4. Track-a-worm, an open-source system for quantitative assessment of C. elegans locomotory and bending behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijie Jason Wang

    Full Text Available A major challenge of neuroscience is to understand the circuit and gene bases of behavior. C. elegans is commonly used as a model system to investigate how various gene products function at specific tissue, cellular, and synaptic foci to produce complicated locomotory and bending behavior. The investigation generally requires quantitative behavioral analyses using an automated single-worm tracker, which constantly records and analyzes the position and body shape of a freely moving worm at a high magnification. Many single-worm trackers have been developed to meet lab-specific needs, but none has been widely implemented for various reasons, such as hardware difficult to assemble, and software lacking sufficient functionality, having closed source code, or using a programming language that is not broadly accessible. The lack of a versatile system convenient for wide implementation makes data comparisons difficult and compels other labs to develop new worm trackers. Here we describe Track-A-Worm, a system rich in functionality, open in source code, and easy to use. The system includes plug-and-play hardware (a stereomicroscope, a digital camera and a motorized stage, custom software written to run with Matlab in Windows 7, and a detailed user manual. Grayscale images are automatically converted to binary images followed by head identification and placement of 13 markers along a deduced spline. The software can extract and quantify a variety of parameters, including distance traveled, average speed, distance/time/speed of forward and backward locomotion, frequency and amplitude of dominant bends, overall bending activities measured as root mean square, and sum of all bends. It also plots worm travel path, bend trace, and bend frequency spectrum. All functionality is performed through graphical user interfaces and data is exported to clearly-annotated and documented Excel files. These features make Track-A-Worm a good candidate for implementation in

  5. Exploring the Impact of Habitat Size on Phylogeographic Patterning in the Overberg Velvet Worm Peripatopsis overbergiensis (Onychophora: Peripatopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Angus Macgregor; Daniels, Savel R

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships in the velvet worm species, Peripatopsis overbergiensis, were examined in 3 forest areas in the Overberg region of South Africa to explore the impact of historical habitat fragmentation on the population genetic structure of the species. We collected 84 P. overbergiensis specimens from Grootvadersbosch, Koppie Alleen, and Marloth Nature Reserves and sequenced all these specimens for the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) locus, whereas a subset of 13 specimens were also sequenced for the 18S rRNA locus. Phylogenetic analyses of the 20 unique COI haplotypes revealed 4 genetically distinct clades, a result that is corroborated by the haplotype network. A hierarchical analysis of genetic variation was performed on the COI haplotype data within the 2 large forested areas, Grootvadersbosch and Marloth Nature Reserves, and across all 3 of the sample localities. These results revealed low haplotypic and nucleotide diversity within the largest Grootvadersbosch Nature Reserve forest and high haplotypic and nucleotide diversity within the fragmented Marloth Nature Reserve forest, whereas Koppie Alleen had the lowest haplotypic and nucleotide diversity. Across all 3 main localities statistically significant F ST values were found, together with the absence of shared haplotypes indicating the absence of maternal gene flow. Divergence time estimations based on the 20 COI haplotypes calculated in BEAST suggest a Pleistocene/Holocene divergence between the 4 clades as a result of habitat fragmentation and the aridification of the region. Our results indicate that conservation efforts should also prioritize linked, smaller fragmented habitats together with continuous habitats to maximize the genetic diversity of saproxylic fauna. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. SM1.3 Seismic Centers Data Acquisition: an introduction to Antelope, EarthWorm, SeisComP and their usage around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Sleeman, Reinoud

    2010-05-01

    Many medium to big size seismic data centers around the world are facing the same question: which software to use to acquire seismic data in real-time? A home-made or a commercial one? Both choices have pros and cons. The in-house development of software usually requires an increased investment in human resources rather than a financial investment. However, the advantage of fully accomplishing your own needs could be put in danger when the software engineer quits the job! Commercial software offers the advantage of being maintained, but it may require both a considerable financial investment and training. The main seismic software data acquisition suites available nowadays are the public domain SeisComP and EarthWorm packages and the commercial package Antelope. Nanometrics, Guralp and RefTek also provide seismic data acquisition software, but they are mainly intended for single station/network acquisition. Antelope is a software package for real-time acquisition and processing of seismic network data, with its roots in the academic seismological community. The software is developed by Boulder Real Time Technology (BRTT) and commercialized by Kinemetrics. It is used by IRIS affiliates for off-line data processing and it is the main acquisition tool for the USArray program and data centers in Europe like the ORFEUS Data Center, OGS (Italy), ZAMG (Austria), ARSO (Slovenia) and GFU (Czech Republic). SeisComP was originally developed for the GEOFON global network to provide a system for data acquisition, data exchange (SeedLink protocol) and automatic processing. It has evolved into to a widely distributed, networked seismographic system for data acquisition and real-time data exchange over Internet and is supported by ORFEUS as the standard seismic data acquisition tool in Europe. SeisComP3 is the next generation of the software and was developed for the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS). SeisComP is licensed by GFZ (free of charge) and

  7. Targeted selective treatment for worm management--how do we sell rational programs to farmers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, J A; Hoste, H; Kaplan, R M; Besier, R B

    2006-07-31

    Seriously escalating global anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants has spawned a variety of alternatives to anthelmintics for worm management, based on the need for sustainable Integrated Parasite Management (sIPM). Pivotal to the sIPM approach is the concept of refugia, the proportion of a given parasite population that escapes exposure to control measures. By balancing drug applications with the maintenance of refugia, the accumulation of anthelmintic resistance alleles in worm populations can be considerably delayed, while still providing good levels of control. The over-dispersed nature of parasitic infections provides an opportunity to achieve this balance, by targeting treatments to the members of a flock or herd that are least tolerant to nematode infection. However, implementation of this strategy has only recently become feasible, with the development of the FAMACHA((c)) system for clinical evaluation of anaemia due to haemonchosis. Subsequently, the use of milk yields has proven an effective indicator in dairy goats infected predominantly with nematodes other than Haemonchus contortus. In addition, short-term weight changes and perhaps also body condition scoring may provide indices of parasitism, permitting the rapid identification of animals likely to benefit from treatment. However, sIPM and refugia-based approaches are more complex than whole-flock treatments in conventional programs, and adoption by farmers is most likely where the theoretical basis is understood. As close communication with informed advisors is generally limited, there is a danger that sIPM will remain a theoretical concept without alternative modes of communication. The development of computer-based decision support programs, which use epidemiological, seasonal and clinical information to provide recommendations for specific situations, should be accorded high priority in the future development of worm management systems.

  8. WormScan: a technique for high-throughput phenotypic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Mathew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are four main phenotypes that are assessed in whole organism studies of Caenorhabditis elegans; mortality, movement, fecundity and size. Procedures have been developed that focus on the digital analysis of some, but not all of these phenotypes and may be limited by expense and limited throughput. We have developed WormScan, an automated image acquisition system that allows quantitative analysis of each of these four phenotypes on standard NGM plates seeded with E. coli. This system is very easy to implement and has the capacity to be used in high-throughput analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our system employs a readily available consumer grade flatbed scanner. The method uses light stimulus from the scanner rather than physical stimulus to induce movement. With two sequential scans it is possible to quantify the induced phototactic response. To demonstrate the utility of the method, we measured the phenotypic response of C. elegans to phosphine gas exposure. We found that stimulation of movement by the light of the scanner was equivalent to physical stimulation for the determination of mortality. WormScan also provided a quantitative assessment of health for the survivors. Habituation from light stimulation of continuous scans was similar to habituation caused by physical stimulus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There are existing systems for the automated phenotypic data collection of C. elegans. The specific advantages of our method over existing systems are high-throughput assessment of a greater range of phenotypic endpoints including determination of mortality and quantification of the mobility of survivors. Our system is also inexpensive and very easy to implement. Even though we have focused on demonstrating the usefulness of WormScan in toxicology, it can be used in a wide range of additional C. elegans studies including lifespan determination, development, pathology and behavior. Moreover, we have even adapted the

  9. Human TNF-α induces differential protein phosphorylation in Schistosoma mansoni adult male worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Katia C; Carvalho, Mariana L P; Bonatto, José Matheus C; Schechtman, Debora; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and its vertebrate host have a complex and intimate connection in which several molecular stimuli are exchanged and affect both organisms. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is known to induce large-scale gene expression changes in the parasite and to affect several parasite biological processes such as metabolism, egg laying, and worm development. Until now, the molecular mechanisms for TNF-α activity in worms are not completely understood. Here, we aimed at exploring the effect of hTNF-α on S. mansoni protein phosphorylation by 2D gel electrophoresis followed by a quantitative analysis of phosphoprotein staining and protein identification by mass spectrometry. We analyzed three biological replicates of adult male worms exposed to hTNF-α and successfully identified 32 protein spots with a statistically significant increase in phosphorylation upon in vitro exposure to hTNF-α. Among the differentially phosphorylated proteins, we found proteins involved in metabolism, such as glycolysis, galactose metabolism, urea cycle, and aldehyde metabolism, as well as proteins related to muscle contraction and to cytoskeleton remodeling. The most differentially phosphorylated protein (30-fold increase in phosphorylation) was 14-3-3, whose function is known to be modulated by phosphorylation, belonging to a signal transduction protein family that regulates a variety of processes in all eukaryotic cells. Further, 75% of the identified proteins are known in mammals to be related to TNF-α signaling, thus suggesting that TNF-α response may be conserved in the parasite. We propose that this work opens new perspectives to be explored in the study of the molecular crosstalk between host and pathogen.

  10. Epidemiology of the eye worm Thelazia callipaeda in cats from southern Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, B; Nägeli, F; Nägeli, C; Solari-Basano, F; Schiessl, B; Deplazes, P; Schnyder, M

    2014-07-14

    Thelazia callipaeda is a spiruroid nematode of dogs, cats and wild carnivores transmitted by zoophilic drosophilid Phortica flies and found in an increasing number of European countries. In cats the disease is diagnosed sporadically. This study presents an epidemiological investigation of feline thelaziosis, performed in southern Ticino, Switzerland, an endemic area for T. callipaeda. Between January 2009 and July 2011 2171 cats, having outdoor access and presenting for various reasons, were examined by in-depth eye examinations, and clinical and anamnestic data were collected. The overall prevalence of T. callipaeda in the study area was 0.8% (17/2171 cats, 95% confidence interval: 0.5-1.3%). Among cats showing ocular illness, the prevalence was 9.2% (11/120, CI: 4.7-15.8%). Cats with eye worms had no international travel history and were significantly more often diagnosed between June and December than during other months. With one exception, one single eye per cat was infested, each harboring between 1 and 10 eye worms (arithmetic mean: 2.8 per cat). One cat presented with conjunctivitis and ulcers, seven with conjunctivitis only and 3 with a mildly increased lacrimation, while 6 cats were asymptomatic. Significantly more male than female cats had eye worms and cats older than one year were overrepresented. No pure-bred cats were infested. This study confirms the establishment of this potentially zoonotic parasite in cats from the study area. Due to the clinical relevance and pain caused by the infestations, increased disease awareness and in depth eye examination for the detection of T. callipaeda in cats are recommended, even in absence of obvious clinical signs, in order to initiate appropriate anthelmintic treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracts of Ascaris suum egg and adult worm share similar immunosuppressive properties

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    Souza V.M.O.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult Ascaris suum body extract (Asc prepared from male and female worms (with stored eggs down-regulates the specific immune response of DBA/2 mice to ovalbumin (OA and preferentially stimulates a Th2 response to its own components, which is responsible for the suppression of the OA-specific Th1 response. Here, we investigated the participation of soluble extracts prepared from male or female worms or from eggs (E-Asc in these immunological events. Extracts from either sex (1 mg/animal or E-Asc (0.35 or 1 mg protein/animal suppressed the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH reaction (60-85%, proliferative response (50-70%, IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion (below detection threshold and IgG1 antibody production (70-90% of DBA/2 mice to OA. A dose of 0.1 mg E-Asc/animal did not change DTH or proliferation, but was as effective as 0.35 mg in suppressing IL-2 and IFN-gamma, and OA-specific IgG1 antibodies. Lymph node cells from DBA/2 mice injected with Asc (1 mg/animal or a high dose of E-Asc (1 mg protein/animal secreted IL-4 upon in vitro stimulation with concanavalin A. As previously demonstrated for Asc, the cytokine profile obtained with the E-Asc was dose dependent and changed towards Th1 when a low dose (0.1 mg protein/animal was used. Taken together, these results suggest that adult worms of either sex and eggs induce the same type of T cell response and share similar immunosuppressive properties.

  12. Animal-sediment interactions: the effect of ingestion and excretion by worms on mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, S. J.; Worden, R. H.; McIlroy, D.

    2004-09-01

    By controlled experiments that simulate marine depositional environments, it is shown that accelerated weathering and clay mineral authigenesis occur during the combined process of ingestion, digestion and excretion of fine-grained sediment by two species of annelid worms. Previously characterized synthetic mud was created using finely ground, low-grade metamorphic slate (temperature approximately 300°C) containing highly crystalline chlorite and muscovite. This was added to experiment and control tanks along with clean, wind-blown sand. Faecal casts were collected at regular intervals from the experimental tanks and, less frequently, from the control tanks. Over a period of many months the synthetic mud (slate) proved to be unchanged in the control tanks, but was significantly different in faecal casts from the experimental tanks that contained the worms Arenicola marina and Lumbricus terrestris. Chlorite was preferentially destroyed during digestion in the gut of A. marina. Both chlorite and muscovite underwent XRD peak broadening with a skew developing towards higher lattice spacing, characteristic of smectite formation. A neoformed Fe-Mg-rich clay mineral (possibly berthierine) and as-yet undefined clay minerals with very high d-spacing were detected in both A. marina and L. terrestris cast samples. We postulate that a combination of the low pH and bacteria-rich microenvironment in the guts of annelid worms may radically accelerate mineral dissolution and clay mineral precipitation processes during digestion. These results show that macrobiotic activity significantly accelerates weathering and mineral degradation as well as mineral authigenesis. The combined processes of sediment ingestion and digestion thus lead to early diagenetic growth of clay minerals in clastic sediments.

  13. The effects of chronic radiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of lifetime exposure to chronic irradiation on reproductive success were assessed for laboratory populations of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata. Lifetime exposure was initiated upon the spawning of the P1 female and was terminated upon spawning of the F1 female. Groups of experimental worms received either no radiation (controls) or 0.19, 2.1, or 17 mGy/h. The total dose received by the worms was either background or approximately 0.55, 6.5, or 54 Gy, respectively. The broods from the F1 mated pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on brood size, on the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and on the number of embryos that were living, dying, and dead. The mean number of embryos in the broods from the F1 females exposed to lifetime radiation of 0.19 and 2.1 mGy/h was not significantly different from the mean number of embryos from control females; however, the mean number of embryos was different from those F1 females exposed to 17 mGy/h. There was a significant reduction in the number of live embryos in the broods from the F1 mated pairs that were exposed to the lowest dose rate given, 0.19 mGy/h, as well as those exposed to 2.1 and 17 mGy/h. Also, increased percentages of abnormal embryos were determined in the broods of all the radiation-exposed groups. 39 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Anisakis simplex: from Obscure Infectious Worm to Inducer of Immune Hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audicana, M. Teresa; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Infection of humans with the nematode worm parasite Anisakis simplex was first described in the 1960s in association with the consumption of raw or undercooked fish. During the 1990s it was realized that even the ingestion of dead worms in food fish can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions, that these may be more prevalent than infection itself, and that this outcome could be associated with food preparations previously considered safe. Not only may allergic symptoms arise from infection by the parasites (“gastroallergic anisakiasis”), but true anaphylactic reactions can also occur following exposure to allergens from dead worms by food-borne, airborne, or skin contact routes. This review discusses A. simplex pathogenesis in humans, covering immune hypersensitivity reactions both in the context of a living infection and in terms of exposure to its allergens by other routes. Over the last 20 years, several studies have concentrated on A. simplex antigen characterization and innate as well as adaptive immune response to this parasite. Molecular characterization of Anisakis allergens and isolation of their encoding cDNAs is now an active field of research that should provide improved diagnostic tools in addition to tools with which to enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and controversial aspects of A. simplex allergy. We also discuss the potential relevance of parasite products such as allergens, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors and the activation of basophils, eosinophils, and mast cells in the induction of A. simplex-related immune hypersensitivity states induced by exposure to the parasite, dead or alive. PMID:18400801

  15. Cluster algorithms for frustrated two-dimensional Ising antiferromagnets via dual worm constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakala, Geet; Damle, Kedar

    2017-08-01

    We report on the development of two dual worm constructions that lead to cluster algorithms for efficient and ergodic Monte Carlo simulations of frustrated Ising models with arbitrary two-spin interactions that extend up to third-neighbors on the triangular lattice. One of these algorithms generalizes readily to other frustrated systems, such as Ising antiferromagnets on the Kagome lattice with further neighbor couplings. We characterize the performance of both these algorithms in a challenging regime with power-law correlations at finite wave vector.

  16. A simple method to count total faecal Capillaria worm eggs in racing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Francis

    2013-10-18

    Capillaria columbae and C. longicollis are fine threadworms found in racing pigeons' small intestines that produce a characteristic lemon shaped bipolar egg. Clinically, capillariasis in racing pigeons can present as severe illness and it has been suggested that worms may affect race performance. A major aim of this study was to validate a cheap, simple to perform flotation technique for counting Capillaria worm eggs in racing pigeon droppings. Trials using reference samples of pigeon droppings laced with 348, 275 and 129 Capillaria eggs per gram, found a typical flotation method based on the modified Wisconsin technique to be inaccurate at counting worm eggs. The main sources of error were due to the loss of eggs in the faecal discard and insufficient flotation time. A new technique, using 0.15 g sample size and 8h flotation time resulted in significantly improved test accuracy. On average the new technique recovered 93% of eggs from reference samples with 129-348 epg concentration, recovering 197 times more eggs than the modified Wisconsin technique. Typical percentage error, as a measure of absolute reliablility, was 10% for the new technique and 50% for the modified Wisconsin technique. The regression line on a test-retest series of samples over a range of egg counts from 0 to 573 epg had a gradient of 0.96 (y=0.96x+6.28; r(2)=0.8408) for the new technique and 0.54 (y=0.54x+0.06; r(2)=0.4249) for the modified Wisconsin technique. The Pearson product moment correlations of the new technique and the modified Wisconsin technique were 0.92 and 0.65 respectively. As measures of relative reliability both the gradient of the regression line and the Pearson product moment correlation further suggested better repeatability of the new technique. It was concluded that the new technique would be an appropriate quantitative method of assessing worm egg burdens in racing pigeons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. First record of the sipunculan worm Phascolion (Phascolion caupo Hendrix, 1975 in the Mediterranean Sea

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    L.M. FERRERO-VICENTE

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the sipunculan worm Phascolion (Phascolion caupo Hendrix, 1975 have been collected for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, thus increasing the number of known sipunculan species of up to 36 in this area. They were encountered on soft bottoms from the coast of San Pedro del Pinatar (Western Mediterranean. Thirty specimens were collected at a depth ranging from 32.6 to 37.2 m, mainly in sandy substrata with high load of silt and clays. 80% of the individuals were found inhabiting empty shells of gastropods or empty tubes of serpulid polychaetes.

  18. Cluster algorithms for frustrated two-dimensional Ising antiferromagnets via dual worm constructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakala, Geet; Damle, Kedar

    2017-08-01

    We report on the development of two dual worm constructions that lead to cluster algorithms for efficient and ergodic Monte Carlo simulations of frustrated Ising models with arbitrary two-spin interactions that extend up to third-neighbors on the triangular lattice. One of these algorithms generalizes readily to other frustrated systems, such as Ising antiferromagnets on the Kagome lattice with further neighbor couplings. We characterize the performance of both these algorithms in a challenging regime with power-law correlations at finite wave vector.

  19. The worm endosymbionts in tabulate corals from the Silurian of Podolia, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mõtus, Mari-Ann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Two endosymbionts, Chaetosalpinx sibiriensis and Coralloconchus bragensis, occur in Silurian tabulate corals of Podolia. The endosymbiotic worms responsible for C. sibiriensis bioclaustrations in tabulates are found only in certain species: Paleofavosites cf. collatatus, Heliolites sp. A, Heliolites sp. B, Heliolites sp. C, Favosites gothlandicus, Favosites sp. A. One to six C. sibiriensis-infested tabulate species are known from Late Homerian to Ludfordian, in the reef-related community. Chaetosalpinx sibiriensis preferred certain tabulate species over the others, but showed no preference for the favositid or heliolitid type of morphology.

  20. Effect of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) leaf extract on resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and Schistosoma mansoni worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelemes, Patrick V; Perfeito, Márcia L G; Guimarães, Maria A; dos Santos, Raimunda C; Lima, David F; Nascimento, Carlos; Silva, Marcos P N; Soares, Maria José dos S; Ropke, Cristina D; Eaton, Peter; de Moraes, Josué; Leite, José Roberto S A

    2015-12-04

    There are ethnopharmacological reports supporting the use of neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) leaf against bacterial and worm infections. However there is a lack of studies about its effect on bacterial biofilm formation and Schistosoma mansoni worms. This study reports the in vitro effects of neem leaf ethanolic extract (Neem EE) on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilm and planktonic aggregation formation, and against S. mansoni worms. Quantification of the Azadirachtin (AZA), thought to be one of their main compounds related to biological effects, was performed. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of Neem EE on biofilm formation and planktonic aggregates of S. aureus was tested using the crystal violet dye method and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis, respectively. Changes in S. mansoni motor activity and death of worms were analyzed in vitro after exposition to the extract. Treated schistosomes were also examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was observed the presence of AZA in the extract (0.14 ± 0.02 mg/L). Testing Neem EE sub-inhibitory concentrations, a significant biofilm adherence inhibition from 62.5 µg/mL for a sensitive S. aureus and 125 µg/mL for two MRSA strains was observed. AFM images revealed that as the Neem EE concentration increases (from 250 to 1000 µg/mL) decreased ability of a chosen MRSA strain to form large aggregates. In relation of anti-schistosoma assay, the extract caused 100% mortality of female worms at a concentration of 50 µg/mL at 72 h of incubation, while 300 µg/mL at 24h of incubation was required to achieve 100% mortality of male worms. The extract also caused significant motor activity reduction in S. mansoni. For instance, at 96 h of incubation with 100 µg/mL, 80% of the worms presented significant motor activity reduction. By the confocal microscopy analysis, the dorsal surface of the tegument of worms exposed to 300 µg/mL (male) and 100 µg/mL (female) of the extract

  1. Petri Net and Probabilistic Model Checking Based Approach for the Modelling, Simulation and Verification of Internet Worm Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Misbah; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Internet worms are analogous to biological viruses since they can infect a host and have the ability to propagate through a chosen medium. To prevent the spread of a worm or to grasp how to regulate a prevailing worm, compartmental models are commonly used as a means to examine and understand the patterns and mechanisms of a worm spread. However, one of the greatest challenge is to produce methods to verify and validate the behavioural properties of a compartmental model. This is why in this study we suggest a framework based on Petri Nets and Model Checking through which we can meticulously examine and validate these models. We investigate Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model and propose a new model Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Delayed-Quarantined (Susceptible/Recovered) (SEIDQR(S/I)) along with hybrid quarantine strategy, which is then constructed and analysed using Stochastic Petri Nets and Continuous Time Markov Chain. The analysis shows that the hybrid quarantine strategy is extremely effective in reducing the risk of propagating the worm. Through Model Checking, we gained insight into the functionality of compartmental models. Model Checking results validate simulation ones well, which fully support the proposed framework.

  2. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their subfractions to the sludge aggregation in membrane bioreactor coupled with worm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Tian, Yu; Ding, Yi; Wang, Haoyu; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    This study focused on the effect of predated sludge recycle on the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and their subfractions to sludge aggregation in combined MBR system. It was observed that aggregation abilities of sludge samples were decreased by worm predation. Furthermore, worm predation enhanced the energy barriers and weakened the secondary energy minimum in the interaction energy profiles of slime, loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). Further investigations demonstrated that the content decrease and structural change of different EPS fractions induced by worm predation may be the reason for the decreased aggregation of sludge. Concomitantly, the adsorption tests and atomic force microscopy observation confirmed that the worm predation decreased the adsorption of slime, LB-EPS and TB-EPS on membrane. This would indicate the worm predation could keep an optimum EPS level for which floc structure was maintained and the fouling propensity of mixed liquid was reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Approach to the resistance of exportation tebo worms when irradiated with gamma ray through a quarantine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva R, Samy; Zarate S, Herman; Aguirre H, Paulina [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)], e-mail: hzarate@cchen.cl, e-mail: paguirre@cchen.cl, e-mail: ssilva@cchen.cl; Aburto, Patricio [Expo Agro (Chile)], e-mail: expoag@expoag.cl

    2009-07-01

    The tebo worms or butterworms (Chilecomadia moorei) are widely used in Chile in fishing, and so are in the international markets although there are some countries, that use these species, to a less extent for preparing food reptiles. Some foreign countries requirements demand, from the exporters, to carry out quarantine treatments related to the sterilization by ionizing energy, however customers need to make sure about their products safety and that is why it is compulsory to establish limits in connection with worms' irradiation resistance. The irradiation effect on a worms sample using doses of 0.3; 0.45; 0.6 and 0.9 kGy was studied macroscopically, after 1 hour, and then 30, 60 and 90 days after the treatment. One of the equipment utilized had a Cobalt 60 source, where as the other one had Cesium 137 irradiators, with a dose rate of 42.7 Gy minute (min){sup -1} and 37.1 Gy min{sup -1}, respectively. The results concluded that tebo worms can resist more than 3 times the doses suggested by the meta countries without reducing the population drastically, nevertheless it is required to increase the number of worms to be analyzed in order to validate the findings. (author)

  4. The effects of worms, clay and biochar on CO2 emissions during production and soil application of co-composts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthod, Justine; Rumpel, Cornélia; Paradelo, Remigio; Dignac, Marie-France

    2016-12-01

    In this study we evaluated CO2 emissions during composting of green wastes with clay and/or biochar in the presence and absence of worms (species of the genus Eisenia), as well as the effect of those amendments on carbon mineralization after application to soil. We added two different doses of clay, biochar or their mixture to pre-composted green wastes and monitored carbon mineralization over 21 days in the absence or presence of worms. The resulting co-composts and vermicomposts were then added to a loamy Cambisol and the CO2 emissions were monitored over 30 days in a laboratory incubation. Our results indicated that the addition of clay or clay/biochar mixture reduced carbon mineralization during co-composting without worms by up to 44 %. In the presence of worms, CO2 emissions during composting increased for all treatments except for the low clay dose. The effect of the amendments on carbon mineralization after addition to soil was small in the short term. Overall, composts increased OM mineralization, whereas vermicomposts had no effect. The presence of biochar reduced OM mineralization in soil with respect to compost and vermicompost without additives, whereas clay reduced mineralization only in the composts. Our study indicates a significant role of the conditions of composting on mineralization in soil. Therefore, the production of a low CO2 emission amendment requires optimization of feedstocks, co-composting agents and worm species.

  5. Clot Formation in the Sipunculid Worm Themiste petricola: A Haemostatic and Immune Cellular Response

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    Tomás Lombardo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clot formation in the sipunculid Themiste petricola, a coelomate nonsegmented marine worm without a circulatory system, is a cellular response that creates a haemostatic mass upon activation with sea water. The mass with sealing properties is brought about by homotypic aggregation of granular leukocytes present in the coelomic fluid that undergo a rapid process of fusion and cell death forming a homogenous clot or mass. The clot structure appears to be stabilized by abundant F-actin that creates a fibrous scaffold retaining cell-derived components. Since preservation of fluid within the coelom is vital for the worm, clotting contributes to rapidly seal the body wall and entrap pathogens upon injury, creating a matrix where wound healing can take place in a second stage. During formation of the clot, microbes or small particles are entrapped. Phagocytosis of self and non-self particles shed from the clot occurs at the clot neighbourhood, demonstrating that clotting is the initial phase of a well-orchestrated dual haemostatic and immune cellular response.

  6. An externally brooding acorn worm (Hemichordata, Enteropneusta, Torquaratoridae) from the Russian arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Karen J; Gebruk, Andrey V; Rogacheva, Antonina; Holland, Nicholas D

    2013-10-01

    A single specimen of a previously undescribed acorn worm in the family Torquaratoridae was trawled from a bottom depth of about 350 m in the Kara Sea (Russian Arctic). The new species is the shallowest of the exclusively deep-sea torquaratorids found to date, possibly an example of high-latitude emergence. On the basis of ribosomal DNA sequences and morphology, the worm is described here as the holotype of Coleodesmium karaensis n. gen., n. sp. It is most similar in overall body shape to the previously described enteropneust genus Allapasus, but is uniquely characterized by a tubular component of the proboscis skeleton ensheathing the collar nerve cord. Additionally, within the proboscis, the sparseness of the musculature of C. karaensis clearly distinguishes it from the much more muscular members of Allapasus. The holotype is a female bearing about a dozen embryos on the surface of her pharyngeal region, each recessed within a shallow depression in the dorsal epidermis. The embryos, ranging from late gastrula to an early stage of coelom formation, are a little more than 1 mm in diameter and surrounded by a thin membrane. Each embryo comprises an external ectoderm of monociliated cells (not arranged in obvious ciliated bands) and an internal endo-mesoderm; the blastopore is closed. In the most advanced embryos, the anterior coelom is starting to constrict off from the archenteron. Coleodesmium karaensis is the first enteropneust (and indeed the first hemichordate) found brooding embryos on the surface of the mother's body.

  7. Microplastic moves pollutants and additives to worms, reducing functions linked to health and biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Niven, Stewart J; Galloway, Tamara S; Rowland, Steve J; Thompson, Richard C

    2013-12-02

    Inadequate products, waste management, and policy are struggling to prevent plastic waste from infiltrating ecosystems [1, 2]. Disintegration into smaller pieces means that the abundance of micrometer-sized plastic (microplastic) in habitats has increased [3] and outnumbers larger debris [2, 4]. When ingested by animals, plastic provides a feasible pathway to transfer attached pollutants and additive chemicals into their tissues [5-15]. Despite positive correlations between concentrations of ingested plastic and pollutants in tissues of animals, few, if any, controlled experiments have examined whether ingested plastic transfers pollutants and additives to animals. We exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5% microplastic that was presorbed with pollutants (nonylphenol and phenanthrene) and additive chemicals (Triclosan and PBDE-47). Microplastic transferred pollutants and additive chemicals into gut tissues of lugworms, causing some biological effects, although clean sand transferred larger concentrations of pollutants into their tissues. Uptake of nonylphenol from PVC or sand reduced the ability of coelomocytes to remove pathogenic bacteria by >60%. Uptake of Triclosan from PVC diminished the ability of worms to engineer sediments and caused mortality, each by >55%, while PVC alone made worms >30% more susceptible to oxidative stress. As global microplastic contamination accelerates, our findings indicate that large concentrations of microplastic and additives can harm ecophysiological functions performed by organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pelvic abscess from enterobius vermicularis. Report of a case with cytologic detection of eggs and worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D K; Pathan, S K; Hira, P R; Madda, J P; Hasaniah, W F; Juma, T H

    2001-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is known to produce perianal and ischioanal abscesses and invade the peritoneal cavity via the female reproductive system, causing pelvic peritonitis. However, there are only rare case reports on the cytodiagnosis of these parasitic lesions. A 28-year-old woman was admitted with a tender left iliac fossa mass and greenish vaginal discharge. Ultrasonogram and computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of a mass lesion suggestive of a tuboovarian abscess. Cytologic examination of the pus obtained during left salpingo-oophorectomy revealed the presence of ova of E vermicularis and fragments of the adult worm in an inflammatory exudate consisting predominantly of neutrophils, eosinophils and occasional epithelioid cell granulomas. Paraffin sections of the tuboovarian mass showed necrotizing epithelioid cell granulomas, but neither ova nor any worm section was identified. Although the possibility of tuberculosis was considered histologically, Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N) stain for acid-fast bacilli was negative. Z-N staining of the smear and mycobacterial culture of the pus also did not yield positive results. E vermicularis may cause tuboovarian abscess with necrotizing epithelioid granulomas mimicking tuberculosis. Cytologic examination of the pus is helpful in the diagnosis.

  9. Bioaccumulation of isocarbophos enantiomers from laboratory-contaminated aquatic environment by tubificid worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiantian; Diao, Jinling; Di, Shanshan; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2015-04-01

    The benthic fauna is of great importance to assess the environmental fate of contaminations in aquatic ecosystem. In this study, tubificids were exposed to both laboratory-contaminated aqueous phases and spiked sediment to study the bioaccumulation of isocarbophos (ICP). Two types of spiked sediments were used in the spiked sediment experiment. During the exposure period, an enantioselective bioaccumulation was found in spiked water treatment, with concentrations of the (-)-ICP higher than that of the (+)-ICP, but no enantioselectivity was detected in the spiked sediment treatments. However, different bioaccumulation patterns were observed in the two spiked sediment treatments. Results showed that for spiked forest field sediment (FF sediment) incubation, bioaccumulation was governed by the concentrations in soil. Whereas ICP was bioaccumulated dominantly from overlying water in spiked Chagan Lake sediment (CG sediment) test. The dissipation rates were proved different in the two sediments and ICP dissipated much faster in CG sediment than that in FF sediment. Significant difference in ICP's half-life was also observed between worm-present and worm-free treatments in FF sediment. The detections of concentrations in overlying water indicated that much more ICP diffused to aquatic phase with the present of tubificids. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermal limit for metazoan life in question: in vivo heat tolerance of the Pompeii worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaux, Juliette; Hamel, Gérard; Zbinden, Magali; Tasiemski, Aurélie A; Boutet, Isabelle; Léger, Nelly; Tanguy, Arnaud; Jollivet, Didier; Shillito, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The thermal limit for metazoan life, expected to be around 50°C, has been debated since the discovery of the Pompeii worm Alvinella pompejana, which colonizes black smoker chimney walls at deep-sea vents. While indirect evidence predicts body temperatures lower than 50°C, repeated in situ temperature measurements depict an animal thriving at temperatures of 60°C and more. This controversy was to remain as long as this species escaped in vivo investigations, due to irremediable mortalities upon non-isobaric sampling. Here we report from the first heat-exposure experiments with live A. pompejana, following isobaric sampling and subsequent transfer in a laboratory pressurized aquarium. A prolonged (2 hours) exposure in the 50-55°C range was lethal, inducing severe tissue damages, cell mortalities and triggering a heat stress response, therefore showing that Alvinella's upper thermal limit clearly is below 55°C. A comparison with hsp70 stress gene expressions of individuals analysed directly after sampling in situ confirms that Alvinella pompejana does not experience long-term exposures to temperature above 50°C in its natural environment. The thermal optimum is nevertheless beyond 42°C, which confirms that the Pompeii worm ranks among the most thermotolerant metazoans.

  11. Schistosoma japonicum: immunological characterization and detection of circulating polysaccharide antigens from adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z L; Deelder, A M

    1983-04-01

    The antigenic constituents of a trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-soluble fraction of adult Schistosoma japonicum were studied with immunoelectrophoresis, and compared with those of Schistosoma mansoni. Eight TCA-soluble antigens of S. japonicum were demonstrated, five of which showed immunological identity with S. mansoni antigens. Of the eight antigens, five antigens with anodic motility were found as circulating antigens in S. japonicum-infected hamster and rabbit sera; the major circulating antigen was the circulating anodic antigen (CAA). Two other antigens, with cathodic motility, including the circulating cathodic antigen (CCA), were demonstrable as circulating antigens in S. mansoni infections, but not in S. japonicum infections. Most of the circulating antigens were shown to be gut-associated. Only one antigen, line 2, which was not demonstrable as circulating antigen and which was present in the parenchyma of the worms, was found to be specific for S. japonicum. Using an ELISA for the detection of CAA in the sera of S. japonicum-infected rabbits, a lower detection level of 100 ng CAA/ml serum was achieved. Moreover, at 7-8 weeks after infection, a direct relationship between worm burden and CAA level was demonstrated.

  12. The Optimal Locomotion of a Self-Propelled Worm Actuated by Two Square Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziwang Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Worm-like locomotion at small scales induced by propagating a series of extensive or contraction waves has exhibited enormous possibilities in reproducing artificial mobile soft robotics. However, the optimal relation between locomotion performance and some important parameters, such as the distance between two adjacent waves, wave width, and body length, is still not clear. To solve this problem, this paper studies the optimal problem of a worm’s motion induced by two peristalsis waves in a viscous medium. Inspired by a worm’s motion, we consider that its body consists of two segments which can perform the respective shape change. Next, a quasi-static model describing the worm-like locomotion is used to investigate the relationship between its average velocity over the period and these parameters. Through the analysis of the relationship among these parameters, we find that there exist four different cases which should be addressed. Correspondingly, the average velocity in each case can be approximately derived. After that, optimization is carried out on each case to maximize the average velocity according to the Kuhn–Tucker Conditions. As a result, the optimal conditions of all of the cases are obtained. Finally, numerical and experimental verifications are carried out to demonstrate the correctness of the obtained results.

  13. Conditions for worm-robot locomotion in a flexible environment: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, David; Sharf, Inna; Shoham, Moshe

    2012-04-01

    Biological vessels are characterized by their substantial compliance and low friction that present a major challenge for crawling robots for minimally invasive medical procedures. Quite a number of studies considered the design and construction of crawling robots; however, very few focused on the interaction between the robots and the flexible environment. In a previous study, we derived the analytical efficiency of worm locomotion as a function of the number of cells, friction coefficients, normal forces, and local (contact) tangential compliance. In this paper, we introduce the structural effects of environment compliance, generalize our previous analysis to include dynamic and static coefficients of friction, determine the conditions of locomotion as function of the external resisting forces, and experimentally validate our previous and newly obtained theoretical results. Our experimental setup consists of worm robot prototypes, flexible interfaces with known compliance and a Vicon motion capture system to measure the robot positioning. Separate experiments were conducted to measure the tangential compliance of the contact interface that is required for computing the analytical efficiency. The validation experiments were performed for both types of compliant conditions, local and structural, and the results are shown to be in clear match with the theoretical predictions. Specifically, the convergence of the tangential deflections to an arithmetic series and the partial and overall loss of locomotion verify the theoretical predictions.

  14. Growth of green catfish seed fed on sludge worm and artificial feed combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netti Aryani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research aimed to obtain information of growth and survival of green catfish (Mystus nemurus juvenile fed with sludge worm (Tubifex sp.; T and artificial diet (PB and added with the combination of 50% soybean pulp waste and 50% freshwater trash fish. Feeding was performed in several variation of time during 40 days of fish rearing. Average body length of juvenile was 12 mm and weight 2.8±0.0 mg, maintained at a density of 30 individuals/aquarium. The treatment in this research was T10PB30 (8–18 days old juvenile were fed with sludge worm and 18–48 days old fish were fed with artificial diet, T20PB20 (8–28 days old juvenile were fed with sludge worm and 28–48 days old were fed with artificial diet, T30PB10 (8–38 days old juvenile were fed with sludge worm and 38–48 days old were given artificial diet, PB40 (8–48 days old juvenile were fed artificial diet, T40 (8–48 days old juvenile were fed with sludge worm. The results indicated that the treatment of 40 days feeding with sludge worm provided the best growth and survival as daily growth rate of 16.4±28.0 g/day, the growth of the absolute length was 43.60±0.01 mm, the absolute body weight 2,047.2±35.0 mg and the survival rate was 96.44%. The best artificial feeding treatment was feeding with sludge worm for 30 days and with 10 days of artificial diet, results in daily growth rate of 4.53±0,25 mm/day, the growth of the absolute length 40.00±0.04 mm, the absolute body weight 1,447.2±15.0 mg, and the survival rate 94.44±2.60%. Keywords: artificial feed, sludge worm, growth, green catfish  ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan informasi pertumbuhan dan sintasan benih ikan baung (Mystus nemurus dengan pemberian cacing sutra (Tubifex sp.; T dan pakan buatan (PB kombinasi 50% limbah ampas tahu dan 50% ikan rucah air tawar. Pakan diberikan dengan variasi lama waktu berbeda selama pemeliharaan 40 hari. Rerata panjang awal benih adalah 12 mm dan bobot

  15. Thermal limit for metazoan life in question: in vivo heat tolerance of the Pompeii worm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Ravaux

    Full Text Available The thermal limit for metazoan life, expected to be around 50°C, has been debated since the discovery of the Pompeii worm Alvinella pompejana, which colonizes black smoker chimney walls at deep-sea vents. While indirect evidence predicts body temperatures lower than 50°C, repeated in situ temperature measurements depict an animal thriving at temperatures of 60°C and more. This controversy was to remain as long as this species escaped in vivo investigations, due to irremediable mortalities upon non-isobaric sampling. Here we report from the first heat-exposure experiments with live A. pompejana, following isobaric sampling and subsequent transfer in a laboratory pressurized aquarium. A prolonged (2 hours exposure in the 50-55°C range was lethal, inducing severe tissue damages, cell mortalities and triggering a heat stress response, therefore showing that Alvinella's upper thermal limit clearly is below 55°C. A comparison with hsp70 stress gene expressions of individuals analysed directly after sampling in situ confirms that Alvinella pompejana does not experience long-term exposures to temperature above 50°C in its natural environment. The thermal optimum is nevertheless beyond 42°C, which confirms that the Pompeii worm ranks among the most thermotolerant metazoans.

  16. WormAssay: a novel computer application for whole-plate motion-based screening of macroscopic parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Marcellino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is caused by filarial nematode parasites, including Brugia malayi. Adult worms live in the lymphatic system and cause a strong immune reaction that leads to the obstruction of lymph vessels and swelling of the extremities. Chronic disease leads to the painful and disfiguring condition known as elephantiasis. Current drug therapy is effective against the microfilariae (larval stage of the parasite, but no drugs are effective against the adult worms. One of the major stumbling blocks toward developing effective macrofilaricides to kill the adult worms is the lack of a high throughput screening method for candidate drugs. Current methods utilize systems that measure one well at a time and are time consuming and often expensive. We have developed a low-cost and simple visual imaging system to automate and quantify screening entire plates based on parasite movement. This system can be applied to the study of many macroparasites as well as other macroscopic organisms.

  17. [Epidemiological investigation of Taenia saginata asiatica in Duyun, Guizhou and detection of amino acids and elements of adult worms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Bao, Huai-en; Li, Jin-fu; Lang, Shu-yuan; Qiu, Xue-li; Huang, Jiang; Wu, Yuan-ming; Zhang, Chao-yun

    2003-01-01

    To study epidemiological factors of taeniasis and to detect amino acid and element components of adult worms in Duyun of Guizhou Province. 1. Traditional methods were used for epidemiological investigation. 2. Automatic amino acid analyzer and bioassay were applied for the detection. Among 70 persons with clinical symptoms, 25 patients (24 men and 1 woman) were found to have adult taenia worms in their faeces after taking Areca catechu L. and other drugs. Sixteen amino acids and 12 elements were determined in adult worms. Duyun area in Guizhou is a highly endemic area of taeniasis. The pathogenic parasite is identified as Taenia saginata asiatica. Its clinical symptoms are similar to that of Taenia saginata saginata.

  18. C. elegans maximum velocity correlates with healthspan and is maintained in worms with an insulin receptor mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhee; DiLoreto, Race; Shi, Cheng; Lee, Seung-Jae V; Murphy, Coleen T; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-11-20

    Ageing is marked by physical decline. Caenorhabditis elegans is a valuable model for identifying genetic regulatory mechanisms of ageing and longevity. Here we report a simple method to assess C. elegans' maximum physical ability based on the worms' maximum movement velocity. We show maximum velocity declines with age, correlates well with longevity, accurately reports movement ability and, if measured in mid-adulthood, is predictive of maximal lifespan. Contrary to recent findings, we observe that maximum velocity of worm with mutations in daf-2(e1370) insulin/IGF-1 signalling scales with lifespan. Because of increased odorant receptor expression, daf-2(e1370) mutants prefer food over exploration, causing previous on-food motility assays to underestimate movement ability and, thus, worm health. Finally, a disease-burden analysis of published data reveals that the daf-2(e1370) mutation improves quality of life, and therefore combines lifespan extension with various signs of an increased healthspan.

  19. WormAssay: a novel computer application for whole-plate motion-based screening of macroscopic parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellino, Chris; Gut, Jiri; Lim, K C; Singh, Rahul; McKerrow, James; Sakanari, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by filarial nematode parasites, including Brugia malayi. Adult worms live in the lymphatic system and cause a strong immune reaction that leads to the obstruction of lymph vessels and swelling of the extremities. Chronic disease leads to the painful and disfiguring condition known as elephantiasis. Current drug therapy is effective against the microfilariae (larval stage) of the parasite, but no drugs are effective against the adult worms. One of the major stumbling blocks toward developing effective macrofilaricides to kill the adult worms is the lack of a high throughput screening method for candidate drugs. Current methods utilize systems that measure one well at a time and are time consuming and often expensive. We have developed a low-cost and simple visual imaging system to automate and quantify screening entire plates based on parasite movement. This system can be applied to the study of many macroparasites as well as other macroscopic organisms.

  20. Schistosoma bovis: plasminogen binding in adults and the identification of plasminogen-binding proteins from the worm tegument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Oleaga, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a ruminant haematic parasite that lives for years in the mesenteric vessels of the host. The aim of this work was to investigate the ability of adult S. bovis worms to interact with plasminogen, a central component in the host fibrinolytic system. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that plasminogen bound to the tegument surface of the male-but not female-S. bovis worms and that this binding was strongly dependent on lysine residues. It was also observed that a protein extract of the worm tegument (TG) had the capacity to generate plasmin and to enhance the plasmin generation by the tissue-type plasminogen activator. Proteomic analysis of the TG extract identified 10 plasminogen-binding proteins, among which the major ones were enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and actin. This study represents the first report about the binding of plasminogen to Schistosoma sp. proteins.

  1. [The singular story of Doctor Worm -Nicholas Andry de Boisregard- and of his daughters Parasitology and Orthopaedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Homini verminoso or Dr. Worm were the nicknames that Nicholas Aindry won in life for his consecration to the study of intestinal worms and for his bad temper, which led him to fiercely attack the surgeons. The article reassumes the studies and contributions that gave Andry the title of Father of Parasitology and the candidacy to Father of Orthopaedics, and mentions some other candidates to this honor. Quite a man, he had -besides his biological one- two famous daughters, growing till our days; wrote at least three valuable books; and planted the immortal "tree of Andry", the symbol of Orthopaedics.

  2. Scattering Analysis of a Compact Dipole Array with Series and Parallel Feed Network including Mutual Coupling Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Sneha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in defense arena is towards the stealth technology with an emphasis to control the radar cross-section (RCS. The scattering from the antennas mounted over the platform is of prime importance especially for a low-observable aerospace vehicle. This paper presents the analysis of the scattering cross section of a uniformly spaced linear dipole array. Two types of feed networks, that is, series and parallel feed networks, are considered. The total RCS of phased array with either kind of feed network is obtained by following the signal as it enters through the aperture and travels through the feed network. The RCS estimation of array is done including the mutual coupling effect between the dipole elements in three configurations, that is, side-by-side, collinear, and parallel-in-echelon. The results presented can be useful while designing a phased array with optimum performance towards low observability.

  3. A prototype implementation of a network-level intrusion detection system. Technical report number CS91-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heady, R.; Luger, G.F.; Maccabe, A.B.; Servilla, M.; Sturtevant, J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1991-05-15

    This paper presents the implementation of a prototype network level intrusion detection system. The prototype system monitors base level information in network packets (source, destination, packet size, time, and network protocol), learning the normal patterns and announcing anomalies as they occur. The goal of this research is to determine the applicability of current intrusion detection technology to the detection of network level intrusions. In particular, the authors are investigating the possibility of using this technology to detect and react to worm programs.

  4. Viability of microcomputed tomography to study tropical marine worm galleries in humid muddy sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennafirme, Simone F., E-mail: sipennafirme@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Marinha; Machado, Alessandra S.; Lima, Inaya; Suzuki, Katia N.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: machado@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: norisuzuki6@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Bioturbation is an ecological process driven by organisms, which transports nutrients and gases from air/water to sediment through their galleries, by the time they feed, burrow and/or construct galleries. This exchange is vital to the maintenance of micro and macrobenthic organisms, mainly in muddy flat environments. Species with distinct galleries could create levels of bioturbation, affecting the benthic interactions. In this sense, it is fundamental developing a non-destructive method that permits identifying/quantifying the properties of these galleries. The recent advances in micro-computed tomography are allowing the high resolution 3D images generation. However, once muddy sediments are rich in organic matter and interstitial water, these would lead to motion artifacts which could, in turn, decrease the accuracy of galleries identification/quantification. In this context, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol which combines laboratory experiments and microtomography analysis in order to generate accurate 3D images of the small marine worm's galleries within humid muddy sediments. The sediment was collected at both muddy flats of Surui's and Itaipu lagoon's mangroves (RJ-Brazil), sieved (0.5mm mesh) and introduced with one individual of the marine worm Laeonereis acuta (Nereididae, Polychaeta) in each acrylic corer holders (4.4cm of internal diameter). High energy microtomography scanner was used to obtain 3D images and the setup calibration was 130 kV and 61 mA. Each acquisition image time was among 4h and 6h. Several procedures of drying remained water inside the cores were performed aiming obtaining images without movement artifacts due to circulating water, and this issue was one of the main studied parameter. In order to investigate possible chemical effects, 2ml of formalin (35%) with menthol were added to the surface of the cores. The results show that although the drying time was appropriated, the chemicals created bubbles

  5. Worm control practice against gastro-intestinal parasites in Norwegian sheep and goat flocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatn Synnøve

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthelmintic treatment is the most common way of controlling nematode infections in ruminants. However, several countries have reported anthelmintic resistance (AR, representing a limitation for sustainable small ruminant production. The knowledge regarding worm control management represents a baseline to develop a guideline for preventing AR. The aim of the present study was therefore to improve our knowledge about the worm control practices in small ruminant flocks in Norway. Methods A questionnaire survey regarding worm control practices was performed in small ruminant flocks in Norway. Flocks were selected from the three main areas of small ruminant farming, i.e. the coastal, inland and northern areas. A total of 825 questionnaires, comprising 587 sheep flocks (return rate of 51.3% and 238 goat flocks (52.6% were included. Results The results indicated that visual appraisal of individual weight was the most common means of estimating the anthelmintic dose used in sheep (78.6% and goat (85.1% flocks. The mean yearly drenching rate in lambs and ewes were 2.5 ± 1.7 and 1.9 ± 1.1, respectively, whereas it was 1.0 (once a year in goats. However, these figures were higher in sheep in the coastal area with a rate of 3.4 and 2.2 in lambs and ewes, respectively. Benzimidazoles were the predominant anthelmintic class used in sheep flocks (64.9% in 2007, whereas benzimidazoles and macrocyclic lactones were both equally used in dairy goat flocks. In the period of 2005-2007, 46.3% of the sheep flocks never changed the anthelmintic class. The dose and move strategy was practiced in 33.2% of the sheep flocks. Conclusions The present study showed that inaccurate weight calculation gives a risk of under-dosing in over 90% of the sheep and goat flocks in Norway. Taken together with a high treatment frequency in lambs, a lack of anthelmintic class rotation and the common use of a dose-and-move strategy, a real danger for development of

  6. Fluorescent sperm in a transparent worm: validation of a GFP marker to study sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie-Orleach, Lucas; Janicke, Tim; Vizoso, Dita B; Eichmann, Micha; Schärer, Lukas

    2014-06-30

    Sexual selection has initially been thought to occur exclusively at the precopulatory stage in terms of contests among males and female mate choice, but research over the last four decades revealed that it often continues after copulation through sperm competition and cryptic female choice. However, studying these postcopulatory processes remains challenging because they occur internally and therefore are often difficult to observe. In the transparent free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano, a recently established transgenic line that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) in all cell types, including sperm, offers a unique opportunity to non-invasively visualise and quantify the sperm of a GFP-expressing donor inside the reproductive tract of wild-type recipients in vivo. We here test several aspects of the reproductive performance of the transgenic individuals and the accuracy of the techniques involved in assessing the GFP-expressing worms and their sperm. We then show the usefulness of these methods in a study on sperm displacement. GFP-expressing worms do not differ from wild-type worms in terms of morphology, mating rate and reproductive success. In addition, we show that the GFP signal is reliably and unequivocally expressed by all GFP-expressing individuals observed under epifluorescence illumination. However, the intensity of the GFP signal emitted by sperm of GFP expressing donors can vary (which we show to be at least in part due to sperm ageing) and the GFP marker is inherited according to Mendel's laws in most, but not all, of the individuals. Nevertheless, we argue these two issues can be addressed with an appropriate experimental design. Finally, we demonstrate the value of the GFP-techniques by comparing the number of GFP-expressing sperm in a wild-type recipient before and after mating with a competing sperm donor, providing clear experimental evidence for sperm displacement in M. lignano. This result suggests that sperm donors can displace

  7. JPRS Report, Science & Technology. China: Stealth/Counter-Stealth Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-19

    Frequency-Selective Surfaces 92FE0801F Beijing DIANZIXUEBAO [ACTA ELECTRONICA SINICA] in Chinese Vol 20 No 6, Jun 92 pp 85-88 [Article by Shen...microwave devices and electromag- netic scattering. Motion Compensation Method in ISAR Imaging 92FE0801A Beijing DIANZIXUEBAO [ACTA ELECTRONICA ...Chinese Society of Electronics and an editor of DIANZI XUEBAO [ACTA ELECTRONICA SINICA]. Deng Wenbiao Born in February 1961, he graduated from the

  8. Force responses of strongly intrinsically curved DNA helices deviate from worm-like chain predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompitak, M.; Schiessel, H.; Barkema, G. T.

    2016-12-01

    DNA sequences with nontrivial intrinsic curvature are of interest for a range of biological and artificial DNA systems. We design both intrinsically strongly curved and intrinsically straight sequences. We find that such sequences with opposing curvatures can be designed even under constraints that would naively lead one to assume that those sequences would be highly similar in their mechanical properties. We then characterize the force response of those sequences and find that their force-extension curves deviate significantly in the low-force regime, and that the standard worm-like chain description is inadequate to describe the low-force response of the strongly bent sequences. We propose a modified description that takes the intrinsic curvature into account, making the DNA act, in the low-force regime, like a nanoscale helical spring. We find strongly improved agreement between the model and the simulated force-extension curves.

  9. Study of the stability of a SEIRS model for computer worm propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Guillén, J. D.; Martín del Rey, A.; Hernández Encinas, L.

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, malware is the most important threat to information security. In this sense, several mathematical models to simulate malware spreading have appeared. They are compartmental models where the population of devices is classified into different compartments: susceptible, exposed, infectious, recovered, etc. The main goal of this work is to propose an improved SEIRS (Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible) mathematical model to simulate computer worm propagation. It is a continuous model whose dynamic is ruled by means of a system of ordinary differential equations. It considers more realistic parameters related to the propagation; in fact, a modified incidence rate has been used. Moreover, the equilibrium points are computed and their local and global stability analyses are studied. From the explicit expression of the basic reproductive number, efficient control measures are also obtained.

  10. Small Angle Neutron Scattering for the Detection of Branching in Worm-Like Micellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtt, Karsten; Rai, Durgesh; Beaucage, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Micellar solutions can exhibit a broad variety of phase structure as a function of counter ion content, surfactant concentration, and the presence of ternary components. Under some conditions extended cylindrical structures that display persistence and other chain features of polymers are produced. These worm-like micelles (WLMs) can form branched structures that dynamically change under shear and even in quiescent conditions. The rheology of these branched WLMs is strongly dependent on migration of the branch points, and the dynamics of branch formation and removal. We have recently developed a scattering model for branched polyolefins and other topologically complex materials that can quantify the branching density, branch length, branch functionality and the hyperbranch (branch-on-branch) content of polymers. Using small angle neutron scattering these parameters are determined for model emulsions with varying surfactant and salt concentrations.

  11. A Worm Algorithm for the Lattice CP(N-1) Model arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    The CP(N-1) model in 2D is an interesting toy model for 4D QCD as it possesses confinement, asymptotic freedom and a non-trivial vacuum structure. Due to the lower dimensionality and the absence of fermions, the computational cost for simulating 2D CP(N-1) on the lattice is much lower than the one for simulating 4D QCD. However to our knowledge, no efficient algorithm for simulating the lattice CP(N-1) model has been tested so far, which also works at finite density. To this end we propose and test a new type of worm algorithm which is appropriate to simulate the lattice CP(N-1) model in a dual, flux-variables based representation, in which the introduction of a chemical potential does not give rise to any complications.

  12. Lessons from "lower" organisms: what worms, flies, and zebrafish can teach us about human energy metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Schlegel

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A pandemic of metabolic diseases (atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and obesity, unleashed by multiple social and economic factors beyond the control of most individuals, threatens to diminish human life span for the first time in the modern era. Given the redundancy and inherent complexity of processes regulating the uptake, transport, catabolism, and synthesis of nutrients, magic bullets to target these diseases will be hard to find. Recent studies using the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fly Drosophila melanogaster, and the zebrafish Danio rerio indicate that these "lower" metazoans possess unique attributes that should help in identifying, investigating, and even validating new pharmaceutical targets for these diseases. We summarize findings in these organisms that shed light on highly conserved pathways of energy homeostasis.

  13. Worms on a plane: simulation studies of an active nematic phase of flexible chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Michael; Najafi, Mohammad; Selinger, Robin

    2015-03-01

    We present simulation studies of flexible nematogen ``worms'' composed of soft spheres assembled into flexible polymer-like chains. These elongated, flexible chains are confined to a planar substrate with periodic boundary conditions or else confined within bounding walls. We consider a variety of driving mechanisms including unidirectional gliding and gliding with random reversals. We also model actuation via kinesin motor clusters which attach and travel along a pair of neighboring chains of opposite polarity, producing inter-chain sliding forces and driving the chains in opposite directions. We examine resulting nematic order, defect nucleation, motion, and annihilation, and density fluctuations as a function of chain length, flexibility, density, and driving mechanism. In a geometry where the chains are constrained to move in tandem with tight spacing, we observe spontaneous formation of organized beating. We compare our results to experimental and theoretical studies of gliding bacteria and kinesin-driven microtubules. Supported by NSF DMR-1409658 and NSF DMR-1106014.

  14. Counter-Rotatable Fan Gas Turbine Engine with Axial Flow Positive Displacement Worm Gas Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Rollin George (Inventor); Murrow, Kurt David (Inventor); Fakunle, Oladapo (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A counter-rotatable fan turbine engine includes a counter-rotatable fan section, a worm gas generator, and a low pressure turbine to power the counter-rotatable fan section. The low pressure turbine maybe counter-rotatable or have a single direction of rotation in which case it powers the counter-rotatable fan section through a gearbox. The gas generator has inner and outer bodies having offset inner and outer axes extending through first, second, and third sections of a core assembly. At least one of the bodies is rotatable about its axis. The inner and outer bodies have intermeshed inner and outer helical blades wound about the inner and outer axes and extending radially outwardly and inwardly respectively. The helical blades have first, second, and third twist slopes in the first, second, and third sections respectively. A combustor section extends through at least a portion of the second section.

  15. Worm crawling inside my brain”: a rare case of delusional parasitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekh Afrar Alam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Delusional parasitosis is a disorder in which persons suffering have a firm and unshakeable belief of harbouring some parasite or worm in his/her body. In today’s nosology, it has been placed under delusional disorder-somatic type in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 (297.1 and under persistent delusional disorders in the tenth revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10 (F22. Existing literature has extensively described this condition to affect mainly the skin with some instances of affecting the oral mucosa and the intestine. We are reporting a rare case of delusional disorder of parasite infestation in the brain.

  16. Bugs as drugs, part two: worms, leeches, scorpions, snails, ticks, centipedes, and spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniack, E Paul

    2011-03-01

    In this second of a two-part series analyzing the evidence for the use of organisms as medicine, the use of a number of different "bugs" (worms, leeches, snails, ticks, centipedes, and spiders) is detailed. Several live organisms are used as treatments: leeches for plastic surgery and osteoarthritis and the helminths Trichuris suis and Necator americanus for inflammatory bowel disease. Leech saliva is the source of a number of anticoagulants, including the antithrombin agent hirudin and its synthetic analogues, which have been approved for human use. Predatory arthropods, such as certain species of snails, spiders, scorpions, centipedes, and ticks provide a trove of potential analgesic peptides in their venom. A synthetic analogue of a snail venom peptide, ziconotide, has been approved for human use and is used as an alternative to opioids in severe pain cases. Arthropods, such as ticks, have venom that contains anticoagulants and centipede venom has a protein that corrects abnormalities in lipid metabolism.

  17. [Activities of treg cells stimulated by soluble adult worm antigen and egg antigen of Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Cui; Yang, Xiao-Wei; Li, Yong; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Xue, Xue; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Kong, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Ji-Feng; Zhou, Sha; Liu, Feng; Su, Chuan

    2013-04-01

    To observe and compare the effects of soluble adult worm antigen (SWA) and soluble egg antigen (SEA) of Schistosoma japonicum on the induction of Treg cells and the suppressive activity of Treg cells. Splenocytes were prepared from mice treated with PBS, SWA, and SEA, respectively, and then the proportions of Treg cells and the levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta in Treg cells were determined by FACS. The purified Treg cells from the mice treated as above-mentioned were detected for their immunosuppressive activities by incorporation of [3H] thymidine for the final 16 h of culture. Compared to SWA, SEA induced the higher proportion of Treg cells with a stronger suppressive activity, which produced the higher levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta (P < 0.05). SEA significantly induces Treg cells and enhances their immunosuppressive activity.

  18. Transparent and flexible write-once-read-many (WORM) memory device based on egg albumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Bo; Lin, Qianru; Wan, Tao; Du, Haiwei; Chen, Nan; Lin, Xi; Chu, Dewei

    2017-08-01

    Egg albumen, as an important protein resource in nature, is an interesting dielectric material exhibiting many fascinating properties for the development of environmentally friendly electronic devices. Taking advantage of their extraordinary transparency and flexibility, this paper presents an innovative preparation approach for albumen thin film based write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory devices in a simple, cost-effective manner. The fabricated device shows superior data retention properties including non-volatile character (over 105 s) and promising great read durability (106 times). Furthermore, our results suggested that the electric-field-induced trap-controlled space charge limited current (SCLC) conduction is responsible for the observed resistance switching effect. The present study may likely reveal another pathway towards complete see-through electrical devices.

  19. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides with crude parasite antigens reduce worm recovery in Opisthorchis viverrini infected hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewraemruaen, Chamraj; Sermswan, Rasana W; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2016-12-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini, a human liver fluke, is still an endemic parasitic infection in Thailand and nearly all countries in Southeast Asia. O. viverrini induces a chronic stage of infection in hamsters. During the first 2 weeks of infection, Th1 inducing cytokine, IL-12, increased but was down regulated in chronic infection. In this study it was found that unmethylated-CpG ODN (oligodeoxynucleotides) 1826 increased hamster mononuclear cell proliferation and stimulated IFN-γ production in vitro. The IFN-γ levels in hamster sera were significantly increased in hamsters injected with CpG ODN 1826 alone or plus crude somatic antigens (CSAg). Further investigation using the flow cytometer found that CD4(+)T cells and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+)T cells (Th1-like cells) in the hamster blood were significantly increased. The role of these cells in the protective responses in hamsters was evaluated by challenging with 25 metacercaria and observation for 3 months. The number of worms recovered was significantly reduced in the hamsters injected with CpG ODN 1826 with CSAg, but not in CpG ODN 1826 alone groups when compared to PBS control. The percent of reduction in hamsters against this parasite were 32.95% and 21.49% in the CpG ODN 1826 with CSAg and CpG ODN 1826 alone. This study indicates that CpG ODN 1826 plus parasite antigens elicit a Th1-like response that leads to the enhancement of worm reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the hedgehog stomach worm, Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Physaloptera clausa (Spirurida: Physalopteridae) nematodes parasitize the stomach of the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) and cause weight loss, anorexia and gastric lesions. The present study provides the first morphological description of adult P. clausa from the stomachs of infected hedgehogs, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods From June to October 2011, 10 P. clausa from European hedgehogs were fixed, dried, coated and subjected to SEM examination. Results Males and females (22–30 mm and 28–47 mm, respectively) were stout, with the cuticle reflecting over the lips to form a large cephalic collarette and showing fine transverse striations in both sexes. The mouth was characterized by two large, simple triangular lateral pseudolabia, each armed with external and internal teeth. Inside the buccal cavity, a circle of internal small teeth can be observed. Around the mouth, four sub-median cephalic papillae and two large amphids were also observed. The anterior end of both male and female bore an excretory pore on the ventral side and a pair of lateral ciliated cervical papillae. In the female worm, the vulva was located in the middle and the eggs were characterized by smooth surfaces. The posterior end of the female worm was stumpy with two large phasmids in proximity to its extremity. The posterior end of the male had large lateral alae, joined together anteriorly across the ventral surface, with subequal and dissimilar spicules, as well as four pairs of stalked pre-cloacal papillae, three pairs of post-cloacal papillae, and two phasmids. Three sessile papillae occured anteriorly and four posteriorly to the cloaca. Conclusions The present SEM study provides the first in-depth morphological characterization of adult P. clausa, and highlights similarities and differences with P. bispiculata P. herthameyerae, Heliconema longissimum and Turgida turgida. PMID:23566611

  1. Accounting for Film-Forming and Damping Properties of Lubricants in Worm Gear Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Polyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers to use a curve of changing vibration amplitude of the rotating moment on the worm shaft of reducer in the process of growing brake (loading moment as one of criteria of the worm reducer operability. A condition of reducer operability at the nominal moment is lack of vibrations of the rotating moment with a critical value of amplitude.It is shown that vibrations of rotating moment on a shaft of the electric engine, by their nature, are self-vibrations in the system with "negative friction". Values of the brake moment at which there is a sharp increase of vibration amplitude leading to operability loss correspond to the nominal moment for this reducer or to the brake moment, corresponding to the maximum efficiency. It is shown that different lubricants differently influence on the generation of self-vibrations. The most efficient damping occurs when using oil with the additive "Striboil", and the reason of falling efficiency at the excess of the nominal moment is essentially increased energy losses at generation of vibrations with "negative friction", especially when approaching to the resonance area. Thus, taking into account a nature of damping vibrations, with using different lubricants, allows us to increase the permissible tension since the more is a damping value the more is a brake moment corresponding to the maximum efficiency. It is noted that, when using the additives to oils, a growth of the permissible tension is caused by the processes of film formation increasing the real contact area, which increases its share of the nominal contact area determined by the Hertz formula.

  2. Analysis of Intrusion Detection and Attack Proliferation in Computer Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Prahalad; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the popular models to describe computer worm propagation is the Susceptible-Infected (SI) model [1]. This model of worm propagation has been implemented on the simulation toolkit Network Simulator v2 (ns-2) [2]. The ns-2 toolkit has the capability to simulate networks of different topologies. The topology studied in this work, however, is that of a simple star-topology. This work introduces our initial efforts to learn the relevant quantities describing an infection given synthetic data obtained from running the ns-2 worm model. We aim to use Bayesian methods to gain a predictive understanding of how computer infections spread in real world network topologies. This understanding would greatly reinforce dissemination of targeted immunization strategies, which may prevent real-world epidemics. The data consist of reports of infection from a subset of nodes in a large network during an attack. The infection equation obtained from [1] enables us to derive a likelihood function for the infection reports. This prior information can be used in the Bayesian framework to obtain the posterior probabilities for network properties of interest, such as the rate at which nodes contact one another (also referred to as contact rate or scan rate). Our preliminary analyses indicate an effective spread rate of only 1/5th the actual scan rate used for a star-type of topology. This implies that as the population becomes saturated with infected nodes the actual spread rate will become much less than the scan rate used in the simulation.

  3. Sprouting as a gardening strategy to obtain superior supplementary food: evidence from a seed-caching marine worm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Z.; van Belzen, J.; Hong, T; Kunihiro, T.; Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P.M.J.; Bouma, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Abstract: Only a handful of non-human animals are known to grow their own food by cultivating high-yield fungal or algal crops as staple food. Here we report an alternative strategy utilized by an omnivorous marine worm Hediste

  4. Minyoo Matata - The Vicious Worm - A Taenia solium Computer-Based Health-Education Tool - in Swahili

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trevisan, Chiara; Fèvre, Eric M.; Owiny, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    Lack of knowledge is one of the main risk factors for the spread of the zoonotic parasite Taenia solium. The computer-based health-education tool 'The Vicious Worm' was developed to create awareness and provide evidence-based health education as a specific measure in control strategies. To increase...

  5. A novel extracellular gut symbiont in the marine worm Priapulus caudatus (Priapulida) reveals an alphaproteobacterial symbiont clade of the Ecdysozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroer, Paul; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2016-01-01

    Priapulus caudatus (phylum Priapulida) is a benthic marine predatory worm with a cosmopolitan distribution. In its digestive tract we detected symbiotic bacteria that were consistently present in specimens collected over eight years from three sites at the Swedish west coast. Based on their 16S r...

  6. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research…

  7. Worm burdens in outbred and inbred laboratory rats with morphometric data on Syphacia muris (Yamaguti, 1935 Yamaguti, 1941 (Nematoda, Oxyuroidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Magalhães Pinto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphacia muris worm burdens were evaluated in the rat Rattus norvegicus of the strains Wistar (outbred, Low/M and AM/2/Torr (inbred, maintained conventionally in institutional animal houses in Brazil. Morphometrics and illustration data for S. muris recovered from Brazilian laboratory rats are provided for the first time since its proposition in 1935.

  8. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from creosote-contaminated soil in selected plants and the oligochaete worm Enchytraeus crypticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann-Sofie Allard; Marianne Malmberg; Alasdair H. Neilson; Mikael Remberger [IVL, Stockholm (Sweden). Swedish Environmental Research Institute

    2005-07-01

    The accumulation of PAHs from a creosote-contaminated soil was examined in laboratory experiments using English ryegrass (Lolium perenne), white clover (Trifolium repens) and radish (Raphanus sativus), and the oligochaete worm Enchytraeus crypticus. Toxicity to the plants and the worms was assessed, and a soil sample mixed with calcined sand was used for accumulation experiments to avoid interference from toxicity in the soil. Accumulation of potentially carcinogenic PAHs varied among the plants, and there was a linear relation between concentrations of PAHs in the soil and in the plants. Correlations between values of the biota-soil accumulation factors and octanol-water partition coefficients, or water solubility varied among the plants and were rather weak, so that lipophilic character or water solubility of the PAHs alone cannot explain PAH accumulation. Accumulation of carcinogenic PAHs from the soil, in the presence of the other PAHs was greatest for Trifolium repens. PAHs were accumulated in the oligochaete worm (Enchytraeus crypticus), and biota-soil accumulation factors exceeded those for the plants. It is suggested that site-specific evaluation of contaminated sites should include not only chemical analysis and evaluation of toxicity but also accumulation of contaminants into biota such as plants and worms.

  9. The carbon to nitrogen ratio in isoenergetic wheat based diets controls the growth rate of the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, B.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Temmink, H.

    2016-01-01

    The aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv) contains high levels of proteins and can provide an excellent fish food. Large-scale production of Lv on low value organic substrates, such as by-products produced during wheat processing, therefore can be a promising and sustainable concept for the

  10. Using experimental de-worming to measure the immunological and pathological impacts of lungworm infection in cane toads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick B. Finnerty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunological and pathological consequences of parasite infection can be more rigorously assessed from experimental manipulation than from correlational studies of natural infections. We used anthelmintic treatment to experimentally decrease intensities of lungworm infection in captive and free-ranging wild cane toads to assess parasite impacts on host immune responses. First, we administered the anthelmintic drug Ivermectin to both infected and uninfected toads, to distinguish drug effects per se from the impacts of killing lungworms. Worms began dying and decomposing <48 h after injection. The only immunological variables that were affected by anthelmintic treatment were bactericidal capacity of the blood which increased in parasitized toads (presumably triggered by decomposing worms in the lungs, and the phagocytic capacity of blood (which increased in both infected and uninfected toads; the latter effect presumably was caused by the injection of Ivermectin per se rather than removal of parasites. Second, we looked at correlates of variation in the infection intensity induced by de-worming (in both captive and free-ranging toads over an eight-week period. Heavier lungworm infection was associated with increased phagocytic ability of the host's blood, and a reduction in the host's liver mass (and hence, energy stores. Experimental de-worming thus revealed pathological and immunological costs of the presence of lungworms, and of their removal by anthelmintic injection. Keywords: Rhinella marina, Bufo marinus, Host, Parasite, Nematode

  11. Abundance and population structure of eastern worm snakes in forest stands with various levels of overstory tree retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary I. Felix; Yong Wang; Callie Jo Schweitzer

    2010-01-01

    In-depth analyses of a species’ response to canopy retention treatments can provide insight into reasons for observed changes in abundance. The eastern worm snake (Carphophis amoenus amoenus Say) is common in many eastern deciduous forests, yet little is known about the ecology of the species in managed forests. We examined the relationship between...

  12. Global coordination and standardisation in marine biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS and related databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Costello

    Full Text Available The World Register of Marine Species is an over 90% complete open-access inventory of all marine species names. Here we illustrate the scale of the problems with species names, synonyms, and their classification, and describe how WoRMS publishes online quality assured information on marine species. Within WoRMS, over 100 global, 12 regional and 4 thematic species databases are integrated with a common taxonomy. Over 240 editors from 133 institutions and 31 countries manage the content. To avoid duplication of effort, content is exchanged with 10 external databases. At present WoRMS contains 460,000 taxonomic names (from Kingdom to subspecies, 368,000 species level combinations of which 215,000 are currently accepted marine species names, and 26,000 related but non-marine species. Associated information includes 150,000 literature sources, 20,000 images, and locations of 44,000 specimens. Usage has grown linearly since its launch in 2007, with about 600,000 unique visitors to the website in 2011, and at least 90 organisations from 12 countries using WoRMS for their data management. By providing easy access to expert-validated content, WoRMS improves quality control in the use of species names, with consequent benefits to taxonomy, ecology, conservation and marine biodiversity research and management. The service manages information on species names that would otherwise be overly costly for individuals, and thus minimises errors in the application of nomenclature standards. WoRMS' content is expanding to include host-parasite relationships, additional literature sources, locations of specimens, images, distribution range, ecological, and biological data. Species are being categorised as introduced (alien, invasive, of conservation importance, and on other attributes. These developments have a multiplier effect on its potential as a resource for biodiversity research and management. As a consequence of WoRMS, we are witnessing improved

  13. Global Coordination and Standardisation in Marine Biodiversity through the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) and Related Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Philippe; Boxshall, Geoff; Fauchald, Kristian; Gordon, Dennis; Hoeksema, Bert W.; Poore, Gary C. B.; van Soest, Rob W. M.; Stöhr, Sabine; Walter, T. Chad; Vanhoorne, Bart; Decock, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The World Register of Marine Species is an over 90% complete open-access inventory of all marine species names. Here we illustrate the scale of the problems with species names, synonyms, and their classification, and describe how WoRMS publishes online quality assured information on marine species. Within WoRMS, over 100 global, 12 regional and 4 thematic species databases are integrated with a common taxonomy. Over 240 editors from 133 institutions and 31 countries manage the content. To avoid duplication of effort, content is exchanged with 10 external databases. At present WoRMS contains 460,000 taxonomic names (from Kingdom to subspecies), 368,000 species level combinations of which 215,000 are currently accepted marine species names, and 26,000 related but non-marine species. Associated information includes 150,000 literature sources, 20,000 images, and locations of 44,000 specimens. Usage has grown linearly since its launch in 2007, with about 600,000 unique visitors to the website in 2011, and at least 90 organisations from 12 countries using WoRMS for their data management. By providing easy access to expert-validated content, WoRMS improves quality control in the use of species names, with consequent benefits to taxonomy, ecology, conservation and marine biodiversity research and management. The service manages information on species names that would otherwise be overly costly for individuals, and thus minimises errors in the application of nomenclature standards. WoRMS' content is expanding to include host-parasite relationships, additional literature sources, locations of specimens, images, distribution range, ecological, and biological data. Species are being categorised as introduced (alien, invasive), of conservation importance, and on other attributes. These developments have a multiplier effect on its potential as a resource for biodiversity research and management. As a consequence of WoRMS, we are witnessing improved communication within the

  14. Urban pollution of sediments: Impact on the physiology and burrowing activity of tubificid worms and consequences on biogeochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigneret, M., E-mail: mathilde.pigneret@univ-lyon1.fr [LEHNA, UMR CNRS 5023, Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, ENTPE, 6 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Mermillod-Blondin, F.; Volatier, L.; Romestaing, C. [LEHNA, UMR CNRS 5023, Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, ENTPE, 6 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Maire, E.; Adrien, J. [MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, INSA de Lyon, 25 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Guillard, L.; Roussel, D.; Hervant, F. [LEHNA, UMR CNRS 5023, Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, ENTPE, 6 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-10-15

    In urban areas, infiltration basins are designed to manage stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of associated pollutants. The sedimentary layer deposited at the surface of these structures is highly organic and multicontaminated (mainly heavy metals and hydrocarbons). Only few aquatic species are able to maintain permanent populations in such an extreme environment, including the oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. Nevertheless, the impact of urban pollutants on these organisms and the resulting influence on infiltration basin functioning remain poorly studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine how polluted sediments could impact the survival, the physiology and the bioturbation activity of L. hoffmeisteri and thereby modify biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface. To this end, we conducted laboratory incubations of worms, in polluted sediments from infiltration basins or slightly polluted sediments from a stream. Analyses were performed to evaluate physiological state and burrowing activity (X-ray micro-tomography) of worms and their influences on biogeochemical processes (nutrient fluxes, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} degassing rates) during 30-day long experiments. Our results showed that worms exhibited physiological responses to cope with high pollution levels, including a strong ability to withstand the oxidative stress linked to contamination with heavy metals. We also showed that the presence of urban pollutants significantly increased the burrowing activity of L. hoffmeisteri, demonstrating the sensitivity and the relevance of such a behavioural response as biomarker of sediment toxicity. In addition, we showed that X-ray micro-tomography was an adequate technique for accurate and non-invasive three-dimensional investigations of biogenic structures formed by bioturbators. The presence of worms induced stimulations of nutrient fluxes and organic matter recycling (between + 100% and 200% of CO

  15. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae) from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Sergi; Riesgo, Ana; Bas, Maria; Arnedo, Miquel A; Cristobo, Javier; Rouse, Greg W; Avila, Conxita

    2015-01-01

    Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs) have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica) and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic). We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I-COI-), using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI) although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. 'mediterranea') recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma) and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma) concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. 'mediterranea' to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from Deception

  16. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Taboada

    Full Text Available Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic. We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I-COI-, using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. 'mediterranea' recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. 'mediterranea' to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from

  17. Bone-Eating Worms Spread: Insights into Shallow-Water Osedax (Annelida, Siboglinidae) from Antarctic, Subantarctic, and Mediterranean Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Sergi; Riesgo, Ana; Bas, Maria; Arnedo, Miquel A.; Cristobo, Javier; Rouse, Greg W.; Avila, Conxita

    2015-01-01

    Osedax, commonly known as bone-eating worms, are unusual marine annelids belonging to Siboglinidae and represent a remarkable example of evolutionary adaptation to a specialized habitat, namely sunken vertebrate bones. Usually, females of these animals live anchored inside bone owing to a ramified root system from an ovisac, and obtain nutrition via symbiosis with Oceanospirillales gamma-proteobacteria. Since their discovery, 26 Osedax operational taxonomic units (OTUs) have been reported from a wide bathymetric range in the Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. Using experimentally deployed and naturally occurring bones we report here the presence of Osedax deceptionensis at very shallow-waters in Deception Island (type locality; Antarctica) and at moderate depths near South Georgia Island (Subantarctic). We present molecular evidence in a new phylogenetic analysis based on five concatenated genes (28S rDNA, Histone H3, 18S rDNA, 16S rDNA, and cytochrome c oxidase I–COI–), using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference, supporting the placement of O. deceptionensis as a separate lineage (Clade VI) although its position still remains uncertain. This phylogenetic analysis includes a new unnamed species (O. ‘mediterranea’) recently discovered in the shallow-water Mediterranean Sea belonging to Osedax Clade I. A timeframe of the diversification of Osedax inferred using a Bayesian framework further suggests that Osedax diverged from other siboglinids during the Middle Cretaceous (ca. 108 Ma) and also indicates that the most recent common ancestor of Osedax extant lineages dates to the Late Cretaceous (ca. 74.8 Ma) concomitantly with large marine reptiles and teleost fishes. We also provide a phylogenetic framework that assigns newly-sequenced Osedax endosymbionts of O. deceptionensis and O. ‘mediterranea’ to ribospecies Rs1. Molecular analysis for O. deceptionensis also includes a COI-based haplotype network indicating that individuals from

  18. Influence of tubificid worms on nutrient fluxes across water-sediment interface in fish farm settling ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puigagut J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of tubificid worms on nutrient translocation from water to fish farm sediments accumulating in settling ponds was addressed under laboratory conditions. Small microcosms of 0.5 L were filled up with 35 g of sludge from a fish farm settling pond and 0.15 L of filtered settling pond water. The experimental set up consisted of one control line (no worms added, a second experimental line with 1 mg of tubificid worms·g-1 fresh sediment (550 individuals·m-2 and a third experimental line with 40 mg of tubificid worms·g-1 fresh sediment (22 000 individuals·m-2. Nutrients translocation was determined by monitoring overlaying water concentration of ammonia, nitrate and phosphate for ten days. Results showed that abundances of 550 individuals·m-2 had no significant influence on the fluxes of nutrients here considered. However, the influence of higher abundances of tubificids (22 000 individuals·m-2 was of significant extent on the translocation of nitrate and phosphate. Accordingly, bioturbation of tubificids caused 55% lower nitrate uptake by the sediment when compared to control conditions. Phosphorus released by the sediments of the control condition was ca. 90% higher than that recorded under abundances of tubificids (22 000 individuals·m-2. Results obtained allowed us to estimate that fish farm settling ponds highly colonized by tubificid worms (22 000 individuals·m-2 may contribute to decrease phosphorus discharge (in terms of soluble phosphorus in ca. 5 g of P·ton-1 of fish produced.

  19. Transcriptomic and proteomic insights into innate immunity and adaptations to a symbiotic lifestyle in the gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippler, Juliane; Kleiner, Manuel; Lott, Christian; Gruhl, Alexander; Abraham, Paul E; Giannone, Richard J; Young, Jacque C; Hettich, Robert L; Dubilier, Nicole

    2016-11-21

    The gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis has a completely reduced digestive and excretory system, and lives in an obligate nutritional symbiosis with bacterial symbionts. While considerable knowledge has been gained of the symbionts, the host has remained largely unstudied. Here, we generated transcriptomes and proteomes of O. algarvensis to better understand how this annelid worm gains nutrition from its symbionts, how it adapted physiologically to a symbiotic lifestyle, and how its innate immune system recognizes and responds to its symbiotic microbiota. Key adaptations to the symbiosis include (i) the expression of gut-specific digestive enzymes despite the absence of a gut, most likely for the digestion of symbionts in the host's epidermal cells; (ii) a modified hemoglobin that may bind hydrogen sulfide produced by two of the worm's symbionts; and (iii) the expression of a very abundant protein for oxygen storage, hemerythrin, that could provide oxygen to the symbionts and the host under anoxic conditions. Additionally, we identified a large repertoire of proteins involved in interactions between the worm's innate immune system and its symbiotic microbiota, such as peptidoglycan recognition proteins, lectins, fibrinogen-related proteins, Toll and scavenger receptors, and antimicrobial proteins. We show how this worm, over the course of evolutionary time, has modified widely-used proteins and changed their expression patterns in adaptation to its symbiotic lifestyle and describe expressed components of the innate immune system in a marine oligochaete. Our results provide further support for the recent realization that animals have evolved within the context of their associations with microbes and that their adaptive responses to symbiotic microbiota have led to biological innovations.

  20. Ultrastructural study on the morphological changes to male worms of Schistosoma mansoni after in vitro exposure to allicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caliandra Maria Bezerra Luna Lima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Garlic has a wide range of actions, including antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiprotozoal and anthelmintic actions. This antiparasitic activity has been attributed to allicin, which is the main constituent of garlic. The present study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of allicin on the tegument of adult Schistosoma mansoni worms using scanning electron microscopy. METHODS: Swiss Webster mice were infected with S. mansoni cercariae (100 per mouse and sacrificed 50 days later to acquire the adult worms. These worms were collected by perfusion and placed in RPMI medium 1,640 at 37°C before transferring to RPMI media containing 0 (control, 5, 10, 15 and 20mg/mL of allicin, where they were incubated for 2h. The worms were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde solution, washed twice, post-fixed in osmium tetroxide, washed twice and then dehydrated with ascending grades of ethanol. The samples were air-dried, mounted on stubs, gold coated in an ion sputtering unit and viewed using a scanning electron microscope. RESULTS: A concentration of 5mg/mL caused wrinkling in the tegument; a concentration of 10mg/mL resulted in changes to tubercles and loss or modification of spines. With 15 and 20mg/mL increasing damage to the tegument could be seen, such as vesicle formation and the presence of ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate the effect of allicin on adult S. mansoni worms and indicate that most of the changes occur at concentrations greater than that normally indicated for treatment.

  1. A reversible bipolar WORM device based on AlOxNy thin film with Al nano phase embedded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.; Hu, X. C.

    2017-03-01

    An Al-rich AlOxNy thin film based reversible Write-Once-Read-Many-Times (WORM) memory device with MIS structure could transit from high resistance state (HRS, ∼1011 Ω) to low resistance state (LRS, ∼105 Ω) by sweeping voltage up to ∼20 V. The first switching could be recorded as writing process for WORM device which may relate to conductive path are formed through the thin film. The conductive path should be formed by both Al nano phase and oxygen vacancies. Among of them, Al nano phases are not easy to move, but oxygen vacancies could migrate under high E-field or at high temperature environment. Such conductive path is not sensitive to charging effect after it formed, but it could be broken by heating effect, which may relate to the migration of excess Al ions and oxygen vacancies at high temperature. After baking LRS (ON state) WORM device at 200 °C for 2 min, the conductivity will decrease to HRS which indicates conductive path is broken and device back to HRS (OFF state) again. This phenomenon could be recorded as recovery process. Both writing and recovery process related to migration of oxygen vacancies and could be repeated over 10 times in this study. It also indicates that there is no permanent breakdown occurred in MIS structured WORM device operation. We suggest that this conductive path only can be dissolved by a temperature sensitive electro-chemical action. This WORM device could maintain at LRS over 105 s with on-off ratio over 4 orders.

  2. The influence of worm age, duration of exposure and endpoint selection on bioassay sensitivity for Neanthes arenaceodentata (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridges, T.S. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Waterways Experiment Station; Farrar, J.D. [AScI Corp., Vicksburg, MS (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The influence of worm age, duration of exposure, and endpoint selection on bioassay sensitivity were evaluated for Neanthes arenaceodentata. Worms were exposed to contaminated sediment collected from Black Rock Harbor (BRH) near Bridgeport, Connecticut, USA. This sediment was diluted with clean control sediment to result in five experimental treatments: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% BRH. Three exposure scenarios were employed: (1) a 4-week exposure beginning with newly emerged juveniles (EJ-4w), (2) a 7-week exposure beginning with newly emerged juveniles (EJ-7w), and (3) a 4-week exposure beginning with 3-week-old juveniles (3WO-4w). Six measures of worm size were recorded at the conclusion of each exposure to evaluate differences among measurement endpoints. Survival was significantly reduced at the 25% BRH level for the EJ-7w scenario and at the 100% BRH level for the EJ-4w and 3WO-4w scenarios. Growth was significantly reduced at the 25% BRH level in each exposure scenario. Estimates based on the calculated minimum detectable difference indicated that considerably lower concentrations of BRH (6--10%) should be distinguishable by measuring effects on Neanthes growth. Worm size measured in terms of projected area, dry weight, and ash-free dry weight provided the most sensitive measures of effects. Increasing the length of exposure from 4 to 7 weeks and initiating exposures with emergent juveniles rather than 3-week-old worms increased the sensitivity of the bioassay. The results of this study demonstrate that N. arenacedentata is sensitive to the presence of sediment-associated contaminants and that test animal age, duration of exposure, and choice of endpoint can have a large effect on the magnitude of the toxic response observed.

  3. Contrasting evolutionary histories of the legless lizards slow worms (Anguis) shaped by the topography of the Balkan Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Daniel; Jandzik, David; Mikulíček, Peter; Džukić, Georg; Ljubisavljević, Katarina; Tzankov, Nikolay; Jelić, Dušan; Thanou, Evanthia; Moravec, Jiří; Gvoždík, Václav

    2016-05-10

    Genetic architecture of a species is a result of historical changes in population size and extent of distribution related to climatic and environmental factors and contemporary processes of dispersal and gene flow. Population-size and range contractions, expansions and shifts have a substantial effect on genetic diversity and intraspecific divergence, which is further shaped by gene-flow limiting barriers. The Balkans, as one of the most important sources of European biodiversity, is a region where many temperate species persisted during the Pleistocene glaciations and where high topographic heterogeneity offers suitable conditions for local adaptations of populations. In this study, we investigated the phylogeographical patterns and demographic histories of four species of semifossorial slow-worm lizards (genus Anguis) present in the Balkan Peninsula, and tested the relationship between genetic diversity and topographic heterogeneity of the inhabited ranges. We inferred phylogenetic relationships, compared genetic structure and historical demography of slow worms using nucleotide sequence variation of mitochondrial DNA. Four Anguis species with mostly parapatric distributions occur in the Balkan Peninsula. They show different levels of genetic diversity. A signature of population growth was detected in all four species but with various courses in particular populations. We found a strong correlation between genetic diversity of slow-worm populations and topographic ruggedness of the ranges (mountain systems) they inhabit. Areas with more rugged terrain harbour higher genetic diversity. Phylogeographical pattern of the genus Anguis in the Balkans is concordant with the refugia-within-refugia model previously proposed for both several other taxa in the region and other main European Peninsulas. While slow-worm populations from the southern refugia mostly have restricted distributions and have not dispersed much from their refugial areas, populations from the extra

  4. Advancing Global Health - The Need for (Better) Social Science Comment on "Navigating Between Stealth Advocacy and Unconscious Dogmatism: The Challenge of Researching the Norms, Politics and Power of Global Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Johanna

    2016-02-06

    In his perspective "Navigating between stealth advocacy and unconscious dogmatism: the challenge of researching the norms, politics and power of global health," Ooms argues that actions taken in the field of global health are dependent not only on available resources, but on the normative premise that guides how these resources are spent. This comment sets out how the application of a predominately biomedical positivist research tradition in global health, has potentially limited understanding of the value judgements underlying decisions in the field. To redress this critical social science, including health policy analysis has much to offer, to the field of global health including on questions of governance. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  5. Process query systems for network security monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Vincent; Fox, Naomi

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we present the architecture of our network security monitoring infrastructure based on a Process Query System (PQS). PQS offers a new and powerful way of efficiently processing data streams, based on process descriptions that are submitted as queries. In this case the data streams are familiar network sensors, such as Snort, Netfilter, and Tripwire. The process queries describe the dynamics of network attacks and failures, such as worms, multistage attacks, and router failures. Using PQS the task of monitoring enterprise class networks is simplified, offering a priority-based GUI to the security administrator that clearly outlines events that require immediate attention. The PQS-Net system is deployed on an unsecured production network; the system has successfully detected many diverse attacks and failures.

  6. Collective Dynamics in Physical and Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Alexander

    We study four systems where individual units come together to display a range of collective behavior. First, we consider a physical system of phase oscillators on a network that expands the Kuramoto model to include oscillator-network interactions and the presence of noise: using a Hebbian-like learning rule, oscillators that synchronize in turn strengthen their connections to each other. We find that the average degree of connectivity strongly affects rates of flipping between aligned and anti-aligned states, and that this result persists to the case of complex networks. Turning to a fully multi-player, multi-strategy evolutionary dynamics model of cooperating bacteria that change who they give resources to and take resources from, we find several regimes that give rise to high levels of collective structure in the resulting networks. In this setting, we also explore the conditions in which an intervention that affects cooperation itself (e.g. "seeding the network with defectors") can lead to wiping out an infection. We find a non-monotonic connection between the percent of disabled cooperation and cure rate, suggesting that in some regimes a limited perturbation can lead to total population collapse. At a larger scale, we study how the locomotor system recovers after amputation in fruit flies. Through experiment and a theoretical model of multi-legged motion controlled by neural oscillators, we find that proprioception plays a role in the ability of flies to control leg forces appropriately to recover from a large initial turning bias induced by the injury. Finally, at the human scale, we consider a social network in a traditional society in Africa to understand how social ties lead to group formation for collective action (stealth raids). We identify critical and distinct roles for both leadership (important for catalyzing a group) and friendship (important for final composition). We conclude with prospects for future work.

  7. Metabolic rates, enzyme activities and chemical compositions of some deep-sea pelagic worms, particularly Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuesen, Erik V.; Childress, James J.

    1993-05-01

    Investigations of metabolic rate, enzyme activity and chemical composition were undertaken on two abundant deep-sea pelagic worms: Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta). Six other species of worms ( Pelagonemertes brinkmanni (Nemertea) and the following polychaetes: Pelagobia species A, Tomopteris nisseni, Tomopteris pacifica, Tomopteris species A, and Traviopsis lobifera) were captured in smaller numbers and used for comparison in the physiological and biochemical measurements. Polychaete worms had the highest oxygen consumption rates and, along with N. mirabilis, displayed significant size effects on metabolic rate. Poeobius meseres had the lowest rates of oxygen consumption and displayed no significant relationship of oxygen consumption rate to wet weight. No significant effect of size on the activities of citrate synthase, lactate dehydrogenase or pyruvate kinase was observed in P. meseres or N. mirabilis. Lipid content was higher than protein content for all the worms in this study. Carbohydrate was of little significance in these worms and was usually <0.01% of the total weight. Citrate synthase activities of pelagic worms showed excellent correlation with metabolic rates. It appears that polychaete worms as a group have higher metabolic rates than bathypelagic shrimps, copepods and fishes, and may be the animals with the highest metabolic rates in the bathypelagic regions of the world's oceans.

  8. Non chemical control of helminths in ruminants: adapting solutions for changing worms in a changing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J

    2011-08-04

    Infections with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) remain a major threat for ruminant production, health and welfare associated with outdoor breeding. The control of these helminth parasites has relied on the strategic or tactical use of chemical anthelmintic (AH) drugs. However, the expanding development and diffusion of anthelmintic resistance in nematode populations imposes the need to explore and validate novel solutions (or to re-discover old knowledge) for a more sustainable control of GIN. The different solutions refer to three main principles of action. The first one is to limit the contact between the hosts and the infective larvae in the field through grazing management methods. The latter were described since the 1970s and, at present, they benefit from innovations based on computer models. Several biological control agents have also been studied in the last three decades as potential tools to reduce the infective larvae in the field. The second principle aims at improving the host response against GIN infections relying on the genetic selection between or within breeds of sheep or goats, crossbreeding of resistant and susceptible breeds and/or the manipulation of nutrition. These approaches may benefit from a better understanding of the potential underlying mechanisms, in particular in regard of the host immune response against the worms. The third principle is the control of GIN based on non-conventional AH materials (plant or mineral compounds). Worldwide studies show that non conventional AH materials can eliminate worms and/or negatively affect the parasite's biology. The recent developments and pros and cons concerning these various options are discussed. Last, some results are presented which illustrate how the integration of these different solutions can be efficient and applicable in different systems of production and/or epidemiological conditions. The integration of different control tools seems to be a pre-requisite for the sustainable

  9. Long-Term Effects of Dredging Operations Program. Development of a Chronic Sublethal Bioassay for Evaluating Contaminated Sediment with the Marine Polychaete Worm Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    arenaceodentata is well doc- or absence of eggs in the coelom [211. Unpaired umented [11,201. As worms approach sexual ma- worms are not returned to...their own and begin to feed. Juvenile mixed with other broods and returned to the 38-L worms grow and eggs become visible in the coelom aquaria to...9 EGGS VISIBLE 8 IN THE COELOM P 07 -- 6 05LLI 5 4 - cc:C) 3 - 21 0 0 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 WEEKS POST-EMERGENCE Fig. 1. Growth of Nereis (Neanthes

  10. Study of the formation and solution properties of worm-like micelles formed using both N-hexadecyl-N-methylpiperidinium bromide-based cationic surfactant and anionic surfactant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihu Yan

    Full Text Available The viscoelastic properties of worm-like micelles formed by mixing the cationic surfactant N-hexadecyl-N-methylpiperidinium bromide (C16MDB with the anionic surfactant sodium laurate (SL in aqueous solutions were investigated using rheological measurements. The effects of sodium laurate and temperature on the worm-like micelles and the mechanism of the observed shear thinning phenomenon and pseudoplastic behavior were systematically investigated. Additionally, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images further ascertained existence of entangled worm-like micelles.

  11. Risk of parasitic worm infection from eating raw fish in Hawai'i: a physician's survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, J John; Medina, Lorraine B

    2009-10-01

    Public health concerns have been raised over the risk of parasitic helminth (roundworm, tapeworm and fluke) infections from eating raw fish, an increasing US consumer trend. Hawai'i consumers eat seafood at nearly 3 times the US national average rate, with a long tradition and high level of raw fish consumption. The local fish species commonly eaten raw in Hawai'i include tuna (bigeye, yellowfin, albacore and skipjack), marlin (blue and striped) and deepwater snappers (long-tailedred, pink and blue green). Forty-eight Hawai'i-based physicians (gastroenterologists, internists, general and family practitioners) were surveyed to count known cases of parasitic worm infection linked to raw fish consumption and to explore physicians' perceptions of risk associated with the consumption of fresh, never frozen local fish with an emphasis on raw tuna and skipjack. No single known case of helminth infection due to consumption of raw tuna or skipjack, or other local fish species caught in Hawai'i was reported. The majority of the physicians surveyed reported that they eat raw yellowfin and bigeye tuna, also eat raw skipjack and do not think that these fish present a significant health risk of helminthic parasites. The survey results support the conclusion that the risk of parasitic helminth infection from the consumption of Hawai'i-caught tuna, skipjack, marlin and deepwater snappers is negligible.

  12. Extracellular micro and nanostructures forming the velvet worm solidified adhesive secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Ureña, Yendry Regina; Sanchez, Angie; Pereira, Reinaldo; Rischka, Klaus; Kowalik, Thomas; Vega-Baudrit, José

    2017-12-01

    The onychophoran Epiperipatus hilkae secrets a sticky slime that solidifies almost immediately upon contact with air and under high humidy environmental condition forming a glassy like material. The general adhesive biochemical composition, the releasing and hardening mechanism have been partially described in literature. In this study, the structural characterization of the extracellular microstructures and nanostructures forming the solid adhesive of the secretion from Epiperipatus hilkae velvet worm is presented. The adhesive secretion is formed by macro-threads, which, in their solid state, are composed of globular particles approximately 700 nm in diameter that are distributed homogeneously throughout the matrix surface, and nanoparticles approximately 70 nm in diameter that and 6 nm in height self-assemble forming fiber-like structures. Nanoparticules with approximately 2 nm heights and others with non roundish forms are also observed. These 70 nm nano particles could be associated to proteins that form high density coverage films with low roughness; suggesting the formation of 2D ordered films. A crystalline and an amorphous phase composes the solidified secretion. The glassy or viscoelastic properties depend on the time in contact with air before being adhered to a solid surface and/or the mechanical stimulus; suggesting a key role of the drying on the hardening process.

  13. Nodding syndrome may be an autoimmune reaction to the parasitic worm Onchocerca volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tory P; Tyagi, Richa; Lee, Paul R; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Johnson, Kory R; Kowalak, Jeffrey; Elkahloun, Abdel; Medynets, Marie; Hategan, Alina; Kubofcik, Joseph; Sejvar, James; Ratto, Jeffrey; Bunga, Sudhir; Makumbi, Issa; Aceng, Jane R; Nutman, Thomas B; Dowell, Scott F; Nath, Avindra

    2017-02-15

    Nodding syndrome is an epileptic disorder of unknown etiology that occurs in children in East Africa. There is an epidemiological association with Onchocerca volvulus, the parasitic worm that causes onchocerciasis (river blindness), but there is limited evidence that the parasite itself is neuroinvasive. We hypothesized that nodding syndrome may be an autoimmune-mediated disease. Using protein chip methodology, we detected autoantibodies to leiomodin-1 more abundantly in patients with nodding syndrome compared to unaffected controls from the same village. Leiomodin-1 autoantibodies were found in both the sera and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with nodding syndrome. Leiomodin-1 was found to be expressed in mature and developing human neurons in vitro and was localized in mouse brain to the CA3 region of the hippocampus, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, and cortical neurons, structures that also appear to be affected in patients with nodding syndrome. Antibodies targeting leiomodin-1 were neurotoxic in vitro, and leiomodin-1 antibodies purified from patients with nodding syndrome were cross-reactive with O. volvulus antigens. This study provides initial evidence supporting the hypothesis that nodding syndrome is an autoimmune epileptic disorder caused by molecular mimicry with O. volvulus antigens and suggests that patients may benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Chronic toxicity of phenanthrene to the marine polychaete worm, Nereis (Neanthes) arenaceodentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.L. Jr.; Dillon, T.M. [USAE Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment. While environmental concentrations are generally below acutely, lethal levels, chronic, low level exposures may result in subtle sublethal effects. PAHs accumulate in bottom sediments and may represent a hazard to the benthos. Polychaetes are important members of this community. The objective of this study is to evaluate the chronic sublethal effects of one PAH, phenanthrene (PHN), on the polychaete worm, Nereis arenaceodentata. PHN was selected because of its high toxicity to marine invertebrates relative to other PAHs. The response of bivalves to heavy metals and other toxins has usually been determined by observing valve position. Since mussels close their valves to avoid noxious stimuli, experimental delivery of chemicals is uncertain. To obtain constant results. Preston employed plastic spacers to hold the valves apart. This obviates the observation of valve position as an index of response, and some other method is required. Electromyography of intact mussels is one such index, and is shown to be a simple, effective and quantitative measurement of activity. Experiments are reported on the effects of added mercury on salt water and fresh water species. Parts of this Nvork have appeared in brief form.

  15. Genome Instability in Development and Aging: Insights from Nucleotide Excision Repair in Humans, Mice, and Worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diletta Edifizi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage causally contributes to aging and cancer. Congenital defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER lead to distinct cancer-prone and premature aging syndromes. The genetics of NER mutations have provided important insights into the distinct consequences of genome instability. Recent work in mice and C. elegans has shed new light on the mechanisms through which developing and aging animals respond to persistent DNA damage. The various NER mouse mutants have served as important disease models for Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP, Cockayne syndrome (CS, and trichothiodystrophy (TTD, while the traceable genetics of C. elegans have allowed the mechanistic delineation of the distinct outcomes of genome instability in metazoan development and aging. Intriguingly, highly conserved longevity assurance mechanisms respond to transcription-blocking DNA lesions in mammals as well as in worms and counteract the detrimental consequences of persistent DNA damage. The insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS effector transcription factor DAF-16 could indeed overcome DNA damage-driven developmental growth delay and functional deterioration even when DNA damage persists. Longevity assurance mechanisms might thus delay DNA damage-driven aging by raising the threshold when accumulating DNA damage becomes detrimental for physiological tissue functioning.

  16. Genome Instability in Development and Aging: Insights from Nucleotide Excision Repair in Humans, Mice, and Worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edifizi, Diletta; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-08-13

    DNA damage causally contributes to aging and cancer. Congenital defects in nucleotide excision repair (NER) lead to distinct cancer-prone and premature aging syndromes. The genetics of NER mutations have provided important insights into the distinct consequences of genome instability. Recent work in mice and C. elegans has shed new light on the mechanisms through which developing and aging animals respond to persistent DNA damage. The various NER mouse mutants have served as important disease models for Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), while the traceable genetics of C. elegans have allowed the mechanistic delineation of the distinct outcomes of genome instability in metazoan development and aging. Intriguingly, highly conserved longevity assurance mechanisms respond to transcription-blocking DNA lesions in mammals as well as in worms and counteract the detrimental consequences of persistent DNA damage. The insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) effector transcription factor DAF-16 could indeed overcome DNA damage-driven developmental growth delay and functional deterioration even when DNA damage persists. Longevity assurance mechanisms might thus delay DNA damage-driven aging by raising the threshold when accumulating DNA damage becomes detrimental for physiological tissue functioning.

  17. [Anaemia in a school of rural Cambodia: detection, prevalence, and links with intestinal worms and malnutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, V; Odermatt, P; Mel, Y; Keluangkhot, V; Strobel, M

    2006-05-01

    According to WHO, half of the world's children suffers from anaemia, which is a silent and neglected endemic resulting from three major causes: iron deficiency intestinal worms and malaria. A two month transversal study was conducted in a rural primary school in Battambang Province, Cambodia, in a malaria-free area. The main objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of anaemia and two of its possible driving factors, intestinal parasites and general malnutrition; a secondary objective was to assess the accuracy of haemoglobin colour scale, an easy and cheap visual technique compared to spectrophotometry used as the reference. Among 168 school children (average age: 11), the prevalence rates of moderate and severe anaemia were 24% and nil respectively; average haemoglobin was 12.6 g/dl. These results compared favourably with previous data from Cambodia. In our study's conditions, the haemoglobin colour scale grossly overestimated the anaemia prevalence: 83 vs. 24%, specificity 22%. Despite its simplicity and very low cost, this technique appeared inaccurate. Anaemia was independently associated with Ancylostoma carriage (p = 0.05), and stunting (p = 0.01), which prevalences were 54% et 40% respectively; and this, despite a mebendazole 500 mg dose given 9 months prior to the study as part of a regular deworming school program. Although periodical mass deworming in schools does not prevent early Ancylostoma reinfection, it may reduce the severity of anaemia. It therefore appears fully justified, and may be strengthened, notably by switching from mebendazole to albendazole.

  18. Immuno-PCR for detection of antigen to Angiostrongylus cantonensis circulating fifth-stage worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chye, Soi-Moi; Lin, Shiu-Ru; Chen, Ya-Lei; Chung, Lee-Yi; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2004-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of infestation with Angiostrongylus cantonensis is difficult because the parasitic nematode is undetectable in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of one-half of afflicted patients and the diagnostic sensitivity of ELISA for circulating worm antigens in patient sera is low. We studied immuno-PCR as a diagnostic tool. We studied 30 controls and 60 afflicted patients (30 confirmed by parasitologic analysis of CSF). We used a monoclonal antibody to capture circulating A. cantonensis antigens in serum samples. A DNA label generated by PCR amplification with biotinylated primer was bound by use of streptavidin to a biotinylated third antibody. Circulating antigens sandwiched by monoclonal antibody were detected by PCR amplification of the DNA label. The detection limit of the ELISA was 100-1000 times higher than that of the immuno-PCR. The concentrations of circulating antigens in patients were markedly higher than those in controls (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, P <0.001). At a cutoff of 0.1 ng/L, sensitivity and specificity for immunodiagnosis of patients with angiostrongyliasis by immuno-PCR were 98% (95% confidence interval, 91-99%) and 100% (93-100%), respectively. The test was positive in all parasitologically confirmed cases. Immuno-PCR is a promising technique for diagnosis of A. cantonensis infestation.

  19. BENEFITS VERSUS RISKS OF PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS: ARE WE OPENING THE CAN OF WORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Ashraf Tadvi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide They are indicated for treatment of Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD, acid peptic disorders, stress ulcers and prophylaxis of NSAID induced ulcers.[1] PPIs are more efficacious than other drugs like histamine -2 receptor blockers for the treatment of these disorders.[1] Though PPIs are highly potent and effective acid suppressors they are often misused and prescribed irrationally. The incidence of irrational use of PPIs varies from 40-70 % in different studies. [2] In one of our previous studies 58 % of PPIs prescriptions were irrational. [2] These findings become much more significant in the light of recent findings which suggest correlation of long term use of PPIs to myocardial infarction and kidney injury. [3,4] The PPIs may be deemed safe for short term use but chronic use carries risk of hip fractures, infection with clostridium difficle, community acquired pneumonia.[2] PPIs exposure in elderly population was also found to be associated with hyperparathyroidism in one recently conducted study.[5] The ongoing long term studies for assessing the safety and association of PPIs with various serious outcomes may open up a new can of worms. Keeping in mind the benefits as well as risks of proton pump inhibitors, clinicians should judiciously use these drugs in practice. The patients should also be educated regarding the adverse outcomes of PPIs on long term therapy as these drugs are easily available without prescription.

  20. The developing schistosome worms elicit distinct immune responses in different tissue regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Maupin, Kevin A; Haab, Brian B; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T

    2013-08-01

    Schistosome parasites follow a complex migration path through various tissues, changing their antigenic profile as they develop. A thorough understanding of the antibody response in each tissue region could help unravel the complex immunology of these developing parasites and aid vaccine design. Here we used a novel strategy for analysing the local antibody responses induced by Schistosoma japonicum infection at each site of infection. Cells from rat lymph nodes draining the sites of larval migration (the skin and lungs), the liver-lymph nodes where adults reside and the spleens were cultured to allow the in vivo-induced antibody-secreting cells to release antibody into the media. The amount and isotype of antibodies secreted in the supernatants differed significantly in the different lymph nodes and spleen, corresponding with the migration path of the schistosome worms. In addition, there were significant differences in binding specificity, as determined by surface labelling, western blots and by screening a glycan array. Through capturing the local antibody response, this study has revealed dramatic differences in the quality and specificity of the immune response at different tissue sites, and highlighted the existence of stage-specific protein and carbohydrate antigens. This will provide a valuable tool for the isolation of novel vaccine targets against the larval stages of schistosomes.

  1. Christmas tree worms of Indo-Pacific coral reefs: untangling the Spirobranchus corniculatus (Grube, 1862) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willette, Demian A.; Iñiguez, Abril R.; Kupriyanova, Elena K.; Starger, Craig J.; Varman, Tristan; Toha, Abdul Hamid; Maralit, Benedict A.; Barber, Paul H.

    2015-09-01

    Christmas tree worm is the common name of a group of colorful serpulid polychaetes from the genus Spirobranchus that are symbionts of hermatypic corals. As is increasingly common with reef-associated organisms, Spirobranchus is arranged as a complex of species with overlapping geographic ranges. Current species delimitations based largely on opercular morphology are problematic because of high intraspecific variation. Here, a multi-gene phylogeny of the Spirobranchus corniculatus complex, which tentatively includes S. corniculatus, S. cruciger, and S. gaymardi, sampled from the Coral Triangle, Australia, and Fiji, was reconstructed to test whether the complex includes three genetically distinct lineages identifiable by their opercula. Maximum-likelihood analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial markers revealed a single, monophyletic clade for the S. corniculatus complex. Furthermore, the genetic and morphological variation observed is not geographically based, indicating that the former S. corniculatus complex of three morphospecies is a single, morphologically variable species across the Central Indo-Pacific. Resolving the taxonomy of S. corniculatus presents novel opportunities to utilize this tentative bio-indicator species for monitoring reef health.

  2. Effect of praziquantel on adult Echinostoma paraensei worms in experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Juliana; Souza, Joyce; Costa-Silva, Michele; Torres, Eduardo; Santana, André; Lanfredi, Reinalda; Maldonado, Arnaldo; Garcia, Juberlan

    2012-07-01

    Echinostomiasis is a food-borne intestinal, snail-mediated parasitosis caused principally by ingestion of snails infected with digenean trematodes of the Echinostoma genus. The treatment and control of trematodiasis is usually done by administration of praziquantel (PZQ). In this study, we evaluated the effect on Echinostoma paraensei of different doses of praziquantel through analysis of morphological parameters using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal scanning laser microscopy along with parasitological data. We used 30 female mice aged 4 weeks. Each animal was given 40 metacercarie of E. paraensei by gavage. The animals were divided into five groups, each group containing six animals, where one group was utilized as untreated control. Two weeks after infection, the mice were given praziquantel by gavage at total dosages of 12.5, 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg by body weight. Two days after treatment, the mice were euthanized in a CO(2) chamber for recovery of helminths in the small intestine. The doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg of praziquantel eliminated all the worms. There were significant differences (pworm elimination.

  3. Agent of whirling disease meets orphan worm: phylogenomic analyses firmly place Myxozoa in Cnidaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian P Nesnidal

    Full Text Available Myxozoa are microscopic obligate endoparasites with complex live cycles. Representatives are Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease in salmonids, and the enigmatic "orphan worm" Buddenbrockia plumatellae parasitizing in Bryozoa. Originally, Myxozoa were classified as protists, but later several metazoan characteristics were reported. However, their phylogenetic relationships remained doubtful. Some molecular phylogenetic analyses placed them as sister group to or even within Bilateria, whereas the possession of polar capsules that are similar to nematocysts of Cnidaria and of minicollagen genes suggest a close relationship between Myxozoa and Cnidaria. EST data of Buddenbrockia also indicated a cnidarian origin of Myxozoa, but were not sufficient to reject a closer relationship to bilaterians. Phylogenomic analyses of new genomic sequences of Myxobolus cerebralis firmly place Myxozoa as sister group to Medusozoa within Cnidaria. Based on the new dataset, the alternative hypothesis that Myxozoa form a clade with Bilateria can be rejected using topology tests. Sensitivity analyses indicate that this result is not affected by long branch attraction artifacts or compositional bias.

  4. Potential effects of warmer worms and vectors on onchocerciasis transmission in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheke, Robert A; Basáñez, Maria-Gloria; Perry, Malorie; White, Michael T; Garms, Rolf; Obuobie, Emmanuel; Lamberton, Poppy H L; Young, Stephen; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike Y; Intsiful, Joseph; Shen, Mingwang; Boakye, Daniel A; Wilson, Michael D

    2015-04-05

    Development times of eggs, larvae and pupae of vectors of onchocerciasis (Simulium spp.) and of Onchocerca volvulus larvae within the adult females of the vectors decrease with increasing temperature. At and above 25°C, the parasite could reach its infective stage in less than 7 days when vectors could transmit after only two gonotrophic cycles. After incorporating exponential functions for vector development into a novel blackfly population model, it was predicted that fly numbers in Liberia and Ghana would peak at air temperatures of 29°C and 34°C, about 3°C and 7°C above current monthly averages, respectively; parous rates of forest flies (Liberia) would peak at 29°C and of savannah flies (Ghana) at 30°C. Small temperature increases (less than 2°C) might lead to changes in geographical distributions of different vector taxa. When the new model was linked to an existing framework for the population dynamics of onchocerciasis in humans and vectors, transmission rates and worm loads were projected to increase with temperature to at least 33°C. By contrast, analyses of field data on forest flies in Liberia and savannah flies in Ghana, in relation to regional climate change predictions, suggested, on the basis of simple regressions, that 13-41% decreases in fly numbers would be expected between the present and before 2040. Further research is needed to reconcile these conflicting conclusions.

  5. Haemonchus contortus: identification of proteases with diverse characteristics in adult worm excretory-secretory products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanu, F N; Rurangirwa, F R; McGuire, T C; Jasmer, D P

    1993-11-01

    Host tissue penetration and feeding by helminth parasites may be mediated by both mechanical processes and histolytic products released by the parasites. To investigate potential histolytic products released by adult Haemonchus contortus worms, proteases in excretory-secretory (ES) products were analyzed. The optimum activity of ES proteases was at pH 5.0, although activity was observed over a wide range of pH tested (pH 3.0-9.0). Four protease bands were observed on gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels, with estimated molecular weights (M(r)) of 32, 35, 38, and 40 kDa. Proteases of 32 and 35 kDa were active at pH 5.0-8.0, while activity of the 38- and 40-kDa proteases was inhibited at pH 8.0. Based on inhibitor studies, the four proteases identified on gelatin-containing polyacrylamide gels were classified as cysteine proteases. Evidence was also obtained that indicated the presence of aspartic and metalloprotease activities in ES products, but these activities were not detected in gels. The diversity of adult H. contortus ES proteases may indicate variable functional requirements for the proteases. Further characterization of ES proteases will facilitate evaluation of their potential application in immunotherapeuti control of disease.

  6. Evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy of Fasciola adult worm vomit for serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsibaei, Mahmoud Mohamed; Ali, Nehad Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Ayman Nabil; Mohammed, Basant Osama

    2013-05-01

    The diagnostic efficacy of Fasciola gigantica adult worm vomit (AWV) preparation in diagnosis of human fasciolosis was evaluated using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Falcon assay screening test (FAST)-ELISA in comparison with F. gigantica adult total soluble extract (TSE). Sera of fasciolosis patients, patients with other parasitic diseases (hydatid disease, schistosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, and amebiasis), and sera of healthy individuals were enrolled in this study. The results showed that the sensitivity of both conventional ELISA and FAST-ELISA was improved from 95 % using TSE to 100 % when using AWV. The specificity of conventional ELISA was 93.3 % using TSE and increased to 96.7 % using AWV. The specificity of FAST-ELISA using TSE was 96.7 % and became 100 % AWV antigen. The diagnostic accuracy of conventional ELISA was 94 % using TSE and increased to 98 % using AWV. The diagnostic accuracy of FAST-ELISA was 96 % using TSE and increased to 100 % using AWV. It is concluded that both TSE and AWV antigenic preparations are efficient for use in the serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis.

  7. Proteomic analysis of the tegument and excretory-secretory products of adult Schistosoma bovis worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Oleaga, Ana

    2006-04-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a ruminant pathogen that is poorly known at a molecular level. With an aim of identifying the parasite proteins involved in host-parasite interplay, we studied two protein extracts that contain, respectively, the proteins excreted/secreted by the adult worm (ES) and the tegumental proteins exposed to the host (TG). The 2-DE, 2-D immunoblot and MS were employed to separate and identify the antigenic proteins and the most abundant non-antigenic proteins in each extract. There were some 400 and 600 spots detected in the ES and the TG extracts, respectively. Ninety-six spots were subjected to MS analysis and 64 of them were identified. Overall, we identified 18 S. bovis proteins located at the host-parasite interface, 16 of which have not been identified previously in this parasite, and one of which -lysozyme- has never been reported in a Schistosoma species. Of the proteins identified, at least 4 can counteract host defence mechanisms. The other proteins are also likely to play some role in the host-parasite relationships. Therefore, studies in grater depth on all these proteins will provide a better understanding of how this parasite interacts with its host and new strategies for anti-schistosome drug or vaccine design.

  8. Ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and operative findings in dogs infested with giant kidney worms (Dioctophyme renale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Sheila C; Mamprim, Maria J; Oliveira, Hugo S; Mesquita, Luciane R; Faria, Luis G; Takahira, Regina K; Matsubara, Lídia M; Agostinho, Felipe S

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare ultrasonographic, CT, and surgical findings in dogs infested with giant kidney worms (Dioctophyme renale). DESIGN--Case series. ANIMALS--15 crossbred dogs infected with D renale. PROCEDURES--Immediately after ultrasonography was performed with dogs in dorsal recumbency, sequential transverse images of the abdomen were acquired with a helical CT scanner. After plain CT, contrast CT was performed with a nonionic iodinated contrast agent. Subsequently, exploratory celiotomy was performed. RESULTS--In the corticomedullary area of the right kidney of 12 dogs, ultrasonography revealed several ring-like structures with an echogenic wall and anechoic central area in the transverse plane and arrayed as bands in the longitudinal plane. Similar structures were observed in the abdominal cavity of 10 dogs. In 13 dogs, CT revealed loss of corticomedullary differentiation in the right kidney, with discrete uptake of contrast material in the periphery of the kidney, and several ring-like or elongated structures with a hyperdense wall and hypodense center. In 11 dogs, the same structures were observed free in the abdominal cavity. Surgery revealed that 13 dogs had a damaged right kidney that required nephrectomy. Parasites were found free in the abdominal cavity of 7 dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE--Ultrasonography and CT were effective imaging methods for detecting D renale in the kidney and less effective for detecting parasites in the abdominal cavity. Care should be taken to avoid erroneously interpreting normal structures as parasites, especially in the abdominal cavity.

  9. Selenium incorporated in vegetable material for the obtaining of worm flour and compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulbio Alcivar Cedeño

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was done to evaluate the quality of the earthworm flour fed with the addition of selenium. Two groups with three replicates were used; a food made of sterilized vegetable waste and other with the addition of soya (5% as a source of selenium. Temperature, humidity, and pH were controlled to ensure the optimal growth of earthworms. A 0.5 g sample of both groups replicates was weighed in order to determine the amount of Na, K, Fe, Ca, Zn, Mg, Mn, Cu, Li, Se, Hg and Pb. The humus quality provided by the samples was also qualitatively analyzed, and the amount of moisture, protein, dry matter, fat, ash, crude fiber and soluble carbohydrates were determined. The amount of the elements Ca, Fe, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn and Li was satisfactory because the flour had concentrations similar to the conventional worm flour, which is first achieved for this type of product. The amount of protein and lipid was also high similar to the conventional foods derived from animals. No heavy metals were found. Remarkably, the use of Eisenia foetida Savigny extracts can be used as a dietary supplement in amounts less than 1 g per person, which minimizes the risk of heavy metals. The application of humus from earthworms that were fed with a diet that contained selenium, corn plants obtained were significantly different from the untreated ones.

  10. The mitochondrial genomes of the acoelomorph worms Paratomella rubra, Isodiametra pulchra and Archaphanostoma ylvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Helen E; Lapraz, François; Egger, Bernhard; Telford, Maximilian J; Schiffer, Philipp H

    2017-05-12

    Acoels are small, ubiquitous - but understudied - marine worms with a very simple body plan. Their internal phylogeny is still not fully resolved, and the position of their proposed phylum Xenacoelomorpha remains debated. Here we describe mitochondrial genome sequences from the acoels Paratomella rubra and Isodiametra pulchra, and the complete mitochondrial genome of the acoel Archaphanostoma ylvae. The P. rubra and A. ylvae sequences are typical for metazoans in size and gene content. The larger I. pulchra  mitochondrial genome contains both ribosomal genes, 21 tRNAs, but only 11 protein-coding genes. We find evidence suggesting a duplicated sequence in the I. pulchra mitochondrial genome. The P. rubra, I. pulchra and A. ylvae mitochondria have a unique genome organisation in comparison to other metazoan mitochondrial genomes. We found a large degree of protein-coding gene and tRNA overlap with little non-coding sequence in the compact P. rubra genome. Conversely, the A. ylvae and I. pulchra genomes have many long non-coding sequences between genes, likely driving genome size expansion in the latter. Phylogenetic trees inferred from mitochondrial genes retrieve Xenacoelomorpha as an early branching taxon in the deuterostomes. Sequence divergence analysis between P. rubra sampled in England and Spain indicates cryptic diversity.

  11. "Omic" investigations of protozoa and worms for a deeper understanding of the human gut "parasitome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Valeria; Mancinelli, Livia; Bracaglia, Giorgia; Del Chierico, Federica; Vernocchi, Pamela; Di Girolamo, Francesco; Garrone, Stefano; Tchidjou Kuekou, Hyppolite; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Urbani, Andrea; Putignani, Lorenza

    2017-11-01

    The human gut has been continuously exposed to a broad spectrum of intestinal organisms, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites (protozoa and worms), over millions of years of coevolution, and plays a central role in human health. The modern lifestyles of Western countries, such as the adoption of highly hygienic habits, the extensive use of antimicrobial drugs, and increasing globalisation, have dramatically altered the composition of the gut milieu, especially in terms of its eukaryotic "citizens." In the past few decades, numerous studies have highlighted the composition and role of human intestinal bacteria in physiological and pathological conditions, while few investigations exist on gut parasites and particularly on their coexistence and interaction with the intestinal microbiota. Studies of the gut "parasitome" through "omic" technologies, such as (meta)genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, are herein reviewed to better understand their role in the relationships between intestinal parasites, host, and resident prokaryotes, whether pathogens or commensals. Systems biology-based profiles of the gut "parasitome" under physiological and severe disease conditions can indeed contribute to the control of infectious diseases and offer a new perspective of omics-assisted tropical medicine.

  12. Distribution of the Common Adder Vipera berus and the Slow Worm Anguis fragils in Silesia, SW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopij Grzezgorz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the years 2004-2008 the distribution of the Common Adder and the Slow Worm were studied in Silesia through questionnaire directed to forest inspectorates (n=871; 83.8% of them responded. These data were tested through field work in several randomly selected inspectorates. Both species were found to be widespread in the region, with a few strongholds identified in Sudety Mts. and larger forest complexes. The Common Adder was recorded in 68.5% of forest districts which responded, while the Slow Worm – in 73.6% of those districts. Changes in distribution and population trends could not be derived, since no reliable data were available from previous years.

  13. Seasonal evolution of faecal egg output by gastrointestinal worms in goats on communal farms in eastern Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumba, F F; Katjivena, H; Kauta, G; Lutaaya, E

    2003-12-01

    As a more detailed continuation of a previous study, faecal samples for worm egg counts were collected per rectum from ten marked adult animals in selected flocks of goats, in each of six villages evenly spread out in the communal farming district of Okakarara in eastern Namibia. The study was conducted on a monthly basis from August 1999 to July 2000. Average faecal worm egg counts (FECs) were highest during the warm-wet season, much lower during the cold-dry months and moderate during the hot-dry season. Least square means of FECs were 2140, 430 and 653 per gram of faeces for the three seasons, respectively. Seasonal variation in egg counts was significant (P FAMACHA system that identifies severely affected animals for treatment is technically a better option for communal farmers.

  14. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Laarhoven

    Full Text Available An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv. The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml, 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin. With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates.

  15. Agar Sediment Test for Assessing the Suitability of Organic Waste Streams for Recovering Nutrients by the Aquatic Worm Lumbriculus variegatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarhoven, Bob; Elissen, H J H; Temmink, H; Buisman, C J N

    2016-01-01

    An agar sediment test was developed to evaluate the suitability of organic waste streams from the food industry for recovering nutrients by the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv). The effects of agar gel, sand, and food quantities in the sediment test on worm growth, reproduction, and water quality were studied. Agar gel addition ameliorated growth conditions by reducing food hydrolysis and altering sediment structure. Best results for combined reproduction and growth were obtained with 0.6% agar-gel (20 ml), 10 g. fine sand, 40 g. coarse sand, and 105 mg fish food (Tetramin). With agar gel, ingestion and growth is more the result of addition of food in its original quality. Final tests with secondary potato starch sludge and wheat bran demonstrated that this test is appropriate for the comparison of solid feedstuffs and suspended organic waste streams. This test method is expected to be suitable for organic waste studies using other sediment dwelling invertebrates.

  16. Optimization of worm-bed leachate for culturing of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) inoculated with Glomus fasciculatum and Pseudomonas fluorescens

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva-Llaven,María Ángela; Rodríguez-Hernández,Ludwi; Mendoza-Nazar,Paula; Ruiz-Sesma, Benigno; Álvarez-Solís,José David; Dendooven, Luc; Federico A. Gutiérrez-Miceli

    2010-01-01

    A response surface technique was used to analyze the effect of Glomus fasciculatum, Pseudomonas fluorescens and worm-bed leachate (WBL) on growth, yield and characteristics of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill). The treatments combined inoculation with or without P. fluorescensor G. fasciculatum and the application of WBL at 20% (v/v) each day or every three days. Plant height, number of leaves and yield of tomato fruits was not affected by the factors studied. However, plants with foliar ...

  17. Addition of a Worm Leachate as Source of Humic Substances in the Drinking Water of Broiler Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Rosales, S.; M. de L. Angeles

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth performance, the apparent ileal digestibility of nitrogen and energy, the retention of nutrients and the apparent metabolizable energy corrected to zero nitrogen retention (AMEn) in broiler chickens supplemented with increasing doses of a worm leachate (WL) as a source of humic substances (HS) in the drinking water. In Exp. 1, 140 male broilers were penned individually and assigned to four WL levels (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%) mixed in the...

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the gullet worm Gongylonema pulchrum: gene content, arrangement, composition and phylogenetic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Jia, Yan-Qing; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Gongylonema pulchrum (Nematoda: Gongylonematidae), a thread-like spirurid gullet worm, infects a range of mammalian definitive hosts, including cattle, pigs, equines, goats, primates and humans, and can cause gongylonemiasis. Methods In the present study, the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of G. pulchrum was obtained using Long-range PCR and subsequent primer walking. The phylogenetic position of G. pulchrum within the Spiruromorpha was established using Bayesian analyses of th...

  19. The Schistosoma mansoni Cytochrome P450 (CYP3050A1 Is Essential for Worm Survival and Egg Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Ziniel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis affects millions of people in developing countries and is responsible for more than 200,000 deaths annually. Because of toxicity and limited spectrum of activity of alternatives, there is effectively only one drug, praziquantel, available for its treatment. Recent data suggest that drug resistance could soon be a problem. There is therefore the need to identify new drug targets and develop drugs for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome sequence for proteins involved in detoxification processes found that it encodes a single cytochrome P450 (CYP450 gene. Here we report that the 1452 bp open reading frame has a characteristic heme-binding region in its catalytic domain with a conserved heme ligating cysteine, a hydrophobic leader sequence present as the membrane interacting region, and overall structural conservation. The highest sequence identity to human CYP450s is 22%. Double stranded RNA (dsRNA silencing of S. mansoni (SmCYP450 in schistosomula results in worm death. Treating larval or adult worms with antifungal azole CYP450 inhibitors results in worm death at low micromolar concentrations. In addition, combinations of SmCYP450-specific dsRNA and miconazole show additive schistosomicidal effects supporting the hypothesis that SmCYP450 is the target of miconazole. Treatment of developing S. mansoni eggs with miconazole results in a dose dependent arrest in embryonic development. Our results indicate that SmCYP450 is essential for worm survival and egg development and validates it as a novel drug target. Preliminary structure-activity relationship suggests that the 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl-2-(1H-imidazol-1-ylethan-1-ol moiety of miconazole is necessary for activity and that miconazole activity and selectivity could be improved by rational drug design.

  20. Serial CT Findings of Paragonimus Infested Dogs and the Micro-CT Findings of the Worm Cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Hong, Sung Tae; Shen, Cheng Hua; Chung, Doo Hyun; Son, Kyu Ri; Chang, Jung Min; Eo, Hong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    To investigate the serial CT findings of Paragonimus westermani infected dogs and the microscopic structures of the worm cysts using Micro-CT. This study was approved by the committee on animal research at our institution. Fifteen dogs infected with P. westermani underwent serial contrast-enhanced CT scans at pre-infection, after 10 days of infection, and monthly thereafter until six months for determining the radiologic-pathologic correlation. Three dogs (one dog each time) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. After fixation of the lungs, both multi-detector CT and Micro-CT were performed for examining the worm cysts. The initial findings were pleural effusion and/or subpleural groundglass opacities or linear opacities at day 10. At day 30, subpleural and peribronchial nodules appeared with hydropneumothorax and abdominal or chest wall air bubbles. Cavitary change and bronchial dilatation began to be seen on CT scan at day 30 and this was mostly seen together with mediastinal lymphadenopathy at day 60. Thereafter, subpleural ground-glass opacities and nodules with or without cavitary changes were persistently observed until day 180. After cavitary change of the nodules, the migratory features of the subpleural or peribronchial nodules were seen on all the serial CT scans. Micro-CT showed that the cyst wall contained dilated interconnected tubular structures, which had communications with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. The CT findings of paragonimiasis depend on the migratory stage of the worms. The worm cyst can have numerous interconnected tubular channels within its own wall and these channels have connections with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus.

  1. Urban pollution of sediments: Impact on the physiology and burrowing activity of tubificid worms and consequences on biogeochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigneret, M; Mermillod-Blondin, F; Volatier, L; Romestaing, C; Maire, E; Adrien, J; Guillard, L; Roussel, D; Hervant, F

    2016-10-15

    In urban areas, infiltration basins are designed to manage stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces and allow the settling of associated pollutants. The sedimentary layer deposited at the surface of these structures is highly organic and multicontaminated (mainly heavy metals and hydrocarbons). Only few aquatic species are able to maintain permanent populations in such an extreme environment, including the oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri. Nevertheless, the impact of urban pollutants on these organisms and the resulting influence on infiltration basin functioning remain poorly studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine how polluted sediments could impact the survival, the physiology and the bioturbation activity of L. hoffmeisteri and thereby modify biogeochemical processes occurring at the water-sediment interface. To this end, we conducted laboratory incubations of worms, in polluted sediments from infiltration basins or slightly polluted sediments from a stream. Analyses were performed to evaluate physiological state and burrowing activity (X-ray micro-tomography) of worms and their influences on biogeochemical processes (nutrient fluxes, CO2 and CH4 degassing rates) during 30-day long experiments. Our results showed that worms exhibited physiological responses to cope with high pollution levels, including a strong ability to withstand the oxidative stress linked to contamination with heavy metals. We also showed that the presence of urban pollutants significantly increased the burrowing activity of L. hoffmeisteri, demonstrating the sensitivity and the relevance of such a behavioural response as biomarker of sediment toxicity. In addition, we showed that X-ray micro-tomography was an adequate technique for accurate and non-invasive three-dimensional investigations of biogenic structures formed by bioturbators. The presence of worms induced stimulations of nutrient fluxes and organic matter recycling (between +100% and 200% of CO2 degassing rate

  2. Teknik Pengecoran Logam Perancangan Pola Worm Screw Dengan Proses Pengecoran Menggunakan Cetakan Pasir Untuk Pabrik Kelapa Sawit

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar, Rizqi

    2011-01-01

    This plan aims to plan the pattern of Worm Screw With Process Sand Casting Mold Using Palm Oil For Factory, ranging from selecting the type of molding, selection of raw materials, plan the dimensions of the pattern, plan systems for casting channel screw press in order to obtain the best possible outcome and be able to understand the results obtained if it has been as planned. Because the breadth of issues concerning the problem of casting foundry in the planning task ...

  3. Aspects Regarding of Surface Roughness Obtained from Processing Archimedian Worms on CNC Machines with Frontal-cylindrical Milling Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Cristian Albu

    2014-12-01

    well as higher accuracy. The experiment which form the basis of the work has been doneon CNC machine, OKUMA MULTUS B300 by processing a batch of archimedian worms with ma = 10, z1 = 2 with the use of a mills FRANKE, code 2887A.010. The paper demonstrates that urface roughness obtained by milling through the use of a frontalcylindrical milling tool from carbide mono-block is comparable to that obtained by grinding.

  4. Managing anthelmintic resistance-Variability in the dose of drug reaching the target worms influences selection for resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathwick, Dave M; Luo, Dongwen

    2017-08-30

    The concentration profile of anthelmintic reaching the target worms in the host can vary between animals even when administered doses are tailored to individual liveweight at the manufacturer's recommended rate. Factors contributing to variation in drug concentration include weather, breed of animal, formulation and the route by which drugs are administered. The implications of this variability for the development of anthelmintic resistance was investigated using Monte-Carlo simulation. A model framework was established where 100 animals each received a single drug treatment. The 'dose' of drug allocated to each animal (i.e. the concentration-time profile of drug reaching the target worms) was sampled at random from a distribution of doses with mean m and standard deviation s. For each animal the dose of drug was used in conjunction with pre-determined dose-response relationships, representing single and poly-genetic inheritance, to calculate efficacy against susceptible and resistant genotypes. These data were then used to calculate the overall change in resistance gene frequency for the worm population as a result of the treatment. Values for m and s were varied to reflect differences in both mean dose and the variability in dose, and for each combination of these 100,000 simulations were run. The resistance gene frequency in the population after treatment increased as m decreased and as s increased. This occurred for both single and poly-gene models and for different levels of dominance (survival under treatment) of the heterozygote genotype(s). The results indicate that factors which result in lower and/or more variable concentrations of active reaching the target worms are more likely to select for resistance. The potential of different routes of anthelmintic administration to play a role in the development of anthelmintic resistance is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Detecting Distributed Network Traffic Anomaly with Network-Wide Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonglin, Li; Guangmin, Hu; Xingmiao, Yao; Dan, Yang

    2008-12-01

    Distributed network traffic anomaly refers to a traffic abnormal behavior involving many links of a network and caused by the same source (e.g., DDoS attack, worm propagation). The anomaly transiting in a single link might be unnoticeable and hard to detect, while the anomalous aggregation from many links can be prevailing, and does more harm to the networks. Aiming at the similar features of distributed traffic anomaly on many links, this paper proposes a network-wide detection method by performing anomalous correlation analysis of traffic signals' instantaneous parameters. In our method, traffic signals' instantaneous parameters are firstly computed, and their network-wide anomalous space is then extracted via traffic prediction. Finally, an anomaly is detected by a global correlation coefficient of anomalous space. Our evaluation using Abilene traffic traces demonstrates the excellent performance of this approach for distributed traffic anomaly detection.

  6. Detecting Distributed Network Traffic Anomaly with Network-Wide Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Distributed network traffic anomaly refers to a traffic abnormal behavior involving many links of a network and caused by the same source (e.g., DDoS attack, worm propagation. The anomaly transiting in a single link might be unnoticeable and hard to detect, while the anomalous aggregation from many links can be prevailing, and does more harm to the networks. Aiming at the similar features of distributed traffic anomaly on many links, this paper proposes a network-wide detection method by performing anomalous correlation analysis of traffic signals' instantaneous parameters. In our method, traffic signals' instantaneous parameters are firstly computed, and their network-wide anomalous space is then extracted via traffic prediction. Finally, an anomaly is detected by a global correlation coefficient of anomalous space. Our evaluation using Abilene traffic traces demonstrates the excellent performance of this approach for distributed traffic anomaly detection.

  7. New insights on serodiagnosis of trichinellosis during window period: early diagnostic antigens from Trichinella spiralis intestinal worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Quan; Shi, Ya-Li; Liu, Rou-Dan; Jiang, Peng; Guan, Ya-Yi; Chen, Ying-Dan; Cui, Jing

    2017-02-20

    The clinical diagnosis of trichinellosis is difficult because its clinical manifestations are nonspecific. Detection of anti-Trichinella IgG by ELISA using T. spiralis muscle larval excretory-secretory (ES) antigens is the most commonly used serological method for diagnosis of trichinellosis, but the main disadvantage is false negativity during the early stage of infection. There is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity.During the intestinal stage of Trichinella infection, the ES antigens of intestinal worms (intestinal infective larvae and adults) are exposed to host's immune system at the earliest time and elicit the production of specific anti-Trichinella antibodies. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in infected mice were detectable by ELISA with ES antigens of intestinal worms as soon as 8-10 days post infection (dpi), but ELISA with muscle larval ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. Therefore, the new early antigens from T. spiralis intestinal worms should be screened, identified and characterized for early serodiagnosis of trichinellosis.

  8. Anthelmintic Activity of Crude Extract and Essential Oil of Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae against Adult Worms of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyana Silva Godinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, affects more than 200 million people worldwide, and its control is dependent on a single drug, praziquantel. Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae is used in folk medicine as a vermifuge. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro schistosomicidal activity of the crude extract (TV and the essential oil (TV-EO from the aerial parts of T. vulgare. TV-EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS, which allowed the identification of β-thujone (84.13% as the major constituent. TV and TV-EO, at 200 μg/mL, decreased motor activity and caused 100% mortality of all adult worms. At 100 and 50 μg/mL, only TV caused death of all adult worms, while TV-EO was inactive. TV (200 μg/mL was also able to reduce viability and decrease production of developed eggs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed morphological alterations in the tegument of the S. mansoni surface after incubation with TV (50 and 100 μg/mL. Quantitative analysis on the schistosomes tegument showed that TV caused changes in the numbers of tubercles of S. mansoni male worms in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that T. vulgare is a potential source of schistosomicidal compounds.

  9. Anthelmintic Activity of Crude Extract and Essential Oil of Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae) against Adult Worms of Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Loyana Silva; Aleixo de Carvalho, Lara Soares; Barbosa de Castro, Clarissa Campos; Dias, Mirna Meana; Pinto, Priscila de Faria; Crotti, Antônio Eduardo Miller; Pinto, Pedro Luiz Silva; de Moraes, Josué; Da Silva Filho, Ademar A.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, affects more than 200 million people worldwide, and its control is dependent on a single drug, praziquantel. Tanacetum vulgare (Asteraceae) is used in folk medicine as a vermifuge. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro schistosomicidal activity of the crude extract (TV) and the essential oil (TV-EO) from the aerial parts of T. vulgare. TV-EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/MS, which allowed the identification of β-thujone (84.13%) as the major constituent. TV and TV-EO, at 200 μg/mL, decreased motor activity and caused 100% mortality of all adult worms. At 100 and 50 μg/mL, only TV caused death of all adult worms, while TV-EO was inactive. TV (200 μg/mL) was also able to reduce viability and decrease production of developed eggs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed morphological alterations in the tegument of the S. mansoni surface after incubation with TV (50 and 100 μg/mL). Quantitative analysis on the schistosomes tegument showed that TV caused changes in the numbers of tubercles of S. mansoni male worms in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that T. vulgare is a potential source of schistosomicidal compounds. PMID:24672320

  10. Genetic parameters for FAMACHA score and related traits for host resistance/resilience and production at differing severities of worm challenge in a Merino flock in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D G; Van Wyk, J A

    2009-09-16

    The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters for FAMACHA score and related traits at different levels of worm challenge in sheep and to assess the effect of different methods for modelling records from treated lambs on estimates of genetic parameters. Data were collected over five consecutive Haemonchus seasons from a total of l671 Merino lambs using the FAMACHA clinical evaluation system, and anaemic individuals were treated as needed, until flock health necessitated mass treatment at the peak of the worm season. Records of each sampling occasion were classified into low, moderate, or peak levels of worm challenge. Animal models were run separately for traits within each data set. Alternative analyses were conducted in which records of treated lambs were (1) included without adjustment, (2) included along with a fixed effect representing treatment status of the lamb for each record, and (3) included after application of a penalty to offset any phenotypic improvement or advantage due to that treatment. Estimates of heritability for individual FAMACHA data sets ranged from 0.06+/-0.04 to 0.24+/-0.05, the highest estimates being obtained for peak worm challenge data. Estimates of genetic correlation for FAMACHA with other traits varied, but were always near negative unity for FAMACHA score with haematocrit value. When data of treated lambs were penalised, higher estimates of heritability were obtained than when not penalised, hence this may be an effective method for allowing for early treatment of overly susceptible animals before the level of worm challenge is at an optimum level for BLUP (Best Linear Unbiased Prediction) evaluation. The estimate of genetic correlation for FAMACHA score in moderate worm challenge with that in peak worm challenge was almost unity. This suggests that estimation of breeding values for this trait using data from moderate worm challenge may be as effective as that from peak challenge.

  11. 有光層におけるハオリムシの発見 / Discovery of Vestimentiferan Tube-worms in the Euphotic Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hashimoto; TOMOYUKI, MIURA; Katsunori, Fujikura; Joyo, OSSAKA; Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University; Deep Sea Research Department, Japan Marine Science and Technology Center; Tamagawa University

    1993-01-01

    To date, vestimentiferan tube-worms have been considered to be a typical member of the deep-sea biological communities supported by chemosynthetic production. In 1993, during a series of surveys exploring the biological community accompanied by submarine fumaroles called "Tagiri" by local fishermen, thousands of vestimentiferans were discovered to form clusters at a depth of 82 m in Kagoshima Bay, southern Japan. The tube-worms were collected by means of a small dredge attached to a deep-tow ...

  12. Capacidad de carga de las transmisiones por tornillo sinfín y corona. // Load capacity of worm gears transmissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rivero Llerena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El uso de los reductores de velocidad comenzó a principios del siglo xx, su extensa difusión en el mundo actual permiteadquirirlos como unidades ensambladas a un costo relativamente bajo para la calidad del producto ofertado. Losantecedentes de este trabajo están en las investigaciones realizadas desde hace más de tres décadas en el ISPJAE. Lacreación de tecnologías propias sobre la base de estas investigaciones ha permitido la producción de reductores develocidad por tornillo sinfín con índices de calidad comparables con los índices de los reductores foráneos. El método dereconversión de reductores de velocidad que han quedado fuera de servicio, es utilizado en Cuba con resultadossatisfactorios a partir de la utilización de las carcasas originales. El presente trabajo pretende destacar la influencia de loserrores de contacto en la capacidad de carga de la transmisión por tornillo sinfín. Se brinda en esta ocasión, unprocedimiento para el cálculo automatizado de la superficie activa del diente de la rueda y se ofrece una expresión decálculo propia que permite pronosticar la capacidad de carga de la transmisión, a partir de la huella de contacto, encorrespondencia con los requisitos de contacto para un grado de precisión dado.Palabras claves: Capacidad de carga, huella de contacto, tornillo sinfín._____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.The use of worm gears transmissions started at the beginning of the 20th century and its wide spread use allow to purchaseas join units with low cost according to the product quality. Investigations that for more than thirty years took place at theISPJAE are the bases of this study. The Cuban technologies have permitted to produce worm gears with a comparablequality as foreign ones. The reconversion method for worm gears out of service is used in Cuba, and satisfactory results areobtained. In this paper are exposed the contact errors influence

  13. Genetic diversity in populations of asexual and sexual bag worm moths (Lepidoptera: Psychidae

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    Mappes Johanna

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the two-fold cost of sex, most of the higher animals reproduce sexually. The advantage of sex has been suggested to be its ability, through recombination, to generate greater genetic diversity than asexuality, thus enhancing adaptation in a changing environment. We studied the genetic diversity and the population structure of three closely related species of bag worm moths: two strictly sexual (Dahlica charlottae and Siederia rupicolella and one strictly asexual (D. fennicella. These species compete for the same resources and share the same parasitoids. Results Allelic richness was comparable between the sexual species but it was higher than in the asexual species. All species showed high heterozygote deficiency and a large variation was observed among FIS values across loci and populations. Large genetic differentiation was observed between populations confirming the poor dispersal ability of these species. The asexual species showed lower genotype diversity than the sexual species. Nevertheless, genotype diversity was high in all asexual populations. Conclusion The three different species show a similar population structure characterised by high genetic differentiation among populations and low dispersal. Most of the populations showed high heterozygote deficiency likely due to the presence of null alleles at most of the loci and/or to the Wahlund effect. Although the parthenogenetic D. fennicella shows reduced genetic diversity compared to the sexual species, it still shows surprisingly high genotype diversity. While we can not totally rule out the presence of cryptic sex, would explain this high genotype diversity, we never observed sex in the parthenogenetic D. fennicella, nor was there any other evidence of this. Alternatively, a non-clonal parthenogenetic reproduction, such as automictic thelytoky, could explain the high genotypic diversity observed in D. fennicella.

  14. A simultaneous localization and tracking method for a worm tracking system

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    Kowalski Mateusz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The idea of worm tracking refers to the path analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes and is an important tool in neurobiology which helps to describe their behavior. Knowledge about nematode behavior can be applied as a model to study the physiological addiction process or other nervous system processes in animals and humans. Tracking is performed by using a special manipulator positioning a microscope with a camera over a dish with an observed individual. In the paper, the accuracy of a nematode’s trajectory reconstruction is investigated. Special attention is paid to analyzing errors that occurred during the microscope displacements. Two sources of errors in the trajectory reconstruction are shown. One is due to the difficulty in accurately measuring the microscope shift, the other is due to a nematode displacement during the microscope movement. A new method that increases path reconstruction accuracy based only on the registered sequence of images is proposed. The method Simultaneously Localizes And Tracks (SLAT the nematodes, and is robust to the positioning system displacement errors. The proposed method predicts the nematode position by using NonParametric Regression (NPR. In addition, two other methods of the SLAT problem are implemented to evaluate the NPR method. The first consists in ignoring the nematode displacement during microscope movement, and the second is based on a Kalman filter. The results suggest that the SLAT method based on nonparametric regression gives the most promising results and decreases the error of trajectory reconstruction by 25% compared with reconstruction based on data from the positioning system

  15. Early serodiagnosis of trichinellosis by ELISA using excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis adult worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ge-Ge; Wang, Zhong-Quan; Liu, Chun-Ying; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Ruo-Dan; Wen, Hui; Qi, Xin; Wang, Li; Cui, Jing

    2015-09-23

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens of Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis. Their main disadvantage for the detection of anti-Trichinella IgG is false-negative results during the early stage of infection. Additionally, there is an obvious window between clinical symptoms and positive serology. ELISA with adult worm (AW) ES antigens was used to detect anti-Trichinella IgG in the sera of experimentally infected mice and patients with trichinellosis. The sensitivity and specificity were compared with ELISAs with AW crude antigens and ML ES antigens. In mice infected with 100 ML, anti-Trichinella IgG were first detected by ELISA with the AW ES antigens, crude antigens and ML ES antigens 8, 12 and 12 days post-infection (dpi), respectively. In mice infected with 500 ML, specific antibodies were first detected by ELISA with the three antigen preparations at 10, 8 and 10 dpi, respectively. The sensitivity of the ELISA with the three antigen preparations for the detection of sera from patients with trichinellosis at 35 dpi was 100%. However, when the patients' sera were collected at 19 dpi, the sensitivities of the ELISAs with the three antigen preparations were 100% (20/20), 100% (20/20) and 75% (15/20), respectively (P < 0.05). The specificities of the ELISAs with the three antigen preparations were 98.11, 95.60 and 89.31%, respectively (P < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of the T. spiralis AW ES antigens were superior to those of the AW crude antigens and ML ES antigens. Thus, the AW ES antigens might serve as potential antigens for the early and specific serodiagnosis of trichinellosis.

  16. Immunoproteomic analysis of the excretory-secretory products of Trichinella pseudospiralis adult worms and newborn larvae

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    Yang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nematode Trichinella pseudospiralis is an intracellular parasite of mammalian skeletal muscle cells and exists in a non-encapsulated form. Previous studies demonstrated that T. pseudospiralis could induce a lower host inflammatory response. Excretory-secretory (ES proteins as the most important products of host-parasite interaction may play the main functional role in alleviating host inflammation. However, the ES products of T. pseudospiralis early stage are still unknown. The identification of the ES products of the early stage facilitates the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the immunomodulation and may help finding early diagnostic markers. Results In this study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE-based western blotting coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS to separate and identify the T. pseudospiralis adult worms ES products immunoreaction-positive proteins. In total, 400 protein spots were separated by 2-DE. Twenty-eight protein spots were successfully identified using the sera from infected pigs and were characterized to correlate with 12 different proteins of T. pseudospiralis, including adult-specific DNase II-10, poly-cysteine and histidine-tailed protein isoform 2, serine protease, serine/threonine-protein kinase ULK3, enolase, putative venom allergen 5, chymotrypsin-like elastase family member 1, uncharacterized protein, peptidase inhibitor 16, death-associated protein 1, deoxyribonuclease II superfamily and golgin-45. Bioinformatic analyses showed that the identified proteins have a wide diversity of molecular functions, especially deoxyribonuclease II (DNase II activity and serine-type endopeptidase activity. Conclusions Early candidate antigens from the ES proteins of T. pseudospiralis have been screened and identified. Our results suggest these proteins may play key roles during the T. pseudospiralis

  17. "Tooth worms", poverty tattoos and dental care conflicts in Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marilyn K; Nuto, Sharmêniade de Araújo Soares

    2002-01-01

    While medical anthropologists have studied doctor-patient clinical conflicts during the last 25-30 years, dentist-patient communication clashes have received scant attention to date. Besides structural barriers and power inequities, such conceptual differences further dehumanize dental care and lower service quality. Potential for dentist-patient discordance is greater in developing regions--such as Northeast Brazil--where there exists a wider socio-economic gap between professionals and laypersons. A critical anthropological evaluation of oral health services quality is undertaken in two rural communities in Ceará, Brazil where the PAHO-inspired Local Oral Health Inversion of Attention Program was implemented in 1994. This 6-month qualitative field study utilized ethnographic interviews with key informants, participant-observation and projective techniques to probe professionals' and patients' explanatory models (EMs) of oral health. Despite the recent expansion of services into rural regions, the authors conclude that the quality of dental care remains problematic. Patients' culturally constructed EMs of teeth rotted (estraga) by "tooth worms" (lagartas) differ substantively from dentists' model of dental decay by Streptococcus mutans. "Exploding chins" (queixo estourado), "spoiled, rotting teeth" (dente pĵdi) and "false plates" or teeth (chapas) tattoo and stigmatize the poor, reinforcing gross class inequities. Dentists' dominant discourse largely ignores lay logic, ridicules popular practices and de-legitimates, even castigates, popular healers despite their pivotal role in primary oral health care. Poor parents are not only barred from clinics but are blamed for children's rotten teeth. In sum, universal access to dental care is more a myth (even nightmare) than a reality. Dentists all too often "avert"--not "invert"--attention from poor Brazilian patients. In order to improve oral health in this setting, both "societal decay" and bacteria-laden plaque

  18. Quantification of the Bioturbation Activity of Lumbriculus Variegatus Worms Using Fluorescent Particulate Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. M.; Roche, K. R.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Important biological, physical and chemical processes, such as fluxes of oxygen, nutrients and contaminants, occur across sediment-water interfaces. These processes are influenced by bioturbation activities of benthic animals. Bioturbation is thought to be significant in releasing metals to the water column from contaminated sediments, but metals contamination also affects organism activity. Consequently, the aim of this study was to consider the interactions of biological activity, sediment chemistry, pore water transport, and chemical reactions in sediment mixing and the flux and toxicity of metals in sediments. Prior studies have modeled bioturbation as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not describe accurately sediment mixing due to bioturbation. To this end, we used the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model to assess sediment mixing caused by bioturbation activity of Lumbriculus variegatus worms. We performed experiments using fine-grained sediments with different levels of zinc contamination from Lake DePue, which is a Superfund Site in Illinois. The tests were conducted in an aerated fresh water chamber. Fluorescent particulate tracers were added to the sediment surface to quantify mixing processes and the influence of metals contaminants on L. variegatus bioturbation activity. We observed sediment mixing and organism activity by time-lapse photography over 14 days. Then, we analyzed the images to characterize the fluorescent particle concentration as a function of sediment depth and time. Results reveal that sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. These results suggest that anomalous sediment mixing is probably a ubiquitous process, as this behavior has only been observed previously in marine sediments. Also, the experiments indicate that bioturbation and sediment mixing decreased in the presence of higher metals concentrations in sediments. This process is expected to decrease

  19. Opening a can of worms: unprecedented sympatric cryptic diversity within British lumbricid earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R Andrew; Tibble, Amy L; Symondson, William O C

    2008-11-01

    Earthworms play a major role in many aspects of soil fertility, food web ecology and ecosystem functioning, and hence are frequently the subjects of, for example, ecological and toxicological research. Our aim was to examine the genetic structure of common earthworm species, to identify cryptic lineages or species that may be distinct ecotypes or biotypes (and hence confound current research based upon morphotypes) and to try to explain the massive cryptic diversity that eventually emerged. We demonstrated that species such as Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea longa, Aporrectodea rosea and Lumbricus rubellus all comprise highly divergent lineages with species-level divergence at the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene. In Allo. chlorotica alone, we found 55 haplotypes for COI, with 35 of these being found in pink and 20 in green morph worms. There were no cases of the two colour morphs sharing COI haplotypes. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial COI and 16S genes showed the presence of five highly divergent lineages, suggesting the presence of multiple cryptic species within Allo. chlorotica. There was no clear geographical pattern to lineage distribution and many populations were polymorphic for both mitochondrial DNA lineage and colour morph. Amplified fragment length polymorphism results, based on two primer combinations, were broadly congruent with mitochondrial DNA results with one significant exception. Despite showing over 14% divergence at COI, amplified fragment length polymorphism markers showed that the two green morph lineages may be interbreeding and therefore represent a single taxon. The cryptic diversity revealed by these results has profound consequences for all areas of earthworm research.

  20. Excretory/Secretory Products from Trichinella spiralis Adult Worms Ameliorate DSS-Induced Colitis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyun; Zhan, Bin; Gu, Yuan; Cheng, Yuli; Zhu, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    Background Many evidences show the inverse correlation between helminth infection and allergic or autoimmune diseases. Identification and characterization of the active helminth-derived products responsible for the beneficial effects on allergic or inflammatory diseases will provide another feasible approach to treat these diseases. Methods and Findings Colitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by giving 3% DSS orally for 7 days. During this period, the mice were treated daily with the excretory/secretory products from T. spiralis adult worms (AES) intraperitoneally. The severity of colitis was monitored by measuring body weight, stool consistency or bleeding, colon length and inflammation. To determine the T. spiralis AES product-induced immunological response, Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory cytokine profiles were measured in lymphocytes isolated from colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and the spleen of treated mice. The CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were also measured in the spleens and MLN of treated mice. Mice treated with AES significantly ameliorated the severity of the DSS-induced colitis indicated by the reduced disease manifestations, improved macroscopic and microscopic inflammation correlated with the up-regulation of Treg response (increased regulatory cytokines IL-10, TGF-beta and regulatory T cells) and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-6 and IL-17) in the spleens, MLN and colon of treated mice. Conclusions Our results provide direct evidences that T. spiralis AES have a therapeutic potential for alleviating inflammatory colitis in mice. This effect is possibly mediated by the immunomodulation of regulatory T cells to produce regulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24788117

  1. Excretory/secretory products from Trichinella spiralis adult worms ameliorate DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many evidences show the inverse correlation between helminth infection and allergic or autoimmune diseases. Identification and characterization of the active helminth-derived products responsible for the beneficial effects on allergic or inflammatory diseases will provide another feasible approach to treat these diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Colitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by giving 3% DSS orally for 7 days. During this period, the mice were treated daily with the excretory/secretory products from T. spiralis adult worms (AES intraperitoneally. The severity of colitis was monitored by measuring body weight, stool consistency or bleeding, colon length and inflammation. To determine the T. spiralis AES product-induced immunological response, Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory cytokine profiles were measured in lymphocytes isolated from colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN, and the spleen of treated mice. The CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs were also measured in the spleens and MLN of treated mice. Mice treated with AES significantly ameliorated the severity of the DSS-induced colitis indicated by the reduced disease manifestations, improved macroscopic and microscopic inflammation correlated with the up-regulation of Treg response (increased regulatory cytokines IL-10, TGF-beta and regulatory T cells and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-6 and IL-17 in the spleens, MLN and colon of treated mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide direct evidences that T. spiralis AES have a therapeutic potential for alleviating inflammatory colitis in mice. This effect is possibly mediated by the immunomodulation of regulatory T cells to produce regulatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  2. Collective dynamics of `small-world' networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Duncan J.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    1998-06-01

    Networks of coupled dynamical systems have been used to model biological oscillators, Josephson junction arrays,, excitable media, neural networks, spatial games, genetic control networks and many other self-organizing systems. Ordinarily, the connection topology is assumed to be either completely regular or completely random. But many biological, technological and social networks lie somewhere between these two extremes. Here we explore simple models of networks that can be tuned through this middle ground: regular networks `rewired' to introduce increasing amounts of disorder. We find that these systems can be highly clustered, like regular lattices, yet have small characteristic path lengths, like random graphs. We call them `small-world' networks, by analogy with the small-world phenomenon, (popularly known as six degrees of separation). The neural network of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the power grid of the western United States, and the collaboration graph of film actors are shown to be small-world networks. Models of dynamical systems with small-world coupling display enhanced signal-propagation speed, computational power, and synchronizability. In particular, infectious diseases spread more easily in small-world networks than in regular lattices.

  3. A stochastic model accommodating the FAMACHA© system for estimating worm burdens and associated risk factors in sheep naturally infected with Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynecke, D P; Van Wyk, J A; Gummow, B; Dorny, P; Boomker, J

    2011-05-11

    A previously developed multiple regression algorithm was used as the basis of a stochastic model to simulate worm burdens in sheep naturally infected with Haemonchus contortus over five consecutive Haemonchus seasons (November to January/February) on a farm in the summer rainfall region in South Africa, although only one season is discussed. The algorithm associates haemoglobin levels with worm counts in individual animals. Variables were represented by distributions based on FAMACHA(©) scores and body weights of sheep, and Monte Carlo sampling was used to simulate worm burdens. Under conditions of high disease risk, defined as the sampling event during the worm season with the lowest relative mean haemoglobin level for a class of sheep, the model provided a distribution function for mean class H. contortus burdens and the probability of these occurring. A mean H. contortus burden for ewes (n=130 per sample) of approximately 1000 (range 51-28,768) and 2933 (range 78-44,175) for rams (n=120 per sample) was predicted under these conditions. At the beginning of the worm season when the risk of disease was lowest (i.e. when both classes had their highest estimated mean haemoglobin levels), a mean worm burden of 525 (range 39-4910) for ewes and 651 (range 37-17,260) for rams was predicted. Model indications were that despite being selectively drenched according to FAMACHA(©) evaluation, 72% of the ewes would maintain their mean worm burden below an arbitrarily selected threshold of 1000 even when risk of disease was at its highest. In contrast, far fewer rams (27%) remained below this threshold, especially towards the end of the worm season. The model was most sensitive to changes in haemoglobin value, and thus by extrapolation, the haematocrit, which is used as the gold standard for validating the FAMACHA(©) system. The mean class haemoglobin level at which there was a 50% probability of worm burdens being ≤ 1000 worms was 7.05 g/dl in ewes and 7.92 g/dl in rams

  4. Parasitic Worm in Tiger (Panthera tigris at Serulingmas Zoological Garden Banjarnegara, Bandung Zoological Garden, and Indonesia Safari Park Bogor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Tiuria

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was done to infestigate the existence and the type of parasitic worms from feces of tiger(Panthera tigris at Serulingmas Zoological Garden (TRMS at Banjarnegara, Central Java , BandungZoological Garden (KBB, and Indonesia Safari Park Bogor (TSI. Total of 35 tigers feces samples wereexamined. They are taken from 4 Bengal tigers at Serulingmas Zoological Garden, 12 tigers (8 Bengaltigers and 4 Sumatran tigers at Bandung Zoological Garden, and 19 tigers (4 Bengal tigers and 15Sumatran tigers at Indonesia Safari Park Bogor. All of the feces samples were examined with qualitative(flotation, and sedimentation and quantitative (McMaster slide method to know the existence of parasiticworm eggs. Moreover, a tiger feces that contain eggs of strongylid were cultured. Parasitic worms that werefound in tigers from the research were ascarid (Toxocara sp, Toxascaris sp, strongylid (Trichostrongylus sp,Ancylostoma sp, Cooperia sp, , oxyurid (Oxyuris sp dan Strongyloides sp. The result showed that prevalenceindex of parasitic worms in tigers at TRMS, KBB and TSI were 100%, 50%, and 47,4%, respectively. Parasitic worms at TRMS were ascarid (Toxocara sp, strongylid (Ancylostoma sp, Trichostrongylus sp,Cooperia sp and Strongyloides sp. Parasitic worms at KBB were ascarid (Toxocara sp, Toxascaris sp,strongylid (Ancylostoma sp, Trichostrongylus sp, dan oxyurid (Oxyuris sp. Parasitic worms at TSI wereascarid (Toxocara sp, Toxascaris sp, strongylid (Ancylostoma sp, oxyurid (Oxyuris sp. ABSTRAK Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui jenis cacing parasitik pada harimau (Panthera tigris di Taman Rekreasi Margasatwa Serulingmas (TRMS Banjarnegara Jawa Tengah, Kebun Binatang Bandung (KBB, dan Taman Safari Indonesia (TSI Bogor. Sebanyak 35 sampel tinja harimau dari tiga lembaga konservasi eks-situ, yaitu 4 ekor harimau Benggala dari TRMS, 12 ekor (4 ekor harimau Benggala dan 8 ekor harimau Sumatera dari KBB, dan 19 ekor ( 4 ekor harimau Benggala dan 15 ekor

  5. Decay of velvet worms (Onychophora), and bias in the fossil record of lobopodians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Duncan Je; Gabbott, Sarah E; Mayer, Georg; Purnell, Mark A

    2014-11-29

    Fossil lobopodians, including animals proposed to have close affinity to modern onychophorans, are crucial to understanding the evolution of the panarthropod body plan and the phylum-level relationships between the ecdysozoan groups. Unfortunately, the key features of their anatomy are un-mineralized and subject to biases introduced during death, decay and preservation, yet the extent to which these fossils have been affected by the processes of post-mortem decay is entirely untested. Recent experimental work on chordates has highlighted a profound bias caused by decay, resulting in the erroneous interpretation of badly decayed specimens as primitive members of a clade (stemward slippage). The degree to which this bias affects organisms other than chordates is unknown. Here we use experimental decay of velvet worms (Onychophora) to examine the importance of decay bias in fossil lobopodians. Although we find stemward slippage is not significant in the interpretation of non-mineralized lobopodian fossils, the affect of decay is far from unbiased. Quantitative analysis reveals significant changes in body proportions during decay, a spectrum of decay resistance across anatomical features, and correlated decay of topologically associated characters. These results have significant implications for the interpretation of fossil lobopodian remains, demonstrating that features such as body outline and relative proportions are unreliable for taxonomy or phylogenetic reconstruction, unless decay is taken into account. Similarly, the non-independent loss of characters, due to juxtaposition in the body, during decay has the potential to bias phylogenetic analyses of non-biomineralized fossils. Our results are difficult to reconcile with interpretations of highly decay-prone tissues and structures, such as neural tissue, and complex musculature, in recently described Cambrian lobopodians. More broadly, we hypothesize that stemward slippage is unlikely to be a significant factor

  6. Health-education package to prevent worm infections in Chinese schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Franziska A; Gray, Darren J; Williams, Gail M; Raso, Giovanna; Li, Yue-Sheng; Yuan, Liping; He, Yongkang; Li, Robert S; Guo, Feng-Ying; Li, Sheng-Ming; McManus, Donald P

    2013-04-25

    Soil-transmitted helminths are among the most prevalent sources of human infections globally. We determined the effect of an educational package at rural schools in Linxiang City District, Hunan province, China, where these worms are prevalent. The intervention aimed to increase knowledge about soil-transmitted helminths, induce behavioral change, and reduce the rate of infection. We conducted a single-blind, unmatched, cluster-randomized intervention trial involving 1718 children, 9 to 10 years of age, in 38 schools over the course of 1 school year. Schools were randomly assigned to the health-education package, which included a cartoon video, or to a control package, which involved only the display of a health-education poster. Infection rates, knowledge about soil-transmitted helminths (as assessed with the use of a questionnaire), and hand-washing behavior were assessed before and after the intervention. Albendazole was administered in all the participants at baseline and in all the children who were found to be positive for infection with soil-transmitted helminths at the follow-up assessment at the end of the school year. At the follow-up assessment, the mean score for the knowledge of helminths, calculated as a percentage of a total of 43 points on a questionnaire, was 90% higher in the intervention group than in the control group (63.3 vs. 33.4, P<0.001), the percentage of children who washed their hands after using the toilet was nearly twice as high in the intervention group (98.9%, vs. 54.2% in the control group; P<0.001), and the incidence of infection with soil-transmitted helminths was 50% lower in the intervention group than in the control group (4.1% vs. 8.4%, P<0.001). No adverse events were observed immediately (within 15 minutes) after albendazole treatment. The health-education package increased students' knowledge about soil-transmitted helminths and led to a change in behavior and a reduced incidence of infection within 1 school year. (Funded

  7. A remarkable diversity of bone-eating worms (Osedax; Siboglinidae; Annelida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Shannon B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone-eating Osedax worms have proved to be surprisingly diverse and widespread. Including the initial description of this genus in 2004, five species that live at depths between 25 and 3,000 m in the eastern and western Pacific and in the north Atlantic have been named to date. Here, we provide molecular and morphological evidence for 12 additional evolutionary lineages from Monterey Bay, California. To assess their phylogenetic relationships and possible status as new undescribed species, we examined DNA sequences from two mitochondrial (COI and 16S rRNA and three nuclear genes (H3, 18S and 28S rRNA. Results Phylogenetic analyses identified 17 distinct evolutionary lineages. Levels of sequence divergence among the undescribed lineages were similar to those found among the named species. The 17 lineages clustered into five well-supported clades that also differed for a number of key morphological traits. Attempts to determine the evolutionary age of Osedax depended on prior assumptions about nucleotide substitution rates. According to one scenario involving a molecular clock calibrated for shallow marine invertebrates, Osedax split from its siboglinid relatives about 45 million years ago when archeocete cetaceans first appeared and then diversified during the late Oligocene and early Miocene when toothed and baleen whales appeared. Alternatively, the use of a slower clock calibrated for deep-sea annelids suggested that Osedax split from its siboglinid relatives during the Cretaceous and began to diversify during the Early Paleocene, at least 20 million years before the origin of large marine mammals. Conclusion To help resolve uncertainties about the evolutionary age of Osedax, we suggest that the fossilized bones from Cretaceous marine reptiles and late Oligocene cetaceans be examined for possible trace fossils left by Osedax roots. Regardless of the outcome, the present molecular evidence for strong phylogenetic concordance

  8. The Ghost Is the Machine: How Can We Visibilize the Unseen Norms and Power of Global Health? Comment on "Navigating Between Stealth Advocacy and Unconscious Dogmatism: The Challenge of Researching the Norms, Politics and Power of Global Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Lisa

    2015-12-03

    In his recent commentary, Gorik Ooms argues that "denying that researchers, like all humans, have personal opinions ... drives researchers' personal opinion underground, turning global health science into unconscious dogmatism or stealth advocacy, avoiding the crucial debate about the politics and underlying normative premises of global health." These 'unconscious' dimensions of global health are as Ooms and others suggest, rooted in its unacknowledged normative, political and power aspects. But why would these aspects be either unconscious or unacknowledged? In this commentary, I argue that the 'unconscious' and 'unacknowledged' nature of the norms, politics and power that drive global health is a direct byproduct of the processes through which power operates, and a primary mechanism by which power sustains and reinforces itself. To identify what is unconscious and unacknowledged requires more than broadening the disciplinary base of global health research to those social sciences with deep traditions of thought in the domains of power, politics and norms, albeit that doing so is a fundamental first step. I argue that it also requires individual and institutional commitments to adopt reflexive, humble and above all else, equitable practices within global health research. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  9. Parasitic worms: knowledge, attitudes, and practices in Western Côte d'Ivoire with implications for integrated control.

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    Cinthia A Acka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the developing world where parasitic worm infections are pervasive, preventive chemotherapy is the key strategy for morbidity control. However, local knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP of parasitic worms are poorly understood, although such information is required for prevention and sustainable control. METHODS: We carried out KAP surveys in two rural communities of Côte d'Ivoire that were subjected to school-based and community-based research and control activities. We used qualitative and quantitative methods. The former included observations, in-depth interviews with key informants, and focus group discussions with school children and adults. Quantitative methods consisted of a structured questionnaire administered to household heads. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Access to clean water was lacking in both communities and only a quarter of the households had functioning latrines. There was a better understanding of soil-transmitted helminthiasis than intestinal schistosomiasis, but community-based rather than school-based interventions appeared to improve knowledge of schistosomiasis. In the villages with community-based interventions, three-quarters of household interviewees knew about intestinal schistosomiasis compared to 14% in the village where school-based interventions were implemented (P<0.001. Whereas two-thirds of respondents from the community-based intervention village indicated that the research and control project was the main source of information, only a quarter of the respondents cited the project as the main source. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Preventive chemotherapy targeting school-aged children has limitations, as older population segments are neglected, and hence lack knowledge about how to prevent and control parasitic worm infections. Improved access to clean water and sanitation is necessary, along with health education to make a durable impact against helminth infections.

  10. The use of FAMACHA in estimation of gastrointestinal nematodes and total worm burden in Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Konto; Abba, Yusuf; Ramli, Nur Syairah Binti; Marimuthu, Murugaiyah; Omar, Mohammed Ariff; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Sadiq, Muhammad Abubakar; Tijjani, Abdulnasir; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Lila, Mohammed Azmi Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes and total worm burden of Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep was investigated among smallholder farms in Salak Tinggi district of Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 50 sheep raised in smallholder farms comprising of 27 Damara cross and 23 Barbados Blackbelly cross were categorized based on their age into young and adults. Fecal samples were collected and examined for strongyle egg count by using modified McMaster technique. Severity of infection was categorized into mild, moderate, and heavy, based on egg per gram (EPG). Five sheep were randomly selected and slaughtered to examine the presence of adult gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes through total worm count (TWC). Faffa Malan Chart (FAMACHA) score was used for investigation of worm load based on the degree of anemia. The study revealed an overall EPG prevalence of 88 %, of which 84.1 % had mild infection. There was a significant difference (p = 0.002) in EPG among the two breeds. Based on age, significant difference (p = 0. 004) in EPG was observed among Barbados Blackbelly cross, but not for Damara cross (p = 0.941). The correlation between severity of infection and the FAMACHA score was significant (r = 0.289; p = 0.042). Haemonchus spp. were the most predominant nematode found in the gastrointestinal tract, followed by Trichostrongylus and Oesophagostomum spps. EPG and TWC for Haemonchus were positively correlated, but not significant (r = 0.85, p = 0.066). From regression analysis, 73 % of the variability in TWC for Haemonchus could be explained by EPG. Thus, it can be concluded that FAMACHA score correlates well with severity of infection of a nematode and can be used to assess the strongyle nematode burden in the different sheep crosses.

  11. Seasonal evolution of faecal egg output by gastrointestinal worms in goats on communal farms in eastern Namibia

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    F.F. Kumba

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available As a more detailed continuation of a previous study, faecal samples for worm egg counts were collected per rectum from ten marked adult animals in selected flocks of goats, in each of six villages evenly spread out in the communal farming district of Okakarara in eastern Namibia. The study was conducted on a monthly basis from August 1999 to July 2000. Average faecal worm egg counts (FECs were highest during the warm-wet season, much lower during the cold-dry months and moderate during the hot-dry season. Least square means of FECs were 2 140, 430 and 653 per gram of faeces for the three seasons, respectively. Seasonal variation in egg counts was significant (P < 0.0001. Gastrointestinal strongyles, and to a lesser extent Strongyloides species, were the predominant parasite groups identified in goats. Kidding rates peaked in the cold-dry season and mortality rates in the hot-dry season. Results of this study suggest that gastrointestinal parasitism may be a problem that accentuates the effect of poor nutrition on small ruminants during the season of food shortages in the east of Namibia and that the use of FECs per se to assess the severity of gastrointestinal parasitic infection in goats followed by chemoprophylactic strategic and / or tactical treatment, may not be the best approach to addressing the worm problem under resource-poor conditions. The use of the FAMACHA(c system that identifies severely affected animals for treatment is technically a better option for communal farmers.

  12. A Multiscale Model for the World’s First Parasitic Disease Targeted for Eradication: Guinea Worm Disease

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    Rendani Netshikweta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Guinea worm disease (GWD is both a neglected tropical disease and an environmentally driven infectious disease. Environmentally driven infectious diseases remain one of the biggest health threats for human welfare in developing countries and the threat is increased by the looming danger of climate change. In this paper we present a multiscale model of GWD that integrates the within-host scale and the between-host scale. The model is used to concurrently examine the interactions between the three organisms that are implicated in natural cases of GWD transmission, the copepod vector, the human host, and the protozoan worm parasite (Dracunculus medinensis, and identify their epidemiological roles. The results of the study (through sensitivity analysis of R0 show that the most efficient elimination strategy for GWD at between-host scale is to give highest priority to copepod vector control by killing the copepods in drinking water (the intermediate host by applying chemical treatments (e.g., temephos, an organophosphate. This strategy should be complemented by health education to ensure that greater numbers of individuals and communities adopt behavioural practices such as voluntary reporting of GWD cases, prevention of GWD patients from entering drinking water bodies, regular use of water from safe water sources, and, in the absence of such water sources, filtering or boiling water before drinking. Taking into account the fact that there is no drug or vaccine for GWD (interventions which operate at within-host scale, the results of our study show that the development of a drug that kills female worms at within-host scale would have the highest impact at this scale domain with possible population level benefits that include prevention of morbidity and prevention of transmission.

  13. Comparison of worm development and host immune responses in natural hosts of schistosoma japonicum, yellow cattle and water buffalo

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    Yang Jianmei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yellow cattle and water buffalo are two of the most important natural hosts for Schistosoma japonicum in China. Previous observation has revealed that yellow cattle are more suited to the development of S. japonicum than water buffalo. Understanding more about the molecular mechanisms involved in worm development, as well as the pathological and immunological differences between yellow cattle and water buffalo post infection with S japonicum will provide useful information for the vaccine design and its delivery procedure. Results The worm length (p p p + T cells was higher in yellow cattle, while the percentage of CD8+ T cells was higher in water buffalo from pre-infection to 7 w post infection. The CD4/CD8 ratios were decreased in both species after challenge with schistosomes. Comparing with water buffalo, the IFN-γ level was higher and decreased significantly, while the IL-4 level was lower and increased gradually in yellow cattle from pre-infection to 7 w post infection. Conclusions In this study, we confirmed that yellow cattle were more suited to the development of S. japonicum than water buffalo, and more serious pathological damage was observed in infected yellow cattle. Immunological analysis suggested that CD4+ T cells might be an integral component of the immune response and might associate with worm development in yellow cattle. A shift from Th1 to Th2 type polarized immunity was only shown clearly in schistosome-infected yellow cattle, but no shift in water buffalo. The results provide valuable information for increased understanding of host-schistosome interactions, and for control of schistosomiasis.

  14. Earthworm Effects without Earthworms: Inoculation of Raw Organic Matter with Worm-Worked Substrates Alters Microbial Community Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aira, Manuel; Domínguez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background Earthworms are key organisms in organic matter decomposition because of the interactions they establish with soil microorganisms. They enhance decomposition rates through the joint action of direct effects (i.e. effects due to direct earthworm activity such as digestion, burrowing, etc) and indirect effects (i.e. effects derived from earthworm activities such as cast ageing). Here we test whether indirect earthworm effects affect microbial community functioning in the substrate, as when earthworms are present (i. e., direct effects). Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions we inoculated fresh organic matter (pig manure) with worm-worked substrates (vermicompost) produced by three different earthworm species. Two doses of each vermicompost were used (2.5 and 10%). We hypothesized that the presence of worm-worked material in the fresh organic matter will result in an inoculum of different microorganisms and nutrients. This inoculum should interact with microbial communities in fresh organic matter, thus promoting modifications similar to those found when earthworms are present. Inoculation of worm-worked substrates provoked significant increases in microbial biomass and enzyme activities (β-glucosidase, cellulase, phosphatase and protease). These indirect effects were similar to, although lower than, those obtained in pig manure with earthworms (direct and indirect earthworm effects). In general, the effects were not dose-dependent, suggesting the existence of a threshold at which they were triggered. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that the relationships between earthworms and microorganisms are far from being understood, and suggest the existence of several positive feedbacks during earthworm activity as a result of the interactions between direct and indirect effects, since their combination produces stronger modifications to microbial biomass and enzyme activity. PMID:21298016

  15. Minyoo Matata - The Vicious Worm - A Taenia solium Computer-Based Health-Education Tool - in Swahili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Chiara; Fèvre, Eric M; Owiny, Maurice; Ngere, Isaac; Vang Johansen, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Lack of knowledge is one of the main risk factors for the spread of the zoonotic parasite Taenia solium. The computer-based health-education tool 'The Vicious Worm' was developed to create awareness and provide evidence-based health education as a specific measure in control strategies. To increase the reach of the tool, a new version in Swahili was developed and can now be downloaded for free from http://theviciousworm.sites.ku.dk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Effect of weak combined magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A M; Lednev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+ and extremely weak alternating magnetic field on the metamorphosis of the meal-worm beetle Tenebrio molitor have been studied. It was shown that the exposure of pupas of insects to all above-indicated types of fields stimulates the metamorphosis. However, after the exposure to weak combined magnetic fields adjusted to the parametric resonance for Ca2+ and K+, the number of insects with anomalies increases, which is not observed by the action of the weak alternating magnetic field.

  17. Learning Networks, Networked Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter; Berlanga, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Sloep, P. B., & Berlanga, A. J. (2011). Learning Networks, Networked Learning [Redes de Aprendizaje, Aprendizaje en Red]. Comunicar, XIX(37), 55-63. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-05

  18. Google matrix analysis of C.elegans neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiah, V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2014-05-01

    We study the structural properties of the neural network of the C.elegans (worm) from a directed graph point of view. The Google matrix analysis is used to characterize the neuron connectivity structure and node classifications are discussed and compared with physiological properties of the cells. Our results are obtained by a proper definition of neural directed network and subsequent eigenvector analysis which recovers some results of previous studies. Our analysis highlights particular sets of important neurons constituting the core of the neural system. The applications of PageRank, CheiRank and ImpactRank to characterization of interdependency of neurons are discussed.

  19. A Study of Malware Propagation via Online Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghani, Mohammad Reza; Nguyen, Uyen Trang

    The popularity of online social networks (OSNs) have attracted malware creators who would use OSNs as a platform to propagate automated worms from one user's computer to another's. On the other hand, the topic of malware propagation in OSNs has only been investigated recently. In this chapter, we discuss recent advances on the topic of malware propagation by way of online social networking. In particular, we present three malware propagation techniques in OSNs, namely cross site scripting (XSS), Trojan and clickjacking types, and their characteristics via analytical models and simulations.

  20. Dynamic Model on the Transmission of Malicious Codes in Network

    OpenAIRE

    Bimal Kumar Mishra; Apeksha Prajapati

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces differential susceptible e-epidemic model S_i IR (susceptible class-1 for virus (S1) - susceptible class-2 for worms (S2) -susceptible class-3 for Trojan horse (S3) – infectious (I) – recovered (R)) for the transmission of malicious codes in a computer network. We derive the formula for reproduction number (R0) to study the spread of malicious codes in computer network. We show that the Infectious free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and endemic equilibrium...