WorldWideScience

Sample records for network participant browse

  1. SocialBrowsing: Integrating Social Networks and Web Browsing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Golbeck, Jennifer; Wasser, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    .... The extension is paired with services provided by social networking websites, analyzes the page's contents, and adds tooltips and highlighting to indicate when there is relevant social information...

  2. Core Benefits of Network Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Kheiri Pileh Roud, Ensieh

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the core benefits of network participation from the maritime companies’ perspective. It mainly focuses on the area of innovation, network qualities and absorptive capacities. A single case study has been conducted to address two research questions; 1) what are the core benefits of network participation for a maritime company? 2) Which qualities of network events influence the benefits for the participants? The main findings show that, the networks are valuable communi...

  3. Managerial challenges within networks: emphasizing the paradox of network participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten

    Flexibility and access to numerous resources are essential benefits associated with network participation. An important aspect of managing the network participation of a company is to maintain a dynamic portfolio of partners, and thereby keep up the strategic opportunities for development. However......, maintaining the dynamics within a network seems to be a complex challenge. There is a risk that the network ends up in The Paradox of Network Participation. The desired renewal and flexibility are not utilised because the involved parties preserve the existing networks structure consisting of the same...... companies, and hence, the paradox reduces the potential advantages of the network. The objective of this paper is to analyse the fundamental conditions for a company which depends on an efficient network, and based on this discuss how active use of information can reduce the relative importance of trust...

  4. Managerial Challenges Within Networks - Emphasizing the Paradox of Network Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Flexibility and access to numerous resources are essential benefits associated with network participation. An important aspect of managing the network participation of a company is to maintain a dynamic portfolio of partners, and thereby keep up the strategic opportunities for development. However......, maintaining the dynamics within a network seems to be a complex challenge. There is a risk that the network ends up in The Paradox of Network Participation. The desired renewal and flexibility are not utilised because the involved parties preserve the existing networks structure consisting of the same...... companies, and hence, the paradox reduces the potential advantages of the network. The objective of this paper is to analyse the fundamental conditions for a company which depends on an efficient network, and based on this discuss how active use of information can reduce the relative importance of trust...

  5. The Conceptualization of Digitally Networked Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Theocharis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The conceptualization and measurement of political participation has been an issue vibrantly debated for more than 50 years. The arrival of digital media came to add important parameters to the debate complicating matters further. Digital media have added inexhaustive creative and nonpolitical ways to engage in social and political life that not only often appear to form the basis of political participation but also, in a plethora of everyday contexts, seem to become embedded into what eventually evolves to become a politically meaningful act. This article argues that digitally networked participation—and its manifestations—is a form of political participation and should be conceptualized, identified, and measured as one. Relying on recent conceptual and empirical work, it shows how various common manifestations of digitally networked participation conform to minimalist, targeted, and motivational definitions of political participation. Finally, tackling common misconceptions about the value of such acts, this article argues that nonpolitical forms of digitally networked participation can occasionally be far more impactful than forms of participation commonly accepted as political. This article concludes by recommending the systematic development of measures for digitally networked participation and its formal integration in the study of political participation.

  6. Social Networks and Political Participation: How Do Networks Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chaeyoon

    2008-01-01

    Despite great interest in the role of social networks as channels of political mobilization, few studies have examined which types of social networks work more effectively in recruiting political activists. Using the Citizen Participation Study data, this study shows that contrary to the conventional wisdom in the literature, there is little…

  7. Private Web Browsing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Syverson, Paul F; Reed, Michael G; Goldschlag, David M

    1997-01-01

    .... These are both kept confidential from network elements as well as external observers. Private Web browsing is achieved by unmodified Web browsers using anonymous connections by means of HTTP proxies...

  8. Cohesion network analysis of CSCL participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Mihai; McNamara, Danielle S; Trausan-Matu, Stefan; Allen, Laura K

    2017-04-13

    The broad use of computer-supported collaborative-learning (CSCL) environments (e.g., instant messenger-chats, forums, blogs in online communities, and massive open online courses) calls for automated tools to support tutors in the time-consuming process of analyzing collaborative conversations. In this article, the authors propose and validate the cohesion network analysis (CNA) model, housed within the ReaderBench platform. CNA, grounded in theories of cohesion, dialogism, and polyphony, is similar to social network analysis (SNA), but it also considers text content and discourse structure and, uniquely, uses automated cohesion indices to generate the underlying discourse representation. Thus, CNA enhances the power of SNA by explicitly considering semantic cohesion while modeling interactions between participants. The primary purpose of this article is to describe CNA analysis and to provide a proof of concept, by using ten chat conversations in which multiple participants debated the advantages of CSCL technologies. Each participant's contributions were human-scored on the basis of their relevance in terms of covering the central concepts of the conversation. SNA metrics, applied to the CNA sociogram, were then used to assess the quality of each member's degree of participation. The results revealed that the CNA indices were strongly correlated to the human evaluations of the conversations. Furthermore, a stepwise regression analysis indicated that the CNA indices collectively predicted 54% of the variance in the human ratings of participation. The results provide promising support for the use of automated computational assessments of collaborative participation and of individuals' degrees of active involvement in CSCL environments.

  9. The Role of Social Networking Services in eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæbø, Øystein; Rose, Jeremy; Nyvang, Tom

    2009-01-01

    investigates the potential of Social Networking Services for the eParticipation area by defining social networking services, introducing the driving forces behind their advance, and discusses the potential use of social networking software in the eParticipation context....... and social networking because democratic systems favour the interests of larger groups of citizens --- the more voices behind a political proposition, the greater its chances of success. In this context of challenges the study of social networking on the internet and social network theory offers valuable...... insights into the practices and theories of citizen engagement. Social network theory focuses on the chains of relationships that social actors communicate and act within. Some social networking services on the internet attract large numbers of users, and apparently sustain a great deal of interaction...

  10. The Role of Social Networking Services in eParticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sæbø, Øystein; Rose, Jeremy; Nyvang, Tom

    A serious problem in eParticipation projects is citizen engagement - citizens do not necessarily become more willing to participate simply because net-services are provided for them. Most forms of eParticipation in democratic contexts are, however, dependent on citizen engagement, interaction and social networking because democratic systems favour the interests of larger groups of citizens - the more voices behind a political proposition, the greater its chances of success. In this context of challenges the study of social networking on the internet and social network theory offers valuable insights into the practices and theories of citizen engagement. Social network theory focuses on the chains of relationships that social actors communicate and act within. Some social networking services on the internet attract large numbers of users, and apparently sustain a great deal of interaction, content-generation and the development of loosely-coupled communities. They provide the forum for much discussion and interaction. In this respect social networking could contribute to solve some of the problems of engaging their users that eParticipation services often struggle with. This paper investigates the potential of Social Networking Services for the eParticipation area by defining social networking services, introducing the driving forces behind their advance, and discusses the potential use of social networking software in the eParticipation context.

  11. [Austrian Network for Psychosomatic Medicine: background, development and participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas, Christian; Stelzig, Manfred; Moser, Gabriele; Matzer, Franziska; Schüssler, Gerhard; Harnoncourt, Karl; Pieringer, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Physicians as well as the general public need easy access to information on regional psychosomatic treatment options as can be provided by a network website. We therefore set out to explore the readiness of the Austrian psychosomatic community to participate in a network for Psychosomatic Medicine and actively contribute to its website. All Austrian psychosomatic societies and all psychosomatic in-patient facilities were addressed personally and/or by letter. Through articles published in medical journals, physicians in private practices specialized in psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic medicine were also invited to participate. All departments of medical psychology and psychotherapy, all psychosomatic societies and all psychosomatic in-patient facilities in Austria decided to participate in this network. In addition, 100 physicians in private practice applied for registration in the network. These results support the network concept and have led to its implementation, and clearly, the network should be further developed. The first precondition for its functioning seems to be met.

  12. Customer as a participant of innovative networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in market conditions and basis for competing have brought the changes in profiling and realizing innovation strategies. Customers are the key subject in the process of generating of innovation. Customers in modern conditions do not wait for initiative of enterprise in value creation and they are not a part of formal processes of marketing research. The new communication technologies help them to be included in voluntary way in innovative activities of enterprise, which is motivated by brand loyalty, enthusiasm, hobby, wish to investigate. The enterprises realize the validity of this important source of new ideas and change their behaviour. The intention of author is to consider the importance of innovative networks for market innovation success, to analyse customer evolution from user to value creator, to identify the characteristics of customer as innovator, and to point to challenges for enterprise in the process of including them in its innovative activities.

  13. People’s Motivation to Participate in Social Network Sites, Subsequent Behaviours, and Situation Self-Awareness following a Crisis: Evidence from the MH370 Flight Incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuequn Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As people increasingly integrate social network sites (SNSs into their daily lives, they also turn to these sites for timely information following crises. To date, few studies have examined the effects of different types of motivation on participatory behaviours within SNSs following crises. In this study, self-determination theory (SDT is applied to examine how individuals are motivated to participate in SNSs following a crisis and how individuals’ participatory behaviours can better assist them understand a crisis. The Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370 incident is selected as the context for this study, and data is collected following the incident. The results show that different types of motivation result in different participatory behaviours. Controlled motivation is positively related to browsing content, commenting and sharing content. Conversely, autonomous motivation is positively associated with browsing and sharing content. Besides, browsing content and commenting are positively related to people’s situational self-awareness. The theoretical and practical implications of this study are discussed.

  14. Using social network analysis to understand actor participation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainable management of wetland is complex due competing interests and require the participation of different actors. However, there is little attention on systematic analysis of actor participation in wetland management. This paper uses Social Network Analysis (SNA) approach to analyse how actors with different ...

  15. Communication, Social Networks, and Influence in Citizen Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Thomas P.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews and surveys of participants in five community projects investigated whether the communication process for citizen participation is a factor in increasing or decreasing citizen influence in decision making for a project. Findings demonstrate the importance of social-network analysis in assessing the effectiveness of participation…

  16. National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

  17. Irrigation farmers motivation for participating in social networking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and ninety four irrigation farmers were randomly selected from three irrigation farming areas in two states of Kwara and Kogi in north central Nigeria. Data were obtained using a structured questionnaire. The Motivation for undertaking irrigation farming and their level of participation in social networking were ...

  18. Optimized Reputable Sensing Participants Extraction for Participatory Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By collecting data via sensors embedded personal smart devices, sensing participants play a key role in participatory sensor networks. Using information provided by reputable sensing participants ensures the reliability of participatory sensing data. Setting a threshold for the reputation, and those whose reputations are bigger than this value are regarded as reputable. The bigger the threshold value is, the more reliable the extracted reputable sensing participant is. However, if the threshold value is too big, only very limited participatory sensing data can be involved. This may cause unexpected bias in information collection. Existing works did not consider the relationship between the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants and the ratio of usable participatory sensing data. In this work, we propose a criterion for optimized reputable sensing participant extraction in participatory sensor networks. This is achieved based on the mathematical analysis on the ratio of available participatory sensing data and the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants. Our suggested threshold value for reputable sensing participant extraction is only related to the power of sensing participant’s reputation distribution. It is easy to be applied in real applications. Simulation results tested on real application data further verified the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  19. Factors Underlying Farmers’ Decisions to Participate in Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka Kühne

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 The objective of this elicitation study is to provide insights into farmers’ beliefs which influence their participation in knowledge exchange and innovation networks to enable the enhancement of network participation. A set of facilitating and impeding factors was obtained. Participants identified (a 13 categories of behavioural beliefs (e.g. ‘You learn something’ and ‘Low perceived return on investment’, (b 4 groups of normative beliefs (influence of colleagues, spouses, network coordinators and chain partners and (c 11 control beliefs (facilitators or barriers related to, for example, ‘Network skills’, ‘No time’ and ‘Perceived restraint by farmers in communicating openly and honestly’. Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0pt 5.4pt 0pt 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0pt; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}

  20. Network interventions - How citizens’ social media networks influence their political participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; de Vreese, Claes Holger; Albæk, Erik

    Social media platforms are special places of information exposure because they are structured around a user’s social network and not around content, like other news media. Studies could show that news exposure on social media can affect citizens’ political participation due to the personalized, t...... direct effects of social media exposure on participation but results indeed indicate that such effects are dependent on citizens’ network consistency.......Social media platforms are special places of information exposure because they are structured around a user’s social network and not around content, like other news media. Studies could show that news exposure on social media can affect citizens’ political participation due to the personalized......, targeted, & inadvertent exposure. However, previous research did not strongly focus on how the characteristics of a citizens’ social media network might alter this relationship. We tests how political information exposure via three different media channels affects political participation among Danish...

  1. The Effect of Browsing Social Networking Websites: The Effect of Browsing You tube on the Attitude of Egyptians Towards Those Who Have Different Political Views

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassna Saad

    2015-01-01

      [...]in case of the people of third world countries, the ability of social networking websites to create real democracy even in the virtual world is exaggerated as the people themselves neither determined...

  2. Social networks and participation with others for youth with learning, attention, and autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Consuelo M; Bendixen, Roxanna M; Young, Mary Ellen; Prudencio, Stephanie M; McCarty, Christopher; Mann, William C

    2016-02-01

    Social participation involves activities and roles providing interactions with others, including those within their social networks. This study sought to characterize social networks and participation with others for 36 youth, ages 11 to 16 years, with (n = 19) and without (n = 17) learning disability, attention disorder, or high-functioning autism. Social networks were measured using methods of personal network analysis. The Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment With Whom dimension scores were used to measure participation with others. Youth from the clinical group were interviewed regarding their experiences within their social networks. Group differences were observed for six social network variables and in the proportion of overall, physical, recreational, social, and informal activities engaged with family and/or friends. Qualitative findings explicated strategies used in building, shaping, and maintaining social networks. Social network factors should be considered when seeking to understand social participation. © CAOT 2015.

  3. Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, Cecil W.

    2010-01-01

    Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of social…

  4. Information spreading in complex networks with participation of independent spreaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Li, Weihua; Guo, Quantong; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Zhiming; Gao, Chao; Tang, Shaoting

    2018-02-01

    Information diffusion dynamics in complex networks is often modeled as a contagion process among neighbors which is analogous to epidemic diffusion. The attention of previous literature is mainly focused on epidemic diffusion within one network, which, however neglects the possible interactions between nodes beyond the underlying network. The disease can be transmitted to other nodes by other means without following the links in the focal network. Here we account for this phenomenon by introducing the independent spreaders in a susceptible-infectious-recovered contagion process. We derive the critical epidemic thresholds on Erdős-Rényi and scale-free networks as a function of infectious rate, recovery rate and the activeness of independent spreaders. We also present simulation results on ER and SF networks, as well as on a real-world email network. The result shows that the extent to which a disease can infect might be more far-reaching, than we can explain in terms of link contagion only. Besides, these results also help to explain how activeness of independent spreaders can affect the diffusion process, which can be used to explore many other dynamical processes.

  5. African Americans and Network Disadvantage: Enhancing Social Capital through Participation on Social Networking Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Taana Smith

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the participation of African Americans on social networking sites (SNS, and evaluates the degree to which African Americans engage in activities in the online environment to mitigate social capital deficits. Prior literature suggests that compared with whites, African Americans have less social capital that can enhance their socio-economic mobility. As such, my research question is: do African Americans enhance their social capital through their participation on SNS? I use nationally representative data collected from the Pew Internet and American Life Project to explore the research question. The results suggest that the online environment is potentially a space in which African Americans can lessen social capital deficits.

  6. Mobile web browsing using the cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Bo; Cao, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    This brief surveys existing techniques to address the problem of long delays and high power consumption for web browsing on smartphones, which can be due to the local computational limitation at the smartphone (e.g., running java scripts or flash objects) level. To address this issue, an architecture called Virtual-Machine based Proxy (VMP) is introduced, shifting the computing from smartphones to the VMP which may reside in the cloud. Mobile Web Browsing Using the Cloud illustrates the feasibility of deploying the proposed VMP system in 3G networks through a prototype using Xen virtual machin

  7. European Managers' Interpretations of Participation: A Semantic Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Explores cultural variations in managers' interpretations of a key communicative process: worker participation. Finds that semantic patterns derived from structural analyses indicate cultural differences in meanings managers from five European Community nations attach to the term "participation." Supports two of G. Hofstede's dimensions…

  8. 42 CFR 486.320 - Condition: Participation in Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....320 Condition: Participation in Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. After being designated... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Participation in Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. 486.320 Section 486.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  9. Innovation Network Development Model in Telemedicine: A Change in Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Maryam; Torabi, Mashallah; Safdari, Reza; Dargahi, Hossein; Naeimi, Sara

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a telemedicine innovation network and reports its implementation in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The required conditions for the development of future projects in the field of telemedicine are also discussed; such projects should be based on the common needs and opportunities in the areas of healthcare, education, and technology. The development of the telemedicine innovation network in Tehran University of Medical Sciences was carried out in two phases: identifying the beneficiaries of telemedicine, and codification of the innovation network memorandum; and brainstorming of three workgroup members, and completion and clustering ideas. The present study employed a qualitative survey by using brain storming method. Thus, the ideas of the innovation network members were gathered, and by using Freeplane software, all of them were clustered and innovation projects were defined. In the services workgroup, 87 and 25 ideas were confirmed in phase 1 and phase 2, respectively. In the education workgroup, 8 new programs in the areas of telemedicine, tele-education and teleconsultation were codified. In the technology workgroup, 101 and 11 ideas were registered in phase 1 and phase 2, respectively. Today, innovation is considered a major infrastructural element of any change or progress. Thus, the successful implementation of a telemedicine project not only needs funding, human resources, and full equipment. It also requires the use of innovation models to cover several different aspects of change and progress. The results of the study can provide a basis for the implementation of future telemedicine projects using new participatory, creative, and innovative models.

  10. Associative nature of event participation dynamics: A network theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanić, Jelena; Mitrović Dankulov, Marija

    2017-01-01

    The affiliation with various social groups can be a critical factor when it comes to quality of life of each individual, making such groups an essential element of every society. The group dynamics, longevity and effectiveness strongly depend on group’s ability to attract new members and keep them engaged in group activities. It was shown that high heterogeneity of scientist’s engagement in conference activities of the specific scientific community depends on the balance between the numbers of previous attendances and non-attendances and is directly related to scientist’s association with that community. Here we show that the same holds for leisure groups of the Meetup website and further quantify individual members’ association with the group. We examine how structure of personal social networks is evolving with the event attendance. Our results show that member’s increasing engagement in the group activities is primarily associated with the strengthening of already existing ties and increase in the bonding social capital. We also show that Meetup social networks mostly grow trough big events, while small events contribute to the groups cohesiveness. PMID:28166305

  11. Adolescents' Social Networks: Exploring Different Patterns of Socio-Digital Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shupin; Hietajärvi, Lauri; Palonen, Tuire; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess adolescents' participation in various socio-digital activities by using a self-report questionnaire, a social networking questionnaire, and interviews. The participants (n = 253) were grade 6-9 students from a multicultural lower-secondary school in Finland. Three profiles of socio-digital participation were…

  12. Internet use, browsing, and the urban poor: implications for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, K; McCloud, Rachel; Minsky, Sara; Puleo, Elaine; Kontos, Emily; Bigman-Galimore, Cabral; Rudd, Rima; Emmons, Karen M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the growing penetration of the Internet, little is known about the usage and browsing patterns of those in poverty. We report on a randomized controlled trial that sheds light on the Internet use and browsing patterns among the urban poor. The data come from 312 participants in Boston, Massachusetts, from Click to Connect, a study that examined the impact of an intervention that provided computers, Internet, and training to people from lower socioeconomic position (SEP). Data were gathered through pre- and posttest surveys and Internet use tracking software that generated approximately 13 million network activity files and more than 5.5 million records. Internet use increased among intervention participants, with most of their time spent on social and participatory media sites or Internet portals. Differential patterns of use by gender and race/ethnicity were observed. Purposive searching for health information was low among all participants. Most of the visits to health-related sites were to local hospitals' sites suggesting the influence of possible preexisting relationships and trust. Social networking sites were frequently visited, with three sites enjoying similar popularity among all groups. Our data show that the availability of Internet can lead to significant increase in its use among low SEP groups. Low SEP members used the Internet for participation and engagement, but the sites visited differed by group. Harnessing the power of social networking sites and shareware sites may be a way to increase access to health information.

  13. Associative nature of event participation dynamics: a network theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanić, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Affiliation with various social groups can be a critical factor when it comes to quality of life of every individual, making these groups an essential element of every society. The group dynamics, longevity and effectiveness strongly depend on group's ability to attract new members and keep them engaged in group activities. It was shown that high heterogeneity of scientist's engagement in conference activities of the specific scientific community depends on the balance between the number of previous attendance and non-attendance and is directly related to scientist's association with that community. Here we show that the same holds for leisure groups of Meetup website and further quantify member's association with the group. We examine how structure of personal social networks is evolving with event attendance. Our results show that member's increasing engagement in group activities is primarily associated with the strengthening of already existing ties and increase of bonding social capital. We also show tha...

  14. Municipal consultants’ participation in building networks to support science teachers’ work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    of professional learning networks to assess the consultants’ opportunities and constraints in terms of participating in network development. The results indicate that the consultants’ roles in successful network formation is characterized by personal stable contacts within the science teacher community......This paper focuses particularly on the role of municipal science consultants in developing and maintaining network activities and connections among primary school science teachers. The hypothesis is that consultants play a crucial role in supporting strategic planning, and sustaining contacts...... and activities within professional learning networks. The research is framed by a project that involved 80 primary science teachers in 20 schools. The aim of the project was to develop network activities that facilitate sustainable change of the participating schools’ collective culture and practice of science...

  15. Participation in protected areas: A social network case study in Catalonia, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvet-Mir, L.; Maestre Andrés, S.; Molina, J.L.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Local participation of stakeholders in governance of protected areas is considered to be important to natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. Social network analysis (SNA) is a useful tool for analysis because it allows the understanding of stakeholders’ relationships,

  16. Social networks, social participation, and health among youth living in extreme poverty in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Amelia; Barrington, Clare; Abdoulayi, Sara; Tsoka, Maxton; Mvula, Peter; Handa, Sudhanshu

    2016-12-01

    Extensive research documents that social network characteristics affect health, but knowledge of peer networks of youth in Malawi and sub-Saharan Africa is limited. We examine the networks and social participation of youth living in extreme poverty in rural Malawi, using in-depth interviews with 32 youth and caregivers. We describe youth's peer networks and assess how gender and the context of extreme poverty influence their networks and participation, and how their networks influence health. In-school youth had larger, more interactive, and more supportive networks than out-of-school youth, and girls described less social participation and more isolation than boys. Youth exchanged social support and influence within their networks that helped cope with poverty-induced stress and sadness, and encouraged protective sexual health practices. However, poverty hampered their involvement in school, religious schools, and community organizations, directly by denying them required material means, and indirectly by reducing time and emotional resources and creating shame and stigma. Poverty alleviation policy holds promise for improving youth's social wellbeing and mental and physical health by increasing their opportunities to form networks, receive social support, and experience positive influence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cultural Ecosystem of Creative Place: Creative Class, Creative Networks and Participation in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders-Morawska Justyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to conceptualise a data-based research framework for the role of creative networks in cultural exchange. Participation in culture measured as audience per 1000 residents and expenditures on culture-related activities were analysed in relation to such territorial assets as accessibility to creative infrastructure, the economic status of residents, the governance networks of civil society, and cultural capital. The results indicate how accessibility, governance networks, and cultural capital contribute to participation measured via audience indicators while a low poverty rate has explanatory value with respect to expenditures on culture.

  18. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd W. Boonstra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  19. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W; E Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  20. Browsing capacity and nutritive value of indigenous browses in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study sought to identify indigenous browse species in the Coastal Savannah of Ghana, evaluate their browsing capacity and nutritive value during the dry season. It was hypothesized that indigenous browses maintain a high nutritive value and contribute immensely to livestock feed in the dry season. Data were ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 5051 - 5100 of 11090 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index .... Vol 10, No 84 (2011), Fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1) promoter as a candidate for genetic engineering of fatty acids to .... V Jalasutram, A Jetty, GR Anupoju.

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 490 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... to the extraction and purification of pectin from inferior shaddock using .... Vol 4, No 4 (2008), Assessment of heavy metals concentrations in water from borehole at ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 34 of 34 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 17 (2007), Application of wastewater treatment by algae in irrigation of some economic ... and physiological behavior of drinking water-borne pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 444 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 60 (2007), Determination of Phenols in Water Samples using a ... Silver on Nano-ZnO for the Environmental Purification of Dye Pollutants, Abstract PDF.

  5. Collaborative Tools for e-Participation across Networks: The Comuno Networking Site for Public Governance and Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kaschesky

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents collaborative tools for public participation across multiple networking sites. The tools are part of the Comuno networking site for public governance and services, which is particularly targeted at the public sector (currently in alpha testing at http://comuno.org. The Broadcast tool allows cross-posting content from Comuno to a wide variety of other networking sites, such as Facebook or Twitter. The UserFeed and TopicFeed tools build RSS feeds from content published by a specific user or under a specific topic. The LifeStream tool gathers a user’s activities across multiple networking sites in the private account section at Comuno. These tools and related aspects of the Comuno networking site are discussed and presented in the context of deliberation and opinion-forming in a Swiss bilingual city.

  6. African Journals Online: Browse by Country

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Browse by Country. Home > African Journals Online: Browse by Country. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is ...

  7. Public participation in the process of local public health policy, using policy network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yukyung; Kim, Chang-Yup; You, Myoung Soon; Lee, Kun Sei; Park, Eunyoung

    2014-11-01

    To assess the current public participation in-local health policy and its implications through the analysis of policy networks in health center programs. We examined the decision-making process in sub-health center installations and the implementation process in metabolic syndrome management program cases in two districts ('gu's) of Seoul. Participants of the policy network were selected by the snowballing method and completed self-administered questionnaires. Actors, the interactions among actors, and the characteristics of the network were analyzed by Netminer. The results showed that the public is not yet actively participating in the local public health policy processes of decision-making and implementation. In the decision-making process, most of the network actors were in the public sector, while the private sector was a minor actor and participated in only a limited number of issues after the major decisions were made. In the implementation process, the program was led by the health center, while other actors participated passively. Public participation in Korean public health policy is not yet well activated. Preliminary discussions with various stakeholders, including civil society, are needed before making important local public health policy decisions. In addition, efforts to include local institutions and residents in the implementation process with the public officials are necessary to improve the situation.

  8. Glancing up or down: Mood management and selective social comparisons on social networking sites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, B.K.; Knobloch-Westerwick, S.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking sites (SNS) provide opportunities for mood management through selective exposure. This study tested the prediction that negative mood fosters self-enhancing social comparisons to SNS profiles. Participants were induced into positive or negative moods and then browsed manipulated

  9. Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Paletto A.; Graziani A; Brescancin F; De_Meo I

    2017-01-01

    Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences. Natura 2000 is an ecological network of protected areas identified by the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and the Birds Directive (79/409/EC) - recently replaced by the Directive 2009/147/EC - in order to ensure the long-term protection of endangered species in their natural habitats in European Union (EU) territory. EU Member States are responsible for developing and implementing the...

  10. Coeliac disease: the association between quality of life and social support network participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A R; Wolf, R; Contento, I; Verdeli, H; Green, P H R

    2016-06-01

    There is little information available on the use of social support systems for patients with coeliac disease (CD). We performed a cross-sectional study aiming to examine the association between participation in different types of social support networks and quality of life (QOL) in adults with CD. A survey including a validated CD specific QOL instrument was administered online and in-person to adults with CD who were following a gluten-free diet. Participation in social support networks (type, frequency and duration) were assessed. Among the 2138 participants, overall QOL scores were high, averaging 68.9 out of 100. Significant differences in QOL scores were found for age, length of time since diagnosis and level of education. Most (58%) reported using no social support networks. Of the 42% reporting use of social support networks (online 17.9%, face-to-face 10.8% or both 12.8%), QOL scores were higher for those individuals who used only face-to-face social support compared to only online support (72.6 versus 66.7; P networks is associated with greater QOL scores compared to online social support networks. These findings have potential implications for the management of individuals with CD. Emphasis on face-to-face support may improve long-term QOL and patient outcomes. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  11. Participation in protected areas: a social network case study in Catalonia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Calvet-Mir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Local participation of stakeholders in governance of protected areas is considered to be important to natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. Social network analysis (SNA is a useful tool for analysis because it allows the understanding of stakeholders' relationships, interactions, and influences through communication networks. We combine quantitative and qualitative data to undertake a SNA for the natural park of Sant Llorenç del Munt in Catalonia, Spain. This is aimed at (1 assessing the structure of the communication network; (2 comparing the informal communication network with the formal participatory bodies of the natural park; and (3 selecting participants for subsequent analyses of the adequate governance structure of the natural park. The results suggest that an informal network of communication, which is reasonably well represented in participatory bodies, exists. However, this communication network is not functioning perfectly because stakeholders experience a lack of trust in the governance bodies of the park, which they perceive to be ineffective. Our results show that SNA is an effective tool to support the creation of a broad representation of stakeholders in participatory processes.

  12. Weak and strong publics: drawing on Nancy Fraser to explore parental participation in neonatal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Lewando‐Hundt, Gillian; Blaxter, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims  We draw on the work of Nancy Fraser, and in particular her concepts of weak and strong publics, to analyze the process of parental involvement in managed neonatal network boards. Background  Public involvement has moved beyond the individual level to include greater involvement of both patients and the public in governance. However, there is relatively little literature that explores the nature and outcomes of long‐term patient involvement initiatives or has attempted to theorize, particularly at the level of corporate decision making, the process of patient and public involvement. Methods  A repeated survey of all neonatal network managers in England was carried out in 2006–07 to capture developments and changes in parental representation over this time period. This elicited information about the current status of parent representation on neonatal network boards. Four networks were also selected as case studies. This involved interviews with key members of each network board, interviews with parent representatives, observation of meetings and access to board minutes. Results  Data collected show that a wide range of approaches to involving parents has been adopted. These range from decisions not to involve parents at this level to relatively well‐developed systems designed to link parent representatives on network boards to parents in neonatal units. Conclusion  Despite these variations, we suggest that parental participation within neonatal services remains an example of a weak public because the parent representatives had limited participation with little influence on decision making. PMID:22040481

  13. Fostering participation in learning networks by using reward systems and face-to-face meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Burgos, Daniel; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Burgos, D., Brouns, F. M. R., & Koper, E. J. R. (Submitted). Fostering participation in learning networks by using reward systems and face-to-face meetings. In Proceedings of ICALT 2006 Conference. July 5-7, Kerkrade, The Netherlands

  14. Friend me: which factors influence top global brands participation in social network sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araujo, T.; Neijens, P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - This study focuses on how brands participate in social network sites (SNSs) and investigates both the different strategies they adopt and the factors that influence these strategies. Design/methodology/approach - The activities of top brands in SNSs were investigated through a content

  15. Social networks, social participation and self-perceived health among older people in transitional Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerliu, Naim; Burazeri, Genc; Toçi, Ervin; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Jongen, Wesley; Ramadani, Naser; Brand, Helmut

    2014-04-01

    A number of studies proved that social networks and social participation have beneficial health effects in western countries. However, the evidence from southeast European region is scant. We aimed to assess the extent of social networks and social participation and their relationship with self-perceived health status among older people in post-war Kosovo. A nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted in Kosovo in 2011 including a representative sample of 1890 individuals aged ≥65 years (949 men, mean age 73 ± 6 years; 941 women, mean age 74 ± 7 years; response rate: 83%). Social networks were assessed by means of number of friends and family members that participants had contacts with, whereas social participation by involvement in social groupings/organizations. Information on self-perceived health status and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics was also collected. Overall, 93% of study participants reported that they had at least weekly contacts with more than one family member, and 97% reported daily contacts with their respective friends. Conversely, only 14% of participants reported engagement with social groupings. Generally, individuals who had contacts with friends and/or engaged with social organizations reported a better health status. Our findings point to strong family ties in this patriarchal society. Conversely, levels of social participation were considerably lower in Kosovo compared with the western European countries. The low participation levels in social groupings and their putative deleterious health effects should raise the awareness of policymakers to improve the conditions and increase the degree of social participation among older people in transitional Kosovo.

  16. Political Participation and Power Relations in Egypt: The Scope of Newspapers and Social Network Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Shehata

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation and political power relations. The research employed a mixed methodology, comprised of a survey of 527 Egyptian youth and semi-structured interviews of 12 political activists and journalists. The results showed a significant relationship between reading newspapers and youth’s political participation, but not between using social network sites and political participation. In addition, newspapers and social network sites were platforms for a series of conflicts and coalitions that emerged between pro- and anti-revolution actors. Despite the importance of social network sites as key tools for informing and mobilizing the public, they eventually failed to empower new political actors, and this was because old actors, supported by newspapers and other mainstream media, managed to obstruct the new actors’ progress.

  17. Healthy living champions network: An opportunity for community pharmacy's sustained participation in tackling local health inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Zachariah; Portlock, Jane; Rutter, Paul; Brown, David

    Evaluations recognize healthy living champions (HLCs) as key contributors to the Health Living Pharmacy (HLP) project's success; the project has served to reduce pressure on family doctor services and clients who would have otherwise not sought professional advice have accessed HLP services. To investigate the impact of innovative networking opportunities in supporting HLCs to function within their role and to explore the network's potential in promoting sustained HLP participation. Twenty of Portsmouth's (England) HLCs (n = 33) agreed to participate in focus groups. Transcripts were subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis guided by grounded theory. The transcripts were read repeatedly; recurrent themes were identified and coded manually and consensus was reached by discussion within the research team. Network meetings provide HLCs with professional development, networking opportunities and continued encouragement. Recommendations to develop and sustain the network included the formation of a group committee and establishing of a communication facility accessible between meetings. The successful Portsmouth HLP project informed the design of UK HLP projects. The current focus is to build a successful strategy to sustain the positive outcomes, building on the recognized enablers. This study contributes further lessons learned to guide health commissioners and service implementers to best support staff development, involvement and motivation through innovative practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cooperative Mobile Web Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Q

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper advocates a novel approach for mobile web browsing based on cooperation among wireless devices within close proximity operating in a cellular environment. In the actual state of the art, mobile phones can access the web using different cellular technologies. However, the supported data rates are not sufficient to cope with the ever increasing traffic requirements resulting from advanced and rich content services. Extending the state of the art, higher data rates can only be achieved by increasing complexity, cost, and energy consumption of mobile phones. In contrast to the linear extension of current technology, we propose a novel architecture where mobile phones are grouped together in clusters, using a short-range communication such as Bluetooth, sharing, and accumulating their cellular capacity. The accumulated data rate resulting from collaborative interactions over short-range links can then be used for cooperative mobile web browsing. By implementing the cooperative web browsing on commercial mobile phones, it will be shown that better performance is achieved in terms of increased data rate and therefore reduced access times, resulting in a significantly enhanced web browsing user experience on mobile phones.

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 227 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 7, No 1 (2015): Supplement 1, Impact of a quality improvement project to strengthen infection prevention and control training at rural healthcare facilities ... Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Is temperament a key to the success of teaching innovation?

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 521 ... Journal Home > Advanced Search > Browse Title Index ... Vol 22, No 8 (2004), A medical approach to language delay, Abstract PDF ... Vol 29, No 3 (2011), Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: MRI is now the ...

  1. Perceived Disagreement and Heterogeneity in Social Networks: Distinct Effects on Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Margherita; Cavazza, Nicoletta; Graziani, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    Although the coexistence of conflicting opinions in society is the very core of democracy, people's tendency to avoid conflict could keep them away from political discussion and participation. On the other hand, being exposed to diverse political views could motivate citizens to participate. We conducted secondary analyses on two 2013 ITANES (Italian National Election Studies) probability samples in order to test the hypotheses that perceived network disagreement (between an individual and her/his discussion partners) and heterogeneity (among discussants holding different political opinions) exert independent and opposite effects on political participation through motivation and knowledge. Results converged in showing that disagreement dampened, while heterogeneity encouraged, political participation (voting, propensity to abstain in future, offline and online activism, and timing of vote decision) by decreasing or increasing, respectively, political interest and, in turn, knowledge.

  2. Using Social Network Analysis To Map Participation And Non-participation In Health Promotion and Community-building Among Vulnerable Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    and capacities for collective and collaborative problemsolving is seen as key to successful community building (Kretzmann and McKnight, 1993). By using social network analysis and Bourdieu’s definition of capital, this study aimed to identify patterns of participation and non-participation in a community...

  3. Investigating Patterns of Participation in an Online Support Group for Problem Drinking: a Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanoski, Karen; van Mierlo, Trevor; Cunningham, John

    2016-08-22

    This study contributes to emerging literature on online health networks by modeling communication patterns between members of a moderated online support group for problem drinking. Using social network analysis, we described members' patterns of joint participation in threads, parsing out the role of site moderators, and explored differences in member characteristics by network position. Posts made to the online support group of Alcohol Help Centre during 2013 were structured as a two-mode network of members (n = 205) connected via threads (n = 506). Metrics included degree centrality, clique membership, and tie strength. The network consisted of one component and no cliques of members, although most made few posts and a small number communicated only with the site's moderators. Highly active members were older and tended to have started posting prior to 2013. The distribution of members across threads varied from threads containing posts by one member to others that connected multiple members. Moderators accounted for sizable proportions of the connectivity between both members and threads. After 5 years of operation, the AHC online support group appears to be fairly cohesive and stable, in the sense that there were no isolated subnetworks comprised of specific types of members or devoted to specific topics. Participation and connectedness at the member-level was varied, however, and tended to be low on average. The moderators were among the most central in the network, although there were also members who emerged as central and dedicated contributors to the online discussions across topics. Study findings highlight a number of areas for consideration by online support group developers and managers.

  4. Comparing Social Network Analysis of Posts with Counting of Posts as a Measurement of Learners' Participation in Facebook Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Yeon; Lee, Hyeon Woo

    2016-01-01

    With the currently growing interest in social network services, many college courses use social network services as platforms for discussions, and a number of studies have been conducted on the use of social network analysis to measure students' participation in online discussions. This study aims to demonstrate the difference between counting…

  5. CIHR canadian HIV trials network HIV workshop: ethical research through community participation and strengthening scientific validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Slogrove, Amy; Sas, Jacqueline; Kunda, John; Morfaw, Frederick; Mukonzo, Jackson; Thabane, Lehana

    2014-01-01

    The CIHR canadian HIV trials network mandate includes strengthening capacity to conduct and apply clinical research through training and mentoring initiatives of HIV researchers by building strong networks and partnerships on the African continent. At the17th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA), the CTN facilitated a two-day workshop to address ethical issues in the conduct of HIV research, and career enhancing strategies for young African HIV researchers. Conference attendees were allowed to attend whichever session was of interest to them. We report on the topics covered, readings shared and participants' evaluation of the workshop. The scientific aspects of ethical research in HIV and career enhancement strategies are relevant issues to conference attendees.

  6. Characteristics of nurse practitioners interested in participating in a practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Sharon M; Werner, James J

    2010-03-01

    Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs) have emerged as key laboratories for generating new knowledge that reflects community-based practice; however, the representativeness of nurse practitioners (NPs) interested in PBRN participation is not known. This study describes characteristics of NP members interested in participating in a regional PBRN in comparison with state and national data. All 1016 NPs in northeast (NE) Ohio were surveyed by mail and Internet. The survey captured NP demographics, practice characteristics, and gauged interest in participating in future PBRN studies. Survey respondent's data were compared with Ohio and national data obtained from the 2004 AANP National Nurse Practitioner Sample Survey. NE Ohio NPs were similar to an Ohio and national sample of NPs. Northeast Ohio NPs practicing in ambulatory settings who were interested in participating in subsequent PBRN studies were not significantly different from non-interested NPs. NPs interested in participation in a PBRN appear to be representative of the NE Ohio population of ambulatory practice NPs and are similar demographically to a national sample of NPs. Findings from studies conducted in the NE Ohio PBRN may generalize to other NPs practicing in the region and across the country.

  7. The participation of Interactors in Social Network Sites as a News Event Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela da Silva Zago

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The article discusses the possibility of considering the participation of interactors in social network sites as a news event dimension, to the extent that, by the recirculation, interactors can assign different and unexpected meanings to the event. We take as a starting point for the discussion, in an exploratory nature, the inauguration of the first stretch of the bike path from the Avenida Ipiranga, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in May 2012.

  8. Restrictions of physical activity participation in older adults with disability: employing keyword network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kyo-Man; Kim, Chun-Jong; Park, Chae-Hee; Byeun, Jung-Kyun; Seo, Geon-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Older adults with disability might have been increasing due to the rapid aging of society. Many studies showed that physical activity is an essential part for improving quality of life in later lives. Regular physical activity is an efficient means that has roles of primary prevention and secondary prevention. However, there were few studies regarding older adults with disability and physical activity participation. The purpose of this current study was to investigate restriction factors to regularly participate older adults with disability in physical activity by employing keyword network analysis. Two hundred twenty-nine older adults with disability who were over 65 including aging with disability and disability with aging in type of physical disability and brain lesions defined by disabled person welfare law partook in the open questionnaire assessing barriers to participate in physical activity. The results showed that the keyword the most often used was 'Traffic' which was total of 21 times (3.47%) and the same proportion as in the 'personal' and 'economical'. Exercise was considered the most central keyword for participating in physical activity and keywords such as facility, physical activity, disabled, program, transportation, gym, discomfort, opportunity, and leisure activity were associated with exercise. In conclusion, it is necessary to educate older persons with disability about a true meaning of physical activity and providing more physical activity opportunities and decreasing inconvenience should be systematically structured in Korea.

  9. Public Participation or Social Grooming: A Quantitative Content Analysis of a Local Social Network Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Tanaka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to empirically investigate the structure of a local social network site (SNS by means of a quantitative content analysis. Local SNSs have recently increased in Japan. The Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication has supported city governments to set up local SNSs with the aim of encouraging public participation of citizens in municipal areas. However, the users of SNSs do not necessarily seem to utilize government-driven local SNSs for this purpose. The authors apply concepts of public participation and social grooming to study a local SNS. A quantitative content analysis was conducted to investigate users’ activity and latent factors that influence them. The result showed three findings. Firstly, the content of a local SNS might relate to three latent factors, namely, social grooming, civic participation, and political participation. Second, the former two factors could relate to users’ emotions. Third, compared to male users, female users might provide content that is more emotional and may be affected by the former two factors.

  10. Simulating the effects of social networks on a population's hurricane evacuation participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widener, Michael J.; Horner, Mark W.; Metcalf, Sara S.

    2013-04-01

    Scientists have noted that recent shifts in the earth's climate have resulted in more extreme weather events, like stronger hurricanes. Such powerful storms disrupt societal function and result in a tremendous number of casualties, as demonstrated by recent hurricane experience in the US Planning for and facilitating evacuations of populations forecast to be impacted by hurricanes is perhaps the most effective strategy for reducing risk. A potentially important yet relatively unexplored facet of people's evacuation decision-making involves the interpersonal communication processes that affect whether at-risk residents decide to evacuate. While previous research has suggested that word-of-mouth effects are limited, data supporting these assertions were collected prior to the widespread adoption of digital social media technologies. This paper argues that the influence of social network effects on evacuation decisions should be revisited given the potential of new social media for impacting and augmenting information dispersion through real-time interpersonal communication. Using geographic data within an agent-based model of hurricane evacuation in Bay County, Florida, we examine how various types of social networks influence participation in evacuation. It is found that strategies for encouraging evacuation should consider the social networks influencing individuals during extreme events, as it can be used to increase the number of evacuating residents.

  11. Online identity: constructing interpersonal trust and openness through participating in hospitality social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ronzhyn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes the results of research on online identity construction during the participation in the hospitality social networks. Specifically the user references are analysed to understand patterns that form the image of a member. CouchSurfing service (couchsurfing.org allows users to leave short texts where the experience of hosting/being hosted by a CS member is described, is an evaluation of the CS members of each other’s personal traits, skills and common experience. Therefore references can become a good instrument for portraying a CouchSurfing member and understanding his or her particular traits. References form an important part of a user’s virtual identity in the network. Using a sample of references of Spanish CouchSurfing users, the research established main characteristics of the references, which are the openness, readiness to share ideas and experiences and trustworthiness. These concepts illustrate the typical traits associated with a user of the network and also shed light on the activities common during offl ine CS meetings

  12. Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paletto A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences. Natura 2000 is an ecological network of protected areas identified by the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC and the Birds Directive (79/409/EC - recently replaced by the Directive 2009/147/EC - in order to ensure the long-term protection of endangered species in their natural habitats in European Union (EU territory. EU Member States are responsible for developing and implementing the procedures defined by Habitats Directive, but there are no specific recommendations about participation of stakeholders and local community in the decision-making process. Consequently, each country has adopted a different participatory strategy taking into account the principles of integration approach. The integration approach is based on combining human activities and nature conservation purposes in the same area or, at least, in areas in close proximity. In Italy, the implementation of Natura 2000 network was developed at local level (Regions and Autonomous Provinces using different approaches and procedures. Starting from these considerations, the aim of the study was to analyse the stakeholders’ involvement process during the implementation of Habitats Directive in Italy and the management of Natura 2000 sites. This study was realized using three main criteria with the respective indicators: (1 inclusiveness of participatory process; (2 democracy of participatory process; (3 cooperation and conflicts during the implementation process of Natura 2000 network. The data were collected through the administration by email of a semi-structured questionnaire to 56 stakeholders divided in four main groups of interest (public administrations, universities and research centres, environmental associations, private organizations. The results of the survey show that the participatory process was characterized by a low level of inclusiveness despite the existence

  13. Testing moderation in network meta-analysis with individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Getachew A; Brown, C Hendricks; Howe, George; Kellam, Sheppard G; Liu, Lei

    2016-07-10

    Meta-analytic methods for combining data from multiple intervention trials are commonly used to estimate the effectiveness of an intervention. They can also be extended to study comparative effectiveness, testing which of several alternative interventions is expected to have the strongest effect. This often requires network meta-analysis (NMA), which combines trials involving direct comparison of two interventions within the same trial and indirect comparisons across trials. In this paper, we extend existing network methods for main effects to examining moderator effects, allowing for tests of whether intervention effects vary for different populations or when employed in different contexts. In addition, we study how the use of individual participant data may increase the sensitivity of NMA for detecting moderator effects, as compared with aggregate data NMA that employs study-level effect sizes in a meta-regression framework. A new NMA diagram is proposed. We also develop a generalized multilevel model for NMA that takes into account within-trial and between-trial heterogeneity and can include participant-level covariates. Within this framework, we present definitions of homogeneity and consistency across trials. A simulation study based on this model is used to assess effects on power to detect both main and moderator effects. Results show that power to detect moderation is substantially greater when applied to individual participant data as compared with study-level effects. We illustrate the use of this method by applying it to data from a classroom-based randomized study that involved two sub-trials, each comparing interventions that were contrasted with separate control groups. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Loneliness and social isolation among young and late middle-age adults: Associations with personal networks and social participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Stephanie T; Lawton, Leora

    2017-11-24

    Associations between social networks and loneliness or social isolation are well established among older adults. Yet, limited research examines personal networks and participation on perceived loneliness and social isolation as distinct experiences among younger adults. Accordingly, we explore relationships among objective and subjective measures of personal networks with loneliness and isolation, comparing a younger and older cohort. The UC Berkeley Social Networks Study offers unique cohort data on young (21-30 years old, n = 472) and late middle-age adults' (50-70 years old, n = 637) personal network characteristics, social participation, network satisfaction, relationship status, and days lonely and isolated via online survey or in-person interview. Negative binomial regression models were used to examine associations between social network characteristics, loneliness, and isolation by age group. Young adults reported twice as many days lonely and isolated than late middle-age adults, despite, paradoxically, having larger networks. For young adults, informal social participation and weekly religious attendance were associated with fewer days isolated. Among late middle-age adults, number of close kin and relationship status were associated with loneliness. Network satisfaction was associated with fewer days lonely or isolated among both age groups. Distinct network characteristics were associated with either loneliness or isolation for each cohort, suggesting network factors are independently associated with each outcome, and may fluctuate over time. Network satisfaction was associated with either loneliness or isolation among both cohorts, suggesting perceptions of social networks may be equally important as objective measures, and remain salient for loneliness and isolation throughout the life course.

  15. Task and Participant Scheduling of Trading Platforms in Vehicular Participatory Sensing Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Heyuan; Song, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ming; Sun, Jiaguang

    2016-11-28

    The vehicular participatory sensing network (VPSN) is now becoming more and more prevalent, and additionally has shown its great potential in various applications. A general VPSN consists of many tasks from task, publishers, trading platforms and a crowd of participants. Some literature treats publishers and the trading platform as a whole, which is impractical since they are two independent economic entities with respective purposes. For a trading platform in markets, its purpose is to maximize the profit by selecting tasks and recruiting participants who satisfy the requirements of accepted tasks, rather than to improve the quality of each task. This scheduling problem for a trading platform consists of two parts: which tasks should be selected and which participants to be recruited? In this paper, we investigate the scheduling problem in vehicular participatory sensing with the predictable mobility of each vehicle. A genetic-based trading scheduling algorithm (GTSA) is proposed to solve the scheduling problem. Experiments with a realistic dataset of taxi trajectories demonstrate that GTSA algorithm is efficient for trading platforms to gain considerable profit in VPSN.

  16. Ethnic identities, social capital and health inequalities: factors shaping African-Caribbean participation in local community networks in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; McLean, Carl

    2002-08-01

    This paper examines the impact of ethnic identity on the likelihood of peoples' participation in local community networks, in the context of recent policy emphasis on the participation of marginalised communities in such networks as a means of reducing health inequalities. Conceptually, the paper is located against the background of debates about possible links between health and social capital--defined in terms of grassroots participation in local community networks--and an interest in the way in which social exclusion impacts on social capital. The paper draws on lengthy semi-structured, open-ended interviews with 25 African-Caribbean residents of a deprived multi-ethnic area of a south England town. While African-Caribbean identity played a central role in peoples' participation in inter-personal networks, this inter-personal solidarity did not serve to unite people at the local community level beyond particular face-to-face networks. Levels of participation in voluntary organisations and community activist networks were low. Informants regarded this lack of African-Caribbean unity within the local community as a problem, saying that it placed African-Caribbean people at a distinct disadvantage--furthering their social exclusion through limiting their access to various local community resources. The paper examines the way in which the construction of ethnic identities--within a context of institutionalised racism at both the material and symbolic levels--makes it unlikely that people will view local community organisations or networks as representative of their interests or needs, or be motivated to participate in them. Our findings highlight the limitations of policies which simply call for increased community participation by socially excluded groups, in the absence of specific measures to address the obstacles that stand in the way of such participation.

  17. Motivating students' participation in a computer networks course by means of magic, drama and games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilas, Constantinos S; Politis, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    The recent economic crisis has forced many universities to cut down expenses by packing students into large lecture groups. The problem with large auditoria is that they discourage dialogue between students and faculty and they burden participation. Adding to this, students in computer science courses usually find the field to be full of theoretical and technical concepts. Lack of understanding leads them to lose interest and / or motivation. Classroom experience shows that the lecturer could employ alternative teaching methods, especially for early-year undergraduate students, in order to grasp their interest and introduce basic concepts. This paper describes some of the approaches that may be used to keep students interested and make them feel comfortable as they comprehend basic concepts in computer networks. The lecturing procedure was enriched with games, magic tricks and dramatic representations. This approach was used experimentally for two semesters and the results were more than encouraging.

  18. Employing the Gini coefficient to measure participation inequality in treatment-focused Digital Health Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Hyatt, Douglas; Ching, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Digital Health Social Networks (DHSNs) are common; however, there are few metrics that can be used to identify participation inequality. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the Gini coefficient, an economic measure of statistical dispersion traditionally used to measure income inequality, could be employed to measure DHSN inequality. Quarterly Gini coefficients were derived from four long-standing DHSNs. The combined data set included 625,736 posts that were generated from 15,181 actors over 18,671 days. The range of actors (8-2323), posts (29-28,684), and Gini coefficients (0.15-0.37) varied. Pearson correlations indicated statistically significant associations between number of actors and number of posts (0.527-0.835, p inequality. However, as a standalone metric, the Gini coefficient does not indicate optimal numbers or ratios of actors to posts, or effective network engagement. Further, mixed-methods research investigating quantitative performance metrics is required.

  19. The Role of Nonprofit Sector Networks as Mechanisms for Immigrant Political Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Veronis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Issues of immigrant political incorporation and transnational politics have drawn increased interest among migration scholars. This paper contributes to debates in this field by examining the role of networks, partnerships and collaborations of immigrant community organizations as mechanisms for immigrant political participation both locally and transnationally. These issues are addressed through an ethnographic study of the Hispanic Development Council, an umbrella advocacy organization representing settlement agencies serving Latin American immigrants in Toronto, Canada. Analysis of HDC’s three sets of networks (at the community, city and transnational levels from a geographic and relational approach demonstrates the potentials and limits of nonprofit sector partnerships as mechanisms and concrete spaces for immigrant mobilization, empowerment, and social action in a context of neoliberal governance. It is argued that a combination of partnerships with a range of both state and non-state actors and at multiple scales can be significant in enabling nonprofit organizations to advance the interests of immigrant, minority and disadvantaged communities.

  20. Anonymous Web Browsing and Hosting

    OpenAIRE

    MANOJ KUMAR; ANUJ RANI

    2013-01-01

    In today’s high tech environment every organization, individual computer users use internet for accessing web data. To maintain high confidentiality and security of the data secure web solutions are required. In this paper we described dedicated anonymous web browsing solutions which makes our browsing faster and secure. Web application which play important role for transferring our secret information including like email need more and more security concerns. This paper also describes that ho...

  1. Digital recovery management: Characterizing recovery-specific social network site participation and perceived benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Brandon G; Kelly, Nathaniel W; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Vilsaint, Corrie L; Kelly, John F

    2017-06-01

    Research shows that digital social network sites (SNSs) may be valuable platforms to effect health behavior change. Little is known specifically about their ability to help address alcohol and other drug problems. This gap is noteworthy, given that individuals are already participating in existing, recovery-specific SNSs (hereafter referred to as recovery SNSs): online communities with the functionality of conventional SNSs (e.g., Facebook) that focus on substance use disorder (SUD) recovery. For example, InTheRooms.com (ITR) is a large, well-known recovery SNS that is available for free 24 hr/day via website and mobile smartphone applications. It offers recovery tools within a digital social milieu for over 430,000 registered users. To augment the knowledge base on recovery SNS platforms, we conducted an online survey of 123 ITR participants (M = 50.8 years old; 56.9% female; 93.5% White; M = 7.3 years of abstinence, range of 0-30 years; 65% cited alcohol as their primary substance). Respondents engaged with ITR, on average, for about 30 min/day several times each week. Daily meditation prompts and live online video meetings were the most commonly utilized resources. Participants generally endorsed ITR as a helpful platform, particularly with respect to increased abstinence/recovery motivation and self-efficacy. Compared to individuals abstinent for 1 or more years, those abstinent less than 1 year (including nonabstinent individuals) showed similar rates of engagement with ITR activities and similar levels of perceived benefit. Our findings suggest that longitudinal studies are warranted to examine the clinical utility of ITR and other recovery SNSs as SUD treatment adjuncts and/or recovery self-management tools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Antiepileptic drug monotherapy for epilepsy: a network meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Sudell, Maria; Weston, Jennifer; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Marson, Anthony G

    2017-06-29

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Approximately 60% to 70% of people with epilepsy will achieve a longer-term remission from seizures, and most achieve that remission shortly after starting antiepileptic drug treatment. Most people with epilepsy are treated with a single antiepileptic drug (monotherapy) and current guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom for adults and children recommend carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line treatment for partial onset seizures and sodium valproate for generalised onset seizures; however a range of other antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments are available, and evidence is needed regarding their comparative effectiveness in order to inform treatment choices. To compare the time to withdrawal of allocated treatment, remission and first seizure of 10 AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, phenobarbitone, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide) currently used as monotherapy in children and adults with partial onset seizures (simple partial, complex partial or secondary generalised) or generalised tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types (absence, myoclonus). We searched the following databases: Cochrane Epilepsy's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and SCOPUS, and two clinical trials registers. We handsearched relevant journals and contacted pharmaceutical companies, original trial investigators, and experts in the field. The date of the most recent search was 27 July 2016. We included randomised controlled trials of a monotherapy design in adults or children with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). This was an individual participant data (IPD) review and network meta-analysis. Our primary outcome was 'time to withdrawal of allocated treatment', and our secondary

  3. Antiepileptic drug monotherapy for epilepsy: a network meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Sudell, Maria; Weston, Jennifer; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Marson, Anthony G

    2017-12-15

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Approximately 60% to 70% of people with epilepsy will achieve a longer-term remission from seizures, and most achieve that remission shortly after starting antiepileptic drug treatment. Most people with epilepsy are treated with a single antiepileptic drug (monotherapy) and current guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom for adults and children recommend carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line treatment for partial onset seizures and sodium valproate for generalised onset seizures; however a range of other antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments are available, and evidence is needed regarding their comparative effectiveness in order to inform treatment choices. To compare the time to withdrawal of allocated treatment, remission and first seizure of 10 AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, phenobarbitone, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide) currently used as monotherapy in children and adults with partial onset seizures (simple partial, complex partial or secondary generalised) or generalised tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types (absence, myoclonus). We searched the following databases: Cochrane Epilepsy's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and SCOPUS, and two clinical trials registers. We handsearched relevant journals and contacted pharmaceutical companies, original trial investigators, and experts in the field. The date of the most recent search was 27 July 2016. We included randomised controlled trials of a monotherapy design in adults or children with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). This was an individual participant data (IPD) review and network meta-analysis. Our primary outcome was 'time to withdrawal of allocated treatment', and our secondary

  4. The PAGES 2k Network, Phase 3: Introduction, Goals and Call for Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Helen; Phipps, Steven; von Gunten, Lucien; Martrat, Belen; Linderholm, Lars; Abram, Nerilie; Bothe, Oliver; Neukom, Raphael; St. George, Scott; Evans, Michael; Kaufman, Darrell; Goosse, Hugues; Turney, Chris

    2017-04-01

    The past 2000 years (the "2k" interval) provides critical context for recent anthropogenic forcing of the climate, baseline information about Earth's natural climate variability, opportunities to improve the interpretation of proxy observations, and evaluation of climate models. The PAGES 2k Network (2008-2013 Phase 1; 2014-2016 Phase 2) built regional and global surface temperature reconstructions for terrestrial regions and the oceans, and used comparison with realistically forced simulations to identify mechanisms of climate variation on interannual to bicentennial time scales. The goals of Phase 3 (2017-2019), which launches in May 2017 at the PAGES Open Science Meeting, are to: 1) Further understand the mechanisms driving regional climate variability and change on interannual to centennial time scales (Theme: "Climate Variability, Modes and Mechanisms"); 2) Reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of observations imprinted in paleoclimatic archives by environmental sensors (Theme: "Methods and Uncertainties"); and 3) Identify and analyse the extent of agreement between reconstructions and climate model simulations (Theme: "Proxy and Model Understanding") Research will be organized as a linked network of well-defined projects and targeted manuscripts, identified and led by 2k members. The 2k projects will focus on specific scientific questions aligned with Phase 3 goals, rather than being defined along regional boundaries. An enduring element from earlier phases of PAGES 2k will be a culture of collegiality, transparency, and reciprocity. Phase 3 seeks to stimulate community based projects and facilitate collaboration of researchers from different regions and career stages, drawing on breadth and depth of the global PAGES 2k community; support end-to-end workflow transparency and open data and knowledge access; and develop collaborations with other research communities and engage with stakeholders. If you would like to participate in PAGES 2k Phase 3 or

  5. Simulating browse production and response of Acacia karroo to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 Evaluation of browse management systems and strategies. ... In comparison, cooler overall temperatures throughout the season reduce growth less markedly. ... Keywords: acacia karroo; browse production; browsing; defoliation; drought; eastern cape; goats; growth; management; management strategy; model; number of ...

  6. Cooperative Mobile Web Browsing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrucci, GP; Fitzek, FHP; Zhang, Qi

    2009-01-01

    extension of current technology, we propose a novel architecture where mobile phones are grouped together in clusters, using a short-range communication such as Bluetooth, sharing, and accumulating their cellular capacity. The accumulated data rate resulting from collaborative interactions over short......This paper advocates a novel approach for mobile web browsing based on cooperation among wireless devices within close proximity operating in a cellular environment. In the actual state of the art, mobile phones can access the web using different cellular technologies. However, the supported data...... rates are not sufficient to cope with the ever increasing trafic requirements resulting from advanced and rich content services. Extending the state of the art, higher data rates can only be achieved by increasing complexity, cost, and energy consumption of mobile phones. In contrast to the linear...

  7. Network organizations of general practitioners: antecedents of formation and consequences of participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Domenico

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network forms of organization are increasingly popular in primary care. At the end of the 1990s General Practitioners (GPs in Italy were given the opportunity to adopt network forms of organization with the aim of improving the quality of their services. However factors affecting GPs' choices to join a network and the consequences of network membership have not been evaluated. Methods Administrative data of a Local Health Authority in Central Italy were analyzed using statistical methods at individual and dyadic levels of analysis. Results Homophily factors seem to influence a GP's choice of network. The consequences of network membership on GP performances seem very limited. Conclusions When considering to foster the diffusion of network organizational forms in health care creating a network structure, like that of Italian GPs, is not sufficient. Other features of the implementation phase, work organization and human resource management should also be considered.

  8. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Larsen, M.E.; Christensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing.

  9. Keratin 1 maintains skin integrity and participates in an inflammatory network in skin through interleukin-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wera; Kumar, Vinod; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Richter, Miriam; Wohlenberg, Claudia; Reuter, Ursula; Thiering, Sören; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Hofmann, Andrea; Kreusch, Fatima; Schultze, Joachim L; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Reichelt, Julia; Hausser, Ingrid; Magin, Thomas M

    2012-11-15

    Keratin 1 (KRT1) and its heterodimer partner keratin 10 (KRT10) are major constituents of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in suprabasal epidermis. KRT1 mutations cause epidermolytic ichthyosis in humans, characterized by loss of barrier integrity and recurrent erythema. In search of the largely unknown pathomechanisms and the role of keratins in barrier formation and inflammation control, we show here that Krt1 is crucial for maintenance of skin integrity and participates in an inflammatory network in murine keratinocytes. Absence of Krt1 caused a prenatal increase in interleukin-18 (IL-18) and the S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, accompanied by a barrier defect and perinatal lethality. Depletion of IL-18 partially rescued Krt1(-/-) mice. IL-18 release was keratinocyte-autonomous, KRT1 and caspase-1 dependent, supporting an upstream role of KRT1 in the pathology. Finally, transcriptome profiling revealed a Krt1-mediated gene expression signature similar to atopic eczema and psoriasis, but different from Krt5 deficiency and epidermolysis bullosa simplex. Our data suggest a functional link between KRT1 and human inflammatory skin diseases.

  10. Examining Social Influence on Participation and Outcomes among a Network of Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention Enrollees

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, T. L.; Eddings, K. E.; Krukowski, R. A.; Love, S. J.; Harvey-Berino, J. R.; West, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that social networks, social support, and social influence are associated with weight trajectories among treatment- and non-treatment-seeking individuals. This study examined the impact of having a social contact who participated in the same group behavioral weight-control intervention in the absence of specific social support training on women engaged in a weight-loss program. Participants (n = 92; 100% female; 54% black; mean age: 46 ? 10 years; mean BMI: 38 ? 6) were grou...

  11. MODIS Atmospheric L2 Browse Cloud Optical Thickness Product (TERRA Browse Product)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is browse product: "MODIS Atmospheric L2 Browse Cloud Optical Thickness Product" Data set information: http://modis-atmos.gsfc.nasa.gov/ [placeholder metadata

  12. MODIS/Terra L2 browse jpeg, Aerosol Optical Depth (TERRA Browse Product)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is browse product: "MODIS/Terra L2 browse jpeg, Aerosol Optical Depth" Data set information: http://modis-atmos.gsfc.nasa.gov/ [placeholder metadata

  13. Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Burgos, D., Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Brouns, F., & Koper, R. (2009). Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design). In L. Lockyer, S. Bennett, S. Agostinho & B. Harper (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Learning Design

  14. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; E. Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interac...

  15. Mentoring Entrepreneurial Networks: mapping conceptions of participants in technological-based business incubators in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontes Regis, Helder

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent entrepreneurship research agenda includes the analysis of cognitive structures of successful entrepreneurs, revealing an important tool for the examination of an entrepreneurial career. Using techniques of cognitive maps, this study explores the concepts of a successful career and the network itself, as a whole, for career development. Fifty-three entrepreneurs were studied, in seven technological incubators in the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Specifically, this study aimed to map the shared meanings of the incubated entrepreneurs regarding informal support networks. Such networks support the entrepreneurial career and the present study explores the characteristics and the conceptual model that underlies the networks. The data collection was achieved through interviews through a free evocation technique. The shared meanings indicate the existence of inherent thought categories that support network context in the incubator environment, mainly the mentoring networks. The results endorse the interpretation of an informal mentoring model emerging from the dominant evocations concerning a successful career and of the network itself as promoter of career development.

  16. The community seismic network and quake-catcher network: enabling structural health monitoring through instrumentation by community participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Monica D.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Cheng, Ming-Hei

    2013-04-01

    A new type of seismic network is in development that takes advantage of community volunteers to install low-cost accelerometers in houses and buildings. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network are examples of this, in which observational-based structural monitoring is carried out using records from one to tens of stations in a single building. We have deployed about one hundred accelerometers in a number of buildings ranging between five and 23 stories in the Los Angeles region. In addition to a USB-connected device which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor-plug-computer device that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or wifi. In the case of the Community Seismic Network, the sensors report both continuous data and anomalies in local acceleration to a cloud computing service consisting of data centers geographically distributed across the continent. Visualization models of the instrumented buildings' dynamic linear response have been constructed using Google SketchUp and an associated plug-in to matlab with recorded shaking data. When data are available from only one to a very limited number of accelerometers in high rises, the buildings are represented as simple shear beam or prismatic Timoshenko beam models with soil-structure interaction. Small-magnitude earthquake records are used to identify the first set of horizontal vibrational frequencies. These frequencies are then used to compute the response on every floor of the building, constrained by the observed data. These tools are resulting in networking standards that will enable data sharing among entire communities, facility managers, and emergency response groups.

  17. Increases in New Social Network Ties are Associated with Increased Cohesion among Intervention Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Sabina B.; Barkin, Shari L.; Sommer, Evan C.; Thompson, Jessica R.; Valente, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many behavior change programs are delivered in group settings to manage implementation costs and to foster support and interactions among group members to facilitate behavior change. Understanding the group dynamics that evolve in group settings (e.g., weight management, Alcoholics Anonymous) is important, yet rarely measured. This paper examined the relationship between social network ties and group cohesion in a group-based intervention to prevent obesity in children. Method The data reported are process measures from an ongoing community-based randomized controlled trial. 305 parents with a child (3-6 years) at risk of developing obesity were assigned to an intervention that taught parents healthy lifestyles. Parents met weekly for 12 weeks in small consistent groups. Two measures were collected at weeks 3 and 6: a social network survey (people in the group with whom one discusses healthy lifestyles); and the validated Perceived Cohesion Scale (Bollen & Hoyle, 1990). We used lagged random and fixed effects regression models to analyze the data. Results Cohesion increased from 6.51 to 6.71 (t=4.4, p<0.01). Network nominations tended to increase over the 3-week period in each network. In the combined discussion and advice network, the number of nominations increased from 1.76 to 1.95 (z=2.59, p<0.01). Cohesion at week 3 was the strongest predictor of cohesion at week 6 (b=0.55, p<0.01). Number of new network nominations at week 6 was positively related to cohesion at week 6 (b=0.06, p<.01). In sum, being able to name new network contacts was associated with feelings of cohesion. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate how network changes affect perceived group cohesion within a behavioral intervention. Given that many behavioral interventions occur in group settings, intentionally building new social networks could be promising to augment desired outcomes. PMID:26286298

  18. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-03-01

    This article provides an example of the application of social network analysis method to assess community participation thereby strengthening planning and implementation of health promotion programming. Community health promotion often takes the form of services that reach out to or are located within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people's behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community to achieve social change. However, considerable uncertainty exists over exact levels of participation in these interventions. The article draws on a mixed methods research within a community development project in a vulnerable neighborhood of a town in Denmark. It presents a detailed analysis of the way in which social network analysis can be used as a tool to display participation and nonparticipation in community development and health promotion activities, to help identify capacities and assets, mobilize resources, and finally to evaluate the achievements. The article concludes that identification of interpersonal ties among people who know one another well as well as more tenuous relationships in networks can be used by community development workers to foster greater cohesion and cooperation within an area.

  19. Long-term care facilities: important participants of the acute care facility social network?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Y Lee

    Full Text Available Acute care facilities are connected via patient sharing, forming a network. However, patient sharing extends beyond this immediate network to include sharing with long-term care facilities. The extent of long-term care facility patient sharing on the acute care facility network is unknown. The objective of this study was to characterize and determine the extent and pattern of patient transfers to, from, and between long-term care facilities on the network of acute care facilities in a large metropolitan county.We applied social network constructs principles, measures, and frameworks to all 2007 annual adult and pediatric patient transfers among the healthcare facilities in Orange County, California, using data from surveys and several datasets. We evaluated general network and centrality measures as well as individual ego measures and further constructed sociograms. Our results show that over the course of a year, 66 of 72 long-term care facilities directly sent and 67 directly received patients from other long-term care facilities. Long-term care facilities added 1,524 ties between the acute care facilities when ties represented at least one patient transfer. Geodesic distance did not closely correlate with the geographic distance among facilities.This study demonstrates the extent to which long-term care facilities are connected to the acute care facility patient sharing network. Many long-term care facilities were connected by patient transfers and further added many connections to the acute care facility network. This suggests that policy-makers and health officials should account for patient sharing with and among long-term care facilities as well as those among acute care facilities when evaluating policies and interventions.

  20. Digital Citizen Participation within Schools in the United Kingdom and Indonesia: An Actor–Network Theory (ANT Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yusuf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen engagement and participation are a key focus for government and government agencies, and with the advent of Internet technologies questions arise about the role and impact of technology on citizen participation. This paper aims to explore the role of technology in citizen participation within schools. This research used in-depth comparative case studies using examples from two different schools and school systems, one in the United Kingdom and one in Indonesia. The wider school systems are complex and dynamic environments with multiple stakeholders, media, and supporting systems, and the schools operate under geopolitical and social influences. This paper provides a framework, based on Actor-Network Theory (ANT, for capturing e-participation in schools, particularly identifying the influence of technology as a conduit for enabling, engaging, and empowering stakeholders.

  1. IMPACT OF DISTANCES FROM PARTICIPANTS IN THE SUPPLY NETWORK ON COOPERATION OF INNOVATIVE ENTERPRISES OF FOOD INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tomaszewski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of the article is to show the impact of market location and the distance from the supply network participants on the occurrence of innovative cooperation between the food industry companies and industry- and science-oriented entities. The methodological part of the article is based on probit modelling. The material necessary for the analyses present in this article has been collected by means of a questionnaire sent to the companies all over Poland. The conducted research confi rmed that the situation when the market or other participants of the supply network (suppliers, customers and competitors are localised in close proximity to the food industry company has a negative impact on the occurrence of innovative activity between the company and other food industry companies or science-oriented units. On the other hand, the location outside one’s own region stimulates this kind of collaboration.

  2. Report of International Coastal Atlas Network Workshop 6: Expanding Participation in Coastal Web Atlas Development and Use

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer, Ned; Kopke, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    From June 16th to 17th, 2013, the International Coastal Atlas Network (ICAN) held a workshop on “Expanding Participation in Coastal Web Atlas Development and Use”, at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The workshop (aka “ICAN 6”) engaged 29 participants from 9 countries, representing 22 organizations and multiple areas of scientific and technical expertise. This meeting was a follow-up to the successful 2011 workshop on “Coastal Atlases as Engines for Coastal & Marine Spati...

  3. A GWAS Study on Liver Function Test Using eMERGE Network Participants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Namjou

    Full Text Available Liver enzyme levels and total serum bilirubin are under genetic control and in recent years genome-wide population-based association studies have identified different susceptibility loci for these traits. We conducted a genome-wide association study in European ancestry participants from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE Network dataset of patient medical records with available genotyping data in order to identify genetic contributors to variability in serum bilirubin levels and other liver function tests and to compare the effects between adult and pediatric populations.The process of whole genome imputation of eMERGE samples with standard quality control measures have been described previously. After removing missing data and outliers based on principal components (PC analyses, 3294 samples from European ancestry were used for the GWAS study. The association between each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and total serum bilirubin and other liver function tests was tested using linear regression, adjusting for age, gender, site, platform and ancestry principal components (PC.Consistent with previous results, a strong association signal has been detected for UGT1A gene cluster (best SNP rs887829, beta = 0.15, p = 1.30x10-118 for total serum bilirubin level. Indeed, in this region more than 176 SNPs (or indels had p<10-8 spanning 150Kb on the long arm of chromosome 2q37.1. In addition, we found a similar level of magnitude in a pediatric group (p = 8.26x10-47, beta = 0.17. Further imputation using sequencing data as a reference panel revealed association of other markers including known TA7 repeat indels (rs8175347 (p = 9.78x10-117 and rs111741722 (p = 5.41x10-119 which were in proxy (r2 = 0.99 with rs887829. Among rare variants, two Asian subjects homozygous for coding SNP rs4148323 (G71R were identified. Additional known effects for total serum bilirubin were also confirmed including organic anion transporters SLCO1B1-SLCO1B

  4. Governance networks as a frame for inter-demoi participation and deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2012-01-01

    By focusing exclusively on the contributions of political participation and deliberation to the enhancement of democratic regulation within a unitary democratic unit-that is, a demos-traditional liberal theories of democracy overlook the democratic value of political participation and deliberation...

  5. Shrub control by browsing: Targeting adult plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira Pontes, Laíse; Magda, Danièle; Gleizes, Benoît; Agreil, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Reconciling the well known benefits of shrubs for forage with environmental goals, whilst preventing their dominance, is a major challenge in rangeland management. Browsing may be an economical solution for shrubby rangelands as herbivore browsing has been shown to control juvenile shrub growth. Less convincing results have been obtained for adult plants, and long-term experiments are required to investigate the cumulative effects on adult plants. We therefore assessed the impact of different levels of browsing intensity on key demographic parameters for a major dominant shrub species (broom, Cytisus scoparius), focusing on adult plants. We assigned individual broom plants to one of three age classes: 3-5 years (young adults); 5-7 years (adults); and 7-9 years (mature adults). These plants were then left untouched or had 50% or 90% of their total edible stem biomass removed in simulated low-intensity and high-intensity browsing treatments, respectively. Morphological, survival and fecundity data were collected over a period of four years. Browsing affected the morphology of individual plants, promoting changes in subsequent regrowth, and decreasing seed production. The heavily browsed plants were 17% shorter, 32% narrower, and their twigs were 28% shorter. Light browsing seemed to control the growth of young adult plants more effectively than that of older plants. Reproductive output was considerably lower than for control plants after light browsing, and almost 100% lower after heavy browsing. High-intensity browsing had a major effect on survival causing high levels of plant mortality. We conclude that suitable browsing practices could be used to modify adult shrub demography in the management of shrub dominance and forage value.

  6. Associations between sensory loss and social networks, participation, support, and loneliness: Analysis of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Paul; Parfyonov, Maksim; Wittich, Walter; Phillips, Natalie; Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, M

    2018-01-01

    To determine if hearing loss, vision loss, and dual sensory loss were associated with social network diversity, social participation, availability of social support, and loneliness, respectively, in a population-based sample of older Canadians and to determine whether age or sex modified the associations. Cross-sectional population-based study. Canada. The sample included 21 241 participants in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging tracking cohort. The sample was nationally representative of English- and French-speaking, non-institutionalized 45- to 89-year-old Canadians who did not live on First Nations reserves and who had normal cognition. Participants with missing data for any of the variables in the multivariable regression models were excluded from analysis. Hearing and vision loss were determined by self-report. Dual sensory loss was defined as reporting both hearing and vision loss. Univariate analyses were performed to assess cross-sectional associations between hearing, vision, and dual sensory loss, and social, demographic, and medical variables. Multivariable regression models were used to analyze cross-sectional associations between each type of sensory loss and social network diversity, social participation, availability of social support, and loneliness. Vision loss (in men) and dual sensory loss (in 65- to 85-year-olds) were independently associated with reduced social network diversity. Vision loss and dual sensory loss (in 65- to 85-year-olds) were each independently associated with reduced social participation. All forms of sensory loss were associated with both low availability of social support and loneliness. Sensory impairment is associated with reduced social function in older Canadians. Interventions and research that address the social needs of older individuals with sensory loss are needed. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  7. Preservice Teachers' Participation and Perceptions of Twitter Live Chats as Personal Learning Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian; Sickel, Jamie; Cheng, Li

    2017-01-01

    This study presents two cases in which undergraduates were introduced to Twitter in their teacher preparation program as a means of developing a personal learning network. Twitter live chats are synchronous discussions that allow education stakeholders to discuss issues and share resources, engaging on potentially a global scale via the social…

  8. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  9. Knowledge-based network participation in destination and event marketing: A hospitality scenario analysis perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. Go; Ad Breukel

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how enterprises may decide to bring about effective network collaboration even though present mediation forms have proven inadequate. One of the main problems of these enterprises is that they lack a clear picture of the potential future ‘‘modular business’’. The Dutch

  10. Open to Influence: What Counts as Academic Influence in Scholarly Networked "Twitter" Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Within the academy, signals of a scholar's academic influence are made manifest in indices like the "h"-index, which rank output. In open scholarly networks, however, signals of influence are less codified, and the ways in which they are enacted and understood have yet to be articulated. Yet the influence scholars cultivate in open…

  11. Employees’ participation in electronic networks of practice within a corporate group: perceived benefits and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Lukosch, S.; van Splunter, S.; Brazier, F.M.T.; Hamedi, M.; van Beers, C.

    This paper explores benefits and costs of knowledge exchange perceived by individuals in connected electronic networks of practice (ENoP) in a corporate setting. The results of 25 semi-structured interviews show 9 perceived benefits and 5 perceived costs to be of importance for knowledge exchange.

  12. Employees’ participation in electronic networks of practice within a corporate group: perceived benefits and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Lukosch, S.G.; van Splunter, S.; Brazier, F.M.; Hamedi, Mohsen; van Beers, C.P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores benefits and costs of knowledge exchange perceived by individuals in connected electronic networks of practice (ENoP) in a corporate setting. The results of 25 semi-structured interviews show 9 perceived benefits and 5 perceived costs to be of importance for knowledge exchange.

  13. Correlates and Risk Markers for Sleep Disturbance in Participants of the Autism Treatment Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollway, Jill A.; Aman, Michael G.; Butter, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We explored possible cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and physiological risk markers for sleep disturbance in children with autism spectrum disorders. Data from 1,583 children in the Autism Treatment Network were analyzed. Approximately 45 potential predictors were analyzed using hierarchical regression modeling. As medication could confound…

  14. Digital Divides and Social Network Sites: Which Students Participate in Social Media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, June

    2011-01-01

    Social network sites (SNSs) like Myspace and Facebook are now popular online communities with large teenage user populations. Teens use these technologies to interact, play, explore, and learn in significant ways. As scholars become interested in studying these new online communities, I contribute to the emerging conversation by re-examining…

  15. Rasch analysis of the participation scale (P-scale): usefulness of the P-scale to a rehabilitation services network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Mariana Angélica Peixoto; Coster, Wendy Jane; Mancini, Marisa Cotta; Dutra, Fabiana Caetano Martins Silva; Kramer, Jessica; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira

    2017-12-08

    A person's participation is acknowledged as an important outcome of the rehabilitation process. The Participation Scale (P-Scale) is an instrument that was designed to assess the participation of individuals with a health condition or disability. The scale was developed in an effort to better describe the participation of people living in middle-income and low-income countries. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to examine whether the Participation Scale is suitable to assess the perceived ability to take part in participation situations by patients with diverse levels of function. The sample was comprised by 302 patients from a public rehabilitation services network. Participants had orthopaedic or neurological health conditions, were at least 18 years old, and completed the Participation Scale. Rasch analysis was conducted using the Winsteps software. The mean age of all participants was 45.5 years (standard deviation = 14.4), 52% were male, 86% had orthopaedic conditions, and 52% had chronic symptoms. Rasch analysis was performed using a dichotomous rating scale, and only one item showed misfit. Dimensionality analysis supported the existence of only one Rasch dimension. The person separation index was 1.51, and the item separation index was 6.38. Items N2 and N14 showed Differential Item Functioning between men and women. Items N6 and N12 showed Differential Item Functioning between acute and chronic conditions. The item difficulty range was -1.78 to 2.09 logits, while the sample ability range was -2.41 to 4.61 logits. The P-Scale was found to be useful as a screening tool for participation problems reported by patients in a rehabilitation context, despite some issues that should be addressed to further improve the scale.

  16. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people’s behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community......This paper provides an example of the application of Social Network Analysis (SNA) method to assess community participation thereby strengthening planning and implementation of health promotion programming. Community health promotion often takes the form of services that reach out to or are located...... to achieve social change. However, considerable uncertainty exists over exact levels of participation in these interventions. The paper draws on a mixed methods research within a community development project in a vulnerable neighborhood of a town in Denmark. It presents a detailed analysis of the way...

  17. Browsing Your Way to Better Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of browsing and searching (in libraries, online, inside sources, at meetings, in abstracts, etc.) as a way to stimulate the teacher of undergraduate mathematics, specifically in differential equations. The approach works in all other areas of mathematics. Browsing can help build new and refreshing teaching materials based on…

  18. Savanna browse production. 1: Determinants and measurement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the rapid expansion of wildlife ranching and conservation in South African savannas and the resultant increase in multi-species grazing and browsing systems, information on browse production potential is essential for determination of carrying capacity. This study, conducted on three game reserves in the northern ...

  19. Indexing, Browsing, and Searching of Digital Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, Alan F.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to indexing, browsing, and searching of digital video: video coding and standards; conventional approaches to accessing digital video; automatically structuring and indexing digital video; searching, browsing, and summarization; measurement and evaluation of the effectiveness of…

  20. Examining Social Influence on Participation and Outcomes among a Network of Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention Enrollees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Carson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that social networks, social support, and social influence are associated with weight trajectories among treatment- and non-treatment-seeking individuals. This study examined the impact of having a social contact who participated in the same group behavioral weight-control intervention in the absence of specific social support training on women engaged in a weight-loss program. Participants (n=92; 100% female; 54% black; mean age: 46±10 years; mean BMI: 38±6 were grouped based upon whether or not they reported a social contact enrolled previously/concurrently in our behavioral weight-control studies. Primary outcomes were 6-month weight change and treatment adherence (session attendance and self-monitoring. Half of the participants (53% indicated that they had a social contact; black women were more likely to report a social contact than white women (67.3% versus 39.5%; P<0.01. Among participants with a social contact, 67% reported at least one contact as instrumental in the decision to enroll in the program. Those with a contact lost more weight (5.9 versus 3.7 kg; P=0.04, attended more group sessions (74% versus 54%; P<0.01, and submitted more self-monitoring journals (69% versus 54%; P=0.01 than those without a contact. Participants' weight change was inversely associated with social contacts' weight change (P=0.04. There was no association between participant and contact’s group attendance or self-monitoring. Social networks may be a promising vehicle for recruiting and engaging women in a behavioral weight-loss program, particularly black women. The role of a natural social contact deserves further investigation.

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 951 - 1000 of 1011 ... Vol 32, No 2 (2013), The Influence of the Urban Transport System in Java on City Fuel Consumption, Abstract PDF. M Handajani .... Vol 36, No 1 (2017), VOLTAGE COMPENSATION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK: A CASE STUDY OF RUMUOLA DISTRIBUTION NETWORK, Abstract PDF.

  2. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH FOR LINKED DATA BROWSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Beek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Netherlands' Cadastre, Land Registry and Mapping Agency – in short Kadaster – collects and registers administrative and spatial data on property and the rights involved. Currently, the Kadaster is publishing its geo-spatial data assets as Linked Open Data. The Kadaster manages hundreds of datasets that describe hundreds of millions of geospatial objects, including all Dutch buildings, roads, and forests. The Kadaster exposes this large collection of data to thousands of daily users that operate from within different contexts and that need to be supported in different use cases. Therefore, Kadaster must offer diverse, yet complementary, approaches for browsing and exploring the data it publishes. Specifically, it supports the following paradigms for browsing and exploring its data assets: hierarchical browsing, graph navigation, faceted browsing, and tabular browsing. These paradigms are useful for different tasks, cover different use cases, and are implemented by reusing and/or developing Open Source libraries and applications.

  3. Social Network Analysis of Students' Participation and Presence in a Community of Educational Blogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Tsiotakis, Panagiotis; Roussinos, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on an investigation of university students' participation and learning presence in a blogging activity, designed to support collaborative learning. There are three main reasons justifying the current research: to better understand the structure and the dynamics of students' blogging subgroups; to…

  4. Flipping the Script in Study Abroad Participation: The Influence of Popular Culture and Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Shelbee; Coryell, Joellen E.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores primary perceptions of and motivations to study abroad for adult and higher education learners. A large Hispanic-serving Southwestern university serves as the context of this study where undergraduate students and one graduate student were enrolled in an Italian urbanism study abroad program. The age of the participants ranged…

  5. Exploring the Roles of Social Participation in Mobile Social Media Learning: A Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Helmi; Nordin, Norazah; Din, Rosseni; Ally, Mohamad; Dogan, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Social media is increasingly becoming an essential platform for social connectivity in our daily lives. The availability of mobile technology has further fueled its importance -- making it a ubiquitous tool for social interaction. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate roles of social participation in this field. Thus, the…

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Abstract PDF. Abdelmalek Bouguettaya, Salah Toumi, Mohamed Tahar Kimour, Abderrahim Boudjedra. Vol 32 (2016), A new technique for accelerating routing information process in communication networks, Abstract PDF. Ramzi Benaicha ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    piston ring contact in internal combustion engine, Abstract PDF. Amar Ayad, Amar Skendraoui, Ammar Haiahem. Vol 26 (2013), The modeling of response indicators of integrated water resources management with artificial neural networks in the ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 198 of 198 ... Vol 15, No 1 (2015), Performance Evaluation of a Mobile Wireless Computational Grid ... Wireless Network Platforms to Support Emerging Applications. ... of Bingham University Library Management System, Abstract PDF.

  9. Keratin 1 maintains skin integrity and participates in an inflammatory network in skin via interleukin-18

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Wera; Kumar, Vinod; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Richter, Miriam; Wohlenberg, Claudia; Reuter, Ursula; Thiering, Sören; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Hofmann, Andrea; Kreusch, Fatima; Schultze, Joachim L; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Reichelt, Julia; Hausser, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Keratin 1 (KRT1) and its heterodimer partner keratin 10 (KRT10) are major constituents of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in suprabasal epidermis. KRT1 mutations cause epidermolytic ichthyosis in humans, characterized by loss of barrier integrity and recurrent erythema. In search of the largely unknown pathomechanisms and the role of keratins in barrier formation and inflammation control, we show here that Krt1 is crucial for maintenance of skin integrity and participates in an inflamm...

  10. Automated Analysis of e-Participation Data by Utilizing Associative Networks, Spreading Activation and Unsupervised Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufl, Peter; Payer, Udo; Parycek, Peter

    According to [1], the term e-participation is defined as ”the use of information and communication technologies to broaden and deepen political participation by enabling citizens to connect with one another and with their elected representatives”. This definition sounds quite simple and logical, but when considering the implementation of such a service in a real world scenario, it is obvious that it is not possible to evaluate messages, which are generated by thousands of citizens, by hand. Such documents need to be read and analyzed by experts with the required in-depth domain knowledge. In order to enable this analysis process and thereby to increase the number of possible e-particpation applications, we need to provide these experts with automated analysis tools that cluster, pre-screen and pre-evaluate public opinions and public contributions. In this paper we present a framework based on Machine Learning-(ML) and Artificial Intelligence-(AI) techniques that are capable of various analysis mechanisms such as unsupervised clustering of yet unread documents, searching for related concepts within documents and the description of relations between terms. To finish, we show how the proposed framework can be applied to real world data taken from the Austrian e-participation platform mitmachen.at.

  11. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  12. Participative Teaching with Mobile Devices and Social Networks for K-12 Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article details a set of participatory pedagogical experiments conducted within a research grant PN II IDEI (”Time Maps. Real communities, virtual worlds, experimented pasts” performed with the purpose of helping rural communities in identifying their cultural heritage andtransmitting it to the younger generations by means of modern IT technologies, including web 2.0. In a Danubian rural community, several points of archaeological interest (POIs were identified, which were then included in a geographic Augmented Reality application for smartphones and tablets. Subsequently, the geographic data were collected from the archaeological site by the K-12 children, under the coordination of an academic staff member of the National University of Arts in Bucharest, and stored on their devices using Google Maps. The augmented information provided onthe site was annotated and shared with other K-12 children, through different social networks sites (SNS and content postings. This first stage experiment was extended to the development of a social learning environment complementary to the educational site (www.timemaps.net to support thetransmission of several traditional technologies (textile, ceramic, glass in a collaborative manner. We consider that our experiments can significantly increase the visibility of the information pertaining to the identity of target places and communities among the younger generation. A mobile-learning paradigm, in combination with web 2.0 technologies, was the support for a distributed and low-cost platform for communication and collaboration. Social networks linked thearchaeological heritage and the academic research with the larger community of rural K-12 children. The article analyzes this platform as a solution for creating, collecting and sharingeducational content, and presents conclusions on using social media for effective blended learning and transmittal of the cultural heritage.

  13. Online activity and participation in treatment affects the perceived efficacy of social health networks among patients with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Bergman, Yoav S; Grosberg, Dafna

    2014-01-10

    The use of online health-related social networks for support, peer-to-peer connections, and obtaining health information has increased dramatically. Participation in an online health-related social network can enhance patients' self-efficacy and empowerment, as they are given knowledge and tools to manage their chronic health condition more effectively. Thus, we can deduce that patient activation, the extent to which individuals are able to manage their own health care, also increases. However, little is known about the effects of participation in online health-related social networks and patient activation on the perceived usefulness of a website across disease groups. The intent of the study was to evaluate the effects and benefits of participation in an online health-related social network and to determine which variables predict perceived site usefulness, while examining patient activation. Data were collected from "Camoni", the first health-related social network in the Hebrew language. It offers medical advice, including blogs, forums, support groups, internal mail, chats, and an opportunity to consult with experts. This study focused on the site's five largest and most active communities: diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, spinal injury, and depression/anxiety. Recruitment was conducted during a three-month period in which a link to the study questionnaire was displayed on the Camoni home page. Three questionnaires were used: a 13-item measure of perceived usefulness (Cronbach alpha=.93) to estimate the extent to which an individual found the website helpful and informative, a 9-item measure of active involvement in the website (Cronbach alpha=.84), and The Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13, Cronbach alpha=.86), which assesses a patient's level of active participation in his or her health care. There were 296 participants. Men 30-39 years of age scored higher in active involvement than those 40-49 years (P=.03), 50-64 years (P=.004), or 65+ years (P

  14. Practice benefit from participating in a practice-based research network study of postpartum depression: a national research network (NRN) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Pace, Wilson; Dietrich, Allen; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary; Graham, Deborah; Huff, Jessica; Rocca, Liliana; Wollan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    At the midpoint of a large clinical trial taking place in a practice-based research network (PBRN), we asked leaders of the enrolled practices about the impact of participating in a PBRN study. Using semistructured interviews, the lead study nurse and physician from each site were queried about the impact of study participation on issues related to the study topic of postpartum depression (PPD) as well as any other impacts on the practice not directly related to PPD. From the results, initial themes were identified by 3 of the investigators (BPY, SB, MK) and confirmed by all the authors. Interviewee responses were grouped by theme. Forty-eight study leaders from 28 solo, moderately sized group and residency practices were interviewed during a period of 60 days. Practices were located in 20 different states, and 54% were in rural communities. Six major themes emerged. Study participation led to: ((1)) the recognition of the need for systematic approaches; ((2)) more effective teamwork and communication within the practice; ((3)) adaptation and extension of the PPD study tools and a systematic approach to the care of other chronic conditions; ((4)) increased professional self-worth and community recognition; ((5)) opportunity and support for staff members to "stretch" into new roles; and ((6)) increased research literacy within the practice. Participating in a PBRN research study can provide advantages to practices that extend beyond the study's specific purpose and content. These results provide further support for the value of PBRN research funding.

  15. A national study predicting licensed social workers' levels of political participation: the role of resources, psychological engagement, and recruitment networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Jessica A

    2008-10-01

    The social work literature is replete with studies evaluating social workers' direct practice interventions, but strikingly few have assessed how well social workers are faring in the political arena. This study tests a major theoretical model, the civic voluntarism model, developed to explain why some citizens become involved in politics, whereas others do not. The study sample consisted of 396 randomly selected social workers licensed in 11 states, all of whom completed a 25-minute telephone survey. Social workers were surveyed to determine the role of the following variables in explaining social workers' political activity levels-resources needed to participate, psychological engagement, and attachment to recruitment networks. The results indicate that the civic voluntarism model was significant and accounted for 42 percent of the variance. The strongest predictors of social workers' political activity were NASW membership and political interest. This study provides empirical support for the idea that being connected to social networks and having a psychological engagement with politics are crucial factors in explaining social workers' political participation. Implications for social work education are included.

  16. Using information technology and social networking for recruitment of research participants: experience from an exploratory study of pediatric Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Sharron; Smaldone, Arlene; Fennoy, Ilene; Reame, Nancy; Grey, Margaret

    2013-03-19

    Recruiting pediatric samples for research may be challenging due to parental mistrust of the research process, privacy concerns, and family time constraints. Recruitment of children with chronic and genetic conditions may further complicate the enrollment process. In this paper, we describe the methodological challenges of recruiting children for research and provide an exemplar of how the use of information technology (IT) strategies with social networking may improve access to difficult-to-reach pediatric research participants. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of boys between the ages of 8 and 18 years with Klinefelter syndrome. This study presented unique challenges for recruitment of pediatric participants. These challenges are illustrated by the report of recruitment activities developed for the study. We reviewed the literature to explore the issues of recruiting children for research using conventional and IT approaches. Success rates of conventional recruitment approaches, such as brochures, flyers in medical offices, and physician referrals, are compared with IT-based outreach. The IT approaches included teleconferencing via a Klinefelter syndrome support group, services of a Web-based commercial recruitment-matching company, and the development of a university-affiliated research recruitment website with the use of paid advertising on a social networking website (Facebook). Over a 3-month period, dissemination of over 150 recruitment brochures and flyers placed in a large urban hospital and hospital-affiliated clinical offices, with 850 letters to physicians and patients were not successful. Within the same period, face-to-face recruitment in the clinical setting yielded 4 (9%) participants. Using Web-based and social networking approaches, 39 (91%) agreed to participate in the study. With these approaches, 5 (12%) were recruited from the national Klinefelter syndrome advocacy group, 8 (19%) from local and teleconference support groups, 10

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 34 of 34 ... Vol 3, No 1 (2005), Analysis of the heat exchanger network of the topping unit of the Tema Oil Refinery, Abstract. G Afrane. Vol 2, No 2 (2004), Clam shells aggregates for housing construction, Abstract. E Atiemo. Vol 2, No 1 (2004), Commercial appraisal of Pozzolana plant in Ghana, Abstract. E Atiemo.

  18. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 499 ... Vol 17, No 3 (2015), Classification of reservoir sand-facies distribution using multiattribute Probabilistic Neural Network transform in “Bigola” field, Niger Delta, ... Vol 17, No 2 (2015), Composition of large mammal day-time visitation to salt lick sites inside Kainji Lake National Park, Nigeria, Abstract PDF.

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 89 ... Vol 21, No 1 (2014), Combined measures against SQL-Injection attacks, Abstract. R. Mac'Odo, L.N. Onyejegbu. Vol 22 ... Vol 21, No 2 (2014), Comparative evaluation of genetic algorithm and memetic algorithm for optimal topology design of computer networks, Abstract. R.O. Oladele, O.T. Oladele. Vol 19 ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 601 - 650 of 1011 ... Vol 34, No 1 (2015), Modeling of Reservoir Inflow for Hydropower Dams Using Artificial Neural Network, Abstract PDF. AW Salami, AA ... Vol 33, No 2 (2014), Modelling of Far-Field Mixing of Industrial Effluent Plume in Ambient Receiving Water: The Ikpoba River Hub Example, Abstract PDF.

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 901 - 950 of 1183 ... Vol 6, No 3 (2012), Strategies for Integrating Peace Education into Social Studies Curriculum for Junior Secondary (Basic 7-9) Schools in Nigeria, Abstract ... Vol 4, No 1 (2010), Subscribers' Complaints and Response of the Global Satellite Mobile (GSM) Network Operators in Nigeria, Abstract PDF.

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 490 ... Vol 3, No 2 (2007), Bcl-2 and Bax messenger RNA Gene expression detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction after partial hepatectomy and licorice in rats ... Vol 3, No 4 (2007), Comparative analysis of logistic regression and neural network for credit risk assessment, Abstract.

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 82 ... Issue, Title. Vol 7, No 2 (2010), A Markov deterioration model for predicting recurrent maintenance of a network of roads: a case study of Niger state, Nigeria. Abstract PDF. YA Jimoh, AY Adama. Vol 10, No 1 (2013), A Method for Solving the Voltage and Torque Equations of the Split-Phase Induction ...

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 447 ... Vol 32, No 2 (2007), Capitalism, Globalisation and the Underdevelopment Process in Africa: History in Perpetuity, Abstract PDF. AO Olutayo, AO ... Vol 30, No 1 (2005), Connecting African Activism with Global Networks: ICTs and South African Social Movements, Abstract. Herman Wasserman.

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 98 ... Vol 7, No 1 (2015), Applying Social Capital Theory and the ... Vol 2, No 1 (2010), Challenges of sustainable rural tourism development in KwaZulu-Natal ... in online social networks among undergraduates in two universities, ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 232 ... Vol 13, No 2 (2014), Combining Host-based and network-based intrusion detection system: A cost effective tool for managing intrusion detection, Abstract. I.C. Kalu, L.N. Onyejegbu. Vol 13, No 2 (2014), Comparative assessment of plant diversity and utilization patterns of tropical home gardens in Edo ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 901 - 950 of 1236 ... Vol 17, No 2 (2011), Predicting mortality in Hepatitis-C patients using an artificial neural network, Abstract. O Owolabi, BB Baridam .... Vol 11, No 2 (2005), Protective effects of Dried Flower Extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. on Carbon Tetrachloride-induced Liver Injury in the Rat, Abstract. FO Obi, OC ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 141 ... N Mararakanye, NS Nethengwe. Vol 5, No 3 (2016), Hybridized centroid technique for 3D Molodensky-Badekas coordinate transformation in the Ghana geodetic reference network using total least squares approach, Abstract PDF. Richard Fiifi Annan, Yao Yevenyo Ziggah, John Ayer, Christian Amans ...

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 601 - 650 of 1083 ... Vol 17, No 4 (2011): Part 2, Movement symmetry and asymmetry of goal shots in female football at European championships and at World Cup, Abstract. S Wlodzimierz, B ... Vol 16, No 4 (2010): Supplement, Networking in the sport delivery system in South African Universities, Abstract. C Burnett.

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 444 ... O Mazimba, IB Masesane, RRT Majinda, A Muzila. Vol 59 (2006), Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Networks Ensemble as Calibration Model for Simultaneous Spectrophotometric Estimation of Atenolol and Losartan Potassium in Tablets, Abstract PDF. D Satyanarayana, K Kannan, R Manavalan.

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 551 - 559 of 559 ... Yetunde Shobo. Vol 11, No 3 (2012), Youths navigating social networks and social support systems in settings of chronic crisis: the case of youth-headed households in Rwanda, Abstract. Laura May Lee. Vol 5, No 3 (2006), Zambian male adolescents' perceptions about premarital sexual relationships ...

  12. Alcohol peer influence of participating in organized school activities: a network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    This study compares the network influences on adolescent substance use from peers who coparticipated in school-sponsored organized activities (affiliation-based peer influence) with the influence both from their "nominated" friends (i.e., the adolescent named the alter as a friend), and only "reciprocated" friends (i.e., both adolescents mutually named each other as friends). The study also attempts to parse affiliation-based peer influence into the influence of both activity members who are also friends and those who are not, to address the potential confounding of these sources of peer influence. The study data consisted of a nationally representative sample of 12,551 adolescents in Grades 7-12 within 106 schools from the Add Health data. Ordinal logistic regression was conducted to estimate the effects of affiliation-based and friends influence on alcohol use and drinking frequency. Peer influence via organized activities (sports or clubs) with drinkers and the influence of friends who drink had significant effects on adolescent drinking. Peer influence through club activities with drinkers had a stronger effect on any drinking behavior than through sports activities with drinkers. After decomposing peer influence through activities by friendship status, influence through sport activities had a significant effect on drinking only when coparticipant drinkers were also reciprocated friends (but not nominated friends), whereas influence through club activities had a significant effect on drinking, regardless of friendship reciprocation. The design and implementation of school based substance use prevention and treatment programs should consider the contextual effects of school-sponsored activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. On the character and production of 'active participation' in neuro-rehabilitation: an Actor-Network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Simon; Mares, Kathryn; Coull, Neil; Poland, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    The importance of patients' active involvement in neuro-rehabilitation after acquired brain injury has been consistently emphasised in recent years. However, most approaches fail to show how 'active participation' is practically enacted, focusing on individualised explanations of patient choice and behaviours, or notions of inherent patient traits. Using actor-network theory (ANT) as a sensitising concept, we investigated neuro-rehabilitation practices, asking how participation is shaped through biological and socio-material specificities, how rights to knowledge and expertise are constructed, and how a body acclimatises and adjusts within an order of participation and transformation. We analysed video-recorded fieldwork extracts, examining the work of adjusting, testing and transforming; the construction of competence and incompetence; and material and social processes involved in the division of the body and its re-composition. Our findings show how an ANT-sensitised approach provides a critical understanding and context-specific characterisation of 'active participation', produced through the association of heterogeneous actors at any one time. Such specificity and the distribution of work suggest that efforts to account for optimum therapy 'dosages', and clinical attention to establishing individually-located levels of 'self-efficacy' or 'motivation' are misdirected. The performance of 'active participation', rather, should be re-imagined as a product of diverse, mutually attuned entities. A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  14. Workplace violence injury in 106 US hospitals participating in the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN), 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewold, Matthew R; Sarmiento, Raymond F R; Vanoli, Kelly; Raudabaugh, William; Nowlin, Susan; Gomaa, Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    Workplace violence is a substantial occupational hazard for healthcare workers in the United States. We analyzed workplace violence injury surveillance data submitted by hospitals participating in the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN) from 2012 to 2015. Data were frequently missing for several important variables. Nursing assistants (14.89, 95%CI 10.12-21.91) and nurses (8.05, 95%CI 6.14-10.55) had the highest crude workplace violence injury rates per 1000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers. Nursing assistants' (IRR 2.82, 95%CI 2.36-3.36) and nurses' (IRR 1.70, 95%CI 1.45-1.99) adjusted workplace violence injury rates were significantly higher than those of non-patient care personnel. On average, the overall rate of workplace violence injury among OHSN-participating hospitals increased by 23% annually during the study period. Improved data collection is needed for OHSN to realize its full potential. Workplace violence is a serious, increasingly common problem in OHSN-participating hospitals. Nursing assistants and nurses have the highest injury risk. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Browse quality and the Kenai moose population

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the browse quality and the Kenai moose population. The quality of moose forage on the north western Kenai Peninsula was evaluated by determining...

  16. Willow Browse Survey 2015 : Biological Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Browse pressure by ungulate species, primarily elk, is known to have a negative impact on the health of willow stands. On Baca and Alamosa NWR’s, it has been noticed...

  17. Willow Browse Survey 2016 : Biological Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Browse pressure by ungulate species, primarily elk, is known to have a negative impact on the health of willow stands. On Baca and Alamosa NWR’s, it has been noticed...

  18. Social Networks as a New Tool of E-Participation in Local: Example of Facebook and Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent MEMİŞ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on used “what level” and “how” of Facebook and Twitter tools that giving a new impetus to the process of communication or interaction of organizations and individuals, at the level organizations of municipality and mayors of municipality in the context of participation in local public policy. In this context, at the level of personal, Facebook account of 6 mayor and Twitter account of 12 mayor; at the level organizations, Facebook account of 22 municipality and Twitter account of 22 municipality was analyzed by qualitative content analysis method. According to the overall results of study, in this study were determined; even though problems transmitter / requesting information interactions are come forwarded at personal Twitter accounts, examined social networking accounts have the interaction is limited at considering the number of members on accounts and accounts are used form of encourage the direct involvement, form of transfer information which is considered as a first stage.

  19. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 447 of 447 ... Vol 24, No 1 (1999), The Political Economy of Ethnic Conflicts and Governance in Southern Kaduna, Nigeria: [De]Constructing a Contested Terrain, Abstract .... Vol 25, No 1 (2000), We Decide, They Decide For Us: Popular Participation as an Issue in Two Nigerian Women's Development Programmes ...

  20. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 601 - 650 of 900 ... N.G.T. Mushonga, H.A. Mujuru, L.K. Nyanga, S Nyagura, N Musaka, R Dembah. Vol 12, No 1 (2012), Participation in communal day care centre feeding programs is associated with higher diet quantity but not quality among rural Ghanaian children, Abstract PDF. KB Harding, GS Marquis, EK Colecraft, ...

  1. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 412 ... Transferring the principle of double effect from war to business, Abstract. G. J. Rossouw. Vol 26, No 4 ... John M Ostrowick. Vol 22, No 2 (2003), Can more business ethics teaching halt corruption in companies? ... The importance of identification by shared participation, Abstract. P Loobuyck. Vol 33, No 3 ...

  2. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 801 - 850 of 1075 ... 2009: September: Supplement, Social support for health-related leisure activity of the elderly and the relationship with health status and life satisfaction, Abstract ... Vol 12, No 4 (2006):, Social worlds and identity of african athletes who participated in the 8 th all africa games, Abuja 2003, Abstract.

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 23, No 1 (2016), Morbimortalité périnatale dans les grossesses gémellaires dans une maternité marocaine de niveau 3, Abstract PDF. Mohamed El-Mahdi ... Vol 22, No 1 (2015), Motivations and concerns about adolescent tuberculosis vaccine trial participation in rural Uganda: a qualitative study, Abstract PDF.

  4. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 401 - 450 of 635 ... Vol 6, No 1 (2013), Monitoring Urban Sprawl in the Federal Capital Territory of Nigeria Using Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques, Abstract PDF ... Vol 6, No 6 (2013), Perception of “Fadama” III Participating Farmers on Pests and Diseases and the use of Integrated Pest Management Control Strategy ...

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 210 ... Vol 2, No 2 (2005), Institutional reforms, democratic participation and decentralized development in Ghana: the Sissala district as a case study, Abstract PDF ... Vol 1, No 1 (2004), Land tenure, traditional institutions and sustainable development in Northern Ghana within the context of the national land ...

  6. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 17 of 17 ... ... Rhetoric and Reality of Community Participation in Health Planning, Resource Allocation and Service Delivery: a Review of the Reviews, Primary Publications and Grey Literature, Abstract PDF. GM Mubyazi, G Hutton. Vol 2, No 1 (2013), Short communication: Injury Profile in an Emergency Department at ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AM Kabudi, PM Lutala, JM Kazadi, IJ Bardella. Vol 15, No 1 (2013), Prevalence and characteristics of prostate cancer among participants of a communitybased screening in Nigeria using serum prostate specific antigen and digital rectal examination, Abstract PDF. SO Ikuerowo, OA Omisanjo, MJ Bioku, MO Ajala, VPN Mordi ...

  8. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 207 ... Vol 1, No 1 (2005), Constraints To Farmers Effective Participation In Agricultural Extension Programmes Of Non-Profit Non-Governmental Organizations In South –Eastern Nigeria, Abstract. BL Isife, MC Madukwe. Vol 9, No 1 (2013), Constraints to livelihood diversification among rural households in ...

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 3451 - 3500 of 3974 ... Vol 88, No 3 (1998), The ethics of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, Abstract PDF. W A Hampton. Vol 90, No 6 (2000), The evaluation of public psychiatric services in three provinces of South Africa, Abstract PDF. Leana R Uys. Vol 107, No 7 (2017), The evolution of research participant ...

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 188 of 188 ... Vol 20, No 1 (2006), The metamorphosis of Eros: The god of love in early Greek poetry, Abstract PDF. Edward Jennar. Vol 23 (2013), The noun concordance system: some remarks on nouns' participation in Bantu languages syntactic structure, Abstract PDF. Francis Matambirofa. Vol 4, No 1 (1990) ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 6, No 2 (2012), The Impact of Intercollegiate Sports Competitions on the Overall Educational Achievement of Participants in Some Selected Nigerian Universities, Abstract PDF. EJ Jeroh. Vol 11, No 2 (2017), The Impact of Microteaching in Developing Teaching Skills among Pre-Service Teachers in Alvan Ikoku College ...

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 181 ... Vol 26, No 3 (2008), 'Governmentality', 'technologies of the self' and disability: Understanding disabled students' selfefficacy and career planning knowledge at ... Vol 29, No 1 (2011), “They discluded me”: Possibilities and limitations of children's participation in inclusion research in South Africa, Abstract.

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 59 ... Vol 62 (2013), Public participation in town-planning applications: Tlokwe Local Municipality as a case study, Abstract PDF. K Puren, T Goosen, T Jordaan. Vol 65 (2014), Residents' perceptions of the importance of outdoor spaces and neighbourliness for medium-density mixed-housing in South Africa ...

  14. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 669 ... Vol 39, No 3 (2009), Book Review: "Unequal Peers: The Politics of Discourse Management in the Social Science", Abstract. B Karumbidza. Vol 43, No 1 ... Vol 38, No 1 (2008):, Community Participation and Local Government Planning in Lesotho: A Critical Analysis, Abstract. V Mashinini. Vol 45, No 2 ...

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 281 ... Vol 27, No 3 (2015), Role of parents as a protective factor against adolescent athletes' doping susceptibility, Abstract PDF. C Blank, V Leichtfried, D Müller, W Schobersberger. Vol 23, No 4 (2011), Rugby-playing history at the national U13 level and subsequent participation at the national U16 and ...

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 211 ... Vol 14, No 2 (2017), Affirmative Action as a Strategy for Promoting Women's Participation in Politics in the Frafra Traditional Area of Ghana, Abstract PDF ... Vol 13, No 2 (2016), Book Review: Responsible journalism and the quest for professional standards in Ghana, Abstract PDF. Wilberforce S. Dzisah.

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 207 ... EC Matthews-Njoku, JO Ajaero. Vol 5, No 1 (2009), Rural And Urban Youth Participation In Community Development In Southwest Nigeria, Abstract. AE Adekoya. Vol 1, No 1 (2005), Rural Development And Agricultural Extension Administration In Nigeria, Abstract. Donatus Orji Onu. Vol 3, No 2 (2007) ...

  18. Personalization of XML Content Browsing Based on User Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encelle, Benoit; Baptiste-Jessel, Nadine; Sedes, Florence

    2009-01-01

    Personalization of user interfaces for browsing content is a key concept to ensure content accessibility. In this direction, we introduce concepts that result in the generation of personalized multimodal user interfaces for browsing XML content. User requirements concerning the browsing of a specific content type can be specified by means of…

  19. NASA Engineering Network (NEN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topousis, Daria; Trevarthen, Ellie; Yew, Manson

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the NASA Engineering Network (NEN). NEN is designed to search documents over multiple repositories, submit and browse NASA Lessons Learned, collaborate and share ideas with other engineers via communities of practice, access resources from one portal, and find subject matter experts via the People, Organizations, Projects, Skills (POPS) locator.

  20. Methods for Collection of Participant-aided Sociograms for the Study of Social, Sexual and Substance-using Networks Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, L M; Birkett, M; Muth, S Q; Latkin, C; Ortiz-Estes, I; Garofalo, R; Mustanski, B

    In this study, we adapted and tested a participant-aided sociogram approach for the study of the social, sexual, and substance use networks of young men who have sex with men (YMSM); a population of increasing and disproportionate risk of HIV infection. We used a combination of two interviewer-administered procedures: completion of a pre-numbered list form to enumerate alters and to capture alter attributes; and a participant-aided sociogram to capture respondent report of interactions between alters on an erasable whiteboard. We followed the collection of alter interactions via the sociogram with a traditional matrix-based tie elicitation approach for a sub-sample of respondents for comparison purposes. Digital photographs of each network drawn on the whiteboard serve as the raw data for entry into a database in which group interactions are stored. Visual feedback of the network was created at the point of data entry, using NetDraw network visualization software for comparison to the network structure elicited via the sociogram. In a sample of 175 YMSM, we found this approach to be feasible and reliable, with high rates of participation among those eligible for the study and substantial agreement between the participant-aided sociogram in comparison to a traditional matrix-based approach. We believe that key strengths of this approach are the engagement and maintenance of participant attention and reduction of participant burden for alter tie elicitation. A key weakness is the challenge of entry of interview-based list form and sociogram data into the database. Our experience suggests that this approach to data collection is feasible and particularly appropriate for an adolescent and young adult population. This builds on and advances visualization-based approaches to social network data collection.

  1. A Novel Use of a Statewide Telecolposcopy Network for Recruitment of Participants in a Phase I Clinical Trial of a Human Papillomavirus Therapeutic Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L.; Spencer, Horace J.; Greenfield, William W.; Low, Gordon; Hitt, W. Chuck; Quick, Charles M.; Jeffus, Susanne K.; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials has been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single arm, single institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolau smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) or cannot rule out HSIL were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed HSIL were also eligible. Colposopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of HSIL was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. Purpose The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Methods Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits, frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails, and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of identifying factor(s) associated with recruitment and retention. Results Thirty-seven participants were

  2. [A case management programme for women with breast cancer: results of a written survey of participating medical and non-medical networking-partners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, C; Thorenz, A; Grochocka, A; Koch, U; Watzke, B

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer patients are as a rule in need of a multiple sequential in-patient, day-patient and out-patient permanent treatment. The required care demands a trans-sectoral networking of all multi-professional persons involved in diagnostics, therapies, rehabilitation and aftercare. A method to develop the integration of treatment processes, as well as thereby resulting in increased effectiveness and efficiency, can constitute the concept of case management. A prerequisite for an effective implementation of case management and thus the starting point of the present survey is a well-functioning network encompassing optimal cooperation. Within the framework of the evaluation of the case management-based integrated care model "mammaNetz" for women with mamma carcinoma as a whole and against the background of the potential for innovation and improvement of case management on the one hand as well as the existence of only few empirical data otherwise, the present survey of members of a trans-sectoral network of the service centre was accomplished. Medical and non-medical networking partners of the service centre (N=168) were questioned by regular mail about different aspects of the cooperation. Identical items in both surveys were compared. The return rate for the medical networking partners is about 59% (n=35), whereby only medical network partners in private practice participated in the survey. For the non-medical networking partners about 60% (n=66) participated. Medical networking partners assess the cooperation with the service centre in reference to the exchange of information slightly more positively (66%) than the non-medical networking partners (59%). Medical networking partners are in significantly more frequent contact with the service centre and see in the cooperation significantly more advantages for their own office/facility (each with p=0.001) than non-medical networking partners. Overall the results suggest that medical as well as non-medical networking

  3. It's better to give than to receive: the role of social support, trust, and participation on health-related social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hether, Heather J; Murphy, Sheila T; Valente, Thomas W

    2014-12-01

    Nearly 60% of American adults and 80% of Internet users have sought health information online. Moreover, Internet users are no longer solely passive consumers of online health content; they are active producers as well. Social media, such as social networking sites, are increasingly being used as online venues for the exchange of health-related information and advice. However, little is known about how participation on health-related social networking sites affects users. Research has shown that women participate more on social networking sites and social networks are more influential among same-sex members. Therefore, this study examined how participation on a social networking site about pregnancy influenced members' health-related attitudes and behaviors. The authors surveyed 114 pregnant members of 8 popular pregnancy-related sites. Analyses revealed that time spent on the sites was less predictive of health-related outcomes than more qualitative assessments such as trust in the sites. Furthermore, providing support was associated with the most outcomes, including seeking more information from additional sources and following recommendations posted on the sites. The implications of these findings, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

  4. The association between active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social network on the development of lung cancer in smokers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anna; Jung, Julia; Ernstmann, Nicole; Driller, Elke; Neumann, Melanie; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Schneider, Christian; Wolf, Jürgen; Pfaff, Holger

    2012-01-04

    This study analyses the effect of active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social networks on the development of lung cancer in patients who smoke. Our hypothesis is that study participants who lack social networks and do not actively participate in a sports club are at a greater risk for lung cancer than those who do. Data for the study were taken from the Cologne Smoking Study (CoSmoS), a retrospective case-control study examining potential psychosocial risk factors for the development of lung cancer. Our sample consisted of n = 158 participants who had suffered lung cancer (diagnosis in the patient document) and n = 144 control group participants. Both groups had a history of smoking.Data on social networks were collected by asking participants whether they participated in a sports club and about the number of friends and relatives in their social environment. In addition, sociodemographic data (gender, age, education, marital status, residence and religion), physical activity and data on pack years (the cumulative number of cigarettes smoked by an individual, calculated by multiplying the number of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked divided by 20) were collected to control for potential confounders. Logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. The results reveal that participants who are physically active are at a lower risk of lung cancer than those who are not (adjusted OR = 0.53*; CI = 0.29-0.97). Older age and lower education seem also to be risk factors for the development of lung cancer. The extent of smoking, furthermore, measured by pack years is statistically significant. Active participation in a sports club, number of friends and relatives had no statistically significant influence on the development of the cancer. The results of the study suggest that there is a lower risk for physically active participants to develop lung cancer. In the study sample, physical activity seemed to

  5. The association between active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social network on the development of lung cancer in smokers: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Anna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study analyses the effect of active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social networks on the development of lung cancer in patients who smoke. Our hypothesis is that study participants who lack social networks and do not actively participate in a sports club are at a greater risk for lung cancer than those who do. Methods Data for the study were taken from the Cologne Smoking Study (CoSmoS, a retrospective case-control study examining potential psychosocial risk factors for the development of lung cancer. Our sample consisted of n = 158 participants who had suffered lung cancer (diagnosis in the patient document and n = 144 control group participants. Both groups had a history of smoking. Data on social networks were collected by asking participants whether they participated in a sports club and about the number of friends and relatives in their social environment. In addition, sociodemographic data (gender, age, education, marital status, residence and religion, physical activity and data on pack years (the cumulative number of cigarettes smoked by an individual, calculated by multiplying the number of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked divided by 20 were collected to control for potential confounders. Logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. Results The results reveal that participants who are physically active are at a lower risk of lung cancer than those who are not (adjusted OR = 0.53*; CI = 0.29-0.97. Older age and lower education seem also to be risk factors for the development of lung cancer. The extent of smoking, furthermore, measured by pack years is statistically significant. Active participation in a sports club, number of friends and relatives had no statistically significant influence on the development of the cancer. Conclusions The results of the study suggest that there is a lower risk for physically active participants to develop

  6. Savanna browse production. 2: Prediction | Penderis | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... land managers with valuable insight whether the browse component of the system is under stress, is maintaining, or is encroaching, as well as the impact of browsers on the system. Keywords: browser carrying capacity, growing season, multivariate adaptive regression splines, predictive models. African Journal of Range ...

  7. Secure e-mail and Web browsing

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    This is an entry-level 1.5-hour training course aimed to show how to detect and avoid typical security pitfalls encountered when e-mailing and browsing the Web. It is designed for non-technical users of Internet Explorer and Outlook. Register at CTA

  8. Medical Applications of Remote Electronic Browsing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Joseph

    The purposes of this study are to identify and define viable remote browsing techniques and the requirements for an interactive medical information system that would permit the use of such techniques. The main emphasis is in the areas of: (1) remote viewing of page material; and (2) remote interrogation of fact banks with question-answering…

  9. Fermentation characteristics and nutrient composition of browses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation characteristics and nutrient composition of browses ensiled with maize fodder. ... Key words: Animal nutrition, chemical composition, dry matter ... 30, 40 et 50% sur base de la matière sèche et était fermenté en triplet de 2 kg dans un sachet en plastic qui acta comme silo et permit de fermenter pour 30 jours.

  10. Fermentation characteristics and nutrient composition of browses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whereas maize silage had 6.25% crude protein, the 30% browse/maize silages had crude protein content of 12.82, 11.37 and 11.89% for Calliandra/maize, Gliricidia/maize and Leucaena/maize, respectively. Gliricidia/maize silages exhibited the best fermentation and nutrient patterns. Key words: Animal nutrition, chemical ...

  11. Quantifying indices of potential competitiveness and browse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prediction of indices of potential competition with grass and browse productivity of single-stemmed Acacia karroo trees, using various trunk and canopy parameters, was evaluated on the basis of the variance accounted for by each of four operators and the repeatability for all operators. Potential competitiveness and ...

  12. Perspectives of professionals participating in the Brazilian Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity regarding the implementation of routine surveillance: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Adriana Gomes; Osis, Maria José Martins Duarte; Ribeiro, Meire; Cecatti, José Guilherme; Amaral, Eliana

    2014-04-08

    The Brazilian Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity was developed in Brazil with the participation of 27 centers in different regions of the country. The objective of the network project was to evaluate the frequency of severe maternal morbidity (near-miss and potentially life-threatening conditions) and the factors involved with these clinical conditions. Over the data collection period, this project implemented a surveillance system to identify these cases in the participating institutions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the perspective of the professionals who participated in this network regarding the surveillance of cases of severe maternal morbidity, the facilities and difficulties encountered in involving colleagues in the process, and participants’ proposals to give continuity to this practice of qualifying maternal healthcare. A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was conducted in which coordinators, investigators and managers at all the 27 obstetric units participating in the network were interviewed. Data were collected at 6 and 12 months after implementation of the network during semi-structured telephone interviews that were recorded following verbal informed consent. Thematic content analysis was performed of the responses to the open questions in the interviews. In the opinion of 60% of the participants, involving their colleagues in the surveillance process proved difficult, principally because these professionals were not very interested in the research project, but also because they found it difficult to review concepts and professional practices, because they had an excessive workload or due to operational and technical difficulties. The great majority considered that support from government agencies providing financial resources would be crucial to enable surveillance to be maintained or expanded and also to train a larger number of professionals and improve work conditions. The majority of

  13. Social media in the public sector: a guide to participation, collaboration, and transparency in the networked world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mergel, Ines

    2013-01-01

    ..., networked governance, and information management. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes best practices, the strategic, managerial, administrative, and procedural aspects of using social media, and explains the theoretical dimensions of how...

  14. Social media in the public sector: a guide to participation, collaboration, and transparency in the networked world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mergel, Ines

    2013-01-01

    ..., networked governance, and information management. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes best practices, the strategic, managerial, administrative, and procedural aspects of using social media, and explains the theoretical dimensions...

  15. Challenges to Participation in the Sharing Economy: The Case of Local Online Peer-to-Peer Exchange in a Single Parents’ Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airi Lampinen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts an initiative to deploy an online peer-to-peer exchange system for a community network of single parents – a group of people in need of goods, services, and social support in their local neighborhoods. We apply participant observation and semi-structured interviews to uncover key issues that can hinder the emergence of sharing practices in local community networks of this type. Our study illustrates how pressures related to single parenthood can impede opportunities to engage in peer-to-peer exchange, even when community members view the social and material benefits of participation as desirable and necessary. This complicates the prevalent narrative that local peer-to-peer exchange systems are an accessible and convenient alternative to traditional markets. Moreover, we discuss our collaboration with the community as well as the developers of the sharing platform, highlighting the challenges of user-centered design in the sharing economy.

  16. Young adults, social networks, and addiction recovery: post treatment changes in social ties and their role as a mediator of 12-step participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Kelly

    Full Text Available Social factors play a key role in addiction recovery. Research with adults indicates individuals with substance use disorder (SUD benefit from mutual-help organizations (MHOs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, via their ability to facilitate adaptive network changes. Given the lower prevalence of sobriety-conducive, and sobriety-supportive, social contexts in the general population during the life-stage of young adulthood, however, 12-step MHOs may play an even more crucial recovery-supportive social role for young adults, but have not been investigated. Greater knowledge could enhance understanding of recovery-related change and inform young adults' continuing care recommendations.Emerging adults (N = 302; 18-24 yrs; 26% female; 95% White enrolled in a study of residential treatment effectiveness were assessed at intake, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months on 12-step attendance, peer network variables ("high [relapse] risk" and "low [relapse] risk" friends, and treatment outcomes (Percent Days Abstinent; Percent Days Heavy Drinking. Hierarchical linear models tested for change in social risk over time and lagged mediational analyses tested whether 12-step attendance conferred recovery benefits via change in social risk.High-risk friends were common at treatment entry, but decreased during follow-up; low-risk friends increased. Contrary to predictions, while substantial recovery-supportive friend network changes were observed, this was unrelated to 12-step participation and, thus, not found to mediate its positive influence on outcome.Young adult 12-step participation confers recovery benefit; yet, while encouraging social network change, 12-step MHOs may be less able to provide social network change directly for young adults, perhaps because similar-aged peers are less common in MHOs. Findings highlight the importance of both social networks and 12-step MHOs and raise further questions as to how young adults benefit from 12-step MHOs.

  17. Young adults, social networks, and addiction recovery: post treatment changes in social ties and their role as a mediator of 12-step participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Stout, Robert L; Greene, M Claire; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Social factors play a key role in addiction recovery. Research with adults indicates individuals with substance use disorder (SUD) benefit from mutual-help organizations (MHOs), such as Alcoholics Anonymous, via their ability to facilitate adaptive network changes. Given the lower prevalence of sobriety-conducive, and sobriety-supportive, social contexts in the general population during the life-stage of young adulthood, however, 12-step MHOs may play an even more crucial recovery-supportive social role for young adults, but have not been investigated. Greater knowledge could enhance understanding of recovery-related change and inform young adults' continuing care recommendations. Emerging adults (N = 302; 18-24 yrs; 26% female; 95% White) enrolled in a study of residential treatment effectiveness were assessed at intake, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months on 12-step attendance, peer network variables ("high [relapse] risk" and "low [relapse] risk" friends), and treatment outcomes (Percent Days Abstinent; Percent Days Heavy Drinking). Hierarchical linear models tested for change in social risk over time and lagged mediational analyses tested whether 12-step attendance conferred recovery benefits via change in social risk. High-risk friends were common at treatment entry, but decreased during follow-up; low-risk friends increased. Contrary to predictions, while substantial recovery-supportive friend network changes were observed, this was unrelated to 12-step participation and, thus, not found to mediate its positive influence on outcome. Young adult 12-step participation confers recovery benefit; yet, while encouraging social network change, 12-step MHOs may be less able to provide social network change directly for young adults, perhaps because similar-aged peers are less common in MHOs. Findings highlight the importance of both social networks and 12-step MHOs and raise further questions as to how young adults benefit from 12-step MHOs.

  18. People’s Motivation to Participate in Social Network Sites, Subsequent Behaviours, and Situation Self-Awareness following a Crisis: Evidence from the MH370 Flight Incident

    OpenAIRE

    Xuequn Wang

    2016-01-01

    As people increasingly integrate social network sites (SNSs) into their daily lives, they also turn to these sites for timely information following crises. To date, few studies have examined the effects of different types of motivation on participatory behaviours within SNSs following crises. In this study, self-determination theory (SDT) is applied to examine how individuals are motivated to participate in SNSs following a crisis and how individuals’ participatory behaviours can better assis...

  19. A novel use of a statewide telecolposcopy network for recruitment of participants in a Phase I clinical trial of a human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L; Spencer, Horace J; Greenfield, William W; Low, Gordon; Hitt, Wilbur C; Quick, Charles M; Jeffus, Susanne K; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials have been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single-arm, single-institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolaou smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or results that could not rule out high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were also eligible. Colposcopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including referrals through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention, including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits; frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails; and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of

  20. Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

  1. Participation of the Netherlands in the European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care (PaSQ).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, L. van de; Schoten, S. van; Loos, E. de; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    De deelname aan het European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care (PaSQ) betekende een nieuwe impuls voor de implementatie van good practices in deelnemende Nederlandse ziekenhuizen. Met steun van het Nederlandse PaSQ team – bestaande uit het NIVEL en CBO – hebben zeven Nederlandse

  2. Distribution and Chemical Composition of Browse Plants of Egbado ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four herds of cattle were used to investigate the distribution and chemical composition of browse plants in Egbado North of Ogun State. The results showed that a wide variety of browse plants abound-trees and shrubs. Glyricidia sepium and Ficus exasperata were the most frequent trees while Manihot utilissima was the ...

  3. Distribution, animal preference and nutritive value of browse species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Browse species serve as the main feed sources for pastoralists' livestock especially during the dry season when herbaceous feed sources are exhausted. The study was conducted in Aba'ala District, Afar Regional State of Ethiopia to assess the indigenous knowledge on browse ecology and use and to investigate the ...

  4. Meat Goats and Their Utilization of Browse Forage | Tibezinda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review presents and discusses data related to meat goats and their performance when utilizing browse forages. Goats are ... Although Polyethylene glycol (PEG) has been shown to increase intake and digestibility of tannin rich browse, the increase may not justify its use because of the expense involved. Presence of ...

  5. Browsed twig environmental DNA: diagnostic PCR to identify ungulate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Ruth V; Königsson, Helena; Danell, Kjell; Spong, Göran

    2012-11-01

    Ungulate browsing can have a strong effect on ecological processes by affecting plant community structure and composition, with cascading effects on nutrient cycling and animal communities. However, in the absence of direct observations of foraging, species-specific foraging behaviours are difficult to quantify. We therefore know relatively little about foraging competition and species-specific browsing patterns in systems with several browsers. However, during browsing, a small amount of saliva containing buccal cells is deposited at the bite site, providing a source of environmental DNA (eDNA) that can be used for species identification. Here, we describe extraction and PCR protocols for a browser species diagnostic kit. Species-specific primers for mitochondrial DNA were optimized and validated using twigs browsed by captive animals. A time series showed that about 50% of the samples will amplify up to 12 weeks after the browsing event and that some samples amplify up to 24 weeks after browsing (12.5%). Applied to samples of natural browsing from an area where moose (Alces alces), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), fallow deer (Cervus dama) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) are sympatric, amplification success reached 75%. This method promises to greatly improve our understanding of multispecies browsing systems without the need for direct observations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Exploring the Concept of Browsing from the Literature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ju L. Chang

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Browsing as a concept and an activity appears to be a fundamental part of human information behavior, which takes place in diverse contexts in our daily life. At the theoretical level, research on browsing can extend and develop theories of human information behavior. Practically, there could be suggestions for better organization and representation of information and material displayed as well as for effective information seeking and retrieval. This thesis attempts to explore the browsing phenomenon as it appears in the library and information science literature and end-user computing literature. Topics included for discussion are the definitions of the browsing concept, potential consequences, topology and influential factors of browsing as being identified from the literature analysis.[Article content in Chinese

  7. Advanced Techniques in Web Intelligence-2 Web User Browsing Behaviour and Preference Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Palade, Vasile; Jain, Lakhmi

    2013-01-01

    This research volume focuses on analyzing the web user browsing behaviour and preferences in traditional web-based environments, social  networks and web 2.0 applications,  by using advanced  techniques in data acquisition, data processing, pattern extraction and  cognitive science for modeling the human actions.  The book is directed to  graduate students, researchers/scientists and engineers  interested in updating their knowledge with the recent trends in web user analysis, for developing the next generation of web-based systems and applications.

  8. Browsing the Internet: good-bye anonymity!

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2012-01-01

    Do you consider browsing the Internet to be your private business? When visiting random web-sites, how far do you assume you are anonymous? Would it matter to you that Google or Facebook can profile your browsing behaviour in order to better target you with advertisements? Did you notice that you already get targeted ads when you are logged on to Google or Facebook even if you are visiting completely different websites? If matters to you, note that browsing anonymously on the Internet is far from easy.   When you are connected to the Internet, you give away a variety of information: your PC’s IP address, some browser settings like language or screen size, and, probably, your login information. So how private is private? You might argue that your current IP address has been picked from a pool of addresses and therefore regularly changes, so it does not necessarily always pinpoint you. On the other hand, with the dawn of IPv6 there is no need any more for shared IP addresses as the...

  9. INFLUENCE OF SEMIARID SUMMER BROWSING ON CHEMICAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Puga

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A group (A of 20 female French Alpine goats (50 ± 5 Kg BW were fed on summer semiarid vegetation in Querétaro, México. Other group (B with similar characteristic was fed in full confinement with Lucerne hay and concentrate of cereals. Four kids of cheese were prepared: 1 browsed-raw (BR, 2 browsed-pasteurized (BP, 3 indoor-raw (IR and 4 indoor-pasteurized (IP; using 30 kg of milk per group, 15 kg each group were proceed in raw and 15 kg each were pasteurized. Moisture, energy, protein, ash, lipids, cholesterol, fatty acids profile and CLA were determined in the cheeses; the results were analyzed with a variance analysis in a 2x2 factorial arrangement. Energy, fat and ash did not affect for feeding system and heat treatment. Protein content was higher in IP cheese compared with BR and BP cheeses. BR cheese had a lowest cholesterol value in relation to BP, IR and IP cheeses. The browed cheeses had the highest concentration of CLA, EPA and DHA acids in relation to indoor cheeses. Pasteurization did not have effect in cheese quality. Browsing increased concentration of compounds with a beneficial effect on human health, factor that could add revenue to the small farmer’s income.

  10. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Results Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %, never married (83.5 %, unemployed (94.2 %, and without a bank account (66.0 %. Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure, and depression (57.3 %. Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48

  11. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Patel, Falguni; Kirzner, Rachel; Newton-Famous, Nijah; Owens, Constance; Welles, Seth L; Chilton, Mariana

    2016-07-16

    Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full) and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %), never married (83.5 %), unemployed (94.2 %), and without a bank account (66.0 %). Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure), and depression (57.3 %). Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48.5 % of the fathers of the youngest child spent

  12. The Criteria People Use in Relevance Decisions on Health Information: An Analysis of User Eye Movements When Browsing a Health Discussion Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Wenjing; Khoo, Christopher Sg; Chang, Yun-Ke

    2016-06-20

    People are increasingly accessing health-related social media sites, such as health discussion forums, to post and read user-generated health information. It is important to know what criteria people use when deciding the relevance of information found on health social media websites, in different situations. The study attempted to identify the relevance criteria that people use when browsing a health discussion forum, in 3 types of use contexts: when seeking information for their own health issue, when seeking for other people's health issue, and when browsing without a particular health issue in mind. A total of 58 study participants were self-assigned to 1 of the 3 use contexts or information needs and were asked to browse a health discussion forum, HealthBoards.com. In the analysis, browsing a discussion forum was divided into 2 stages: scanning a set of post surrogates (mainly post titles) in the summary result screen and reading a detailed post content (including comments by other users). An eye tracker system was used to capture participants' eye movement behavior and the text they skim over and focus (ie, fixate) on during browsing. By analyzing the text that people's eyes fixated on, the types of health information used in the relevance judgment were determined. Post-experiment interviews elicited participants' comments on the relevance of the information and criteria used. It was found that participants seeking health information for their own health issue focused significantly more on the poster's symptoms, personal history of the disease, and description of the disease (P=.01, .001, and .02). Participants seeking for other people's health issue focused significantly more on cause of disease, disease terminology, and description of treatments and procedures (P=.01, .01, and .02). In contrast, participants browsing with no particular issue in mind focused significantly more on general health topics, hot topics, and rare health issues (P=.01, .01, and .01

  13. MET network in PubMed: a text-mined network visualization and curation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Chu-Hsien; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Ming-Siang; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Rose Jue, Toni; Rao, Shruti; Chou, Hui-Jou; Milacic, Marija; Singh, Onkar; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the dissemination of a cancer/tumor from one organ to another, and it is the most dangerous stage during cancer progression, causing more than 90% of cancer deaths. Improving the understanding of the complicated cellular mechanisms underlying metastasis requires investigations of the signaling pathways. To this end, we developed a METastasis (MET) network visualization and curation tool to assist metastasis researchers retrieve network information of interest while browsing through the large volume of studies in PubMed. MET can recognize relations among genes, cancers, tissues and organs of metastasis mentioned in the literature through text-mining techniques, and then produce a visualization of all mined relations in a metastasis network. To facilitate the curation process, MET is developed as a browser extension that allows curators to review and edit concepts and relations related to metastasis directly in PubMed. PubMed users can also view the metastatic networks integrated from the large collection of research papers directly through MET. For the BioCreative 2015 interactive track (IAT), a curation task was proposed to curate metastatic networks among PubMed abstracts. Six curators participated in the proposed task and a post-IAT task, curating 963 unique metastatic relations from 174 PubMed abstracts using MET.Database URL: http://btm.tmu.edu.tw/metastasisway. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  15. Community Participation, Natural Resource Management and the Creation of Innovative Tourism Products: Evidence from Italian Networks of Reserves in the Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Martini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses value co-creation and social innovation focusing on a new approach to the management of Natura 2000 areas: the Networks of Reserves (NoRs. NoRs have been set up in Trentino (an Italian alpine area to create an ecological network within the territory, with a particular focus on the socio-economic dimensions of nature conservation and with a bottom-up approach. The research investigates the role of NoRs by using a quali-quantitative approach to analyse the attitudes and awareness of private stakeholders, public actors and local communities. In-depth interviews with NoRs coordinators and key players in tourism organizations were carried out. 167 online questionnaires were sent out to local stakeholders. The research investigates community participation and stakeholder engagement in NoRs’ projects and activities, whether and how socio-economic development has occurred, and whether and how innovative sustainable tourism offers have been created. It confirms the role of NoRs in relation to the conservation and valorisation of natural resources through the stimulation of activities such as environmental interpretation and education. The research demonstrates the effectiveness of bottom-up processes for the co-creation of sustainable tourism offers and the fostering of social innovation. NoRs have proved to be successful in overcoming the major impediments to the functioning of the Natura 2000 network highlighted in the literature.

  16. [Study of influences of social support and social networks on participation in periodic health examination of the elderly at home comparison of three regions with different social backgrounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Yuu; Kishi, Reiko; Ecuchi, Teruko; Miyake, Hirotsugu; Sasatani, Harumi; Maeda, Nobuo; Horikawa, Naoko

    2006-02-01

    Periodic health examination are presumed to be important with respect to the well-being of aged individuals. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between elderly at home accepting periodic health examination and their social support and social networks. The survey was performed targeting so-called young elderly persons living at home in 3 regions in Hokkaido Prefecture, a large city (Sapporo), an ex-coalmining town (Yuubari) and a small farming town (Takasu). The study populations were asked about social support and social networks, and the Mantel-Haenszel method was applied to analyze the data. 1) Both males and females who received periodic health examination within the last one year (participants) were members of various groups, such as neighborhood societies, clubs for the elderly and so on, and were more interested in public magazines and political issues than those who had never received periodic health examination (non-participants). Elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were those who were interested in elections, who had a hobby, and who thought that life was worthwhile. 2) Both elderly males and females who accepted periodic health examination were those who had friends, and elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were those who had close relatives and who lived in a friendly neighborhood. 3) Elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were more likely to both receive and supply instrumental and emotional support in interaction with others.

  17. Have No PHEAR: Networks Without Identifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Have No PHEAR: Networks Without Identifiers∗ Richard Skowyra, Kevin Bauer, Veer Dedhia, Hamed Okhravi, and William Streilein MIT Lincoln Laboratory...Ethernet and TCP/IP were not designed to ensure the security and privacy of users. To protect users’ pri- vacy, anonymity networks such as Tor have been...performance for common applications such as web browsing and file sharing. 1. INTRODUCTION The essential network protocols that have enabled the success of

  18. Mortality Rates Among Substance Use Disorder Participants in Clinical Trials: Pooled Analysis of Twenty-Two Clinical Trials Within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Robert; Hu, Lian; Oden, Neal; Wakim, Paul; Rosa, Carmen; VanVeldhuisen, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Most substance use disorders (SUD) treatment clinical trials are too short and small to reliably estimate the incidence of rare events like death. The aim of this study is to estimate the overall mortality rates among a SUD treatment-seeking population by pooling participants from multiple clinical trials conducted through the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-sponsored National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN). Drug and or alcohol users (N=9866) who sought treatment and participated in one of the twenty-two CTN trials. Data were collected through randomized clinical trials in national community treatment programs for SUD. Pooled analysis was performed to assess age- and gender-standardized mortality rate(s) (SM rate(s)), and mortality ratio(s) (SM ratio(s)) of CTN trial participants compared to the U.S. general population. The age- and gender-SM rate among CTN trials participants was 1403 (95% CI: 862-2074) per 100,000 person years (PY) compared to 542 (95% CI: 541-543) per 100,000 PY among the U.S. general population in 2005. By gender, age-adjusted SM ratio for female CTN trial participants was over five times (SM ratio=5.35, 95% CI: 3.31-8.19)), and for male CTN trial participants, it was over three times (SM ratio=3.39, 95% CI: 2.25-4.90) higher than their gender comparable peers in the U.S. general population. Age and gender-standardized mortality rates and ratios among NIDA CTN SUD treatment-seeking clinical trial participants are higher than the age and gender comparable U.S. general population. The overall mortality rates of CTN trial participants are similar to in-treatment mortality reported in large U.S. and non-U.S. cohorts of opioid users. Future analysis with additional CTN trial participants and risk times will improve the stability of estimates, especially within subgroups based on primary substance of abuse. These SUD mortality rates can be used to facilitate safety monitoring within SUD clinical trials. Copyright © 2016

  19. Defining social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities: an ecological model of social networks and community participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplican, Stacy Clifford; Leader, Geraldine; Kosciulek, John; Leahy, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Social inclusion is an important goal for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, families, service providers, and policymakers; however, the concept of social inclusion remains unclear, largely due to multiple and conflicting definitions in research and policy. We define social inclusion as the interaction between two major life domains: interpersonal relationships and community participation. We then propose an ecological model of social inclusion that includes individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and socio-political factors. We identify four areas of research that our ecological model of social inclusion can move forward: (1) organizational implementation of social inclusion; (2) social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities living with their families, (3) social inclusion of people along a broader spectrum of disability, and (4) the potential role of self-advocacy organizations in promoting social inclusion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Perceived Stress in Online Prostate Cancer Community Participants: Examining Relationships with Stigmatization, Social Support Network Preference, and Social Support Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Camella J; Bol, Nadine; Burke-Garcia, Amelia; Rains, Stephen; Wright, Kevin B

    2017-06-01

    Men with prostate cancer often need social support to help them cope with illness-related physiological and psychosocial challenges. Whether those needs are met depends on receiving support optimally matched to their needs. This study examined relationships between perceived stress, prostate cancer-related stigma, weak-tie support preference, and online community use for social support in a survey of online prostate cancer community participants (n = 149). Findings revealed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress. This relationship, however, was moderated by weak-tie support preference and online community use for social support. Specifically, stigma was positively related to perceived stress when weak-tie support was preferred. Analyses also showed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress in those who used their online community for advice or emotional support. Health communication scholars should work collaboratively with diagnosed men, clinicians, and online community administrators to develop online interventions that optimally match social support needs.

  1. A Skyline Plugin for Pathway-Centric Data Browsing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degan, Michael G.; Ryadinskiy, Lillian; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Wilkins, Christopher S.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2016-08-16

    For targeted proteomics to be broadly adopted in biological laboratories as a routine experimental protocol, wet-bench biologists must be able to approach SRM assay design in the same way they approach biological experimental design. Most often, biological hypotheses are envisioned in a set of protein interactions, networks and pathways. We present a plugin for the popular Skyline tool that presents public mass spectrometry data in a pathway-centric view to assist users in browsing available data and determining how to design quantitative experiments. Selected proteins and their underlying mass spectra are imported to Skyline for further assay design (transition selection). The same plugin can be used for hypothesis-drive DIA data analysis, again utilizing the pathway view to help narrow down the set of proteins which will be investigated. The plugin is backed by the PNNL Biodiversity Library, a corpus of 3 million peptides from >100 organisms, and the draft human proteome. Users can upload personal data to the plugin to use the pathway navigation prior to importing their own data into Skyline.

  2. Student Motivation in Computer Networking Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jung Hsin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces several hands-on projects that have been used to motivate students in learning various computer networking concepts. These projects are shown to be very useful and applicable to the learners’ daily tasks and activities such as emailing, Web browsing, and online shopping and banking, and lead to an unexpected byproduct, self-motivation.

  3. Student Motivation in Computer Networking Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jung Hsin, PhD

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces several hands-on projects that have been used to motivate students in learning various computer networking concepts. These projects are shown to be very useful and applicable to the learners’ daily tasks and activities such as emailing, Web browsing, and online shopping and banking, and lead to an unexpected byproduct, self-motivation.

  4. Social networking for web-based communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, T.; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the 21st century, a new technology was introduced to facilitate communication, collaboration, and interaction between individuals and businesses. This technology is called social networking; this technology is now part of Internet commodities like email, browsing and blogging. From the 20th

  5. Development of 3D browsing and interactive web system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaonan; Fu, Jian; Jin, Chaolin

    2017-09-01

    In the current market, users need to download specific software or plug-ins to browse the 3D model, and browsing the system may be unstable, and it cannot be 3D model interaction issues In order to solve this problem, this paper presents a solution to the interactive browsing of the model in the server-side parsing model, and when the system is applied, the user only needs to input the system URL and upload the 3D model file to operate the browsing The server real-time parsing 3D model, the interactive response speed, these completely follows the user to walk the minimalist idea, and solves the current market block 3D content development question.

  6. SAFARI 2000 MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) Browse Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) collected imagery for the SAFARI 2000 field campaign. Currently available data consist of browse imagery and flight track...

  7. Responses to sheep browsing at different stocking rates: water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywods: botany; browsing; carbohydrates; carbon; carbon allocation; Eastern Sweet Grassveld; Eriocephalus ericoides; palatability; photosynthesis; polyphenols; Pteronia tricephala; response; semi-arid; sheep; shrubs; South Africa; stocking rates; water relations; acceptability; elevation; karoo; photosynthetic rate; plant ...

  8. Perbandingan proxy pada linux dan windows untuk mempercepat browsing website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafwen Toresa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPada saat ini sangat banyak organisasi, baik pendidikan, pemerintahan,  maupun perusahaan swasta berusaha membatasi akses para pengguna ke internet dengan alasan bandwidth yang dimiliki mulai terasa lambat ketika para penggunanya mulai banyak yang melakukan browsing ke internet. Mempercepat akses browsing menjadi perhatian utama dengan memanfaatkan teknologi Proxy server. Penggunaan proxy server perlu mempertimbangkan sistem operasi pada server dan tool yang digunakan belum diketahui performansi terbaiknya pada sistem operasi apa.  Untuk itu dirasa perlu untuk menganalisis performan Proxy server pada sistem operasi berbeda yaitu Sistem Operasi Linux dengan tools Squid  dan Sistem Operasi Windows dengan tool Winroute. Kajian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui perbandingan kecepatan browsing dari komputer pengguna (client. Browser yang digunakan di komputer pengguna adalah Mozilla Firefox. Penelitian ini menggunakan 2 komputer klien dengan pengujian masing-masingnya 5 kali pengujian pengaksesan/browsing web yang dituju melalui proxy server. Dari hasil pengujian yang dilakukan, diperoleh kesimpulan bahwa penerapan proxy server di sistem operasi linux dengan tools squid lebih cepat browsing dari klien menggunakan web browser yang sama dan komputer klien yang berbeda dari pada proxy server sistem operasi windows dengan tools winroute.  Kata kunci: Proxy, Bandwidth, Browsing, Squid, Winroute AbstractAt this time very many organizations, both education, government, and private companies try to limit the access of users to the internet on the grounds that the bandwidth owned began to feel slow when the users began to do a lot of browsing to the internet. Speed up browsing access is a major concern by utilizing Proxy server technology. The use of proxy servers need to consider the operating system on the server and the tool used is not yet known the best performance on what operating system. For that it is necessary to analyze Performance Proxy

  9. The Investigation of Pointing Behaviors in Web Browsing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The STIR proposal aims at understanding Internet users’ online activities from the influence of a pointing device, such as...Pointing Behaviors in Web Browsing Report Title The STIR proposal aims at understanding Internet users’ online activities from the influence of a pointing... Inventions (DD882) Scientific Progress This project examined the Fitts’ model in the context of natural web browsing. Mouse movement data

  10. Silvicultural Attempts to Induce Browse Resistance in Conifer Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A. Kimball

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiyear study was conducted to determine if soil amendment combined with topical application of elemental sulfur could be employed to reduce deer browse damage to four conifer species. Fertilizer and sulfur were applied to conifer seedlings at seven sites near Corvallis, OR. Growth and browse damage data were collected for all seedlings over a period of 17 months. Additionally, foliar concentrations of monoterpenes and simple carbohydrates were assessed in western redcedar (Thuja plicata seedlings over a period of three years. Fertilization and sulfur treatments had a moderate impact on growth and no influence on browse damage or the chemical responses. Over the course of the study, browse damage diminished while foliar monoterpene concentrations increased in redcedar. It appears that silvicultural manipulation via sulfur application and/or soil amendment cannot accelerate or alter the ontogenetical changes that may naturally defend seedlings against mammalian herbivores. In a brief trial with captive deer, redcedar browse resistance was influenced by seedling maturation, but not monoterpene content. Other maturation effects may yield significant browse protection to young seedlings.

  11. Does browsing reduce shrub survival and vigor following summer fires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbright, Timothy E.; Dacy, Emily C.; Drawe, D. Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Periodic fire is widely hypothesized to limit woody plant encroachment in semiarid grasslands. In southern Texas, however, most of the woody plants that have invaded grasslands during the past two centuries are resistant to fire. We hypothesized that browsing by Odocoileus virginianus increases mortality of palatable shrubs and reduces vigor of shrubs following fire. We randomly selected ten pairs of each of three shrub species -Condalia hookeri, Acacia farnesiana, and Celtis ehrenbergiana - in each of three locations before prescribed burns during summer 2001. Following burns, we used a wire fence to protect one shrub of each pair from browsing. We estimated intensity of O. virginianus browsing and number and height of sprouts 4, 12, 20, 30, 38, and 47 weeks post-fire. We determined shrub height, survival, and biomass one year post-fire. Averaged across species, browsing intensity on unfenced shrubs was greater (LS Means, P 0.05) one year post-burn. Browsing by O. virginianus at the intensity in our study does not increase mortality or reduce vigor of C. hookeri, A. farnesiana, and Condalia ehrenbergiana producing new growth following destruction of aboveground tissues by a single fire compared to shrubs that are not browsed following fire.

  12. Scripps satellite archive browsing for localized environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. J.

    Scripps Satellite Archive Browsing for Localized Environments (SSable) is a new interactive tool for browsing the Scripps Satellite Oceanography Center's (SSOC) archive of satellite data in your laboratory or office. The archive contains data from the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer(AVHRR) series of satellites dating from 1979 to present. SSOC maintains a capture station, and data are continually being added to the SSable system within 10 minutes of capture completion.SSable provides an easy-to-use, pointand-click, mouse driven user interface developed around the OSF/Motif widget set and the X Window protocol. All options are selected by either directly clicking the mouse on the desired push button, or pulling down a sub-menu from a push-button. A “fill-inthe-blanks” window appears to guide the user in defining the operation. All SSable option menus have a cancel button to abort the operation. Users can search for data by time, day, geographic coordinate or, if the user knows the structure of the Scripps archive, by explicit archive number.

  13. Browse Shrubs and Trees as Fodder for Ruminants: A Review on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reviews the main determinants of productivity and quality of forage from browse species and highlights the usefulness of browse plants as fodder sources. The effect of secondary plant metabolites on forage quality and the consequential effects on browse acceptability and intake are presented. Condensed tannin (CT) is ...

  14. Utilization of woody browse and habitat by the black rhino ( Diceros ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of woody browse and habitat by the black rhino ( Diceros bicornis ) in western Itala Game Reserve. ... The extremely patchy distribution of browse utilization within communities suggests that there are other important factors affecting browse utilization besides plant species composition. It appears that tall grass ...

  15. Responses of herbage and browse production to six range management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Reed Sanderson; Thomas M. Quigley; Arthur R. Tiedemann

    1990-01-01

    From 1977 through 1986, herbage and browse production was sampled on 619 sites representing 10 ecosystems and 51 resource units on the Oregon Range Evaluation study area. We determined the effects of six range management strategies and cultural treatments on combined herbage and browse production. Mean herbage and browse production on the forest ecosystems was 145...

  16. Network unites payers, physicians, hospitals. System participants work together to improve access to care and to design cost-saving incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J

    1993-05-01

    Through Sacred Heart Health System (SHHS), Eugene, OR, physicians, payers, and hospitals are designing a network that will integrate care and improve access by reducing healthcare costs. Together, system members design cost-saving incentives and the products the system offers the community. They promote managed care as the most efficient means to coordinate care and reduce costs. All participants share in the risks of a capitated payment system. Since the system pulled together the payers, physician groups, and hospitals, many of these entities' management functions were consolidated at the system level to avoid duplication and reduce administrative costs. Bringing in physicians was the most difficult yet important aspect of forming a successful network. Working with two physician groups in the community, the system's sponsor-the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace, Health and Hospital Services-developed the Physician Practice Board. The board, representing 300 physicians, meets weekly and makes recommendations on issues that affect physicians. SHHS also added innovative new functions such as an integrated medical cost management and continuous quality improvement program. Another key to success is a clinically oriented information system, which will allow the system to track patients once they leave the hospital. It also will provide a better understanding of what things have an impact on outcomes and will reduce paperwork. A portion of the system's revenue is designated for initiatives to improve access. And the system recently appointed a tack force on access to explore what they can do in cooperation with others in the community.

  17. Tooling and Language Support for Robust and Easy Network Programming of Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xinxin

    2017-01-01

    Most of today’s mobile apps rely on the underlying networks to deliver key func- tions such as web browsing, file synchronization, and social networking. Compared to desktop-based networks, mobile networks are much more dynamic with frequent con- nectivity disruptions, network type switches, and quality changes, posing unique pro- gramming challenges for mobile app developers.As revealed in this thesis, many mobile app developers fail to handle these inter- mittent network conditions in the m...

  18. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Improving adequacy of hemodialysis in Northern California ESRD patients: a final project report. Provider Participants and Medical Review Board of the TransPacific Renal Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J; Josephson, M

    2000-10-01

    with a KT/V below the national benchmark. Only 9% (n = 8) of the 113 providers had a variance in post-BUN sampling methodologies that could be related to the clinical measure of adequacy. In Phase II, a random selection of 12 providers with data below US and Network standards was made for an intensive assessment. A total of 217 patient records were reviewed from a population of 1,027. In addition to comparison of baseline data, each facility was assessed for barriers to achieving adequacy outcomes. The number of problems was extensive and specific to each facility; however, a common reoccurring theme in the majority of events was the lack of supporting documentation for changes to the plan of care when variances occur. The most common occurrences were incorrect blood flow and dialysate flow with no supporting documentation on record for the prescription not being met. In Phase III, Network interventions for facilities not meeting US and Network standards for adequacy as measured by URR and KT/V included required quarterly reporting on their facility-specific quality improvement programs for adequacy. In addition the 12 facilities that participated in the intensive assessment had additional interventions that included an educational "tool box" focused on documentation, legal implications of charting, and general medical records management, and an educational program to review information to be shared with facility staff. All on-site facilities reported ongoing quality improvement programs. In some facilities they did provide a focus on processes and not only a measurement of an indicator. All facilities reported a team concept of some type used in their program. Although there were similarities in the facilities, each facility presented with a unique combination of barriers. In addition to a large patient-to-RN ratio, the lack of technical education for the unlicensed assistive personnel on processes and outcomes appears to play a significant role in the achievement of

  20. Different facets of tree sapling diversity influence browsing intensity by deer dependent on spatial scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohse, Bettina; Seele, Carolin; Holzwarth, Frédéric; Wirth, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Browsing of tree saplings by deer hampers forest regeneration in mixed forests across Europe and North America. It is well known that tree species are differentially affected by deer browsing, but little is known about how different facets of diversity, such as species richness, identity, and composition, affect browsing intensity at different spatial scales. Using forest inventory data from the Hainich National Park, a mixed deciduous forest in central Germany, we applied a hierarchical approach to model the browsing probability of patches (regional scale) as well as the species-specific proportion of saplings browsed within patches (patch scale). We found that, at the regional scale, the probability that a patch was browsed increased with certain species composition, namely with low abundance of European beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) and high abundance of European ash ( Fraxinus excelsior L.), whereas at the patch scale, the proportion of saplings browsed per species was mainly determined by the species' identity, providing a "preference ranking" of the 11 tree species under study. Interestingly, at the regional scale, species-rich patches were more likely to be browsed; however, at the patch scale, species-rich patches showed a lower proportion of saplings per species browsed. Presumably, diverse patches attract deer, but satisfy nutritional needs faster, such that fewer saplings need to be browsed. Some forest stand parameters, such as more open canopies, increased the browsing intensity at either scale. By showing the effects that various facets of diversity, as well as environmental parameters, exerted on browsing intensity at the regional as well as patch scale, our study advances the understanding of mammalian herbivore-plant interactions across scales. Our results also indicate which regeneration patches and species are (least) prone to browsing and show the importance of different facets of diversity for the prediction and management of browsing intensity

  1. The Impact of an Authentic Science Experience on STEM Identity: A Preliminary Analysis of YouthAstroNet and MicroObservatory Telescope Network Participant Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Mary E.; Wright, Erika A.; Sadler, Philip; Sonnert, Gerhard; ITEAMS II Team

    2018-01-01

    Encouraging students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a high priority for national K-12 education improvement initiatives in the United States. Many educators have claimed that a promising strategy for nurturing early student interest in STEM is to engage them in authentic inquiry experiences. “Authentic” refers to investigations in which the questions are of genuine interest and importance to students, and the inquiry more closely resembles the way real science is done. Science education researchers and practitioners at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have put this theory into action with the development of YouthAstroNet, a nationwide online learning community of middle-school aged students, educators, and STEM professionals that features the MicroObservatory Robotic Telescope Network, professional image analysis software, and complementary curricula for use in a variety of learning settings. This preliminary study examines factors that influence YouthAstroNet participants' Science Affinity, STEM Identity, and STEM Career Interest, using the matched pre/post survey results of 261 participants as the data source. The pre/post surveys included some 40 items measuring affinity, identity, knowledge, and career interest. In addition, the post intervention instrument included a number of items in which students reported the instructional strategies they experienced as part of the program. A simple analysis of pre-post changes in affinity and interest revealed very little significant change, and for those items where a small pre-post effect was observed, the average change was most often negative. However, after accounting for students' different program treatment experiences and for their prior attitudes and interests, a predictor of significant student gains in Affinity, STEM Identity, Computer/Math Identity, and STEM Career Interest could be identified. This was the degree to which students reported

  2. Browsing while reading: effects of instructional design and learners' prior knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theimo Müller-Kalthoff

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the key reasons that multimedia, and particularly hypertext systems, are gaining in importance is that they inspire hopes of optimizing learners' processes of knowledge construction. The present study is concerned with the respective influence of individual learner variables (i.e. particularly domain-specific prior knowledge on the use of different design attributes. Thirty-six university students worked through a hierarchically structured two-part hypertext about the psychology of memory under two experimental browsing conditions (reduced versus free browsing. Results show that deeper-level comprehension (i.e. structural knowledge was predicted by the interaction of experimental condition and prior knowledge, but that simply retaining facts was not. Participants with low prior knowledge performed better on the comprehension test if they had worked on the version with reduced access. Moreover, the version with reduced access helped to reduce feelings of disorientation. The measure of disorientation also appeared to be closely linked with the individual's computer experience, self-concept of computer ability and subject-related interest. The main implications for educational practice relate to the design of an adaptive multimedia and hypertext learning system and the successful learning with it.

  3. The emotional responses of browsing Facebook: Happiness, envy, and the role of tie strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruoyun; Utz, Sonja

    2015-11-01

    On Facebook, users are exposed to posts from both strong and weak ties. Even though several studies have examined the emotional consequences of using Facebook, less attention has been paid to the role of tie strength. This paper aims to explore the emotional outcomes of reading a post on Facebook and examine the role of tie strength in predicting happiness and envy. Two studies - one correlational, based on a sample of 207 American participants and the other experimental, based on a sample of 194 German participants - were conducted in 2014. In Study 2, envy was further distinguished into benign and malicious envy. Based on a multi-method approach, the results showed that positive emotions are more prevalent than negative emotions while browsing Facebook. Moreover, tie strength is positively associated with the feeling of happiness and benign envy, whereas malicious envy is independent of tie strength after reading a (positive) post on Facebook.

  4. The emotional responses of browsing Facebook: Happiness, envy, and the role of tie strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruoyun; Utz, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    On Facebook, users are exposed to posts from both strong and weak ties. Even though several studies have examined the emotional consequences of using Facebook, less attention has been paid to the role of tie strength. This paper aims to explore the emotional outcomes of reading a post on Facebook and examine the role of tie strength in predicting happiness and envy. Two studies – one correlational, based on a sample of 207 American participants and the other experimental, based on a sample of 194 German participants – were conducted in 2014. In Study 2, envy was further distinguished into benign and malicious envy. Based on a multi-method approach, the results showed that positive emotions are more prevalent than negative emotions while browsing Facebook. Moreover, tie strength is positively associated with the feeling of happiness and benign envy, whereas malicious envy is independent of tie strength after reading a (positive) post on Facebook. PMID:26877584

  5. Redes de participación e intercambios en la radio pública: los podcasting Networks of Participation and Communicative Interchanges in Public Radio: Podcasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Salgado Santamaría

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available El desarrollo de los podcasting, como sistema añadido de la ciberradio, impulsa a las redes de participación e intercambios comunicativos de interés social, que exhiben numerosas ventajas frente a las prácticas radiofónicas conocidas. La difusión que la radio pública realiza de los podcasts, la colocan en el actual proceso de convergencia tecnológica, y la sitúan en una sociedad de la información y del conocimiento, capaz de ofrecer diferentes servicios al alcance de todos los ciudadanos. Sólo la introducción de nuevos contenidos y servicios que aporten valor añadido a los existentes y satisfagan las necesidades de sus usuarios, procurarán la rentabilidad de este sistema. The development of podcasting as an additional system of cyberradio stimulates the appearance of networks of participation and communicative interchanges of social interest, and has numerous advantages over conventional radio practices. The spreading of podcasts through public radio situates it within the process of technological convergence and in an Information and Knowledge society which is able to offer different services within reach of all citizens. Only the introduction of new contents and services that contribute added value to the existing ones and satisfy the needs of users will make this system profitable.

  6. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media

  7. Das mobilizações às redes de movimentos sociais From social movements to the political participation of network organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Scherer-Warren

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A realidade dos movimentos sociais é bastante dinâmica e nem sempre as teorizações têm acompanhado esse dinamismo. Com a globalização e a informatização da sociedade, os movimentos sociais em muitos países, inclusive no Brasil e em outros países da América Latina, tenderam a se diversificar e se complexificar. Por isso, muitas das explicações paradigmáticas ou hegemônicas nos estudos da segunda metade do século XX necessitam de revisões ou atualizações ante a emergência de novos sujeitos sociais ou cenários políticos. Este estudo busca, inicialmente, uma compreensão acerca da nova configuração da sociedade civil organizada, explicitando os múltiplos tipos de ações coletivas do novo milênio.1A partir desta compreensão, busca-se explorar a diversidade identitária dos sujeitos, a transversalidade nas demandas por direitos, as formas de ativismo e de empoderamento através de articulações em rede e, finalmente, a participação política das organizações em rede.The reality of social movement is quite dynamic, and theorizations do not always follow this dynamism. With globalization and the information age, the social movements in several countries, including Brazil and Latin America, are more diversified and complex. Therefore, many paradigmatic or hegemonic explanations from the last century are in need of revision or updating vis-à-vis the emergence of new social subjects or political scenarios. This study begins by elucidating organized civil society's new forms, aiming to register the multiple types of collective action in the new millennium. From this comprehension the study seeks to explore the diversity of identity of the social subjects, the transverse nature of demands for citizen's rights, the forms of activism and the empowerment through networking and, finally, the political participation of network organizations.

  8. The first year of the Australian Seismometers in Schools Network: Inspiring Students to follow careers in science by participating in a national science experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N.; Sambridge, M.; O'Neill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first year of The Australian Seismometers in Schools program (AuSIS) has been filled with excitement as we completed installing pilot instruments in schools, launched the program nationally and received over 70 "Expressions of Interest" from schools around Australia. The data quality has exceeded expectations with schools recording local earthquakes down to magnitude 1, and large distant earthquakes. Some students participate in the program by looking up earthquake locations on maps and learning about geography, while other more advanced students have been investigating the frequency characteristics and sources of noise at their school. Both students and the schools are particularly proud that their instrument is contributing to the global scientific community and are actively incorporating seismology into the school curriculum. AuSIS is a four-year project (2011-2014) funded by the Education component of AuScope Australian Geophysical Observing System. Over the next four years we will build a network of 40 seismometers in high schools across the nation to provide real-time monitoring of the Australian continent and raise awareness of geoscience through observing our dynamic earth in motion. This program is unique to other seismometers in schools programs as it uses professional seismometers to provide research quality data to the seismological community. The AuSIS project's educational aims are to: raise community awareness of earthquakes; raise awareness of seismology and geoscience, as a field of study; promote science as a possible career; and, provide a tool to teachers to assist in teaching physics and earth science. The data schools collect will be useful to researchers and could complement networks run by government and state agencies due to the high quality of the instruments and will be stored at internationally accessible and supported data management centres, such as IRIS. Data collected during the pilot program have provided clear recordings of

  9. Researchers set up European computer grid TCD is to participate in creating a vast research network of computers in Europe, but many feel the State should now join CERN, which is driving the project

    CERN Multimedia

    Lillington, K

    2001-01-01

    Trinity College Dublin will participate in the major project to create an European research network of computers. Despite this, Ireland remains the only country along with Luxembourg not to be a full member of CERN. Many researchers would like this to change, so they can have full access to the facilities at CERN (2 pages).

  10. Benchmarking of Percutaneous Injuries at the Ministry of Health Hospitals of Saudi Arabia in Comparison with the United States Hospitals Participating in Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZA Memish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to blood-borne pathogens from needle-stick and sharp injuries continues to pose a significant risk to health care workers. These events are of concern because of the risk to transmit blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and the human immunodeficiency virus. Objective: To benchmark different risk factors associated with needle-stick incidents among health care workers in the Ministry of Health hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia compared to the US hospitals participating in Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet ™. Methods: Prospective surveillance of needle-stick and sharp incidents carried out during the year 2012 using EPINet™ ver 1.5 that provides uniform needle stick and sharp injury report form. Results: The annual percutaneous incidents (PIs rate per 100 occupied beds was 3.2 at the studied MOH hospitals. Nurses were the most affected job category by PIs (59.4%. Most PIs happened in patients' wards in the Ministry of Health hospitals (34.6%. Disposable syringes were the most common cause of PIs (47.20%. Most PIs occurred during use of the syringes (36.4%. Conclusion: Among health care workers, nurses and physicians appear especially at risk of exposure to PIs. Important risk factors of injuries include working in patient room, using disposable syringes, devices without safety features. Preventive strategies such as continuous training of health care workers with special emphasis on nurses and physicians, encouragement of reporting of such incidents, observation of sharp handling, their use and implementation of safety devices are warranted.

  11. Jekyll or Hyde? Better browse securely

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    Surfing the web is like walking through London in 1886. Usually you meet nice Dr Jekyll, interact with him and everything is fine. But at other times, at night, you might encounter the malicious Mr Hyde. He just wants your money and your secrets, and wants to take advantage of you.   As in the novel by Stevenson, good and bad web pages can be very close together. Most web pages exist to provide information or a service. But one click away, one Google page down, there are malicious web pages that aim to steal your password, infect your computer, or lull you into disclosing personal information.    So remember: “STOP - THINK - CLICK!” should be the standard when browsing the Internet. If you are presented with a link that looks strange or contains gibberish (like http://211.268.156.277/.PayPal/cgi-bin/wbscrcmd_login.php), just ignore it! It is always better to type simple, comprehensible web addresses like “www.paypal.com” than...

  12. Browsing by giraffe in relation to plant and animal traits in Arusha National Park, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Ndjamba, Johannes Kambinda

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the feeding ecology of mature browsing giraffes during the wet season in Arusha National Park in Tanzania. I looked at different factors (predictor variables) affecting giraffe’s browsing time on a plant, biting rate, bite size, and intake rate (response variables). Predictor variable ranged from plant traits (habitat, spinescence, tree height) to the giraffe’s traits and behaviours (sex, browsing height, bite diameter, biting rate). The study reveals that only sex and...

  13. Efficient One-click Browsing of Large Trajectory Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    presents a novel query type called sheaf, where users can browse trajectory data sets using a single mouse click. Sheaves are very versatile and can be used for location-based advertising, travel-time analysis, intersection analysis, and reachability analysis (isochrones). A novel in-memory trajectory...

  14. The Costs of Web Advertisements while Mobile Browsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brande, Jeffrey; Pras, Aiko

    Tablet PCs, iPads and mobile phones all include facilities to browse the mobile Internet. The costs of mobile Internet access may become extraordinary, however, when the data limit is exceeded or when the user is roaming abroad without a roaming data plan. Since users may see advertisements as

  15. Graph-Based Methods for Discovery Browsing with Semantic Predications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkowski, Bartlomiej; Fiszman, Marcelo; Miller, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension to literature-based discovery that goes beyond making discoveries to a principled way of navigating through selected aspects of some biomedical domain. The method is a type of "discovery browsing" that guides the user through the research literature on a specified phenomen...

  16. Beyond Information Searching and Browsing: Acquiring Knowledge from Digital Library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, L.; Jeusfeld, M.A.; Hoppenbrouwers, J.

    Digital libraries (DLs) are a resource for answering complex questions. Up to now, such systems mainly support keyword-based searching and browsing. The mapping from a research question to keywords and the assessment whether an article is relevant for a research question is completely with the user.

  17. Browsing by Lepus capensis in the Karoo | Kerley | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although previously described as a grazer, Lepus capensis utilizes browse extensively in the Karoo. Observations of dietary selection by this species in the Karoo are presented, and potential competition with stock farmers is suggested. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  18. A promising technique for the determination of browse utilisation | AJ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A possible technique for the determination of browse utilization, without any prior measurements, is described. A high correlation (r = 0,8563) exists between twig diameter and total twig mass (twig plus leaf mass) of Portulacaria afra. A grazing experiment was conducted to determine whether this twig diameter : total twig ...

  19. Federating resources of information systems: browsing interface (FRISBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malchanau, A.V.; van der Vet, P.E.; Roosendaal, Hans E.; de Bra, P.M.E.

    2003-01-01

    Designing the user interface of a federated system (what we call a browsing interface) must consider the knowledge gap that exists between desires of the users and the needs the systems are built to support. The concept of Habitable Interfaces aims to bridge the knowledge gap by providing kinds of

  20. Research Note Estimation of browse biomass of Ficus thonningii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ficus thonningii is a multipurpose browse tree in northern Ethiopia. Despite its importance, techniques for quantifying its browsable biomass have not been developed. To develop best-estimation equations, the dendrometric parameters total height (H), crown height (CH), crown diameter (CD), diameter at stump height ...

  1. Dry Matter Degradation Characteristics of Some Selected Browse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0.030) followed by SBL (0.037) and FAL (0.043) being the highest. Effective dry matter degradation significantly (p<0.05) decreased with increase in outflow rate across browse plants, with FAL having the highest followed by SBL and PBL. From the ...

  2. A Texture Thesaurus for Browsing Large Aerial Photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Ying; Manjunath, B. S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a texture-based image-retrieval system for browsing large-scale aerial photographs. System components include texture-feature extraction, image segmentation and grouping, learning-similarity measure, and a texture-thesaurus model for fast search and indexing. Testing has demonstrated the system's effectiveness in searching and selecting…

  3. The mutual influence of managerial ability and social networks of farmers on participation in an organic vegetable group in Khon Kaen province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panatda Utaranakorn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study were to analyze farmers' managerial ability, social networks, and information sharing, and to describe the two-way relationship between managerial ability and social networks. We collected data through face-to-face interviews, using a structured questionnaire with a purposively selected random sample of 34 farmers in Khon Kaen province, Northeastern Thailand, in September 2013. All respondents belonged to an organic vegetable group. The findings revealed that almost all of the farmers have a high ability level in marketing, information searching, communication, and technical skills. Farmers with high ability, especially group leaders and group managers, have more chances to increase their networks through becoming consulters and transferring knowledge/technology. As a result, their social networks are more active and stronger, both inside and outside their villages. In addition, farmers with larger networks have more opportunities to assess information and exchange knowledge, so their ability can become even more effective.

  4. Is there a ‘browse trap’? Dynamics of herbivore impacts on trees and grasses in an African savanna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staver, Ann Carla; Bond, William J; Austin, Amy

    2014-01-01

    .... Like fire, browsing may impose height‐structured recruitment limitations on trees (i.e. a ‘browse trap’), but the demographics of herbivore effects have rarely been considered explicitly...

  5. A network of networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iedema, Rick; Verma, Raj; Wutzke, Sonia; Lyons, Nigel; McCaughan, Brian

    2017-04-10

    Purpose To further our insight into the role of networks in health system reform, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how one agency, the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI), and the multiple networks and enabling resources that it encompasses, govern, manage and extend the potential of networks for healthcare practice improvement. Design/methodology/approach This is a case study investigation which took place over ten months through the first author's participation in network activities and discussions with the agency's staff about their main objectives, challenges and achievements, and with selected services around the state of New South Wales to understand the agency's implementation and large system transformation activities. Findings The paper demonstrates that ACI accommodates multiple networks whose oversight structures, self-organisation and systems change approaches combined in dynamic ways, effectively yield a diversity of network governances. Further, ACI bears out a paradox of "centralised decentralisation", co-locating agents of innovation with networks of implementation and evaluation expertise. This arrangement strengthens and legitimates the role of the strategic hybrid - the healthcare professional in pursuit of change and improvement, and enhances their influence and impact on the wider system. Research limitations/implications While focussing the case study on one agency only, this study is unique as it highlights inter-network connections. Contributing to the literature on network governance, this paper identifies ACI as a "network of networks" through which resources, expectations and stakeholder dynamics are dynamically and flexibly mediated and enhanced. Practical implications The co-location of and dynamic interaction among clinical networks may create synergies among networks, nurture "strategic hybrids", and enhance the impact of network activities on health system reform. Social implications Network governance requires more

  6. Browsing and Visualization of Linked Environmental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Charalampos; Kyzirakos, Kostis; Bereta, Konstantina; Dogani, Kallirroi; Koubarakis, Manolis

    2014-05-01

    Linked environmental data has started to appear on the Web as environmental researchers make use of technologies such as ontologies, RDF, and SPARQL. Many of these datasets have an important geospatial and temporal dimension. The same is true also for the Web of data that is being rapidly populated not only with geospatial information, but also with temporal information. As the real-world entities represented in linked geospatial datasets evolve over time, the datasets themselves get updated and both the spatial and the temporal dimension of data become significant for users. For example, in the Earth Observation and Environment domains, data is constantly produced by satellite sensors and is associated with metadata containing, among others, temporal attributes, such as the time that an image was acquired. In addition, the acquisitions are considered to be valid for specific periods of time, for example until they get updated by new acquisitions. Satellite acquisitions might be utilized in applications such as the CORINE Land Cover programme operated by the European Environment Agency that makes available as a cartographic product the land cover of European areas. Periodically CORINE publishes the changes in the land cover of these areas in the form of changesets. Tools for exploiting the abundance of geospatial information have also started to emerge. However, these tools are designed for browsing a single data source, while in addition they cannot represent the temporal dimension. This is for two reasons: a) the lack of an implementation of a data model and a query language with temporal features covering the various semantics associated with the representation of time (e.g., valid and user-defined), and b) the lack of a standard temporal extension of RDF that would allow practitioners to utilize when publishing RDF data. Recently, we presented the temporal features of the data model stRDF, the query language stSPARQL, and their implementation in the geospatial

  7. Seqcrawler: biological data indexing and browsing platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallou Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seqcrawler takes its roots in software like SRS or Lucegene. It provides an indexing platform to ease the search of data and meta-data in biological banks and it can scale to face the current flow of data. While many biological bank search tools are available on the Internet, mainly provided by large organizations to search their data, there is a lack of free and open source solutions to browse one’s own set of data with a flexible query system and able to scale from a single computer to a cloud system. A personal index platform will help labs and bioinformaticians to search their meta-data but also to build a larger information system with custom subsets of data. Results The software is scalable from a single computer to a cloud-based infrastructure. It has been successfully tested in a private cloud with 3 index shards (pieces of index hosting ~400 millions of sequence information (whole GenBank, UniProt, PDB and others for a total size of 600 GB in a fault tolerant architecture (high-availability. It has also been successfully integrated with software to add extra meta-data from blast results to enhance users’ result analysis. Conclusions Seqcrawler provides a complete open source search and store solution for labs or platforms needing to manage large amount of data/meta-data with a flexible and customizable web interface. All components (search engine, visualization and data storage, though independent, share a common and coherent data system that can be queried with a simple HTTP interface. The solution scales easily and can also provide a high availability infrastructure.

  8. Seqcrawler: biological data indexing and browsing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallou, Olivier; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Roult, Aurelien

    2012-07-24

    Seqcrawler takes its roots in software like SRS or Lucegene. It provides an indexing platform to ease the search of data and meta-data in biological banks and it can scale to face the current flow of data. While many biological bank search tools are available on the Internet, mainly provided by large organizations to search their data, there is a lack of free and open source solutions to browse one's own set of data with a flexible query system and able to scale from a single computer to a cloud system. A personal index platform will help labs and bioinformaticians to search their meta-data but also to build a larger information system with custom subsets of data. The software is scalable from a single computer to a cloud-based infrastructure. It has been successfully tested in a private cloud with 3 index shards (pieces of index) hosting ~400 millions of sequence information (whole GenBank, UniProt, PDB and others) for a total size of 600 GB in a fault tolerant architecture (high-availability). It has also been successfully integrated with software to add extra meta-data from blast results to enhance users' result analysis. Seqcrawler provides a complete open source search and store solution for labs or platforms needing to manage large amount of data/meta-data with a flexible and customizable web interface. All components (search engine, visualization and data storage), though independent, share a common and coherent data system that can be queried with a simple HTTP interface. The solution scales easily and can also provide a high availability infrastructure.

  9. From spectator to participant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Kofoed, Jens

    The book collects experiences and methods for citizens’ participation in order to strengthen the local Agenda 21 process. 5 different types of methods is presented: Methods of analyses and evaluation, methods of dialogue, methods for action, methods for networking, and finely methods for involving...... local institutions. In the opening part the book deals with fundamental themes in participation processes such as planning of changes and changes and conflicts....

  10. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  11. Sport participation styles revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steven Vos; Erik Thibaut; Bart Vanreusel; Julie Borgers; Hanne Vandermeerschen; Jeroen Scheerder

    2013-01-01

    Social changes have been influencing determinants for sports participation since the introduction of the Sport for All ideology in the early 1970s. Consistent with Crum’s sportisation theory, today’s modes of sports practices, as well as the network of sport services, have diversified and

  12. Conceptualizing Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Bruun Jensen, Bjarne

    Although participation is not a new issue, it would be fair to say that consequential participation, which implies young people engaging in meaningful dialogue with adults and institutions and influencing decision-making processes in matters that concern them, is still in its infancy. This document...... aims to set the scene for discussing young people's participation in different domains that have an impact on their lives. It outlines the meaning and different interpretations of the concept of "participation" before reviewing why participation is an important issue in relation to young people...... and society. It then describes different forms, modes or qualities of participation and proposes a specific model of facilitating participatory work with young people - the IVAC approach (Investigation-Vision-Action-Change). The concept of action, types of actions aimed at initiating change and corresponding...

  13. Introductory course on getting to know journals and on "browsing" a research paper: first steps to proficiency in scientific communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Valerie

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of a course that promotes familiarity with biomedical periodicals and teaches efficient reading skills. A 16-hour course was designed to help inexperienced readers gain confidence navigating the contents of a research paper (instead of reading only abstracts), and make the first steps to critical appraisal. The course consisted of short lessons and small group work in which research papers were read and presented to the class. Participants learned a method called "browsing" that guides the first, superficial reading of a research paper and substitutes abstract reading. The course was administered to 15 hospital physicians and 40 graduate students of molecular medicine, in 4 separate sessions. At course entry, 45 of 55 participants normally read the abstract before consulting the body of a research paper. An end-of-course questionnaire, completed by 47 participants, revealed that only 3 would still read the abstract first, while 33 would perform browsing, 7 would scan figures and tables, and 4 would consult another section of a paper outside of their research interests; similar responses were given for a research paper within their fields. For 43 participants, the course was effective in developing reading skills. On a final comprehension test, participants had a median score of 69% correct responses (interquartile range, 56%-80%). This introductory course on reading scientific articles is effective in overcoming abstract-only reading and in developing confidence with the research literature. Considering participants' subjective evaluation and test scores, the course contents are appropriate for both physicians and young researchers.

  14. Simulating ungulate herbivory across forest landscapes: A browsing extension for LANDIS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan R. De Jager; Patrick J. Drohan; Brian M. Miranda; Brian R. Sturtevant; Susan L. Stout; Alejandro A. Royo; Eric J. Gustafson; Mark C. Romanski

    2017-01-01

    Browsing ungulates alter forest productivity and vegetation succession through selective foraging onspecies that often dominate early succession. However, the long-term and large-scale effects of browsing on forest succession are not possible to project without the use of simulation models. To explore the effects of ungulates on succession in a spatially explicit...

  15. Use of tannin containing browse tree/shrubs in the control of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overall aim of this review was to evaluate the antihelminthics activity of browse forages containing secondary plant factors. Results from literature have shown the benefits of feeding browse foliage in terms of nutrient supply, supplementation supported animal growth and performance. It was found that supplementation ...

  16. Simulated winter browsing may lead to induced susceptibility of willows to beavers in spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veraart, A.J.; Nolet, B.A.; Rosell, F.; De Vries, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Browsing may lead to an induced resistance or susceptibility of the plant to the herbivore. We tested the effect of winter browsing by Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber L., 1758) on food quality of holme willows (Salix dasyclados Wimm.) in and after the following growth season. Shrubs were pruned in

  17. Intensive Selective Deer Browsing Favors Success of Asimina triloba (Paw Paw) a Native Tree Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell A. Slater; Roger C. Anderson

    2014-01-01

    Although white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann) are generalist herbivores, they can have significant effects on species composition and abundance of forest trees, especially when deer densities are high and most plant species are heavily browsed but a few are selectively avoided as browse. We evaluated effects of selective deer...

  18. Knowledge-based image data management - An expert front-end for the BROWSE facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoms, David M.; Star, Jeffrey L.; Estes, John E.

    1988-01-01

    An intelligent user interface being added to the NASA-sponsored BROWSE testbed facility is described. BROWSE is a prototype system designed to explore issues involved in locating image data in distributed archives and displaying low-resolution versions of that imagery at a local terminal. For prototyping, the initial application is the remote sensing of forest and range land.

  19. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...... network methodology in one’s research might supersede the perceived benefits of doing so. As a response to that problem, we argue that workshops can act as a road towards meaningful engagement with networks and highlight that network methodology promises new ways of interpreting data to answer questions...

  20. Authoring Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Papazu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Samsø, Denmark's Renewable Energy Island since 1997, is world renowned for being self-sufficient in renewable energy and for having achieved energy self-sufficiency and CO2 neutrality through successful processes of public participation. In this article I seek to show how these processes of public participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear. By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate, material participation locates participation in everyday practice and work. On Samsø, the islanders’ participation was not an add-on to the project, it was an indispensable resource in itself. Building on extensive fieldwork I analyse how the islanders came to invest their time and resources in the Renewable Energy Island project, highlighting how, by materializing energy in concrete, local projects, energy and climate change-related projects can gain community-strengthening potentialities reaching beyond goals of energy self-sufficiency.

  1. Authoring Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Samsø, Denmark's Renewable Energy Island since 1997, is world renowned for being self-sufficient in renewable energy and for having achieved energy self-sufficiency and CO2 neutrality through successful processes of public participation. In this article I seek to show how these processes of public...... participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear....... By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate...

  2. A Video Browsing Tool for Content Management in Postproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Bailer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an interactive video browsing tool for supporting content management and selection in postproduction. The approach is based on a process model for multimedia content abstraction. A software framework based on this process model and desktop and Web-based client applications are presented. For evaluation, we apply two TRECVID style fact finding approaches (retrieval and question answering tasks and a user survey to the evaluation of the video browsing tool. We analyze the correlation between the results of the different methods, whether different aspects can be evaluated independently with the survey, and if a learning effect can be measured with the different methods, and we also compare the full-featured desktop and the limited Web-based user interface. The results show that the retrieval task correlates better with the user experience according to the survey. The survey rather measures the general user experience while different aspects of the usability cannot be analyzed independently.

  3. Tolerance of an expanding subarctic shrub, Betula glandulosa, to simulated caribou browsing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Champagne

    Full Text Available Densification of the shrub layer has been reported in many subarctic regions, raising questions about the implication for large herbivores and their resources. Shrubs can tolerate browsing and their level of tolerance could be affected by browsing and soils productivity, eventually modifying resource availability for the caribou. Our objective was to assess the compensatory growth potential of a subarctic shrub, Betula glandulosa Michx., in relation with caribou browsing and nutriment availability for the plants. We used a simulated browsing (0, 25 and 75% of available shoots and nitrogen-fertilisation (0 and 10 g m(-2 experiment to test two main hypotheses linking tolerance to resource availability, the Compensatory Continuum Hypothesis and the Growth Rate Hypothesis as well as the predictions from the Limiting Resource Model. We seek to explicitly integrate the relative browsing pressure in our predictions since the amount of tissues removed could affect the capacity of long-lived plants to compensate. Birches fully compensated for moderate browsing with an overall leaf biomass similar to unbrowsed birches but undercompensated under heavy browsing pressure. The main mechanism explaining compensation appears to be the conversion of short shoots into long shoots. The leaf area increased under heavy browsing pressure but only led to undercompensation. Fertilisation for two consecutive years did not influence the response of birch, thus we conclude that our results support the LRM hypothesis of equal tolerance under both high and low nitrogen availability. Our results highlight that the potential for compensatory growth in dwarf birch is surpassed under heavy browsing pressure independently of the fertilisation regime. In the context of the worldwide decline in caribou herds, the reduction in browsing pressure could act synergistically with global climate change to promote the current shrub expansion reported in subarctic regions.

  4. Tolerance of an Expanding Subarctic Shrub, Betula glandulosa, to Simulated Caribou Browsing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Emilie; Tremblay, Jean-Pierre; Côté, Steeve D.

    2012-01-01

    Densification of the shrub layer has been reported in many subarctic regions, raising questions about the implication for large herbivores and their resources. Shrubs can tolerate browsing and their level of tolerance could be affected by browsing and soils productivity, eventually modifying resource availability for the caribou. Our objective was to assess the compensatory growth potential of a subarctic shrub, Betula glandulosa Michx., in relation with caribou browsing and nutriment availability for the plants. We used a simulated browsing (0, 25 and 75% of available shoots) and nitrogen-fertilisation (0 and 10 g m−2) experiment to test two main hypotheses linking tolerance to resource availability, the Compensatory Continuum Hypothesis and the Growth Rate Hypothesis as well as the predictions from the Limiting Resource Model. We seek to explicitly integrate the relative browsing pressure in our predictions since the amount of tissues removed could affect the capacity of long-lived plants to compensate. Birches fully compensated for moderate browsing with an overall leaf biomass similar to unbrowsed birches but undercompensated under heavy browsing pressure. The main mechanism explaining compensation appears to be the conversion of short shoots into long shoots. The leaf area increased under heavy browsing pressure but only led to undercompensation. Fertilisation for two consecutive years did not influence the response of birch, thus we conclude that our results support the LRM hypothesis of equal tolerance under both high and low nitrogen availability. Our results highlight that the potential for compensatory growth in dwarf birch is surpassed under heavy browsing pressure independently of the fertilisation regime. In the context of the worldwide decline in caribou herds, the reduction in browsing pressure could act synergistically with global climate change to promote the current shrub expansion reported in subarctic regions. PMID:23272191

  5. Mortality salience effects on selective exposure and web browsing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Robert G; Wojdynski, Bartosz W

    2012-12-01

    Issue-related attitudes appear to drive individuals' selective Website browsing behavior, as a match between issue-related attitudes and Website content results in a greater number of page views. However, this relationship between content domain involvement and selective exposure is more complex than current theories hold, as the relationship emerges only when individuals are not primed to reflect on their mortality. Reminders of mortality, which are common in everyday life, lead to a defense motivation, which influences selective exposure behavior. In the control condition, issue-related attitudes predicted Website browsing, but under a mortality salience induction, these attitudes did not predict browsing behavior. Further, response latencies for the measure of individuals' attitudes toward the Website were influenced by their issue-related attitudes in the mortality salience condition but not in the control condition. The patterns of interactions produced in this experiment (N=215) illustrate the relationship between dispositional and situational factors that drive selective exposure in an online context. The results also underscore the importance of using behavioral and process-dependent measures in addition to self-report measures.

  6. Improved Software to Browse the Serial Medical Images for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Koojoo; Chung, Min Suk; Park, Jin Seo; Shin, Byeong Seok; Chung, Beom Sun

    2017-07-01

    The thousands of serial images used for medical pedagogy cannot be included in a printed book; they also cannot be efficiently handled by ordinary image viewer software. The purpose of this study was to provide browsing software to grasp serial medical images efficiently. The primary function of the newly programmed software was to select images using 3 types of interfaces: buttons or a horizontal scroll bar, a vertical scroll bar, and a checkbox. The secondary function was to show the names of the structures that had been outlined on the images. To confirm the functions of the software, 3 different types of image data of cadavers (sectioned and outlined images, volume models of the stomach, and photos of the dissected knees) were inputted. The browsing software was downloadable for free from the homepage (anatomy.co.kr) and available off-line. The data sets provided could be replaced by any developers for their educational achievements. We anticipate that the software will contribute to medical education by allowing users to browse a variety of images. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  7. Secure Your Wireless Network: Going Wireless Comes with Its Own Special Set of Security Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Jane; Musa, Atif

    2004-01-01

    Imagine a completely wireless school, an open network in which all students and staff can roam around using laptops or handheld computers to browse the Internet, access files and applications on the school server, and communicate with each other and the world via e-mail. It's a great picture--and at some schools the future is already here. But…

  8. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  9. Identifying the Help Givers in a Community of Learners: Using Peer Reporting and Social Network Analysis as Strategies for Participant Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    The author presents a three-step process for selecting participants for any study of a social phenomenon that occurs between people in locations and at times that are difficult to observe. The process is described with illustrative examples from a previous study of help giving in a community of learners. This paper includes a rationale for…

  10. Helping Citizens Help Themselves : Neighborhood Improvement Programs and the Impact of Social Networks, Trust, and Norms on Neighborhood-Oriented Forms of Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveldt, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    This article analyzes the relationship between social capital and neighborhood-oriented forms of participation within the context of an innovative Dutch neighborhood improvement program. On the basis of a survey among 307 residents, the author studies the link between three dimensions of social

  11. Ambivalent participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes-Green, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in young peoples' sexual cultures in Maputo, Mozambique led to reflections about the field dynamics of power, participation, desire, and discomfort. Structural inequalities of race, gender, and educational status resulted in informants seeing me as a morally righteous person to whom...... they could not give open accounts about sexual practice. Attempting to overcome these barriers, I participated in excessive nightlife activities, and as a consequence they began viewing me as a more accepting and reliable person. Although breaking down these barriers provided invaluable insight...... into their sexual culture, it also caused anxiety and troubling desires vis-à-vis informants. I discuss how anthropologists, through fieldwork are transformed from powerful seducers of informants to objects of informants' seduction. This creates dilemmas for the anthropologist whose fieldwork depends on informants...

  12. Both gas chromatography and an electronic nose reflect chemical polymorphism of juniper shrubs browsed or avoided by sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markó, Gábor; Novák, Ildikó; Bernáth, Jeno; Altbäcker, Vilmos

    2011-07-01

    Chemical polymorphism may contribute to variation in browsing damage by mammalian herbivores. Earlier, we demonstrated that essential oil concentration in juniper, Juniperus communis, was negatively associated with herbivore browsing. The aim of the present study was to characterize the volatile chemical composition of browsed and non-browsed J. communis. By using either gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) or an electronic nose device, we could separate sheep-browsed or non-browsed juniper shrubs by their essential oil pattern and complex odor matrix. The main components of the essential oil from J. communis were monoterpenes. We distinguished three chemotypes, dominated either by α-pinene, sabinene, or δ-3-carene. Shrubs belonging to the α-pinene- or sabinene-dominated groups were browsed, whereas all individuals with the δ-3-carene chemotype were unused by the local herbivores. The electronic nose also separated the browsed and non-browsed shrubs indicating that their odor matrix could guide sheep browsing. Responses of sheep could integrate the post-ingestive effects of plant secondary metabolites with sensory experience that stems from odor-phytotoxin interactions. Chemotype diversity could increase the survival rate in the present population of J. communis as certain shrubs could benefit from relatively better chemical protection against the herbivores.

  13. Claiming Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, Louise; Samson, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    with participation are currently strong influential factors in Danish planning. The article explores the use of participatory DIY urban design in two cases: the relocation of beer drinkers in Enghave Square and the Carlsberg City development in Copenhagen, Denmark. Carlsberg City is the most thorough Danish example...

  14. Simulating ungulate herbivory across forest landscapes: A browsing extension for LANDIS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Drohan, Patrick J.; Miranda, Brian M.; Sturtevant, Brian R.; Stout, Susan L.; Royo, Alejandro; Gustafson, Eric J.; Romanski, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    Browsing ungulates alter forest productivity and vegetation succession through selective foraging on species that often dominate early succession. However, the long-term and large-scale effects of browsing on forest succession are not possible to project without the use of simulation models. To explore the effects of ungulates on succession in a spatially explicit manner, we developed a Browse Extension that simulates the effects of browsing ungulates on the growth and survival of plant species cohorts within the LANDIS-II spatially dynamic forest landscape simulation model framework. We demonstrate the capabilities of the new extension and explore the spatial effects of ungulates on forest composition and dynamics using two case studies. The first case study examined the long-term effects of persistently high white-tailed deer browsing rates in the northern hardwood forests of the Allegheny National Forest, USA. In the second case study, we incorporated a dynamic ungulate population model to simulate interactions between the moose population and boreal forest landscape of Isle Royale National Park, USA. In both model applications, browsing reduced total aboveground live biomass and caused shifts in forest composition. Simulations that included effects of browsing resulted in successional patterns that were more similar to those observed in the study regions compared to simulations that did not incorporate browsing effects. Further, model estimates of moose population density and available forage biomass were similar to previously published field estimates at Isle Royale and in other moose-boreal forest systems. Our simulations suggest that neglecting effects of browsing when modeling forest succession in ecosystems known to be influenced by ungulates may result in flawed predictions of aboveground biomass and tree species composition.

  15. Increasing Ethnic Minority Participation in Substance Abuse Clinical Trials: Lessons Learned in the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlew, Kathleen; Larios, Sandra; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Holmes, Beverly; Venner, Kamilla; Chavez, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Underrepresentation in clinical trials limits the extent to which ethnic minorities benefit from advances in substance abuse treatment. The objective of this article is to share the knowledge gained within the Clinical Trials Network (CTN) of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and other research on recruiting and retaining ethnic minorities into substance abuse clinical trials. The article includes a discussion of two broad areas for improving inclusion— community involvement and cultural adaptation. CTN case studies are included to illustrate three promising strategies for improving ethnic minority inclusion: respondent-driven sampling, community-based participatory research, and the cultural adaptation of the recruitment and retention procedures. The article concludes with two sections describing a number of methodological concerns in the current research base and our proposed research agenda for improving ethnic minority inclusion that builds on the CTN experience. PMID:21988575

  16. Browse Title Index - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 7801 - 7850 of 11090 ... Vol 13, No 12 (2014), Optimization of chromium biosorption in aqueous solution by marine yeast biomass of Yarrowia lipolytica using Doehlert .... from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis using response surface methodology (RSM) combined with artificial neural network-genetic algorithm (ANN-GA) ...

  17. A Method for Analyzing the Business Case for Provider Participation in the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program and Similar Federally Funded Provider-Based Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L.; Song, Paula H.; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2011-01-01

    Background The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) efforts to increase enrollment in clinical trials. There is currently little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. This paper presents a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation and provides a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. Methods A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Results Key components of the business case include CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The value of incidental benefits is recognized as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation, but is not currently calculated. Conclusions Providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers’ understanding of the financial implications of participation. PMID:22213241

  18. Student Participation - Simulation or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the concept of student participation in learning processes within the health promoting schools approach. A model that distinguishes between token and genuine participation, which has been conceptualised on the basis of experience gained from the Macedonian Network of Health...

  19. Browsing Patterns of White-Tailed Deer Following Increased Timber Harvest and a Decline in Population Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn M. Crimmins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined browsing patterns of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus on a site in the central Appalachians that experienced a substantial (>50% reduction in deer population density and an increase in the amount of timber harvest since 2001. We sampled woody browse in and immediately adjacent to 12 clearcuts ranging in age from 0–5 years postharvest in summer 2007. Clearcut-interior areas had higher woody browse abundance and browsing rates than clearcut-edge or mature forest areas. Woody browse abundance was slightly higher within individual clearcuts than in 2001 at higher population densities and lower timber harvest rates. Overall browsing rates declined from approximately 17% in 2001 to less than 5% during our study, suggesting that the combination of deer population control, and increasing the amount of timber harvest across the landscape can reduce herbivory to levels that may not impede growth and survival of forest vegetation.

  20. Deriving percentage study weights in multi-parameter meta-analysis models: with application to meta-regression, network meta-analysis and one-stage individual participant data models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Richard D; Ensor, Joie; Jackson, Dan; Burke, Danielle L

    2017-01-01

    Many meta-analysis models contain multiple parameters, for example due to multiple outcomes, multiple treatments or multiple regression coefficients. In particular, meta-regression models may contain multiple study-level covariates, and one-stage individual participant data meta-analysis models may contain multiple patient-level covariates and interactions. Here, we propose how to derive percentage study weights for such situations, in order to reveal the (otherwise hidden) contribution of each study toward the parameter estimates of interest. We assume that studies are independent, and utilise a decomposition of Fisher's information matrix to decompose the total variance matrix of parameter estimates into study-specific contributions, from which percentage weights are derived. This approach generalises how percentage weights are calculated in a traditional, single parameter meta-analysis model. Application is made to one- and two-stage individual participant data meta-analyses, meta-regression and network (multivariate) meta-analysis of multiple treatments. These reveal percentage study weights toward clinically important estimates, such as summary treatment effects and treatment-covariate interactions, and are especially useful when some studies are potential outliers or at high risk of bias. We also derive percentage study weights toward methodologically interesting measures, such as the magnitude of ecological bias (difference between within-study and across-study associations) and the amount of inconsistency (difference between direct and indirect evidence in a network meta-analysis).

  1. Voice-controlled Internet Browsing for Motor-handicapped Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom; Aaskoven, Erik

    2006-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system has been designed and implemented in collaboration...... with an advisory board of motor-handicapped (potential) end-users and underlies a number of a priori defined design criteria: learnability and memorability rather than naturalness, minimal need for maintenance after release, support for "all" web standards (not just HTML conforming to certain "recommendations...

  2. Ungulate browsing maintains shrub diversity in the absence of episodic disturbance in seasonally-arid conifer forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak K Pekin

    Full Text Available Ungulates exert a strong influence on the composition and diversity of vegetation communities. However, little is known about how ungulate browsing pressure interacts with episodic disturbances such as fire and stand thinning. We assessed shrub responses to variable browsing pressure by cattle and elk in fuels treated (mechanical removal of fuels followed by prescribed burning and non-fuels treated forest sites in northeastern Oregon, US. Seven treatment paddocks were established at each site; three with cattle exclusion and low, moderate and high elk browsing pressure, three with elk exclusion and low, moderate and high cattle browsing pressure, and one with both cattle and elk exclusion. The height, cover and number of stems of each shrub species were recorded at multiple plots within each paddock at the time of establishment and six years later. Changes in shrub species composition over the six year period were explored using multivariate analyses. Generalized Linear Mixed Models were used to determine the effect of browsing pressure on the change in shrub diversity and evenness. Vegetation composition in un-browsed paddocks changed more strongly and in different trajectories than in browsed paddocks at sites that were not fuels treated. In fuels treated sites, changes in composition were minimal for un-browsed paddocks. Shrub diversity and evenness decreased strongly in un-browsed paddocks relative to paddocks with low, moderate and high browsing pressure at non-fuels treated sites, but not at fuels treated sites. These results suggest that in the combined absence of fire, mechanical thinning and ungulate browsing, shrub diversity is reduced due to increased dominance by certain shrub species which are otherwise suppressed by ungulates and/or fuels removal. Accordingly, ungulate browsing, even at low intensities, can be used to suppress dominant shrub species and maintain diversity in the absence of episodic disturbance events.

  3. Children's participation in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Danholt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Teledialogue is a combined research and design project aimed at improving communications between social workers and children under their custody living in foster care or youth institutions. While social workers are responsible for the welfare of placed children they are under heavy workload...... and often only communicate with children at biannual meetings - the minimum required by law. The purpose of Teledialogue is to use participatory methods to develop an IT-enabled concept for children and social workers to maintain communication between the biannual meetings. Social workers and children...... are thus the primary participants in this design process. This presentation describes the inclusion and participation of the placed children in Teledialogue. With an outset in Actor-Network Theory (ANT) two points are made: 1) that children were participating in shaping the design long before they were...

  4. VG2 URA PRA RESAMPLED SUMMARY BROWSE 48SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of edited browse data derived from an original dataset obtained from the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) instrument in the vicinity...

  5. VG2 NEP PRA RESAMPLED SUMMARY BROWSE 48SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of edited browse data derived from an original dataset obtained from the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) instrument in the vicinity...

  6. Seasonal variations in diet selection of Nguni goats: effects of physical and chemical traits of browse

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fomum, SW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Goats select some browse species more than others, given options. Seasonal trends of diet selection of Nguni goats indexed by intake were investigated in cafeteria-style experiments. The relationships between diet selection and plant chemical...

  7. A battery and network usage model for smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Smartphones have emerged into platforms with powerful computational capabilities that generate large amount of data. Smartphones have become an important part of our daily life and we use smartphones more frequently than we used desktop computers to stay connected on internet, reading news, playing games, browsing, watching video and staying connected with friends through social networking websites like Facebook and Tweeter. On the other hand the smartphones have a strict energy budget and li...

  8. Browse Title Index - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Gisselquist, John J Potterat, Stuart Brody. Vol 95, No 8 (2005):, HIV vaccine research - South Africa\\'s ethical-legal framework and its ability to promote the welfare of trial participants, Abstract PDF. Ann Strode, Catherine Slack, Muriel Mushariwa. Vol 91, No 7 (2001), HIV/AIDS - related knowledge, attitudes and ...

  9. Generalities in grazing and browsing ecology: using across-guild comparisons to control contingencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Johan T; Olff, Han

    2014-04-01

    In community ecology, broad-scale spatial replication can accommodate contingencies in patterns within species groups, but contingencies in processes across species groups remain problematic. Here, based on a focused review of grazing and browsing by large mammals, we use one trophic guild as a "control" for the other to identify generalities that are not contingent upon specific consumer-resource interactions. An example of such a generality is the Jarman-Bell principle, which explains how allometries of metabolism and digestion influence dietary tolerance and thereby enable resource partitioning within both guilds at multiple scales. By comparing the grazing succession with browsing stratification we show how competition from smaller herbivores, rather than facilitation from larger ones, is the underlying process structuring ungulate assemblages when shared resources become limiting. Also, grazing lawns and browsing hedges are functionally similar. In each case, plants expressing tolerance traits can withstand chronic grazing or browsing in sites where the nutritive value of the local food resource is enhanced in positive feedback to the actions of its consumers. The debate over whether ungulates accelerate or decelerate nutrient cycling can be resolved by comparing grazing and browsing effects in the same ecosystem type. Evidence from African savannas points to the rate of nutrient cycling being controlled by the mix of tolerance and resistance traits in plants; not the relative dominance of grazing or browsing by local herbivores. We recommend this across-guild comparative approach as a novel solution with widespread utility for resolving contingencies in community processes.

  10. The wireshark field guide analyzing and troubleshooting network traffic

    CERN Document Server

    Shimonski, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Wireshark Field Guide provides hackers, pen testers, and network administrators with practical guidance on capturing and interactively browsing computer network traffic. Wireshark is the world's foremost network protocol analyzer, with a rich feature set that includes deep inspection of hundreds of protocols, live capture, offline analysis and many other features. The Wireshark Field Guide covers the installation, configuration and use of this powerful multi-platform tool. The book give readers the hands-on skills to be more productive with Wireshark as they drill

  11. Participative Mindscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Katan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In parallel with my social activism, I introduced architecture into my kinetic art and participatory activism into my architecture. Flexibility and participation in architectural design has been a permanent feature of my practice, bringing new opportunities for self-expression in urban living. To form follows function I opposed form follows movement because it is man oriented while function is object oriented. After my 1962–1964 Mecanographs, machine-made images based on an interaction between the movement, the artist and the machine, I joined forces with Len Lye to determine what kind of positive attributes a Museum of Kinetic Art should have, defining three aspects of kinetic movement: illumination, sound, and physical movement. Vasarely and other kinetic artists put their mark on their time by promoting a form of social art, accessible to all, suggesting movement without actual movement. Walking through my medieval village can be a kinetic experience. The sense of wonder you feel at every corner compares with that of optical art. In the past decade, I moved toward a new form of participatory kinetic expression using state-of-the-art technology (plastics, LED, wireless devices. I view my kinetic work as an architectural experience and architecture as a stimulating kinetic experience.

  12. Networking Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    HIDA). Many of these alumni have and will in the future exchange ideas and keep contact not only to Japan, but also to fellow alumni around the globe and, thereby, practice south-south exchanges, which are made possible and traceable by their established alumni network and the World Network of Friends...... (WNF). Through the alumni network, Japan continues to infuse ideas to participants and alumni, who interpret and disseminate these ideas through alumni society networks and activities, but their discussions nationally and regionally also get reported back to Japan and affect future policies...

  13. Higher Education Scholars' Participation and Practices on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, G.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars participate in online social networks for professional purposes. In such networks, learning takes the form of participation and identity formation through engagement in and contribution to networked practices. While current literature describes the possible benefits of online participation, empirical research on scholars' use of online…

  14. The canary in the coal mine: Sprouts as a rapid indicator of browse impact in managed forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Royo; David W. Kramer; Karl V. Miller; Nathan P. Nibbelink; Susan L. Stout

    2016-01-01

    Forest managers are frequently confronted with sustaining vegetation diversity and structure in land-scapes experiencing high ungulate browsing pressure. Often, managers monitor browse damage and risk to plant communities using vegetation as indicators (i.e., phytoindicators). Although useful, the efficacy of traditional phytoindicators is sometimes hampered by limited...

  15. Browsing patterns of white-tailed deer following increased timber harvest and a decline in population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawn M. Crimmins; John W. Edwards; W. Mark Ford; Patrick D. Keyser; James M. Crum

    2010-01-01

    We examined browsing patterns of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on a site in the central Appalachians that experienced a substantial (>50%) reduction in deer population density and an increase in the amount of timber harvest since 2001. We sampled woody browse in and immediately adjacent to 12 clearcuts ranging in age from 0-5 years...

  16. SHRIMP (CRANGON-CRANGON L) BROWSING UPON SIPHON TIPS INHIBITS FEEDING AND GROWTH IN THE BIVALVE MACOMA-BALTHICA (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMERMANS, P; HUITEMA, HJ

    1994-01-01

    The influence of siphon browsing on the feeding behaviour and growth of Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding bivalve, was studied in three manipulative experiments. Browsing was simulated by removing part of the inhalant siphon with scissors, or studied by exposing the bivalves to shrimps (Crangon

  17. Basal area growth for aspen suckers under simulated browsing on Cedar Mountain, southern Utah, western United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Tshireletso; J. C. Malechek; D. L. Bartos

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of season and intensity of clipping using simulated browsing on suckers' (Populus tremulaides Michx.) basal area growth on Cedar Mountain, Southern Utah, Western United States of America. Three randomly selected stands measuring 70 m x 70 m were clear-felled in mid-July, 2005, and fenced. Simulated browsing...

  18. Technologies for Home Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A broad overview of the home networking field, ranging from wireless technologies to practical applications. In the future, it is expected that private networks (e.g. home networks) will become part of the global network ecosystem, participating in sharing their own content, running IP...

  19. Binary Classification Method of Social Network Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Poryadin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of research is a binary classification method of social network users based on the data analysis they have placed. Relevance of the task to gain information about a person by examining the content of his/her pages in social networks is exemplified. The most common approach to its solution is a visual browsing. The order of the regional authority in our country illustrates that its using in school education is needed. The article shows restrictions on the visual browsing of pupil’s pages in social networks as a tool for the teacher and the school psychologist and justifies that a process of social network users’ data analysis should be automated. Explores publications, which describe such data acquisition, processing, and analysis methods and considers their advantages and disadvantages. The article also gives arguments to support a proposal to study the classification method of social network users. One such method is credit scoring, which is used in banks and credit institutions to assess the solvency of clients. Based on the high efficiency of the method there is a proposal for significant expansion of its using in other areas of society. The possibility to use logistic regression as the mathematical apparatus of the proposed method of binary classification has been justified. Such an approach enables taking into account the different types of data extracted from social networks. Among them: the personal user data, information about hobbies, friends, graphic and text information, behaviour characteristics. The article describes a number of existing methods of data transformation that can be applied to solve the problem. An experiment of binary gender-based classification of social network users is described. A logistic model obtained for this example includes multiple logical variables obtained by transforming the user surnames. This experiment confirms the feasibility of the proposed method. Further work is to define a system

  20. Increased Participation and Conversation Using Networked Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Christopher; Meyer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    For many the phrase "teaching math online" evokes a vision of teaching and learning that is not based in physical classrooms. Perhaps teachers and students are even interacting asynchronously. In math classrooms in the United States, the increasing availability of devices (e.g. laptops, Chromebooks™, smartphones, and tablets) and…

  1. Student Participation: A Democratic Education perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health Promoting Schools, and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Netwo...... and token participation are presented and discussed in the paper. Underpinning values that these models endorse as important for the processes of health promotion in schools include self-determination, participation, democracy, diversity, and equity....

  2. Research on Browsing Behavior in the Libraries: An Empirical Analysis of Consequences, Success and Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Ju L. Chang

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Browsing as an important part of human information behavior has been observed and investigated in the context of information seeking in the library in general and has assumed greater importance in human-machine interaction in particular. However, the nature and consequences of browsing are not well understood, and little is known of the success rate of such behavior.In this research, exploratory empirical case studies from three types of libraries were conducted, using questionnaires, observation logs, interviews, and computer search logs, to derive the empirical evidence to understand, from the user point of view, what are the consequences of browsing, what constitutes successful browsing, and what factors influence the extent of browsing. Content analysis and statistical analysis were conducted to analyze and synthesize the data. The research results show: (1 There are nine categories of the consequence of browsing, including accidental findings, modification of information need, found the desirable information, learning, feeling relaxation/recreational, information gathering, keeping updated, satisfying curiosity, and not finding what is needed. (2 Four factors that produce successful browsing: intention, the amount or quality of information, the utility of what is found, and help for solving problem or making judgment. (3 Three types of reasons for unsuccessful experience in browsing: not finding what one wanted, inadequate volume or quality of information, and not finding some things useful or interesting. (4 Three types of reasons for partial success: found the intended object but not happy with the quality or amount of information in it, not finding what one wanted but discovering new or potential useful information, not accomplish one purpose but achieve another one given multiple purposes. (5 The influential factors that affect the extent one engages in browsing include browser’s time, scheme of information organization, proximity to

  3. Network Affordances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Audrey; Soon, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of network affordance within the context of network art. Building on Gibson's theory (Gibson, 1979) we understand affordance as the perceived and actual parameters of a thing. We expand on Gaver's affordance of predictability (Gaver, 1996) to include ecological...... and computational parameters of unpredictability. We illustrate the notion of unpredictability by considering four specific works that were included in a network art exhibiton, SPEED SHOW [2.0] Hong Kong. The paper discusses how the artworks are contingent upon the parameteric relations (Parisi, 2013......), of the network. We introduce network affordance as a dynamic framework that could articulate the experienced tension arising from the (visible) symbolic representation of computational processes and its hidden occurrences. We base our proposal on the experience of both organising the SPEED SHOW and participating...

  4. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), a drug, or their combination: differential therapeutics for persistent depressive disorder: a study protocol of an individual participant data network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Weitz, Erica S; Salanti, Georgia; Efthimiou, Orestis; Michalak, Johannes; Watanabe, Norio; Keller, Martin B; Kocsis, James H; Klein, Daniel N; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite important advances in psychological and pharmacological treatments of persistent depressive disorders in the past decades, their responses remain typically slow and poor, and differential responses among different modalities of treatments or their combinations are not well understood. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only psychotherapy that has been specifically designed for chronic depression and has been examined in an increasing number of trials against medications, alone or in combination. When several treatment alternatives are available for a certain condition, network meta-analysis (NMA) provides a powerful tool to examine their relative efficacy by combining all direct and indirect comparisons. Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis enables exploration of impacts of individual characteristics that lead to a differentiated approach matching treatments to specific subgroups of patients. Methods and analysis We will search for all randomised controlled trials that compared CBASP, pharmacotherapy or their combination, in the treatment of patients with persistent depressive disorder, in Cochrane CENTRAL, PUBMED, SCOPUS and PsycINFO, supplemented by personal contacts. Individual participant data will be sought from the principal investigators of all the identified trials. Our primary outcomes are depression severity as measured on a continuous observer-rated scale for depression, and dropouts for any reason as a proxy measure of overall treatment acceptability. We will conduct a one-step IPD-NMA to compare CBASP, medications and their combinations, and also carry out a meta-regression to identify their prognostic factors and effect moderators. The model will be fitted in OpenBUGS, using vague priors for all location parameters. For the heterogeneity we will use a half-normal prior on the SD. Ethics and dissemination This study requires no ethical approval. We will publish the findings in a peer

  5. Nutritional composition and condensed tannin concentration changes as browse leaves become litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Amanda; Muir, James P; Wolfe, Richard M

    2010-12-01

    The role of condensed tannins (CT) in ruminant nutrition and health makes changes in leaf litter (LL) after abscission of interest. This study compared the effect of different drying methods of green leaves (GL) with that of natural drying of LL on CT, fibre, crude protein (CP) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in nine Texas browse species. Leaves harvested before autumn shedding were oven-dried (OD) or freeze-dried (FD). Where different (P 0.05) from GL to LL, with CP concentrations ranging from 63 to 151 g kg(-1) in the latter. Browse LL had high nutritive value and CT concentrations, explaining why browsing ruminants utilise this feed resource. However, changes in nutrient and CT concentrations as leaves become litter in some species mean that information on one is not necessarily applicable to the other. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Engaged Youth in the Internet. The Role of Social Networks in Social Active Participation/ Jóvenes comprometidos en la Red: El papel de las redes sociales en la participación social activa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Galera, María-Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the analysis of the role that social networks play in civic, social mobilization and solidarity of Spanish young people, considering whether social networks are responsible...

  7. Semantic MEDLINE for discovery browsing: using semantic predications and the literature-based discovery paradigm to elucidate a mechanism for the obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairelli, Michael J; Miller, Christopher M; Fiszman, Marcelo; Workman, T Elizabeth; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Applying the principles of literature-based discovery (LBD), we elucidate the paradox that obesity is beneficial in critical care despite contributing to disease generally. Our approach enhances a previous extension to LBD, called "discovery browsing," and is implemented using Semantic MEDLINE, which summarizes the results of a PubMed search into an interactive graph of semantic predications. The methodology allows a user to construct argumentation underpinning an answer to a biomedical question by engaging the user in an iterative process between system output and user knowledge. Components of the Semantic MEDLINE output graph identified as "interesting" by the user both contribute to subsequent searches and are constructed into a logical chain of relationships constituting an explanatory network in answer to the initial question. Based on this methodology we suggest that phthalates leached from plastic in critical care interventions activate PPAR gamma, which is anti-inflammatory and abundant in obese patients.

  8. Social Media Membership, Browsing, and Profile Updating in a Representative U.S. Sample: Independent and Interdependent Effects of Big Five Traits and Aging and Social Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogg, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Guided by cybernetic perspectives on personality, the present work used a representative sample of U.S. adults (N = 992) to examine Big Five personality traits and social and aging factors as predictors of social media network membership and past-month browsing/searching and profile updating among members. The results showed adults who were less extraverted and less neurotic and who reported greater physical limitations were less likely to be members. Moreover, extraverted adults without partners were more likely to be members than introverted adults without partners. Among members, the results showed extraverted and emotionally stable younger and older adults reported a similar frequency of profile updating. In contrast, older adults with all other combinations of extraversion and neuroticism showed a reduced frequency of profile updating compared to younger adults. The findings are discussed in terms of social media involvement as a response of a self-regulatory system of personality adaptation. PMID:28713320

  9. Social Media Membership, Browsing, and Profile Updating in a Representative U.S. Sample: Independent and Interdependent Effects of Big Five Traits and Aging and Social Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogg, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Guided by cybernetic perspectives on personality, the present work used a representative sample of U.S. adults ( N = 992) to examine Big Five personality traits and social and aging factors as predictors of social media network membership and past-month browsing/searching and profile updating among members. The results showed adults who were less extraverted and less neurotic and who reported greater physical limitations were less likely to be members. Moreover, extraverted adults without partners were more likely to be members than introverted adults without partners. Among members, the results showed extraverted and emotionally stable younger and older adults reported a similar frequency of profile updating. In contrast, older adults with all other combinations of extraversion and neuroticism showed a reduced frequency of profile updating compared to younger adults. The findings are discussed in terms of social media involvement as a response of a self-regulatory system of personality adaptation.

  10. Litter and soil properties are not altered by invasive deer browsing in forests of NW Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relva, María Andrea; Castán, Elisa; Mazzarino, María Julia

    2014-01-01

    It is largely accepted that large mammalian herbivores can indirectly influence ecosystem properties by changing the quantity and quality of litter inputs to soil through selective browsing on plant communities. However, idiosyncratic effects (positive, neutral and negative) have been found for different vegetation types, herbivory and soil properties. In this study we tested whether browsing by exotic deer introduced into Patagonian forests 90 years ago alters physical, chemical and biological soil properties and litter quantity and quality. As in many terrestrial ecosystems, N is the main nutrient that limits plant growth in Patagonia. Consequently, any disturbance that alters the N cycle, such as changes in the type or intensity of herbivory, is expected to affect these forest ecosystems. We compared soil and total litter from inside and outside five 7-yr old exclosures located on Isla Victoria, Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi, Argentina. Despite introduced deer has significantly affected the composition, abundance and structure of the understory vegetation, we found no differences between browsed and unbrowsed areas in the physical (bulk density, moisture), chemical (pH, base cations, organic C and total N) and biological (potential microbial respiration and net N mineralization) soil properties. This could be attributable to the high capacity of volcanic soils to stabilize organic matter, buffering disturbance-induced changes. However, the quantity and quality (C, N and C/N ratio) of total litter were also not different between browsed and unbrowsed areas. Although non-significant differences were found between treatments in both compartments, litter and soil, most variables showed a slight trend toward higher values in unbrowsed areas. This suggests that 7 years of browsing exclusion would be not enough to detect changes induced by browsing, particularly in highly stable volcanic soils.

  11. Lifelong learning and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles; Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    in involvement of older people in voluntary social work as mentors for young people. The challenge of the ageing societies is quite often discussed as the ‘burden of the elderly’ and discussed as an economic problem. However, the challenge is not only economical. It is also a social and cultural challenge, among...... other things because a unilateral focus on the economic aspects may cause dissolution of the social cohesion and decrease in well-being for far too many people. The HEAR ME project aimed at developing strategies for lifelong learning and new roles for older people based on their competences, network...... and an assumed desire of generativity. Action learning seems to be an appropriate learning concept in relation to keeping older people engaged in the community. The authors thus point at participating and lifelong learning as part of the answers to the demographic challenges, and they suggest what you might call...

  12. Method of Performance-Aware Security of Unicast Communication in Hybrid Satellite Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Chowdhury, Ayan (Inventor); Baras, John S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and apparatus utilizes Layered IPSEC (LES) protocol as an alternative to IPSEC for network-layer security including a modification to the Internet Key Exchange protocol. For application-level security of web browsing with acceptable end-to-end delay, the Dual-mode SSL protocol (DSSL) is used instead of SSL. The LES and DSSL protocols achieve desired end-to-end communication security while allowing the TCP and HTTP proxy servers to function correctly.

  13. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), a drug, or their combination: differential therapeutics for persistent depressive disorder: a study protocol of an individual participant data network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toshi A; Schramm, Elisabeth; Weitz, Erica S; Salanti, Georgia; Efthimiou, Orestis; Michalak, Johannes; Watanabe, Norio; Cipriani, Andrea; Keller, Martin B; Kocsis, James H; Klein, Daniel N; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-05-04

    Despite important advances in psychological and pharmacological treatments of persistent depressive disorders in the past decades, their responses remain typically slow and poor, and differential responses among different modalities of treatments or their combinations are not well understood. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only psychotherapy that has been specifically designed for chronic depression and has been examined in an increasing number of trials against medications, alone or in combination. When several treatment alternatives are available for a certain condition, network meta-analysis (NMA) provides a powerful tool to examine their relative efficacy by combining all direct and indirect comparisons. Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis enables exploration of impacts of individual characteristics that lead to a differentiated approach matching treatments to specific subgroups of patients. We will search for all randomised controlled trials that compared CBASP, pharmacotherapy or their combination, in the treatment of patients with persistent depressive disorder, in Cochrane CENTRAL, PUBMED, SCOPUS and PsycINFO, supplemented by personal contacts. Individual participant data will be sought from the principal investigators of all the identified trials. Our primary outcomes are depression severity as measured on a continuous observer-rated scale for depression, and dropouts for any reason as a proxy measure of overall treatment acceptability. We will conduct a one-step IPD-NMA to compare CBASP, medications and their combinations, and also carry out a meta-regression to identify their prognostic factors and effect moderators. The model will be fitted in OpenBUGS, using vague priors for all location parameters. For the heterogeneity we will use a half-normal prior on the SD. This study requires no ethical approval. We will publish the findings in a peer-reviewed journal. The study results will contribute to more

  14. LINCS Canvas Browser: interactive web app to query, browse and interrogate LINCS L1000 gene expression signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Qiaonan; Flynn, Corey; Niepel, Mario; Hafner, Marc; Muhlich, Jeremy L; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Rouillard, Andrew D; Tan, Christopher M; Chen, Edward Y; Golub, Todd R; Sorger, Peter K; Subramanian, Aravind; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2014-07-01

    For the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS) project many gene expression signatures using the L1000 technology have been produced. The L1000 technology is a cost-effective method to profile gene expression in large scale. LINCS Canvas Browser (LCB) is an interactive HTML5 web-based software application that facilitates querying, browsing and interrogating many of the currently available LINCS L1000 data. LCB implements two compacted layered canvases, one to visualize clustered L1000 expression data, and the other to display enrichment analysis results using 30 different gene set libraries. Clicking on an experimental condition highlights gene-sets enriched for the differentially expressed genes from the selected experiment. A search interface allows users to input gene lists and query them against over 100 000 conditions to find the top matching experiments. The tool integrates many resources for an unprecedented potential for new discoveries in systems biology and systems pharmacology. The LCB application is available at http://www.maayanlab.net/LINCS/LCB. Customized versions will be made part of the http://lincscloud.org and http://lincs.hms.harvard.edu websites. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Instagram Use, Loneliness, and Social Comparison Orientation: Interact and Browse on Social Media, But Don't Compare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chia-Chen

    2016-12-01

    Ever since the emergence of social networking sites (SNSs), it has remained a question without a conclusive answer whether SNSs make people more or less lonely. To achieve a better understanding, researchers need to move beyond studying overall SNS usage. In addition, it is necessary to attend to personal attributes as potential moderators. Given that SNSs provide rich opportunities for social comparison, one highly relevant personality trait would be social comparison orientation (SCO), and yet this personal attribute has been understudied in social media research. Drawing on literature of psychosocial implications of social media use and SCO, this study explored associations between loneliness and various Instagram activities and the role of SCO in this context. A total of 208 undergraduate students attending a U.S. mid-southern university completed a self-report survey (M age  = 19.43, SD = 1.35; 78 percent female; 57 percent White). Findings showed that Instagram interaction and Instagram browsing were both related to lower loneliness, whereas Instagram broadcasting was associated with higher loneliness. SCO moderated the relationship between Instagram use and loneliness such that Instagram interaction was related to lower loneliness only for low SCO users. The results revealed implications for healthy SNS use and the importance of including personality traits and specific SNS use patterns to disentangle the role of SNS use in psychological well-being.

  16. Spatio-temporal variation in foodscapes modifies deer browsing impact on vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro A. Royo; David W. Kramer; Karl V. Miller; Nathan P. Nibbelink; Susan L. Stout

    2017-01-01

    Context. Ungulate browsers often alter plant composition and reduce diversity in forests worldwide, yet our ability to predict browse impact on vegetation remains equivocal. Theory suggests, however, that ungulate distribution and foraging impacts are shaped by scale-dependent decisions based on variation in habitat composition and structure...

  17. Deer browse resources of the Atomic Energy Commission's Savannah River project area

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Moore

    1967-01-01

    A procedure developed in Georgia was used to inventory the browse resources of the Atomic Energy Commission's Savannah River Project Area near Aiken, South Carolina. Through this procedure, the forest land manager is supplied with relative carrying capacity data for deer . If silvical practices can be related to habitat quality and quantity, he can adjust...

  18. Influence of molasses on the intake of browse by goats | Ng'ambi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two 3 x 3 Latin square design experiments with twelve growing goats (small East African crosses) in each were used to examine the influence of molasses on the intake by goats of browse offered with a supplement. The first experiment examined the responses in voluntary intake when molasses was sprayed onto Cassia ...

  19. InfoLink: analysis of Dutch broadcast news and cross-media browsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morang, Jeroen; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; van Hessen, Adrianus J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a cross-media browsing demonstrator named InfoLink is described. InfoLink automatically links the content of Dutch broadcast news videos to related information sources in parallel collections containing text and/or video. Automatic segmentation, speech recognition and available

  20. Manipulating sheep browsing levels on coyote willow (Salix exigua) with supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macronutrients and additives have been used to suppress or promote intake of upland tannin-containing browse species by livestock, but to our knowledge this technique has not been applied to sheep that feed on tannin-containing species in riparian areas. The objective of this study was to determine ...

  1. Phenotypic sex ratios of Atriplex canescens shrubs in relation to cattle browsing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres F. Cibils; David M. Swift; Richard H. Hart

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies conducted at our research site on the shortgrass steppe in Colorado showed that phenotypic sex ratios of tetraploid fourwing saltbush (Atriplex canescens Pursh [Nutt]) shrubs were less female biased in grazed pastures than in adjacent exclosures. The potential effects of cattle browsing on shrub sex ratios were studied both in the field and in a...

  2. Snow-mediated ptarmigan browsing and shrub expansion in arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken D. Tape; Rachel Lord; Hans-Peter Marshall; Roger W. Ruess

    2010-01-01

    Large, late-winter ptarmigan migrations heavily impact the shoot, plant, and patch architecture of shrubs that remain above the snow surface. Ptarmigan browsing on arctic shrubs was assessed in the vicinity of Toolik Lake, on the north side of the Brooks Range in Alaska. Data were collected in early May 2007, at maximum snow depth, after the bulk of the ptarmigan...

  3. Browse species from Ethiopia: role in methane reduction and nematode control in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengistu, Genet F.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to evaluate browse species collected from Ethiopia for preference by goats, and for their in vitro anthelmintic and methane (CH4) reduction properties. During the conduct of the studies observations were made warranting a further aim, to compare in

  4. Aspects of the feeding ecology of a browsing ruminant: the kudu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forbs form the preferred dietary component of the kudu (Tragelaphus sfrepsiceros). This preference was associated with the high nutrient content of their leaves and less fibrous stem material relative to trees and shrubs. Woody browse was most sought after during the early growing season when their new shoots are softest ...

  5. Test of localized nanagement for reducing deer browsing in forest regeneration areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brad F. Miller; Tyler A. Campbell; Ben R. Laseter; W.Mark Ford; Karl V. Miller

    2010-01-01

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) browsing in forest regeneration sites can affect current and future stand structure and species composition. Removal of deer social units (localized management) has been proposed as a strategy to alleviate deer overbrowsing in forest systems. We conducted an experimental localized removal in a high-density...

  6. Potential values of some non-leguminous browse plants as dry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest potential gas production, rate of gas production, metabolizable energy and short chain fatty acid were observed in S. mombin. From the result obtained, it is suggested that some of the browse species could be utilized by ruminants as feed supplement during both wet and dry seasons. S. mombin being high in ...

  7. Effect of elephant browsing on selected species of Acacia along the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elephant damage was assessed in 1,007 Acacia trees and responses between Acacia tortilis and A. kirkii in Ruaha National park were compared in 30 transects randomly placed in 38.8 km2 on the northern bank of Great Ruaha River (GRR) basing on six browsing categories and four debarking classes. There was no ...

  8. Development of Northern White-Cedar Regeneration Following Partial Cutting, with and without Deer Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Larouche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L. is an important commercial species with a high wildlife value, both as a food source and habitat for many bird and mammal species. Concerns have been expressed about its decreasing abundance across its range, and especially in mixedwood stands, where it has to compete with several other species and can suffer from heavy browsing. In this study, we quantified the development of natural northern white-cedar seedlings and saplings under various partial cutting regimes, with and without white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virgianus Zimmerman browsing, in three selected sites in Quebec (Canada and in Maine (USA. Our data show that northern white-cedar regeneration was present in all studied stands, but that only a few stems were taller than 30 cm on the two sites with high densities of deer. In the absence of heavy browsing, stems reached a height of 30 cm in 11 years, and 130 cm in 28 years. Height growth of northern white-cedar regeneration increased with canopy light transmittance, while ground-level diameter increment increased after partial cutting. This suggests that partial cutting can be used in mixedwood stands to release natural northern white-cedar regeneration, but also that the recruitment of northern white-cedar seedlings to larger size classes constitutes a major challenge in stands subject to heavy deer browsing.

  9. Common browse plants of the Georgia coastal plain: their chemical composition and contribution to cattle diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.K. Halls; F.E. Knox; V. A. Lazar

    1957-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consolidate avilable information on several important browse plants of the Georgia coastal plain so that their value and over-all contribution to cattle feed can be more fully assessed and compared to other kinds of forage. Numerous observation and notes pertaining to cattle diet were accumulated in the vicinity of the Alapaha...

  10. The Philosophy behind a (Danish) Voice-controlled Interface to Internet Browsing for motor-handicapped

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Tom

    2005-01-01

    The public-funded project "Indtal" ("Speak-it") has succeeded in developing a Danish voice-controlled utility for internet browsing targeting motor-handicapped users having difficulties using a standard keyboard and/or a standard mouse. The system underlies a number of a priori defined design...

  11. Generalities in grazing and browsing ecology : Using across-guild comparisons to control contingencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Toit, Johan T.; Olff, Han

    In community ecology, broad-scale spatial replication can accommodate contingencies in patterns within species groups, but contingencies in processes across species groups remain problematic. Here, based on a focused review of grazing and browsing by large mammals, we use one trophic guild as a

  12. Performance Analysis of 3G Communication Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Anwar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this project, third generation (3G technologies research had been carried out to design and optimization conditions for 3G network. The 3G wireless mobile communication networks are growing at an ever faster rate, and this is likely to continue in the foreseeable future. Some services such as e-mail, web browsing etc allow the transition of the network from circuit switched to packet switched operation, resulting in increased overall network performance. Higher reliability, better coverage and services, higher capacity, mobility management, and wireless multimedia are all parts of the network performance. Throughput and spectral efficiency are fundamental parameters in capacity planning for 3G cellular network deployments. This project investigates also the downlink (DL and uplink (UL throughput and spectral efficiency performance of the standard Universal Mobile Telecommunications system (UMTS system for different scenarios of user and different technologies. Power consumption comparison for different mobile technology is also discussed. The analysis can significantly help system engineers to obtain crucial performance characteristics of 3G network. At the end of the paper, coverage area of 3G from one of the mobile network in Malaysia is presented.

  13. Deer browsing delays succession by altering aboveground vegetation and belowground seed banks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio DiTommaso

    Full Text Available Soil seed bank composition is important to the recovery of natural and semi-natural areas from disturbance and serves as a safeguard against environmental catastrophe. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus populations have increased dramatically in eastern North America over the past century and can have strong impacts on aboveground vegetation, but their impacts on seed bank dynamics are less known. To document the long-term effects of deer browsing on plant successional dynamics, we studied the impacts of deer on both aboveground vegetation and seed bank composition in plant communities following agricultural abandonment. In 2005, we established six 15 × 15 m fenced enclosures and paired open plots in recently followed agricultural fields near Ithaca, NY, USA. In late October of each of six years (2005-2010, we collected soil from each plot and conducted seed germination cycles in a greenhouse to document seed bank composition. These data were compared to measurements of aboveground plant cover (2005-2008 and tree density (2005-2012. The impacts of deer browsing on aboveground vegetation were severe and immediate, resulting in significantly more bare soil, reduced plant biomass, reduced recruitment of woody species, and relatively fewer native species. These impacts persisted throughout the experiment. The impacts of browsing were even stronger on seed bank dynamics. Browsing resulted in significantly decreased overall species richness (but higher diversity, reduced seed bank abundance, relatively more short-lived species (annuals and biennials, and fewer native species. Both seed bank richness and the relative abundance of annuals/biennials were mirrored in the aboveground vegetation. Thus, deer browsing has long-term and potentially reinforcing impacts on secondary succession, slowing succession by selectively consuming native perennials and woody species and favoring the persistence of short-lived, introduced species that continually

  14. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN HEALTH DELIVERY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PHC system and its global programmes and strategies shaped community participation ... global front about the promotion of community participation in health,“ two decades after the Alma-Ata, the strategy ..... cific programmes define the nature of the collaboration and institutional networking. In most NGO programmes, ...

  15. Political Participation and Power Relations in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation...... and political power relations. The research employed a mixed methodology, comprised of a survey of 527 Egyptian youth and semi-structured interviews of 12 political activists and journalists. The results showed a significant relationship between reading newspapers and youth’s political participation......, but not between using social network sites and political participation. In addition, newspapers and social network sites were platforms for a series of conflicts and coalitions that emerged between pro- and anti-revolution actors. Despite the importance of social network sites as key tools for informing...

  16. NeuroTerrain--a client-server system for browsing 3D biomedical image data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Carl; Bug, William J; Nissanov, Jonathan

    2007-02-05

    Three dimensional biomedical image sets are becoming ubiquitous, along with the canonical atlases providing the necessary spatial context for analysis. To make full use of these 3D image sets, one must be able to present views for 2D display, either surface renderings or 2D cross-sections through the data. Typical display software is limited to presentations along one of the three orthogonal anatomical axes (coronal, horizontal, or sagittal). However, data sets precisely oriented along the major axes are rare. To make fullest use of these datasets, one must reasonably match the atlas' orientation; this involves resampling the atlas in planes matched to the data set. Traditionally, this requires the atlas and browser reside on the user's desktop; unfortunately, in addition to being monolithic programs, these tools often require substantial local resources. In this article, we describe a network-capable, client-server framework to slice and visualize 3D atlases at off-axis angles, along with an open client architecture and development kit to support integration into complex data analysis environments. Here we describe the basic architecture of a client-server 3D visualization system, consisting of a thin Java client built on a development kit, and a computationally robust, high-performance server written in ANSI C++. The Java client components (NetOStat) support arbitrary-angle viewing and run on readily available desktop computers running Mac OS X, Windows XP, or Linux as a downloadable Java Application. Using the NeuroTerrain Software Development Kit (NT-SDK), sophisticated atlas browsing can be added to any Java-compatible application requiring as little as 50 lines of Java glue code, thus making it eminently re-useable and much more accessible to programmers building more complex, biomedical data analysis tools. The NT-SDK separates the interactive GUI components from the server control and monitoring, so as to support development of non-interactive applications

  17. Anthelmintic activity of some Mediterranean browse plants against parasitic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolaraki, F; Sotiraki, S; Stefanakis, A; Skampardonis, V; Volanis, M; Hoste, H

    2010-04-01

    The anthelmintic properties of tannin-rich plants are being explored as an alternative to chemical drugs. Most data have been acquired on legume forages, but only few on browse plants. The present study aimed to (i) screen the in vitro effects of extracts from 7 Mediterranean plants on Haemonchus contortus, (ii) verify the role of tannins using an inhibitor, polyvinyl polypyrrolidone (PVPP) and (iii) verify the in vivo effects of extracts from 4 plants. Significant inhibition was shown in vitro using a larval migration inhibition (LMI) assay for all extracts except that from Olea europaea var. koroneiki. After adding PVPP, the LMI values were restored to control levels for all plants except Pistacia lentiscus and Ceratonia siliqua, confirming a role for tannins in the activity. In the in vivo experiment, 48 lambs composed 6 groups, depending on diet. On Day 0, groups G1-G5 received H. contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae and G6 remained uninfected. The various diets were distributed from Days 14 to 45: P. lentiscus (G1), Quercus coccifera (G2), C. siliqua (G3), Onobrychis viciifolia (G4), or Medicago sativa for the 2 control groups (G5, G6). Egg excretion, packed cell volumes (PCVs) and inorganic phosphate were measured weekly throughout the entire experimental period. At slaughter, the worms were enumerated and their fecundity assessed. Consumption of the 4 browser plants did not provoke differences in pathophysiological measurements but there were significant decreases in egg excretion, mainly explained by significant decreases in worm fecundity for both species, without any statistical difference in worm numbers.

  18. Observing Strategies Used by Children When Selecting Books to Browse, Read or Borrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahranah A. Raqi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper described 1. the investigation undertaken to trace the strategies used by children in selecting books to borrow, use or browse in two children’s public libraries, and 2. map the information seeking patterns adopted by the selected children. The sample comprised 43 children who used the Bayan Budiman Children’s Library, Petaling Jaya and the Kuala Lumpur Children’s Library. The children were randomly chosen, aged between 7 and 12 and comprised those who entered the library with the observed behaviour of selecting books to browse, use or borrow. Two stages were used to collect data; 1. observing the children’s behavior as they enter the library to the point when they pick up a book to browse, read or borrow for fifteen to twenty minutes and 2. interviewing those selected with a semi-structure questionnaire. Belkin, et al’s (1993 information search strategy (ISS dimensions were used to transcribe children’s browsing and selecting behavior. Based on the observations and interviews respondent’s behaviour was mapped to illustrate the children’s choosing process. The findings indicated that 1. browsing was the most popular method used when choosing a book combined with various strategies such as looking for a book by an author or series, finding a book by subjects, visually or physically scanning and recognizing the physical composition of the book; 2. children based their selection on the storyline, illustrations, cover designs and typography of the books; and 3. the searching behaviour is likely to be non-linear in nature. The majority of the children faced no problems in choosing or locating a book as most are regular visitors. A few indicated being overwhelmed by the library’s large collection or, face initial confusion before they started to browse and interact with resources. Children used visual cues rather from textual information when searching for books, inferring that children libraries need to be supported with

  19. Chronic over browsing and biodiversity collapse in a forest understory in Pennsylvania: Results from a 60 year-old deer exclusion plot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Goetsch; Jennifer Wigg; Alejandro A. Royo; Todd Ristau; Walter P. Carson

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of chronic deer over browsing on the diversity and abundance of understory forbs and shrubs within a forest stand in the Allegheny High Plateau Region of Pennsylvania by comparing vegetation inside a 60-year-old exclosure to vegetation within an adjacent reference site. This is the oldest known exclosure in the Eastern Deciduous Forest. Browsing...

  20. Information diffusion in structured online social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Zhang, Yini; Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, due to the word-of-mouth effect, online social networks have been considered to be efficient approaches to conduct viral marketing, which makes it of great importance to understand the diffusion dynamics in online social networks. However, most research on diffusion dynamics in epidemiology and existing social networks cannot be applied directly to characterize online social networks. In this paper, we propose models to characterize the information diffusion in structured online social networks with push-based forwarding mechanism. We introduce the term user influence to characterize the average number of times that messages are browsed which is incurred by a given type user generating a message, and study the diffusion threshold, above which the user influence of generating a message will approach infinity. We conduct simulations and provide the simulation results, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis results perfectly. These results are of use in understanding the diffusion dynamics in online social networks and also critical for advertisers in viral marketing who want to estimate the user influence before posting an advertisement.

  1. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  2. Book Shelf virtual browse interface and searching for records with physical copies on CDS

    CERN Document Server

    Amanor, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This project provided the opportunity to learn how the CERN Document Server functions by creating a local invenio instance. With the python programming language, a feature was implemented on CDS in conjunction with other developers. This feature makes it possible for CDS users to search for records using their shelf number and for records which have a physical copy attached to them. This was done by adding the fields 852__2, 852__h and 340__p, obtained from a bibicirculation module’s database table to the marc data of the records. Research was also done into ways of creating a virtual browsing system for CDS users to quickly browse through shelves of books while online.

  3. Remote sensing information sciences research group: Browse in the EOS era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John E.; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of science data browse was examined. Given the tremendous data volumes that are planned for future space missions, particularly the Earth Observing System in the late 1990's, the need for access to large spatial databases must be understood. Work was continued to refine the concept of data browse. Further, software was developed to provide a testbed of the concepts, both to locate possibly interesting data, as well as view a small portion of the data. Build II was placed on a minicomputer and a PC in the laboratory, and provided accounts for use in the testbed. Consideration of the testbed software as an element of in-house data management plans was begun.

  4. Subjective Evaluation of Packet Service Performance in UMTS and Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teyeb, Oumer Mohammed; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard; Mogensen, Preben

    2006-01-01

    Quality of Service (QoS) in mobile telecommunication systems is usually identified by some basic performance metrics such as delay, throughput and jitter. However, the main impact of service quality is on the end user, and as such a detailed study of service performance should involve the end user....... In this paper, such an approach is taken where subjective performance evaluation is undertaken for web browsing and video streaming services in Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS) and a heterogeneous network comprised of UMTS and Wireless LAN (WLAN). Using a real-time network emulation testbed...

  5. Why should a grazer browse? Livestock impact on winter resource use by bharal Pseudois nayaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Kulbhushansingh Ramesh; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Mishra, Charudutt

    2010-02-01

    Many mammalian herbivores show a temporal diet variation between graminoid-dominated and browse-dominated diets. We determined the causes of such a diet shift and its implications for conservation of a medium-sized ungulate-the bharal Pseudois nayaur. Past studies show that the bharal diet is dominated by graminoids (>80%) during summer, but the contribution of graminoids declines to about 50% in winter. We tested the predictions generated by two alternative hypotheses explaining the decline: low graminoid availability during winter causes bharal to include browse in their diet; bharal include browse, with relatively higher nutritional quality, in their diet to compensate for the poor quality of graminoids during winter. We measured winter graminoid availability in areas with no livestock grazing, areas with relatively moderate livestock grazing, and those with intense livestock grazing pressures. The chemical composition of plants contributing to the bharal diet was analysed. The bharal diet was quantified through signs of feeding on vegetation at feeding locations. Population structures of bharal populations were recorded using a total count method. Graminoid availability was highest in areas without livestock grazing, followed by areas with moderate and intense livestock grazing. The bharal diet was dominated by graminoids (73%) in areas with highest graminoid availability. Graminoid contribution to the bharal diet declined monotonically (50, 36%) with a decline in graminoid availability. Bharal young to female ratio was 3 times higher in areas with high graminoid availability than areas with low graminoid availability. The composition of the bharal winter diet was governed predominantly by the availability of graminoids in the rangelands. Our results suggest that bharal include more browse in their diet during winter due to competition from livestock for graminoids. Since livestock grazing reduces graminoid availability, creation of livestock-free areas is

  6. Spectral images browsing using principal component analysis and set partitioning in hierarchical tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Zhao, Deping

    2011-12-01

    Spectral imaging technology have been used mostly in remote sensing, but have recently been extended to new area requiring high fidelity color reproductions like telemedicine, e-commerce, etc. These spectral imaging systems are important because they offer improved color reproduction quality not only for a standard observer under a particular illuminantion, but for any other individual exhibiting normal color vision capability under another illuminantion. A possibility for browsing of the archives is needed. In this paper, the authors present a new spectral image browsing architecture. The architecture for browsing is expressed as follow: (1) The spectral domain of the spectral image is reduced with the PCA transform. As a result of the PCA transform the eigenvectors and the eigenimages are obtained. (2) We quantize the eigenimages with the original bit depth of spectral image (e.g. if spectral image is originally 8bit, then quantize eigenimage to 8bit), and use 32bit floating numbers for the eigenvectors. (3) The first eigenimage is lossless compressed by JPEG-LS, the other eigenimages were lossy compressed by wavelet based SPIHT algorithm. For experimental evalution, the following measures were used. We used PSNR as the measurement for spectral accuracy. And for the evaluation of color reproducibility, ΔE was used.here standard D65 was used as a light source. To test the proposed method, we used FOREST and CORAL spectral image databases contrain 12 and 10 spectral images, respectively. The images were acquired in the range of 403-696nm. The size of the images were 128*128, the number of bands was 40 and the resolution was 8 bits per sample. Our experiments show the proposed compression method is suitable for browsing, i.e., for visual purpose.

  7. Intensive Cleaning Increses Sapling Growth and Browse Production in the Southern Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino Della-Bianca

    1969-01-01

    All woody stems except selected crop trees were cut in an 11-year-old mixed-hardwood sapling stand in the Southern Appalachians to determine the effect of intensive cleaning on crop-tree growth and deer-browse production. During the 6-year post-cleaning period, crop trees in uncleaned compartments produced significantly more basal area and grew more in diameter than...

  8. Effect of browsing on willow in the Steel Creek grazing allotment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigley, R.B.; Gale, Gil

    2000-01-01

    The Steel Creek drainage serves as both wildlife range (primarily moose and elk) and as a livestock grazing allotment. For some years there has been concern about the effect of browsing on willows. Dense clusters of twigs have formed at the end of branches; entire stems of some plants have died. As of 1996, the relative impacts attributable to each of the ungulate species had not been documented.

  9. [Discussion paper participation research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Erik

    2012-12-01

    This contribution introduces the "Diskussionspapier Teilhabeforschung" (discussion paper participation research) of the German Association for Rehabilitation (DVfR) and German Society for Rehabilitation Science (DGRW). The aim of this paper is to more clearly define current scientific research activity on the subject of participation and the significance of interdisciplinary participation research. The authors emphasise the desirability of a stronger scientific basis for instruments designed to improve the participation of disabled individuals. The paper is meant to be understood as an initial basis for the discussion about participation research development, and the authors are open to suggestions and elaboration.Participation research is understood in this discussion paper as an interdisciplinary research field with 7 goals and characteristics: 1. focussing on participation and self-determination; 2. contextual approach (taking environmental and personal factors into consideration that affect participation); 3. the participation of disabled persons in participation research; 4. interdisciplinary cooperation; 5. involving organisations and institutions whose approaches to participation research overlap; 6. referring to social and healthcare policies; 7. national and international orientations.The authors discuss the rationale behind increasing the support for participation research and theoretical models thereof. Fundamental concepts with high relevance to participation research include the biopsychosocial model of the International Classification of Functionality, Disability and Health (ICF), the inclusion concept, empowerment concept, and capabilities concept. The authors conclude their paper with recommendations for strengthening the research funding for participation research, and specify concrete steps toward greater participation research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...

  11. Procedure for audio-assisted browsing of news video using generalized sound recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakaran, Ajay; Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Xiong, Ziyou; Casey, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In Casey describes a generalized sound recognition framework based on reduced rank spectra and Minimum-Entropy Priors. This approach enables successful recognition of a wide variety of sounds such as male speech, female speech, music, animal sounds etc. In this work, we apply this recognition framework to news video to enable quick video browsing. We identify speaker change positions in the broadcast news using the sound recognition framework. We combine the speaker change position with color & motion cues from video and are able to locate the beginning of each of the topics covered by the news video. We can thus skim the video by merely playing a small portion starting from each of the locations where one of the principal cast begins to speak. In combination with our motion-based video browsing approach, our technique provides simple automatic news video browsing. While similar work has been done before, our approach is simpler and faster than competing techniques, and provides a rich framework for further analysis and description of content.

  12. Search the Audio, Browse the Video—A Generic Paradigm for Video Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Alon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of digital video being shot, captured, and stored is growing at a rate faster than ever before. The large amount of stored video is not penetrable without efficient video indexing, retrieval, and browsing technology. Most prior work in the field can be roughly categorized into two classes. One class is based on image processing techniques, often called content-based image and video retrieval, in which video frames are indexed and searched for visual content. The other class is based on spoken document retrieval, which relies on automatic speech recognition and text queries. Both approaches have major limitations. In the first approach, semantic queries pose a great challenge, while the second, speech-based approach, does not support efficient video browsing. This paper describes a system where speech is used for efficient searching and visual data for efficient browsing, a combination that takes advantage of both approaches. A fully automatic indexing and retrieval system has been developed and tested. Automated speech recognition and phonetic speech indexing support text-to-speech queries. New browsable views are generated from the original video. A special synchronized browser allows instantaneous, context-preserving switching from one view to another. The system was successfully used to produce searchable-browsable video proceedings for three local conferences.

  13. ABC: software for interactive browsing of genomic multiple sequence alignment data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaravelu Senthil AG

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alignment and comparison of related genome sequences is a powerful method to identify regions likely to contain functional elements. Such analyses are data intensive, requiring the inclusion of genomic multiple sequence alignments, sequence annotations, and scores describing regional attributes of columns in the alignment. Visualization and browsing of results can be difficult, and there are currently limited software options for performing this task. Results The Application for Browsing Constraints (ABC is interactive Java software for intuitive and efficient exploration of multiple sequence alignments and data typically associated with alignments. It is used to move quickly from a summary view of the entire alignment via arbitrary levels of resolution to individual alignment columns. It allows for the simultaneous display of quantitative data, (e.g., sequence similarity or evolutionary rates and annotation data (e.g. the locations of genes, repeats, and constrained elements. It can be used to facilitate basic comparative sequence tasks, such as export of data in plain-text formats, visualization of phylogenetic trees, and generation of alignment summary graphics. Conclusions The ABC is a lightweight, stand-alone, and flexible graphical user interface for browsing genomic multiple sequence alignments of specific loci, up to hundreds of kilobases or a few megabases in length. It is coded in Java for cross-platform use and the program and source code are freely available under the General Public License. Documentation and a sample data set are also available http://mendel.stanford.edu/sidowlab/downloads.html.

  14. Search the Audio, Browse the Video—A Generic Paradigm for Video Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Arnon; Srinivasan, Savitha; Efrat, Alon

    2003-12-01

    The amount of digital video being shot, captured, and stored is growing at a rate faster than ever before. The large amount of stored video is not penetrable without efficient video indexing, retrieval, and browsing technology. Most prior work in the field can be roughly categorized into two classes. One class is based on image processing techniques, often called content-based image and video retrieval, in which video frames are indexed and searched for visual content. The other class is based on spoken document retrieval, which relies on automatic speech recognition and text queries. Both approaches have major limitations. In the first approach, semantic queries pose a great challenge, while the second, speech-based approach, does not support efficient video browsing. This paper describes a system where speech is used for efficient searching and visual data for efficient browsing, a combination that takes advantage of both approaches. A fully automatic indexing and retrieval system has been developed and tested. Automated speech recognition and phonetic speech indexing support text-to-speech queries. New browsable views are generated from the original video. A special synchronized browser allows instantaneous, context-preserving switching from one view to another. The system was successfully used to produce searchable-browsable video proceedings for three local conferences.

  15. Improving participation rates by providing choice of participation mode: two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijmans, Naomi; van Lieshout, Jan; Wensing, Michel

    2015-04-02

    Low participation rates reduce effective sample size, statistical power and can increase risk for selection bias. Previous research suggests that offering choice of participation mode can improve participation rates. However, few head-to-head trials compared choice of participation mode using telephone interviews and postal questionnaires as modes of interest. Aiming to explore effects of choice of participation, two randomized controlled trials were performed comparing participation rates of patients provided with and without choice of participation mode, using interviews and questionnaires as participation modes. Two trials were embedded in a larger study on cardiovascular risk management in primary care. Patients with a chronic cardiovascular condition recruited for the larger study were invited to participate in an additional survey on social networks, using invitations with and without choice of participation mode. Primary outcome was participation rate. Other outcomes of interest were participation rate conditional on willingness to participate, and initial willingness to participate. In trial 1 we compared outcomes after choice of participation mode (interview or questionnaire) with invitations for participation in a telephone interview. In Trial 2 results for choice of participation mode were compared with postal questionnaires. In Trial 1 no differences were found in participation rates (65% vs 66%, p = 0.853) although conditional participation rate was highest for interviews (90% vs 72%, p choice of participation mode was provided (90% versus 73%, p choice of participation mode was provided (59% vs 46%, p choice of participation mode had benefit on participation rates compared to invitations to participate in questionnaires, but not when compared to invitations to participate in telephone interviews. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89237105 .

  16. User participation in implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical...... system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff...... experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need...

  17. Connecting Participant Observation Positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCurdy, Patrick; Uldam, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue for the importance of considering participant observation roles in relation to both insider/outsider and overt/covert roles. Through combining key academic debates on participant observation, which have separately considered insider/outsider and overt/covert participant...... observation, we develop a reflexive framework to assist researchers in (1) locating the type of participant observation research; (2) identifying implications of participant observation for both the research and the subjects under study; and (3) reflecting on how one’s role as participant observer shifts over...

  18. Learning Networks, Networked Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter; Berlanga, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Sloep, P. B., & Berlanga, A. J. (2011). Learning Networks, Networked Learning [Redes de Aprendizaje, Aprendizaje en Red]. Comunicar, XIX(37), 55-63. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-05

  19. Politician2.0 on Facebook: Information Behavior and Dissemination on Social Networking Sites – Gaps and Best-Practice. Evaluation Results of a novel eParticipation toolbox to let politicians engage with citizens online.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wandhoefer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers our findings on information behavior and dissemination of parliamentary decision-makers in terms of using Social Networking Sites like Facebook. The article investigates why politicians use those technologies and integrate them more and more in their everyday workflow. In addition to the purpose of social network usage, the focus of our paper is also on best practices and how to deal with challenges like authenticity of politicians’ online profiles. The results presented within the remit of this paper are the outcome of 16 semi-structured interviews that took place as part of an evaluation effort within the EU research project WeGov [1]. The overall aim of the project is to develop a toolbox that enriches the dialogue between citizens and politicians on the web.

  20. Participation and agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe.......The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe....

  1. Citizen participation manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-13

    The Office of Consumer Affairs has the primary responsibility for managing and coordinating the public-participation efforts of the Department of Energy through public meetings, advisory committee participation, and other outreach mechanisms aimed at assuring all citizens an opportunity to participate in the governmental process relating to energy decisions. The Manual outlines the public-participation policy that should be followed by all offices. All offices are directed to observe the guidance in the manual in shaping and conducting public-participation activities, including the public-participation efforts required by DOE Order 2030, Procedures for the Development and Analysis of Regulations, Standards, and Guidelines. Two chapters included are: Determining Public Participation Needs and Public Participation Plan. (MCW)

  2. Meet Clinical Trial Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Meet Clinical Trial Participants Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table ... Articles Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All / Meet Clinical Trial Participants / North Carolinians Volunteer for Knee ...

  3. Labor Force Participation Rate

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This thematic map presents the labor force participation rate of working-age people in the United States in 2010. The 2010 Labor Force Participation Rate shows the...

  4. Participation in adult learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This entry presents an internationally comparative overview of adult learning patterns. Emphasis is placed on who is participating in adult learning and the observed unequal chances to participate. The entry covers three overarching questions that are central to participation research: a) What...

  5. Representing Participation in ICT4D Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. P.; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    How do the discourses of participation inform deployment of information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D)? Discourses here mean narratives that assign roles to actors, and specify causes and outcomes for events. Based on the theory and practice of international development we...... identify two dimensions to participation and ICT4D: whether participation 1) is hierarchical/top-down or agent-driven/bottom-up, and 2) involves conflict or cooperation. Based on these dimensions we articulate four ideal types of discourse that permeate ICT and development efforts: stakeholder......-based discourses that emphasize consensus, networked efforts among actors collaborating in network arrangements, mobilization discourses that account for contestation over meanings of participation, and oppositional discourses from ׳grassroots׳ actors that also include conflict. We conclude that ICT4D efforts...

  6. Active Versus Passive Academic Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Rajeev K.; Grimpe, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines determinants of networking by academics. Using information from a unique large survey of German researchers, the key contribution focuses on the active versus passive networking distinction. Is active networking by researchers a substitute or a complement to passive networking...... that some types of passive academic networking are complementary to active networking, while others are substitute. Further, we find differences in factors promoting participation in European conferences versus conferences in rest of the world. Finally, publishing bottlenecks as a group generally do...... not appear to be a hindrance to active networking. Implications for academic policy are discussed...

  7. Browsing, Understanding, and Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Pankratz, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    just by integrating new data sets, but also by improving its data management and presentation. This means assigning unique identifiers to data sets and the granules that constitute them, which will support better identification and citation of our data sets. We will explore identification issues and solutions related to the dynamic generation of new data sets enabled by LaTiS. We are also improving the access to our metadata, including semantically enabling the site so that our data can be discovered, related concepts can be explored, our inventory can be browsed and searched, and our data understood well enough to be understood and used appropriately. This poster will describe the current state of LISIRD, provide details of the data sets it serves, demonstrate the role of the LaTiS middleware, discuss the assignment of unique identifiers to our data products, describe plans for integration of a semantically metadata database, and address other related aspects of serving spectral and other time series data.

  8. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  9. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  10. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  11. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  12. ENLIGHT Network

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques borrowed from particle accelerators and detectors are a key element in hadrontherapy and several European projects are actively fostering the collaboration amongst the various disciplines and countries. ENLIGHT was established in 2002 to coordinate these European efforts in hadron therapy. The ENLIGHT network is formed by the European hadrontherapy Community, with more than 300 participants from twenty European countries. A major achievement of ENLIGHT has been the blending of traditionally separate communities so that clinicians, physicists, biologists and engineers with experience and interest in particle therapy are working together.

  13. Predicting User Participation in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Erlandsson, Fredrik; Borg, Anton; Johnson, Henric; Bródka, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Online social networking services like Facebook provides a popular way for users to participate in different communication groups and discuss relevant topics with each other. While users tend to have an impact on each other, it is important to better understand and ...

  14. Underage Children and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Shalynn; Cooke, Bethany; McVey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Despite minimum age requirements for joining popular social networking services such as Facebook, many students misrepresent their real ages and join as active participants in the networks. This descriptive study examines the use of social networking services (SNSs) by children under the age of 13. The researchers surveyed a sample of 199…

  15. eParticipation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an update of the existing eParticipation research state of the art, and a longitudinal analysis of the development of the eParticipation field based on a shared framework of analysis. Drawing on a literature search covering the period from April 2006 to March 2011 included, 123...... articles are identified, analysed and classified within the categories of eParticipation actors, activities, contextual factors, effects, and evaluation. Findings show that the field has a high level of dynamism, as focuses on eParticipation activities, contextual factors and effects have shifted in time...

  16. Children's participation in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström professor m.so., Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the 10 planning of/and participation in both education...

  17. Participation beyond observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    , however, the researchers typically uphold the notion that all they methodically engage in is participant observation. The paper argues that important aspects of children’s living and understanding may be lost when considering them mere objects of one’s visual and verbal research practices. First I delve...... on investigating children’s perspectives through participant observation, but also ontological and political ones....

  18. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  19. The body participating:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Hanne; Lund, Lone Blak; Jensen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The literature on participation in rehabilitation by those with the most severe acquired brain injury is very sparse. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore how physiotherapists promote the participation of patients with severe brain injury in therapeutic and daily-...

  20. The tissue micro-array data exchange specification: a web based experience browsing imported data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayers Leona W

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR is an HIV/AIDS tissue bank consortium sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD. The ACSR offers to approved researchers HIV infected biologic samples and uninfected control tissues including tissue cores in micro-arrays (TMA accompanied by de-identified clinical data. Researchers interested in the type and quality of TMA tissue cores and the associated clinical data need an efficient method for viewing available TMA materials. Because each of the tissue samples within a TMA has separate data including a core tissue digital image and clinical data, an organized, standard approach to producing, navigating and publishing such data is necessary. The Association for Pathology Informatics (API extensible mark-up language (XML TMA data exchange specification (TMA DES proposed in April 2003 provides a common format for TMA data. Exporting TMA data into the proposed format offers an opportunity to implement the API TMA DES. Using our public BrowseTMA tool, we created a web site that organizes and cross references TMA lists, digital "virtual slide" images, TMA DES export data, linked legends and clinical details for researchers. Microsoft Excel® and Microsoft Word® are used to convert tabular clinical data and produce an XML file in the TMA DES format. The BrowseTMA tool contains Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT scripts that convert XML data into Hyper-Text Mark-up Language (HTML web pages with hyperlinks automatically added to allow rapid navigation. Results Block lists, virtual slide images, legends, clinical details and exports have been placed on the ACSR web site for 14 blocks with 1623 cores of 2.0, 1.0 and 0.6 mm sizes. Our virtual microscope can be used to view and annotate these TMA images. Researchers can readily navigate from TMA block lists to TMA legends and to clinical details for a selected tissue core

  1. Depression and Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument-whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group.

  2. Depression and Political Participation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  3. Enhancing Political Participation in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd George Waller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Youth participation through political talk appears to be shifting to the online public sphere in many parts of the world. Many attribute this shift to online social networks such as Facebook. Emerging research seem to suggest that this may be a cure for the problem of political apathy among the youth. This study explores such a possibility in Jamaica. In all, 752 youth ages 15 to 24 were surveyed to ascertain whether Facebook encourages political talk among this age cohort, and what if any are the primary factors that discourage this practice. The findings suggest that (a Facebook is an extension of offline political talk among the civically engaged and politically charged youth of Jamaica; (b Facebook does not substantively encourage political talk among the politically apathetic Jamaican youth; and (c fear of political victimization is the primary factor that discourages many Jamaican youth to engage in political talk on Facebook.

  4. ImBrowse.NET - A Software System for Image Database Search

    OpenAIRE

    Bjelkholm, Joel Erving

    2007-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval systems rely on computer vision to find images based on visual content rather than predefined keywords. Using images as input as opposed to text can provide the user with a novel and in some senses more intuitive way of searching for images. ImBrowse.NET is a platform for developing content-based image retrieval methods. It takes the form of an extendible stand-alone application, written using the Microsoft .NET 3.0 Framework. The application employs principal co...

  5. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Jose Echevarria; Jonathan Ruiz-de-Garibay; Jon Legarda; Maite Álvarez; Ana Ayerbe; Juan Ignacio Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based...

  6. Total design of participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of design as an art made not only for the people, but also by the people is an old dream going back at least to William Morris. It is, however, reappearing vigoriously in many kinds of design activism and grows out of the visions of a Total Design of society. The ideas of participation...... for? To which degree should everyone be educated in ’design literacy’ to participate? Total design of participation is an artistic intervention in society and must be discussed in this utopian tradition....

  7. From understanding to participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents some methodological considerations around the topic of the AFinLA 2012 Autumn Symposium: Multimodal discourses of participation. The aim is to shed theoretical and analytical light on embodied participation in material settings. The research is placed in a relational perspective......, multimodal process in which language together with bodily senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste) and a sense of place contribute to a phenomenon being recognized (as shared). Participation can result in inclusion or exclusion, a claim which is discussed with the help of a pilot study from...

  8. Contact Quality in Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Jensen, Olav Storm

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the concept of participation from the perspective of quality of the contact in the communicative interactions between participants. We argue for the need for an academic-personal competence that qualifies the human contact central in all Participatory Design (PD) activities as a way...... to contribute to “an era of participation.” We describe a contact perspective in PD developed through a collaboration with body-oriented psychotherapeutic research that have specialized experiences in investigating open-minded contact and authentic meetings as body-related experiences....

  9. Characterizing eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanford, Clive Carlton; Rose, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    eParticipation is an emerging research area which, like most emerging areas, lacks a clear literature base or research approach. This study maps out some of the academic theories and disciplines that the new area addresses, using conventional literature study techniques. We identify 99 articles...... that are considered to be highly relevant to eParticipation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging research area, and use this schema to identify key academic articles that help to define eParticipation. We adapt Deetz's [(1996). Describing differences...

  10. Web-Browsing Competencies of Pre-Service Adult Facilitators: Implications for Curriculum Transformation and Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa, Ofoegbu; Ugwu, Agboeze Matthias; Ihebuzoaju, Anyanwu Joy; Uche, Asogwa

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the Web-browsing competencies of pre-service adult facilitators in the southeast geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Survey design was adopted for the study. The population consists of all pre-service adult facilitators in all the federal universities in the southeast geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Accidental sampling technique was…

  11. Outdoor Urban Propagation Experiment of a Handset MIMO Antenna with a Human Phantom located in a Browsing Stance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Hayashi, Toshiteru; Ogawa, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    Outdoor radio propagation experiments are presented at 2.4 GHz, using a handset MIMO antenna with two monopoles and two planar inverted-F antennas (PIFAs), adjacent to a human phantom in browsing stance. The propagation test was performed in an urban area of a city, which resulted in non lineof...

  12. Condensed tannins reduce browsing and increase grazing time of free-ranging goats in semi-arid savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkhize, NR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available . While accounting for the effects of the time of the day and season, we tested the hypothesis that goats exposed to high levels of condensed tannins (i) spend less of their foraging time browsing, (ii) spend more time grazing, and (iii) reduce their total...

  13. 2004 progress report : Effects of ungulate browsing on post-fire recovery of riparian cottonwoods : Implications for management of riparian forests, Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge, Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Browsing pressure by ungulates may limit natural establishment of native cottonwood and willow stands, and fires, which have become more frequent on riparian lands...

  14. Participative Management at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Business Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This interview with the chief executive of Donnelly Mirrors, Inc. explains the basis of the company's leadership in participative management and discusses why it is more successful than traditional authority-based management styles. (Author/JG)

  15. Limited Denial of Participation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Limited Denial of Participation (LDP) is an action taken by a HUD Field Office or the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family (DASSF) or Multifamily (DASMF)...

  16. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  17. Practical Attacks on Mobile Cellular Networks and Possible Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Oğul

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to widespread adoption of mobile communications devices and increasingly high throughput capacity of cellular networks, Third-Generation (3G and Long Term Evolution (LTE are becoming ever more popular. Millions of smart phones with 3G capabilities are sold every year and used for mostly browsing the Internet. Hence, mobile operators have been heavily investing in their packet switched networks to meet customer demand and stay ahead in the market. The widespread use of broadband mobile Internet bring along also some IP based threats such as the Denial of Service (DoS attacks, botnets and malwares. In this paper, we performed DoS and flooding attacks on 3G mobile networks and measured their effect on the most critical elements of a network such as the Radio Network Controller (RNC and the Serving GPRS Support Node (SGSN devices. We carried out our experiments on a real mobile network, not just a simulation environment, and hence our findings depict a realistic picture of the vulnerabilities existent in 3G mobile networks. We propose alternative solutions to avoid these vulnerabilities and mitigate the issues raised.

  18. Size and Political Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Serritzlew, Søren

    This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size.......This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size....

  19. maxdLoad2 and maxdBrowse: standards-compliant tools for microarray experimental annotation, data management and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, David; Wilson, Michael; Velarde, Giles; Morrison, Norman; Hayes, Andrew; Hulme, Helen; Wood, A Joseph; Nashar, Karim; Kell, Douglas B; Brass, Andy

    2005-11-03

    maxdLoad2 is a relational database schema and Java application for microarray experimental annotation and storage. It is compliant with all standards for microarray meta-data capture; including the specification of what data should be recorded, extensive use of standard ontologies and support for data exchange formats. The output from maxdLoad2 is of a form acceptable for submission to the ArrayExpress microarray repository at the European Bioinformatics Institute. maxdBrowse is a PHP web-application that makes contents of maxdLoad2 databases accessible via web-browser, the command-line and web-service environments. It thus acts as both a dissemination and data-mining tool. maxdLoad2 presents an easy-to-use interface to an underlying relational database and provides a full complement of facilities for browsing, searching and editing. There is a tree-based visualization of data connectivity and the ability to explore the links between any pair of data elements, irrespective of how many intermediate links lie between them. Its principle novel features are: the flexibility of the meta-data that can be captured, the tools provided for importing data from spreadsheets and other tabular representations, the tools provided for the automatic creation of structured documents, the ability to browse and access the data via web and web-services interfaces. Within maxdLoad2 it is very straightforward to customise the meta-data that is being captured or change the definitions of the meta-data. These meta-data definitions are stored within the database itself allowing client software to connect properly to a modified database without having to be specially configured. The meta-data definitions (configuration file) can also be centralized allowing changes made in response to revisions of standards or terminologies to be propagated to clients without user intervention.maxdBrowse is hosted on a web-server and presents multiple interfaces to the contents of maxd databases. maxdBrowse

  20. maxdLoad2 and maxdBrowse: standards-compliant tools for microarray experimental annotation, data management and dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashar Karim

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background maxdLoad2 is a relational database schema and Java® application for microarray experimental annotation and storage. It is compliant with all standards for microarray meta-data capture; including the specification of what data should be recorded, extensive use of standard ontologies and support for data exchange formats. The output from maxdLoad2 is of a form acceptable for submission to the ArrayExpress microarray repository at the European Bioinformatics Institute. maxdBrowse is a PHP web-application that makes contents of maxdLoad2 databases accessible via web-browser, the command-line and web-service environments. It thus acts as both a dissemination and data-mining tool. Results maxdLoad2 presents an easy-to-use interface to an underlying relational database and provides a full complement of facilities for browsing, searching and editing. There is a tree-based visualization of data connectivity and the ability to explore the links between any pair of data elements, irrespective of how many intermediate links lie between them. Its principle novel features are: • the flexibility of the meta-data that can be captured, • the tools provided for importing data from spreadsheets and other tabular representations, • the tools provided for the automatic creation of structured documents, • the ability to browse and access the data via web and web-services interfaces. Within maxdLoad2 it is very straightforward to customise the meta-data that is being captured or change the definitions of the meta-data. These meta-data definitions are stored within the database itself allowing client software to connect properly to a modified database without having to be specially configured. The meta-data definitions (configuration file can also be centralized allowing changes made in response to revisions of standards or terminologies to be propagated to clients without user intervention. maxdBrowse is hosted on a web-server and presents

  1. Over-browsing in Pennsylvania creates a depauperate forest dominated by an understory tree: results from a 60-year-old deer exclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Kain; Loretta Battaglia; Alejandro Royo; Walter P. Carson

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of long-term over-browsing by white-tailed deer on the diversity and density of trees in a forest in the Allegheny High Plateau region of central Pennsylvania.We compared tree diversity and density inside a 60 year-old deer exclosure to an adjacent reference site. Browsing caused a 55-100% decline in density of four tree species (Prunus...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND IN VITRO DEGRADATION PROFILE OF SOME GUINEA SAVANNAH BROWSE PLANTS OF NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Adewale Okunade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to estimate the nutritive value of six indigenous browse fodders (Etanda africana, Piliostigma thonningii, Detarium microcarpum, Daniellia oliveri, Pterocarpus erinaceus, and Afzelia africana by the evaluation of chemical composition, anti-nutritional factors and in vitro gas characteristics. All samples (g/100g DM had high CP (12.6–24.7, moderate fibre concentrations (NDF, 34.7–54.6; ADF, 19.7–35.2 and lignin, 7.36–12. There were significant differences (P < 0.05 in NDF, ash, ether extract, hemicellulose, cellulose and mineral concentrations among the browse fodders. Except for condensed tannins which were similar among the browse fodders, other anti-nutritional factors were different (P < 0.05. The relative feed values of the selected legume browses ranged from 114.43 in E. africana to 202.94 in A. africana. Gas volume (ml/200mg DM, methane (ml/200mg DM, methane/total gas volume (v:v, metabolisable energy (MJ/kg DM, organic matter digestibility (%, short chain fatty acids (μmol and in vitro dry matter degradability ( % ranged from 19-34, 8.66-11.33, 0.29-0.46, 4.53-6.48, 35.73-49.06, 0.15-0.43 and 46-67 respectively. Results show that the browse species have good nutrient profile, low and safe levels of anti-nutritional factors and relatively high degradability which qualify them as suitable feed supplements to low quality basal diets for ruminants. Â

  3. Integrating remote sensing and conventional grazing/browsing models for modelling carrying capacity in southern African rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjorlolo, C.; Botha, J. O.; Mhangara, P.; Mutanga, O.; Odindi, J.

    2014-10-01

    Woody vegetation encroachment into grasslands or bush thickening, a global phenomenon, is transforming the Southern African grassland systems into savanna-like landscapes. Estimation of woody vegetation is important to rangeland scientists and land managers for assessing its impact on grass production and calculating its grazing and browsing capacity. Assessment of grazing and browsing components is often challenging because agro-ecological landscapes of this region are largely characterized by small scale and heterogeneous land-use-land-cover patterns. In this study, we investigated the utility of high spatial resolution remotely sensing data for modelling grazing and browsing capacity at landscape level. Woody tree density or Tree Equivalents (TE) and Total Leaf Mass (LMASS) data were derived using the Biomass Estimation for Canopy Volume (BECVOL) program. The Random Forest (RF) regression algorithm was assessed to establish relationships between these variables and vegetation indices (Simple Ratio and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), calculated using the red and near infrared bands of SPOT5. The RF analysis predicted LMASS with R2 = 0.63 and a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 1256 kg/ha compared to a mean of 2291kg/ha. TE was predicted with R2 = 0.55 and a RMSE = 1614 TE/ha compared to a mean of 3746 TE/ha. Next, spatial distribution maps of LMASS/ha and TE/ha were derived using separate RF regression models. The resultant maps were then used as input data into conventional grazing and browsing capacity models to calculate grazing and browsing capacity maps for the study area. This study provides a sound platform for integrating currently available and future remote sensing satellite data into rangeland carrying capacity modelling and monitoring.

  4. Effectiveness of fencing and hunting to control Lama guanicoe browsing damage: Implications for Nothofagus pumilio regeneration in harvested forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pastur, Guillermo; Soler, Rosina; Ivancich, Horacio; Lencinas, María V; Bahamonde, Héctor; Peri, Pablo L

    2016-03-01

    Browsing damage by native ungulates is often to be considered one of the reasons of regeneration failure in Nothofagus pumilio silvicultural systems. Fencing and hunting in forests at regeneration phase have been proposed to mitigate browsing effects. This study aims to determine effectiveness of these control methods in harvested forests, evaluating browsing damage over regeneration, as well as climate-related constraints (freezing or desiccation). Forest structure and regeneration plots were established in two exclosures against native ungulates (Lama guanicoe) by wire fences in the Chilean portion of Tierra del Fuego island, where tree regeneration density, growth, abiotic damage and quality (multi-stems and base/stem deformation) were assessed. Exclosures did not influence regeneration density (at the initial stage with 1.3 m high). However, sapling height at 10-years old was significantly lower outside (40-50 cm high) than inside exclosures (80-100 cm), and also increased their annual height growth, probably as a hunting effect. Likewise, quality was better inside exclosures. Alongside browsing, abiotic conditions negatively influenced sapling quality in the regeneration phase (20%-28% of all seedlings), but greatly to taller plants (as those from inside exclosure). This highlights the importance of considering climatic factors when analysing browsing effects. For best results, control of guanaco in recently harvested areas by fencing should be applied in combination with a reduction of guanaco density through continuous hunting. The benefits of mitigation actions (fencing and hunting) on regeneration growth may shorten the regeneration phase period in shelterwood cutting forests (30-50% less time), but incremental costs must be analysed in the framework of management planning by means of long-term studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Declarative Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Loo, Boon Thau

    2012-01-01

    Declarative Networking is a programming methodology that enables developers to concisely specify network protocols and services, which are directly compiled to a dataflow framework that executes the specifications. Declarative networking proposes the use of a declarative query language for specifying and implementing network protocols, and employs a dataflow framework at runtime for communication and maintenance of network state. The primary goal of declarative networking is to greatly simplify the process of specifying, implementing, deploying and evolving a network design. In addition, decla

  6. Characteristics of patients seeking health information online via social health networks versus general Internet sites: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Grosberg, Dafna; Novikov, Ilya; Ziv, Arnona; Shani, Mordechai; Freedman, Laurence S

    2015-03-01

    Camoni.co.il, a Hebrew-language social health network offers advice, consultation, and connection to others with chronic illness. This study compared characteristics and objectives of Camoni.co.il users and individuals seeking medical information through general Internet sites. Similar questionnaires were sent to 1009 Internet and 900 Camoni users. Cluster analysis defined four modes of online social health network use: "acquiring information and support", "communicating", "networking" and "browsing". Six hundred and five Internet and 125 Camoni users responded. Diabetes, hypertension, obesity and lung diseases were found more often among general Internet users than Camoni users. Among Camoni users, "acquiring information and support" was the main motivation for individuals over age 55 years, women, those with lower income, chronic pain, obesity and depression. "Communicating" was the main incentive of men, those 20-34 years old, those with less education, or an eating disorder. "Networking" was the most significant motivation for those with multiple sclerosis or depression. Browsing was most frequent among individuals with multiple sclerosis. Identifying needs of social health network surfers will allow planning unique contents and enhancing social health sites. Physicians might advise patients to use them to obtain support and information regarding their conditions, possibly leading to improved compliance and self-management.

  7. Creating and maintaining social networks: women’s participation in Basque pilota. [Creación y mantenimiento de redes sociales: participación de mujeres en pelota vasca].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uxue Fernandez-Lasa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Basque pilota is a traditional sport played mainly by men. A project emerged in 2005 to promote female participation: Emakumea Pilotari (Woman pelota player. In this article we present the main points that emerged from an ethnographic study of the social relationships that playing Basque pilota can provide. The study was carried out in 2011-2012 season with a purposive sample of 28 adult women Basque pilota players (pilotaris (between 22 and 60 years old. 26 participants were pilotaris in recreational groups and the other two were their trainers. The results suggest that a sense of community, team membership, the development of a general reciprocity and group security are the most important aspects for players. A sense of community is the fundamental reason why they practise this sport. The group as a whole is the top priority. Female pilotaris share the desire to relate to each other as women, build relationships, create bonds and help each other. Resumen La pelota vasca es un deporte tradicional practicado mayoritariamente por hombres. En 2005 se puso en marcha un proyecto para promover la participación de las mujeres: Emakumea Pilotari (Mujer Pelotari. En este artículo se presentan los hallazgos de un estudio etnográfico llevado a cabo durante una temporada en torno a las relaciones sociales que genera jugar a pelota vasca. La investigación se realizó con una muestra intencionada de 28 mujeres pelotaris adultas (entre 22 y 60 años, de las cuales 26 eran participantes de un programa recreativo y dos entrenadoras. Los resultados indican que los aspectos más importantes para las participantes son el sentimiento de comunidad, ser miembro de un grupo, el desarrollo de la reciprocidad general y la seguridad que da el grupo. La comunidad es la razón fundamental para practicar este deporte, ya que el grupo es la mayor prioridad. Las mujeres pelotaris comparten el deseo de relacionarse entre ellas como mujeres, construir relaciones, crear

  8. Participation as a matter of concern in participatory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Danholt, Peter; Halskov, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This article starts from the paradox that, although participation is a defining trait of participatory design (PD), there are few explicit discussions in the PD literature of what constitutes participation. Thus, from a point of departure in Actor-Network Theory (ANT), this article develops...... by individuals and (2) that participation partially exists in all elements of a project. These traits are explicated in a design project called ‘Teledialogue’, where the participants are unfolded as networks of reports, government institutions, boyfriends, social workers and so on. The argument is synthesised...

  9. A comparison of woody browse selection by hand-raised, boma-adapted and wild black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, L. in Matusadona National Park, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Matipano

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Differences in woody browse selection between hand-raised (and subsequently released, boma-adapted and wild black rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis, L. were studied in Matusadona National Park between December 1999 and July 2000. Boma-adapted rhinoceros were animals that were subjected to hand-raising and were kept in bomas (enclosures over night. The feeding behaviour was different between the three rhinoceros groups. All rhinoceros groups utilised and selected for a few browse species in common, at different preference levels in the same habitat types according to season. Wild rhinoceroses browsed most in Colophospermum-Terminalia-Combretum woodland in the wet season and in thicket in the dry season. Hand-raised rhinoceroses browsed most in Colophospermum-Terminalia-Combretum woodland and boma-adated rhinos in thickets in both the wet and the early dry seasons. Hand-raised and bomaadapted rhinos changed their habitats less for browse selection than wild rhinos. This can be ascribed to a relative restriction of home range in the hand-raised group and a herding effect for the boma-adapted animals. These situations might have accounted for differences in seasonal browse selection by the rhinoceros groups.

  10. A Practical Method for Multilevel Classification and Accounting of Traffic in Computer Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bujlow, Tomasz; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    the service provider (as Facebook, YouTube, or Google). Furthermore, Deep Packet Inspection (DPI), which seems to be the most accurate technique, in addition to the extensive needs for resources, often cannot be used by ISPs in their networks due to privacy or legal reasons. Techniques based on Machine......, SSH, and Telnet. Within each application group we identify a number of behaviors -- for example, for HTTP, we selected file transfer, web browsing, web radio, and unknown. Our system built based on the method provides also traffic accounting and it was tested on 2 datasets. The classification results...

  11. New maritime information browsing and service system based on 3D virtual Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Haigang; Gao, Xiaorong; Hua, Li; Zhang, Anmin

    2007-11-01

    Maritime information is very important to ensure traffic safety on the sea. In recent years the maritime information browsing and service system is widely used. However, most of the traditional systems are based on 2D electronic charts and are not satisfied with people's multi-dimension and multi-viewpoint way to observe the world. So it is necessary and urgent to research and develop the maritime information service in 3D virtual environment. Aiming at this, a new idea for maritime information browsing and service based on 3D virtual earth is presented in this paper. Corresponding key technologies including integrated creation of underwater and land terrain, creation of 3D maritime model based on the integration of GIS and CAD, spatial information extraction from nonspatial data, organization and management of terrain data and 3D maritime models, moving object management based on orbit positioning algorithm, 3D visualization of different information are discussed in detail. At last, a system named 3DMBINS is developed and obtained initial application in maritime administration.

  12. Coupling News Sentiment with Web Browsing Data Improves Prediction of Intra-Day Price Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Ranco

    Full Text Available The new digital revolution of big data is deeply changing our capability of understanding society and forecasting the outcome of many social and economic systems. Unfortunately, information can be very heterogeneous in the importance, relevance, and surprise it conveys, affecting severely the predictive power of semantic and statistical methods. Here we show that the aggregation of web users' behavior can be elicited to overcome this problem in a hard to predict complex system, namely the financial market. Specifically, our in-sample analysis shows that the combined use of sentiment analysis of news and browsing activity of users of Yahoo! Finance greatly helps forecasting intra-day and daily price changes of a set of 100 highly capitalized US stocks traded in the period 2012-2013. Sentiment analysis or browsing activity when taken alone have very small or no predictive power. Conversely, when considering a news signal where in a given time interval we compute the average sentiment of the clicked news, weighted by the number of clicks, we show that for nearly 50% of the companies such signal Granger-causes hourly price returns. Our result indicates a "wisdom-of-the-crowd" effect that allows to exploit users' activity to identify and weigh properly the relevant and surprising news, enhancing considerably the forecasting power of the news sentiment.

  13. Java-based browsing, visualization and processing of heterogeneous medical data from remote repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, M; Bonacina, S; Pinciroli, F

    2004-01-01

    The actual development of distributed information technologies and Java programming enables employing them also in the medical arena to support the retrieval, integration and evaluation of heterogeneous data and multimodal images in a web browser environment. With this aim, we used them to implement a client-server architecture based on software agents. The client side is a Java applet running in a web browser and providing a friendly medical user interface to browse and visualize different patient and medical test data, integrating them properly. The server side manages secure connections and queries to heterogeneous remote databases and file systems containing patient personal and clinical data. Based on the Java Advanced Imaging API, processing and analysis tools were developed to support the evaluation of remotely retrieved bioimages through the quantification of their features in different regions of interest. The Java platform-independence allows the centralized management of the implemented prototype and its deployment to each site where an intranet or internet connection is available. Giving healthcare providers effective support for comprehensively browsing, visualizing and evaluating medical images and records located in different remote repositories, the developed prototype can represent an important aid in providing more efficient diagnoses and medical treatments.

  14. Coupling News Sentiment with Web Browsing Data Improves Prediction of Intra-Day Price Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranco, Gabriele; Bordino, Ilaria; Bormetti, Giacomo; Caldarelli, Guido; Lillo, Fabrizio; Treccani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The new digital revolution of big data is deeply changing our capability of understanding society and forecasting the outcome of many social and economic systems. Unfortunately, information can be very heterogeneous in the importance, relevance, and surprise it conveys, affecting severely the predictive power of semantic and statistical methods. Here we show that the aggregation of web users' behavior can be elicited to overcome this problem in a hard to predict complex system, namely the financial market. Specifically, our in-sample analysis shows that the combined use of sentiment analysis of news and browsing activity of users of Yahoo! Finance greatly helps forecasting intra-day and daily price changes of a set of 100 highly capitalized US stocks traded in the period 2012-2013. Sentiment analysis or browsing activity when taken alone have very small or no predictive power. Conversely, when considering a news signal where in a given time interval we compute the average sentiment of the clicked news, weighted by the number of clicks, we show that for nearly 50% of the companies such signal Granger-causes hourly price returns. Our result indicates a "wisdom-of-the-crowd" effect that allows to exploit users' activity to identify and weigh properly the relevant and surprising news, enhancing considerably the forecasting power of the news sentiment.

  15. JAtlasView: a Java atlas-viewer for browsing biomedical 3D images and atlases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Mark

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many three-dimensional (3D images are routinely collected in biomedical research and a number of digital atlases with associated anatomical and other information have been published. A number of tools are available for viewing this data ranging from commercial visualization packages to freely available, typically system architecture dependent, solutions. Here we discuss an atlas viewer implemented to run on any workstation using the architecture neutral Java programming language. Results We report the development of a freely available Java based viewer for 3D image data, descibe the structure and functionality of the viewer and how automated tools can be developed to manage the Java Native Interface code. The viewer allows arbitrary re-sectioning of the data and interactive browsing through the volume. With appropriately formatted data, for example as provided for the Electronic Atlas of the Developing Human Brain, a 3D surface view and anatomical browsing is available. The interface is developed in Java with Java3D providing the 3D rendering. For efficiency the image data is manipulated using the Woolz image-processing library provided as a dynamically linked module for each machine architecture. Conclusion We conclude that Java provides an appropriate environment for efficient development of these tools and techniques exist to allow computationally efficient image-processing libraries to be integrated relatively easily.

  16. JAtlasView: a Java atlas-viewer for browsing biomedical 3D images and atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guangjie; Burton, Nick; Hill, Bill; Davidson, Duncan; Kerwin, Janet; Scott, Mark; Lindsay, Susan; Baldock, Richard

    2005-03-09

    Many three-dimensional (3D) images are routinely collected in biomedical research and a number of digital atlases with associated anatomical and other information have been published. A number of tools are available for viewing this data ranging from commercial visualization packages to freely available, typically system architecture dependent, solutions. Here we discuss an atlas viewer implemented to run on any workstation using the architecture neutral Java programming language. We report the development of a freely available Java based viewer for 3D image data, descibe the structure and functionality of the viewer and how automated tools can be developed to manage the Java Native Interface code. The viewer allows arbitrary re-sectioning of the data and interactive browsing through the volume. With appropriately formatted data, for example as provided for the Electronic Atlas of the Developing Human Brain, a 3D surface view and anatomical browsing is available. The interface is developed in Java with Java3D providing the 3D rendering. For efficiency the image data is manipulated using the Woolz image-processing library provided as a dynamically linked module for each machine architecture. We conclude that Java provides an appropriate environment for efficient development of these tools and techniques exist to allow computationally efficient image-processing libraries to be integrated relatively easily.

  17. A subjective scheduler for subjective dedicated networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman; Fakhrizal, Said Reza; Al-Akaidi, Marwan

    2017-09-01

    Multiple access technique is one of important techniques within medium access layer in TCP/IP protocol stack. Each network technology implements the selected access method. Priority can be implemented in those methods to differentiate services. Some internet networks are dedicated for specific purpose. Education browsing or tutorial video accesses are preferred in a library hotspot, while entertainment and sport contents could be subjects of limitation. Current solution may use IP address filter or access list. This paper proposes subjective properties of users or applications are used for priority determination in multiple access techniques. The NS-2 simulator is employed to evaluate the method. A video surveillance network using WiMAX is chosen as the object. Subjective priority is implemented on WiMAX scheduler based on traffic properties. Three different traffic sources from monitoring video: palace, park, and market are evaluated. The proposed subjective scheduler prioritizes palace monitoring video that results better quality, xx dB than the later monitoring spots.

  18. eParticipation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2012-01-01

    Research on the use of information technology to support democratic decision-making (eParticipation) is experiencing ongoing growth, stimulated by an increasing attention from both practitioner and research communities. This study provides the first longitudinal analysis of the development of the e......Participation field based on a shared framework, capturing the directions that the research field of eParticipation is taking in recent developments. Drawing on a literature search covering the period from April 2006 to March 2011, this study identifies, analyzes, and classifies 122 research articles within...... also suggests new analytical categories of research. Drawing on the analysis, inputs for a research agenda are suggested. These include the need to move beyond a technological perspective, encouraging the ongoing shift of research focus from government to citizens and other stakeholders, and the need...

  19. Total design of participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of design as an art made not only for the people, but also by the people is an old dream going back at least to William Morris. It is, however, reappearing vigoriously in many kinds of design activism and grows out of the visions of a Total Design of society. The ideas of participation...... by Tim Brown can be compared to considerations by László Moholy-Nagy and Walter Gropuis on the training and education of active and capable citizens. This opens, though, some dilemmas to discuss: To what extend is the capability of creativity then a (pre)condition to be a citizen of the society wished...... for? To which degree should everyone be educated in ’design literacy’ to participate? Total design of participation is an artistic intervention in society and must be discussed in this utopian tradition....

  20. Participation and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We would like to welcome you to a series of dialogues within the framework of action research (AR) and participatory research (PR), which will be focused on the relationship between participation and power. The basic question in this anthology is ‘What are the possibilities and barriers to partic......We would like to welcome you to a series of dialogues within the framework of action research (AR) and participatory research (PR), which will be focused on the relationship between participation and power. The basic question in this anthology is ‘What are the possibilities and barriers...... to participation conceptualised as various degrees of codetermination in organisations and in research processes?’ The anthology is part of a follow-up on an initiative taken in 2010 by Professor Werner Fricke, editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Action Research for many years. His vision was to create...

  1. European Patterns of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas Fehmerling; Ejrnæs, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Social Survey (ESS) Round 4 (2008), the article finds that satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the government is an important predictor alongside the institutional macro-level variable. The article combines a critical tradition, which suggests that political participation is motivated by a feeling...... of dissatisfaction with the government and feelings of being member of a discriminated group affect the level of extra-parliamentary participation, and second, how different welfare regimes condition the extend to which these groups chose to act. In a comparative multilevel design, using data from the European...... of dissatisfaction with an institutional perspective in which certain institutional conditions are seen as enablers for citizens to actively participate in political life. Our results show that the overall level of extra-parliamentary activity in the Scandinavian countries is higher than in the other European...

  2. Public Access ICT across Cultures: Diversifying Participation in the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Public Access ICT across Cultures: Diversifying Participation in the Network Society. Public Access ICT across ... Jordan, Rwanda). The book documents the impacts of public access, positive and negative, on individuals, society and networks, and women, and examines the policy implications of findings.

  3. Participation in physical planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlata Ploštajner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical planning is also a political activity. Therefore participation is a necessary form of democratic actions undertaken by individuals and groups that strive for democratisation of civil society and strengthening of democratic social values. Public participation of citizens, legal subjects, interest groups and others in physical planning is essential even from the aspect of ensuring success and efficiency of planning documents, if the idea is to devise a plan, which the people would be ready and capable of implementing. Thus the role of the physical planner is changing from technical expert to mediator or anchor-person, who nevertheless has to operate within a normative framework.

  4. Public Participation GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten

    2004-01-01

    information in environmental planning and gives an overview over the various approaches to public participation. The current advances in Web-based GIS in many countries contain great possibilities for supporting good governance based on information and knowledge on the one hand and active involvement...... of the citizens on the other hand. One important precondition for success in this field is a well-informed population with access to the Internet. The overall purpose of this paper is to give en overview of how to utilise geographic information and public participation as natural components in environmental...

  5. NeuroTerrain – a client-server system for browsing 3D biomedical image data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Carl; Bug, William J; Nissanov, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Background Three dimensional biomedical image sets are becoming ubiquitous, along with the canonical atlases providing the necessary spatial context for analysis. To make full use of these 3D image sets, one must be able to present views for 2D display, either surface renderings or 2D cross-sections through the data. Typical display software is limited to presentations along one of the three orthogonal anatomical axes (coronal, horizontal, or sagittal). However, data sets precisely oriented along the major axes are rare. To make fullest use of these datasets, one must reasonably match the atlas' orientation; this involves resampling the atlas in planes matched to the data set. Traditionally, this requires the atlas and browser reside on the user's desktop; unfortunately, in addition to being monolithic programs, these tools often require substantial local resources. In this article, we describe a network-capable, client-server framework to slice and visualize 3D atlases at off-axis angles, along with an open client architecture and development kit to support integration into complex data analysis environments. Results Here we describe the basic architecture of a client-server 3D visualization system, consisting of a thin Java client built on a development kit, and a computationally robust, high-performance server written in ANSI C++. The Java client components (NetOStat) support arbitrary-angle viewing and run on readily available desktop computers running Mac OS X, Windows XP, or Linux as a downloadable Java Application. Using the NeuroTerrain Software Development Kit (NT-SDK), sophisticated atlas browsing can be added to any Java-compatible application requiring as little as 50 lines of Java glue code, thus making it eminently re-useable and much more accessible to programmers building more complex, biomedical data analysis tools. The NT-SDK separates the interactive GUI components from the server control and monitoring, so as to support development of non

  6. NeuroTerrain – a client-server system for browsing 3D biomedical image data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissanov Jonathan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three dimensional biomedical image sets are becoming ubiquitous, along with the canonical atlases providing the necessary spatial context for analysis. To make full use of these 3D image sets, one must be able to present views for 2D display, either surface renderings or 2D cross-sections through the data. Typical display software is limited to presentations along one of the three orthogonal anatomical axes (coronal, horizontal, or sagittal. However, data sets precisely oriented along the major axes are rare. To make fullest use of these datasets, one must reasonably match the atlas' orientation; this involves resampling the atlas in planes matched to the data set. Traditionally, this requires the atlas and browser reside on the user's desktop; unfortunately, in addition to being monolithic programs, these tools often require substantial local resources. In this article, we describe a network-capable, client-server framework to slice and visualize 3D atlases at off-axis angles, along with an open client architecture and development kit to support integration into complex data analysis environments. Results Here we describe the basic architecture of a client-server 3D visualization system, consisting of a thin Java client built on a development kit, and a computationally robust, high-performance server written in ANSI C++. The Java client components (NetOStat support arbitrary-angle viewing and run on readily available desktop computers running Mac OS X, Windows XP, or Linux as a downloadable Java Application. Using the NeuroTerrain Software Development Kit (NT-SDK, sophisticated atlas browsing can be added to any Java-compatible application requiring as little as 50 lines of Java glue code, thus making it eminently re-useable and much more accessible to programmers building more complex, biomedical data analysis tools. The NT-SDK separates the interactive GUI components from the server control and monitoring, so as to support

  7. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Abbas S, Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Ahmed Z, Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Arya A, Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Alok Ashutosh K, Tata Institute of ...

  8. List of Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of Participants. Ajithkumar B P, Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India ajith@nsc.ernet.in. Ansari Q N, Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India qansari 2000@yahoo.com. Ashenfelter Jeffery, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

  9. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Abbas Sohrab, BARC, Mumbai, India. Achary S N, BARC, Mumbai, India. Acharya Prashant G, JMS College, Ahmedabad, India. Aggarwal S K, BARC, Mumbai, India. Agrawal Ashish, BARC, Mumbai, India. Alam Md Sayem, AMU, Aligarh, India. Alamelu D, BARC, Mumbai, India. Aldona Rajewska, IAE ...

  10. List of Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of Participants. Margo Aller. Denis Bastieri. Xiongwei Bi. Weihao Bian. Vera Bychkova. Bo Chai. Jianling Chen. Xuhui Chen. Ye Chen. Zhifu Chen. Yongjun Chen. Liang Chen. Zhaoyu Chen. Kwongsang Cheng. Lang Cui. Benzhong Dai. Zhen Ding. Dimitrios Emmanoulopoulos. Xiaohong Fan. Junhui Fan. Longxing Fan.

  11. Participation and Intermediary NGOs

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    1995-01-01

    Nongovenrmental organizations (NGOs) can be effective intermediaries in Bank funded projects which depend on participation and capacity building at the community level. Successful collaboration depends on identifying an organization with appropriate characteristics, and involving its staff in decisionmaking from as early as possible in the project cycle. Steps must be taken to prevent Bank...

  12. Mapping eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2007-01-01

    Participation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging socio-technical research area and use this schema to map the research contributions identified. This allows us make an initial sketch of the scientific character of the area and its central concerns, theories...

  13. Participation som organisatorisk praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Hans Jeppe; Jønsson, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hensigten med artiklen er at give et bidrag til forståelsen af begrebet organisatorisk participation både teoretisk og ud fra praksis. Det gøres ud fra analyser og tematiseringer af participationens mangfoldighed, participationssystemers konstituering, participationens substans og finalitet samt...

  14. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  15. Participation and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.; Huitema, Dave; O'Toole, Laurence J.; Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.; Huitema, D.; O'Toole, Laurence J.

    1998-01-01

    The main subject to which this book seeks to contribute is the question of how and under which circumstances public participation can enhance the quality of environmental decision-making. This chapter outlines the issues addressed in the succeeding contributions. The core of the argument is that in

  16. Variation in participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erna Hooghiemstra; J.G.F. Merens

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Variatie in participatie. The four groups of ethnic minority women studied in this report follow the trend of increasing labour market participation. Some of them are however found still to lag (far) behind), while others now work more than the average. All ethnic groups have

  17. Participation under Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudourides, Moses A. [Univ. of Patras, Rio-Patras (Greece). Dept. of Mathematics

    2003-10-01

    This essay reviews a number of theoretical perspectives about uncertainty and participation in the present-day knowledge-based society. After discussing the on-going reconfigurations of science, technology and society, we examine how appropriate for policy studies are various theories of social complexity. Post-normal science is such an example of a complexity-motivated approach, which justifies civic participation as a policy response to an increasing uncertainty. But there are different categories and models of uncertainties implying a variety of configurations of policy processes. A particular role in all of them is played by expertise whose democratization is an often-claimed imperative nowadays. Moreover, we discuss how different participatory arrangements are shaped into instruments of policy-making and framing regulatory processes. As participation necessitates and triggers deliberation, we proceed to examine the role and the barriers of deliberativeness. Finally, we conclude by referring to some critical views about the ultimate assumptions of recent European policy frameworks and the conceptions of civic participation and politicization that they invoke.

  18. Communication Games: Participant's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, Karen R.

    Using a series of communicational games, the author leads the participant through self-awareness, verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and skills in perception, listening, and small group, organizational, and cultural communications. The thesis behind the book is that model-making, role-playing, or other forms of…

  19. Participation in decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EG Valoyi

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which employees would like to participate in decision making concerning various organisational issues, especially those concerning: the work itself, working conditions, human resources issues, and corporate policy and planning. The sample consisted of 146 participants, including managers, middle managers, and junior officials from a South African development corporation. A questionnaire to measure employees' desire to participate in decision making was specially constructed for this investigation. It has found that employees with higher academic qualifications were more desirous to participate in decision-making at all levels than employees with lower academic qualifications. This was also true for employees in higher job grades than in lower job grades. Men were more desirous to participate in decision making than women. The implications of the findings are discussed. Opsomming Die doel van die huidige studie was om vas te stel in watter mate werknemers sal wil deelneem aan die besluit- nameproses van organisasies, veral rakende die volgende sake: die werk self, werksomstandighede, menslike hulpbronaangeleenthede en korporatiewe beleid en beplanning. Die steekproef het uit 146 deelnemers, insluitende bestuurders, middelvlakbestuurders en junior amptenare van'n Suid Afrikaanse ontwikkelingskorporasie, bestaan. nVraelys wat die begeerte van werknemers meet om aan die besluitnameproses deel te neem, is spesiaal vir die doel van hierdie ondersoek, ontwerp. Dit is bevind dat werknemers met hoer akademiese kwalifikasies meer begerig is om aan die besluitnameproses op alle vlakke deel te neem as werknemers met laer akademiese kwalifikasies. Dit was ook waar vir werknemers in hoervlakposte vergeleke met werknemers in laervlakposte. Mans was ook meer begerig om aan die besluitnameproses deel te neem as vroue. Die implikasies van die studie word bespreek.

  20. NETS - Danish participation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsen, S. (Grontmij - Carl Bro, Glostrup (Denmark)); Theel, C. (Baltic Sea Solutions, Holeby (Denmark))

    2008-12-15

    Within the NICe-funded project 'Nordic Environmental Technology Solutions (NETS)' a new type of networking at the Nordic level was organized in order to jointly exploit the rapidly growing market potential in the environmental technology sector. The project aimed at increased and professionalized commercialization of Nordic Cleantech in energy and water business segments through 1) closer cooperation and joint marketing activities, 2) a website, 3) cleantech product information via brochures and publications 4) and participating in relevant trade fairs and other industry events. Facilitating business-to-business activities was another core task for the NETS project partners from Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark with the aim to encourage total solutions for combined Cleantech system offers. The project has achieved to establish a Cleantech register of 600 Nordic Cleantech companies, a network of 86 member enterprises, produced several publications and brochures for direct technology promotion and a website for direct access to company profiles and contact data. The project partners have attended 14 relevant international Cleantech trade fairs and conferences and facilitated business-to-business contacts added by capacity building offers through two company workshops. The future challenge for the project partners and Nordic Cleantech will be to coordinate the numerous efforts within the Nordic countries in order to reach concerted action and binding of member companies for reliable services, an improved visibility and knowledge exchange. With Cleantech's growing market influence and public awareness, the need to develop total solutions is increasing likewise. Marketing efforts should be encouraged cross-sectional and cross-border among the various levels of involved actors from both the public and the private sector. (au)

  1. The network researchers' network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C.; Jiang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987). In thi......The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987......). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...

  2. Participating in patient education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg; Antoft, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The paper builds on previous ethnographic research in Denmark focusing on the significance of participating in a locally developed patient education programme for everyday life (Kristiansen et.al. 2015). It presents a secondary analysis. Group based patient education can be understood as a health...... point is applied in order to illustrate two central status passages taking place at the locally developed patient education programme: 1) The status passage from novice to an experienced person with chronic illness, and 2) The transformation from adolescence to adulthood living with a chronic illness...... studies within the field of patient education and how it can enhance our understanding of the social practices at play and the identity transitions occurring as a result of the chronic illness itself and the participation at the programme. Further we reflect on potential practical implications of our...

  3. Invited to Participate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Dam

    This thesis presents an ethnography of e-health and patient participation in heart care. Drawing on Science & Technology Studies (STS) and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), the thesis goes beyond the common narrative of e-health as a solution and vehicle for transforming healthcare...... towards more patient-centered practices and explores what patient-involving e-health, in practice, can become. With the user test of an e-health system for ICD-patients as the pivotal case, the thesis unpacks what happens when patients are invited to become participants and, in particular, information...... providers through e-health as well as other devices. It does so from a highly interventionist approach where the author uses her role as facilitator of the user test to conduct an ethnographic experiment. The thesis consists of four papers. Concurrently but with different analytical devices, the papers...

  4. [Rehabilitation and work participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethge, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Work participation is increasingly seen as a primary outcome of rehabilitation measures. Randomised controlled trials from several different countries and the reviews and meta-analyses based on them show that multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes improve work participation, return-to-work rates, and reduce sickness absence in patients with back pain, depression, and cancer. In Germany, such programmes were implemented as work-related medical rehabilitation. This intervention targets patients with poor work ability and an increased risk of permanent work disability. Randomised controlled trials have confirmed a reduction of sickness absence and increased rates of sustainable work participation in favour of work-related medical rehabilitation as compared to common medical rehabilitation. Dissemination of these programmes and translation of research evidence into practice progresses. An additional important strategy to support returning to work following rehabilitation is graded return to work. There is emerging evidence of sustainable employment effects in favour of graded return to work. A direct involvement of the workplace and a closer cooperation with employers and occupational health physicians may further improve the outcomes of rehabilitation programmes. Strategies that synergistically integrate safety, health promotion and rehabilitation may achieve more favourable outcomes than separated actions.

  5. Sanitation and Civic Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Peña Barreto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is proposed in order to propose an action plan for environmental sanitation citizen participation in the "Manuela Sáenz" Concentrating National Basic School Parish Municipality City Bolivia Pedraza Barinas state. It is part of the qualitative approach in the form of participatory action research and supported by a narrative descriptive design. The selected scenario for performance of work was the Concentrating National School "Manuela Sáenz" key informants consist of 1 member of the community, 1 member of the community council and one teacher of the institution. The techniques used are observation and depth interview, using as instruments a field notebook and an interview script. For the presentation and analysis of results he was categorized, triangulated and theorized the information obtained, performing a thorough and detailed report on the integrated management of solid waste diagnosis. Subsequently, the proposal called Action Plan for environmental sanitation was developed with citizen participation in concentrated Manuela Saenz National Basic School. Then the proposal where participants expressed the view that activities allowed to obtain very important basic knowledge on environmental sanitation was run.

  6. Governability and Citizen Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarla de Quiroga

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available bjective conditions that allow for a harmonic relationship between the governors and the governed. We are speaking about a set of conditions for governing by consensus and in harmony. By “citizen participation” we refer to the fact that citizens share in the powerof decision over something that concerns them. In Bolivia, as well in other Latin American countries, citizenship participation in municipal management is a recent phenomena. This article describes the experience of citizenry participation in the municipality ofCochabamba (Bolivia in relation to quality of life and living conditions in a neighborhood. The municipality of Cochabamba has embarked upon a mission of rescue and evaluation of the neighborhood organizations, not only incorporating the population into the processes of participation, but also acting in favor of social integration because this stresses the commitment of the neighborhood citizens in the design of the plans. In conclusion, the unfolding experience in the municipality of Cochabamba makes the fact clear that beyond the concept of governability, the search for a co-government-type relation prevails, one that is more horizontal and equitable and where the population takes on a leading role for bringing about the social cohesion and the sense of belonging needed to face the serious problems that afflict Latin American cities.

  7. Participation: the insider's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret

    2010-09-01

    The insider-outsider distinction is discussed in the context of people with disabilities. Insiders to disability are likely to have different subjective responses to life situations than do those who experience disability as onlookers. The importance of including the insider's perspective is discussed with respect to assessing participation in terms of setting goals, evaluating programs, setting research agendas, and conducting needs assessments. In terms of incorporating the insider's subjective response to participation into assessment, it is argued that both importance and salience are required to reflect the person's values and goals fully. A review of a sample of currently used assessment approaches is provided with a focus on how each instrument either incorporates or fails to incorporate the insider's perspective on participation. A distinction is made between instruments that tap into the perspective of a specific person at the point of assessment versus those that substitute a perspective based on discussions by groups of insiders, such as emerges from focus groups. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Network cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  9. Network Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  10. Use of social media and online tools for participative space education and citizen science in India: Perspectives of future space leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aafaque; Sridhar, Apoorva

    2012-07-01

    The previous decade saw the emergence of internet in the new avatar popularly known as Web 2.0. After its inception, Internet (also known as Web 1.0) remained centralized and propriety controlled; the information was displayed in form of static pages and users could only browse through these pages connected via URLs (Unique Resource Locator), links and search engines. Web 2.0, on the other hand, has features and tools that allow users to engage in dialogue, interact and contribute to the content on the World Wide Web. As a Result, Social Media has become the most widely accepted medium of interactive and participative dialogue around the world. Social Media is not just limited to Social Networking; it extends from podcasts, webcasts, blogs, micro-blogs, wikis, forums to crowd sourcing, cloud storage, cloud computing and Voice over Internet Protocol. World over, there is a rising trend of using Social Media for Space Education and Outreach. Governments, Space Agencies, Universities, Industry and Organizations have realized the power of Social Media to communicate advancement of space science and technology, updates on space missions and their findings to the common man as well as to the researchers, scientists and experts around the world. In this paper, the authors intend to discuss, the perspectives, of young students and professionals in the space industry on various present and future possibilities of using Social Media in space outreach and citizen science, especially in India and other developing countries. The authors share a vision for developing Social Media platforms to communicate space science and technology, along innovative ideas on participative citizen science projects for various space based applications such as earth observation and space science. Opinions of various young students and professionals in the space industry from different parts of the world are collected and reflected through a comprehensive survey. Besides, a detailed study and

  11. Redes sociais e participação em uma comunidade referenciada a uma unidade de saúde da família Redes sociales y participación en una comunidad referenciada a una unidad de salud de la familia Social networks and participation in a community referenced to a family health care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Denardin Budó

    2010-12-01

    segunda, las formas de organización y como las personas participan en la comunidad. Se concluye que, a partir de las discusiones y reflexiones presentadas en ese trabajo, podrán ser planeadas estrategias que promuevan la formación de vínculos y una mayor movilización para la participación social.The aim of this research is to describe factors that may influence the constitution of social networks and participation in a community referenced to a Family Health Care Unit, located in a medium-sized city in the South of Brazil. It is a qualitative research developed with key informants, community members, community health agents and other health team personnel. The method used was rapid participative assessment, through semi-structured interviews and field observation. Content analysis was used and two categories emerged: considerations about social networks and community participation. The first category presents factors related to social networks, such as family aggregation, socio-economic structure, alcoholism, among others. The second one presents community organization and the ways people participate in the community. Discussions and reflections presented in this paper enable to conclude that strategies to promote strengthening of bonds and greater mobilization for social participation may be developed.

  12. Roe deer browsing effects on growth development of Turkey oak and chestnut coppices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cutini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Over the last three decades wild ungulates populations in Italy increased to values ranging from 300% to 600%. As a consequence, in Italy as well as in other European countries, situations with high ungulate density and, then, negative effects on the stability and dynamics of ecosystems, are increasing frequently. Starting from these evidences we investigated the effects of roe deer population on the vegetative regeneration of two different broadleaved tree species: Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L. and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. coppice stands. In Alpe di Catenaia (Apennines – Central Italy, after coppicing in 2002, we chose six experimental areas where fenced (P and non-fenced (NP plots were established. Measurements were performed at the beginning of the study period and in winter 2008 in both P and NP plots. Diameter and    height of all sprouts were measured. Results showed a different impact of roe deer on the two species. After seven years chestnut did not show any significant browsing-related damage, while in Turkey oak heavy differences between protected and non-protected areas are present: in NP plots roe deer browsing has produced a significant reduction in basal area (58% and volume (57% compared to P plots. The results agree with previous studies and confirm: (a a selective browsing pressure on Turkey oak; (b the lasting effect of the early impact after clear cutting, visible even seven years after. Based on the findings, we discussed the need for an integrated management of forest vegetation and forest fauna which should define the density of ungulates not only according to the theoretical carrying capacity    of ecosystems, but also considering (i the preservation of the ecosystem overall functionality, (ii the forest structure development and (iii the forest management type. st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso

  13. Lifelong learning and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles; Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    This article is inspired by an EU-founded project on intergenerational mentoring: ‘HEAR ME’, which was conducted from 2009 – 2011 in five European countries. Starting from the demographic challenges that affect all European welfare states, the authors discuss attitudes to and possibilities...... in involvement of older people in voluntary social work as mentors for young people. The challenge of the ageing societies is quite often discussed as the ‘burden of the elderly’ and discussed as an economic problem. However, the challenge is not only economical. It is also a social and cultural challenge, among...... other things because a unilateral focus on the economic aspects may cause dissolution of the social cohesion and decrease in well-being for far too many people. The HEAR ME project aimed at developing strategies for lifelong learning and new roles for older people based on their competences, network...

  14. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jose Echevarria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.. This work presents a novel solution (WebTag for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  15. WebTag: Web browsing into sensor tags over NFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Alvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm.

  16. IMPACT OF GLOBAL RETAILERS ON REGIONAL MARKET PARTICIPANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Evtyugina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The given article is focused on a topical subject of global trade networks and the current trends of their development on a regional retail market. The authors believe that deep integration of international networks in the regions significantly increases the competition among network operators in the trade sector and creates a certain challenge for Russian retailers, and require introduction of innovative management techniques, automation of operational processes, expansion of assortment, better service, lower prices, etc. Research and assessment of the parameters given in the article help verifying an effect of international networks on the development process of regional market participants.

  17. Cultural participation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, David; Kann-Rasmussen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This conclusion has been reached due to the findings of the latest cross national cultural participation survey. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem......’ and instead suggests that there is a shared problematisation across Europe sustained by common discursive archaeology that employs various discursive strands in relation to a dominant institutional discourse. The argument is that the ‘problem’ of ‘non-participation’ legitimates a ‘solution’ that predates its...

  18. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... practices. Through this dialogue, it develops an original trans-disciplinary critical theory and practice of collective subjectivity for which the ongoing construction and overcoming of common sense, or ideology, is central. It also points to ways of relating discourse with agency, and fertilizing insights...... from interactionism and ideology theories in a cultural-historical framework....

  19. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER THROUGH NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GYÖRGY ATTILA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a vital intangible asset for any organization and cannot be valued exactly due its special form of materialization. Although we have this drawback, a scientifically established value should be used in order to measure the performance of knowledge holders. A correct valuation helps to know the worth of assets offered in exploitation. Exploitation of this resource could be done in several different ways, but integration in knowledge networks seems to generate best efficiency ratio. Networks offer the possibility to change information, to obtain new information, to build further ideas arose from network partners or to develop together new ideas. Thus, networks assure conditions to optimize the members’ knowledge portfolios. Optimization of knowledge usage creates benefits for network members. These benefits could be profits (if members are private companies or social welfare (if members are looking after collective purposes. Taxonomy of knowledge networks is diverse, permitting an adaptation to the needs of members. Networks permit a large scale of heterogeneity. Since an important part of new knowledge creating costs is covered from public budgetary resources, a special development is recorded at those networks which are exclusively or partly organized in the public sector or benefit by participation from the public sector.

  20. Online Social Network Interactions:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jung Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-cultural comparison of social networking structure on McDonald’s Facebook fan sites between Taiwan and the USA was conducted utilizing the individualism/collectivism dimension proposed by Hofstede. Four network indicators are used to describe the network structure of McDonald’s Facebook fan sites: size, density, clique and centralization. Individuals who post on both Facebook sites for the year of 2012 were considered as network participants for the purpose of the study. Due to the huge amount of data, only one thread of postings was sampled from each month of the year of 2012. The final data consists of 1002 postings written by 896 individuals and 5962 postings written by 5532 individuals from Taiwan and the USA respectively. The results indicated that the USA McDonald’s Facebook fan network has more fans, while Taiwan’s McDonald’s Facebook fan network is more densely connected. Cliques did form among the overall multiplex and within the individual uniplex networks in two countries, yet no significant differences were found between them. All the fan networks in both countries are relatively centralized, mostly on the site operators.

  1. Towards Controlling Latency in Wireless Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Bouacida, Nader

    2017-04-24

    Wireless networks are undergoing an unprecedented revolution in the last decade. With the explosion of delay-sensitive applications in the Internet (i.e., online gaming and VoIP), latency becomes a major issue for the development of wireless technology. Taking advantage of the significant decline in memory prices, industrialists equip the network devices with larger buffering capacities to improve the network throughput by limiting packets drops. Over-buffering results in increasing the time that packets spend in the queues and, thus, introducing more latency in networks. This phenomenon is known as “bufferbloat”. While throughput is the dominant performance metric, latency also has a huge impact on user experience not only for real-time applications but also for common applications like web browsing, which is sensitive to latencies in order of hundreds of milliseconds. Concerns have arisen about designing sophisticated queue management schemes to mitigate the effects of such phenomenon. My thesis research aims to solve bufferbloat problem in both traditional half-duplex and cutting-edge full-duplex wireless systems by reducing delay while maximizing wireless links utilization and fairness. Our work shed lights on buffer management algorithms behavior in wireless networks and their ability to reduce latency resulting from excessive queuing delays inside oversized static network buffers without a significant loss in other network metrics. First of all, we address the problem of buffer management in wireless full-duplex networks by using Wireless Queue Management (WQM), which is an active queue management technique for wireless networks. Our solution is based on Relay Full-Duplex MAC (RFD-MAC), an asynchronous media access control protocol designed for relay full-duplexing. Compared to the default case, our solution reduces the end-to-end delay by two orders of magnitude while achieving similar throughput in most of the cases. In the second part of this thesis

  2. Browsing Space Weather Data and Models with the Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Marlo M.; Mullinix, Richard E.; Berrios, David H.; Hesse, Michael; Rastaetter, Lutz; Pulkkinen, Antti; Hourcle, Joseph A.; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System is a comprehensive web-based platform for space weather information that combines data from solar, heliospheric and geospace observatories with forecasts based on the most advanced space weather models. The iSWA system collects, generates, and presents a wide array of space weather resources in an intuitive, user-configurable, and adaptable format - thus enabling users to respond to current and future space weather impacts as well as enabling post-impact analysis. iSWA currently provides over 200 data and modeling products, and features a variety of tools that allow the user to browse, combine, and examine data and models from various sources. This presentation will consist of a summary of the iSWA products and an overview of the customizable user interfaces, and will feature several tutorial demonstrations highlighting the interactive tools and advanced capabilities.

  3. Browsing and Querying in Online Documentation:A Study of User Interfaces and the Interaction Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Frøkjær, Erik

    1996-01-01

    retrieval, (3) boolean retrieval based on Venn diagrams, and (4) these three combined. Further, the modes of TeSS were compared to the use of printed manuals. The subjects observed were 87 computer science students who solved a number of information retrieval tasks in an area of computing new to them......SS, browsing is the fastest and the one causing fewest operational errors. On the same two variables, time and operational errors, the Venn diagram mode performs better than conventional boolean retrieval. The combined mode scores worst on the objective performance measures; nonetheless nearly all subjects...... prefer this mode. Concerning the interaction process, the subjects tend to manage the complexities of the information retrieval tasks by issuing series of simple commands and exploiting the interactive capabilities of TeSS. To characterise the dynamics of the interaction process two concepts...

  4. The Participation Decision Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Y. Ficaj

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2011 participation decision study involved exploration into the impact of the external education environment on the decision for private school participation in Federal funding, one deliberately declining player in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001(NCLB choice and competition equation. In the qualitative collective case, three religiously triangulated Michigan private school decision-makers submitted to semi-structured interviews. Analysis of the external environmental factors was through the lens of Gould and Eldredge’s (1977 environmentally oriented theory, punctuated equilibria philosophy of change. Analysis involved layering, direct interpretation, categorical aggregation, and cross-comparison of two external environmental categories identified at literature review (NCLB-content and privatization-dynamic with numerous major and sub-groupings and space for newly emergent material. The category privatization-dynamics emerged as significant influence, as did the major theme trust and the sub-themes motivational intent, competency, consistency, grapevine, creativity or inspiration, restrictions on curriculum, lack of awareness of opportunities available, and fear of failure. The study included five specific recommendations for leaders of change to explain, predict, and improve organizational performance toward greater synchronization in operation of the NCLB choice and competition mechanisms.

  5. PARTICIPANTS IN INSOLVENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RARES-SEBASTIAN PUIU-NAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the officials and other participants in insolvency. The main purpose of the insolvency procedure is to cover all the debts of the debtor side, in favor of his creditor side. The most important regulations regarding this issue consist in Law no. 85/2006, according to it in the insolvency procedure are to be appointed the following officials: insolvency courts of justice, insolvency judge, receiver, liquidator. All these officials have to act in celerity, in order to promptly perform acts and operations provided by law and to respect and provide other participants’ rights and obligations. My article present in the beginning the insolvency courts of justice, their material and territorial competence and the procedure rules. Next chapters are dedicated to the insolvency judge, receiver and liquidator and analyze the following issues: their appointment, their powers, their auxiliary officials and their ceasing of the powers. Some regards on the British law and French law are also included. The next chapter is dedicated to the participants to the insolvency procedure: the creditors general assembly, creditors committee and special administrator, followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  6. Spaceflight participant visits CERN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    On 15 July, CERN welcomed spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari.   Anousheh Ansari’s grin stretches from ear to ear, during an intriguing conversation with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at AMS POCC. (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari was the first-ever female spaceflight participant, spending eight days on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006. She now has a new addition to her list of extraordinary sights ­– the home of the world’s largest particle accelerator: CERN.   On 15 July, Anousheh Ansari came to CERN and, unsurprisingly, visited the control room of the experiment attached to the ISS: the AMS. At the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre (AMS POCC) on CERN’s Prévessin site, she met the Nobel laureate Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the AMS experiment. Ansari and her accompanying guests were thrilled to expand their knowledge about CERN, its research and its...

  7. Address Translation Problems in IMS Based Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs Godor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of packed based multimedia networks reached a turning point when the ITU-T and the ETSIhave incorporated the IMS to the NGN. With the fast development of mobile communication more and more services andcontent are available. In contrast with fix network telephony both the services and the devices are personalized in the “mobileworld”. Services, known from the Internet - like e-mail, chat, browsing, presence, etc. – are already available via mobiledevices as well. The IMS originally wanted to exploit both the benefits of mobile networks and the fancy services of theInternet. But today it is already more than that. IMS is the core of the next generation telecommunication networks and abasis for fix-mobile convergent services. The fact however that IMS was originally a “mobile” standard, where IPv6 was notoddity generated some problems for the fix networks, where IPv4 is used. In this article I give an overview of these problemsand mention some solutions as well.

  8. Telecommunication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iannone, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Many argue that telecommunications network infrastructure is the most impressive and important technology ever developed. Analyzing the telecom market's constantly evolving trends, research directions, infrastructure, and vital needs, Telecommunication Networks responds with revolutionized engineering strategies to optimize network construction. Omnipresent in society, telecom networks integrate a wide range of technologies. These include quantum field theory for the study of optical amplifiers, software architectures for network control, abstract algebra required to design error correction co

  9. ADF/ADC Web Tools for Browsing and Visualizing Astronomical Catalogs and NASA Astrophysics Mission Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, E.; Kargatis, V.; Blackwell, J.; Borne, K.; White, R. A.; Cheung, C.

    1998-05-01

    Several new web based services have been introduced this year by the Astrophysics Data Facility (ADF) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. IMPReSS is a graphical interface to astrophysics databases that presents the user with the footprints of observations of space-based missions. It also aids astronomers in retrieving these data by sending requests to distributed data archives. The VIEWER is a reader of ADC astronomical catalogs and journal tables that allows subsetting of catalogs by column choices and range selection and provides database-like search capability within each table. With it, the user can easily find the table data most appropriate for their purposes and then download either the subset table or the original table. CATSEYE is a tool that plots output tables from the VIEWER (and soon AMASE), making exploring the datasets fast and easy. Having completed the basic functionality of these systems, we are enhancing the site to provide advanced functionality. These will include: market basket storage of tables and records of VIEWER output for IMPReSS and AstroBrowse queries, non-HTML table responses to AstroBrowse type queries, general column arithmetic, modularity to allow entrance into the sequence of web pages at any point, histogram plots, navigable maps, and overplotting of catalog objects on mission footprint maps. When completed, the ADF/ADC web facilities will provide astronomical tabled data and mission retrieval information in several hyperlinked environments geared for users at any level, from the school student to the typical astronomer to the expert datamining tools at state-of-the-art data centers.

  10. Chemical composition and digestibility of some browse plant species collected from Algerian arid rangelands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boufennara, S.; Lopez, S.; Boussebouna, H.; Bodas, R.; Bouazza, L.

    2012-11-01

    Many wild browse and bush species are undervalued mainly because of insufficient knowledge about their potential feeding value. The objective was to evaluate some nutritional attributes of various Algerian browse and shub species (Atriplex halimus, Artemisia campestris, Artemisia herba-alba, Astragalus gombiformis, Calobota saharae, Retama raetam, Stipagrostis pungens, Lygeum spartum and Stipa tenacissima). Chemical composition, phenols and tannins concentration, in vitro digestibility, in vitro gas production kinetics and in vitro bio-assay for assessment of tannins using buffered rumen fluid, and in situ disappearence of the edible parts of the plants (leaves, thin twigs and flowers) were determined. In general, protein content in dicotyledon species was always greater than in monocotyledon grasses, these showing higher neutral and acid detergent fibre and lower lignin contents than dicots. The tannin concentrations varied considerably between species, but in general the plants investigated in this study had low tannin contents (except for Artemisia spp. and S. tenacissima). Monocots showed lower in vitro and in situ digestibilities, fermentation rate, cumulative gas production and extent of degradation than dicot species. The plants were clustered by principal components analysis in two groups: poor-quality grasses and the most digestible dicot species. Chemical composition (neutral detergent fibre and protein) and digestibility were the main influential variables determining the ranking. In conclusion, A. halimus, A. campestris, A. herba-alba and A. gombiformis can be considered of greater nutritional value than the highly fibrous and low digestible grasses (S. pungens, L. spartum and S. tenacissima) that should be considered emergency roughages. (Author) 46 refs.

  11. Feeding characteristics reveal functional distinctions among browsing herbivorous fishes on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Robert P.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-12-01

    The removal of macroalgal biomass by fishes is a key process on coral reefs. Numerous studies have identified the fish species responsible for removing mature macroalgae, and have identified how this varies spatially, temporally, and among different algal types. None, however, have considered the behavioural and morphological traits of the browsing fishes and how this may influence the removal of macroalgal material. Using video observations of fish feeding on the brown macroalga Sargassum polycystum, we quantified the feeding behaviour and morphology of the four dominant browsing species on the Great Barrier Reef ( Kyphosus vaigiensis, Naso unicornis, Siganus canaliculatus, and Siganus doliatus). The greatest distinction between species was the algal material they targeted. K. vaigiensis and N. unicornis bit on the entire macroalgal thallus in approximately 90 % of bites. In contrast, Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus avoided biting the stalks, with 80-98 % of bites being on the macroalgal leaves only. This distinctive grouping into `entire thallus-biters' versus `leaf-biters' was not supported by size-standardized measures of biting morphology. Rather, species-specific adult body sizes, tooth shape, and feeding behaviour appear to underpin this functional distinction, with adults of the two larger fish species ( N. unicornis and K. vaigiensis) eating the entire macroalgal thallus, while the two smaller species ( Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus) bite only leaves. These findings caution against assumed homogeneity within this, and potentially other, functional groups on coral reefs. As functional redundancy within the macroalgal browsers is limited, the smaller `leaf-biting' species are unlikely to be able to compensate functionally for the loss of larger `entire thallus-biting' species.

  12. 2-D Petroleum System Modelling of the Browse Basin, Offshore Northwestern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byeong-Kook

    2017-04-01

    Petroleum system modelling was performed for the Browse Basin, which is a hydrocarbon-bearing basin in the offshore area of northwestern Australia. The Browse Basin was formed by two cycles of tectonically controlled extension, thermal subsidence, and inversion. The first rifting had occurred by the extension in the Late Carboniferous to Early Permian, and the second was in the Early to Middle Jurassic. Thick sediments were deposited during subsequent subsidence and inversion in the basin. The Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous succession is considered to have the high quality source potential. Major reservoirs are fluvio-deltaic and nearshore marine sandstone units in the Jurassic and Cretaceous. Late Cretaceous to Tertiary sequences are dominated by thick carbonate rocks. Maturity model and paleo-heat flow history were made in 1-D petroleum system modelling by comparing with vitrinite values and temperature measured from the drill wells. Based on the geologic setting and the 1-D model, 2-D Petroleum system modelling was conducted on an E-W cross section crossing three wells to understand hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation in the basin. Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous formations, including Aptian, Vlanginian, and Callovian rocks, were assigned as source rocks in the 2-D modelling. The 2-D model shows that hydrocarbons were generated during Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. A thick succession of overburden rocks provided the source rocks with heat and pressure to generate a significant amount of hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbons expelled from the source rocks were migrated dominantly downward to Late Jurassic sandy reservoir rocks. Upward migration is restricted by dense shale and carbonate successions. Large accumulations of gas have been found in the basin, rather than oil. It seems that the amount of gases was significantly increased by secondary cracking of the oil in reservoir formations in deep and hot conditions.

  13. Self-medication with tannin-rich browse in goats infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, M; Cohen, I; Marcovics, A; Muklada, H; Glasser, T A; Ungar, E D; Landau, S Y

    2013-12-06

    Primates self-medicate to alleviate symptoms caused by gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) by consuming plants that contain secondary compounds. Would goats display the same dietary acumen? Circumstantial evidence suggests they could: goats in Mediterranean rangelands containing a shrub - Pistacia lentiscus - with known anthelmintic properties consume significant amounts of the shrub, particularly in the fall when the probability of being infected with GIN is greatest, even though its tannins impair protein metabolism and deter herbivory. In order to test rigorously the self-medication hypothesis in goats, we conducted a controlled study using 21 GIN-infected and 23 non-infected goats exposed to browse foliage from P. lentiscus, another browse species - Phillyrea latifolia, or hay during the build-up of infection. GIN-infected goats showed clear symptoms of infection, which was alleviated by P. lentiscus foliage but ingesting P. lentiscus had a detrimental effect on protein metabolism in the absence of disease. When given a choice between P. lentiscus and hay, infected goats of the Mamber breed showed higher preference for P. lentiscus than non-infected counterparts, in particular if they had been exposed to Phillyrea latifolia before. This was not found in Damascus goats. Damascus goats, which exhibit higher propensity to consume P. lentiscus may use it as a drug prophylactically, whereas Mamber goats, which are more reluctant to ingest it, select P. lentiscus foliage therapeutically. These results hint at subtle trade-offs between the roles of P. lentiscus as a food, a toxin and a medicine. This is the first evidence of self-medication in goats under controlled conditions. Endorsing the concept of self-medication could greatly modify the current paradigm of veterinary parasitology whereby man decides when and how to treat GIN-infected animals, and result in transferring this decision to the animals themselves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ungulate browsing causes species loss in deciduous forests independent of community dynamics and silvicultural management in Central and Southeastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Schulze

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Grid-based inventories of 1,924 deciduous forests plots in Germany and 4,775 in Romania were used to investigate tree species composition as affected by browsing and grazing under different forest management (rotation forestry, selectively cut forest, protected forest. At regional scale, the loss of tree species in the dominant layer was between 52 to 67% in Germany and of 10 to 30% in Romania, with largest effects in protected nature reserves in Germany. At plot level, only 50% (Germany to 54% (Romania of canopy species were found in the regeneration layer with a height of 1.5 m. Browsing was influenced by the proportion of Fagus in the regenerating trees in Germany, and by stand density, basal area, and management in both regions. Structural equation modeling explained 11 to 26% of the variance in species loss based on the fresh loss of the terminal bud in the winter prior to the inventory work (one season browsing. Browsing (and grazing in Romania is shown to be a significant cause of species loss across both countries and all management types. Potential cascading effects on other organisms of deciduous forest ecosystems are discussed. We conclude that the present hunting practices that support overabundant ungulate populations constitute a major threat to the biodiversity of deciduous forests in Germany and Romania and to other places with similar ungulate management, and that changes my only be possible by modernizing the legal framework of hunting.

  15. Using SNA to map participation and non-participation in vulnerable populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    investigation of social networks in a deprived area, the study aimed at identifying social networks of residents who participated in various community-based activities as well as informal groups. Fisher’s (1982) theoretical definition of relation was used and a scheme for coding respondents on the adequacy......The pursuit of equality in health is an overriding goal and principle in Danish health policy. Inequality in health prevails especially among population groups with low education and income levels. Many municipalities have therefore been focusing on deprived areas attempting to fight inequality...

  16. The networking practices of businesswomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Bogaards

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the networking practices of businesswomen in the Gauteng Province, South Africa. The study of businesswomen's networking practices can provide critical insight into the manner in which networking can assist businesswomen in personal and professional skills development. Problem investigated: An investigation was conducted into the manner in which the concepts of networking and social networking are perceived by businesswomen in Gauteng. The study further investigated the motivation behind businesswomen's networking practices and the contents of their social networks were explored. Design/methodology/approach: A non-probability purposive sample, followed by snowball sampling, was used to select businesswomen for in-depth interviews (n = 31. In-depth interviews were used as a qualitative method to investigate the networking practices of these participants.Findings: The results indicate that businesswomen have various perceptions regarding the concepts of networking and social networking. It was also found that businesswomen include certain types of people in their social networks and that they receive various business and personal benefits when their networking is focused (having a clear objective to networking. Originality/value: These findings provide a background to the manner in which businesswomen perceive networking and social networking. This can serve as a basis for training initiatives to raise businesswomen's awareness of networking and social networking. Aforementioned may also provide insight into the meaning this may hold for them in their work and personal lives (for example, obtaining insight into the manner in which networking can be used to obtain business and personal support. Information derived from this study can further be utilised by businesswomen to assist them in social network development. Conclusion: It was concluded from the study that businesswomen perceive

  17. Democracy and shareholder's participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Vuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Democracy and participation of shareholders or the demand for their active participation in the meetings of the Assemblyhas increasingly gained in importance in modern conditions. This is because, negative trends of passivation, the limitations of democratic potential of shareholders and shareholders' rights abuse by the management body, especially in the work control and compensation policy of shareholders, have been observed in a detailed analysis of the application and results of the Shareholder Rights Directive. The passivity of shareholders, as one of the most striking features of their position in the joint stock company today, is the biggest problem and threat to democratic processes within the company. If we bear in mind that the most common definition of shareholder democracy is 'ability of shareholders to influence the management of the company', we can notice a clear picture of the seriousness and importance of the lack of shareholder participation. This is the reason why the author of this paper gradually examines the causes and consequences of the passivity of shareholders, the proposed changes in this context in the Law of the European Union and the practical implications of such solutions in practice. In addition, the author examines contemporary forms and conditions for shareholder democracy and the legal framework in the European Union and the Republic of Serbia. In this way, we analyze the situation in this area and point out shortcomings of certain solutions, as well as the implications they cause in practice. The main thesis from which starts the scientific work and which will be gradually proven through theoretical and practical analysis is that the wider social processes directly reflect on the state of the joint-stock companies, or the state of corporate governance. This means that the negative trends of modern democracy (in the constitutional sense are almost mirrored in economic capital (EC and our attempt in this paper

  18. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    in a systematic, reproducible fashion using optimized and standardized protocols. The PCBN is funded as a consortium of participating network sites...biospecimens obtained in a systematic, reproducible fashion using optimized and standardized protocols. The PCBN is funded as a consortium of... questionnaires , and surveys, etc. Nothing to report Organization Name: The Brooklyn Hospital Location of Organization: Brooklyn, New York Partner’s

  19. How happy is your web browsing? A model to quantify satisfaction of an Internet user searching for desired information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Anirban; Magarkar, Aniket

    2012-09-01

    We feel happy when web browsing operations provide us with necessary information; otherwise, we feel bitter. How to measure this happiness (or bitterness)? How does the profile of happiness grow and decay during the course of web browsing? We propose a probabilistic framework that models the evolution of user satisfaction, on top of his/her continuous frustration at not finding the required information. It is found that the cumulative satisfaction profile of a web-searching individual can be modeled effectively as the sum of a random number of random terms, where each term is a mutually independent random variable, originating from ‘memoryless’ Poisson flow. Evolution of satisfaction over the entire time interval of a user’s browsing was modeled using auto-correlation analysis. A utilitarian marker, a magnitude of greater than unity of which describes happy web-searching operations, and an empirical limit that connects user’s satisfaction with his frustration level-are proposed too. The presence of pertinent information in the very first page of a website and magnitude of the decay parameter of user satisfaction (frustration, irritation etc.) are found to be two key aspects that dominate the web user’s psychology. The proposed model employed different combinations of decay parameter, searching time and number of helpful websites. The obtained results are found to match the results from three real-life case studies.

  20. Personalized tag prediction via social influence in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenlei; Zhou, Jie

    2011-11-01

    Currently, social tagging systems have been adopted by many social websites. As tags help users to browse social content effectively, personalized tag prediction problem becomes important in social networks. In this paper, we present a new generative probabilistic model to solve personalized tag prediction problem. Differently with previous methods, we consider social influence between users and friends into this model. We bring two major contributions: 1) We propose a new probabilistic model which considers in social influence to describe users' actual tagging activities; 2) Based on this model, we propose a new approach to perform personalized tag prediction task. Experimental results on a real-world dataset crawled from Last.fm show that our method outperforms other methods.