WorldWideScience

Sample records for network mercury analytical

  1. Social network data analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Charu C

    2011-01-01

    Social network analysis applications have experienced tremendous advances within the last few years due in part to increasing trends towards users interacting with each other on the internet. Social networks are organized as graphs, and the data on social networks takes on the form of massive streams, which are mined for a variety of purposes. Social Network Data Analytics covers an important niche in the social network analytics field. This edited volume, contributed by prominent researchers in this field, presents a wide selection of topics on social network data mining such as Structural Pr

  2. Analytics for Cyber Network Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plantenga, Todd. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kolda, Tamara Gibson [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This report provides a brief survey of analytics tools considered relevant to cyber network defense (CND). Ideas and tools come from elds such as statistics, data mining, and knowledge discovery. Some analytics are considered standard mathematical or statistical techniques, while others re ect current research directions. In all cases the report attempts to explain the relevance to CND with brief examples.

  3. Visual analytics of brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Faraco, Carlos; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Yuan, Yixuan; Lv, Jinglei; Deng, Fan; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Zhang, Degang; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2012-05-15

    Identification of regions of interest (ROIs) is a fundamental issue in brain network construction and analysis. Recent studies demonstrate that multimodal neuroimaging approaches and joint analysis strategies are crucial for accurate, reliable and individualized identification of brain ROIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach of visual analytics and its open-source software for ROI definition and brain network construction. By combining neuroscience knowledge and computational intelligence capabilities, visual analytics can generate accurate, reliable and individualized ROIs for brain networks via joint modeling of multimodal neuroimaging data and an intuitive and real-time visual analytics interface. Furthermore, it can be used as a functional ROI optimization and prediction solution when fMRI data is unavailable or inadequate. We have applied this approach to an operation span working memory fMRI/DTI dataset, a schizophrenia DTI/resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) dataset, and a mild cognitive impairment DTI/R-fMRI dataset, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of visual analytics. Our experimental results are encouraging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mercury content in marketed cosmetics: analytical survey in Shijiazhuang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Mercury is one of the skin-lightening ingredients in cosmetics as mercury ions are thought to inhibit the synthesis of the skin pigment melanin in melanocyte cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mercury levels of cosmetics currently marketed in Shijiazhuang, a northern city in China. We collected 146 random cosmetic samples and analyzed for mercury concentrations or levels by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Among the 146 samples, 134 (91.8%) were positive for mercury, and the concentrations of mercury ranged from not detectable to 592 ng/g. Cosmetic samples for children and babies had the highest detection rate (100%), followed by shampoo and hair conditioner (92.3%) and skin-lightening cream (92.0%). All of them were lower than the acceptable limit (1 μg/g) in China. Cosmetics for skin had the highest mean mercury content (45 ng/g), followed by hair products (42.1 ng/g). The concentrations of mercury detected in samples were lower than the current legal limit in China, indicating it may not pose a risk to consumers.

  5. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and treatments are needed. ELEMENTAL MERCURY Inhaled elemental mercury poisoning may be difficult to treat. The person may ... metals from the body INORGANIC MERCURY For inorganic mercury poisoning, treatment often begins with supportive care. The person ...

  6. Customer Intelligence Analytics on Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brano MARKIĆ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering needs, habits and consumer behavior is the primary task of marketing analytics. It is necessary to integrate marketing and analytical skills with IT skills. Such knowledge integration allows access to data (structured and unstructured, their analysis and finding out information about the opinions, attitudes, needs and behavior of customers. In the paper is set the hypothesis that software tools can collect data (messages from social networks, analyze the content of messages and get to know the attitudes of customers about a product, service, tourist destination with the ultimate goal of improving customer relations. Experimental results are based on the analysis of the content of social network Facebook by using the package and function R language. This language showed a satisfactory application and development power in analysis of textual data on social networks for marketing analytics.

  7. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  8. Field analytical techniques for mercury in soils technology evaluation. Topical report, November 1994--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solc, J.; Harju, J.A.; Grisanti, A.A.

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the four field analytical techniques for mercury detection in soils, namely (1) an anodic stripping voltametry technique (ASV) developed and tested by General Electric Corporation; (2) a static headspace analysis (SHSA) technique developed and tested by Dr. Ralph Turner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (3) the BiMelyze{reg_sign} Mercury Immunoassay (Bio) developed and tested by BioNebraska, Inc.; and (4) a transportable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument/technique developed and tested by Spectrace, Inc.

  9. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  10. Network Monitoring as a Streaming Analytics Problem

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Arpit

    2016-11-02

    Programmable switches make it easier to perform flexible network monitoring queries at line rate, and scalable stream processors make it possible to fuse data streams to answer more sophisticated queries about the network in real-time. Unfortunately, processing such network monitoring queries at high traffic rates requires both the switches and the stream processors to filter the traffic iteratively and adaptively so as to extract only that traffic that is of interest to the query at hand. Others have network monitoring in the context of streaming; yet, previous work has not closed the loop in a way that allows network operators to perform streaming analytics for network monitoring applications at scale. To achieve this objective, Sonata allows operators to express a network monitoring query by considering each packet as a tuple and efficiently partitioning each query between the switches and the stream processor through iterative refinement. Sonata extracts only the traffic that pertains to each query, ensuring that the stream processor can scale traffic rates of several terabits per second. We show with a simple example query involving DNS reflection attacks and traffic traces from one of the world\\'s largest IXPs that Sonata can capture 95% of all traffic pertaining to the query, while reducing the overall data rate by a factor of about 400 and the number of required counters by four orders of magnitude. Copyright 2016 ACM.

  11. External quality assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2016-07-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Quality Systems operated five distinct programs to provide external quality assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s (NADP) National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network during 2013–14. The National Trends Network programs include (1) a field audit program to evaluate sample contamination and stability, (2) an interlaboratory comparison program to evaluate analytical laboratory performance, and (3) a colocated sampler program to evaluate bias from precipitation sampler upgrades. The Mercury Deposition Network programs include the (4) system blank program and (5) an interlaboratory comparison program. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends for chemical constituents in wet deposition.

  12. Mercury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Irma|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41398625X

    2017-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring metal that exists in several physical and chemical forms. Inorganic mercury refers to compounds formed after the combining of mercury with elements such as chlorine, sulfur, or oxygen. After combining with carbon by covalent linkage, the compounds formed are called

  13. Sensor Network Information Analytical Methods: Analysis of Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Sensor Network information engineering literature, few references focus on the definition and design of Sensor Network information analytical methods. Among those that do are Munson, et al. and the ISO standards on functional size analysis. To avoid inconsistent vocabulary and potentially incorrect interpretation of data, Sensor Network information analytical methods must be better designed, including definitions, analysis principles, analysis rules, and base units. This paper analyzes the similarities and differences across three different views of analytical methods, and uses a process proposed for the design of Sensor Network information analytical methods to analyze two examples of such methods selected from the literature.

  14. Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are ... National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection ... inadequate human cancer data available for all forms of mercury. Mercuric chloride ...

  15. Analytical Performances of Nanostructured Gold Supported on Metal Oxide Sorbents for the Determination of Gaseous Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured gold supported TiO2, ZnO, and Al2O3 materials (1% w/w Au) were tested as sorbents for gaseous mercury (Hg) trapping and preconcentration. Their analytical performances were first compared with the one of traditional gold wool trap for the quantification of Hg standards injected into the argon flow followed by thermal desorption at 600°C and CVAFS detection. Good linearity and reproducibility were obtained, especially for Au/TiO2 material (R 2 = 0.995; slope: 1.39) in the volume range of 10 to 60 µL (132–778 pg Hg). This latter even showed a better performance compared to pure Au in the volume range of 10 to 100 µL (132–1329 pg Hg) when the carrier gas flow was increased from 60 to 100 mL min−1. The method detection limit (MDL) obtained with Au/TiO2 trap (0.10 pg Hg0 L−1) was suitable for total gaseous mercury (TGM) determination. Au/TiO2 was, therefore, used in trapping and determining TGM in collected air samples. TGM values in the samples ranged from 6 to 10 ng m−3. Similar results were obtained with the commercial gold-coated sand trap which showed an average TGM concentration of 7.8 ± 0.9 ng m−3. PMID:24808914

  16. U.S. Geological Survey external quality-assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2011-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) / National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2011–2012. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples; a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory and Mercury Analytical Laboratory (HAL). A blind-audit program was implemented for the MDN during 2011 to evaluate analytical bias in HAL total mercury concentration data. The co-located–sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from the replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages and precipitation collectors that use optical precipitation sensors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the United States. Co-located rain gage results indicate -3.7 to +6.5 percent bias in NADP precipitation-depth measurements. Co-located collector results suggest that the retrofit of the NADP networks with the new precipitation collectors could cause +10 to +36 percent shifts in NADP annual deposition values for ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate; -7.5 to +41 percent shifts for hydrogen-ion deposition; and larger shifts (-51 to +52 percent) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The prototype N-CON Systems bucket collector typically catches more precipitation than the NADP-approved Aerochem Metrics Model 301 collector.

  17. Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André; Steiger, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Mercury, the planet closest to the Sun, is different in several respects from the other three terrestrial planets. In appearance, it resembles the heavily cratered surface of the Moon, but its density is high, it has a magnetic field and magnetosphere, but no atmosphere or ionosphere. This book reviews the progress made in Mercury studies since the flybys by Mariner 10 in 1974-75, based on the continued research using the Mariner 10 archive, on observations from Earth, and on increasingly realistic models of its interior evolution.

  18. Network performance and fault analytics for LTE wireless service providers

    CERN Document Server

    Kakadia, Deepak; Gilgur, Alexander

    2017-01-01

     This book is intended to describe how to leverage emerging technologies big data analytics and SDN, to address challenges specific to LTE and IP network performance and fault management data in order to more efficiently manage and operate an LTE wireless networks. The proposed integrated solutions permit the LTE network service provider to operate entire integrated network, from RAN to Core , from UE to application service, as one unified system and correspondingly collect and align disparate key metrics and data, using an integrated and holistic approach to network analysis. The LTE wireless network performance and fault involves the network performance and management of network elements in EUTRAN, EPC and IP transport components, not only as individual components, but also as nuances of inter-working of these components. The key metrics for EUTRAN include radio access network accessibility, retainability, integrity, availability and mobility. The key metrics for EPC include MME accessibility, mobility and...

  19. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology

    OpenAIRE

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    During genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of...

  20. External quality-assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn; Rhodes, Mark F.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2009–2010. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples; a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) and Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL). The blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in total Hg concentration data produced by the HAL. The co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and precipitation collectors that use optical sensors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the United States. Results also suggest that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new precipitation collectors could cause –8 to +14 percent shifts in NADP annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations and total deposition values for ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and hydrogen ion, and larger shifts (+13 to +74 percent) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The prototype N-CON Systems bucket collector is more efficient in the catch of precipitation in winter than Aerochem Metrics Model 301 collector, especially for light snowfall.

  1. Global analytic treatment of terrestrial photogrammetric networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mayoud, M

    1980-01-01

    In order to solve certain special CERN metrology problems, analytical terrestrial photogrammetry may have some advantages which are first discussed along with their drawbacks and limitations. In this application, it is necessary to carry out a rigorous and global adjustment of the observations and simultaneously process all the perspective ray bundles. The basic principles, the least squares solution and the stochastic analysis of the results are presented. However, for the CERN project, one wonders if the production of digital theodolites is going to reduce the advantages of the photogrammetric method. (12 refs).

  2. Identifying Geographic Clusters: A Network Analytic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Catini, Roberto; Penner, Orion; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the role of networks and clusters in the global economy. Despite being a popular research topic in economics, sociology and urban studies, geographical clustering of human activity has often studied been by means of predetermined geographical units such as administrative divisions and metropolitan areas. This approach is intrinsically time invariant and it does not allow one to differentiate between different activities. Our goal in this paper is to present a new methodology for identifying clusters, that can be applied to different empirical settings. We use a graph approach based on k-shell decomposition to analyze world biomedical research clusters based on PubMed scientific publications. We identify research institutions and locate their activities in geographical clusters. Leading areas of scientific production and their top performing research institutions are consistently identified at different geographic scales.

  3. Heterogeneous fractionation profiles of meta-analytic coactivation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Angela R; Riedel, Michael C; Okoe, Mershack; Jianu, Radu; Ray, Kimberly L; Eickhoff, Simon B; Smith, Stephen M; Fox, Peter T; Sutherland, Matthew T

    2017-04-01

    Computational cognitive neuroimaging approaches can be leveraged to characterize the hierarchical organization of distributed, functionally specialized networks in the human brain. To this end, we performed large-scale mining across the BrainMap database of coordinate-based activation locations from over 10,000 task-based experiments. Meta-analytic coactivation networks were identified by jointly applying independent component analysis (ICA) and meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) across a wide range of model orders (i.e., d=20-300). We then iteratively computed pairwise correlation coefficients for consecutive model orders to compare spatial network topologies, ultimately yielding fractionation profiles delineating how "parent" functional brain systems decompose into constituent "child" sub-networks. Fractionation profiles differed dramatically across canonical networks: some exhibited complex and extensive fractionation into a large number of sub-networks across the full range of model orders, whereas others exhibited little to no decomposition as model order increased. Hierarchical clustering was applied to evaluate this heterogeneity, yielding three distinct groups of network fractionation profiles: high, moderate, and low fractionation. BrainMap-based functional decoding of resultant coactivation networks revealed a multi-domain association regardless of fractionation complexity. Rather than emphasize a cognitive-motor-perceptual gradient, these outcomes suggest the importance of inter-lobar connectivity in functional brain organization. We conclude that high fractionation networks are complex and comprised of many constituent sub-networks reflecting long-range, inter-lobar connectivity, particularly in fronto-parietal regions. In contrast, low fractionation networks may reflect persistent and stable networks that are more internally coherent and exhibit reduced inter-lobar communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analytic Strategies for Longitudinal Networks with Missing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haye, Kayla; Embree, Joshua; Punkay, Marc; Espelage, Dorothy L; Tucker, Joan S; Green, Harold D

    2017-07-01

    Missing data are often problematic when analyzing complete longitudinal social network data. We review approaches for accommodating missing data when analyzing longitudinal network data with stochastic actor-based models. One common practice is to restrict analyses to participants observed at most or all time points, to achieve model convergence. We propose and evaluate an alternative, more inclusive approach to sub-setting and analyzing longitudinal network data, using data from a school friendship network observed at four waves (N =694). Compared to standard practices, our approach retained more information from partially observed participants, generated a more representative analytic sample, and led to less biased model estimates for this case study. The implications and potential applications for longitudinal network analysis are discussed.

  5. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-04-06

    Social learning-by observing and copying others-is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fails to propagate this cognitive strategy. When people make false intuitive conclusions and are exposed to the analytic output of their peers, they recognize and adopt this correct output. But they fail to engage analytical reasoning in similar subsequent tasks. Thus, humans exhibit an 'unreflective copying bias', which limits their social learning to the output, rather than the process, of their peers' reasoning-even when doing so requires minimal effort and no technical skill. In contrast to much recent work on observation-based social learning, which emphasizes the propagation of successful behaviour through copying, our findings identify a limit on the power of social networks in situations that require analytical reasoning.

  6. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Social learning—by observing and copying others—is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fails to propagate this cognitive strategy. When people make false intuitive conclusions and are exposed to the analytic output of their peers, they recognize and adopt this correct output. But they fail to engage analytical reasoning in similar subsequent tasks. Thus, humans exhibit an ‘unreflective copying bias’, which limits their social learning to the output, rather than the process, of their peers’ reasoning—even when doing so requires minimal effort and no technical skill. In contrast to much recent work on observation-based social learning, which emphasizes the propagation of successful behaviour through copying, our findings identify a limit on the power of social networks in situations that require analytical reasoning. PMID:24501275

  7. Analytical Computation of the Epidemic Threshold on Temporal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Valdano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The time variation of contacts in a networked system may fundamentally alter the properties of spreading processes and affect the condition for large-scale propagation, as encoded in the epidemic threshold. Despite the great interest in the problem for the physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and epidemiology communities, a full theoretical understanding is still missing and currently limited to the cases where the time-scale separation holds between spreading and network dynamics or to specific temporal network models. We consider a Markov chain description of the susceptible-infectious-susceptible process on an arbitrary temporal network. By adopting a multilayer perspective, we develop a general analytical derivation of the epidemic threshold in terms of the spectral radius of a matrix that encodes both network structure and disease dynamics. The accuracy of the approach is confirmed on a set of temporal models and empirical networks and against numerical results. In addition, we explore how the threshold changes when varying the overall time of observation of the temporal network, so as to provide insights on the optimal time window for data collection of empirical temporal networked systems. Our framework is of both fundamental and practical interest, as it offers novel understanding of the interplay between temporal networks and spreading dynamics.

  8. Assessing Partnership Alternatives in an IT Network Employing Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Reza Salamat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main critical success factors for the companies is their ability to build and maintain an effective collaborative network. This is more critical in the IT industry where the development of sustainable competitive advantage requires an integration of various resources, platforms, and capabilities provided by various actors. Employing such a collaborative network will dramatically change the operations management and promote flexibility and agility. Despite its importance, there is a lack of an analytical tool on collaborative network building process. In this paper, we propose an optimization model employing AHP and multiobjective programming for collaborative network building process based on two interorganizational relationships’ theories, namely, (i transaction cost theory and (ii resource-based view, which are representative of short-term and long-term considerations. The five different methods were employed to solve the formulation and their performances were compared. The model is implemented in an IT company who was in process of developing a large-scale enterprise resource planning (ERP system. The results show that the collaborative network formed through this selection process was more efficient in terms of cost, time, and development speed. The framework offers novel theoretical underpinning and analytical solutions and can be used as an effective tool in selecting network alternatives.

  9. Analytic solution of neural network with disordered lateral inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kosuke; Hatchett, J. P. L.; Okada, Masato

    2006-05-01

    The replica method has played a key role in analyzing systems with disorder, e.g., the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, and associative neural networks. Here we study the influence of disorder in the lateral inhibition type interactions on the cooperative and uncooperative behavior of recurrent neural networks by using the replica method. Although the interaction between neurons has a dependency on distance, our model can be solved analytically. Bifurcation analysis identifies the boundaries between paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, spin-glass, and localized phases. In the localized phase, the network shows a bump like activity, which is often used as a model of spatial working memory or columnar activity in the visual cortex. Simulation results show that disordered interactions can stabilize the drift the of bump position, which is commonly observed in conventional lateral inhibition type neural networks.

  10. MercNet: A national monitoring network to assess responses to changing mercury emissions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeltz, D.; Evers, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T.; Artz, R.; Cohen, M.; Gay, D.; Haeuber, R.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Mason, R.; Morris, K.; Wiener, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    A partnership of federal and state agencies, tribes, industry, and scientists from academic research and environmental organizations is establishing a national, policy-relevant mercury monitoring network, called MercNet, to address key questions concerning changes in anthropogenic mercury emissions and deposition, associated linkages to ecosystem effects, and recovery from mercury contamination. This network would quantify mercury in the atmosphere, land, water, and biota in terrestrial, freshwater, and coastal ecosystems to provide a national scientific capability for evaluating the benefits and effectiveness of emission controls. Program development began with two workshops, convened to establish network goals, to select key indicators for monitoring, to propose a geographic network of monitoring sites, and to design a monitoring plan. MercNet relies strongly on multi-institutional partnerships to secure the capabilities and comprehensive data that are needed to develop, calibrate, and refine predictive mercury models and to guide effective management. Ongoing collaborative efforts include the: (1) development of regional multi-media databases on mercury in the Laurentian Great Lakes, northeastern United States, and eastern Canada; (2) syntheses and reporting of these data for the scientific and policy communities; and (3) evaluation of potential monitoring sites. The MercNet approach could be applied to the development of other monitoring programs, such as emerging efforts to monitor and assess global mercury emission controls. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA).

  11. Measuring Respiratory Pressures with Mercury Manometer in Low Economic Health Care Settings- An Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Vishnupriya; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Trakroo, Madanmohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health care economics restricts many health centers from using hi-tech diagnostics equipment. Mercury manometers are used for calibration of pressure transducers. If standardized it would be a cost effective, simple alternative to transducers in low economic settings. Aim To analyse the feasibility of mercury manometer usage in respiratory pressure measurement. Materials and Methods The experimental study was conducted with 30 healthy volunteers of age group 17–19 yrs. They were recruited by using simple random sampling method. The volunteers were made familiarized to lab environment, instrument and techniques of maximum inspiratory (Pimax) and expiratory pressures (Pemax). Then parameters were recorded using mercury manometer connected to different syringes as mouth piece (2.5 ml, 10 ml, and 20 ml) and with sphygmomanometer. Statistical analysis was done by using IBM SPSS statistics version 21. Results The Pimax was 111.07 ± 6.53 with a 2.5 ml syringe as mouth piece. With 20 ml syringe it was 61.47 ± 9.98. PEmax with 2.5 ml syringe was 70.33 ± 8.19 with a confidence limit of 2.93 and with sphygmomanometer was 99.33 ± 8.16 with a confidence limit of 2.92. There was a change in recorded pressure and the correlation analysis result showed a significant difference from both above and below 10 ml mouth piece range. Conclusion Mercury manometers could be used for recording respiratory pressures in low economic facilities once standardized. Size of syringe to be used as mouth piece needs further more works although this study finds 10 ml syringe as suitable. PMID:26894061

  12. Analytical solution of a stochastic content-based network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mungan, Muhittin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Bogazici University, 34342 Bebek Istanbul (Turkey); Guersey Institute, PO Box 6, Cengelkoey, 34680 Istanbul (Turkey); Kabakoglu, Alkan [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Koc University, 34450 Sariyer Istanbul (Turkey); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Balcan, Duygu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey); Erzan, Ayse [Guersey Institute, PO Box 6, Cengelkoey, 34680 Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-11-04

    We define and completely solve a content-based directed network whose nodes consist of random words and an adjacency rule involving perfect or approximate matches for an alphabet with an arbitrary number of letters. The analytic expression for the out-degree distribution shows a crossover from a leading power law behaviour to a log-periodic regime bounded by a different power law decay. The leading exponents in the two regions have a weak dependence on the mean word length, and an even weaker dependence on the alphabet size. The in-degree distribution, on the other hand, is much narrower and does not show any scaling behaviour.

  13. Accelerating Network Traffic Analytics Using Query-DrivenVisualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Campbell, Scott; Dart, Eli; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu,Kesheng

    2006-07-29

    Realizing operational analytics solutions where large and complex data must be analyzed in a time-critical fashion entails integrating many different types of technology. This paper focuses on an interdisciplinary combination of scientific data management and visualization/analysis technologies targeted at reducing the time required for data filtering, querying, hypothesis testing and knowledge discovery in the domain of network connection data analysis. We show that use of compressed bitmap indexing can quickly answer queries in an interactive visual data analysis application, and compare its performance with two alternatives for serial and parallel filtering/querying on 2.5 billion records worth of network connection data collected over a period of 42 weeks. Our approach to visual network connection data exploration centers on two primary factors: interactive ad-hoc and multiresolution query formulation and execution over n dimensions and visual display of then-dimensional histogram results. This combination is applied in a case study to detect a distributed network scan and to then identify the set of remote hosts participating in the attack. Our approach is sufficiently general to be applied to a diverse set of data understanding problems as well as used in conjunction with a diverse set of analysis and visualization tools.

  14. Network analytical tool for monitoring global food safety highlights China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Nepusz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beijing Declaration on food safety and security was signed by over fifty countries with the aim of developing comprehensive programs for monitoring food safety and security on behalf of their citizens. Currently, comprehensive systems for food safety and security are absent in many countries, and the systems that are in place have been developed on different principles allowing poor opportunities for integration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed a user-friendly analytical tool based on network approaches for instant customized analysis of food alert patterns in the European dataset from the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed. Data taken from alert logs between January 2003-August 2008 were processed using network analysis to i capture complexity, ii analyze trends, and iii predict possible effects of interventions by identifying patterns of reporting activities between countries. The detector and transgressor relationships are readily identifiable between countries which are ranked using i Google's PageRank algorithm and ii the HITS algorithm of Kleinberg. The program identifies Iran, China and Turkey as the transgressors with the largest number of alerts. However, when characterized by impact, counting the transgressor index and the number of countries involved, China predominates as a transgressor country. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reports the first development of a network analysis approach to inform countries on their transgressor and detector profiles as a user-friendly aid for the adoption of the Beijing Declaration. The ability to instantly access the country-specific components of the several thousand annual reports will enable each country to identify the major transgressors and detectors within its trading network. Moreover, the tool can be used to monitor trading countries for improved detector/transgressor ratios.

  15. Selecting public relations personnel of hospitals by analytic network process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Sen-Kuei; Chang, Kuei-Lun

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the use of analytic network process (ANP) in the Taiwanese hospital public relations personnel selection process. Starting with interviewing 48 practitioners and executives in north Taiwan, we collected selection criteria. Then, we retained the 12 critical criteria that were mentioned above 40 times by theses respondents, including: interpersonal skill, experience, negotiation, language, ability to follow orders, cognitive ability, adaptation to environment, adaptation to company, emotion, loyalty, attitude, and Response. Finally, we discussed with the 20 executives to take these important criteria into three perspectives to structure the hierarchy for hospital public relations personnel selection. After discussing with practitioners and executives, we find that selecting criteria are interrelated. The ANP, which incorporates interdependence relationships, is a new approach for multi-criteria decision-making. Thus, we apply ANP to select the most optimal public relations personnel of hospitals. An empirical study of public relations personnel selection problems in Taiwan hospitals is conducted to illustrate how the selection procedure works.

  16. Applying fuzzy analytic network process in quality function deployment model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Afsharkazemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an empirical study of QFD implementation when fuzzy numbers are used to handle the uncertainty associated with different components of the proposed model. We implement fuzzy analytical network to find the relative importance of various criteria and using fuzzy numbers we calculate the relative importance of these factors. The proposed model of this paper uses fuzzy matrix and house of quality to study the products development in QFD and also the second phase i.e. part deployment. In most researches, the primary objective is only on CRs to implement the quality function deployment and some other criteria such as production costs, manufacturing costs etc were disregarded. The results of using fuzzy analysis network process based on the QFD model in Daroupat packaging company to develop PVDC show that the most important indexes are being waterproof, resistant pill packages, and production cost. In addition, the PVDC coating is the most important index in terms of company experts’ point of view.

  17. An analytical method for determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy; Determinazione di mercurio. Metodo per spettrometria di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, L. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Mastroianni, D.; Capri, S.; Pettine, M. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Ricerca sulle Acque; Spezia, S.; Bettinelli, M. [ENEL, Unified Modelling Language, Piacenza (Italy)

    1999-09-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of total mercury in wastewaters and natural waters is described. Aqueous samples are fast digested with nitric acid by using the microwave-oven technique; the analysis of mercury is then performed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) using two possible instrumental apparatus (batch system or flow injection). Sodium borohydride is used as the reducing agent for mercury in solution (Method A). The use of amalgamation traps on gold for the preconcentration of mercury lowers the detection limit of the analyte (Method B). [Italian] Viene descritta una procedura analitica per la determinazione del mercurio totale in acque di scarico e naturali. Il campione acquoso viene sottoposto a mineralizzazione con acido nitrico in forno a microonde e analizzato mediante spettroscopia di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS) in due possibili configurazioni strumentali (sistema batch oppure flow injection), utilizzando sodio boro idruro come agente riducente del mercurio (metodo A). L'impiego della trappola di oro per la preconcentrazione del mercurio mediante amalgama consente di determinare l'analita a livelli di pochi ng/L (metodo B).

  18. Development of a Ground-Based Atmospheric Monitoring Network for the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprovieri F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Consistent, high-quality measurements of atmospheric mercury (Hg are necessary in order to better understand Hg emissions, transport, and deposition on a global scale. Although the number of atmospheric Hg monitoring stations has increased in recent years, the available measurement database is limited and there are many regions of the world where measurements have not been extensively performed. Long-term atmospheric Hg monitoring and additional ground-based monitoring sites are needed in order to generate datasets that will offer new insight and information about the global scale trends of atmospheric Hg emissions and deposition. In the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a coordinated global observational network for atmospheric Hg is being established. The overall research strategy of GMOS is to develop a state-of-the-art observation system able to provide information on the concentration of Hg species in ambient air and precipitation on the global scale. This network is being developed by integrating previously established ground-based atmospheric Hg monitoring stations with newly established GMOS sites that are located both at high altitude and sea level locations, as well as in climatically diverse regions. Through the collection of consistent, high-quality atmospheric Hg measurement data, we seek to create a comprehensive assessment of atmospheric Hg concentrations and their dependence on meteorology, long-range atmospheric transport and atmospheric emissions.

  19. Laboratory-scale evaluation of various sampling and analytical methods for determining mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbede, R.O.; Bochan, A.J.; Clements, J.L. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Comparative bench-scale mercury sampling method tests were performed at the Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) laboratories for EPA Method 101A, EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro Method. Both blank and impinger spiking experiments were performed. The experimental results show that the ambient level of mercury in the ATS laboratory is at or below the detection limit (10 ng Hg) as measured by a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CVAAS) which was used to analyze the mercury samples. From the mercury spike studies, the following observations and findings were made. (a) The recovery of mercury spikes using EPA Method 101A was 104%. (b) The Ontario Hydro Method retains about 90% of mercury spikes in the first absorbing solution but has a total spike retention of 106%. As a result, the test data shows possible migration of spiked mercury from the first impinger solution (KCI) to the permanganate impingers. (c) For the EPA Method 29 solutions, when only the peroxide impingers were spiked, mercury recoveries were 65.6% for the peroxide impingers, 0.1% for the knockout impinger and 32.8% for the permanganate impingers with an average total mercury recovery of 98.4%. At press time, data was still being obtained for both the peroxide and permanganate impinger solution spikes. This and other data will be available at the presentation.

  20. Applications of surface analytical techniques for study of the interactions between mercury and fluorescent lamp materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Twan A; Frisk, T A; Grossman, M W

    2002-08-01

    Several surface analytical techniques, including electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA)(X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), were used to study the interaction between Hg and other components of fluorescent lamps, a very critical issue in lighting industries. Active sites, responsible for Hg interaction/deposition, can be successfully identified by comparing the x- y distribution (obtained by ESCA mapping) and depth distribution (available through SNMS) of respective lamp components with that of Hg. A correlation in both depth and x- y distribution is strong evidence of site preference for Hg interaction/deposition. A burial mechanism is, however, proposed when only depth distribution, not x- y, is correlated. Other modes of ESCA (high resolution, angle-resolved, etc.) were also helpful. Information about the valence states of the interacted Hg species would help to define the nature of the interaction.

  1. Measurement of company effectiveness using analytic network process method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Janjić

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable development of an organisation is monitored through the organisation’s performance, which beforehand incorporates all stakeholders’ requirements in its strategy. The strategic management concept enables organisations to monitor and evaluate their effectiveness along with efficiency by monitoring of the implementation of set strategic goals. In the process of monitoring and measuring effectiveness, an organisation can use multiple-criteria decision-making methods as help. This study uses the method of analytic network process (ANP to define the weight factors of the mutual influences of all the important elements of an organisation’s strategy. The calculation of an organisation’s effectiveness is based on the weight factors and the degree of fulfilment of the goal values of the strategic map measures. New business conditions influence the changes in the importance of certain elements of an organisation’s business in relation to competitive advantage on the market, and on the market, increasing emphasis is given to non-material resources in the process of selection of the organisation’s most important measures.

  2. Using analytic network process for evaluating mobile text entry methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Lanndon A; Seva, Rosemary R

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights a preference evaluation methodology for text entry methods in a touch keyboard smartphone using analytic network process (ANP). Evaluation of text entry methods in literature mainly considers speed and accuracy. This study presents an alternative means for selecting text entry method that considers user preference. A case study was carried out with a group of experts who were asked to develop a selection decision model of five text entry methods. The decision problem is flexible enough to reflect interdependencies of decision elements that are necessary in describing real-life conditions. Results showed that QWERTY method is more preferred than other text entry methods while arrangement of keys is the most preferred criterion in characterizing a sound method. Sensitivity analysis using simulation of normally distributed random numbers under fairly large perturbation reported the foregoing results reliable enough to reflect robust judgment. The main contribution of this paper is the introduction of a multi-criteria decision approach in the preference evaluation of text entry methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating the Performance of Taiwan Homestay Using Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chung Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Homestay industry in Taiwan is not only thriving, but also its operation is moving gradually toward elaboration strategy and in a specialized-operation manner these years. Nevertheless, the evaluation frameworks of the earlier studies were sporadically constructed from an overall perspective of homestays. Moreover, the functions, operational model, and natures of homestays are dissimilar to those of hotels; therefore, if the evaluation criteria of homestays employ the ones of hotels, it would appear to be incoherent and incompatible. This study has accordingly developed and constructed a set of evaluation indicators tailor-made for homestay sector through discussion of literatures and interviewing experts so that the evaluation framework would be more comprehensive and more practical. In the process of interviewing experts, it was discovered that dependences lay on the aspects and criteria. Consequently, this research chose the ANP (analytic network process to get the weights and, further, to acquire the homestay business performance through fuzzy theory. The result reveals, as regards key aspects, homestay proprietors and customer groups both weight the surroundings of the building and features, service quality, operation, and management most. In respect to overall homestay performance, customer groups consider it has reached the satisfactory level.

  4. Supercritical boiler material selection using fuzzy analytic network process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Ranjan Maity

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of world is being adversely affected by the scarcity of power and energy. To survive in the next generation, it is thus necessary to explore the non-conventional energy sources and efficiently consume the available sources. For efficient exploitation of the existing energy sources, a great scope lies in the use of Rankin cycle-based thermal power plants. Today, the gross efficiency of Rankin cycle-based thermal power plants is less than 28% which has been increased up to 40% with reheating and regenerative cycles. But, it can be further improved up to 47% by using supercritical power plant technology. Supercritical power plants use supercritical boilers which are able to withstand a very high temperature (650-720˚C and pressure (22.1 MPa while producing superheated steam. The thermal efficiency of a supercritical boiler greatly depends on the material of its different components. The supercritical boiler material should possess high creep rupture strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, high specific heat and very high temperature withstandability. This paper considers a list of seven supercritical boiler materials whose performance is evaluated based on seven pivotal criteria. Given the intricacy and difficulty of this supercritical boiler material selection problem having interactions and interdependencies between different criteria, this paper applies fuzzy analytic network process to select the most appropriate material for a supercritical boiler. Rene 41 is the best supercritical boiler material, whereas, Haynes 230 is the worst preferred choice.

  5. The perisylvian language network and language analytical abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepinska, Olga; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Dutton, Eleanor M; Caspers, Johanneke; Schiller, Niels O

    2017-10-01

    Aiming at exploring the brain's structural organisation underlying successful second language learning, we investigate the anatomy of the perisylvian language network in a group of healthy adults, consisting of participants with high and average language analytical abilities. Utilising deterministic tractography, six tracts per participant (left and right long direct segment, left and right indirect anterior segment and left and right indirect posterior segment) were virtually dissected and measurements pertaining to their microstructural organisation were collected. Our results obtained by means of linear discriminant analysis pointed to mean diffusivity (MD) values of three tracts (right anterior, left long and left anterior segments) as best discriminating between the two groups. By far the highest coefficient was obtained for the MD values of the right anterior segment, pointing to the role of the right white matter fronto-parietal connectivity for superior language learning abilities. The results imply the importance of attentional processes and reasoning abilities for successful L2 acquisition, and support previous findings concerning right-hemispheric involvement in language learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurement of company effectiveness using analytic network process method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goran, Janjić; Zorana, Tanasić; Borut, Kosec

    2017-07-01

    The sustainable development of an organisation is monitored through the organisation's performance, which beforehand incorporates all stakeholders' requirements in its strategy. The strategic management concept enables organisations to monitor and evaluate their effectiveness along with efficiency by monitoring of the implementation of set strategic goals. In the process of monitoring and measuring effectiveness, an organisation can use multiple-criteria decision-making methods as help. This study uses the method of analytic network process (ANP) to define the weight factors of the mutual influences of all the important elements of an organisation's strategy. The calculation of an organisation's effectiveness is based on the weight factors and the degree of fulfilment of the goal values of the strategic map measures. New business conditions influence the changes in the importance of certain elements of an organisation's business in relation to competitive advantage on the market, and on the market, increasing emphasis is given to non-material resources in the process of selection of the organisation's most important measures.

  7. Analytical network process based optimum cluster head selection in wireless sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, Haleem; Javed, Huma; Jan, Bilal; Ahmad, Jamil; Ali, Shaukat; Khalil, Falak Naz; Khan, Murad

    2017-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are becoming ubiquitous in everyday life due to their applications in weather forecasting, surveillance, implantable sensors for health monitoring and other plethora of applications. WSN is equipped with hundreds and thousands of small sensor nodes. As the size of a sensor node decreases, critical issues such as limited energy, computation time and limited memory become even more highlighted. In such a case, network lifetime mainly depends on efficient use of available resources. Organizing nearby nodes into clusters make it convenient to efficiently manage each cluster as well as the overall network. In this paper, we extend our previous work of grid-based hybrid network deployment approach, in which merge and split technique has been proposed to construct network topology. Constructing topology through our proposed technique, in this paper we have used analytical network process (ANP) model for cluster head selection in WSN. Five distinct parameters: distance from nodes (DistNode), residual energy level (REL), distance from centroid (DistCent), number of times the node has been selected as cluster head (TCH) and merged node (MN) are considered for CH selection. The problem of CH selection based on these parameters is tackled as a multi criteria decision system, for which ANP method is used for optimum cluster head selection. Main contribution of this work is to check the applicability of ANP model for cluster head selection in WSN. In addition, sensitivity analysis is carried out to check the stability of alternatives (available candidate nodes) and their ranking for different scenarios. The simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms existing energy efficient clustering protocols in terms of optimum CH selection and minimizing CH reselection process that results in extending overall network lifetime. This paper analyzes that ANP method used for CH selection with better understanding of the dependencies of

  8. Mussel tissue (T-31) - A new analytical quality control material for the determination of mercury and arsenic in mussels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawlik, B. [Joint Research Centre Ispra, Ispra, Varese (Italy). Environment Institute]|[Muenchen, Technische Universitaet (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Oekologische Chemie und Umweltanalytik; Druges, M. [Thomson Microelectronics, Crolles (France); Bianchi, M.; Muntau, H. [Joint Research Centre Ispra, Ispra, Varese (Italy). Environment Institute; Bortoli, A. [ULSS 12, Venice (Italy). Presidio Multizonale di Prevenzione; Kettrup, A. [Muenchen, Technische Universitaet (Germany). Lehrstuhl fur Oekologische Chemie und Umweltanalytik]|[GSF Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie

    1998-05-01

    The use of filter-feeding molluscs for the monitoring of selected contaminant levels in the marine environment is well-known in the scientific community. In the order to assure the quality of those analysis and to prepare laboratories for accreditation procedures certified reference materials and proficiency testing campaigns were introduced. However, there is still a need for the introduction of suitable analytical quality materials of high quality which can be used on a daily basis. This paper therefore describes the preparation of a mussel tissue material for the internal quality control of Hg and As analysis in bivalves, as well as the principle of preparation and the analytical characterisation of such a material. The total concentration for arsenic (8.98 {+-} 0.67 {mu}g/g) and mercury (0.169 {+-} 0.005 {mu}g/g) was determined by the use of different techniques. Additionally, indicative values for major constituents (C, H, N, Na, Cl, P, S, K, Mg, Ca, Si, Fe, Al, Br, Zn, Sr) and some trace elements (Cu, Cd, Pb, Ni) were measured. [Italiano] L`uso di molluschi filtratori nel monitoraggio dei livelli di contaminazione in ambiente marino e` ben noto in ambito scientifico. Per assicurare la qualita` di queste analisi e preparare i laboratori alle procedure di accreditamento e stato introdotto l`uso di materiali di riferimento certificati accoppiato alla partecipazione a campagne di controllo interlaboratoriale. Attualmente non sono ancora disponibili materiali di riferimento appropriati e di alta qualita`, che possano essere usati su base quotidiana. Questo lavoro descrive la preparazione di un materiale di riferimanto di cozze da usare come mezzo di controllo di qualita` interna e i principi di preparazione e di caratterizzazione analitica di un materiale di questo tipo. La concentrazione totale dell`arsenico (8.98 {+-} 0.67 {mu}g/g) e del mercurio (0.169 {+-} 0.005 {mu}g/g) sono state determinati mediante l`uso di differenti tecniche. Sono stati in oltre misurati

  9. An analytical approach to optical burst switched networks

    CERN Document Server

    Venkatesh, T

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the latest results on modeling and analysis of OBS networks. It classifies all the literature on the topic, and its scope extends to include discussion of high-speed communication networks with limited or no buffers.

  10. Towards effective visual analytics on multiplex and multilayer networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Luca; Magnani, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss visualisation strategies for multiplex networks. Since Moreno’s early works on network analysis, visualisation has been one of the main ways to understand networks thanks to its ability to summarise a complex structure into a single representation highlighting multiple ...

  11. An analytic approach to the design of survivable optical mesh networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Manish

    2007-12-01

    One of the key components of the cost of building and operating optical mesh communication networks is the requirement of survivability and many mesh survivability schemes have been suggested and their cost and performance numerically evaluated in the literature. However, little work has been done in developing comprehensive and tractable analytic models of the requirements in terms of capacity deployment and performance of the different mesh restoration schemes. Such analytic models are all the more significant given the large computation time required to numerically evaluate every possible network scenario. The focus of this thesis is to fill this void in our understanding of the costs and performance of mesh restoration schemes. Analytic models of the capacity requirements of mesh restoration schemes are presented and the accuracy of the analytic models evaluated over a wide range of network scenarios. Analytic models of the temporal performance of mesh restoration schemes are also presented thus extending for the first time the network modeling effort into the operational expenditure domain. Consequently, the number and nature of variables incorporated into the analysis is also enhanced from just the network topology and demand profile to include the switch hardware and routing protocols. We show for the first time in a quantifiable fashion the consequences of certain technology choices on the operational expenditure of optical mesh networks. Finally, the analytic models are leveraged to design a novel mesh network restoration architecture with lower restoration capacity requirement and better temporal performance than existing architectures. Such an architecture, although relevant in its own right due to its lower cost and better performance also represents a paradigm shift in the design philosophy of mesh networks wherein the analytic model guides the design process and numerical analysis confirms improvements predicted by the model. Future applications of

  12. Measurement of Gaseous Oxidized Mercury at a SEARCH Network Site in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Gustin, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    There are three operationally defined forms of mercury (Hg) that have been measured in the atmosphere. These include gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM), and particle-bound Hg (PBM). The chemical compounds that make up GOM are currently not well understood, and because of this we do not understand its transport and fate. Additionally, there are limitations associated with the current measurement method, the Tekran 2537/1130/1135 system. Recent work has shown that this system underestimates GOM concentrations, and may not measure all forms. Here we describe work building on ongoing research that focuses on understanding the limitations associated with the instrument, and the chemical forms of GOM. Mercury data have been collected at a Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network site, Outlying Landing Field (OLF), by the University of Nevada-Reno since 2006. This site is located near the Gulf of Mexico in western Florida. This site is potentially influenced by multiple Hg sources including marine air, electricity generating facilities, mobile sources, and long range transport from high elevation and inland regions. Recent work using data from this location and two others in Florida indicated that on top of background deposition, Hg input to OLF is due to local mobile sources, and long range transport in the spring. Air masses with different chemistry have been hypothesized to carry different GOM compounds. To test this hypothesis, an active Hg sampling system that collects GOM on nylon and cation-exchange membranes is being deployed at OLF. Measurements started March 2013. Here we will present data collected so far, and compare concentrations measured to those obtained using a Tekran system. Ancillary data including meteorology, criteria air pollutants, and those collected using surrogated surfaces for dry Hg deposition and Hg passive samplers will be applied to help understand the sources of GOM. Back trajectory analyses

  13. Socio-semantic Networks of Research Publications in the Learning Analytics Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fazeli, S., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2013, April). Socio-semantic Networks of Research Publications in the Learning Analytics Community. Presentation at the Learning Analystic and Knowelege (LAK13), Leuven, Belgium.

  14. USER PERCEPTION TOWARDS SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES - AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. S. Shanmugapriya; A. Kokila

    2017-01-01

    A social networking site (SNS) or social media is an online platform that people use to build social networks or social relations with other people who share similar personal or career interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. The advent of Social Networking sites and its resources have revolutionized the communication and social relation world. This paper aims to assess the user perception towards SNS like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. In the study data was obtained thro...

  15. A Mobile Network Planning Tool Based on Data Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Moysen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planning future mobile networks entails multiple challenges due to the high complexity of the network to be managed. Beyond 4G and 5G networks are expected to be characterized by a high densification of nodes and heterogeneity of layers, applications, and Radio Access Technologies (RAT. In this context, a network planning tool capable of dealing with this complexity is highly convenient. The objective is to exploit the information produced by and already available in the network to properly deploy, configure, and optimise network nodes. This work presents such a smart network planning tool that exploits Machine Learning (ML techniques. The proposed approach is able to predict the Quality of Service (QoS experienced by the users based on the measurement history of the network. We select Physical Resource Block (PRB per Megabit (Mb as our main QoS indicator to optimise, since minimizing this metric allows offering the same service to users by consuming less resources, so, being more cost-effective. Two cases of study are considered in order to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme, one to smartly plan the small cell deployment in a dense indoor scenario and a second one to timely face a detected fault in a macrocell network.

  16. Application of analytical learning to the syntesis of neural network for process control of physical rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Trunov

    2015-01-01

    The problem of analytical learning of artificial neural network (ANN) is consider. Solutions in the analytic form for synaptic weight coefficients (SWC) as recurrent sequence are obtained. Convergence of recurrent approximation for two scheme of approach by a linear and quadratic curve are proved and discussed

  17. Socio-semantic Networks of Research Publications in the Learning Analytics Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fazeli, S., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2013). Socio-semantic Networks of Research Publications in the Learning Analytics Community. In M. d'Aquin, S. Dietze, H. Drachsler, E. Herder, & D. Taibi (Eds.), Linked data challenge, Learning Analytic and Knowledge (LAK13) (pp. 6-10). Vol. 974, Leuven,

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE CHEMICAL FORMS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TARGET POLLUTANTS IN COAL-FIRED BOILER FLUE GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terence J. McManus, Ph.D.

    1999-06-30

    . (ATS) as a secondary DOE contractor on this project, assessed the sampling and analytical plans and the emission reports of the five primary contractors to determine how successful the contractors were in satisfying their defined objectives. ATS identified difficulties and inconsistencies in a number of sampling and analytical methodologies in these studies. In particular there was uncertainty as to the validity of the sampling and analytical methods used to differentiate the chemical forms of mercury observed in coal flue gas. Considering the differences in the mercury species with regard to human toxicity, the rate of transport through the ecosystem and the design variations in possible emission control schemes, DOE sought an accurate and reliable means to identify and quantify the various mercury compounds emitted by coal-fired utility boilers. ATS, as a contractor for DOE, completed both bench- and pilot-scale studies on various mercury speciation methods. The final validation of the modified Ontario-Hydro Method, its acceptance by DOE and submission of the method for adoption by ASTM was a direct result of these studies carried out in collaboration with the University of North Dakota's Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). This report presents the results from studies carried out at ATS in the development of analytical methods to identify and quantify various chemical species, particularly those of mercury, in coal derived flue gas. Laboratory- and pilot-scale studies, not only on mercury species, but also on other inorganics and organics present in coal combustion flue gas are reported.

  19. Analytical Modeling of Medium Access Control Protocols in Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Imperatives and chal- lenges. Ad Hoc Networks, 1(1):13–64, July 2003. [28] I. Chlamtac and A. Faragó. Making transmission schedules immune to topology changes...P. Karn. MACA - a new channel access method for packet radio. In ARRL/CRRL Amateur Radio 9th Computer Networking Conference, pages 134–140, 1990

  20. The implementation of a system for managing analytical quality in networked laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassam, Nuthar; Lindsay, Chris; Harrison, Kevin; Thompson, Douglas; Bosomworth, Mike P; Barth, Julian H

    2011-03-01

    In a network of laboratories analytical variability between instruments, even of the same type, may exist for reasons beyond the control of laboratory staff. Controlling variability is a prerequisite for the application of shared reference ranges and for ensuring the transferability of patient test results. Controlling variability requires a robust, non-conventional quality system to detect poor performance of analysers that are geographically distant. Essential to this quality system is a set of well-defined quality specifications. The approach used in our study started with (1) selection of a model for quality specifications based on biological variation; the 'three-level model' (TLM) was selected on the basis of its flexibility to accommodate various levels of analytical performance; (2) determination of the performance characteristics of the 71 analytes measured in core biochemistry in terms of imprecision and bias; (3) defining quality requirements in the form of imprecision, bias and total error for 71 analytes measured routinely in core biochemistry; and (4) developing software to assist a consistent wide application of the quality specifications and to monitor analytical indices to the common quality specifications. In this paper we describe how we have implemented this model across our network. Forty-six of the 71 analytes in our core laboratory repertoire were allocated to the TLM. We were able to demonstrate equivalence of results on all analysers, for 42 out of 46 analytes allocated to this model. We propose that other networked laboratories should investigate the suitability of this quality system for use in their network.

  1. Graph analytic characterization of resting state networks in post-stroke aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kiran

    2014-04-01

    Relative to controls, these results indicate inefficiencies in the post-stroke resting-state network, with greater shifts in network hubs in PWA dependent on the site and size of lesion. Such graph analytic results may prove informative in advancing individual-specific therapies.

  2. Distributed data networks: a blueprint for Big Data sharing and healthcare analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Jennifer R

    2017-01-01

    This paper defines the attributes of distributed data networks and outlines the data and analytic infrastructure needed to build and maintain a successful network. We use examples from one successful implementation of a large-scale, multisite, healthcare-related distributed data network, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-sponsored Sentinel Initiative. Analytic infrastructure-development concepts are discussed from the perspective of promoting six pillars of analytic infrastructure: consistency, reusability, flexibility, scalability, transparency, and reproducibility. This paper also introduces one use case for machine learning algorithm development to fully utilize and advance the portfolio of population health analytics, particularly those using multisite administrative data sources. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Reasoning and Knowledge Acquisition Framework for 5G Network Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Sotelo Monge

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic self-management is a key challenge for next-generation networks. This paper proposes an automated analysis framework to infer knowledge in 5G networks with the aim to understand the network status and to predict potential situations that might disrupt the network operability. The framework is based on the Endsley situational awareness model, and integrates automated capabilities for metrics discovery, pattern recognition, prediction techniques and rule-based reasoning to infer anomalous situations in the current operational context. Those situations should then be mitigated, either proactive or reactively, by a more complex decision-making process. The framework is driven by a use case methodology, where the network administrator is able to customize the knowledge inference rules and operational parameters. The proposal has also been instantiated to prove its adaptability to a real use case. To this end, a reference network traffic dataset was used to identify suspicious patterns and to predict the behavior of the monitored data volume. The preliminary results suggest a good level of accuracy on the inference of anomalous traffic volumes based on a simple configuration.

  4. Reasoning and Knowledge Acquisition Framework for 5G Network Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo Monge, Marco Antonio; Maestre Vidal, Jorge; García Villalba, Luis Javier

    2017-10-21

    Autonomic self-management is a key challenge for next-generation networks. This paper proposes an automated analysis framework to infer knowledge in 5G networks with the aim to understand the network status and to predict potential situations that might disrupt the network operability. The framework is based on the Endsley situational awareness model, and integrates automated capabilities for metrics discovery, pattern recognition, prediction techniques and rule-based reasoning to infer anomalous situations in the current operational context. Those situations should then be mitigated, either proactive or reactively, by a more complex decision-making process. The framework is driven by a use case methodology, where the network administrator is able to customize the knowledge inference rules and operational parameters. The proposal has also been instantiated to prove its adaptability to a real use case. To this end, a reference network traffic dataset was used to identify suspicious patterns and to predict the behavior of the monitored data volume. The preliminary results suggest a good level of accuracy on the inference of anomalous traffic volumes based on a simple configuration.

  5. An analytic approximation of the feasible space of metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, Alfredo; Muntoni, Anna Paola; Pagnani, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Assuming a steady-state condition within a cell, metabolic fluxes satisfy an underdetermined linear system of stoichiometric equations. Characterizing the space of fluxes that satisfy such equations along with given bounds (and possibly additional relevant constraints) is considered of utmost importance for the understanding of cellular metabolism. Extreme values for each individual flux can be computed with linear programming (as flux balance analysis), and their marginal distributions can be approximately computed with Monte Carlo sampling. Here we present an approximate analytic method for the latter task based on expectation propagation equations that does not involve sampling and can achieve much better predictions than other existing analytic methods. The method is iterative, and its computation time is dominated by one matrix inversion per iteration. With respect to sampling, we show through extensive simulation that it has some advantages including computation time, and the ability to efficiently fix empirically estimated distributions of fluxes.

  6. A Fuzzy analytical hierarchy process approach in irrigation networks maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza Permana, Angga; Rintis Hadiani, Rr.; Syafi’i

    2017-11-01

    Ponorogo Regency has 440 Irrigation Area with a total area of 17,950 Ha. Due to the limited budget and lack of maintenance cause decreased function on the irrigation. The aim of this study is to make an appropriate system to determine the indices weighted of the rank prioritization criteria for irrigation network maintenance using a fuzzy-based methodology. The criteria that are used such as the physical condition of irrigation networks, area of service, estimated maintenance cost, and efficiency of irrigation water distribution. 26 experts in the field of water resources in the Dinas Pekerjaan Umum were asked to fill out the questionnaire, and the result will be used as a benchmark to determine the rank of irrigation network maintenance priority. The results demonstrate that the physical condition of irrigation networks criterion (W1) = 0,279 has the greatest impact on the assessment process. The area of service (W2) = 0,270, efficiency of irrigation water distribution (W4) = 0,249, and estimated maintenance cost (W3) = 0,202 criteria rank next in effectiveness, respectively. The proposed methodology deals with uncertainty and vague data using triangular fuzzy numbers, and, moreover, it provides a comprehensive decision-making technique to assess maintenance priority on irrigation network.

  7. Summary of Mercury and Trace Element Results in Precipitation from the Culpeper, Virginia, Mercury Deposition Network Site (VA-08), 2002-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Mark A.; Kolker, Allan; Mose, Douglas E.; East, Joseph A.; McCord, Jamey D.

    2008-01-01

    The VA-08 Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) site, southwest of Culpeper, Virginia, was established in autumn of 2002. This site, along with nearby VA-28 (~31 km west) at Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park, fills a spatial gap in the Mid-Atlantic region of the MDN network and provides Hg deposition data immediately west of the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. Results for the Culpeper site from autumn of 2002 to the end of 2006 suggest that the highest mercury (Hg) deposition (up to 5.0 ug/m2 per quarter of the 6.5-12.6 ug/m2 annual Hg deposition) is measured during the second and third quarters of the year (April-September). This is a result of both elevated Hg precipitation concentrations (up to 27 ng/L) and greater precipitation during these months. The data also exhibit a general statistically significant (pBig Meadows sites indicates that although quarterly Hg deposition was not significantly different (pdata identified 3 primary source categories, each with large loadings of characteristic elements: 1) Ca, Al, Mg, Sr, La, and Ce (crustal sources); 2) V, Na, and Ni (local wintertime heating oil); and 3) Zn, Cd, Mn, and Hg (regional anthropogenic emission sources). HYSPLIT air mass trajectory modeling and enrichment factor calculations are consistent with this interpretation. A preliminary source attribution model suggests that ~51% of the Hg in wet deposition is due to regional anthropogenic sources, while crustal sources and local oil combustion account for 9.5% and accounts for ~40% of the Hg in wet deposition.

  8. SEMANTIC NETWORKS: THEORETICAL, TECHNICAL, METHODOLOGIC AND ANALYTICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Vera Noriega

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is a review of the methodological procedures and cares for the measurement of the connotative meanings which will be used in the elaboration of instruments with ethnic validity. Beginning from the techniques originally proposed by Figueroa et al. (1981 and later described by Lagunes (1993, the intention is to offer a didactic panorama to carry out the measurement by semantic networks introducing some recommendations derived from the studies performed with this method.

  9. Evaluasi Kinerja Organisasi Publik Dengan Menggunakan Pendekatan Balanced Scorecard dan Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Mora Tunggul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Balanced scorecard is a strategic business management method that links performance evaluation to vision and strategies using a multidimensional set of financial and nonfinancial performance metrics. This study examined both quantitative data for the proposed Analytic Network Process method. The purpose of this research is to build a model that combines the Balanced Scorecard approach and Analytical Network Process to assist in the performance evaluation of public organizations tax services. Balanced Scorecard concept is applied to determine the hierarchy of the financial perspective, customer perspective, internal business processes, and learning and growth perspective as well as their respective performance indicators of public organizations and then Analytical Network Process used to tolerate vagueness and ambiguity of information and built an information system that is applied to facilitate the performance evaluation process. The study provides recommendations to the management of public organizations regarding the tax service strategy to improve the performance of public organizations.

  10. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data

  11. Comparison of Analytical and Measured Performance Results on Network Coding in IEEE 802.11 Ad-Hoc Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Fang; Médard, Muriel; Hundebøll, Martin

    2012-01-01

    CATWOMAN that can run on standard WiFi hardware. We present an analytical model to evaluate the performance of COPE in simple networks, and our results show the excellent predictive quality of this model. By closely examining the performance in two simple topologies, we observe that the coding gain results...

  12. Atmospheric mercury concentrations observed at ground-based monitoring sites globally distributed in the framework of the GMOS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola; Bencardino, Mariantonia; D'Amore, Francesco; Carbone, Francesco; Cinnirella, Sergio; Mannarino, Valentino; Landis, Matthew; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Weigelt, Andreas; Brunke, Ernst-Günther; Labuschagne, Casper; Martin, Lynwill; Munthe, John; Wängberg, Ingvar; Artaxo, Paulo; Morais, Fernando; Barbosa, Henrique de Melo Jorge; Brito, Joel; Cairns, Warren; Barbante, Carlo; Diéguez, María del Carmen; Garcia, Patricia Elizabeth; Dommergue, Aurélien; Angot, Helene; Magand, Olivier; Skov, Henrik; Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Read, Katie Alana; Mendes Neves, Luis; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; Sena, Fabrizio; Mashyanov, Nikolay; Obolkin, Vladimir; Wip, Dennis; Feng, Xin Bin; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Xuewu; Ramachandran, Ramesh; Cossa, Daniel; Knoery, Joël; Marusczak, Nicolas; Nerentorp, Michelle; Norstrom, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Long-term monitoring of data of ambient mercury (Hg) on a global scale to assess its emission, transport, atmospheric chemistry, and deposition processes is vital to understanding the impact of Hg pollution on the environment. The Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project was funded by the European Commission (gmos.eu" target="_blank">http://www.gmos.eu) and started in November 2010 with the overall goal to develop a coordinated global observing system to monitor Hg on a global scale, including a large network of ground-based monitoring stations, ad hoc periodic oceanographic cruises and measurement flights in the lower and upper troposphere as well as in the lower stratosphere. To date, more than 40 ground-based monitoring sites constitute the global network covering many regions where little to no observational data were available before GMOS. This work presents atmospheric Hg concentrations recorded worldwide in the framework of the GMOS project (2010-2015), analyzing Hg measurement results in terms of temporal trends, seasonality and comparability within the network. Major findings highlighted in this paper include a clear gradient of Hg concentrations between the Northern and Southern hemispheres, confirming that the gradient observed is mostly driven by local and regional sources, which can be anthropogenic, natural or a combination of both.

  13. Ancient mercury-based plating methods: combined use of surface analytical techniques for the study of manufacturing process and degradation phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, Gabriel Maria; Guida, Giuseppe; Angelini, Emma; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Mezzi, Alessio; Padeletti, Giuseppina

    2013-11-19

    Fire gilding and silvering are age-old mercury-based processes used to coat thesurface of less precious substrates with thin layers of gold or silver. In ancient times, these methods were used to produce and decorate different types of artefacts, such as jewels, statues, amulets, and commonly-used objects. Gilders performed these processes not only to decorate objects but also to simulate the appearance of gold or silver, sometimes fraudulently. From a technological point of view, the aim of these workmen over 2000 years ago was to make the precious metal coatings as thin and adherent as possible. This was in order to save expensive metals and to improve the resistance to the wear caused by continued use and circulation. Without knowledge about the chemical-physical processes, the ancient crafts-men systematically manipulated these metals to create functional and decorative artistic objects. The mercury-based methods were also fraudulently used in ancient times to produce objects such as jewels and coins that looked like they were made of silver or gold but actually had a less precious core. These coins were minted by counterfeiters but also by the official issuing authorities. The latter was probably because of a lack of precious metals, reflecting periods of severe economic conditions. In this Account, we discuss some representative cases of gold- and silver-coatedobjects, focusing on unique and valuable Roman and Dark Ages period works of art, such as the St. Ambrogio's altar (825 AD), and commonly used objects. We carried out the investigations using surface analytical methods, such as selected area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. We used these methods to investigate the surface and subsurface chemical features of these important examples of art and technology, interpreting some aspects of the manufacturing methods and of disclosing degradation agents and mechanisms. These findings

  14. Networking in the Desert - Operational and Analytical Challenges for MINUSMA in Mali

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugegaard, Rikke

    This paper will initiate a discussion of the operational and analytical challenges in understanding network dynamics in Mali, and how these dynamics can be seen as one source of conflict in Mali. The paper is based on a field visit to Mali in 2014....

  15. A Visual Analytics Technique for Identifying Heat Spots in Transportation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Sorin Nistor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The decision takers of the public transportation system, as part of urban critical infrastructures, need to increase the system resilience. For doing so, we identified analysis tools for biological networks as an adequate basis for visual analytics in that domain. In the paper at hand we therefore translate such methods for transportation systems and show the benefits by applying them on the Munich subway network. Here, visual analytics is used to identify vulnerable stations from different perspectives. The applied technique is presented step by step. Furthermore, the key challenges in applying this technique on transportation systems are identified. Finally, we propose the implementation of the presented features in a management cockpit to integrate the visual analytics mantra for an adequate decision support on transportation systems.

  16. Analytical Model based on Green Criteria for Optical Backbone Network Interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2011-01-01

    Key terms such as Global warming, Green House Gas emissions, or Energy efficiency are currently on the scope of scientific research. Regarding telecommunications networks, wireless applications, routing protocols, etc. are being designed following this new “Green” trend. This work contributes...... to the evaluation of the environmental impact of networks from physical interconnection point of view. Networks deployment, usage, and disposal are analyzed as contributing elements to ICT’s (Information and Communications Technology) CO2 emissions. This paper presents an analytical model for evaluating...

  17. Development of an analytical method for total mercury and alkyl mercury in environmental water with GC/MS; Suichu zen suigin oyobi arukiru suigin no feniru ka ni yoru GC/MS bunsekiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, H.; Nakayama, S.; Funakoshi, S. [Fukuoka City Inst. of Public Health, Fukuoka (Japan); Urano, K. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-07-10

    Electronic display Gas chromatography (ECD-GC) is used as a analysis method for alkyl mercury, however, in this method, the peak of chromatogram is broad and also is easy to effect by interference. This is because of the analysis of extreme compounds like R-Hg-Cl using ECD detector. In this research, highly reliable method was developed in order to identify and quantity each form of mercury in the environment using GC/MS. That is to say, application of phenylation method was tried after solvent extraction using JIS-K0102 and reverse extraction with L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution. The reverse extraction solution of alkyl mercury contains L-cysteine, however, the reaction rate of methylphenyl mercury and ethylphenyl mercury was favorable when reaction between sodium tetraphenylborate and methyl mercury, ethyl mercury was carried out, and phenylation compounds, in GS/MS analysis, show sharp peak of SIM chromatogram with slight interference. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Impact of bankruptcy through asset portfolios. Network analytic solution unveils 1990s Japanese banking crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Vodenska, I.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the Japanese banking crisis in the late 1990s with a simple network based mathematical model, which allows us to simulate the crisis as well as to obtain new perspective through analytic solution of our network model. We effectively identify the actual bankrupted banks and the robustness of the banking system using a simulation model based on properties of a bi-partite bank-asset network. We show the mean time property and analytical solution of the model revealing aggregate time dynamics of bank asset prices throughout the banking crisis. The results disclose simple but fundamental property of asset growth, instrumental for understanding the bank crisis. We also estimate the selling pressure for each asset type, derived from a Cascading Failure Model (CFM), offering new perspective for investigating the phenomenon of banking crisis.

  19. Analytical computation of the Mercury perihelion precession via the relativistic gravitational law and comparison with general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Fokas, Athanassios S; Grigoriou, D

    2015-01-01

    Let $r(\\varphi)$ denote the orbit of Mercury and other planets. We compare the formula of General Relativity (GR) for $r(\\varphi)$, as well as the formula for the corresponding perihelion precession angle $\\Delta \\varphi$, with the formulae obtained via the relativistic gravitational law, $F=GMm\\gamma^3/r^2$. The latter law can be derived from Newton's gravitational law by employing the gravitational rather than the rest mass of the rotating body and using special relativity (SR) together with the equivalence principle to compute the inertial and hence the gravitational, mass. Remarkably, it is found that the two expressions for $r(\\varphi)$ differ only by a factor of 2 and by an additive constant. This constant does not affect the formula for the $\\Delta \\varphi$, thus the two expressions for $\\Delta\\varphi$ differ only by a factor of 2.

  20. Recursively constructing analytic expressions for equilibrium distributions of stochastic biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X Flora; Baetica, Ania-Ariadna; Singhal, Vipul; Murray, Richard M

    2017-05-01

    Noise is often indispensable to key cellular activities, such as gene expression, necessitating the use of stochastic models to capture its dynamics. The chemical master equation (CME) is a commonly used stochastic model of Kolmogorov forward equations that describe how the probability distribution of a chemically reacting system varies with time. Finding analytic solutions to the CME can have benefits, such as expediting simulations of multiscale biochemical reaction networks and aiding the design of distributional responses. However, analytic solutions are rarely known. A recent method of computing analytic stationary solutions relies on gluing simple state spaces together recursively at one or two states. We explore the capabilities of this method and introduce algorithms to derive analytic stationary solutions to the CME. We first formally characterize state spaces that can be constructed by performing single-state gluing of paths, cycles or both sequentially. We then study stochastic biochemical reaction networks that consist of reversible, elementary reactions with two-dimensional state spaces. We also discuss extending the method to infinite state spaces and designing the stationary behaviour of stochastic biochemical reaction networks. Finally, we illustrate the aforementioned ideas using examples that include two interconnected transcriptional components and biochemical reactions with two-dimensional state spaces. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Enhanced storage capacity with errors in scale-free Hopfield neural networks: An analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Park, Jinha; Kahng, Byungnam

    2017-01-01

    The Hopfield model is a pioneering neural network model with associative memory retrieval. The analytical solution of the model in mean field limit revealed that memories can be retrieved without any error up to a finite storage capacity of O(N), where N is the system size. Beyond the threshold, they are completely lost. Since the introduction of the Hopfield model, the theory of neural networks has been further developed toward realistic neural networks using analog neurons, spiking neurons, etc. Nevertheless, those advances are based on fully connected networks, which are inconsistent with recent experimental discovery that the number of connections of each neuron seems to be heterogeneous, following a heavy-tailed distribution. Motivated by this observation, we consider the Hopfield model on scale-free networks and obtain a different pattern of associative memory retrieval from that obtained on the fully connected network: the storage capacity becomes tremendously enhanced but with some error in the memory retrieval, which appears as the heterogeneity of the connections is increased. Moreover, the error rates are also obtained on several real neural networks and are indeed similar to that on scale-free model networks.

  2. Determination of Optimal Opening Scheme for Electromagnetic Loop Networks Based on Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying optimization and decision for opening electromagnetic loop networks plays an important role in planning and operation of power grids. First, the basic principle of fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP is introduced, and then an improved FAHP-based scheme evaluation method is proposed for decoupling electromagnetic loop networks based on a set of indicators reflecting the performance of the candidate schemes. The proposed method combines the advantages of analytic hierarchy process (AHP and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. On the one hand, AHP effectively combines qualitative and quantitative analysis to ensure the rationality of the evaluation model; on the other hand, the judgment matrix and qualitative indicators are expressed with trapezoidal fuzzy numbers to make decision-making more realistic. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated by the application results on the real power system of Liaoning province of China.

  3. ANALYTIC NETWORK PROCESS AND BALANCED SCORECARD APPLIED TO THE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Reis dos Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of public health systems is an issue of great concern. After all, to assure people's quality of life, public health systems need different kinds of resources. Balanced Scorecard provides a multi-dimensional evaluation framework. This paper presents the application of the Analytic Network Process and Balanced Scorecard in the performance evaluation of a public health system in a typical medium-sized Southeastern town in Brazil.

  4. HOW DO STUDENTS SELECT SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES? AN ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS (AHP MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Meng Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social networking sites are popular among university students, and students today are indeed spoiled for choice. New emerging social networking sites sprout up amid popular sites, while some existing ones die out. Given the choice of so many social networking sites, how do students decide which one they will sign up for and stay on as an active user? The answer to this question is of interest to social networking site designers and marketers. The market of social networking sites is highly competitive. To maintain the current user base and continue to attract new users, how should social networking sites design their sites? Marketers spend a fairly large percent of their marketing budget on social media marketing. To formulate an effective social media strategy, how much do marketers understand the users of social networking sites? Learning from website evaluation studies, this study intends to provide some answers to these questions by examining how university students decide between two popular social networking sites, Facebook and Twitter. We first developed an analytic hierarchy process (AHP model of four main selection criteria and 12 sub-criteria, and then administered a questionnaire to a group of university students attending a course at a Malaysian university. AHP analyses of the responses from 12 respondents provided an insight into the decision-making process involved in students’ selection of social networking sites. It seemed that of the four main criteria, privacy was the top concern, followed by functionality, usability, and content. The sub-criteria that were of key concern to the students were apps, revenue-generating opportunities, ease of use, and information security. Between Facebook and Twitter, the students thought that Facebook was the better choice. This information is useful for social networking site designers to design sites that are more relevant to their users’ needs, and for marketers to craft more effective

  5. Gray matter alterations in chronic pain: A network-oriented meta-analytic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cauda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have attempted to characterize morphological brain changes due to chronic pain. Although it has repeatedly been suggested that longstanding pain induces gray matter modifications, there is still some controversy surrounding the direction of the change (increase or decrease in gray matter and the role of psychological and psychiatric comorbidities. In this study, we propose a novel, network-oriented, meta-analytic approach to characterize morphological changes in chronic pain. We used network decomposition to investigate whether different kinds of chronic pain are associated with a common or specific set of altered networks. Representational similarity techniques, network decomposition and model-based clustering were employed: i to verify the presence of a core set of brain areas commonly modified by chronic pain; ii to investigate the involvement of these areas in a large-scale network perspective; iii to study the relationship between altered networks and; iv to find out whether chronic pain targets clusters of areas. Our results showed that chronic pain causes both core and pathology-specific gray matter alterations in large-scale networks. Common alterations were observed in the prefrontal regions, in the anterior insula, cingulate cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, periaqueductal gray, post- and pre-central gyri and inferior parietal lobule. We observed that the salience and attentional networks were targeted in a very similar way by different chronic pain pathologies. Conversely, alterations in the sensorimotor and attention circuits were differentially targeted by chronic pain pathologies. Moreover, model-based clustering revealed that chronic pain, in line with some neurodegenerative diseases, selectively targets some large-scale brain networks. Altogether these findings indicate that chronic pain can be better conceived and studied in a network perspective.

  6. Optimal design of supply chain network under uncertainty environment using hybrid analytical and simulation modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiadamrong, N.; Piyathanavong, V.

    2017-04-01

    Models that aim to optimize the design of supply chain networks have gained more interest in the supply chain literature. Mixed-integer linear programming and discrete-event simulation are widely used for such an optimization problem. We present a hybrid approach to support decisions for supply chain network design using a combination of analytical and discrete-event simulation models. The proposed approach is based on iterative procedures until the difference between subsequent solutions satisfies the pre-determined termination criteria. The effectiveness of proposed approach is illustrated by an example, which shows closer to optimal results with much faster solving time than the results obtained from the conventional simulation-based optimization model. The efficacy of this proposed hybrid approach is promising and can be applied as a powerful tool in designing a real supply chain network. It also provides the possibility to model and solve more realistic problems, which incorporate dynamism and uncertainty.

  7. A network analytical approach to the study of labour market mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toubøl, Jonas; Larsen, Anton Grau; Jensen, Carsten Strøby

    The aim of this paper is to present a new network analytical method for analysis of social mobility between categories like occupations or industries. The method consists of two core components; the algorithm MONECA (Mobility Network Clustering Algorithm), and the intensity measure of Relative Ri...... of the typical theory driven definition of the labour market segments, the use of social network analysis enable a data driven definition of the segments based on the direct observation of mobility between job-positions, which reveals a number of new findings....... (RR), which enable us to identify clusters of inter-mobile categories. We apply the method to data of the labour market mobility in Denmark 2000-2007 and demonstrate how this new method can overcome some long standing obstacles to the advance of labour market segmentation theory: Instead...

  8. Social Sensor Analytics: Making Sense of Network Models in Social Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Chase P.; Harrison, Joshua J.; Sathanur, Arun V.; Sego, Landon H.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2015-07-27

    Social networks can be thought of as noisy sensor networks mapping real world information to the web. Owing to the extensive body of literature in sensor network analysis, this work sought to apply several novel and traditional methods in sensor network analysis for the purposes of efficiently interrogating social media data streams from raw data. We carefully revisit our definition of a social media signal from previous work both in terms of time-varying features within the data and the networked nature of the medium. Further, we detail our analysis of global patterns in Twitter over the months of November 2013 and June 2014, detect and categorize events, and illustrate how these analyses can be used to inform graph-based models of Twitter, namely using a recent network influence model called PhySense: similar to PageRank but tuned to behavioral analysis by leveraging a sociologically inspired probabilistic model. We ultimately identify forms of information dissemination via analysis of time series and dynamic graph spectra and corroborate these findings through manual investigation of the data as a requisite step in modeling the diffusion process with PhySense. We hope to sufficiently characterize global behavior in a medium such as Twitter as a means of learning global model parameters one may use to predict or simulate behavior on a large scale. We have made our time series and dynamic graph analytical code available via a GitHub repository https://github.com/cpatdowling/salsa and our data are available upon request.

  9. Effectiveness evaluation of double-layered satellite network with laser and microwave hybrid links based on fuzzy analytic hierarchy process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rao, Qiaomeng

    2018-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of high speed, large capacity and limited spectrum resources of satellite communication network, a double-layered satellite network with global seamless coverage based on laser and microwave hybrid links is proposed in this paper. By analyzing the characteristics of the double-layered satellite network with laser and microwave hybrid links, an effectiveness evaluation index system for the network is established. And then, the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process, which combines the analytic hierarchy process and the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation theory, is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the double-layered satellite network with laser and microwave hybrid links. Furthermore, the evaluation result of the proposed hybrid link network is obtained by simulation. The effectiveness evaluation process of the proposed double-layered satellite network with laser and microwave hybrid links can help to optimize the design of hybrid link double-layered satellite network and improve the operating efficiency of the satellite system.

  10. Toward an Analytical and Methodological Understanding of Actor-Network Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Jackson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Actor-Network theory (ANT is well developed within social studies of science and technology. The last two decades have seen an increasing awareness and interest in ANT within the social sciences and it has increasingly been invoked to theorise the role of ‘nonhumans’ in social life.  In this respect the conceptual repertoire of ANT has been increasingly drawn upon to examine the relational dimensions between artefacts and people. Despite this the use of ANT as an analytical and/or methodological approach occupies a peripheral within social science research.  In part, the reticence towards ANT may be explained by its lack of theoretical unity. Analytically and methodologically the application of ANT and thought which is closely associated with the approach is considerably varied. ANT informed research often differs quite considerably in terms of methodological approach and style of analyses. This is further complicated by the disparate emphases of ANT proponents and the proliferation of different versions of ANT. Thus, there is no generic way to ‘apply’ actor-network theory and it lacks methodological prescription. This article intends to articulate the analytical and methodological possibilities of ANT. For those who are encountering ANT for the first time or for whom ANT has been regarded as a somewhat left field and inaccessible theory obscured by its own vocabularies and heterogeneity this article may provide a useful conceptual map through which the key elements of ANT can be navigated.

  11. Adaptive cyclically dominating game on co-evolving networks: numerical and analytic results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chi Wun; Xu, Chen; Hui, Pak Ming

    2017-10-01

    A co-evolving and adaptive Rock (R)-Paper (P)-Scissors (S) game (ARPS) in which an agent uses one of three cyclically dominating strategies is proposed and studied numerically and analytically. An agent takes adaptive actions to achieve a neighborhood to his advantage by rewiring a dissatisfying link with a probability p or switching strategy with a probability 1 - p. Numerical results revealed two phases in the steady state. An active phase for p pc has three separate clusters of agents using only R, P, and S, respectively with terminated adaptive actions. A mean-field theory based on the link densities in co-evolving network is formulated and the trinomial closure scheme is applied to obtain analytical solutions. The analytic results agree with simulation results on ARPS well. In addition, the different probabilities of winning, losing, and drawing a game among the agents are identified as the origin of the small discrepancy between analytic and simulation results. As a result of the adaptive actions, agents of higher degrees are often those being taken advantage of. Agents with a smaller (larger) degree than the mean degree have a higher (smaller) probability of winning than losing. The results are informative for future attempts on formulating more accurate theories.

  12. Multicriteria Based Next Forwarder Selection for Data Dissemination in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks Using Analytical Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Latif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular ad hoc network (VANET is a wireless emerging technology that aims to provide safety and communication services to drivers and passengers. In VANETs, vehicles communicate with other vehicles directly or through road side units (RSU for sharing traffic information. The data dissemination in VANETs is a challenging issue as the vehicles have to share safety critical information in real time. The data distribution is usually done using broadcast method resulting in inefficient use of network resources. Therefore, to avoid the broadcast storm and efficiently use network resources, next forwarder vehicle (NFV is selected to forward data to nearby vehicles. The NFV selection is based on certain parameters like direction, distance, and position of vehicles, which makes it a multicriteria decision problem. In this paper, analytical network process (ANP is used as a multicriteria decision tool to select the optimal vehicle as NFV. The stability of alternatives (candidate vehicles for NFV selection ranking is checked using sensitivity analysis for different scenarios. Mathematical formulation shows that ANP method is applicable for NFV selection in VANETs. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme outperforms other state-of-the-art data dissemination schemes in terms of reachability, latency, collisions, and number of transmitted and duplicate data packets.

  13. Analytic network process (ANP approach for product mix planning in railway industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Pazoki Toroudi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the competitive environment in the global market in recent years, organizations need to plan for increased profitability and optimize their performance. Planning for an appropriate product mix plays essential role for the success of most production units. This paper applies analytical network process (ANP approach for product mix planning for a part supplier in Iran. The proposed method uses four criteria including cost of production, sales figures, supply of raw materials and quality of products. In addition, the study proposes different set of products as alternatives for production planning. The preliminary results have indicated that that the proposed study of this paper could increase productivity, significantly.

  14. Sustainability performance measurement with Analytic Network Process and balanced scorecard: Cuban practical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Medel-González

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent years has arisen a global discussion in relation with how to incorporate sustainability at a business level. Corporate sustainability is a multidimensional concept, is the translation of Sustainable Development concept at a business level. Sustainability in organizations must be managed and assessed by decision makers, for that reason a multi-criteria sustainability performance measurement is necessary. The aim of this paper is combine different important tools that helps to make operative corporate sustainability and sustainability performance measurement in Cuban organizations. The combination of Sustainability Balanced Scorecard, multi-criteria decisions models like: Analytic Network Process, and Matrix of Sustainable Strategic Alignment, can help managers in sustainability performance measurement and assessment. The result of this paper focus in a Corporate Sustainability Measurement Network design as a first approach for further sustainability performance measurement systems development emphasizing in multi-criteria analysis.

  15. Analytical Study of QoS-Oriented Multicast in Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyakhov Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicast is a very popular bandwidth-conserving technology exploited in many multimedia applications. However, existing standards of high rate wireless networks provide no error recovery mechanism (ARQ for multicast traffic. ARQ absence in wireless networks unreliable by their nature leads to frequent packet losses, which is inappropriate for most of multimedia applications. In this paper, we study new reliable multicast mechanism proposed recently to support multimedia QoS (packet loss ratio, latency, and throughput with various wireless technologies. This mechanism is based on the concept of multiple ACK-leaders, that is, multicast recipients responsible for acknowledging data packets. We develop analytical models of the mechanism with various leader selection schemes and use the models to study the schemes efficiency and to optimize them. Numerical results show that the novel multicast mechanism with multiple ACK-leaders can be easily tuned to meet specific QoS requirements of multimedia or any other multicast applications.

  16. Green supply chain management strategy selection using analytic network process: case study at PT XYZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelina, W.; Kusumastuti, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    This study is about business strategy selection for green supply chain management (GSCM) for PT XYZ by using Analytic Network Process (ANP). GSCM is initiated as a response to reduce environmental impacts from industrial activities. The purposes of this study are identifying criteria and sub criteria in selecting GSCM Strategy, and analysing a suitable GSCM strategy for PT XYZ. This study proposes ANP network with 6 criteria and 29 sub criteria, which are obtained from the literature and experts’ judgements. One of the six criteria contains GSCM strategy options, namely risk-based strategy, efficiency-based strategy, innovation-based strategy, and closed loop strategy. ANP solves complex GSCM strategy-selection by using a more structured process and considering green perspectives from experts. The result indicates that innovation-based strategy is the most suitable green supply chain management strategy for PT XYZ.

  17. A robust evaluation of sustainability initiatives with analytic network process (ANP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanndon Ocampo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology on evaluating sustainable manufacturing initiatives using analytic network process (ANP as its base.The evaluation method is anchored on the comprehensive sustainable manufacturing framework proposed recently in literature. A numerical example that involves an evaluation of five sustainable manufacturing initiatives is shown in this work. Results show that sustainable manufacturing implies enhancing customer and community well-being by means of addressing environmental issues related to pollution due to toxic substances, greenhouse gas emissions and air emissions. To test the robustness of the results, two approaches are introduced in this work: (1 using Monte Carlo simulation and (2 introducing structural changes on the evaluation model. It suggests that the results are robust to random variations and to marginal changes of the network structure. The contribution of this work lies on presenting a sustainable manufacturing evaluation approach that addresses complexity and robustness in decision-making. 

  18. Analytical modeling of address allocation protocols in wireless ad hoc networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Radaideh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Detailed descriptions of Internet Protocol Address Assignment (IPAA and Mobile Ad Hoc Network Configuration (MANETconf are presented and state diagrams for their behavior are constructed. Formulae for the expected latency and communication overhead of the IPAA protocol are derived, with the results being given as functions of the number of nodes in the network with message loss rate, contention window size, coverage ratio, and the counter threshold as parameters. Simulation is used to validate the analytical results and also to compare performance of the two protocols. The results show that the latency and communication overhead for MANETconf are significantly higher than the measures of the IPAA protocol. Results of extensive sensitivity analyses for the IPAA protocol are also presented.

  19. Dynamic Network Model for Smart City Data-Loss Resilience Case Study: City-to-City Network for Crime Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotevska, Olivera; Kusne, A Gilad; Samarov, Daniel V; Lbath, Ahmed; Battou, Abdella

    2017-01-01

    Today's cities generate tremendous amounts of data, thanks to a boom in affordable smart devices and sensors. The resulting big data creates opportunities to develop diverse sets of context-aware services and systems, ensuring smart city services are optimized to the dynamic city environment. Critical resources in these smart cities will be more rapidly deployed to regions in need, and those regions predicted to have an imminent or prospective need. For example, crime data analytics may be used to optimize the distribution of police, medical, and emergency services. However, as smart city services become dependent on data, they also become susceptible to disruptions in data streams, such as data loss due to signal quality reduction or due to power loss during data collection. This paper presents a dynamic network model for improving service resilience to data loss. The network model identifies statistically significant shared temporal trends across multivariate spatiotemporal data streams and utilizes these trends to improve data prediction performance in the case of data loss. Dynamics also allow the system to respond to changes in the data streams such as the loss or addition of new information flows. The network model is demonstrated by city-based crime rates reported in Montgomery County, MD, USA. A resilient network is developed utilizing shared temporal trends between cities to provide improved crime rate prediction and robustness to data loss, compared with the use of single city-based auto-regression. A maximum improvement in performance of 7.8% for Silver Spring is found and an average improvement of 5.6% among cities with high crime rates. The model also correctly identifies all the optimal network connections, according to prediction error minimization. City-to-city distance is designated as a predictor of shared temporal trends in crime and weather is shown to be a strong predictor of crime in Montgomery County.

  20. Analytical speciation of mercury in fish tissues by reversed phase liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with Bi(3+) as internal standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, María Maldonado; Figueroa, Julio Alberto Landero; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2009-08-15

    In this work, the quantification of two mercury species (Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+)) in fish tissues has been revisited. The originality of our approach relies on the use of Bi(3+) as internal standard (IS) and on the modification of typical extraction conditions. The IS (125 microl, 1000 microg l(-1) Bi(3+)) was added to the aliquot of fresh fish tissue (400-500 mg). A high-speed blender and ultrasound-assisted homogenization/extraction was carried out in the presence of perchloric acid (1.5 ml, 0.6 mol l(-1)), l-cysteine (500 microl, 0.75 mol l(-1)) and 500 microl toluene:methanol (1:1). Perchloric acid was used for protein denaturation and precipitation, toluene helped to destroy lipid structures potentially sequestering CH(3)Hg(+), L-cysteine was used to form water-soluble complexes with Bi(3+), Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+). The excess of perchloric acid was eliminated by addition of potassium hydroxide (pH 5 with acetic acid). The obtained extract, was diluted with the mobile phase (1:1) and introduced (20 microl) to the reversed phase HPLC-ICP-MS system. The separation was achieved by isocratic elution (2.5 mmol l(-1) cysteine, 12.5 mmol l(-1) (NH(4))(2)HPO(4), 0.05% triethylamine, pH 7.0:methanol (96:4)) at a flow rate 0.6 ml min(-1). Column effluent was on-line introduced to ICP-MS for specific detection of (202)Hg, (200)Hg and (209)Bi. Analytical signal was defined as the ratio between (202)Hg/(209)Bi peak areas. The detection limits evaluated for Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+) were 0.8 and 0.7 microg l(-1). Recovery of the procedure, calculated as the sum of species concentrations found in the sample with respect to total ICP-MS-determined Hg was 91.9% for king mackerel muscle and 89.5% for red snapper liver. In the standard addition experiments, the recovery results were 98.9% for Hg(2+) and 100.6% for CH(3)Hg(+). It should be stressed that the use of Bi(3+) as IS enabled to improve analytical performance by compensating for incomplete extraction and for imprecision of

  1. Evolution of airports from a network perspective – An analytical concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Azzam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing airports' role in global air transportation and monitoring their development over time provides an additional perspective on the dynamics of network evolution. In order to understand the different roles airports can play in the network an integrated and multi-dimensional approach is needed. Therefore, an approach to airport classification through hierarchical clustering considering several parameters from network theory is presented in this paper. By applying a 29 year record of global flight data and calculating the conditional transition probabilities the results are displayed as an evolution graph similar to a discrete-time Markov chain. With this analytical concept the meaning of airports is analyzed from a network perspective and a new airport taxonomy is established. The presented methodology allows tracking the development of airports from certain categories into others over time. Results show that airports of equal classes run through similar stages of development with a limited number of alternatives, indicating clear evolutionary patterns. Apart from giving an overview of the results the paper illustrates the exact data-driven approach and suggests an evaluation scheme. The methodology can help the public and industry sector to make informed strategy decisions when it comes to air transportation infrastructure.

  2. Analytical bounds on the area spectral efficiency of uplink heterogeneous networks over generalized fading channels

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    Heterogeneous networks (HetNets) are envisioned to enable next-generation cellular networks by providing higher spectral and energy efficiency. A HetNet is typically composed of multiple radio access technologies where several low-power low-cost operators or user-deployed small-cell base stations (SBSs) complement the macrocell network. In this paper, we consider a two-tier HetNet where the SBSs are arranged around the edge of the reference macrocell such that the resultant configuration is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE). Each mobile user in a small cell is considered capable of adapting its uplink transmit power according to a location-based slow power control mechanism. The COE configuration is observed to increase the uplink area spectral efficiency (ASE) and energy efficiency while reducing the cochannel interference power. A moment-generating-function (MGF)-based approach has been exploited to derive the analytical bounds on the uplink ASE of the COE configuration. The derived expressions are generalized for any composite fading distribution, and closed-form expressions are presented for the generalized- K fading channels. Simulation results are included to support the analysis and to show the efficacy of the COE configuration. A comparative performance analysis is also provided to demonstrate the improvements in the performance of cell-edge users of the COE configuration compared with that of macro-only networks (MoNets) and other unplanned deployment strategies. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Analytical theory of polymer-network-mediated interaction between colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Zaccone, Alessio; Eiser, Erika

    2012-06-26

    Nanostructured materials based on colloidal particles embedded in a polymer network are used in a variety of applications ranging from nanocomposite rubbers to organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. Further, polymer-network-mediated colloidal interactions are highly relevant to biological studies whereby polymer hydrogels are commonly employed to probe the mechanical response of living cells, which can determine their biological function in physiological environments. The performance of nanomaterials crucially relies upon the spatial organization of the colloidal particles within the polymer network that depends, in turn, on the effective interactions between the particles in the medium. Existing models based on nonlocal equilibrium thermodynamics fail to clarify the nature of these interactions, precluding the way toward the rational design of polymer-composite materials. In this article, we present a predictive analytical theory of these interactions based on a coarse-grained model for polymer networks. We apply the theory to the case of colloids partially embedded in cross-linked polymer substrates and clarify the origin of attractive interactions recently observed experimentally. Monte Carlo simulation results that quantitatively confirm the theoretical predictions are also presented.

  4. AtPID: the overall hierarchical functional protein interaction network interface and analytic platform for Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zang, Weidong; Li, Yuhua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Jigang; Shi, Tieliu

    2011-01-01

    Protein interactions are involved in important cellular functions and biological processes that are the fundamentals of all life activities. With improvements in experimental techniques and progress in research, the overall protein interaction network frameworks of several model organisms have been created through data collection and integration. However, most of the networks processed only show simple relationships without boundary, weight or direction, which do not truly reflect the biological reality. In vivo, different types of protein interactions, such as the assembly of protein complexes or phosphorylation, often have their specific functions and qualifications. Ignorance of these features will bring much bias to the network analysis and application. Therefore, we annotate the Arabidopsis proteins in the AtPID database with further information (e.g. functional annotation, subcellular localization, tissue-specific expression, phosphorylation information, SNP phenotype and mutant phenotype, etc.) and interaction qualifications (e.g. transcriptional regulation, complex assembly, functional collaboration, etc.) via further literature text mining and integration of other resources. Meanwhile, the related information is vividly displayed to users through a comprehensive and newly developed display and analytical tools. The system allows the construction of tissue-specific interaction networks with display of canonical pathways. The latest updated AtPID database is available at http://www.megabionet.org/atpid/.

  5. Penerapan Cutomer Relationship Management (CRM Dengan Menggunakan Metode Analytic Network Process (ANP Pada Perusahaan Ritel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nofiyati Nofiyati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retail industry or retail business is a fast-growing business in the midst of global competition conditions. One strategy to attract more consumers are Customer Relationship Management (CRM. The successful implementation of CRM in the enterprise is influenced by several environmental perspectives, strategies, customers and products / services, processes, participants, infrastructure, and information technology are integrated in the framework of Work System (WS. This research was carried out by applying the method of Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM that is able to accommodate the outer and inner linkage from multiple nodes / indicators are considered, namely the Analytical Network Process (ANP to rank the quality of implementation CRM in retail companies and strong influential node / indicator of the best retail among three alternative the consisting of Alfamart, Indomaret and Smesco mart. From the results of application ANP method, obtained the rank quality of implementation CRM in retail companies with first rank is Indomaret the value of 1.0000; and the second is Alfamart with a value 0.9575; and the third is Smesco mart with a value of 0.8034. While node / indicator strong influence on the the best retail is level of chaos, long and short term planning, customer service, system integration, appropriate skills, technical infrastructure, easily of use and accessibility of information.   Keywords: Ritel, Customer Relationship Management (CRM, Analytic Network Process (ANP, Kerangka Work System (WS.

  6. APLIKASI ANALYTIC NETWORK PROCESS (ANP PADA PERANCANGAN SISTEM PENGUKURAN KINERJA (Studi Kasus pada PT. X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Vanany

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the application of Analytic Network Process (ANP to support the weighted of design performance measurement system with Balanced Scorecard method. During the time, the weighted uses method that disregarding interdependence between objectives strategy and Key Performance Indicator (KPI's. The method which often used in this weighted is Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP. In fact this condition does not express the concept of strategy map of Balanced Scorecard. Therefore is needed apply the other weighted method which attention to the interdependence between Key Performance Indicator (KPI. Application of the weighted with ANP method is conducted at one of the power company. This company represents result of restructuring of PT. PLN (Persero. The result of design performance measurement system of PT. X are objective strategy, Key Performance Indicator (KPI and strategy map, will be weighted by method of ANP. Further more Modeling of ANP based on strategy map. The result of application indicates that related of model of strategy map in Balanced Scorecard at PT. X is Feedback Network (hiernet with phenomenon of inner and dependence of outer dependence. The perspective on Balanced Scorecard is identically with cluster on ANP, while objective strategy and KPI are identically with sub-element and element. Result of weighted with ANP method shows the existence of culmination of weighted on financial perspective of Strategy Map at PT. X. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Makalah ini membahas aplikasi Analytic Network Process (ANP untuk mendukung pembobotan pada perancangan sistem pengukuran kinerja dengan metode Balanced Scorecard. Selama ini, pembobotan yang ada menggunakan metode yang mengabaikan saling keterkaitan antar strategi objektif dengan Key Performance Indicator (KPI-KPI -nya. Metode yang sering digunakan didalam pembobotan ini adalah Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP. Kondisi ini sebenarnya tidak mencerminkan konsep Strategy Map

  7. A Mercury Frequency Standard Engineering Prototype for the NASA Deep Space Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Bricker, C.; Diener, W.; Hamell, R. L.; Kirk, A.; Kuhnle, P.; Maleki, L.; Prestage, J. D.; Santiago, D.; Seidel, D.; hide

    1996-01-01

    An engineering prototype linear ion trap frequency standar (LITS-4) using (sup 199)Hg+ is operational and currently under test for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The DSN requires high stability and reliability with continuous operation.

  8. Interactive network analytical tool for instantaneous bespoke interrogation of food safety notifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Nepusz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The globalization of food supply necessitates continued advances in regulatory control measures to ensure that citizens enjoy safe and adequate nutrition. The aim of this study was to extend previous reports on network analysis relating to food notifications by including an optional filter by type of notification and in cases of contamination, by type of contaminant in the notified foodstuff. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A filter function has been applied to enable processing of selected notifications by contaminant or type of notification to i capture complexity, ii analyze trends, and iii identify patterns of reporting activities between countries. The program rapidly assesses nations' roles as transgressor and/or detector for each category of contaminant and for the key class of border rejection. In the open access demonstration version, the majority of notifications in the Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed were categorized by contaminant type as mycotoxin (50.4%, heavy metals (10.9% or bacteria (20.3%. Examples are given demonstrating how network analytical approaches complement, and in some cases supersede, descriptive statistics such as frequency counts, which may give limited or potentially misleading information. One key feature is that network analysis takes the relationship between transgressor and detector countries, along with number of reports and impact simultaneously into consideration. Furhermore, the indices that compliment the network maps and reflect each country's transgressor and detector activities allow comparisons to be made between (transgressing vs. detecting as well as within (e.g. transgressing activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This further development of the network analysis approach to food safety contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of the effort ensuring food is safe for consumption in the European Union. The unique patterns of the interplay between detectors and

  9. Evaluation the concentration of mercury, zinc, arsenic, lead and cobalt in the Ilam city water supply network and resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Yazdanbakhsh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of heavy metals in water resources above threshold levels can be toxic and carcinogenic for consumers. This study determined the concentrations of heavy metals in the drinking water distribution network and resources of the city of Ilam in Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study from 6 sources of water supply and also, different parts of the water supply system of Ilam city, samples were collected based on standard sampling methods. The samples were tested with a BRAIC atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The data was analyzed using nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Results: The concentration of zinc in all water sources of the city of Ilam was higher than WHO guidelines and Iranian standard 1053. Contamination by cobalt, arsenic and lead from Ilam dam, Pich-e Ashoori well and Haft Cheshmeh well was higher than national and international standards. The amount of cobalt and mercury at Ilam dam was significantly different from the levels at other sources (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The use of pesticides in the agricultural sector, contamination of water by human waste and aged and worn water pipes are the likely sources of the increased concentrations of heavy metals, especially lead and arsenic. Because there is a cumulative effect from these metals, appropriate measures are necessary by the relevant agencies to address this problem.

  10. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  11. [Mercury poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication. Copyright © 2010 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Analytic network process model for sustainable lean and green manufacturing performance indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminuddin, Adam Shariff Adli; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Mohamed, Nik Mohd Zuki Nik

    2014-09-01

    Sustainable manufacturing is regarded as the most complex manufacturing paradigm to date as it holds the widest scope of requirements. In addition, its three major pillars of economic, environment and society though distinct, have some overlapping among each of its elements. Even though the concept of sustainability is not new, the development of the performance indicator still needs a lot of improvement due to its multifaceted nature, which requires integrated approach to solve the problem. This paper proposed the best combination of criteria en route a robust sustainable manufacturing performance indicator formation via Analytic Network Process (ANP). The integrated lean, green and sustainable ANP model can be used to comprehend the complex decision system of the sustainability assessment. The finding shows that green manufacturing is more sustainable than lean manufacturing. It also illustrates that procurement practice is the most important criteria in the sustainable manufacturing performance indicator.

  13. Comparison of the Helicobacter Pylori Diagnosis Methods with Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer KONAKLI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is infecting %70-80 of the world’s population and is assumed to cause gastric diseases. Diagnosis of the bacteria is crucial for the treatment of the bacteria related infections. Histology, culture, urea breath test, stool antigen test some of the diagnosis methods each having specific strength and weaknesses as sensitivity, specificity, cost, easiness, time, effectiveness in the treatment and laboratory requirements. In this study, three of the commonly used H. pylori diagnosis methods: histology, culture and urea breath test, are evaluated with Analytic network process (ANP and the rank of the criteria and alternatives are obtained. The evaluation of the methods and the rank of the diagnosis methods can reduce time, cost, and validity of the test results.

  14. Analytical and artificial neural network models to estimate the discharge coefficient for ogee spillway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarar, Alpaslan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, analytical and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model were used for determine the discharge coefficient of Ogee Spillways. For this aim, discharge coefficients of 11 different heads were calculated by using a test flume having 7.5 cm width, 15 cm depth and 5 m length, in the laboratory. Discharge coefficients were also computed by the formula for the same heads measured in the laboratory to investigate the accuracy of experimental setup. An ANN model was set by using the experimental results in order to estimate the discharge coefficient. Then, the performance of the ANN model was investigated. As the result, the coefficient of determination between ANN model and experimental setup is found R2= 0.98. ANN model is show a good consistency with experimental results.

  15. ENTVis: A Visual Analytic Tool for Entropy-Based Network Traffic Anomaly Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangfang; Huang, Wei; Zhao, Ying; Shi, Yang; Liang, Xing; Fan, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Entropy-based traffic metrics have received substantial attention in network traffic anomaly detection because entropy can provide fine-grained metrics of traffic distribution characteristics. However, some practical issues--such as ambiguity, lack of detailed distribution information, and a large number of false positives--affect the application of entropy-based traffic anomaly detection. In this work, we introduce a visual analytic tool called ENTVis to help users understand entropy-based traffic metrics and achieve accurate traffic anomaly detection. ENTVis provides three coordinated views and rich interactions to support a coherent visual analysis on multiple perspectives: the timeline group view for perceiving situations and finding hints of anomalies, the Radviz view for clustering similar anomalies in a period, and the matrix view for understanding traffic distributions and diagnosing anomalies in detail. Several case studies have been performed to verify the usability and effectiveness of our method. A further evaluation was conducted via expert review.

  16. An analytic network process approach for locating undesirable facilities: an example from Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzkaya, Gülfem; Onüt, Semih; Tuzkaya, Umut R; Gülsün, Bahadir

    2008-09-01

    Locating an undesirable facility is a sophisticated problem, for the evaluation procedures involve several objectives and the solution to the problem calls for some compromises to be made between probable conflicting criteria. This paper addresses the problem of undesirable facility location selection using the analytic network process (ANP), a multi-criteria decision-making technique. The ANP technique enables us to consider both qualitative and quantitative criteria as well as the interdependencies and feedbacks. A number of criteria (benefits, opportunities, costs and risks) and their sub-criteria are considered for siting a new facility with which this study has dealt. The questions of what criteria would be considered and what the interdependencies between these criteria and their weights would be were discussed and determined via interviews with some competent authorities of the Istanbul Municipality and of two environmental organizations. Four representative locations were evaluated and the most convenient one was selected. This was followed by the sensitivity analyses of the results.

  17. Prioritizing of effective factors on development of medicinal plants cultivation using analytic network process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbanali Rassam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For the overall development of medicinal plants cultivation in Iran, there is a need to identify various effective factors on medicinal plant cultivation. A proper method for identifying the most effective factor on the development of the medicinal plants cultivation is essential. This research conducted in order to prioritizing of the effective criteria for the development of medicinal plant cultivation in North Khorasan province in Iran using Analytical Network Process (ANP method. The multi-criteria decision making (MCDM is suggested to be a viable method for factor selection and the analytic network process (ANP has been used as a tool for MCDM. For this purpose a list of effective factors offered to expert group. Then pair wise comparison questionnaires were distributed between relevant researchers and local producer experts of province to get their opinions about the priority of criteria and sub- criteria. The questionnaires were analyzed using Super Decision software. We illustrated the use of the ANP by ranking main effective factors such as economic, educational-extension services, cultural-social and supportive policies on development of medicinal plants. The main objective of the present study was to develop ANP as a decision making tool for prioritizing factors affecting the development of medicinal plants cultivation. Results showed that the ANP methodology was perfectly suited to tackling the complex interrelations involved in selection factor in this case. Also the results of the process revealed that among the factors, supporting the cultivation of medicinal plants, build the infrastructure for marketing support, having educated farmer and easy access to production input have most impact on the development of medicinal plant cultivation.

  18. Facing mixed emotions: Analytic and holistic perception of facial emotion expressions engages separate brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaux, Emilie; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2016-11-01

    The ability to decode facial emotions is of primary importance for human social interactions; yet, it is still debated how we analyze faces to determine their expression. Here we compared the processing of emotional face expressions through holistic integration and/or local analysis of visual features, and determined which brain systems mediate these distinct processes. Behavioral, physiological, and brain responses to happy and angry faces were assessed by presenting congruent global configurations of expressions (e.g., happy top+happy bottom), incongruent composite configurations (e.g., angry top+happy bottom), and isolated features (e.g. happy top only). Top and bottom parts were always from the same individual. Twenty-six healthy volunteers were scanned using fMRI while they classified the expression in either the top or the bottom face part but ignored information in the other non-target part. Results indicate that the recognition of happy and anger expressions is neither strictly holistic nor analytic Both routes were involved, but with a different role for analytic and holistic information depending on the emotion type, and different weights of local features between happy and anger expressions. Dissociable neural pathways were engaged depending on emotional face configurations. In particular, regions within the face processing network differed in their sensitivity to holistic expression information, which predominantly activated fusiform, inferior occipital areas and amygdala when internal features were congruent (i.e. template matching), whereas more local analysis of independent features preferentially engaged STS and prefrontal areas (IFG/OFC) in the context of full face configurations, but early visual areas and pulvinar when seen in isolated parts. Collectively, these findings suggest that facial emotion recognition recruits separate, but interactive dorsal and ventral routes within the face processing networks, whose engagement may be shaped by

  19. Electrogenerated thin films of microporous polymer networks with remarkably increased electrochemical response to nitroaromatic analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Cando, Alex; Scherf, Ullrich

    2015-06-03

    Thin films of microporous polymer networks (MPNs) have been generated by electrochemical polymerization of a series of multifunctional carbazole-based monomers. The microporous films show high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 1300 m2 g(-1) as directly measured by krypton sorption experiments. A correlation between the number of polymerizable carbazole units of the monomer and the resulting surface area is observed. Electrochemical sensing experiments with 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene as prototypical nitroaromatic analyte demonstrate an up to 180 times increased current response of MPN-modified glassy carbon electrodes in relation to the nonmodified electrode. The phenomenon probably involves intermolecular interactions between the electron-poor nitroaromatic analytes and the electron-rich, high surface area microporous deposits, with the electrochemical reduction at the MPN-modified electrodes being an adsorption-controlled process for low scan rates. We expect a high application potential of such MPN-modified electrodes for boosting the sensitivity of electrochemical sensor devices.

  20. A fuzzy analytic network process for multi-criteria evaluation of contaminated site remedial countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promentilla, Michael Angelo B; Furuichi, T; Ishii, K; Tanikawa, N

    2008-08-01

    The Analytic Network Process (ANP) has been proposed to incorporate interdependence and feedback effect in the prioritization of remedial countermeasures using a hierarchical network decision model, but this approach seems to be incapable of capturing the vagueness and fuzziness during value judgment elicitation. The aim of this paper is to present an evaluation method using a fuzzy ANP (FANP) approach to address this shortcoming. Triangular fuzzy numbers (TFN) and their degree of fuzziness are used in the semantic scale as human judgment expressed in natural language is most often vague and fuzzy. The method employs the alpha-cuts, interval arithmetic and optimism index to transform the fuzzy comparative judgment matrix into set of crisp matrices, and then calculates the desired priorities using the eigenvector method. A numerical example, which was drawn from a real-life case study of an uncontrolled landfill in Japan, is presented to demonstrate the process. Results from the sensitivity analysis describe how the fuzziness in judgment could affect the solution robustness of the prioritization method. The proposed FANP approach therefore could effectively deal with the uncertain judgment inherent in the decision making process and derive the meaningful priorities explicitly from a complex decision structure in the evaluation of contaminated site remedial countermeasures.

  1. To Mercury dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    Present significance of the study of rotation of Mercury considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned Mercury missions. New high accurate data on Mercury's structure and its physical fields are expected from BepiColombo mission (Anselmi et al., 2001). Investigation of resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play here main part. New approaches to the study of Mercury dynamics and the construction of analytical theory of its resonant rotation are suggested. Within these approaches Mercury is considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a core and a mantle. The mantle of Mercury is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a large ellipsoidal cavity of Mercury. This Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in resonant traslatory-rotary regime of the resonance 3:2. We take into account only the second harmonic of the force function of the Sun and Mercury. For the study of Mercury rotation we have been used specially designed canonical equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincare variables (Barkin, Ferrandiz, 2001), more convenient for the application of mentioned methods. Approximate observational and some theoretical evaluations of the two main coefficients of Mercury gravitational field J_2 and C22 are known. From observational data of Mariner-10 mission were obtained some first evaluations of these coefficients: J_2 =(8± 6)\\cdot 10-5(Esposito et al., 1977); J_2 =(6± 2)\\cdot 10-5and C22 =(1.0± 0.5)\\cdot 10-5(Anderson et al., 1987). Some theoretical evaluation of ratio of these coefficients has been obtained on the base of study of periodic motions of the system of two non-spherical gravitating bodies (Barkin, 1976). Corresponding values of coefficients consist: J_2 =8\\cdot 10-5and C22 =0.33\\cdot 10-5. We have no data about non-sphericity of inner core of Mercury. Planned missions to Mercury (BepiColombo and Messenger) promise to

  2. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilten eNicola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF. The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks

  3. Mercury migration into ground water, a literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Carden, J.L.; Kury, R.; Eichholz, G.G.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents a broad review of the technical literature dealing with mercury migration in the soil. The approach followed was to identify relevant articles by searching bibliographic data bases, obtaining the promising articles and searching these articles for any additional relevant citations. Eight catagories were used to organize the literature, with a review and summary of each paper. Catagories used were the following: chemical states of mercury under environmental conditions; diffusion of mercury vapor through soil; solubility and stability of mercury in environmental waters; transport of mercury on colloids; models for mercury migration through the environment; analytical techniques; retention of mercury by soil components; formation of organomecurials.

  4. Assessment of Matrix Multiplication Learning with a Rule-Based Analytical Model--"A Bayesian Network Representation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    This study explored an alternative assessment procedure to examine learning trajectories of matrix multiplication. It took rule-based analytical and cognitive task analysis methods specifically to break down operation rules for a given matrix multiplication. Based on the analysis results, a hierarchical Bayesian network, an assessment model,…

  5. Manufacturing plant location selection in logistics network using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Yu Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In recent years, numerous companies have moved their manufacturing plants to China to capitalize on lower cost and tax. Plant location has such an impact on cost, stocks, and logistics network but location selection in the company is usually based on subjective preference of high ranking managers. Such a decision-making process might result in selecting a location with a lower fixed cost but a higher operational cost. Therefore, this research adapts real data from an electronics company to develop a framework that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative factors for selecting new plant locations. Design/methodology/approach: In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 high rank managers (7 of them are department manager, 2 of them are vice-president, 1 of them is senior engineer, and 2 of them are plant manager in the departments of construction, finance, planning, production, and warehouse to determine the important factors. A questionnaire survey is then conducted for comparing factors which are analyzed using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Findings: Results show that the best location chosen by the developed framework coincides well with the company’s primal production base. The results have been presented to the company’s high ranking managers for realizing the accuracy of the framework. Positive responses of the managers indicate usefulness of implementing the proposed model into reality, which adds to the value of this research. Practical implications: The proposed framework can save numerous time-consuming meetings called to compromise opinions and conflictions from different departments in location selection. Originality/value: This paper adapts the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP to incorporate quantitative and qualitative factors which are obtained through in-depth interviews with high rank managers in a company into the location decision.

  6. Using the Analytical Network Process to Select the Best Strategy for Reducing Risks in a Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers four types of the most prominent risks in the supply chain. Their subcriteria and relations between them and within the network are also considered. In a supply chain, risks are mostly created by fluctuations. The aim of this study is to adopt a strategy for eliminating or reducing risks in a supply chain network. Having various solutions helps the supply chain to be resilient. Therefore, five alternatives are considered, namely, total quality management (TQM, leanness, alignment, adaptability, and agility. This paper develops a new network of supply chain risks by considering the interactions between risks. Perhaps, the network elements have interacted with some or all of the factors (clusters or subfactors. We constitute supply chain risks in the analytic network process (ANP, which attracted less attention in the previous studies. Most of the studies about making a decision in supply chains have been applied in analytic hierarchy process (AHP network. The present study considers the ANP as a well-known multicriteria decision making (MCDM technique to choose the best alternative, because of the interdependency and feedbacks of different levels of the network. Finally, the ANP selects TQM as the best alternative among the considered ones.

  7. Basic Information about Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Environment Contact Us Share Basic Information about Mercury On this page: What is mercury? Emissions of ... Consumer products that traditionally contain mercury What is Mercury? Mercury is a naturally-occurring chemical element found ...

  8. ProteoLens: a visual analytic tool for multi-scale database-driven biological network data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tianxiao; Sivachenko, Andrey Y; Harrison, Scott H; Chen, Jake Y

    2008-08-12

    New systems biology studies require researchers to understand how interplay among myriads of biomolecular entities is orchestrated in order to achieve high-level cellular and physiological functions. Many software tools have been developed in the past decade to help researchers visually navigate large networks of biomolecular interactions with built-in template-based query capabilities. To further advance researchers' ability to interrogate global physiological states of cells through multi-scale visual network explorations, new visualization software tools still need to be developed to empower the analysis. A robust visual data analysis platform driven by database management systems to perform bi-directional data processing-to-visualizations with declarative querying capabilities is needed. We developed ProteoLens as a JAVA-based visual analytic software tool for creating, annotating and exploring multi-scale biological networks. It supports direct database connectivity to either Oracle or PostgreSQL database tables/views, on which SQL statements using both Data Definition Languages (DDL) and Data Manipulation languages (DML) may be specified. The robust query languages embedded directly within the visualization software help users to bring their network data into a visualization context for annotation and exploration. ProteoLens supports graph/network represented data in standard Graph Modeling Language (GML) formats, and this enables interoperation with a wide range of other visual layout tools. The architectural design of ProteoLens enables the de-coupling of complex network data visualization tasks into two distinct phases: 1) creating network data association rules, which are mapping rules between network node IDs or edge IDs and data attributes such as functional annotations, expression levels, scores, synonyms, descriptions etc; 2) applying network data association rules to build the network and perform the visual annotation of graph nodes and edges

  9. Analisis Masalah Pengembangan Perbankan Syariah di Indonesia: Aplikasi Metode Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aam Slamet Rusydiana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Development Problems Analysis of Islamic Banking in Indonesia: Application Analytic Network Process MethodThis study would try to address the problems that faced by Islamic banking institutions in Indonesia. The results showed that the problems that arise in the development of Islamic banks in Indonesia consists of four important aspects, namely: human, technical, legal/structural aspect, and market/communal aspect. Decomposition of problem as a whole gains the priorities: 1 There is not enough of Islamic banks capital yet; 2 Lack of understanding of Islamic bank practitioners; 3 Lack of government support; 4 the trust and public interest to Islamic banks tend to be low.While the priority of policy strategies that are considered able to resolve the problems of Islamic banking industry in Indonesia consists of: 1 strengthen the capital and business scale and improve the efficiency level; 2 improve the quantity and quality of human resources, and also information systems and technologies; Furthermore, 3 improve the structure of Islamic bank funds and harmonization of regulation and supervision. DOI: 10.15408/ess.v6i2.3573

  10. Analytical Solutions for Rumor Spreading Dynamical Model in a Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, R.; Chakouvari, S.; Askari, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, Laplace Adomian decomposition method is utilized for evaluating of spreading model of rumor. Firstly, a succinct review is constructed on the subject of using analytical methods such as Adomian decomposion method, Variational iteration method and Homotopy Analysis method for epidemic models and biomathematics. In continue a spreading model of rumor with consideration of forgetting mechanism is assumed and subsequently LADM is exerted for solving of it. By means of the aforementioned method, a general solution is achieved for this problem which can be readily employed for assessing of rumor model without exerting any computer program. In addition, obtained consequences for this problem are discussed for different cases and parameters. Furthermore, it is shown the method is so straightforward and fruitful for analyzing equations which have complicated terms same as rumor model. By employing numerical methods, it is revealed LADM is so powerful and accurate for eliciting solutions of this model. Eventually, it is concluded that this method is so appropriate for this problem and it can provide researchers a very powerful vehicle for scrutinizing rumor models in diverse kinds of social networks such as Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, LinkedIn and Tuitor.

  11. Network Traffic Analysis With Query Driven VisualizationSC 2005HPC Analytics Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng; Campbell, Scott; Lau, Stephen; Fisk, Mike; Gavrilov, Eugene; Kent, Alex; Davis, Christopher E.; Olinger,Rick; Young, Rob; Prewett, Jim; Weber, Paul; Caudell, Thomas P.; Bethel,E. Wes; Smith, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Our analytics challenge is to identify, characterize, and visualize anomalous subsets of large collections of network connection data. We use a combination of HPC resources, advanced algorithms, and visualization techniques. To effectively and efficiently identify the salient portions of the data, we rely on a multi-stage workflow that includes data acquisition, summarization (feature extraction), novelty detection, and classification. Once these subsets of interest have been identified and automatically characterized, we use a state-of-the-art-high-dimensional query system to extract data subsets for interactive visualization. Our approach is equally useful for other large-data analysis problems where it is more practical to identify interesting subsets of the data for visualization than to render all data elements. By reducing the size of the rendering workload, we enable highly interactive and useful visualizations. As a result of this work we were able to analyze six months worth of data interactively with response times two orders of magnitude shorter than with conventional methods.

  12. USING ANALYTIC NETWORK FOR SELECTION OF ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING (ERP ALIGNED TO BUSINESS STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto de Medeiros Junior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The choice of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP must be made judiciously by the high costs involved in the acquisition of such systems. Managers in areas such as accounting, financial and information technology need support and tools that help in selecting an appropriate ERP for their business. With this article, we present a study aimed at investigating the possibility of a Decision Support System (DSS to be used for this selection interrelating evaluation criteria, which could allow to contemplate the strategic alignment between Business and Information Technology. From the literature review 28 factors related to the selection of software packages, with special emphasis on ERP were identified. For the research procedures, the qualitative ones were adopted, in that the 18 factors considered relevant to a good selection of ERP were classified with the Delphi technique and used as input in a DSS: Analytical Network Process (ANP, applied as a Case Study in a small business that hired the ERP. The results showed that the ANP was efficient in interrelated criteria and evaluated the strategic alignment between Business and Information Technology.

  13. Solid waste facilities location using of analytical network process and data envelopment analysis approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadivi, M R; Fatemi Ghomi, S M T

    2012-06-01

    Selection of the appropriate site for solid waste facilities is a complex problem and requires an extensive evaluation process, because it is very difficult to develop a selection criterion that can precisely describe the preference of one location over another. Therefore selection of these sites can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision-making or multiple attributes decision-making problem. For this purpose, we propose a technique that can effectively take managerial preferences and subjective data into consideration, along with quantitative factors. The tool proposed here relies on the use of the analytical network process (ANP) and to help integrate managerial evaluations into a more quantitatively based decision tool, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is applied. In this paper, a location selection procedure is presented to construct an undesirable facility applying ANP and DEA approaches in two stages. In the first stage ANP approach is used, results of this stage are inputs for the second stage. In this stage, DEA is applied to select the best location. Finally, to illustrate the proposed framework, at "Results and discussion" section, a total of four undesirable facility locations are evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing weighted criteria to evaluate lean reverse logistics through analytical network process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagloel, Teuku Yuri M.; Hakim, Inaki Maulida; Krisnawardhani, Rike Adyartie

    2017-11-01

    Reverse logistics is a part of supply chain that bring materials from consumers back to manufacturer in order to gain added value or do a proper disposal. Nowadays, most companies are still facing several problems on reverse logistics implementation which leads to high waste along reverse logistics processes. In order to overcome this problem, Madsen [Framework for Reverse Lean Logistics to Enable Green Manufacturing, Eco Design 2009: 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, Sapporo, 2009] has developed a lean reverse logistics framework as a step to eliminate waste by implementing lean on reverse logistics. However, the resulted framework sets aside criteria used to evaluate its performance. This research aims to determine weighted criteria that can be used as a base on reverse logistics evaluation by considering lean principles. The resulted criteria will ensure reverse logistics are kept off from waste, thus implemented efficiently. Analytical Network Process (ANP) is used in this research to determine the weighted criteria. The result shows that criteria used for evaluation lean reverse logistics are Innovation and Learning (35%), Economic (30%), Process Flow Management (14%), Customer Relationship Management (13%), Environment (6%), and Social (2%).

  15. Analytical transport network theory to guide the design of 3-D microstructural networks in energy materials: Part 2. Flow with reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alex P.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2017-12-01

    We extend the fully analytical, heuristic "Analytical Transport Network Model" for steady-state, diffusive flow in a 3-D network to account for surface reactions. In the limit of negligible reactions, the model reduces to the conserved flow solution. The extension does not increase the time required to run the model, which in Part 1 was shown to be 0.5-1.5 and 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than electrochemical fin (ECF) theory and finite element analysis (FEA) for conserved flow, respectively. The model is compared to reacting-flow ECF and FEA as well as to experiments and is demonstrated as a potentially useful heuristic for understanding the influence of morphology and topology on reactive-diffusive flow through a 3-D microstructural network.

  16. A universal, fault-tolerant, non-linear analytic network for modeling and fault detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, J.E. [Advanced Modeling Techniques Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); King, R.W.; Monson, L.R.; Olson, D.L.; Staffon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-03-06

    The similarities and differences of a universal network to normal neural networks are outlined. The description and application of a universal network is discussed by showing how a simple linear system is modeled by normal techniques and by universal network techniques. A full implementation of the universal network as universal process modeling software on a dedicated computer system at EBR-II is described and example results are presented. It is concluded that the universal network provides different feature recognition capabilities than a neural network and that the universal network can provide extremely fast, accurate, and fault-tolerant estimation, validation, and replacement of signals in a real system.

  17. Analytical modeling of mode selection and power control for underlay D2D communication in cellular networks

    KAUST Repository

    Elsawy, Hesham

    2014-11-01

    Device-to-device (D2D) communication enables the user equipments (UEs) located in close proximity to bypass the cellular base stations (BSs) and directly connect to each other, and thereby, offload traffic from the cellular infrastructure. D2D communication can improve spatial frequency reuse and energy efficiency in cellular networks. This paper presents a comprehensive and tractable analytical framework for D2D-enabled uplink cellular networks with a flexible mode selection scheme along with truncated channel inversion power control. The developed framework is used to analyze and understand how the underlaying D2D communication affects the cellular network performance. Through comprehensive numerical analysis, we investigate the expected performance gains and provide guidelines for selecting the network parameters.

  18. A Sensemaking Approach to Visual Analytics of Attribute-Rich Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Social networks have become more complex, in particular considering the fact that elements in social networks are not only abstract topological nodes and links, but contain rich social attributes and reflecting diverse social relationships. For example, in a co-authorship social network in a scientific community, nodes in the social network, which…

  19. Mapping debris flow susceptibility using analytical network process in Kodaikkanal Hills, Tamil Nadu (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, Evangelin Ramani; Sridhar, Venkataramana

    2017-12-01

    Rapid debris flows, a mixture of unconsolidated sediments and water travelling at speeds > 10 m/s are the most destructive water related mass movements that affect hill and mountain regions. The predisposing factors setting the stage for the event are the availability of materials, type of materials, stream power, slope gradient, aspect and curvature, lithology, land use and land cover, lineament density, and drainage. Rainfall is the most common triggering factor that causes debris flow in the Palar subwatershed and seismicity is not considered as it is a stable continental region and moderate seismic zone. Also, there are no records of major seismic activities in the past. In this study, one of the less explored heuristic methods known as the analytical network process (ANP) is used to map the spatial propensity of debris flow. This method is based on top-down decision model and is a multi-criteria, decision-making tool that translates subjective assessment of relative importance to weights or scores and is implemented in the Palar subwatershed which is part of the Western Ghats in southern India. The results suggest that the factors influencing debris flow susceptibility in this region are the availability of material on the slope, peak flow, gradient of the slope, land use and land cover, and proximity to streams. Among all, peak discharge is identified as the chief factor causing debris flow. The use of micro-scale watersheds demonstrated in this study to develop the susceptibility map can be very effective for local level planning and land management.

  20. Tourism infrastructure development prioritization in Sabang Island using analytic network process methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Hafnidar A.; Afifuddin, Moch.; Akbar, Herry

    2017-11-01

    Indonesia has been widely known as an archipelago country, with its geographical location is at the equator, which make this country as a tropical country. It has the topography of diverse islands which consist of lakes, mountains, and one of countries which have the longest coastline. This condition cause Indonesia has various beautiful tourism objects and become the attraction to the international tourists to come. Indonesia still has the other islands which are as beautiful as Bali Island offering different beauties. One of them is an island located in the most western island of Indonesia, which becomes the zero point of the country. It is Sabang Island in Aceh Province. Sabang Island is the small volcanic island located in the most western island of Sumatra. Infrastructure becomes the basic device in supporting this tourism aspect, which the buildings and service institutions play the important role in appropriate managing of economic and community needs. The problem in this study is how to determine the priority of tourism infrastructure development in Sabang Island. The objective of this study is to determine the priority rank of tourism infrastructure development and the priority rank of the potential investment in Sabang Island to be developed. The ranking results of the Analytic Network Process (ANP) calculations of tourism locations/zones and tourism supporting infrastructure found that Teupin Layeu and Gapang, and Rubiah Island have the highest priority to be developed in the hotel/accommodation infrastructure which scores are 0.02589 and 0.02120. Then followed by parking infrastructure in Teupin Layeu and access road to Km 0 which became as the main priority determined by Sabang government which scores are 0.01750 and 0.01618.

  1. Supplier selection in supply chain management using analytical network process for Indonesian cement industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A. H.; Mahardika, R. Z. Z.

    2017-12-01

    Supply chain management has increased more significance with the impact of globalization. In the present worldwide market, well-managed supply chain is a standout amongst the most vital requirement to be more competitive in the market. For any organization incorporate cement industry, the most critical decision in initial process of supply chain management is to buy products, materials or services from suppliers. So the role of suppliers is irrefutable important in the global aggressive markets. Appropriate decision of supplier selection can lead to reducing cost in supply chain management. However, it is becoming more complex because of existing various criteria and involving the suitable experts in the company to make valid decision in accordance with its criteria. In this study, the supplier selection of an Indonesia’s leading cement company is analyzed by using one of the popular multi-criteria decision making method, Saaty’s analytical network process (ANP). It is employed for the selection of the best alternative among three suppliers of pasted bag. Supplier with the highest rank comes from several major steps from building the relationship between various criteria to rating the alternatives with the help of experts from the company. The results show that, Communication capability, Flexible payment terms, Ability to meet delivery quantities are the most important criteria in the pasted bag supplier selection in Indonesian cement industry with 0.155, 0.110 and 0.1 ANP coefficient respectively. And based on the ANP coefficient values in limit supermatrix, the A2 or supplier 2 had the highest score with 64.7% or 0.13 ANP coefficient.

  2. HOW DO STUDENTS SELECT SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES? AN ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS (AHP) MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Chun Meng Tang; Miang Hong Ngerng

    2015-01-01

    Social networking sites are popular among university students, and students today are indeed spoiled for choice. New emerging social networking sites sprout up amid popular sites, while some existing ones die out. Given the choice of so many social networking sites, how do students decide which one they will sign up for and stay on as an active user? The answer to this question is of interest to social networking site designers and marketers. The market of social networking sites is highly co...

  3. Live Data Analytics With Collaborative Edge and Cloud Processing in Wireless IoT Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Shree Krishna; Wang, Xianbin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, big data analytics has received important attention in a variety of application domains including business, finance, space science, healthcare, telecommunication and Internet of Things (IoT...

  4. A framework for investigating mobile web success in the context of e-commerce:an analytic network process (ANP) approach

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Mona; Keramati, Abbas; Didehkhani, H.

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes a framework to investigate the factors of mobile web success in the context of e-commerce, and the relative importance of these success factors in selecting the most preferred mobile web. First, the Updated Delone and Mclean IS success model (2003) is chosen to extract significant mobile web success factors in the context of e-commerce. Second, it is extended through applying an Analytic Network Process (ANP) approach for investigating therelative importance of each factor...

  5. Analytical transport network theory to guide the design of 3-D microstructural networks in energy materials: Part 1. Flow without reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Alex P.; Nakajo, Arata; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2017-12-01

    We present a fully analytical, heuristic model - the "Analytical Transport Network Model" - for steady-state, diffusive, potential flow through a 3-D network. Employing a combination of graph theory, linear algebra, and geometry, the model explicitly relates a microstructural network's topology and the morphology of its channels to an effective material transport coefficient (a general term meant to encompass, e.g., conductivity or diffusion coefficient). The model's transport coefficient predictions agree well with those from electrochemical fin (ECF) theory and finite element analysis (FEA), but are computed 0.5-1.5 and 5-6 orders of magnitude faster, respectively. In addition, the theory explicitly relates a number of morphological and topological parameters directly to the transport coefficient, whereby the distributions that characterize the structure are readily available for further analysis. Furthermore, ATN's explicit development provides insight into the nature of the tortuosity factor and offers the potential to apply theory from network science and to consider the optimization of a network's effective resistance in a mathematically rigorous manner. The ATN model's speed and relative ease-of-use offer the potential to aid in accelerating the design (with respect to transport), and thus reducing the cost, of energy materials.

  6. A Multi-Criteria Analysis for the Evaluation of Social Housing Proposals: from the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP to the Analytic Network Process (ANP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ferri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Social housing requires appropriate evaluation models of projects, considering them from multiple perspectives: architectural, technical, environmental, economic, financial, paying particular attention to social aspects. The study proposes the use of a multi criteria evaluation model, based on the hierarchical (AHP and network (ANP analysis, as support in decision-making to guide practitioners and policy on the choice among alternative interventions. These methods allow to consider the overall effect of projects on urban system and the different points of view of those concerned, in an integrated and participatory approach. Interesting research perspectives concern the application of these evaluation approaches to case studies related to neighborhoods in which urban planning provides for social housing. The analysis will address the recent proposals for social housing in the city of Pescara (Italy, and in particular the urban transformation that is expected to achieve by means of the Integrated Urban Development Programme on the south-west of the city, whose regeneration was started by the Community Programme Urban 2.   Un’Analisi Multi Criteri per la Valutazione delle Proposte di Housing Sociale: dall’Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP all’Analytic Network Process (ANP I modelli insediativi di social housing richiedono idonei strumenti valutativi degli interventi immobiliari, considerandoli da molteplici punti di vista: architettonici, urbanistici, ambientali, economici, finanziari, con particolare attenzione agli aspetti sociali. Lo studio propone l’impiego di un modello valutativo multicriteri basato sull’analisi gerarchica (AHP e a rete (ANP, come supporto ai processi decisionali riguardanti la scelta tra interventi alternativi di edilizia residenziale sociale, considerando il loro effetto complessivo sul sistema urbano secondo un approccio integrato e partecipativo. Parole Chiave: analisi multicriteri, edilizia residenziale sociale

  7. Establishment of a Standard Analytical Model of Distribution Network with Distributed Generators and Development of Multi Evaluation Method for Network Configuration Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Matsuki, Junya; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shigekazu; Miyazaki, Teru; Kobayashi, Naoki

    Since a distribution network has many sectionalizing switches, there are huge radial network configuration candidates by states (opened or closed) of sectionalizing switches. Recently, the total number of distributed generation such as photovoltaic generation system and wind turbine generation system connected to the distribution network is drastically increased. The distribution network with the distributed generators must be operated keeping reliability of power supply and power quality. Therefore, the many configurations of the distribution network with the distributed generators must be evaluated multiply from various viewpoints such as distribution loss, total harmonic distortion, voltage imbalance and so on. In this paper, the authors propose a multi evaluation method to evaluate the distribution network configuration candidates satisfied with constraints of voltage and line current limit from three viewpoints ((1) distribution loss, (2) total harmonic distortion and (3) voltage imbalance). After establishing a standard analytical model of three sectionalized and three connected distribution network configuration with distributed generators based on the practical data, the multi evaluation for the established model is carried out by using the proposed method based on EMTP (Electro-Magnetic Transients Programs).

  8. Mercury and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Mercury and pregnancy Mercury and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... vision problems. How can you be exposed to mercury? Mercury has several forms: It can be a ...

  9. Applying social network analysis in economic geography: framing some key analytic issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, A.L.J. ter; Boschma, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Social network analysis attracts increasing attention in economic geography. We claim social network analysis is a promising tool for empirically investigating the structure and evolution of inter-organizational interaction and knowledge flows within and across regions. However, the potential of

  10. A hybrid analytical network process and fuzzy goal programming for supplier selection: A case study of auto part maker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Zande Hesami

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to present a hybrid model to select auto part suppliers. The proposed method of this paper uses factor analysis to find the most influencing factors on part maker selection and the results are validated using different statistical tests such as Cronbach's Alpha and Kaiser-Meyer.The hybrid model uses analytical network process to rank different part maker suppliers and fuzzy goal programming to choose the appropriate alternative among various choices. The implementation of the proposed model of this paper is used for a case study of real-world problem and the results are discussed.

  11. Disconnected by design: analytic approach in treatment networks having no common comparator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, S M; Gustafson, P; Liu, Y; Saab, S; Cline, S K; Platt, R W

    2016-12-01

    In a network meta-analysis, comparators of interest are ideally connected either directly or via one or more common comparators. However, in some therapeutic areas, the evidence base can produce networks that are disconnected, in which there is neither direct evidence nor an indirect route for comparing certain treatments within the network. Disconnected networks may occur when there is no accepted standard of care, when there has been a major paradigm shift in treatment, when use of a standard of care or placebo is debated, when a product receives orphan drug designation, or when there is a large number of available treatments and many accepted standards of care. These networks pose a challenge to decision makers and clinicians who want to estimate the relative efficacy and safety of newly available agents against alternatives. A currently recommended approach is to insert a distribution for the unknown treatment effect(s) into a network meta-analysis model of treatment effect. In this paper, we describe this approach along with two alternative Bayesian models that can accommodate disconnected networks. Additionally, we present a theoretical framework to guide the choice between modeling approaches. This paper presents researchers with the tools and framework for selecting appropriate models for indirect comparison of treatment efficacies when challenged with a disconnected framework. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Development of analytic intermodal freight networks for use within a GIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, F.; Xiong, D.; Middendorf, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Transportation Analysis

    1997-05-01

    The paper discusses the practical issues involved in constructing intermodal freight networks that can be used within GIS platforms to support inter-regional freight routing and subsequent (for example, commodity flow) analysis. The procedures described can be used to create freight-routable and traffic flowable interstate and intermodal networks using some combination of highway, rail, water and air freight transportation. Keys to realistic freight routing are the identification of intermodal transfer locations and associated terminal functions, a proper handling of carrier-owned and operated sub-networks within each of the primary modes of transport, and the ability to model the types of carrier services being offered.

  13. Mercury Information Clearinghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

    2006-03-31

    The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through

  14. TCM-Mesh: The database and analytical system for network pharmacology analysis for TCM preparations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Run-zhi Zhang; Shao-jun Yu; Hong Bai; Kang Ning

    2017-01-01

    ...” network, and revealing the regulation principles of small molecules in a high-throughput manner, thus would be very effective for the analysis of drug combinations, especially for TCM preparations...

  15. Time-to-event analysis with artificial neural networks: an integrated analytical and rule-based study for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Paulo J G; Etchells, Terence A; Jarman, Ian H; Hane Aung, M S; Chabaud, Sylvie; Bachelot, Thomas; Perol, David; Gargi, Thérèse; Bourdès, Valérie; Bonnevay, Stéphane; Négrier, Sylvie

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of censored survival data for breast cancer specific mortality and disease-free survival. There are three stages to the process, namely time-to-event modelling, risk stratification by predicted outcome and model interpretation using rule extraction. Model selection was carried out using the benchmark linear model, Cox regression but risk staging was derived with Cox regression and with Partial Logistic Regression Artificial Neural Networks regularised with Automatic Relevance Determination (PLANN-ARD). This analysis compares the two approaches showing the benefit of using the neural network framework especially for patients at high risk. The neural network model also has results in a smooth model of the hazard without the need for limiting assumptions of proportionality. The model predictions were verified using out-of-sample testing with the mortality model also compared with two other prognostic models called TNG and the NPI rule model. Further verification was carried out by comparing marginal estimates of the predicted and actual cumulative hazards. It was also observed that doctors seem to treat mortality and disease-free models as equivalent, so a further analysis was performed to observe if this was the case. The analysis was extended with automatic rule generation using Orthogonal Search Rule Extraction (OSRE). This methodology translates analytical risk scores into the language of the clinical domain, enabling direct validation of the operation of the Cox or neural network model. This paper extends the existing OSRE methodology to data sets that include continuous-valued variables.

  16. An Analytic Network Process approach for siting a municipal solid waste plant in the Metropolitan Area of Valencia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonés-Beltrán, Pablo; Pastor-Ferrando, Juan Pascual; García-García, Fernando; Pascual-Agulló, Amadeo

    2010-05-01

    In this paper the Analytic Network Process (ANP) is applied to select the best location for the construction of a municipal solid waste (MSW) plant in the Metropolitan area of Valencia (Spain). Selection of the appropriate MSW facility location can be viewed as a complex multicriteria decision-making problem that requires an extensive evaluation process of the potential MSW plant locations and other factors as diverse as economic, technical, legal, social or environmental issues. The decision-making process includes the identification of six candidate MSW plant sites and 21 criteria grouped into clusters for the construction of a network. Two technicians of the Metropolitan Waste Disposal Agency acted as decision makers (DMs). The influences between the elements of the network were identified and analyzed using the ANP multicriteria decision method. Two different ANP models were used: one hierarchy model (that considers AHP as a particular case of ANP) and another network-based model. The results obtained in each model were compared and analyzed. The strengths and weaknesses of ANP as a multicriteria decision analysis tool are also described in the paper. The main findings of this research have proved that ANP is a useful tool to help technicians to make their decision process traceable and reliable. Moreover, this approach helps DMs undertake a sound reflection of the siting problem. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The longitudinal use of SaNDVis: visual social network analytics in the enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perer, Adam; Guy, Ido; Uziel, Erel; Ronen, Inbal; Jacovi, Michal

    2013-07-01

    As people continue to author and share increasing amounts of information in social media, the opportunity to leverage such information for relationship discovery tasks increases. In this paper, we describe a set of systems that mine, aggregate, and infer a social graph from social media inside an enterprise, resulting in over 73 million relationships between 450,000 people. We then describe SaNDVis, a novel visual analytics tool that supports people-centric tasks like expertise location, team building, and team coordination in the enterprise. We provide details of a 22-month-long, large-scale deployment to over 2,300 users from which we analyze longitudinal usage patterns, classify types of visual analytics queries and users, and extract dominant use cases from log and interview data. By integrating social position, evidence, and facets into SaNDVis, we demonstrate how users can use a visual analytics tool to reflect on existing relationships as well as build new relationships in an enterprise setting.

  18. Toward a Unified Understanding of Mercury and Methylated Mercury from the World's Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, M. K.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Landing, W. M.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2012-12-01

    Marine fish and shellfish are the main source of toxic methylmercury exposure for humans. As recently as decade ago, very limited aqueous methylated mercury data were available from marine settings, resulting in a generally poor understanding of the processes controlling mercury in pelagic marine food webs. Recent oceanographic cruises have significantly improved availability of reliable measurements of methylated mercury and total mercury in seawater. This presentation will focus on vertical seawater profiles collected to depths 1000 m from three recent sampling efforts in collaboration with the CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography Program sponsored by NOAA including: 1) the northeastern Pacific (P16N cruise from Honolulu, Hawaii to Kodiak, Alaska); (2) the southern Indian Ocean (I5 cruise from Cape Town, South Africa, to Fremantle, Australia); and, (3) the Southern Ocean cruise (S4P from McMurdo, Antarctica, to Punta Arenas, Chile). Analytical results presented were all derived from the USGS Mercury Research Lab (http://wi.water.usgs.gov/mercury-lab). Supporting data derived from these cruises on water mass ages, nutrients, carbon and dissolved oxygen provide an opportunity to develop a stronger understanding of the biogeochemical factors controlling oceanic distributions of mercury and methylated mercury. Whole-water, median total mercury, and methylated mercury concentrations for the northern Pacific, southern Indian, and Southern Ocean were 1.10, 0.80, and 1.65 pM, , and 0.11, 0.08, and 0.32 pM, respectively. For all three oceans, vertical profiles of total mercury generally show the lowest concentrations in the surface mixed layer, and concentration maxima at the 700-1000 m depths. Surface depletion of total mercury is attributed to photo-chemical reduction and evasion of gaseous elemental mercury as well as scavenging by settling particulate matter, the main vector of transport to the subsurface ocean. Methylated mercury in all the ocean profiles reveal distinct mid

  19. Analytic treatment of tipping points for social consensus in large random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Lim, C.; Szymanski, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a homogeneous pair approximation to the naming game (NG) model by deriving a six-dimensional Open Dynamics Engine (ODE) for the two-word naming game. Our ODE reveals the change in dynamical behavior of the naming game as a function of the average degree of an uncorrelated network. This result is in good agreement with the numerical results. We also analyze the extended NG model that allows for presence of committed nodes and show that there is a shift of the tipping point for social consensus in sparse networks.

  20. Tools for Large-Scale Data Analytic Examination of Relational and Epistemic Networks in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Krishna; Johri, Aditya; Xian, Hanjun; Wang, G. Alan; Liu, Xiaomo

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of digital information technologies and related infrastructure has given rise to novel ways of capturing, storing and analyzing data. In this paper, we describe the research and development of an information system called Interactive Knowledge Networks for Engineering Education Research (iKNEER). This system utilizes a framework…

  1. A Project Strategic Index proposal for portfolio selection in electrical company based on the Analytic Network Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith-Perera, Aida [Universidad Metropolitana de Caracas, Departamento de Gestion Tecnologica, Caracas 1071, Edo Miranda (Venezuela); Garcia-Melon, Monica; Poveda-Bautista, Rocio; Pastor-Ferrando, Juan-Pascual [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Camino de vera s/n 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    In this paper a new approach to prioritize project portfolio in an efficient and reliable way is presented. It is based on strategic objectives of the company and multicriteria decision methods. The paper introduces a rigorous method with acceptable complexity which seeks to assist managers of a big Electrical Company of Venezuela to distribute the annual budget among the possible improvement actions to be conducted on the electrical network of Caracas. A total of 15 network improvement actions grouped into three clusters according to the strategic objectives of the company have been analyzed using the Project Strategic Index (PSI) proposed. The approach combines the use of the Analytic Network Process (ANP) method with the information obtained from the experts during the decision-making process. The ANP method allows the aggregation of the experts' judgments on each of the indicators used into one Project Strategic Index. In addition, ANP is based on utility ratio functions which are the most appropriate for the analysis of uncertain data, like experts' estimations. Finally, unlike the other multicriteria techniques, ANP allows the decision problem to be modelled using the relationships among dependent criteria. The participating experts coincided in the appreciation that the method proposed in this paper is useful and an improvement from traditional budget distribution techniques. They find the results obtained coherent, the process seems sufficiently rigorous and precise, and the use of resources is significantly less than in other methods. (author)

  2. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov . Mercury Background Mercury Report Additional Resources Mercury Report - Children's Exposure to Elemental Mercury Recommend on Facebook ... I limit exposure to mercury? Why was the report written? Children attending a daycare in New Jersey ...

  3. CIPP: a versatile analytical model for VBR traffic in ATM networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasakan, R.; Desai, U. B.; Karandikar, Abhay

    1999-08-01

    Correlated Interarrival time Process (CIPP) has been proposed, for modeling both the composite arrival process of packets in broadband networks and the individual source modeling. The CIPP--a generalization of the Poisson process- - is a stationary counting process and is parameterized by a correlation parameter `p' which represents the degree of correlation in adjacent interarrivals in addition to `(lambda) ' the intensity of the process. In this paper, we present the performance modeling of VBR video traffic in ATM networks, using CIPP/M/1 queue. We first give the expressions for stationary distributions for CIPP/M/1 queue. The, we derive the queuing measures of interest. We simulate a queue with smoothed VBR video trace data as input (with exponential services) to compare with the theoretical measures derived above. Experimental results show that the CIPP/M/1 queue, models well with ATM multiplexer performance with the real world VBR video traffic input.

  4. Performance Analysis for Wireless Networks: An Analytical Approach by Multifarious Sym Teredo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shalini Punithavathani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IPv4-IPv6 transition rolls out numerous challenges to the world of Internet as the Internet is drifting from IPv4 to IPv6. IETF recommends few transition techniques which includes dual stack and translation and tunneling. By means of tunneling the IPv6 packets over IPv4 UDP, Teredo maintains IPv4/IPv6 dual stack node in isolated IPv4 networks behindhand network address translation (NAT. However, the proposed tunneling protocol works with the symmetric and asymmetric NATs. In order to make a Teredo support several symmetric NATs along with several asymmetric NATs, we propose multifarious Sym Teredo (MTS, which is an extension of Teredo with a capability of navigating through several symmetric NATs. The work preserves the Teredo architecture and also offers a backward compatibility with the original Teredo protocol.

  5. Wearable Networked Sensing for Human Mobility and Activity Analytics: A Systems Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities in ...

  6. Collectivism culture, HIV stigma and social network support in Anhui, China: a path analytic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Chunpeng; Guida, Jennifer; Sun, Yehuan; Liu, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    HIV stigma is rooted in culture and, therefore, it is essential to investigate it within the context of culture. The objective of this study was to examine the interrelationships among individualism-collectivism, HIV stigma, and social network support. A social network study was conducted among 118 people living with HIVAIDS in China, who were infected by commercial plasma donation, a nonstigmatized behavior. The Individualism-Collectivism Interpersonal Assessment Inventory (ICIAI) was used to measure cultural norms and values in the context of three social groups, family members, friends, and neighbors. Path analyses revealed (1) a higher level of family ICIAI was significantly associated with a higher level of HIV self-stigma (β=0.32); (2) a higher level of friend ICIAI was associated with a lower level of self-stigma (β=-035); (3) neighbor ICIAI was associated with public stigma (β=-0.61); (4) self-stigman was associated with social support from neighbors (β=-0.27); and (5) public stigma was associated with social support from neighbors (β=-0.24). This study documents that HIV stigma may mediate the relationship between collectivist culture and social network support, providing an empirical basis for interventions to include aspects of culture into HIV intervention strategies.

  7. Transdisciplinarity among tobacco harm-reduction researchers: a network analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, Keith G; Clark, Pamela I; Huerta, Timothy

    2008-08-01

    Progress in tobacco control and other areas of health research is thought to be heavily influenced by the extent to which researchers are able to work with each other not only within, but also across disciplines. This study provides an examination of the extent to which researchers in the area of tobacco harm reduction work together. Specifically, data were collected in 2005 from a national group of 67 top tobacco-control researchers from eight broadly defined disciplines representing 17 areas of expertise. Network analysis was utilized to examine the extent to which these researchers were engaged in research that was interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary, based on the outcome or product attained. Findings revealed that interdisciplinary network ties were much denser than transdisciplinary ties, but researchers in some disciplines were more likely to work across disciplines than others, especially when synergistic outcomes resulted. The study demonstrates for the first time how tobacco-control researchers work together, providing direction for policy officials seeking to encourage greater transdisciplinarity. The study also demonstrates the value of network-analysis methods for understanding research relationships in one important area of health care.

  8. Optimizing Low-Concentration Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Fe₃O₄ Composites with the Aid of an Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rensheng; Fan, Mingyi; Hu, Jiwei; Ruan, Wenqian; Xiong, Kangning; Wei, Xionghui

    2017-11-07

    Reduced graphene oxide-supported Fe₃O₄ (Fe₃O₄/rGO) composites were applied in this study to remove low-concentration mercury from aqueous solutions with the aid of an artificial neural network (ANN) modeling and genetic algorithm (GA) optimization. The Fe₃O₄/rGO composites were prepared by the solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), N₂-sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and superconduction quantum interference device (SQUID). Response surface methodology (RSM) and ANN were employed to model the effects of different operating conditions (temperature, initial pH, initial Hg ion concentration and contact time) on the removal of the low-concentration mercury from aqueous solutions by the Fe₃O₄/rGO composites. The ANN-GA model results (with a prediction error below 5%) show better agreement with the experimental data than the RSM model results (with a prediction error below 10%). The removal process of the low-concentration mercury obeyed the Freudlich isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. In addition, a regeneration experiment of the Fe₃O₄/rGO composites demonstrated that these composites can be reused for the removal of low-concentration mercury from aqueous solutions.

  9. The Use of Analytic Network Process for Risk Assessment in Production of Renewable Energy from Agriculture Biomass in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandija Rivza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment is an important factor for successful and sustainable entrepreneurship of bioenergy production that has become one of the priorities in energy sector of Latvia. Promotion of the use of renewable energy is included as one of the strategic goals for European Union (EU and Latvia. As this field of energy production in Latvia is rather new and scantily explored there are many risk factors arising in different stages of production, starting with planning and building of a bioreactor and ending with production and further use and distribution of energy. The present research focuses on risk assessment in renewable energy production form biomass as this kind of energy is seen as a perspective source for renewable energy under the conditions of Latvia. A risk assessment module for renewable energy production made by using the Analytic Network Process (ANP software is described in the paper.

  10. Implementasi Life Cycle Assessment (LCA dan Pendekatan Analytical Network Process (ANP untuk Pengembangan Produk Hetric Lamp yang Ramah Lingkungan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Aditya Pringgajaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mempertimbangkan produk ramah lingkungan yang menjadi isu lingkungan belakangan ini, product hetric lamp telah dicitrakan sebagai produk yang ramah lingkungan dilihat dari material penyusun produk serta fungsi produk. Tetapi, perusahaan dalam mencitrakan produknya sebagai green product tidak memperhatikan perspektif ramah lingkungan dari sisi life cycle produk yang dihasilkan.  Pada penelitian ini akan diidentifikasi apakah produk hetric lamp benar-benar memiliki kriteria ramah lingkungan dilihat dari sisi life cycle produk dengan menggunakan pendekatan Life Cycle Assessment (LCA. Dari hasil Life Cycle Assessment (LCA diketahui bahwa bagian proses produksi memiliki dampak terbesar yaitu sebesar 60.2 Pt. Dari hasil Life Cycle Assessment (LCA tersebut kemudian ditemukan empat alternatif utama yang akan dipilih untuk mengurangi dampak lingkungan pada proses produksi dengan menggunakan metode Analytical Network Process (ANP. Metode ANP digunakan pada penelitian ini dikarenakan data-data yang ada memiliki hubungan keterkaitan antara satu elemen kriteria dengan elemen kriteria lainnya dan hubungan keterkaitan antara kriteria dengan subkriterianya.

  11. Analytic tools for investigating the structure of network reliability measures with regard to observation correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prószyński, W.; Kwaśniak, M.

    2017-09-01

    A global measure of observation correlations in a network is proposed, together with the auxiliary indices related to non-diagonal elements of the correlation matrix. Based on the above global measure, a specific representation of the correlation matrix is presented, being the result of rigorously proven theorem formulated within the present research. According to the theorem, each positive definite correlation matrix can be expressed by a scale factor and a so-called internal weight matrix. Such a representation made it possible to investigate the structure of the basic reliability measures with regard to observation correlations. Numerical examples carried out for two test networks illustrate the structure of those measures that proved to be dependent on global correlation index. Also, the levels of global correlation are proposed. It is shown that one can readily find an approximate value of the global correlation index, and hence the correlation level, for the expected values of auxiliary indices being the only knowledge about a correlation matrix of interest. The paper is an extended continuation of the previous study of authors that was confined to the elementary case termed uniform correlation. The extension covers arbitrary correlation matrices and a structure of correlation effect.

  12. Mercury in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, L.J.

    1971-05-01

    The global mercury cycle is diagrammed, and the movement of mercury in aquatic food chains is discussed. The methylation mechanisms in aquatic systems are diagrammed and discussed. The mercury flow in US society is diagrammed; the diagram shows the percentage contribution of various sources to the environment. Atmospheric levels of mercury are graphed, and the concentration of mercury in foodstuffs from various parts of the world are tabulated. The possibility of chromosome damage caused by mercury is briefly treated. 7 figures, 1 table.

  13. Mercury exanthem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vena, G A; Foti, C; Grandolfo, M; Angelini, G

    1994-10-01

    We have observed 9 male patients with a generalized rash following the topical use of an over-the-counter antiparasitic powder (MOM), containing ammoniated (11.2 g%) and metallic (4.2 g%) mercury, to treat phthiriasis (lice infestation). Primary and intensely erythemato-exudative lesions of the pubic region and genitals were associated with inverted erythema of the upper inner thighs and, in severe cases, involvement of the face, neck, trunk and major flexures. Eruptions included exanthematic, papulo-vesicular, purpuric and erythema-multiforme-like clinical pictures. 7 of the 9 cases presented with general malaise and pyrexia. A positive patch test reaction to ammoniated mercury was observed in all cases. There are probably 3 routes of powder exposure behind this type of rash: (i) direct skin contact; (ii) airborne skin contact; (iii) inhalation.

  14. Concept mapping and network analysis: an analytic approach to measure ties among constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Alyssa W; Kane, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Group concept mapping is a mixed-methods approach that helps a group visually represent its ideas on a topic of interest through a series of related maps. The maps and additional graphics are useful for planning, evaluation and theory development. Group concept maps are typically described, interpreted and utilized through points, clusters and distances, and the implications of these features in understanding how constructs relate to one another. This paper focuses on the application of network analysis to group concept mapping to quantify the strength and directionality of relationships among clusters. The authors outline the steps of this analysis, and illustrate its practical use through an organizational strategic planning example. Additional benefits of this analysis to evaluation projects are also discussed, supporting the overall utility of this supplemental technique to the standard concept mapping methodology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimating complicated baselines in analytical signals using the iterative training of Bayesian regularized artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani-Varnosfaderani, Ahmad; Kanginejad, Atefeh; Gilany, Kambiz; Valadkhani, Abolfazl

    2016-10-12

    The present work deals with the development of a new baseline correction method based on the comparative learning capabilities of artificial neural networks. The developed method uses the Bayes probability theorem for prevention of the occurrence of the over-fitting and finding a generalized baseline. The developed method has been applied on simulated and real metabolomic gas-chromatography (GC) and Raman data sets. The results revealed that the proposed method can be used to handle different types of baselines with cave, convex, curvelinear, triangular and sinusoidal patterns. For further evaluation of the performances of this method, it has been compared with benchmarking baseline correction methods such as corner-cutting (CC), morphological weighted penalized least squares (MPLS), adaptive iteratively-reweighted penalized least squares (airPLS) and iterative polynomial fitting (iPF). In order to compare the methods, the projected difference resolution (PDR) criterion has been calculated for the data before and after the baseline correction procedure. The calculated values of PDR after the baseline correction using iBRANN, airPLS, MPLS, iPF and CC algorithms for the GC metabolomic data were 4.18, 3.64, 3.88, 1.88 and 3.08, respectively. The obtained results in this work demonstrated that the developed iterative Bayesian regularized neural network (iBRANN) method in this work thoroughly detects the baselines and is superior over the CC, MPLS, airPLS and iPF techniques. A graphical user interface has been developed for the suggested algorithm and can be used for easy implementation of the iBRANN algorithm for the correction of different chromatography, NMR and Raman data sets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ANALISIS PROBLEMATIKA ZAKAT PADA BAZNAS KOTA TASIKMALAYA:PENDEKATAN METODE ANALYTIC NETWORK PROCESS (ANP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irman Firmansyah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Zakat is an obligation that must be carried out by muzakki that not only aims to carry out obligations to Almighty but sharp-edged nature of social justice among mankind. Therefore charity must be managed properly by the board amilin especially by channeling zakat use specifically targeted at Tasikmalaya City Baznas charity board. The study was to examine the affairs of Baznas perzakatan at Tasikmalaya City. Analysis tool used namely Analysis Network Process (ANP is a qualitative-quantitative method using super decision software . The analysis showed that there is an internal problem which consists of lacking leadership and lacking performance OPZ performance. The problems consist of the absence of external PERDA about channeling zakat institutions and communities less know Baznas. As for an internal solution consisting of leadership and performance maximization of transparency and distribution, while the external solution consisted of socialization and support Baznas scholars. Kendall coefficient ( W ranged from 0.970 to 0.9975 means that all respondents have the same relative answer.

  17. OPTIMIZING PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY WALKING PATH FOR THE FIRST AND LAST MILE TRANSIT JOURNEY BY USING THE ANALYTICAL NETWORK PROCESS (ANP DECISION MODEL AND GIS NETWORK ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Naharudin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Every transit trip begins and ends with pedestrian travel. People need to walk to access the transit services. However, their choice to walk depends on many factors including the connectivity, level of comfort and safety. These factors can influence the pleasantness of riding the transit itself, especially during the first/last mile (FLM journey. This had triggered few studies attempting to measure the pedestrian-friendliness a walking environment can offer. There were studies that implement the pedestrian experience on walking to assess the pedestrian-friendliness of a walking environment. There were also studies that use spatial analysis to measure it based on the path connectivity and accessibility to public facilities and amenities. Though both are good, but the perception-based studies and spatial analysis can be combined to derive more holistic results. This paper proposes a framework for selecting a pedestrian-friendly path for the FLM transit journey by using the two techniques (perception-based and spatial analysis. First, the degree of importance for the factors influencing a good walking environment will be aggregated by using Analytical Network Process (ANP decision rules based on people’s preferences on those factors. The weight will then be used as attributes in the GIS network analysis. Next, the network analysis will be performed to find a pedestrian-friendly walking route based on the priorities aggregated by ANP. It will choose routes passing through the preferred attributes accordingly. The final output is a map showing pedestrian-friendly walking path for the FLM transit journey.

  18. Optimizing Pedestrian-Friendly Walking Path for the First and Last Mile Transit Journey by Using the Analytical Network Process (anp) Decision Model and GIS Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naharudin, N.; Ahamad, M. S. S.; Sadullah, A. F. M.

    2017-10-01

    Every transit trip begins and ends with pedestrian travel. People need to walk to access the transit services. However, their choice to walk depends on many factors including the connectivity, level of comfort and safety. These factors can influence the pleasantness of riding the transit itself, especially during the first/last mile (FLM) journey. This had triggered few studies attempting to measure the pedestrian-friendliness a walking environment can offer. There were studies that implement the pedestrian experience on walking to assess the pedestrian-friendliness of a walking environment. There were also studies that use spatial analysis to measure it based on the path connectivity and accessibility to public facilities and amenities. Though both are good, but the perception-based studies and spatial analysis can be combined to derive more holistic results. This paper proposes a framework for selecting a pedestrian-friendly path for the FLM transit journey by using the two techniques (perception-based and spatial analysis). First, the degree of importance for the factors influencing a good walking environment will be aggregated by using Analytical Network Process (ANP) decision rules based on people's preferences on those factors. The weight will then be used as attributes in the GIS network analysis. Next, the network analysis will be performed to find a pedestrian-friendly walking route based on the priorities aggregated by ANP. It will choose routes passing through the preferred attributes accordingly. The final output is a map showing pedestrian-friendly walking path for the FLM transit journey.

  19. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. I. Relationship of mercury in blood and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, L.J.; Jacobs, M.B.; Ladd, A.C.

    1962-12-01

    In order to determine if there was any correlation between mercury levels in blood and urine, 4 series of studies on humans who were exposed to mercury vapor and to dusts of several inorganic and organic compounds of mercury were performed. In all 4 sets of observations, the mercury levels found in blood and urine covered a wide range and were not distributed in the pattern of a normal curve. A fairly good degree of correlation between blood and urine, on a group basis, was found in 3 of the 4 sets of observations. Lack of correlation in one series may have been due to a variation in analytical method or to other causes. Correlation between blood and urine levels of mercury in any individual was rarely found.

  20. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. II. Urinary mercury in relation to duration of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd, A.C.; Goldwater, L.J.; Jacobs, M.B.

    1963-04-01

    An experimental and analytical study was performed on the relationship between duration of exposure of mercury and its compounds and the urinary excretion of mercury. The human subjects were employed in factories which process a variety of inorganic and organic mercury compounds. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used as the principal statistical test. In 3 out of 4 sets of observations there were indications that in those men having the longest exposure the urinary mercury levels are highest. The fourth set of observations was equivocal. At present available data do not show any build-up of mercury in the blood paralleling duration of exposure, at least under the conditions prevailing in the factories studied.

  1. An Analytic Network Process approach for the environmental aspect selection problem — A case study for a hand blender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereketli Zafeirakopoulos, Ilke, E-mail: ibereketli@gsu.edu.tr; Erol Genevois, Mujde, E-mail: merol@gsu.edu.tr

    2015-09-15

    Life Cycle Assessment is a tool to assess, in a systematic way, the environmental aspects and its potential environmental impacts and resources used throughout a product's life cycle. It is widely accepted and considered as one of the most powerful tools to support decision-making processes used in ecodesign and sustainable production in order to learn about the most problematic parts and life cycle phases of a product and to have a projection for future improvements. However, since Life Cycle Assessment is a cost and time intensive method, companies do not intend to carry out a full version of it, except for large corporate ones. Especially for small and medium sized enterprises, which do not have enough budget for and knowledge on sustainable production and ecodesign approaches, focusing only on the most important possible environmental aspect is unavoidable. In this direction, finding the right environmental aspect to work on is crucial for the companies. In this study, a multi-criteria decision-making methodology, Analytic Network Process is proposed to select the most relevant environmental aspect. The proposed methodology aims at providing a simplified environmental assessment to producers. It is applied for a hand blender, which is a member of the Electrical and Electronic Equipment family. The decision criteria for the environmental aspects and relations of dependence are defined. The evaluation is made by the Analytic Network Process in order to create a realistic approach to inter-dependencies among the criteria. The results are computed via the Super Decisions software. Finally, it is observed that the procedure is completed in less time, with less data, with less cost and in a less subjective way than conventional approaches. - Highlights: • We present a simplified environmental assessment methodology to support LCA. • ANP is proposed to select the most relevant environmental aspect. • ANP deals well with the interdependencies between aspects

  2. Mercury contamination extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Mark [Silver Spring, MD; Heiser, John [Bayport, NY; Kalb, Paul [Wading River, NY

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  3. Leaching of mercury from seal carcasses into Antarctic soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvěřina, O.; Coufalík, Pavel; Brat, K.; Červenka, R.; Kuta, J.; Mikeš, O.; Komárek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2017), s. 1424-1431 ISSN 0944-1344 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : mercury * soil * Antarctica Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.741, year: 2016

  4. Disaster risk management in prospect mining area Blitar district, East Java, using microtremor analysis and ANP (analytical network processing) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwatiningtyas, Diyan; Ambarsari, Erlin Windia; Marlina, Dwi; Wiratomo, Yogi

    2014-03-01

    Indonesia has a wealth of natural assets is so large to be managed and utilized, either from its own local government and local communities, especially in the mining sector. However, mining activities can change the state of the surface layer of the earth that have a high impact disaster risk. This could threaten the safety and disrupt human life, environmental damage, loss of property, and the psychological impact, sulking to the rule of law no 24 of 2007. That's why we strive to manage and minimize the risk of mine disasters in the region, how to use the method of calculation of Amplification Factor (AF) from the analysis based microtremor sulking Kanai and Nakamura, and decision systems were tested by analysis of ANP. Based on the amplification factor and Analytical Network Processing (ANP) obtained, some points showed instability in the surface layer of a mining area include the site of the TP-7, TP-8, TP-9, TP-10, (Birowo2). If in terms of structure, location indicated unstable due to have a sloping surface layer, resulting in the occurrence of landslides and earthquake risk is high. In the meantime, other areas of the mine site can be said to be a stable area.

  5. Disaster risk management in prospect mining area Blitar district, East Java, using microtremor analysis and ANP (analytical network processing) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parwatiningtyas, Diyan, E-mail: diane.tyas@gmail.com, E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Ambarsari, Erlin Windia, E-mail: diane.tyas@gmail.com, E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Marlina, Dwi, E-mail: diane.tyas@gmail.com, E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com; Wiratomo, Yogi, E-mail: diane.tyas@gmail.com, E-mail: erlinunindra@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Indraprasta PGRI University, Nangka Street No. 58C Tanjung Barat, South Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Indonesia has a wealth of natural assets is so large to be managed and utilized, either from its own local government and local communities, especially in the mining sector. However, mining activities can change the state of the surface layer of the earth that have a high impact disaster risk. This could threaten the safety and disrupt human life, environmental damage, loss of property, and the psychological impact, sulking to the rule of law no 24 of 2007. That's why we strive to manage and minimize the risk of mine disasters in the region, how to use the method of calculation of Amplification Factor (AF) from the analysis based microtremor sulking Kanai and Nakamura, and decision systems were tested by analysis of ANP. Based on the amplification factor and Analytical Network Processing (ANP) obtained, some points showed instability in the surface layer of a mining area include the site of the TP-7, TP-8, TP-9, TP-10, (Birowo2). If in terms of structure, location indicated unstable due to have a sloping surface layer, resulting in the occurrence of landslides and earthquake risk is high. In the meantime, other areas of the mine site can be said to be a stable area.

  6. Integration fuzzy analytic network process (ANP) and SWOT business strategy for the development of small and medium enterprises (SME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotimah, Bain Khusnul; Irhamni, Firli; Kustiyahningsih, Yenny

    2017-08-01

    Business competition is one risk factor for Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) to set up good management in handling the risk of loss. This proposed research will look for criteria that influence the occurrence of damages based on data from by Cooperative and SME on Batik Madura. Method approach which used Fuzzy Analytic Network Process (FANP) as the weight of interest in decision support systems. Factor analysis of the level losses will influence the performance in the business sector. SWOT analysis combined with FANP method to determine the most appropriate development strategy to be applied industry. From the results of SWOT analysis and FANP, it was found the strategy of the best development to apply business strategy. The raw materials and human resources are available to increase the production capacity of the test results of SWOT analysis SME on Batik Madura. The result measurement of SME are always favourable the position, because the value is well resulted production and the amount is stable revenue which caused SME are in the first quadrant, so the power can exist take advantage of business opportunities. While the trial results of SWOT analysis on SME on Batik Madura in January and March are quadrant of second quadrant because of the number of defective products is quite produced, causing SME are under threat. But although SME suffer threats, SME still have strength on the amount of production and timely delivery.

  7. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury Quick Facts Health Effects of Mercury Exposure What is Elemental Mercury? Elemental (metallic) mercury is the shiny, silver-gray metal found in thermometers, barometers, and thermostats and other ...

  8. Searching for the Source of Salt Marsh Buried Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, C. G.; Nelson, D. C.; Fleming, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes provide a barrier between upstream mercury contamination and coastal ecosystems. Mercury is sorbed, transported, and deposited in estuarine systems. Once the upstream mercury source has been remediated, the downstream mercury contaminated salt marsh sediments should become "capped" or buried by uncontaminated sediments preventing further ecosystem contamination. Downstream from a remediated mercury mine, an estuarine intertidal marsh in Tomales Bay, CA, USA, scavengers/predators (e.g. Pachygrapsus crassipes, Lined Shore Crab) have leg mercury concentrations as high as 5.5 ppm (dry wt./dry wt.), which increase significantly with crab size, a surrogate for trophic level. These elevated mercury concentrations suggests that "buried" mercury is rereleased into the environment. To locate possible sources of mercury release in Walker Marsh, we sampled a transect across the marsh that included diverse micro-environments (e.g. rhizoshere, stratified sediments, faunal burrows). From each location we determined the sediment structure, sediment color, total sediment mercury, total sediment iron, and microbial composition (n = 28). Where flora or fauna had perturbed the sediment, mercury concentrations were 10% less than undisturbed stratified sediments (1025 ppb vs. 1164 ppb, respectively). High-throughput SSU rRNA gene sequencing and subsequent co-occurrence network analysis genera indicated that in flora- or fauna- perturbed sediments there was an increased likelihood that microbial genera contained mercury mobilizing genes (94% vs 57%; in perturbed vs stratified sediments, respectively). Our observations are consistent with findings by others that in perturbed sites mercury mobility increased. We did however identify a microbial and geochemical profile with increased mercury mobility. For future work we plan to quantify the role these micro-environments have on mercury-efflux from salt marshes.

  9. Analytical Study on Multi-Tier 5G Heterogeneous Small Cell Networks: Coverage Performance and Energy Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhu; Liu, Hongjing; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-11-04

    In this paper, we investigate the coverage performance and energy efficiency of multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) which are composed of macrocells and different types of small cells, i.e., picocells and femtocells. By virtue of stochastic geometry tools, we model the multi-tier HetNets based on a Poisson point process (PPP) and analyze the Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) via studying the cumulative interference from pico-tier and femto-tier. We then derive the analytical expressions of coverage probabilities in order to evaluate coverage performance in different tiers and investigate how it varies with the small cells' deployment density. By taking the fairness and user experience into consideration, we propose a disjoint channel allocation scheme and derive the system channel throughput for various tiers. Further, we formulate the energy efficiency optimization problem for multi-tier HetNets in terms of throughput performance and resource allocation fairness. To solve this problem, we devise a linear programming based approach to obtain the available area of the feasible solutions. System-level simulations demonstrate that the small cells' deployment density has a significant effect on the coverage performance and energy efficiency. Simulation results also reveal that there exits an optimal small cell base station (SBS) density ratio between pico-tier and femto-tier which can be applied to maximize the energy efficiency and at the same time enhance the system performance. Our findings provide guidance for the design of multi-tier HetNets for improving the coverage performance as well as the energy efficiency.

  10. An integrated approach of analytical network process and fuzzy based spatial decision making systems applied to landslide risk mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi Gheshlaghi, Hassan; Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar

    2017-09-01

    Landslides in mountainous areas render major damages to residential areas, roads, and farmlands. Hence, one of the basic measures to reduce the possible damage is by identifying landslide-prone areas through landslide mapping by different models and methods. The purpose of conducting this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a combination of two models of the analytical network process (ANP) and fuzzy logic in landslide risk mapping in the Azarshahr Chay basin in northwest Iran. After field investigations and a review of research literature, factors affecting the occurrence of landslides including slope, slope aspect, altitude, lithology, land use, vegetation density, rainfall, distance to fault, distance to roads, distance to rivers, along with a map of the distribution of occurred landslides were prepared in GIS environment. Then, fuzzy logic was used for weighting sub-criteria, and the ANP was applied to weight the criteria. Next, they were integrated based on GIS spatial analysis methods and the landslide risk map was produced. Evaluating the results of this study by using receiver operating characteristic curves shows that the hybrid model designed by areas under the curve 0.815 has good accuracy. Also, according to the prepared map, a total of 23.22% of the area, amounting to 105.38 km2, is in the high and very high-risk class. Results of this research are great of importance for regional planning tasks and the landslide prediction map can be used for spatial planning tasks and for the mitigation of future hazards in the study area.

  11. Analytic Network Process on Financial Access of the Small and Medium Enterprise in Sharia Banking in Tasikmalaya City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Suryanto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Small and Medium Enterprise (SME has a significant role in national economic development. The increase of Small and Medium Enterprise is followed by the rise in employment absorbment and equity in income distribution. The capital constraint and the impedance of banking financial access have become the main problem to the Small and Medium entrepreneurs. The objectives of this research: 1 To identify the main factors as problems of Small and Medium Enterprises in having access to the financial institutions.2 To find the solutions of the research problems. This research used qualitative approach i.e. Analytic Network Process (ANP. For applying this method, it is expected to help the researchers in making measurement and sinthesis of some factors regarding the topic analyzed as well as finding the solution for problems faced by the SMEs. Data used in this research is primary data collected from questionaires and indepth interview with experts, practitioners, SMEs and regulators which then analyzed by structuringthe hierarchi into homogen clusters of the SMEs problems and solutions, measuring into ratio scale and building sinthesis. As the result, it becomes clear what factors impeding the financial access of the SMEs to banks. The results of this research shows that the difficulties of SMEs in accessing financial support in islamic financial institutions are internal problems of islamic banking i.e. 1 lack of financial assistance given to the SMEs, 2 the functions of islamic banking as business partners for SMEs is not optimal. Whereas the external problems in the SMEs is the disability in meeting the financial requirements asked by islamic banking that is collateral and business history. The solutions are: 1 internal solution; islamic banking should give business mentoring to SMEs that have received financial supports to minimalize the bad credits level. 2 external solution; the government should socialize islamic financial mechanism to SMEs as

  12. An Analytical Network Process on Financial Access of the Small and Medium Enterprise in Sharia Banking in Tasikmalaya City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Suryanto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Small and Medium Enterprise (SME is one of the significant roles in national economic development. It is seemly followed by the rise of employment absorbent and equity in income distribution. The capital constraint and the impedance of banking financial access have become the main problem to the Small and Medium entrepreneurs. The objectives of this research are to identify the main factors as problems of Small and Medium Enterprises in having access to the financial institutions, and also to find out the solutions of the research problems. This research uses qualitative approach i.e. Analytic Network Process (ANP. Through applying this method, it is expected to help the researchers in making measurement and synthesis of some factors regarding on the topic analyzed as well as finding the solution for problems faced by the SMEs. The resources of the data is derived from questionnaires and in-depth interview with experts, practitioners, SMEs and regulators which then analyzed by the structure and hierarchy into homogen clusters of the SMEs problems and solutions, measuring into ratio scale and building synthesis. As the result, it becomes clear what factors impeding the financial access of the SMEs to banks. The results of this research show that the difficulties of SMEs in accessing financial support in Islamic financial institutions are internal problems of Islamic banking i.e. lack of financial assistance given to the SMEs, the functions of Islamic banking as business partners for SMEs is not optimal. Whereas the external problems in the SMEs are the disability in meeting the financial requirements asked by Islamic banking that are collateral and business history. The internal solutions are Islamic banking must give business mentoring to SMEs that have received financial supports to minimalize the bad credits level. The external solution is the government must also socialize Islamic financial mechanism to SMEs as part of education efforts.

  13. Litterfall mercury dry deposition in the eastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin R. Risch; John F. DeWild; David P. Krabbenhoft; Randall K. Kolka; Leiming. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) in autumn litterfall frompredominately deciduous forestswas measured in 3 years of samples from 23 Mercury Deposition Network sites in 15 states across the eastern USA. Annual litterfall Hg dry depositionwas significantly higher (median 12.3 micrograms per square meter (µg/m2), range 3.5-23.4 µg/m2...

  14. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  15. [Mercury contact dermatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarasa, J G; Huguet, J; Alomar, A; Calderon, P G

    1983-01-01

    Eight female patients with contact allergy to Mercury were studied with the L. T. T. and the Histamine degranulation test of basophiles. In the eight cases the L. T. T. was specific. P. H. A. (an inspecific lymphocyte stimulator lectin) and the Histamine degranulation basophile test, were used as controls. Thirty subjects were used as controls. All of them were negative to the patch test with mercury at 0,5% in petrolatum. No atopic antecedents were among them and their families. No once case of lymphocyte activity to mercury was observed. Mercury acetate solutions at: 12,5 ng/ml. 25 ng/ml and 5 ng/ml were employed. This salt was the unique useful for the L. T. T. practice. Extremely difficulties for the solubilization of mercury bichloride, mercury oxide, phenyl mercury and ammoniated mercury, impaired the L. T. T. with these salts.

  16. Comparison of atmospheric mercury (Hg) among Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan during 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Chang, Tai-Hua

    2009-03-15

    The paper reviewed studies about total gaseous mercury, atmospheric particulate of mercury and average dry deposition fluxes of mercury in Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan. This study compared sample collection and analytical methods for mercury in Asian countries. Analytical results indicated that the primary mercury sources are anthropogenic source (for example coal burning) and high temperature processes. This study also elucidates the sources, analytical tools, and the average concentrations for atmospheric mercury (Hg) for these Asian countries during 2000-2008. This study indicated that the total gaseous mercury concentrations were higher in urban area than that in suburban area in Asian countries (Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan). As for the seasonal variations, in general, the average total gaseous mercury concentrations were higher in winter than that in summer especially in China. In addition, the average total gaseous mercury concentrations were higher in mining areas than that in the rest of the other areas. And the total gaseous mercury concentrations were decreasing as this distance increasing. These phenomena revealed that the total gaseous mercury concentrations are reduced by long-distance transportation especially in the main land of China.

  17. Mercury in Your Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic information about mercury, how it gets in the air, how people are exposed to it and health effects associated with exposure; what EPA and other organizations are doing to limit exposures; what citizens should know to minimize exposures and to reduce mercury in the environment; and information about products that contain mercury.

  18. An analytic Study of the Key Factors In uencing the Design and Routing Techniques of a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Bahuguna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network contains various nodes having certain sensing, processing and communication capabilities. Actually they are multifunctional battery operated nodes called motes. These motes are small in size and battery constrained. They are operated by a power source. A wireless sensor network consists of a huge number of tiny sensor nodes which are deployed either randomly or according to some predefined distribution. The sensors nodes in a sensor network are cooperative among themselves having self-organizing ability. This ensures that a wireless network serves a wide variety of applications. Few of them are weather monitoring, health, security and military etc. As their applications are wide, this requires that sensors in a sensor network must play their role very efficiently. But, as discussed above, the sensor nodes have energy limitation. This limitation leads failure of nodes after certain round of communication. So, a sensor network suffers with sensors having energy limitations. Beside this, sensor nodes in a sensor network must fulfill connectivity and coverage requirements. In this paper, we have discussed various issues affecting the design of a wireless sensor network. This provides the readers various research issues in designing a wireless sensor network.

  19. Mercury Calibration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  20. Students' Personal Networks in Virtual and Personal Learning Environments: A Case Study in Higher Education Using Learning Analytics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquero, Oskar; Ovelar, Ramón; Romo, Jesús; Benito, Manuel; Alberdi, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyse the effect of the affordances of a virtual learning environment and a personal learning environment (PLE) in the configuration of the students' personal networks in a higher education context. The results are discussed in light of the adaptation of the students to the learning network made up by two…

  1. Sistem Informasi Manajemen Rantai Pasok Pariwisata Untuk Pembuatan Produk Wisata Pada Agen Tour dan Travel dengan Analisis Swot dan Metode Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Mustika Kusumawardani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of services company in tourism is increasing. Therefore each tour & travel agent should be able to improve the quality of attractive and competitive products. This research builds a system analysis of supply chain management in the manufacturing of tour packages with SWOT analysis and Analytic Network Process (ANP. SWOT analysis is one way to decide marketing strategy for the company to able to face global competition. In this study, a SWOT analysis is used to select the best suppliers in tourism sector. Suppliers include: hotels, restaurants, attractions and accommodations. Combination of the best suppliers used as in one product of tour package. While the method of Analytic Network Process is used to rank the tour package has been obtained previously. In addition, this method is applied because it can provide information about the most influential of criteria in making tour package. This method conducted by looking at dependency relationship between among criteria. Then give them weight among criteria, sub-criteria and alternatives. The criteria used in the method of Analytic Network Process are: product, price, place and promotion. The results obtained from this research is the system analysis of supply chain management of tourism which capable of producing an attractive and competitive tour packages form of tour packages 1 with a value of 0.53. In addition, this information system provides information that the most influential criteria in making tour package is the product criteria with a value of 0.30. The next criterion which affects the making of attractive and competitive tour packages is price of criteria with a value of 0.28.

  2. A comprehensive study of Mercury and MESSENGER orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-10-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury for more than 4 years. The probe started its science mission in orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system were the instruments dedicated to geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury. X-band radio-tracking range-rate data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2.The extensive range data acquired in orbit around Mercury during the science mission (from April 2011 to April 2015), and during the three flybys of the planet in 2008 and 2009, provide a powerful dataset for the investigation of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession attributable to the gravitational flattening of the Sun (J2) and the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β, which describe the space curvature produced by a unit rest mass and the nonlinearity in superposition of gravity, respectively. Therefore, the estimation of Mercury's ephemeris can provide crucial information on the interior structure of the Sun and Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, the high correlation among J2, γ, and β complicates the combined recovery of these parameters, so additional assumptions are required, such as the Nordtvedt relationship η = 4β - γ - 3.We have modified our orbit determination software, GEODYN II, to enable the simultaneous integration of the spacecraft and central body trajectories. The combined estimation of the MESSENGER and Mercury orbits allowed us to determine a more accurate gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, and the values of GM and J2 for the Sun, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the solar mass

  3. Curriculum Analytics: Application of Social Network Analysis for Improving Strategic Curriculum Decision-Making in a Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Shane; Hubball, Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides insight into the use of curriculum analytics to enhance learning-centred curricula in diverse higher education contexts. Engagement in evidence-based practice to evaluate and monitor curricula is vital to the success and sustainability of efforts to reform undergraduate and graduate programs. Emerging technology-enabled inquiry…

  4. Mercury in the National Parks: Current Status and Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, C.; Blett, T. F.; Morris, K.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is a globally distributed contaminant that can harm human and wildlife health, and threaten resources the National Park Service (NPS) is charged with protecting. Due in part to emissions and long-range transport from coal burning power plants, even remote national park environments receive mercury deposition from the atmosphere. Given the concern regarding mercury, there are and have been many mercury monitoring initiatives in national parks to determine the risk from mercury contamination. This includes the study of litter fall at Acadia National Park (Maine), snow at Mount Rainier National Park (Washington), heron eggs at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (Indiana), bat hair at Mammoth Cave National Park (Kentucky), and panthers at Everglades National Park (Florida). Wet deposition is also measured at 16 national parks as part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Network / Mercury Deposition Network. Results from these studies indicate that mercury deposition is increasing or is elevated in many national parks, and fish and other biota have been found to contain levels of mercury above toxicity thresholds for impacts to both humans and wildlife. Current research coordinated by the NPS Air Resources Division (ARD) in Denver, Colorado, on the effects of mercury includes broad-scale assessments of mercury in fish, dragonfly larvae, and songbirds across 30+ national parks. Fish provide the trophic link to human and wildlife health, dragonfly larvae can describe fine-scale differences in mercury levels, and songbirds shed light on the risk to terrestrial ecosystems. External project partners include the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Maine, and the Biodiversity Research Institute. In addition, the dragonfly project engages citizen scientists in the collection of dragonfly larvae, supporting the NPS Centennial Initiative by connecting people to parks and advancing the educational mission, and increasing public awareness about mercury impacts. Much of

  5. A synthesis of research needs for improving the understanding of atmospheric mercury cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leiming; Lyman, Seth; Mao, Huiting; Lin, Che-Jen; Gay, David A.; Wang, Shuxiao; Sexauer Gustin, Mae; Feng, Xinbin; Wania, Frank

    2017-07-01

    This synthesis identifies future research needs in atmospheric mercury science, based on a series of review papers, as well as recent developments in field data collection, modeling analysis, and emission assessments of speciated atmospheric mercury. Research activities are proposed that focus on areas that we consider important. These include refinement of mercury emission estimations, quantification of dry deposition and air-surface exchange, improvement of the treatment of chemical mechanisms in chemical transport models, increase in the accuracy of oxidized mercury measurements, better interpretation of atmospheric mercury chemistry data, and harmonization of network operation. Knowledge gained in these research areas will significantly improve our understanding of atmospheric cycling from local to global scales.

  6. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  7. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Wirsich

    2016-01-01

    In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures.

  8. Development of a robust analytical framework for assessing landbird trends, dynamics and relationships with environmental covariates in the North Coast and Cascades Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Chris; Saracco, James; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Huff, Mark; Happe, Patricia J.; Ransom, Jason I.

    2017-01-01

    During 2015-2016, we completed development of a new analytical framework for landbird population monitoring data from the National Park Service (NPS) North Coast and Cascades Inventory and Monitoring Network (NCCN). This new tool for analysis combines several recent advances in modeling population status and trends using point-count data and is designed to supersede the approach previously slated for analysis of trends in the NCCN and other networks, including the Sierra Nevada Network (SIEN). Advances supported by the new model-based approach include 1) the use of combined data on distance and time of detection to estimate detection probability without assuming perfect detection at zero distance, 2) seamless accommodation of variation in sampling effort and missing data, and 3) straightforward estimation of the effects of downscaled climate and other local habitat characteristics on spatial and temporal trends in landbird populations. No changes in the current field protocol are necessary to facilitate the new analyses. We applied several versions of the new model to data from each of 39 species recorded in the three mountain parks of the NCCN, estimating trends and climate relationships for each species during 2005-2014. Our methods and results are also reported in a manuscript in revision for the journal Ecosphere (hereafter, Ray et al.). Here, we summarize the methods and results outlined in depth by Ray et al., discuss benefits of the new analytical framework, and provide recommendations for its application to synthetic analyses of long-term data from the NCCN and SIEN. All code necessary for implementing the new analyses is provided within the Appendices to this report, in the form of fully annotated scripts written in the open-access programming languages R and JAGS.

  9. Influence of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Aubert, J.

    2009-04-01

    large oscillations due to convection cells. A pole-to-equator trend is superimposed on this for the case with laterally-varying surface temperature. Although the amplitude of this long-wavelength variation is smaller than that of the within-cell variation, its long-wavelength nature might be effective in driving thermal winds in the core. Results in a full 3-D spherical shell indicate that convection adopts a cellular structure with a polygonal network of downwellings and plume-like upwellings, as is usually obtained for stagnant lid convection, for example, in the recent 3-D spherical Mercury models of [4]. This is in notable contrast to the models of [5], in which linear upwellings were obtained. This difference could be because the initial perturbations used by [5] used a small number of low-order spherical harmonics, i.e., a long-wavelength pattern with particular symmetries, whereas our initial perturbations are random white noise. The origin of this difference requires further investigation. The pattern of CMB heat flux shows a strong l=2, m=0 pattern, again with superimposed small-scale variations due to convection cells. The surface geoid displays an very dominant (2,0) pattern, which would be a strong diagnostic of this behaviour. These models are being further analysed for boundary topography and stress distribution. Models of planetary dynamos have traditionally depended upon the concept that secular cooling and internal radioactive decay are responsible for genererating convective fluid motions within the core [e.g. 6]. Some models, of Earth's dynamo in particular, also include thermal winds --shear flows driven by heat flux variations along the core-mantle boundary -- that modify the dynamo process [e.g. 7]. We have now shown, following the work of [8], that thermal winds themselves are capable of driving dynamo action in planetary cores (Fig. 4). In fully self-consistent, three-dimensional models, we find that thermal wind dynamos do not require a net heat

  10. Social Network Analysis as an Analytic Tool for Task Group Research: A Case Study of an Interdisciplinary Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Naorah C.

    2017-01-01

    Group counselors commonly collaborate in interdisciplinary settings in health care, substance abuse, and juvenile justice. Social network analysis is a methodology rarely used in counseling research yet has potential to examine task group dynamics in new ways. This case study explores the scholarly relationships among 36 members of an…

  11. Global Mercury Assessment

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    in dentistry, of which about 70-100 tonnes (i.e. 20-. 30%) likely enters the solid waste stream. In the production of vinyl chloride monomer, information is still lacking on the lifecycle and eventual fate of the mercury catalyst. Most of this production occurs in China, and about 800 tonnes of mercury is thought to have been used ...

  12. Mercury exposure in Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cullen, Elizabeth; Evans, David S; Davidson, Fred

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring of human exposure to mercury is important due to its adverse health effects. This study aimed to determine the extent of mercury exposure among mothers and their children in Ireland, and to identify factors associated with elevated levels. It formed part of the Demonstration...

  13. Mercury's shifting, rolling past

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of scalloped-edged cliffs or lobate scarps on Mercury's surface are thrust faults that are consistent with the planet shrinking and cooling with time. However, compression occurred in the planet's early history and Mariner 10 images revealed decades ago that lobate scarps are among the youngest features on Mercury. Why don't we find more evidence of older compressive features?

  14. Estimation and mapping of wet and dry mercury deposition across northeastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E.K.; Vanarsdale, A.; Keeler, G.J.; Chalmers, A.; Poissant, L.; Kamman, N.C.; Brulotte, R.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas many ecosystem characteristics and processes influence mercury accumulation in higher trophic-level organisms, the mercury flux from the atmosphere to a lake and its watershed is a likely factor in potential risk to biota. Atmospheric deposition clearly affects mercury accumulation in soils and lake sediments. Thus, knowledge of spatial patterns in atmospheric deposition may provide information for assessing the relative risk for ecosystems to exhibit excessive biotic mercury contamination. Atmospheric mercury concentrations in aerosol, vapor, and liquid phases from four observation networks were used to estimate regional surface concentration fields. Statistical models were developed to relate sparsely measured mercury vapor and aerosol concentrations to the more commonly measured mercury concentration in precipitation. High spatial resolution deposition velocities for different phases (precipitation, cloud droplets, aerosols, and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM)) were computed using inferential models. An empirical model was developed to estimate gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition. Spatial patterns of estimated total mercury deposition were complex. Generally, deposition was higher in the southwest and lower in the northeast. Elevation, land cover, and proximity to urban areas modified the general pattern. The estimated net GEM and RGM fluxes were each greater than or equal to wet deposition in many areas. Mercury assimilation by plant foliage may provide a substantial input of methyl-mercury (MeHg) to ecosystems. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  15. Mercury in Nordic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munthe, John; Waengberg, Ingvar (IVL Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Stockholm (SE)); Rognerud, Sigurd; Fjeld, Eirik (Norwegian Inst. for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo (Norway)); Verta, Matti; Porvari, Petri (Finnish Environment Inst. (SYKE), Helsinki (Finland)); Meili, Markus (Inst. of Applied Environmental Research (ITM), Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    This report provides a first comprehensive compilation and assessment of available data on mercury in air, precipitation, sediments and fish in the Nordic countries. The main conclusion is that mercury levels in Nordic ecosystems continue to be affected by long-range atmospheric transport. The geographical patterns of mercury concentrations in both sediments and fish are also strongly affected by ecosystem characteristics and in some regions possibly by historical pollution. An evaluation of geographical variations in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicates that the influence from anthropogenic sources from Central European areas is still significant. The annual variability of deposition is large and dependant of precipitation amounts. An evaluation of data from stations around the North Sea has indicated a significant decrease in mercury concentrations in precipitation indicating a continuous decrease of emissions in Europe (Waengberg et al., 2007). For mercury in air (TGM), the geographical pattern is less pronounced indicating the influence of mercury emissions and distribution over a larger geographical area (i.e. hemispherical transport). Comparison of recent (surficial) and historical lake sediments show significantly elevated concentrations of mercury most likely caused by anthropogenic atmospheric deposition over the past century. The highest pollution impact was observed in the coastal areas of southern Norway, in south western Finland and in Sweden from the coastal areas in the southwest across the central parts to the north-east. The general increase in recent versus old sediments was 2-5 fold. Data on mercury in Nordic freshwater fish was assembled and evaluated with respect to geographical variations. The fish data were further compared with temporal and spatial trends in mercury deposition and mercury contamination of lake sediments in order to investigate the coupling between atmospheric transport and deposition of mercury and local mercury

  16. Mercury poisoning in wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, G.H.; Fairbrother, Anne; Locke, Louis N.; Hoff, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    Mercury is an intriguing contaminant because it has complex chemical properties, a wide range of harmful effects, and an infinite persistence in the environment. Die-offs of wildlife due to mercury have occurred in many countries, especially before mercury seed dressings were banned. Today, most mercury problems are associated with aquatic environments. Methylmercury, the most toxic chemical form, attacks many organ systems, but damage to the central nervous system is most severe. Harmful wet-weight concentrations of mercury, as methylmercury, in the tissues of adult birds and mammals range from about 8-30 ppm in the brain, 20-60 ppm in liver, 20-60 ppm in kidney, and 15-30 ppm in muscle. Young animals may be more sensitive.

  17. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  18. TrajGraph: A Graph-Based Visual Analytics Approach to Studying Urban Network Centralities Using Taxi Trajectory Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoke; Zhao, Ye; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Chong; Ma, Chao; Ye, Xinyue

    2016-01-01

    We propose TrajGraph, a new visual analytics method, for studying urban mobility patterns by integrating graph modeling and visual analysis with taxi trajectory data. A special graph is created to store and manifest real traffic information recorded by taxi trajectories over city streets. It conveys urban transportation dynamics which can be discovered by applying graph analysis algorithms. To support interactive, multiscale visual analytics, a graph partitioning algorithm is applied to create region-level graphs which have smaller size than the original street-level graph. Graph centralities, including Pagerank and betweenness, are computed to characterize the time-varying importance of different urban regions. The centralities are visualized by three coordinated views including a node-link graph view, a map view and a temporal information view. Users can interactively examine the importance of streets to discover and assess city traffic patterns. We have implemented a fully working prototype of this approach and evaluated it using massive taxi trajectories of Shenzhen, China. TrajGraph's capability in revealing the importance of city streets was evaluated by comparing the calculated centralities with the subjective evaluations from a group of drivers in Shenzhen. Feedback from a domain expert was collected. The effectiveness of the visual interface was evaluated through a formal user study. We also present several examples and a case study to demonstrate the usefulness of TrajGraph in urban transportation analysis.

  19. Conversion of elemental mercury to the oxidized form in a fabric filter baghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManus, T.J.; Agbede, R.O.; Khosah, R.P. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE-FETC) has in the last several years funded efforts on identifying a sampling and analytical method to differentiate and quantify the chemical forms of mercury emitted from coal-fired electric utility boilers. DOE-FETC requested Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) to develop new methodologies for determining the chemical species of mercury in coal flue gas, either by the modification of existing ones or by the introduction of novel methods. Through the efforts of ATS and others, this goal was attained and demonstrated by the final validation of the Ontario-Hydro Method. Also, in these mercury method comparison studies performed by ATS, conversion of elemental mercury to oxidized mercury in a fabric filter baghouse was observed. Investigation of this type of phenomenon was a step beyond mercury species measurement in that this had an impact on the design of mercury control devices for coal-fired power plants which must be mercury species-specific. Moreover, long and short term transport and deposition into the ecosystem with the resulting human and animal toxicity are the ultimate concerns and are all dependent upon the mercury species involved. Results will be reported from a five day study in which mercury species were measured and identified utilizing the Ontario-Hydro Method at the outlet of a baghouse accepting natural gas flue gas spiked with various mercury species.

  20. Evaluating a Social Network Analytic Tool to Support Outbreak Management and Contact Tracing in an Outbreak of Pertussis

    OpenAIRE

    Munene, Esther; Mottice, S.; Reid, J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and value of a social network analysis tool to support pertussis outbreak management and contact tracing in the state of Utah. Introduction Pertussis (i.e., whooping cough) is on the rise in the US. To implement effective prevention and treatment strategies, it is critical to conduct timely contact tracing and evaluate people who may have come into contact with an infected person. We describe a collaborative effort between epidemiologists and public heal...

  1. An integrated PHY-MAC analytical model for IEEE 802.15.7 VLC network with MPR capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-feng; Chi, Xue-fen; Liu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Considering that the collision caused by hidden terminal is particularly serious due to the narrow beams of optical devices, the multi-packet reception (MPR) is introduced to mitigate the collisions for IEEE 802.15.7 visible light communication (VLC) system. To explore the impact of MPR on system performance and investigate the interaction between physical (PHY) layer and media access control (MAC) layer, a three dimensional (3D) integrated PHY-MAC analytical model of carrier sense multiple access/collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) is established based on Markov chain theory for VLC system, in which MPR is implemented through the use of orthogonal code sequence. Throughput is derived to evaluate the performance of VLC system with MPR capability under imperfect optical channel. The results can be used for the performance optimization of a VLC system with MPR capability.

  2. The Application of Fuzzy Analytical Network Process (FANP Approach for Appropriate Location Selection of Health Centers: case study in ramsar cite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Mohammadi Zanjirani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appropriate location selection for health Services unites is a Strategic decision which is based on gathering information and also exact analysis of related alternatives. It's clear that result of this decision is really important and will led to long time improvement in all dimensions including economic, social, and etc. Otherwise, the most studies of location have done in background manufacturing rather than service area and there are just few articles which have focused in field of healthcare. This study attempted to solve this stock of researches. Methods: By using an almost comprehensive literatures review, objective and subjective criteria are identified. After finalizing criteria's, Are used from decision-makers’ assessments for collection data. Fuzzy Analytical Network Process is used for analyzing the data. Results: The finding indicates that the criteria's of proposed model are high validity and reliability for appropriate location selection of Health Centers. Conclusion: The analyzing of data indicates that lamtar locate is selected appropriate location.

  3. Bilişsel Haritalama ve Analitik Serim Süreci (ASS Entegrasyonu(The Integration of Cognitive Mapping and Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aşkın ÖZDAĞOĞLU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The type of variables (qualitative or quantitative directly affect the construction of the model. Gaining the quantitative data for decision making problems may not be possible. Therefore, only the qualitative data are had to be considered within decision making process. Another problem is to make a decision by considering many interactive factors. Analytic Network Process (ANP is a technique which finds the most appropriate alternative in the multicriteria decision problems that have many options. In this study, concept mapping is used for determining the relationships among the main components that affect the product in a frozen foods company and ANP structure is created with the help of concept mapping. During the solving process, the importance levels of the criteria are obtained.

  4. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  5. The toxicology of mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, T W

    1997-01-01

    The major physical forms of mercury to which humans are exposed are mercury vapor, Hg0, and methylmercury compounds, Ch3HgX. Mercury vapor emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources is globally distributed in the atmosphere. It is returned as a water-soluble form in precipitation and finds its way into bodies of fresh and ocean water. Land run-off also accounts for further input into lakes and oceans. Inorganic mercury, present in water sediments, is subject to bacterial conversion to methylmercury compounds that are bioaccumulated in the aquatic food chain to reach the highest concentration in predatory fish. Human exposure to mercury vapor is from dental amalgam and industries using mercury. Methylmercury compounds are found exclusively in seafood and freshwater fish. The health effects of mercury vapor have been known since ancient times. Severe exposure results in a triad of symptoms, erethism, tremor, and gingivitis. Today, we are concerned with more subtle effects such as preclinical changes in kidney function and behavioral and cognitive changes associated with effects on the central nervous system. Methylmercury is a neurological poison affecting primarily brain tissue. In adults, brain damage is focal affecting the function of such areas as the cerebellum (ataxia) and the visual cortex (constricted visual fields). Methylmercury also at high doses can cause severe damage to the developing brain. Today the chief concern is with the more subtle effects arising from prenatal exposure such as delayed development and cognitive changes in children.

  6. Generalized semi-analytical solutions to multispecies transport equation coupled with sequential first-order reaction network in arbitrary heterogenious medium using GITT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heejun

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical procedure for solving coupled the multispecies reactive solute transport equations, with a sequential first-order reaction network in arbitrary heterogeneous media using General Integral Transformation Tecgnique(GITT).This proposed approach was developed to describe behavior of reactive multicpecise transport on spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients with distinct retardation factors, which might be function of space and time. This proposed approach deals with general initial conditions, and arbitrary temporal variable inlet concentration as well as arbitrary heterogenous media. The proposed approach sequentially calculates the concentration distributions of each species by employing only the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). Because the proposed solutions for each species' concentration distributions have separable forms in space and time, the solution for subsequent species (daughter species) can be obtained using only the GITT without the decomposition by change-of-variables method imposing the limitation of identical retarda- tion values for all the reactive species by directly substituting solutions for the preceding species (parent species) into the transport equation of subsequent species (daughter species). The proposed solutions were compared with previously published analytical solutions or numerical solutions of the numerical code of the Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (2DFATMIC) in all verification examples. In these examples, the proposed solutions were well matched with previous analytical solutions and the numerical solutions obtained by 2DFATMIC model. A hypothetical single-well push-pull test example and a scale-dependent dispersion example were designed to demonstrate the practical application of the proposed solution to a real field problem.

  7. Generalized semi-analytical solutions to multispecies transport equation coupled with sequential first-order reaction network with spatially or temporally variable transport and decay coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heejun

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical procedure for solving coupled the multispecies reactive solute transport equations, with a sequential first-order reaction network on spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients involving distinct retardation factors. This proposed approach was developed to overcome the limitation reported by Suk (2013) regarding the identical retardation values for all reactive species, while maintaining the extensive capability of the previous Suk method involving spatially variable or temporally variable coefficients of transport, general initial conditions, and arbitrary temporal variable inlet concentration. The proposed approach sequentially calculates the concentration distributions of each species by employing only the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). Because the proposed solutions for each species' concentration distributions have separable forms in space and time, the solution for subsequent species (daughter species) can be obtained using only the GITT without the decomposition by change-of-variables method imposing the limitation of identical retardation values for all the reactive species by directly substituting solutions for the preceding species (parent species) into the transport equation of subsequent species (daughter species). The proposed solutions were compared with previously published analytical solutions or numerical solutions of the numerical code of the Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (2DFATMIC) in three verification examples. In these examples, the proposed solutions were well matched with previous analytical solutions and the numerical solutions obtained by 2DFATMIC model. A hypothetical single-well push-pull test example and a scale-dependent dispersion example were designed to demonstrate the practical application of the proposed solution to a real field problem.

  8. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials.

  9. Mercury analysis in hair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit K; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A

    2015-01-01

    assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating.......20-0.71 and 0.80-1.63) per exercise. The results revealed relative standard deviations of 7.87-13.55% and 4.04-11.31% for the low and high mercury concentration ranges, respectively. A total of 16 out of 18 participating laboratories the QAP requirements and were allowed to analyze samples from the DEMOCOPHES...

  10. Deformed space-time transformations in Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, F.; Albertini, G.; Bassani, D.; Cherubini, G.; Guerriero, E.; Mignani, R.; Monti, M.; Petrucci, A.; Ridolfi, F.; Rosada, A.; Rosetto, F.; Sala, V.; Santoro, E.; Spera, G.

    2017-09-01

    A mole of Mercury was suitably treated by ultrasound in order to generate in it the same conditions of local Lorentz invariance violation that were generated in a sonicated cylindrical bar of AISI 304 steel and that are the cause of neutron emission during the sonication. After 3 min, part of the mercury turned into a solid material which turned out to contain isotopes having a different mass (higher and lower) with respect to the isotopes already present in the initial material (mercury). These transformations in the atomic weight without gamma production above the background are brought about during Deformed Space-Time reactions. We present the results of the analyses performed on samples taken from the transformation product. The analyses have been done in two groups, the first one using five different analytical techniques: ICP-OES, XRF, ESEM-EDS, ICP-MS, INAA. In the second group of analyses, we used only two techniques: INAA and ICP-MS. The second group of analyses confirmed the occurring of the transformations in mercury.

  11. [A study of the literature on the concentrations of arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury in body fluids and tissues to define normal values and detection of overload. 1. Description of analytical methods and arsenic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, P; Schweinsberg, F

    1988-07-01

    The present review covers 208 papers dealing with determination of the metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury in human biologic material. A comprehensive data bank survey of the literature from January 1980 to April 1984 was conducted and supplemented by review of some earlier publications. As shown by comparison of the results from a number of papers, the various state-of-the-art methods for determining metal content in biologic materials (e.g., atomic absorption spectrophotometry, neutron activation analysis, and x-ray fluorescent analysis) appear to be equally sensitive and reliable. These detection methods are suited to determination of the above metals in the following media: arsenic in urine, hair; cadmium in blood, urine, hair, renal cortex; lead in blood, hair; mercury in blood, urine, hair. To permit better comparison of the results presented in various publications, agreement must be reached on use of uniform concentration units and participation in quality control programs. Safe levels of chronic biological exposure overlap with concentrations which cause health effects or measurable impairment of body function over a wide range. Individual sensitivity to biological exposure varies. In a number of studies, metal concentrations are measured in symptom-free persons which cause symptoms in persons examined in other studies. Due to differences in the sensitivity of detection of symptoms, the range of minimum levels of biological exposure considered to be associated with deleterious health effects (levels of critical exposure) is unacceptably broad. Minimum levels of critical exposure should protect against development of early symptoms of toxicity. If the lowest published critical levels of biological exposure are taken as a cutoff, then a sizable portion of the persons currently revealing metal exposure in any of the reported media exceeds such levels. Symptoms of detrimental effects should be detectable in such persons and should be investigated. In

  12. Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Paknahad, Maryam; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental amalgam is composed?of approximately?50% elemental mercury. Despite concerns over the toxicity of mercury, amalgam is still the most widely used restorative material. Wi-Fi is a rapidly using local area wireless computer networking technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the effect of exposure to Wi-Fi signals on mercury release from amalgam restorations. Methods Standard class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 20 non...

  13. Net analyte signal-based simultaneous determination of antazoline and naphazoline using wavelength region selection by experimental design-neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Ghavami, Raoof; Miri, Ramin; Shamsipur, Majtaba

    2006-02-15

    Net analyte signal (NAS)-based multivariate calibration methods were employed for simultaneous determination of anthazoline and naphazoline. The NAS vectors calculated from the absorbance data of the drugs mixture were used as input for classical least squares (CLS), principal component and partial least squares regression PCR and PLS methods. A wavelength selection strategy was used to find the best wavelength region for each drug separately. As a new procedure, we proposed an experimental design-neural network strategy for wavelength region optimization. By use of a full factorial design method, some different wavelength regions were selected by taking into account different spectral parameters including the starting wavelength, the ending wavelength and the wavelength interval. The performance of all the multivariate calibration methods, in all selected wavelength regions for both drugs, was evaluated by calculating a fitness function based on the root mean square error of calibration and validation. A three-layered feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) model with back-propagation learning algorithm was employed to model the nonlinear relationship between the spectral parameters and fitness of each regression method. From the resulted ANN models, the spectral regions in which lowest fitness could be obtained were chosen. Comparison of the results revealed that the net NAS-PLS resulted in lower prediction error than the other models. The proposed NAS-based calibration method was successfully applied to the simultaneous analyses of anthazoline and naphazoline in a commercial eye drop sample.

  14. Ecosystem conceptual model- Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Foe, Chris; Klasing, Susan; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Slotton, Darell G.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2008-01-01

    Mercury has been identified as an important contaminant in the Delta, based on elevated concentrations of methylmercury (a toxic, organic form that readily bioaccumulates) in fish and wildlife. There are health risks associated with human exposure to methylmercury by consumption of sport fish, particularly top predators such as bass species. Original mercury sources were upstream tributaries where historical mining of mercury in the Coast Ranges and gold in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath-Trinity Mountains caused contamination of water and sediment on a regional scale. Remediation of abandoned mine sites may reduce local sources in these watersheds, but much of the mercury contamination occurs in sediments stored in the riverbeds, floodplains, and the Bay- Delta, where scouring of Gold-Rush-era sediment represents an ongoing source.Conversion of inorganic mercury to toxic methylmercury occurs in anaerobic environments including some wetlands. Wetland restoration managers must be cognizant of potential effects on mercury cycling so that the problem is not exacerbated. Recent research suggests that wettingdrying cycles can contribute to mercury methylation. For example, high marshes (inundated only during the highest tides for several days per month) tend to have higher methylmercury concentrations in water, sediment, and biota compared with low marshes, which do not dry out completely during the tidal cycle. Seasonally inundated flood plains are another environment experiencing wetting and drying where methylmercury concentrations are typically elevated. Stream restoration efforts using gravel injection or other reworking of coarse sediment in most watersheds of the Central Valley involve tailings from historical gold mining that are likely to contain elevated mercury in associated fines. Habitat restoration projects, particularly those involving wetlands, may cause increases in methylmercury exposure in the watershed. This possibility should be evaluated.The DRERIP

  15. PEMILIHAN STRATEGI PEMASARAN DI KAMPOENG KOPI BANARAN MENGGUNAKAN PENDEKATAN METODE ANALYTICAL NETWORK PROCESS (ANP DAN TECHNIQUE FOR ORDER PREFERENCE BY SIMILARITY TO AN IDEAL SOLUTION (TOPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aries Susanty

    2014-09-01

    untuk pemasaran Kampoeng Kopi Banaran adalah Strategi Segmentasi   Kata Kunci : strategi pemasaran; kampoeng kopi banaran; analytical network process (ANP; TOPSIS Abstract Kampoeng Kopi Banaran can’t achieve a return in accordance with the targets set. Hypothesized, this is the case because of the increasing number of competitors with similar business, such as Cimory, Kampoeng Rawa, Tlogo Plantation, Salib Putih, and Umbul Sidomukti and have not had a proper marketing strategy by Kampoeng Kopi Banaran. During this time, Kampoeng Kopi Banaran has been promote its products by using the website, brochures, and word of mouth. According to this condition, this study aimed to identify the appropriate criteria and sub-criteria for the formulation of a marketing strategy for Kampoeng Kopi Banaran, determine the weight of each criteria and sub-criteria, as well as proposing specific marketing strategies based on the criteria and sub-criteria. In this study, there are eight criteria used as a basis to develop a marketing strategy for Kampoeng Kopi Banaran, namely Managerial Capabilities (MC, Market Innovation Capabilities (MIC, Customer Linking Capabilities (CLC, Human Resource Assetes (HRA, Reputational assets (RA, Competition (C, Economy (E, and Social and cultural (SC. Meanwhile, the eight criterias will be further elaborated into a number of sub-criterias. The method is used to calculate weights of criteria and sub-criteria was Analytical Network Process (ANP whereas the method is used for the preparation of a marketing strategy was Technique for Others Reference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS. Data for this study were obtain by distributing questionnaires for managers and marketing section at Kampoeng Kopi Banaran. The results of data was processing show that the criteria with the highest weight in the marketing strategy for the preparation at Kampoeng Kopi Banaran is Managerial Capabilities (MC (0.1897 and sub-criteria with the highest weight is brand or

  16. Framework for developing a spatial walkability index (SWI) for the light-rail transit (LRT) stations in Kuala Lumpur city centre using analytical network process (ANP) and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naharudin, Nabilah; Ahamad, Mohd Sanusi S.; Sadullah, Ahmad Farhan Mohd

    2017-10-01

    In support to the nation's goal of developing a liveable city, Malaysian government aims to improve the mobility in Kuala Lumpur by providing good quality transit services across the city. However, the public starts to demand for more than just a connectivity between two points. They want their transit journey to be comfortable and pleasant from the very first mile. The key here is the first and last mile (FLM) of the transit service which defines their journey to access the station itself. The question is, does the existing transit services' FLM satisfy public's needs? Therefore, many studies had emerged in attempt to assess the pedestrian-friendliness. While most of them did base on the pedestrian's perceptions, there were also studies that spatially measured the connectivity and accessibility to various landuses and point of interests. While both can be a good method, their integration could actually produce a better assessment. However, till date, only a few studies had attempted to do so. This paper proposes a framework to develop a Spatial Walkability Index (SWI) by integrating a multicriteria evaluation technique, Analytical Network Process (ANP) and network analysis on geographical information system (GIS) platform. First, ANP will aggregate the degree of importance for each walkability criteria based on the pedestrian's perceptions. Then, the network analysis will use the weighted criteria as attributes to find the walkable routes within half mile radius from each station. The index will be calculated by rationing the total length of walkable routes in respect to the available footpath. The final outcome is a percentage of walkable FLM transit routes for each station which will be named as the SWI. It is expected that the developed framework can be applied in other cities across the globe. It can also be improvised to suit the demand and purpose there.

  17. Mercury CEM Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  18. Mercury cycling in a wastewater treatment plant treating waters with high mercury contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Noguero, Eva M.; García-Noguero, Carolina; Higueras, Pablo; Reyes-Bozo, Lorenzo; Esbrí, José M.

    2015-04-01

    The Almadén mercury mining district has been historically the most important producer of this element since Romans times to 2004, when both mining and metallurgic activities ceased as a consequence both of reserves exhaustion and persistent low prices for this metal. The reclamation of the main dump of the mine in 2007-2008 reduced drastically the atmospheric presence of the gaseous mercury pollutant in the local atmosphere. But still many areas, and in particular in the Almadén town area, can be considered as contaminated, and produce mercury releases that affect the urban residual waters. Two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) where built in the area in year 2002, but in their design the projects did not considered the question of high mercury concentrations received as input from the town area. This communication presents data of mercury cycling in one of the WWTP, the Almadén-Chillón one, being the larger and receiving the higher Hg concentrations, due to the fact that it treats the waters coming from the West part of the town, in the immediate proximity to the mine area. Data were collected during a number of moments of activity of the plant, since April 2004 to nowadays. Analyses were carried out by means of cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS), using a PSA Millennium Merlin analytical device with gold trap. The detection limit is 0.1 ng/l. The calibration standards are prepared using the Panreac ICP Standard Mercury Solution (1,000±0,002 g/l Hg in HNO3 2-5%). Results of the surveys indicate that mercury concentrations in input and output waters in this plant has suffered an important descent since the cessation of mining and metallurgical activities, and minor reduction also after the reclamation of the main mine's dump. Since 2009, some minor seasonal variations are detected, in particular apparently related to accumulation during summer of mercury salts and particles, which are washed to the plant with the autumn's rains. Further

  19. On the oscillations in Mercury's obliquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, E.; Rambaux, N.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury's capture into the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance can be explained as a result of its chaotic orbital dynamics. One major objective of MESSENGER and BepiColombo spatial missions is to accurately measure Mercury's rotation and its obliquity in order to obtain constraints on internal structure of the planet. Analytical approaches at the first-order level using the Cassini state assumptions give the obliquity constant or quasi-constant. Which is the obliquity's dynamical behavior deriving from a complete spin-orbit motion of Mercury simultaneously integrated with planetary interactions? We have used our SONYR model (acronym of Spin-Orbit N-bodY Relativistic model) integrating the spin-orbit N-body problem applied to the Solar System (Sun and planets). For lack of current accurate observations or ephemerides of Mercury's rotation, and therefore for lack of valid initial conditions for a numerical integration, we have built an original method for finding the libration center of the spin-orbit system and, as a consequence, for avoiding arbitrary amplitudes in librations of the spin-orbit motion as well as in Mercury's obliquity. The method has been carried out in two cases: (1) the spin-orbit motion of Mercury in the 2-body problem case (Sun-Mercury) where an uniform precession of the Keplerian orbital plane is kinematically added at a fixed inclination ( S2K case), (2) the spin-orbit motion of Mercury in the N-body problem case (Sun and planets) ( S case). We find that the remaining amplitude of the oscillations in the S case is one order of magnitude larger than in the S2K case, namely 4 versus 0.4 arcseconds (peak-to-peak). The mean obliquity is also larger, namely 1.98 versus 1.80 arcminutes, for a difference of 10.8 arcseconds. These theoretical results are in a good agreement with recent radar observations but it is not excluded that it should be possible to push farther the convergence process by drawing nearer still more precisely to the libration center. We

  20. Mercury Emissions: The Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercury emissions are a global problem that knows no national or continental boundaries. Mercury that is emitted to the air can travel thousands of miles in the atmosphere before it is eventually deposited back to the earth.

  1. Microenvironmental exposure to mercury vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopford, W.; Bundy, S.D.; Goldwater, L.J.; Bittikofer, J.A.

    1978-05-01

    Work area and breathing zone samples were collected in a factory utilizing metallic mercury and analyzed for mercury vapor content. Breathing zone samples averaged several fold higher in concentration than concurrent area samples, reflecting a ''microenvironmental'' exposure to mercury vapor, presumably from contaminated clothing and hands. Blood and corrected total urine mercury values correlated well with the average microenvironmental exposure level for each worker. Measurements of unbound mercury in urine samples were sensitive at picking up minimal exposures. Excessive amounts of unbound mercury were not found in the urine, even with wide day-to-day swings in microenvironmental mercury vapor levels, suggesting that the human body can adapt to a chronic, moderate exposure to mercury vapor.

  2. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  3. User Behavior Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Juston Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    User Behaviour Analytics is the tracking, collecting and assessing of user data and activities. The goal is to detect misuse of user credentials by developing models for the normal behaviour of user credentials within a computer network and detect outliers with respect to their baseline.

  4. Analysis of discontinuities across thin inhomogeneities, groundwater/surface water interactions in river networks, and circulation about slender bodies using slit elements in the Analytic Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater and surface water contain interfaces across which hydrologic functions are discontinuous. Thin elements with high hydraulic conductivity in a porous media focus groundwater, which flows through such inhomogeneities and causes an abrupt change in stream function across their interfaces, and elements with low conductivity retard flow with discontinuous head. Base flow interactions at the interface between groundwater and surface water transport water between these stores and generate a discontinuous normal component of flow. Thin objects in surface water with Kutta condition generate circulation by the discontinuous tangential component of flow across their interface. These discontinuities across hydrologic interfaces are quantified and visualized using the Analytic Element Method, where slit elements are formulated using the Joukowsky transformation with Laurent series and new influence functions to represent sinks and circulation, and methods are developed for these applications expressing discontinuities as Fourier series. The specific geometries illustrate solutions for a randomly generated heterogeneous porous media with nonintersecting inhomogeneities, for groundwater/surface water interaction in a synthetic river network, and for a slender body with geometry similar to the wings of the Wright Brothers. The mathematical details are reduced to series solutions and matrix multiplications, which are easily extensible to other geometries and applications.

  5. Penerapan Metode Analytic Network Process (ANP Untuk Pendukung Keputusan Pemilihan Tema Tugas Akhir (Studi Kasus: Program Studi S1 Informatika ST3 Telkom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dila Nurlaila

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Berdasarkan hasil dari survey yang dilakukan terhadap 30 mahasiswa Informatika yang akan mengambil mata kuliah tugas akhir, lebih dari 80% menjawab belum memiliki konsep Tugas Akhir, hal ini menjadi perhatian bahwa masih banyak dari mahasiswa yang belum mengetahui tema Tugas Akhir apa yang akan dambilnya nanti yang sesuai dengan minat dan kompetensinya. Dari hal tersebut akan dilakukan penelitian penerapan metode Analytic Network Process (ANP pada  Pendukung keputusan pemilihan tugas tema Tugas Akhir. ANP merupakan suatu metode dalam decision making yang mempertimbangkan hubungan antar kriteria. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji tingkat keberhasilan metode ANP dalam mengatasi masalah mahasiswa yang belum mengetahui konsep dari tugas akhir. Langkah pertama, ditentukan kriteria yang menjadi penentu dari pemilihan tema Tugas Akhir di prodi S1 Informatika. Kriteria ini akan dibuat model jaringan ANP menggunakan software super decision dan setiap kriteria akan dilakukan pairwised comparison (perbandingan berpasangan guna untuk mendapatkan pembobotan dari masing – masing kriteria dan sub kriteria. Yang menjadi expert judgement pada pengambil keputusan ini adalah ketua keahlian program studi ICM dan DESTI. Setelah melakukan pengujian dengan membandingkan pilihan secara manual dengan pilihan berdasarkan perhitungan ANP hasilnya sebesar 46,6% tema tugas akhir mahasiswa sesuai dan akurat, hilangnya 53,4% akurasi dikarenakan ketidak sesuaian jawaban mahasiswa saat menentukan nilai peminatan.

  6. Analytic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90(°) rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  7. Analytic trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, William J; Maxwell, E A; Sneddon, I N

    1963-01-01

    Analytic Trigonometry details the fundamental concepts and underlying principle of analytic geometry. The title aims to address the shortcomings in the instruction of trigonometry by considering basic theories of learning and pedagogy. The text first covers the essential elements from elementary algebra, plane geometry, and analytic geometry. Next, the selection tackles the trigonometric functions of angles in general, basic identities, and solutions of equations. The text also deals with the trigonometric functions of real numbers. The fifth chapter details the inverse trigonometric functions

  8. Mercury speciation in seafood using isotope dilution analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémens, Stéphanie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David; Guérin, Thierry

    2012-01-30

    Mercury is a toxic compound that can contaminate humans through food and especially via fish consumption. Mercury's toxicity depends on the species, with methylmercury being the most hazardous form for humans. Hg speciation analysis has been and remains a widely studied subject because of the potential difficulty of preserving the initial distribution of mercury species in the analysed sample. Accordingly, many analytical methods have been developed and most of them incur significant loss and/or cross-species transformations during sample preparation. Therefore, to monitor and correct artefact formations, quantification by isotope dilution is increasingly used and provides significant added value for analytical quality assurance and quality control. This review presents and discusses the two different modes of application of isotope dilution analysis for elemental speciation (i.e. species-unspecific isotope dilution analysis and species-specific isotope dilution analysis) and the different quantification techniques (i.e. classical and multiple spike isotope dilution analyses). Isotope tracers are thus used at different stages of sample preparation to determine the extent of inter-species transformations and correct such analytical artefacts. Finally, a synthesis of the principal methods used for mercury speciation in seafood using isotope dilution analysis is presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of mercury and other heavy metals accumulated in lichen Usnea antarctica from James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvěřina, O.; Láska, K.; Červenka, R.; Kuta, J.; Coufalík, Pavel; Komárek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 12 (2014), s. 9089-9100 ISSN 0167-6369 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : antarctica * heavy metal * mercury * lichen Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2014

  10. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  11. Mercury Shopping Cart Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

  12. [Mercury in vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Thiomersal, also called thimerosal, is an ethyl mercury derivative used as a preservative to prevent bacterial contamination of multidose vaccine vials after they have been opened. Exposure to low doses of thiomersal has essentially been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Nevertheless there is no evidence that allergy to thiomersal could be induced by thiomersal-containing vaccines. Allergy to thiomersal is usually of delayed-hypersensitivity type, but its detection through cutaneous tests is not very reliable. Hypersensitivity to thiomersal is not considered as a contraindication to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines. In 1999 in the USA, thiomersal was present in approximately 30 different childhood vaccines, whereas there were only 2 in France. Although there were no evidence of neurological toxicity in infants related to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines, the FDA considered that the cumulative dose of mercury received by young infants following vaccination was high enough (although lower than the FDA threshold for methyl mercury) to request vaccine manufacturers to remove thiomersal from vaccine formulations. Since 2002, all childhood vaccines used in Europe and the USA are thiomersal-free or contain only minute amounts of thiomersal. Recently published studies have shown that the mercury levels in the blood, faeces and urine of children who had received thiomersal-containing vaccines were much lower than those accepted by the American Environmental Protection Agency. It has also been demonstrated that the elimination of mercury in children was much faster than what was expected on the basis of studies conducted with methyl mercury originating from food. Recently, the hypothesis that mercury contained in vaccines could be the cause of autism and other neurological developmental disorders created a new debate in the medical community and the general public. To date, none of the epidemiological studies conducted in Europe and elsewhere

  13. Analysis of land suitability for urban development in Ahwaz County in southwestern Iran using fuzzy logic and analytic network process (ANP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmir, Maryam; Zarkesh, Mir Masoud Kheirkhah; Monavari, Seyed Masoud; Jozi, Seyed Ali; Sharifi, Esmail

    2016-08-01

    The ever-increasing development of cities due to population growth and migration has led to unplanned constructions and great changes in urban spatial structure, especially the physical development of cities in unsuitable places, which requires conscious guidance and fundamental organization. It is therefore necessary to identify suitable sites for future development of cities and prevent urban sprawl as one of the main concerns of urban managers and planners. In this study, to determine the suitable sites for urban development in the county of Ahwaz, the effective biophysical and socioeconomic criteria (including 27 sub-criteria) were initially determined based on literature review and interviews with certified experts. In the next step, a database of criteria and sub-criteria was prepared. Standardization of values and unification of scales in map layers were done using fuzzy logic. The criteria and sub-criteria were weighted by analytic network process (ANP) in the Super Decision software. Next, the map layers were overlaid using weighted linear combination (WLC) in the GIS software. According to the research findings, the final land suitability map was prepared with five suitability classes of very high (5.86 %), high (31.93 %), medium (38.61 %), low (17.65 %), and very low (5.95 %). Also, in terms of spatial distribution, suitable lands for urban development are mainly located in the central and southern parts of the Ahwaz County. It is expected that integration of fuzzy logic and ANP model will provide a better decision support tool compared with other models. The developed model can also be used in the land suitability analysis of other cities.

  14. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States). Sludge and Salt Planning; Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  15. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  16. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  17. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  18. Dynamic role of the liquid core of Mercury in its motion on Cassini's laws and in resonant librations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    Introduction New approaches to the study of Mercury dynamics and the construction of analytical theory of its resonant rotation are suggested. Within these approaches Mercury is considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a core and a mantle. The mantle of Mercury is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a large ellipsoidal cavity of Mercury. This Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in resonant traslatoryrotary regime 3n = 2Omega (n is the mean orbital motion and Omega is the rotational angular velocity). In considered model Mercury moves on elliptical precessing orbit with inclination to Laplace plane i = 7`0029 and with eccentricity e = 0.2056. The orbit plane precesses with respect to normal nL to Laplace plane with the small angular velocity nAndoyer and Poincare variables.

  19. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  20. Determination of non-gaseous and gaseous mercury fractions in unused fluorescent lamps: a study of different lamp types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figi, Renato; Nagel, Oliver; Schreiner, Claudia; Hagendorfer, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Since incandescent light bulbs have been phased out in the European Union from 2009, the use of fluorescent lamps has drastically increased as a reliable, more energy-efficient and cost-effective alternative. State-of-the-art fluorescent lamps are dependent on mercury/mercury alloys, posing a risk for the consumer and the environment, and appropriate waste management is challenging. Consequently analytical methods to determine possible mercury species (non-gaseous/gaseous) in these lamps are of need. Here, a straightforward and wet-chemistry-based analytical strategy for the determination of gaseous and non-gaseous mercury in commercially available fluorescent lamps is presented. It can be adapted in any analytical laboratory, without or with only minimum modifications of already installed equipment. The analytical figures of merit, as well as application of the method to a series of commercially available fluorescent lamps, are presented. Out of 14 analysed and commercially available lamp types, results from this study indicate that only one contains a slightly higher amount of mercury than set by the legislative force. In all new lamps the amount of gaseous mercury is negligible compared with the non-gaseous fraction (88%-99% of total mercury). © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Iodine and mercury resonance lamps and their spectrum in far UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Uldis; Ubelis, Arnolds; Jansons, Janis

    2001-03-01

    Electrodeless iodine, mercury iodide, and mercury radio- frequency discharge lamps have been made to provide effective sources of atomic spectra for analytical spectroscopy providing powerful resonance radiation of iodine and mercury in the 120-253 nm region. The lamps are required and can be used for spectral calibration, resonance absorption, and fluorescence detection techniques, for investigation of atomic characteristics (e.g., branching ratios) and other purposes where intense monochromatic spectra are needed. Production technology, development, and investigation of the UV and VUV emission are described.

  2. [Mercury (and...) through the centuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłys, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Mercury has a long history, fascinating in its many aspects. Through the centuries--from ancient times to the present day--the metal in its various forms, also known under the name "quicksilver", accompanied the man and was used for diversified purposes. Today, mercury is employed in manufacturing thermometers, barometers, vacuum pumps and explosives. It is also used in silver and gold mining processes. Mercury compounds play a significant role in dentistry, pharmaceutical industry and crop protection. The contemporary use of mercury markedly decreases, but historically speaking, the archives abound in materials that document facts and events occurring over generations and the immense intellectual effort aiming at discovering the true properties and mechanisms of mercury activity. Mercury toxicity, manifested in destruction of biological membranes and binding of the element with proteins, what disturbs biochemical processes occurring in the body, was discovered only after many centuries of the metal exerting its effect on the lives of individuals and communities. For centuries, mercury was present in the work of alchemists, who searched for the universal essence or quintessence and the so-called philosopher's stone. In the early modern era, between the 16th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to manufacture mirrors. Mercury compounds were employed as a medication against syphilis, which plagued mankind for more than four hundred years--from the Middle Ages till mid 20th century, when the discovery of penicillin became the turning point. This extremely toxic therapy resulted in much suffering, individual tragedies, chronic poisonings leading to fatalities and dramatic sudden deaths. In the last fifty years, there even occurred attempts of mentally imbalanced individuals at injecting themselves with metallic mercury, also as a performance-enhancing drug. Instances of mass mercury poisoning occurred many times in the past in consequence of eating food products

  3. Mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenhoft, David P.; Rickert, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Mercury has been well known as an environmental pollutant for several decades. As early as the 1950's it was established that emissions of mercury to the environment could have serious effects on human health. These early studies demonstrated that fish and other wildlife from various ecosystems commonly attain mercury levels of toxicological concern when directly affected by mercury-containing emissions from human-related activities. Human health concerns arise when fish and wildlife from these ecosystems are consumed by humans. During the past decade, a new trend has emerged with regard to mercury pollution. Investigations initiated in the late 1980's in the northern-tier states of the U.S., Canada, and Nordic countries found that fish, mainly from nutrient-poor lakes and often in very remote areas, commonly have high levels of mercury. More recent fish sampling surveys in other regions of the U.S. have shown widespread mercury contamination in streams, wet-lands, reservoirs, and lakes. To date, 33 states have issued fish consumption advisories because of mercury contamination. These continental to global scale occurrences of mercury contamination cannot be linked to individual emissions of mercury, but instead are due to widespread air pollution. When scientists measure mercury levels in air and surface water, however, the observed levels are extraordinarily low. In fact, scientists have to take extreme precautions to avoid direct contact with water samples or sample containers, to avert sample contamination (Fig 3). Herein lies an apparent discrepancy: Why do fish from some remote areas have elevated mercury concentrations, when contamination levels in the environment are so low?

  4. Dual detection of nitrate and mercury in water using disposable electrochemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Minh-Phuong N; Brockgreitens, John; Ahmed, Snober; Abbas, Abdennour

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a disposable, cost effective electrochemical paper-based sensor for the detection of both nitrate and mercury ions in lake water and contaminated agricultural runoff. Disposable carbon paper electrodes were functionalized with selenium particles (SePs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The AuNPs served as a catalyst for the reduction of nitrate ions using differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The AuNPs also served as a nucleation sites for mercury ions. The SePs further reinforced this mercury ion nucleation due to their high binding affinity to mercury. Differential pulse stripping voltammetry techniques were used to further enhance mercury ion accumulation on the modified electrode. The fabricated electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electrochemistry techniques. The obtained results show that the PEG-SH/SePs/AuNPs modified carbon paper electrode has a dual functionality in that it can detect both nitrate and mercury ions without any interference. The modified carbon paper electrode has improved the analytical sensitivity of nitrate and mercury ions with limits of detection of 8.6µM and 1.0ppb, respectively. Finally, the modified electrode was used to measure nitrate and mercury in lake water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Human mercury exposure and irregular menstrual cycles in relation to artisanal gold mining in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura Andrea; Jaimes, Diana Carolina; Manquián-Tejos, Adelaida; Sánchez, Luz Helena

    2015-08-01

    Artisanal mining commonly extracts gold with an amalgamation process that uses mercury. The reproductive effects from exposure to elemental mercury used in gold mining have not been sufficiently studied. To evaluate the effect of the exposure to elemental mercury used in gold mining on menstrual cycle regularity and the occurrence of miscarriages in Colombia. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted. The participants were female residents of gold mining districts, with a history of exposure to elemental mercury. Menstrual regularity and the occurrence of miscarriages were compared between these women and an unexposed group. Exposure and outcome variables were registered based on a questionnaire which was evaluated for its test-retest reproducibility. Prevalence rates were calculated using a binomial model and goodness-of-fit was evaluated. A total of 72 women exposed to mercury and 121 unexposed women participated. The average time of exposure to mercury among exposed women was 19.58 ± 9.53 years. The adjusted prevalence of irregular menstruation over the last six months was higher in the group of women chronically exposed to mercury vapors (PR=1.59, 95% CI 0.93-2.73), while there was no difference in the proportion of women with a history of miscarriages. Exposure to elemental mercury used in artisanal gold mining may be associated with a higher prevalence of irregular menstrual cycles but not with the occurrence of miscarriage.

  6. Mercury, Vaccines, and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jeffrey P.

    2008-01-01

    The controversy regarding the once widely used mercury-containing preservative thimerosal in childhood vaccines has raised many historical questions that have not been adequately explored. Why was this preservative incorporated in the first place? Was there any real evidence that it caused harm? And how did thimerosal become linked in the public mind to the “autism epidemic”? I examine the origins of the thimerosal controversy and their legacy for the debate that has followed. More specifically, I explore the parallel histories of three factors that converged to create the crisis: vaccine preservatives, mercury poisoning, and autism. An understanding of this history provides important lessons for physicians and policymakers seeking to preserve the public’s trust in the nation’s vaccine system. PMID:18172138

  7. Recent Advances in Mercury Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J; Aschner, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a highly toxic, non-essential, naturally occurring metal with a variety of uses. Mercury is not required for any known biological process and its presence in the human body may be detrimental, especially to the nervous system. Both genetic and behavioral studies suggest that mercury levels, age (both of exposure and at testing), and genetic background determine disease processes and outcome. The metal receptors and genes responsible for mercury metabolism also appear to play a pivotal role in the etiology of mercury-induced pathology. This review presents information about the latest advances in mercury research, with particular focus on low-level exposures and the contribution of genetics to toxic outcome. Future studies should address the contribution of genetics and low-level mercury exposure to disease, namely gene x environment interactions, taking into consideration age of exposure as developing animals are exquisitely more sensitive to this metal. In addition to recent advances in understanding the pathology associated with mercury exposure, the review highlights transport mechanisms, cellular distribution and detoxification of mercury species in the body.

  8. The planet Mercury (1971)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The physical properties of the planet Mercury, its surface, and atmosphere are presented for space vehicle design criteria. The mass, dimensions, mean density, and orbital and rotational motions are described. The gravity field, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and charged particles in the planet's orbit are discussed. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, and composition data are given along with the surface composition, soil mechanical properties, and topography, and the surface electromagnetic and temperature properties.

  9. Method for scavenging mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-ger [El Cerrito, CA; Liu, Shou-heng [Kaohsiung, TW; Liu, Zhao-rong [Beijing, CN; Yan, Naiqiang [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-20

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  10. Method for scavenging mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-ger; Liu, Shou-heng; Liu, Zhao-rong; Yan, Naiqiang

    2010-07-13

    Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

  11. Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rob James; Virgil Joffrion; John McDermott; Steve Piche

    2010-05-31

    This project was awarded to demonstrate the ability to affect and optimize mercury speciation and multi-pollutant control using non-intrusive advanced sensor and optimization technologies. The intent was to demonstrate plant-wide optimization systems on a large coal fired steam electric power plant in order to minimize emissions, including mercury (Hg), while maximizing efficiency and maintaining saleable byproducts. Advanced solutions utilizing state-of-the-art sensors and neural network-based optimization and control technologies were proposed to maximize the removal of mercury vapor from the boiler flue gas thereby resulting in lower uncontrolled releases of mercury into the atmosphere. Budget Period 1 (Phase I) - Included the installation of sensors, software system design and establishment of the as-found baseline operating metrics for pre-project and post-project data comparison. Budget Period 2 (Phase II) - Software was installed, data communications links from the sensors were verified, and modifications required to integrate the software system to the DCS were performed. Budget Period 3 (Phase III) - Included the validation and demonstration of all control systems and software, and the comparison of the optimized test results with the targets established for the project site. This report represents the final technical report for the project, covering the entire award period and representing the final results compared to project goals. NeuCo shouldered 61% of the total project cost; while DOE shouldered the remaining 39%. The DOE requires repayment of its investment. This repayment will result from commercial sales of the products developed under the project. NRG's Limestone power plant (formerly owned by Texas Genco) contributed the host site, human resources, and engineering support to ensure the project's success.

  12. Metallic mercury poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitsuka, M; Robertson, W O; Fligner, C

    1984-01-01

    Among traditional toxins, mercury has an infamous heritage. Despite 2,000 years of recognized dangers, it continues to menace mankind. Bygone years focused on the dangers of the inorganic form, the past two decades have uncovered aftermaths of the organic form. Over the past ten years our Center has seen patients afflicted by the metallic form via four different avenues of exposure. In the first instance, a toddler succumbed to the effects of accidentally spilled high school chemistry quicksilver on a dining room carpet. In the second, a broken mercury switch in an infant isolette, was responsible for environmental contamination and infants' exposures. In a third, misguided efforts to extract gold from ore affected an entire family and particularly their male toddler with disastrous pulmonary problems. A fourth instance saw intravenous injection of metallic mercury lead to a most unusual chest radiograph and be associated with the demise of an already severely affected cardiac cripple. Highlights of each of these cases will be reviewed as they illustrate the importance of identifying the precise form of any chemical involved in a exposure and the essentiality of such information in predicting toxicity and recommending treatment.

  13. Mercury removal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2016-03-29

    Sorbents and methods of using them for removing mercury from flue gases over a wide range of temperatures are disclosed. Sorbent materials of this invention comprise oxy- or hydroxyl-halogen (chlorides and bromides) of manganese, copper and calcium as the active phase for Hg.sup.0 oxidation, and are dispersed on a high surface porous supports. In addition to the powder activated carbons (PACs), this support material can be comprised of commercial ceramic supports such as silica (SiO.sub.2), alumina (Al.sub.2O.sub.3), zeolites and clays. The support material may also comprise of oxides of various metals such as iron, manganese, and calcium. The non-carbon sorbents of the invention can be easily injected into the flue gas and recovered in the Particulate Control Device (PCD) along with the fly ash without altering the properties of the by-product fly ash enabling its use as a cement additive. Sorbent materials of this invention effectively remove both elemental and oxidized forms of mercury from flue gases and can be used at elevated temperatures. The sorbent combines an oxidation catalyst and a sorbent in the same particle to both oxidize the mercury and then immobilize it.

  14. Analytical quadrics

    CERN Document Server

    Spain, Barry; Ulam, S; Stark, M

    1960-01-01

    Analytical Quadrics focuses on the analytical geometry of three dimensions. The book first discusses the theory of the plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, straight line, and central quadrics in their standard forms. The idea of the plane at infinity is introduced through the homogenous Cartesian coordinates and applied to the nature of the intersection of three planes and to the circular sections of quadrics. The text also focuses on paraboloid, including polar properties, center of a section, axes of plane section, and generators of hyperbolic paraboloid. The book also touches on homogenous coordi

  15. Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Levin

    2005-12-31

    Recent field and pilot-scale results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within the power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury chemistry in plumes based on measured rates to date have improved regional model fits to Mercury Deposition Network wet deposition data for particular years, while not degrading model verification fits for remaining years of the ensemble. The years with improved fit are those with simulated deposition in grid cells in the State of Pennsylvania that have matching MDN station data significantly less than the model values. This project seeks to establish a full-scale data basis for whether or not significant reduction or oxidation reactions occur to mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants, and what numerical redox rate should apply for extension to other sources and for modeling of power plant mercury plumes locally, regionally, and nationally. Although in-stack mercury (Hg) speciation measurements are essential to the development of control technologies and to provide data for input into atmospheric fate and transport models, the determination of speciation in a cooling coal combustion plume is more relevant for use in estimating Hg fate and effects through the atmosphere. It is mercury transformations that may occur in the plume that determine the eventual rate and patterns of mercury deposited to the earth's surface. A necessary first step in developing a supportable approach to modeling any such transformations is to directly measure the forms and concentrations of mercury from the stack exit downwind to full dispersion in the atmosphere. As a result, a study was sponsored by EPRI and jointly funded by EPRI, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), and the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The study was designed to further our understanding of plume chemistry. The study was carried out at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant, Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin

  16. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real W...

  17. Determination of Mercury in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke by Conventional and Amalgamation Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDaniel RL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for differentiation of gas- and particulate-phase mercury in mainstream cigarette smoke was developed using electrostatic precipitation (EP as the trap for the particulate phase and impingers containing acidic potassium permanganate solution as the trap for the gas-phase portion. The mercury collected from the gas phase was analyzed by conventional cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS and the particulate phase was analyzed by gold amalgamation CVAAS. Cigarettes were smoked under two smoking regimes, FTC (35-mL puff volume, 2 s puff duration and one puff every 60 s and an alternative (45-mL puff volume, 2 s puff duration, one puff every 30 s and 50% of any ventilation holes blocked currently recommended by the Massachusetts Department of Health. For the 1R4F reference cigarette smoked under the FTC smoking regime, the mercury found in the particulate phase was less than 0.2 ng/cig, compared with 4.9 ng/cig in the gas phase. By changing smoking parameters, the mercury concentration in mainstream smoke was found to change proportional to the delivery of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC for the same type of cigarette. However, the mercury level for different types of cigarettes smoked under the same smoking parameters had no linear relationship with CSC delivery. Spiked recovery was 98% AA± 8% for gas-phase mercury and 97% AA± 2% for the particulate phase. These results indicate that the analytical method developed is suitable for the determination of mercury in mainstream smoke. For routine analytical work in a smoking laboratory, only the gas phase needs to be analyzed for determination of mercury in mainstream smoke because the amount of mercury in the particulate phase is negligible.

  18. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-08

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications.

  19. Mercury: Exploration of a Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft to Venus and Mercury is detailed in animation and photography. Views of Mercury are featured. Also included is animation on the origin of the solar system. Dr. Bruce C. Murray, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, comments on the mission.

  20. 49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). (a) For transportation by aircraft, mercury must be packaged in packagings which meet the requirements of part 178 of...

  1. Resonant Rotation of Two-layer Moon and Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Y. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    2004-05-01

    Present significance of the study of rotation of the Moon and Mercury (M&M)considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned missions to these bodies. An investigation of the resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play main part for Messenger and BepiColombo missions to Mercury. New accurate data about the Moon dynamics will be obtained from a series of future missions to the Moon. In this connection the new approach to the study of M&M resonant dynamics are suggested. Within these approaches M&M are considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a liquid core and a mantle. The porpoise of study is to construct the analytical theories of resonant rotational motion of two-layer body (M&M). In first we give an explanation and illustration of the main regularities of M&M rotation and formulate generalized Cassini's laws. Main resonant properties of Mercury motion were described first as generalized Cassini's laws (Colombo, 1966). But Colombo and some another's scientists (Peale, 1969; Beletskii, 1972; Ward, 1975, Barkin, 1978) considered Mercury (and the Moon) as rigid non-spherical body sometimes taking into account a tidal deformation. Here we have been formulated these laws and their eneralization for a two-layer model of Mercury and the Moon. The mantle of M&M is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a ellipsoidal cavity of M&M (Poincare model). The Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in a traslatory-rotary regime of the resonance 3:2 and the Moon system - in synchronous regime. We take into account gravitational attraction of the Sun (for Mercury) and gravitational attraction of the Moon and Sun (for the Moon). For the study of M&M rotation we have been used specially designed canonical equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincare variables (Barkin, Ferrandiz, 2001) and special analytical methods of construction of the conditionally

  2. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of a...

  3. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zidong [Urbana, IL; Lee, Jung Heon [Evanston, IL; Lu, Yi [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  4. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... include: re-identification, consumer behavior analysis, utilizing pupillary response for task difficulty measurement, logo detection, saliency prediction, classification of facial expressions, face recognition, face verification, age estimation, super-resolution, pose estimation, and pain recognition...

  5. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    include: re-identification, consumer behavior analysis, utilizing pupillary response for task difficulty measurement, logo detection, saliency prediction, classification of facial expressions, face recognition, face verification, age estimation, super-resolution, pose estimation, and pain recognition......This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...

  6. Analytical history

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand M. Roehner

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to explain what is "analytical history", a modular and testable analysis of historical events introduced in a book published in 2002 (Roehner and Syme 2002). Broadly speaking, it is a comparative methodology for the analysis of historical events. Comparison is the keystone and hallmark of science. For instance, the extrasolar planets are crucial for understanding our own solar system. Until their discovery, astronomers could observe only one instance. Single instan...

  7. Networking in Education: From Concept to Action--An Analytical View on the Educational Territories of Priority Intervention (TEIP) in Northern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marisa; da Silva, Sofia Marques; Araújo, Helena C

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of school principals' perspectives on networking concerning schools and school clusters from areas of social vulnerability (Educational Territories of Priority Intervention (TEIP)) in Northern Portugal. The meanings, purpose, benefits and difficulties of networking in education are examined, based on interviews…

  8. Mercury Fate and Transport in Hunza River Watershed, Northern Areas, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, K.; Khan, S. D.; Shah, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    smelting processes were acquired through interviews with miners. Panning, amalgamation and roasting processes were being done at workers huts where large amount of mercury is released to environment particularly due to no mercury recycling in the smelting process. This ongoing research study attempted to explore the source, fate and transport dynamics of mercury by 1) using high frequency sampling to examine potential source locations and transport dynamics of mercury; 2) determining the relationship between total suspended solids in the water column and mercury transport; 3) comparing analytical and observational data in GIS. Results of this study show that mercury concentrations are elevated in the upstream parts of Hunza watershed, where observational and earlier geochemical data confirm that gold panning activities are common in these areas. Furthermore, particulate bound mercury concentration is 3 orders of magnitude greater than that of dissolved mercury. This suggests that mercury contamination in the rivers is mostly associated with suspended sediments. Abrupt decrease in particulate and dissolved mercury concentration downstream of a naturally formed lake due to landslide, suggests that mercury is being deposited or used in methylation processes.

  9. Increased mercury emissions from modern dental amalgams

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtsson, Ulf; Hylander, Lars D.

    2017-01-01

    All types of dental amalgams contain mercury, which partly is emitted as mercury vapor. All types of dental amalgams corrode after being placed in the oral cavity. Modern high copper amalgams exhibit two new traits of increased instability. Firstly, when subjected to wear/polishing, droplets rich in mercury are formed on the surface, showing that mercury is not being strongly bonded to the base or alloy metals. Secondly, high copper amalgams emit substantially larger amounts of mercury vapor ...

  10. Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic heavy metals and has no known physiological role in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Mercury has been used by man since ancient times. Among the earliest were the Chinese and Romans, who employed cinnabar (mercury sulfide) as a red dye in ink (Clarkson et al. 2007). Mercury has also been used to purify gold and silver minerals by forming amalgams. This is a hazardous practice, but is still widespread in Brazil's Amazon basin, in Laos and in Venezuela, where tens of thousands of miners are engaged in local mining activities to find and purify gold or silver. Mercury compounds were long used to treat syphilis and the element is still used as an antiseptic,as a medicinal preservative and as a fungicide. Dental amalgams, which contain about 50% mercury, have been used to repair dental caries in the U.S. since 1856.Mercury still exists in many common household products around the world.Examples are: thermometers, barometers, batteries, and light bulbs (Swain et al.2007). In small amounts, some organo mercury-compounds (e.g., ethylmercury tiosalicylate(thimerosal) and phenylmercury nitrate) are used as preservatives in some medicines and vaccines (Ballet al. 2001).Each mercury form has its own toxicity profile. Exposure to Hg0 vapor and MeHg produce symptoms in CNS, whereas, the kidney is the target organ when exposures to the mono- and di-valent salts of mercury (Hg+ and Hg++, respectively)occur. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury produces stomatitis, erethism and tremors. Chronic MeHg exposure induced symptoms similar to those observed in ALS, such as the early onset of hind limb weakness (Johnson and Atchison 2009).Among the organic mercury compounds, MeHg is the most biologically available and toxic (Scheuhammer et a!. 2007). MeHg is neurotoxic, reaching high levels of accumulation in the CNS; it can impair physiological function by disrupting endocrine glands (Tan et a!. 2009).The most

  11. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  12. Exploring Mercury: The Iron Planet

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Planet Mercury is both difficult to observe and difficult to reach by spacecraft. Just one spacecraft, Mariner 10, flew by the planet 30 years ago. An upcoming NASA mission, MESSENGER, will be launched this year and will go into orbit around Mercury at the end of this decade. A European mission is planned for the following decade. It's worth going there because Mercury is a strange body and the history of planetary exploration has taught us that strangeness gives us insight into planetary ori...

  13. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers...

  14. Organomercury determination in biological reference materials: Application to a study on mercury speciation in marine mammals off the Faroee Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schintu, M.; Jean-Caurant, F.; Amiard, J.C. (Universita di Cagliari (Italy))

    1992-08-01

    The potential use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) for the organic mercury determination in marine biological tissues was evaluated. Following its isolation by acid extraction in toluene, organic mercury was recovered in aqueous thiosulfate and measured by GF-AAS. The detection limit was 0.01 microgram Hg/g (as methyl mercury). Analyses were conducted on three reference standard materials certified for their methyl mercury content, DOLT-1, DORM-1, and TORT-1, provided by the National Research Council of Canada. The method resulted in very good recovery and reproducibility, indicating that GF-AAS can provide results comparable to those obtained by using more expensive and time consuming analytical techniques. The method was applied to the analysis of liver tissues of pilot whale specimens (Globicephala melas) from the drive fishery of the Faroee Islands (northeast Atlantic). The results provided useful information on the proportion of different mercury forms in the liver of these marine mammals.

  15. Quality dimensions as an analytical tool to study food networks and development trajectories – A Pirsigian based framework illustrated by Danish organic food chains

    OpenAIRE

    Noe, Egon; Hugo F. Alrøe

    2007-01-01

    This paper includes some reflections upon the main theme of this working group: That the different trajectories of European organics are strongly linked to different development pathways in the food networks, and how this question could be interrogated.

  16. [Selected markers of subclinical renal damage in men occupationally exposed to mercury vapours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutowski, Jan; Moszczyński, Paulin

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations of albumin, IgG, transferrin, retinol binding protein (RBP), alpha-1-microglobulin (alpha-1-m) and beta-2-microglobulin (beta-2-m) were determined in urine of 83 males 21 to 60 years old (Mean = 41.2 +/- SD = 10.7) with a history of occupational exposure to metallic mercury vapours from 7 months to 37 years (Mean=16.3 +/- 10.9) and in 30 males without this exposure by using the nephelometry (Behring's antibodies, references and controls). The weighted mean of mercury concentrations in air was from 0.028 to 0.037 mg m(-3). The urinary level of mercury was determined by using the atomic absorption spectrometer Coleman Mercury Analyzer Mas-50, Perkin-Elmer USA, in alpha=253.7nm. The detection limit of the analytical procedure of determination of mercury in urine was 10 microg/dm3 and in blood was 4 microg Hg/dm3. Workers were divided into three groups depending on the duration of exposure: I/. 30 males with a short history of exposure to Hg0 (7 months to 9 years) (4.2 +/- 2.8), II/. 18 males exposed from 10 to 20 years (14.5 +/- 3.3) and III/. 35 males with a history of long exposure (21 to 37 years) (27.5 +/- 4.0) following three groups were divided depending on the degree of exposure: 1/. 32 males with concentrations of mercury in urine urine 51 to 150 microg Hg/dm3 (86.1 +/- 24.3) aged 21 to 60 years (39.8 +/- 10.8) and exposed to Hg0 from 7 months to 35 years (15.9 +/- 10.8) and group 3/. 32 males with concentrations of mercury in urine 151 to 260 microg Hg/dm3 (211.4 +/- 37.1) aged 21 to 56 years (35.5 +/- 13.1) and exposed to Hg0 from 7 months to 30 years (9.1 +/- 8.8). Occupational exposure to mercury vapours influenced urine mercury concentration and urine excretion of determined proteins: albumin, IgG, transferrin, alpha-1-microglubulin and beta-2-microglubulin. In the group of workers exposed to mercury vapours from 7 months to 9 years, statistically significance elevation of alpha-1-m and beta-2-m [alpha-1-m by 67.5% (purine

  17. The Use of Bacteria for Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many processes of mercury transformation in the environment are bacteria mediated. Mercury properties cause some difficulties of remediation of mercury contaminated environment. Despite the significance of the problem of mercury pollution, methods of large scale bioremediation ...

  18. Mercury Exposure and Children’s Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose-O’Reilly, Stephan; McCarty, Kathleen M.; Steckling, Nadine; Lettmeier, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause adverse effects during any period of development. Mercury is a highly toxic element; there is no known safe level of exposure. Ideally, neither children nor adults should have any mercury in their bodies because it provides no physiological benefit. Prenatal and postnatal mercury exposures occur frequently in many different ways. Pediatricians, nurses, and other health care providers should understand the scope of mercury exposures and health problems among children and be prepared to handle mercury exposures in medical practice. Prevention is the key to reducing mercury poisoning. Mercury exists in different chemical forms: elemental (or metallic), inorganic, and organic (methylmercury and ethyl mercury). Mercury exposure can cause acute and chronic intoxication at low levels of exposure. Mercury is neuro-, nephro-, and immunotoxic. The development of the child in utero and early in life is at particular risk. Mercury is ubiquitous and persistent. Mercury is a global pollutant, bio-accumulating, mainly through the aquatic food chain, resulting in a serious health hazard for children. This article provides an extensive review of mercury exposure and children’s health. PMID:20816346

  19. Mercury pollution: a transdisciplinary treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuber, Sharon L; Newman, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    .... Also included are smaller case studies, such as the Minamata tragedy, fish consumption, and international treaties"-- "Mercury is the gravest chemical pollutant problem of our time, and this is...

  20. Analitik Ağ Süreci Yaklaşımı ile Türkiye’de Beyaz Eşya Sektörünün Pazar Payı Tahmini = Estimating Market Share of White Goods Sector in Turkey with Analytic Network Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin ALPTEKİN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is tried to predict the market shares of the largest three companies in the white goods sector in Turkey through the use of the analytic network process. These companies are highly competitive in the white goods sector. To attract new customers and to retain the current ones, they have to compete by setting reasonable prices, produce high quality products and expand their service networks. In line with the sequence of analytic network process, first of all, an estimation of market share problem has been structured and modeled. Next, it is assessed the importance of the factors affected the market share and it is estimated the market shares of the white goods companies in Turkey using analytic network process. The estimated market share values have been compared with actual ones for the validation of the decision model.

  1. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  2. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Helrich, Carl S

    2017-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate textbook begins with the Lagrangian formulation of Analytical Mechanics and then passes directly to the Hamiltonian formulation and the canonical equations, with constraints incorporated through Lagrange multipliers. Hamilton's Principle and the canonical equations remain the basis of the remainder of the text. Topics considered for applications include small oscillations, motion in electric and magnetic fields, and rigid body dynamics. The Hamilton-Jacobi approach is developed with special attention to the canonical transformation in order to provide a smooth and logical transition into the study of complex and chaotic systems. Finally the text has a careful treatment of relativistic mechanics and the requirement of Lorentz invariance. The text is enriched with an outline of the history of mechanics, which particularly outlines the importance of the work of Euler, Lagrange, Hamilton and Jacobi. Numerous exercises with solutions support the exceptionally clear and concise treatment...

  3. Mercury and autism: accelerating evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Joachim; Naumann, Johannes; Schneider, Rainer; Walach, Harald; Haley, Boyd

    2005-10-01

    The causes of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders are unknown. Genetic and environmental risk factors seem to be involved. Because of an observed increase in autism in the last decades, which parallels cumulative mercury exposure, it was proposed that autism may be in part caused by mercury. We review the evidence for this proposal. Several epidemiological studies failed to find a correlation between mercury exposure through thimerosal, a preservative used in vaccines, and the risk of autism. Recently, it was found that autistic children had a higher mercury exposure during pregnancy due to maternal dental amalgam and thimerosal-containing immunoglobulin shots. It was hypothesized that children with autism have a decreased detoxification capacity due to genetic polymorphism. In vitro, mercury and thimerosal in levels found several days after vaccination inhibit methionine synthetase (MS) by 50%. Normal function of MS is crucial in biochemical steps necessary for brain development, attention and production of glutathione, an important antioxidative and detoxifying agent. Repetitive doses of thimerosal leads to neurobehavioral deteriorations in autoimmune susceptible mice, increased oxidative stress and decreased intracellular levels of glutathione in vitro. Subsequently, autistic children have significantly decreased level of reduced glutathione. Promising treatments of autism involve detoxification of mercury, and supplementation of deficient metabolites.

  4. Natural selection for resistance to mercury pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.; Lavie, B.; Nevo, E.

    1985-05-15

    The survival under conditions of mercury pollution of two natural populations of the marine gastropod Cerithium rupestre, derived from mercury-polluted and mercury-free sites, was tested in the laboratory. The results indicate a significantly higher survival rate for animals derived from the mercury-polluted site, in each of six repetitive experiments. We conclude that mercury resistance in marine organisms is reinforced in mercury polluted sites, presumably by natural selection for increased resistance. The evolution of metal tolerance in marine organisms may be as fast as that of metal tolerance in plants and the evolution of industrial melanisms in moths.

  5. Direct determination of mercury in white vinegar by matrix assisted photochemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qingyang, E-mail: liuqingyang0807@yahoo.com.c [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper proposes the use of photochemical vapor generation with acetic acid as sample introduction for the direct determination of ultra-trace mercury in white vinegars by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Under ultraviolet irradiation, the sample matrix (acetic acid) can reduce mercury ion to atomic mercury Hg{sup 0}, which is swept by argon gas into an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for subsequent analytical measurements. The effects of several factors such as the concentration of acetic acid, irradiation time, the flow rate of the carrier gas and matrix effects were discussed and optimized to give detection limits of 0.08 ng mL{sup -1} for mercury. Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (3% v/v acetic acid, 30 s irradiation time and 20 W mercury lamp), the precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation, were 4.6% (one day) and 7.8% (inter-day) for mercury (n = 9). Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the range of 92-98% for mercury. The method was also validated by analysis of vinegar samples without detectable amount of Hg spiked with aqueous standard reference materials (GBW(E) 080392 and GBW(E) 080393). The results were also compared with those obtained by acid digestion procedure and determination of mercury by ICP-MS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  6. Network analysis literacy a practical approach to the analysis of networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zweig, Katharina A

    2014-01-01

    Network Analysis Literacy focuses on design principles for network analytics projects. The text enables readers to: pose a defined network analytic question; build a network to answer the question; choose or design the right network analytic methods for a particular purpose, and more.

  7. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to

  8. Artificial neural networks as a tool for soft-modelling in quantitative analytical chemistry: the prediction of the water content of cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.; Bos, A.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    The application of artificial neural networks for the modelling of a complex process was examined. A real data set concerning the batch production of cheese from an actual plant was used to predict the resulting water content of the cheese from the milk composition and process parameters. Owing to

  9. Mercury: Aspects of its ecology and environmental toxicity. [physiological effects of mercury compound contamination of environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of mercury pollution on the environment. The possible sources of mercury contamination in sea water are identified. The effects of mercury on food sources, as represented by swordfish, are analyzed. The physiological effects of varying concentrations of mercury are reported. Emphasis is placed on the situation existing in the Hawaiian Islands.

  10. Mercury after three MESSENGER flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) space-craft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, is the first space probe to visit the planet Mercury in more than 30 years. MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet twice in 2008 and once last fall. The flybys confirmed that Mercury's internal magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, with a vector moment closely aligned with the spin axis. MESSENGER detected mag-nesium in Mercury's exosphere, demonstrated that Mercury's anti-sunward neutral tail contains multiple species, and revealed that the distributions of sodium, calcium, and magnesium in the exosphere and tail vary differently with latitude, time of day, and Mercury's position in or-bit, signatures of multiple source processes. MESSENGER's laser altimeter showed that the equatorial topographic relief of Mercury exceeds 5 km, revealed an equatorial ellipticity aligned with the ellipticity in Mercury's gravitational potential, and documented the form of numer-ous impact craters and fault scarps. MESSENGER images provided evidence for widespread volcanism, and candidate sites for volcanic centers were identified. In addition, newly imaged lobate scarps and other tectonic landforms support the hypothesis that Mercury contracted globally in response to interior cooling. The ˜1500-km-diameter Caloris basin, viewed in its entirety for the first time by MESSENGER, was the focus for concentrations of volcanic cen-ters, some with evidence of pyroclastic deposits, and widespread contractional and extensional deformation; smooth plains interior and exterior to the basin are demonstrably younger than the basin-forming event. The ˜700-km-diameter Rembrandt basin, less volcanically infilled than Caloris, was likewise a focus for concentrated magmatic and deformational activity. A ˜290-km-diameter basin contains interior plains that are among the youngest volcanic material on the planet. The nearly global observations of Mercury surface units

  11. A European network for food-borne parasites (Euro-FBP: meeting report on ‘Analytical methods for food-borne parasites in human and veterinary diagnostics and in food matrices’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Klotz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Food-borne parasites (FBPs are a neglected topic in food safety, partly due to a lack of awareness of their importance for public health, especially as symptoms tend not to develop immediately after exposure. In addition, methodological difficulties with both diagnosis in infected patients and detection in food matrices result in under-detection and therefore the potential for underestimation of their burden on our societies. This, in consequence, leads to lower prioritization for basic research, e.g. for development new and more advanced detection methods for different food matrices and diagnostic samples, and thus a vicious circle of neglect and lack of progress is propagated. The COST Action FA1408, A European Network for Foodborne Parasites (Euro-FBP aims to combat the impact of FBP on public health by facilitating the multidisciplinary cooperation and partnership between groups of researchers and between researchers and stakeholders. The COST Action TD1302, the European Network for cysticercosis/taeniosis, CYSTINET, has a specific focus on Taenia solium and T. saginata, two neglected FBPs, and aims to advance knowledge and understanding of these zoonotic disease complexes via collaborations in a multidisciplinary scientific network. This report summarizes the results of a meeting within the Euro-FBP consortium entitled ‘Analytical methods for food-borne parasites in human and veterinary diagnostics and in food matrices’ and of the joined Euro-FBP and CYSTINET meeting.

  12. Global Sources and Pathways of Mercury in the Context of Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrre Sundseth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews information from the existing literature and the EU GMOS (Global Mercury Observation System project to assess the current scientific knowledge on global mercury releases into the atmosphere, on global atmospheric transport and deposition, and on the linkage between environmental contamination and potential impacts on human health. The review concludes that assessment of global sources and pathways of mercury in the context of human health is important for being able to monitor the effects from implementation of the Minamata Convention targets, although new research is needed on the improvement of emission inventory data, the chemical and physical behaviour of mercury in the atmosphere, the improvement of monitoring network data, predictions of future emissions and speciation, and on the subsequent effects on the environment, human health, as well as the economic costs and benefits of reducing these aspects.

  13. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina para espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10{mu}g.L{sup -1}. The

  14. Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products do not meet. Sellers and distributors who market mercury-containing skin whitening or lightening creams in ... Simone says. Some people – including pregnant women, nursing babies and young children – are especially vulnerable to mercury ...

  15. Mercury-Containing Devices and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some items inside residential buildings contain mercury, which poses a persistent and toxic human health and environmental threat. These materials should be carefully salvaged for proper recycling to prevent mercury contamination prior to demolition.

  16. Mercury in Thana creek, Bombay harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Desai, B.N.

    weight) with marked increased from harbour to the creek region suggests substantial mercury input in the head region. Chemical extraction by hydrogen peroxide indicated that more than 70% of mercury was leachable and probably organically bound...

  17. EPA Leadership in the Global Mercury Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Mercury Partnership is a voluntary multi-stakeholder partnership initiated in 2005 to take immediate actions to protect human health and the environment from the releases of mercury and its compounds to the environment.

  18. Historical methyl mercury in San Francisco Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — San Francisco Bay, California is considered a mercury-impaired watershed. Elevated concentrations of mercury are found in water and sediment as well as fish and...

  19. The effect of longterm exposure to mercury on the bacterial community in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    1998-01-01

    Mercury pollution, bacteria, diversity, mercury resistance, antibiotic resistance, plasmid abundance......Mercury pollution, bacteria, diversity, mercury resistance, antibiotic resistance, plasmid abundance...

  20. Networked Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Larsen, Malene Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    In this article we take up a critique of the concept of Communities of Practice (CoP) voiced by several authors, who suggest that networks may provide a better metaphor to understand social forms of organisation and learning. Through a discussion of the notion of networked learning and the critique...... of CoPs we shall argue that the metaphor or theory of networked learning is itself confronted with some central tensions and challenges that need to be addressed. We then explore these theoretical and analytic challenges to the network metaphor, through an analysis of a Danish social networking site. We...... argue that understanding meaning-making and ‘networked identities’ may be relevant analytic entry points in navigating the challenges....

  1. The use of artificial neural networks and multiple linear regression in modeling work-health relationships: translating theory into analytical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Karanika-Murray, M; Cox, T

    2010-01-01

    Although psychological theory acknowledges the existence of complex systems and the importance of nonlinear effects, linear statistical models have been traditionally used to examine relationships between environmental stimuli and outcomes. The way we analyse these relationships does not seem to reflect the way we conceptualize them. The present study investigated the application of connectionism (artificial neural networks) to modelling the relationships between work characteristics and empl...

  2. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2004-12-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems.

  3. The determination of mercury in mushrooms by CV-AAS and ICP-AES techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzynska, Grazyna; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    This research presents an example of an excellent applied study on analytical problems due to hazardous mercury determination in environmental materials and validity of published results on content of this element in wild growing mushrooms. The total mercury content has been analyzed in a several species of wild-grown mushrooms and some herbal origin certified reference materials, using two analytical methods. One method was commonly known and well validated the cold-vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) after a direct sample pyrolysis coupled to the gold wool trap, which was a reference method. A second method was a procedure that involved a final mercury measurement using the inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) at λ 194.163 nm, which was used by some authors to report on a high mercury content of a large sets of wild-grown mushrooms. We found that the method using the ICP-AES at λ 194.163 nm gave inaccurate and imprecise results. The results of this study imply that because of unsuitability of total mercury determination using the ICP-AES at λ 194.163 nm, the reports on great concentrations of this metal in a large sets of wild-grown mushrooms, when examined using this method, have to be studied with caution, since data are highly biased.

  4. Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

    2009-03-12

    Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma

  5. An analysis of factors affecting the mercury content in the human femoral bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, A; Dąbrowski, M; Kubaszewski, Ł; Rogala, P; Kowalski, A; Frankowski, M

    2017-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the content of mercury in bone tissue of the proximal femur (head and neck bone) of 95 patients undergoing total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis, using CF-AFS analytical technique. Furthermore, the investigations were aimed at assessing the impact of selected factors, such as age, gender, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to chemical substance at work, type of degenerative changes, clinical evaluation and radiological parameters, type of medications, on the concentration of mercury in the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Mercury was obtained in all samples of the head and neck of the femur (n = 190) in patients aged 25-91 years. The mean content of mercury for the whole group of patients was as follows: 37.1 ± 35.0 ng/g for the femoral neck and 24.2 ± 19.5 ng/g for the femoral head. The highest Hg contents were found in femoral neck samples, both in women and men, and they amounted to 169.6 and 176.5 ng/g, respectively. The research showed that the mercury content of bones can be associated with body mass index, differences in body anatomy, and gender. The uses of statistical analysis gave the possibility to define the influence of factors on mercury content in human femoral bones.

  6. Mercury poisoning through intravenous administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiuying; Liu, Zilong; Chen, Xiaorui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Metallic mercury poisoning through intravenous injection is rare, especially for a homicide attempt. Diagnosis and treatment of the disease are challenging. Patient concerns: A 34-year-old male presented with pyrexia, chill, fatigue, body aches, and pain of the dorsal aspect of right foot. Another case is that of a 29-year-old male who committed suicide by injecting himself metallic mercury 15 g intravenously and presented with dizzy, dyspnea, fatigue, sweatiness, and waist soreness. Diagnosis: The patient's condition in case 1 was deteriorated after initial treatment. Imaging studies revealed multiple high-density spots throughout the body especially in the lungs. On further questioning, the patient's girlfriend acknowledged that she injected him about 40 g mercury intravenously 11 days ago. The diagnosis was then confirmed with a urinary mercury concentration of 4828 mg/L. Interventions: Surgical excision, continuous blood purification, plasma exchange, alveolar lavage, and chelation were performed successively in case 1. Blood irrigation and chelation therapy were performed in case 2. Outcomes: The laboratory test results and organ function of the patient in case 1 gradually returned to normal. However, in case 2, the patient's dyspnea was getting worse and he finally died due to toxic encephalopathy and respiratory failure. Lessons: Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are critical for intravenous mercury poisoning. It should be concerned about the combined use of chelation agents and other treatments, such as surgical excision, hemodialysis and plasma exchange in clinical settings. PMID:29145289

  7. Detection of Mercury's Potassium Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carl; Leblanc, Francois; Moore, Luke; Bida, Thomas A.

    2017-10-01

    Ground-based observations of Mercury's exosphere bridge the gap between the MESSENGER and BepiColombo missions and provide a broad counterpart to their in situ measurements. Here we report the first detection of Mercury's potassium tail in both emission lines of the D doublet. The sodium to potassium abundance ratio at 5 planetary radii down-tail is approximately 95, near the mid-point of a wide range of values that have been quoted over the planet's disk. This is several times the Na/K present in atmospheres of the Galilean satellites and more than an order of magnitude above Mercury's usual analogue, the Moon. The observations confirm that Mercury's anomalously high Na/K ratios cannot be explained by differences in neutral loss rates. The width and structure of the Na and K tails is comparable and both exhibit a persistent enhancement in their northern lobe. We interpret this as a signature of Mercury's offset magnetosphere; the exosphere's source rates are locally enhanced at the southern surface, and sloshing from radiation pressure and gravity guides this population into the northern region of the tail.

  8. Mercury exposure in chloralkali plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, W.B. III; McGill, C.M.; Barber, T.E.; Cromer, J.W. Jr.; Goldwater, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    The employees of two chloralkali plants were studied to correlate the signs and symptoms of mercury toxicity with levels of exposure. For purposes of comparison, the workers were divided into three groups. These groups were selected on the basis of hours worked in the mercury cell room or in other areas of mercury exposure. The population of the first plant was studied from 1957-1978, and preliminary findings were published in 1964. The second plant's population was studied for 3.5 years beginning in 1976. Time-weighted average exposure levels to mercury vapor in the high exposure group generally ranged between 0.05 to 0.10 mg/m3. No significant differences in the frequency of objective or subjective findings were noted among the three groups except for a lower post exposure systolic and post exposure diastolic blood pressure in the high exposure group in the second plant's population. There was no correlation of mercury vapor exposure with subjective or objective weight loss.

  9. MERCURY IN MARINE LIFE DATABASE | Science Inventory ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the Mercury in Marine Life Project is to organize information on estuarine and marine species so that EPA can better understand both the extent of monitoring for mercury and level of mercury contamination in the biota of coastal environments. This report follows a similar report commissioned by the Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP), entitled

  10. 40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section... Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions. The definitions in § 721.3 apply to this section... elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  11. Mineral resource of the month: mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The article offers information on mercury, a mineral commodity used in industrial and small-scale gold mining applications. Mercury has been reported to be used for amalgamation with gold since the Roman times. Mercury from cinnabar from Almadén, Spain has been used by Romans and has been continued to be used through the Middle Ages and the Colonial era.

  12. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. XIV. Salivary excretion of mercury and its relationship to blood and urine mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joselow, M.M.; Ruiz, R.; Goldwater, L.J.

    1968-07-01

    The relationships among the mercury contents of salivary (parotid gland) secretions and simultaneously obtained blood and urine specimens were examined quantitatively among a group occupationally exposed to several mixed mercurials. Mercury concentrations in saliva averaged 1/4 and 1/10 of the blood and urinary concentrations, respectively. A high correlation was observed between blood and parotid fluid mercury contents, inferring that the readily obtainable parotid secretion may be of diagnostic value as an indirect monitor of blood mercury as well as other other foreign substances in the blood.

  13. How Tiny Collisions Shape Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    If space rocks are unpleasant to encounter, space dust isnt much better. Mercurys cratered surface tells of billions of years of meteoroid impacts but its thin atmosphere is what reveals its collisional history with smaller impactors. Now new research is providing a better understanding of what were seeing.Micrometeoroids Ho!The inner solar system is bombarded by micrometeoroids, tiny particles of dust (on the scale of a tenth of a millimeter) emitted by asteroids and comets as they make their closest approach to the Sun. This dust doesnt penetrateEarths layers of atmosphere, but the innermost planet of our solar system, Mercury, doesnt have this convenient cushioning.Just as Mercury is affected by the impacts of large meteoroids, its also shaped by the many smaller-scale impacts it experiences. These tiny collisions are thought to vaporize atoms and molecules from the planets surface, which quickly dissociate. This process adds metals to Mercurys exosphere, the planets extremely tenuous atmosphere.Modeling PopulationsDistribution of the directions from which meteoroids originate before impacting Mercurys surface, as averaged over its entire orbit. Local time of 12 hr corresponds to the Sun-facing side. A significant asymmetry is seen between the dawn (6 hrs) and dusk (18 hrs) rates. [Pokorn et al. 2017]The metal distribution in the exosphere provides a way for us to measure the effect of micrometeoroid impacts on Mercury but this only works if we have accurate models of the process. A team of scientists led by Petr Pokorn (The Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard SFC) has now worked to improve our picture of micrometeoroid impact vaporization on Mercury.Pokorn and collaborators argue that two meteoroid populations Jupiter-family comets (short-period) and Halley-type comets (long-period) contribute the dust for the majority of micrometeoroid impacts on Mercury. The authors model the dynamics and evolution of these two populations, reproducing the

  14. Control of mercury emissions: policies, technologies, and future trends

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Seung-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Seung-Whee Rhee Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Owing to the Minamata Convention on Mercury and the Global Mercury Partnership, policies and regulations on mercury management in advanced countries were intensified by a mercury phaseout program in the mercury control strategy. In developing countries, the legislative or regulatory frameworks on mercury emissions are not established specifically, but mercury management is designed...

  15. Mercury in South Carolina fishes, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, James B; Domino, Marisa E; Altman, Kenneth C; Dillman, James W; Castleberry, William S; Eidson, Jeannie P; Mattocks, Micheal

    2010-04-01

    The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control has collected, processed, and analyzed fish tissue total mercury (Hg) since 1976. For this study, skin-on-filet data from 1993 to 2007 were examined to determine biotic, spatial and temporal trends in tissue Hg levels for SC fishes. Because of the relatively high number of tissue Hg values below the analytical detection limits interval censored regression and censored least absolute deviations were used to construct several models to characterize trends. Large pelagic, piscivorous fish species, such as bowfin (Amia calva Linnaeus 1766), had higher levels of tissue Hg than smaller omnivorous species. Estuarine species had relatively low levels of tissue Hg compared to freshwater species, while two large open ocean species, king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla Cuvier 1829) and swordfish (Xiphias gladius Linnaeus 1758), had higher tissue Hg readings. For a given fish species, length was an important predictor of tissue Hg with larger individuals having higher levels than smaller individuals. The USEPA Level III ecoregion and water body type from where the fishes were collected were important in predicting the levels of tissue Hg. The Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain ecoregion had fishes with the highest levels of tissue Hg, while the Piedmont and Southern Coastal Plain ecoregions had the lowest. For a given ecoregion, large reservoirs and regulated rivers had fish with lower levels of tissue Hg than unregulated rivers. For reservoirs, the size of the impoundment was a significant predictor of tissue mercury with small reservoirs having higher levels of tissue mercury than large reservoirs. Landuse and water chemistry accounted for differences seen in fish of various ecoregions and waterbody types. Sampling locations associated with a high percentage of wetland area had fish with high levels of tissue Hg. Correlation analysis showed a strong positive relationship between tissue Hg levels and water column

  16. How is Mercury's dynamo powered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. A.; Delbridge, B. G.; Irving, J. C. E.; Matsui, H.; McDonough, W. F.; Rose, I.; Shahar, A.; Wahl, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the more surprising findings of the MESSENGER spacecraft is the confirmation that the smallest terrestrial planet has an internally generated, dipolar magnetic field, which is likely driven by a combination of thermal and compositional buoyancy sources. This observation places constraints on the thermal and energetic state of Mercury's large iron core and on mantle dynamics because dynamo operation is strongly dependent on the amount of heat extracted from the core by the mantle. However, other observations point to several factors that should inhibit a present-day dynamo. These include physical constraints on a thin, possibly non-convecting mantle, as well as properties of liquid iron alloys that promote compositional stratification in the core. We consider a range of self-consistent internal structures, core compositions and thermal evolution models that are also consistent with observational constraints, and assess the circumstances under which a dynamo is permitted to operate in Mercury's core. We present the thermal evolution models, 1D parameterized convection models and planetary entropy calculations. We attempt to account for the large uncertainties on some parameters by considering various end member cases. We examine the thermal and magnetic implications of a long-lived lateral temperature difference resulting from Mercury's orbital resonance and how it may play a role in driving the planetary dynamo. We compare simulations of mantle heat flow using the ASPECT convection code to predictions from the parameterized models and produce heat flow maps at the CMB. To represent fluid dynamics and magnetic field generation inside Mercury's core, a numerical dynamo model is performed by using the obtained heat flux maps. Lastly, we also investigate the seismic observability of the different structural models of Mercury to determine the extent to which any future single-seismometer mission will be able to provide alternative insights into Mercury's internal

  17. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  18. Flow Alteration and Chemical Reduction: Air Stripping to Lessen Subsurface Discharges of Mercury to Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. C.; Bogle, M.; Liang, L.; Miller, C. L.; Peterson, M.; Southworth, G. R.; Spalding, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury concentrations in groundwater, surface water, and biota near an industrial facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee remain high some 50 years after the original major releases from the facility to the environment. Since the mid-1980s, various remedial and abatement actions have been implemented at the facility, including re-routing water flows, armoring contaminated stream banks, relining or cleanout of facility storm drains, and activated charcoal treatment of groundwater and sump discharges. These actions were taken to reduce inorganic mercury inputs from the facility to the stream; a strategy that assumes limiting the inorganic mercury precursor will reduce Hg methylation and its subsequent bioaccumulation. To date, such actions have reduced mercury loading from the site by approximately 90% from levels typical of the mid 1980's, but waterborne mercury at the facility boundary remains roughly 100 times the typical local background concentration and methylmercury accumulation in aquatic biota exceed standards for safe consumption by humans and wildlife. In 2008 and 2009, a series of investigations was initiated to explore innovative approaches to further control mercury concentrations in stream water. Efforts in this study focused on decreasing waterborne inorganic mercury inputs from two sources. The first, a highly localized source, is the discharge point of the enclosed stormdrain network whereas the second is a more diffuse short reach of stream where metallic Hg in streambed sediments generates a continued input of dissolved Hg to the overlying water. Moving a clean water flow management discharge point to a position downstream of the contaminated reach reduced mercury loading from the streambed source by 75% - 100%, likely by minimizing resuspension of Hg-rich fine particulates and changing characteristic hyporheic flow path length and residence time. Mercury in the stormdrain discharge exists as highly reactive dissolved Hg(II) due to residual chlorine in

  19. Mercury in the national parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, Colleen Flanagan; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Krabbenhoft, David

    2014-01-01

    One thing is certain: Even for trained researchers, predicting mercury’s behavior in the environment is challenging. Fundamentally it is one of 98 naturally occurring elements, with natural sources, such as volcanoes, and concentrated ore deposits, such as cinnabar. Yet there are also human-caused sources, such as emissions from both coal-burning power plants and mining operations for gold and silver. There are elemental forms, inorganic or organic forms, reactive and unreactive species. Mercury is emitted, then deposited, then re-emitted—thus earning its mercurial reputation. Most importantly, however, it is ultimately transferred into food chains through processes fueled by tiny microscopic creatures: bacteria.

  20. Butanol / Gasoline Mercury CRADA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Metal Shark, the boat manufacturer, using 300 HP Mercury Verado engines. As the graph shows, the data collected during the operational tests agrees...well with Metal Shark’s testing. Figure 5. Mercury engine speed vs. fuel consumption. 1 For...Freshly polished.  1B= Slight  tarnish.  4 = worst, severe corrosion.  Appears as  blackened  test coupon.    6. RON always greater than MON and

  1. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of

  2. Mercury accumulation plant Cyrtomium macrophyllum and its potential for phytoremediation of mercury polluted sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Yu; Feng, Liu; Li, Youdan; Dong, Haochen

    2017-12-01

    Cyrtomium macrophyllum naturally grown in 225.73 mg kg -1 of soil mercury in mining area was found to be a potential mercury accumulator plant with the translocation factor of 2.62 and the high mercury concentration of 36.44 mg kg -1 accumulated in its aerial parts. Pot experiments indicated that Cyrtomium macrophyllum could even grow in 500 mg kg -1 of soil mercury with observed inhibition on growth but no obvious toxic effects, and showed excellent mercury accumulation and translocation abilities with both translocation and bioconcentration factors greater than 1 when exposed to 200 mg kg -1 and lower soil mercury, indicating that it could be considered as a great mercury accumulating species. Furthermore, the leaf tissue of Cyrtomium macrophyllum showed high resistance to mercury stress because of both the increased superoxide dismutase activity and the accumulation of glutathione and proline induced by mercury stress, which favorited mercury translocation from the roots to the aerial parts, revealing the possible reason for Cyrtomium macrophyllum to tolerate high concentration of soil mercury. In sum, due to its excellent mercury accumulation and translocation abilities as well as its high resistance to mercury stress, the use of Cyrtomium macrophyllum should be a promising approach to remediating mercury polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding Business Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    analytic resource for the enter- prise , individual Air Force domain areas see the value of integrating analytic capabilities into their own decision ...Business Analytics, Decision Analytics, Business Intelligence, Advanced Analytics, Data Science. . . to a certain degree, to label is to limit - if only...providing a quantitative basis for complex decisions . Decision Analysis: a systematic, quantitative and visual approach to addressing and evaluating important

  4. Direct determination of mercury in cosmetic samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after dissolution with formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ying; Shi, Zeming; Zong, Qinxia; Wu, Peng; Su, Jing [Sichuan Provincial Key Laboratory of Nuclear Technology in Geology, College of Nuclear Technology and Automation Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liur.ray@gmail.com [Mineral Resources Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions, College of Materials and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, sensitive, and accurate method is established for mercury determination in cosmetics. •The sample preparation procedure is highly simplified. •Isotope dilution efficiently eliminates matrix effect. •First report of using formic acid based method in combination with PVG-ID-ICP MS for mercury quantitation in cosmetics. -- Abstract: A new method was proposed for the accurate determination of mercury in cosmetic samples based on isotopic dilution (ID)-photochemical vapor generation (PVG)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) measurement. Cosmetic samples were directly dissolved in formic acid solution and subsequently subjected to PVG for the reduction of mercury into vapor species following by ICP MS detection. Therefore, the risks of analyte contamination and loss were avoided. Highly enriched {sup 201}Hg isotopic spike is added to cosmetics and the isotope ratios of {sup 201}Hg/{sup 202}Hg were measured for the quantitation of mercury. With ID calibration, the influences originating from sample matrixes for the determination of mercury in cosmetic samples have been efficiently eliminated. The effects of several experimental parameters, such as the concentration of the formic acid, and the flow rates of carrier gas and sample were investigated. The method provided good reproducibility and the detection limits were found to be 0.6 pg mL{sup −1}. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the determination of mercury in six cosmetic samples and a spike test was performed to verify the accuracy of the method.

  5. 76 FR 75446 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV AGENCY: Federal... Mercury, Desert Rock Airport, Mercury, NV. Decommissioning of the Mercury Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport has made this action necessary for the safety and management of Instrument...

  6. Unveiling MERCURY's Mysteries with Bepicolombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkhoff, J.; Fujimoto, M.; Murakami, G.; Zender, J.

    2017-09-01

    NASA's MESSENGER mission has fundamentally changed our view of the innermost planet. Mercury is in many ways a very different planet from what we were expecting. Now BepiColombo has to follow up on answering the fundamental questions that MESSENGER raised and go beyond. The authors are the JAXA and ESA Project Scientists of this wonderful mission.

  7. A downstream voyage with mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  8. PERCEPTION OF MERCURY RISK INFORMATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 8% of American women have blood Mercury levels exceeding the EPA reference dose (a dose below which symptoms would be unlikely). The children of these women are at risk of neurological deficits (lower IQ scores) primarily because of the mother's consumption of conta...

  9. Venus and Mercury as Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A general evolutionary history of the solar planetary system is given. The previously observed characteristics of Venus and Mercury (i.e. length of day, solar orbit, temperature) are discussed. The role of the Mariner 10 space probe in gathering scientific information on the two planets is briefly described.

  10. Effect of radiofrequency radiation from Wi-Fi devices on mercury release from amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Mortazavi, S M J; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Haghani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Dental amalgam is composed of approximately 50% elemental mercury. Despite concerns over the toxicity of mercury, amalgam is still the most widely used restorative material. Wi-Fi is a rapidly using local area wireless computer networking technology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that evaluates the effect of exposure to Wi-Fi signals on mercury release from amalgam restorations. Standard class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 20 non-carious extracted human premolars. The teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10). The control group was stored in non-environment. The specimens in the experimental groups were exposed to a radiofrequency radiation emitted from standard Wi Fi devices at 2.4 GHz for 20 min. The distance between the Wi-Fi router and samples was 30 cm and the router was exchanging data with a laptop computer that was placed 20 m away from the router. The concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva in the groups was evaluated by using a cold-vapor atomic absorption Mercury Analyzer System. The independent t test was used to evaluate any significant differences in mercury release between the two groups. The mean (±SD) concentration of mercury in the artificial saliva of the Wi-Fi exposed teeth samples was 0.056 ± .025 mg/L, while it was only 0.026 ± .008 mg/L in the non-exposed control samples. This difference was statistically significant (P =0.009). Exposure of patients with amalgam restorations to radiofrequency radiation emitted from conventional Wi-Fi devices can increase mercury release from amalgam restorations.

  11. The Plasma Environment at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, James M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gloeckler, George; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menalos; hide

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is the least explored terrestrial planet, and the one subjected to the highest flux of solar radiation in the heliosphere. Its highly dynamic, miniature magnetosphere contains ions from the exosphere and solar wind, and at times may allow solar wind ions to directly impact the planet's surface. Together these features create a plasma environment that shares many features with, but is nonetheless very different from, that of Earth. The first in situ measurements of plasma ions in the Mercury space environment were made only recently, by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) during the MESSENGER spacecraft's three flybys of the planet in 2008-2009 as the probe was en route to insertion into orbit about Mercury earlier this year. Here. we present analysis of flyby and early orbital mission data with novel techniques that address the particular challenges inherent in these measurements. First. spacecraft structures and sensor orientation limit the FIPS field of view and allow only partial sampling of velocity distribution functions. We use a software model of FIPS sampling in velocity space to explore these effects and recover bulk parameters under certain assumptions. Second, the low densities found in the Mercury magnetosphere result in a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio for many ions. To address this issue, we apply a kernel density spread function to guide removal of background counts according to a background-signature probability map. We then assign individual counts to particular ion species with a time-of-flight forward model, taking into account energy losses in the carbon foil and other physical behavior of ions within the instrument. Using these methods, we have derived bulk plasma properties and heavy ion composition and evaluated them in the context of the Mercury magnetosphere.

  12. Measuring and modeling mercury in the atmosphere: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, M. S.; Amos, H. M.; Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Heidecorn, K.

    2015-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global health concern due to its toxicity and ubiquitous presence in the environment. Here we review current methods for measuring the forms of Hg in the atmosphere and models used to interpret these data. There are three operationally defined forms of atmospheric Hg: gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate bound mercury (PBM). There is relative confidence in GEM measurements (collection on a gold surface), but GOM (collection on potassium chloride (KCl)-coated denuder) and PBM (collected using various methods) are less well understood. Field and laboratory investigations suggest the methods to measure GOM and PBM are impacted by analytical interferences that vary with environmental setting (e.g., ozone, relative humidity), and GOM concentrations measured by the KCl-coated denuder can be too low by a factor of 1.6 to 12 depending on the chemical composition of GOM. The composition of GOM (e.g., HgBr2, HgCl2, HgBrOH) varies across space and time. This has important implications for refining existing measurement methods and developing new ones, model/measurement comparisons, model development, and assessing trends. Unclear features of previously published data may now be re-examined and possibly explained, which is demonstrated through a case study. Priorities for future research include identification of GOM compounds in ambient air and development of information on their chemical and physical properties and GOM and PBM calibration systems. With this information, identification of redox mechanisms and associated rate coefficients may be developed.

  13. Mercury and tritium removal from DOE waste oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, E.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This work covers the investigation of vacuum extraction as a means to remove tritiated contamination as well as the removal via sorption of dissolved mercury from contaminated oils. The radiation damage in oils from tritium causes production of hydrogen, methane, and low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. When tritium gas is present in the oil, the tritium atom is incorporated into the formed hydrocarbons. The transformer industry measures gas content/composition of transformer oils as a diagnostic tool for the transformers` condition. The analytical approach (ASTM D3612-90) used for these measurements is vacuum extraction of all gases (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, etc.) followed by analysis of the evolved gas mixture. This extraction method will be adapted to remove dissolved gases (including tritium) from the SRS vacuum pump oil. It may be necessary to heat (60{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C) the oil during vacuum extraction to remove tritiated water. A method described in the procedures is a stripper column extraction, in which a carrier gas (argon) is used to remove dissolved gases from oil that is dispersed on high surface area beads. This method appears promising for scale-up as a treatment process, and a modified process is also being used as a dewatering technique by SD Myers, Inc. (a transformer consulting company) for transformers in the field by a mobile unit. Although some mercury may be removed during the vacuum extraction, the most common technique for removing mercury from oil is by using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). SIAC is currently being used by the petroleum industry to remove mercury from hydrocarbon mixtures, but the sorbent has not been previously tested on DOE vacuum oil waste. It is anticipated that a final process will be similar to technologies used by the petroleum industry and is comparable to ion exchange operations in large column-type reactors.

  14. Quaternionic Multilayer Perceptron with Local Analyticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Matsui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-layered perceptron type neural network is presented and analyzed in this paper. All neuronal parameters such as input, output, action potential and connection weight are encoded by quaternions, which are a class of hypercomplex number system. Local analytic condition is imposed on the activation function in updating neurons’ states in order to construct learning algorithm for this network. An error back-propagation algorithm is introduced for modifying the connection weights of the network.

  15. The 3:2 spin-orbit resonant motion of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Anne; D'Hoedt, Sandrine; Rambaux, Nicolas

    2006-05-01

    Our purpose is to build a model of rotation for a rigid Mercury, involving the planetary perturbations and the non-spherical shape of the planet. The approach is purely analytical, based on Hamiltonian formalism; we start with a first-order basic averaged resonant potential (including J 2 and C 22, and the first powers of the eccentricity and the inclination of Mercury). With this kernel model, we identify the present equilibrium of Mercury; we introduce local canonical variables, describing the motion around this 3:2 resonance. We perform a canonical untangling transformation, to generate three sets of action-angle variables, and identify the three basic frequencies associated to this motion. We show how to reintroduce the short-periodic terms, lost in the averaging process, thanks to the Lie generator; we also comment about the damping effects and the planetary perturbations. At any point of the development, we use the model SONYR to compare and check our calculations.

  16. Launching genomics into the cloud: deployment of Mercury, a next generation sequence analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jeffrey G; Carroll, Andrew; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Sundquist, Andreas; English, Adam; Bainbridge, Matthew; White, Simon; Salerno, William; Buhay, Christian; Yu, Fuli; Muzny, Donna; Daly, Richard; Duyk, Geoff; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2014-01-29

    Massively parallel DNA sequencing generates staggering amounts of data. Decreasing cost, increasing throughput, and improved annotation have expanded the diversity of genomics applications in research and clinical practice. This expanding scale creates analytical challenges: accommodating peak compute demand, coordinating secure access for multiple analysts, and sharing validated tools and results. To address these challenges, we have developed the Mercury analysis pipeline and deployed it in local hardware and the Amazon Web Services cloud via the DNAnexus platform. Mercury is an automated, flexible, and extensible analysis workflow that provides accurate and reproducible genomic results at scales ranging from individuals to large cohorts. By taking advantage of cloud computing and with Mercury implemented on the DNAnexus platform, we have demonstrated a powerful combination of a robust and fully validated software pipeline and a scalable computational resource that, to date, we have applied to more than 10,000 whole genome and whole exome samples.

  17. Environmental Mercury and Its Toxic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Rice

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exists naturally and as a man-made contaminant. The release of processed mercury can lead to a progressive increase in the amount of atmospheric mercury, which enters the atmospheric-soil-water distribution cycles where it can remain in circulation for years. Mercury poisoning is the result of exposure to mercury or mercury compounds resulting in various toxic effects depend on its chemical form and route of exposure. The major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg is largely through eating contaminated fish, seafood, and wildlife which have been exposed to mercury through ingestion of contaminated lower organisms. MeHg toxicity is associated with nervous system damage in adults and impaired neurological development in infants and children. Ingested mercury may undergo bioaccumulation leading to progressive increases in body burdens. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of individual organ systems associated with mercury poisoning. Mercury has profound cellular, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, renal, immunological, neurological, endocrine, reproductive, and embryonic toxicological effects.

  18. Mercury emission from crematories in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Takaoka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic sources of mercury emissions have a significant impact on global pollution. Therefore, finding uncharacterised sources and assessing the emissions from these sources are important. However, limited data are available worldwide on mercury emissions from crematories. In Japan, 99.9% of dead bodies are cremated, which is the highest percentage in the world, and more than 1600 crematories are in operation. We thus focused on emissions from crematories in Japan. The number of targeted facilities was seven, and we used continuous emission monitoring to measure the mercury concentrations and investigate mercury behaviour. The total mercury concentrations in stack gases were a few μg/Nm3 (normal cubic meters. Considering the time profile of mercury and its species in cremations, the findings confirmed that the mercury in stack gas originated from dental amalgam. The amount of mercury emissions was calculated using the total concentration and gas flow rate. Furthermore, the annual amount of mercury emission from crematories in Japan was estimated by using the total number of corpses. The emission amount was considerably lower than that estimated in the United Kingdom. From statistical analyses on population demographics and measurements, future total emissions from crematories were also predicted. As a result, the amount of mercury emitted by crematories will likely increase by 2.6-fold from 2007 to 2037.

  19. Environmental mercury and its toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kevin M; Walker, Ernest M; Wu, Miaozong; Gillette, Chris; Blough, Eric R

    2014-03-01

    Mercury exists naturally and as a man-made contaminant. The release of processed mercury can lead to a progressive increase in the amount of atmospheric mercury, which enters the atmospheric-soil-water distribution cycles where it can remain in circulation for years. Mercury poisoning is the result of exposure to mercury or mercury compounds resulting in various toxic effects depend on its chemical form and route of exposure. The major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) is largely through eating contaminated fish, seafood, and wildlife which have been exposed to mercury through ingestion of contaminated lower organisms. MeHg toxicity is associated with nervous system damage in adults and impaired neurological development in infants and children. Ingested mercury may undergo bioaccumulation leading to progressive increases in body burdens. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of individual organ systems associated with mercury poisoning. Mercury has profound cellular, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, renal, immunological, neurological, endocrine, reproductive, and embryonic toxicological effects.

  20. Mercury exposure in protein A immunoadsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ludwig; Bauer, Edith; Jansen, Martin; Reiter, Daniela; Derfler, Kurt; Schaffer, Andreas

    2004-02-01

    Immunoadsorption is increasingly used to treat antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. To prevent microbial growth during storage, reusable protein A-Sepharose gel columns are primed with ethyl mercury thiosalicylate (thiomersal, 0.1% solution) and rinsed with phosphate buffer before use. In this study, we tested the hypothesis of systemic mercury exposure in protein A immunoadsorption. Whole blood mercury levels were measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy before and after protein A immunoadsorption (11 patients, 26 treatments), anti-IgG immunoadsorption (eight patients, 13 treatments) and LDL apheresis (DALI and Therasorb systems; nine patients, 14 treatments). Patients treated with protein A immunoadsorption had significantly elevated baseline mercury levels compared with the other groups, which were not different from healthy controls. Following protein A immunoadsorption, mercury levels increased from 5.9+/-1.4 microg/l (mean+/-SEM, normal, neurological toxicity developed at a mercury level of 107 microg/l. Symptoms abated slowly and did not recur after switching to a thiomersal-free system and chelation therapy. No mercury release to patients occurred in anti-IgG immunoadsorption or LDL apheresis treatments. This preliminary report suggests that protein A immunoadsorption columns primed with thiomersal during storage may cause a sustained increase of systemic mercury concentrations, which exceed current safety recommendations in a proportion of patients. Considering the potential for mercury-induced toxicity, every effort should be undertaken to reduce systemic mercury exposure, either by adding chelators to the rinsing solution or ideally by replacement of thiomersal.

  1. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  2. The Relationship between Social Networking Site Use and the Internalization of a Thin Ideal in Females: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mingoia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has indicated that exposure to traditional media (i.e., television, film, and print predicts the likelihood of internalization of a thin ideal; however, the relationship between exposure to internet-based social media on internalization of this ideal remains less understood. Social media differ from traditional forms of media by allowing users to create and upload their own content that is then subject to feedback from other users. This meta-analysis examined the association linking the use of social networking sites (SNSs and the internalization of a thin ideal in females. Systematic searches were performed in the databases: PsychINFO, PubMed, Web of Science, Communication and Mass Media Complete, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis that yielded 10 independent effect sizes and a total of 1,829 female participants ranging in age from 10 to 46 years. We found a positive association between extent of use of SNSs and extent of internalization of a thin ideal with a small to moderate effect size (r = 0.18. The positive effect indicated that more use of SNSs was associated with significantly higher internalization of a thin ideal. A comparison was also made between study outcomes measuring broad use of SNSs and outcomes measuring SNS use solely as a function of specific appearance-related features (e.g., posting or viewing photographs. The use of appearance-related features had a stronger relationship with the internalization of a thin ideal than broad use of SNSs. The finding suggests that the ability to interact with appearance-related features online and be an active participant in media creation is associated with body image disturbance. Future research should aim to explore the way SNS users interact with the media posted online and the relationship linking the use of specific appearance features and body image disturbance.

  3. The Relationship between Social Networking Site Use and the Internalization of a Thin Ideal in Females: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingoia, John; Hutchinson, Amanda D; Wilson, Carlene; Gleaves, David H

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that exposure to traditional media (i.e., television, film, and print) predicts the likelihood of internalization of a thin ideal; however, the relationship between exposure to internet-based social media on internalization of this ideal remains less understood. Social media differ from traditional forms of media by allowing users to create and upload their own content that is then subject to feedback from other users. This meta-analysis examined the association linking the use of social networking sites (SNSs) and the internalization of a thin ideal in females. Systematic searches were performed in the databases: PsychINFO, PubMed, Web of Science, Communication and Mass Media Complete, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis that yielded 10 independent effect sizes and a total of 1,829 female participants ranging in age from 10 to 46 years. We found a positive association between extent of use of SNSs and extent of internalization of a thin ideal with a small to moderate effect size (r = 0.18). The positive effect indicated that more use of SNSs was associated with significantly higher internalization of a thin ideal. A comparison was also made between study outcomes measuring broad use of SNSs and outcomes measuring SNS use solely as a function of specific appearance-related features (e.g., posting or viewing photographs). The use of appearance-related features had a stronger relationship with the internalization of a thin ideal than broad use of SNSs. The finding suggests that the ability to interact with appearance-related features online and be an active participant in media creation is associated with body image disturbance. Future research should aim to explore the way SNS users interact with the media posted online and the relationship linking the use of specific appearance features and body image disturbance.

  4. Support vector machine regression (SVR/LS-SVM)--an alternative to neural networks (ANN) for analytical chemistry? Comparison of nonlinear methods on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Roman M; Lomakina, Ekaterina I

    2011-04-21

    In this study, we make a general comparison of the accuracy and robustness of five multivariate calibration models: partial least squares (PLS) regression or projection to latent structures, polynomial partial least squares (Poly-PLS) regression, artificial neural networks (ANNs), and two novel techniques based on support vector machines (SVMs) for multivariate data analysis: support vector regression (SVR) and least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs). The comparison is based on fourteen (14) different datasets: seven sets of gasoline data (density, benzene content, and fractional composition/boiling points), two sets of ethanol gasoline fuel data (density and ethanol content), one set of diesel fuel data (total sulfur content), three sets of petroleum (crude oil) macromolecules data (weight percentages of asphaltenes, resins, and paraffins), and one set of petroleum resins data (resins content). Vibrational (near-infrared, NIR) spectroscopic data are used to predict the properties and quality coefficients of gasoline, biofuel/biodiesel, diesel fuel, and other samples of interest. The four systems presented here range greatly in composition, properties, strength of intermolecular interactions (e.g., van der Waals forces, H-bonds), colloid structure, and phase behavior. Due to the high diversity of chemical systems studied, general conclusions about SVM regression methods can be made. We try to answer the following question: to what extent can SVM-based techniques replace ANN-based approaches in real-world (industrial/scientific) applications? The results show that both SVR and LS-SVM methods are comparable to ANNs in accuracy. Due to the much higher robustness of the former, the SVM-based approaches are recommended for practical (industrial) application. This has been shown to be especially true for complicated, highly nonlinear objects.

  5. The Relationship between Social Networking Site Use and the Internalization of a Thin Ideal in Females: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingoia, John; Hutchinson, Amanda D.; Wilson, Carlene; Gleaves, David H.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that exposure to traditional media (i.e., television, film, and print) predicts the likelihood of internalization of a thin ideal; however, the relationship between exposure to internet-based social media on internalization of this ideal remains less understood. Social media differ from traditional forms of media by allowing users to create and upload their own content that is then subject to feedback from other users. This meta-analysis examined the association linking the use of social networking sites (SNSs) and the internalization of a thin ideal in females. Systematic searches were performed in the databases: PsychINFO, PubMed, Web of Science, Communication and Mass Media Complete, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis that yielded 10 independent effect sizes and a total of 1,829 female participants ranging in age from 10 to 46 years. We found a positive association between extent of use of SNSs and extent of internalization of a thin ideal with a small to moderate effect size (r = 0.18). The positive effect indicated that more use of SNSs was associated with significantly higher internalization of a thin ideal. A comparison was also made between study outcomes measuring broad use of SNSs and outcomes measuring SNS use solely as a function of specific appearance-related features (e.g., posting or viewing photographs). The use of appearance-related features had a stronger relationship with the internalization of a thin ideal than broad use of SNSs. The finding suggests that the ability to interact with appearance-related features online and be an active participant in media creation is associated with body image disturbance. Future research should aim to explore the way SNS users interact with the media posted online and the relationship linking the use of specific appearance features and body image disturbance. PMID:28824519

  6. Mercury analysis in hair: Comparability and quality assessment within the transnational COPHES/DEMOCOPHES project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit Karin; Jiménez, José Antonio; Koch, Holger Martin; Angerer, Jürgen; Rosado, Montserrat; Gómez, Silvia; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Becker, Kerstin; Bloemen, Louis; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Sepai, Ovnair; Exley, Karen; Horvat, Milena; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Joas, Anke; Joas, Reinhard; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Borošová, Daniela; Davidson, Fred; Dumitrascu, Irina; Fischer, Marc E; Grander, Margaretha; Janasik, Beata; Jones, Kate; Kašparová, Lucie; Larssen, Thorjørn; Naray, Miklos; Nielsen, Flemming; Hohenblum, Philipp; Pinto, Rui; Pirard, Catherine; Plateel, Gregory; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Castaño, Argelia

    2015-08-01

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is an effective tool for assessing actual exposure to chemicals that takes into account all routes of intake. Although hair analysis is considered to be an optimal biomarker for assessing mercury exposure, the lack of harmonization as regards sampling and analytical procedures has often limited the comparison of data at national and international level. The European-funded projects COPHES and DEMOCOPHES developed and tested a harmonized European approach to Human Biomonitoring in response to the European Environment and Health Action Plan. Herein we describe the quality assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating laboratories. Training sessions were organized for field workers and four external quality-assessment exercises (ICI/EQUAS), followed by the corresponding web conferences, were organized between March 2011 and February 2012. ICI/EQUAS used native hair samples at two mercury concentration ranges (0.20-0.71 and 0.80-1.63) per exercise. The results revealed relative standard deviations of 7.87-13.55% and 4.04-11.31% for the low and high mercury concentration ranges, respectively. A total of 16 out of 18 participating laboratories the QAP requirements and were allowed to analyze samples from the DEMOCOPHES pilot study. Web conferences after each ICI/EQUAS revealed this to be a new and effective tool for improving analytical performance and increasing capacity building. The procedure developed and tested in COPHES/DEMOCOPHES would be optimal for application on a global scale as regards implementation of the Minamata Convention on Mercury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood Organic Mercury and Dietary Mercury Intake: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999 and 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathryn R. Mahaffey; Robert P. Clickner; Catherine C. Bodurow

    Blood organic mercury (i.e., methyl mercury) concentrations among 1,709 women who were participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 1999 and 2000 (1999-2000 NHANES) were 0.6...

  8. Towards the Smart World. Smart Platform: Infrastructure and Analytics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Velthausz, D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available of unstructured / structured data Technologies ? Sensor networks, mesh networks, IPv6, Internet of Things (IoT), Cloud, IaaS, SaaS, P2P, E-authentication, E-Identity, Trust, Security, ? Infrastructure Data Analytics Data Analytics Scope and intent...

  9. Geo-social visual analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Luo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spatial analysis and social network analysis typically consider social processes in their own specific contexts, either geographical or network space. Both approaches demonstrate strong conceptual overlaps. For example, actors close to each other tend to have greater similarity than those far apart; this phenomenon has different labels in geography (spatial autocorrelation and in network science (homophily. In spite of those conceptual and observed overlaps, the integration of geography and social network context has not received the attention needed in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of their interaction or their impact on outcomes of interest, such as population health behaviors, information dissemination, or human behavior in a crisis. In order to address this gap, this paper discusses the integration of geographic with social network perspectives applied to understanding social processes in place from two levels: the theoretical level and the methodological level. At the theoretical level, this paper argues that the concepts of nearness and relationship in terms of a possible extension of the First Law of Geography are a matter of both geographical and social network distance, relationship, and interaction. At the methodological level, the integration of geography and social network contexts are framed within a new interdisciplinary field:~visual analytics, in which three major application-oriented subfields (data exploration, decision-making, and predictive analysis are used to organize discussion. In each subfield, this paper presents a theoretical framework first, and then reviews what has been achieved regarding geo-social visual analytics in order to identify potential future research.

  10. An Epidemiological Study of Mercury Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Sato

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury sensitization has been historically in question and may be related to recent increases of type I allergic diseases. To clarify the epidemiological factors of mercury sensitization, we investigated factors relating to mercury sensitization in 215 medical students. Their allergic symptoms, family histories and lifestyles were studied by questionnaire. Patch tests were performed with HgCI2 (0.05% aq. and NiS04 (5% aq.. Anti- Dermatophagoides and anti-Crypfomeria pollen IgE antibodies in sera were also measured. Urinary mercury concentrations were measured in 25 mercury sensitized and 44 non-sensitized subjects (controls. Hair mercury concentrations were also measured in 19 sensitized and 22 non-sensitized subjects. While the positive rate of nickel was 6.0% (13/215, that of mercury was high (13.0%; 28/215. The subjects' individual histories of allergic rhinitis, eczema, urticaria and allergic conjunctivitis were significantly associated with family histories of these conditions (P<0.01, P<0.005 and P<0.005, respectively, as reported in the literature. However, no allergen- specific antibody positivity or past history of allergic disease was associated with mercury sensitization. Mercury sensitized subjects had experienced eczema caused by cosmetics, shampoos, soaps and haircreams significantly more frequently (P<0.05. The history of mercurochrome usage was not associated with mercury sensitization. The number of teeth treated with metals in mercury sensitized subjects was significantly higher than that in the control group (6.8±4.3 vs 4.8±1; P<0.05. There were significant differences in urinary mercury concentrations (specific gravity adjusted levels between mercury sensitized subjects and non-sensitized subjects (2.0±0.9 and 1.3±0.6 (xg/L, respectively; P<0.001. There were also significant differences in hair mercury concentrations between mercury sensitized and non-sensitized subjects (2.0±0.9 and 1.2±0.5 μg/g, respectively; P<0

  11. Study of integrated structure of mercury target container with safety hull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Haga, Katsuhiro; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Ishikura, Shuichi; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) are promoting a plan to construct a neutron scattering facility. In the facility, 1 MW pulsed proton beam from a high-intensity proton accelerator will be injected into a mercury target in order to produce high-intensity neutrons. In the spallation mercury target system design, an integrated structure of target container with a safety hull was proposed to ensure the safety and to collect mercury in a case of mercury leakage caused by the target beam window failure. The inner structure arrangement of the mercury target container was determined based on the thermal hydraulic analytical results of 3 GeV, 1 MW proton beam injection. The safety hull consists of containers for helium and heavy water. The containers for mercury target, helium and heavy water will be connected each other by reinforcement ribs mounted on the surface of each container. As for the feasibility of the integrated mercury target container with the safety hull, the static structure strength analyses were carried out under the condition of an internal pressure of 0.8 MPa, which was determined based on the maximum operation pressure of 0.5 MPa and the safety margin, in order to clarify its structural strength. As a result, it was made clear that the maximum static stress appeared on the each container by the internal pressure could be suppressed less than the allowable stress of SUS316L at 300degC, 142.5 MPa, by adding reinforcement ribs on the surface of each container. (author)

  12. Assessing Mercury and Methylmercury Bioavailability in Sediment Pore Water Using Mercury-Specific Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    FINAL REPORT Assessing Mercury and Methylmercury Bioavailability in Sediment Pore Water Using Mercury -Specific Hydrogels SERDP Project ER-1771...From - To) 2010-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessing Mercury and Methylmercury Bioavailability in 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-10-C-0069 Sediment...Using Mercury -Specific DGTs 5b. GRANT NUMBER ER-1771 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER NA 6. AUTHOR(S) Magar, Victor S.*, Steenhaut, Nicholas

  13. Mercury Flow Through the Mercury-Containing Lamp Sector of the Economy of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This Scientific Investigations Report examines the flow of mercury through the mercury-containing lamp sector of the U.S. economy in 2001 from lamp manufacture through disposal or recycling. Mercury-containing lamps illuminate commercial and industrial buildings, outdoor areas, and residences. Mercury is an essential component in fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps (high-pressure sodium, mercury-vapor, and metal halide). A typical fluorescent lamp is composed of a phosphor-coated glass tube with electrodes located at either end. Only a very small amount of the mercury is in vapor form. The remainder of the mercury is in the form of either liquid mercury metal or solid mercury oxide (mercury oxidizes over the life of the lamp). When voltage is applied, the electrodes energize the mercury vapor and cause it to emit ultraviolet energy. The phosphor coating absorbs the ultraviolet energy, which causes the phosphor to fluoresce and emit visible light. Mercury-containing lamps provide more lumens per watt than incandescent lamps and, as a result, require from three to four times less energy to operate. Mercury is persistent and toxic within the environment. Mercury-containing lamps are of environmental concern because they are widely distributed throughout the environment and are easily broken in handling. The magnitude of lamp sector mercury emissions, estimated to be 2.9 metric tons per year (t/yr), is small compared with the estimated mercury losses of the U.S. coal-burning and chlor-alkali industries, which are about 70 t/yr and about 90 t/yr, respectively.

  14. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior across the High-Level Waste Evaporator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jackson, D. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, H. B. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-17

    The Mercury Program team’s effort continues to develop more fundamental information concerning mercury behavior across the liquid waste facilities and unit operations. Previously, the team examined the mercury chemistry across salt processing, including the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU), and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheets. This report documents the data and understanding of mercury across the high level waste 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  15. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  16. BepiColombo: Exploring Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, K.; Novara, M.; Fugger, S.; Benkhoff, J.

    2014-04-01

    BepiColombo is an interdisciplinary mission to explore Mercury, the planet closest to the sun, carried out jointly between the European Space Agency and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency. The mission consists of two orbiters dedicated to the detailed study of the planet and of its magnetosphere, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The MPO is ESA's scientific contribution to the mission and comprises 11 science instruments. It is a three-axis-stabilized, nadir-pointing spacecraft which will be placed in a polar orbit with a period of approximately 2.3 hours, a periapsis of 480 km and an apoapsis of 1500 km, providing excellent spatial resolution over the entire planet surface. The interplanetary transfer is performed by an Electric Propulsion Module, which is jettisoned when Mercury is reached. It will set off in July 2016 on a journey to the smallest and least explored terrestrial planet in our Solar System. When it arrives at Mercury in January 2024, it will endure temperatures in excess of 350 °C and gather data during its 1 year nominal mission, with a possible 1-year extension. The difficulty of reaching, surviving and operating in the harsh environment of a planet so close to the sun, makes BepiColombo one of the most challenging planetary projects undertaken by ESA so far. A range of major challenges need to be overcome to enable the mission including the electric propulsion system, development of a new Multi-Layer Insulation able to withstand the high temperatures, an original solar panel design, stringent pointing requirements to be maintained in extreme conditions varying from a solar flux of 10 solar constants to eclipse conditions etc. The scientific payload of both spacecraft will provide the detailed information necessary to understand the origin and evolution of the planet itself and its surrounding environment. The scientific objectives focus on a global characterization of Mercury through the

  17. Human accumulation of mercury in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Poul; Mulvad, Gert; Pedersen, Henning Sloth

    2007-01-01

    In the Arctic, the traditional diet exposes its people to a high intake of mercury especially from marine mammals. To determine whether the mercury is accumulated in humans, we analyzed autopsy samples of liver, kidney and spleen from adult ethnic Greenlanders who died between 1990 and 1994 from...... a wide range of causes, natural and violent. Liver, kidney and spleen samples from between 33 and 71 case subjects were analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury, and liver samples also for selenium. Metal levels in men and women did not differ and were not related to age except in one case, i.......e. for total mercury in liver, where a significant declining concentration with age was observed. The highest total mercury levels were found in kidney followed by liver and spleen. Methylmercury followed the same pattern, but levels were much lower, constituting only 19% of the total mercury concentration...

  18. Acclimation of subsurface microbial communities to mercury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Oregaard, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    We studied the acclimation to mercury of bacterial communities of different depths from contaminated and noncontaminated floodplain soils. The level of mercury tolerance of the bacterial communities from the contaminated site was higher than those of the reference site. Furthermore, the level...... of mercury tolerance and functional versatility of bacterial communities in contaminated soils initially were higher for surface soil, compared with the deeper soils. However, following new mercury exposure, no differences between bacterial communities were observed, which indicates a high adaptive potential...... of the subsurface communities, possibly due to differences in the availability of mercury. IncP-1 trfA genes were detected in extracted community DNA from all soil depths of the contaminated site, and this finding was correlated to the isolation of four different mercury-resistance plasmids, all belonging...

  19. Mercury in dated Greenland marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmund, G.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty marine sediment cores from Greenland were analysed for mercury, and dated by the lead-210 method. In general the cores exhibit a mercury profile with higher mercury concentrations in the upper centimetres of the core. The cores were studied by linear regression of In Hg vs, age...... of the sediment for the youngest 100 years. As a rule the mercury decreased with depth in the sediment with various degrees of significance. The increase of the mercury flux during the last 100 years is roughly a doubling. The increase may be of anthropogenic origin as it is restricted to the last 100 years....... In four cores the concentration of manganese was found also to increase in the top layers indicating diagenesis. In the other cases the higher concentrations were not accompanied by higher manganese concentrations. The mercury flux to the sediment surface was generally proportional to the Pb-210 flux...

  20. Action of mercury as a soil fungicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booer, J.R.

    1951-01-01

    Metallic mercury and mercury compounds in the soil retard the growth of plants. The development of mosses and lichens is inhibited, and experimental evidence shows that the growth of toadstools on turf and the activity of ascomycetes is retarded by mercury. In vitro, mercury has no fungicidal action but the rate of growth of hyphae is reduced by mercury vapour. The lack of fungicial properties of mercury and its good performance in controlling certain soil-borne diseases are reconciled by assuming that a differential retardation disturbs the relationships necessary for infection. This assumption is supported by diagrams which treat the rates of growth of the parasite and the host as population characteristics normally distributed. 21 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Mercury in Alaskan Eskimo mothers and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, W A

    1976-06-01

    The potential danger of natural mercury accumulation in the diet of the Eskimo is evaluated through mercury levels determined in cord blood, placenta, maternal blood, hair, and milk of 38 maternal-infant pairs from Anchorage and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Although mercury levels are not discernably dangerous, trends to larger accumulations in maternal and fetal RBC and placental tissue with proximity to the sea and consumption of seals during pregnancy provide the basis for considering possible indicators of neonatal involvement. Mercury level in RBC from cord blood appeared as the best potential indicator of this involvement, although relationships with the mother's diet and level of mercury in the placenta also appear useful. In this area, average and maximal mercury levels in cord blood are 39 and 78 ng/ml, respectively, far below the acknowledged toxic level in infants of these mothers who eat seals or fish every day during their pregnancy.

  2. Mercury Distribution in the Processing of Jatiroto Gold Mine Wonogiri Central Java Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri Yudiantoro, Dwi; Nurcholis, Muhammad; Sri Sayudi, Dewi; Abdurrachman, Mirzam; Paramita Haty, Intan; Pambudi, Wiryan; Subroborini, Arum

    2017-06-01

    The research area is one of the Wonogiri gold producer. In this region there are nearly 30 gold processing locations. This area has a steep morphology which is part of Mt. Mas. The work of the gold processing is a part time job besides for the local farmer population. To get the gold bearing rocks, are by digging holes manually around Mt. Mas, while gold processing is carried out in their homes. As a result of these activities, then identified the distribution of mercury in the surrounding settlements. Analytical methods used in this study is the measurement mercury content using Hg meter on altered rocks, soil and using XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) for plant samples. This results of research shows that there are conducted on mercury contents in the altered rocks, soil and plants showed significant mercury contents in altered rocks, soil and plants. This proves that mercury has polluted the environment surrounding residents, both of people living in the hill down on the lower plain areas. The results of this study are expected to be used as reference to help overcome the pollution of the area.

  3. A survey of topsoil arsenic and mercury concentrations across France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, B P; Saby, N P A; Arrouays, D

    2017-08-01

    Even at low concentrations, the presence of arsenic and mercury in soils can lead to ecological and health impacts. The recent European-wide LUCAS Topsoil Survey found that the arsenic concentration of a large proportion of French soils exceeded a threshold which indicated that further investigation was required. A much smaller proportion of soils exceeded the corresponding threshold for mercury but the impacts of mining and industrial activities on mercury concentrations are not well understood. We use samples from the French national soil monitoring network (RMQS: Réseau de Mesures de la Qualité des Sols) to explore the variation of topsoil arsenic and mercury concentrations across mainland France at a finer spatial resolution than was reported by LUCAS Topsoil. We use geostatistical methods to map the expected concentrations of these elements in the topsoil and the probabilities that the legislative thresholds are exceeded. We find that, with the exception of some areas where the geogenic concentrations and soil adsorption capacities are very low, arsenic concentrations are generally larger than the threshold which indicates that further assessment of the area is required. The lower of two other guideline values indicating risks to ecology or health is exceeded in fewer than 5% of RMQS samples. These exceedances occur in localised hot-spots primarily associated with mining and mineralization. The probabilities of mercury concentrations exceeding the further assessment threshold value are everywhere less than 0.01 and none of the RMQS samples exceed either of the ecological and health risk thresholds. However, there are some regions with elevated concentrations which can be related to volcanic material, natural mineralizations and industrial contamination. These regions are more diffuse than the hot-spots of arsenic reflecting the greater volatility of mercury and therefore the greater ease with which it can be transported and redeposited. The maps provide a

  4. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin BMAA and Mercury in Sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Davis, David A; Mondo, Kiyo; Seely, Matthew S; Murch, Susan J; Glover, William Broc; Divoll, Timothy; Evers, David C; Mash, Deborah C

    2016-08-16

    Sharks have greater risk for bioaccumulation of marine toxins and mercury (Hg), because they are long-lived predators. Shark fins and cartilage also contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a ubiquitous cyanobacterial toxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Today, a significant number of shark species have found their way onto the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Many species of large sharks are threatened with extinction due in part to the growing high demand for shark fin soup and, to a lesser extent, for shark meat and cartilage products. Recent studies suggest that the consumption of shark parts may be a route to human exposure of marine toxins. Here, we investigated BMAA and Hg concentrations in fins and muscles sampled in ten species of sharks from the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. BMAA was detected in all shark species with only seven of the 55 samples analyzed testing below the limit of detection of the assay. Hg concentrations measured in fins and muscle samples from the 10 species ranged from 0.05 to 13.23 ng/mg. These analytical test results suggest restricting human consumption of shark meat and fins due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of two synergistic environmental neurotoxic compounds.

  5. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin BMAA and Mercury in Sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Hammerschlag

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sharks have greater risk for bioaccumulation of marine toxins and mercury (Hg, because they are long-lived predators. Shark fins and cartilage also contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA, a ubiquitous cyanobacterial toxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Today, a significant number of shark species have found their way onto the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Many species of large sharks are threatened with extinction due in part to the growing high demand for shark fin soup and, to a lesser extent, for shark meat and cartilage products. Recent studies suggest that the consumption of shark parts may be a route to human exposure of marine toxins. Here, we investigated BMAA and Hg concentrations in fins and muscles sampled in ten species of sharks from the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. BMAA was detected in all shark species with only seven of the 55 samples analyzed testing below the limit of detection of the assay. Hg concentrations measured in fins and muscle samples from the 10 species ranged from 0.05 to 13.23 ng/mg. These analytical test results suggest restricting human consumption of shark meat and fins due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of two synergistic environmental neurotoxic compounds.

  6. 76 FR 13851 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... this analysis, we proposed to reject the option of requiring conversion to non-mercury technology... Information and Analyses for the non-Mercury Technology Option a. Background on the 2008 Proposal and Costs... analysis estimated the costs and the cost-effectiveness of converting the existing mercury cell chlor...

  7. Thiosulphate assisted phytoextraction of mercury contaminated soils at the Wanshan Mercury Mining District, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wanshan, known as the “Mercury Capital” of China, is located in the Southwest of China. Due to the extensive mining and smelting works in the Wanshan area, the local ecosystem has been serious contaminated with mercury. In the present study, a number of soil samples were taken from the Wanshan mercury mining area and the mercury fractionations in soils were analyzed using sequential extraction procedure technique. The obtained results showed that the dominate mercury fractions (represent 95% of total mercury were residual and organic bound mercury. A field trial was conducted in a mercury polluted farmland at the Wanshan mercury mine. Four plant species Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var. ASKYC (ASKYC, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.DPDH (DPDH, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.CHBD(CHBD, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.LDZY (LDZY were tested their ability to extract mercury from soil with thiosulphate amendment. The results indicated that the mercury concentration in the roots and shoots of the four plants were significantly increased with thiosulphate treatment. The mercury phytoextraction yield of ASKYC, DPDH, CHBD and LDZY were 92, 526, 294 and 129 g/ha, respectively.

  8. Blood Mercury Levels of Zebra Finches Are Heritable: Implications for the Evolution of Mercury Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenton A Buck

    Full Text Available Mercury is a ubiquitous metal contaminant that negatively impacts reproduction of wildlife and has many other sub-lethal effects. Songbirds are sensitive bioindicators of mercury toxicity and may suffer population declines as a result of mercury pollution. Current predictions of mercury accumulation and biomagnification often overlook possible genetic variation in mercury uptake and elimination within species and the potential for evolution in affected populations. We conducted a study of dietary mercury exposure in a model songbird species, maintaining a breeding population of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata on standardized diets ranging from 0.0-2.4 μg/g methylmercury. We applied a quantitative genetics approach to examine patterns of variation and heritability of mercury accumulation within dietary treatments using a method of mixed effects modeling known as the 'animal model'. Significant variation in blood mercury accumulation existed within each treatment for birds exposed at the same dietary level; moreover, this variation was highly repeatable for individuals. We observed substantial genetic variation in blood mercury accumulation for birds exposed at intermediate dietary concentrations. Taken together, this is evidence that genetic variation for factors affecting blood mercury accumulation could be acted on by selection. If similar heritability for mercury accumulation exists in wild populations, selection could result in genetic differentiation for populations in contaminated locations, with possible consequences for mercury biomagnification in food webs.

  9. Thiosulphate assisted phytoextraction of mercury contaminated soils at the Wanshan Mercury Mining District, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wanshan, known as the “Mercury Capital” of China, is located in the Southwest of China. Due to the extensive mining and smelting works in the Wanshan area, the local ecosystem has been serious contaminated with mercury. In the present study, a number of soil samples were taken from the Wanshan mercury mining area and the mercury fractionations in soils were analyzed using sequential extraction procedure technique. The obtained results showed that the dominate mercury fractions (represent 95% of total mercury were residual and organic bound mercury. A field trial was conducted in a mercury polluted farmland at the Wanshan mercury mine. Four plant species Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var. ASKYC (ASKYC, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.DPDH (DPDH, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.CHBD(CHBD, Brassica juncea Czern. et Coss.var.LDZY (LDZY were tested their ability to extract mercury from soil with thiosulphate amendment. The results indicated that the mercury concentration in the roots and shoots of the four plants were significantly increased with thiosulphate treatment. The mercury phytoextraction yield of ASKYC, DPDH, CHBD and LDZY were 92, 526, 294 and 129 g/ha, respectively

  10. Human exposure to mercury and vulnerability of the ecosystems to Hg loadings : influence of environmental management and socioeconomic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, M.; Canuel, R.; De Grosbois, S.; Mergler, D.; Roue, A.; Pinsonnault, N. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). COMERN Inst. of Environmental Sciences

    2005-07-01

    The pan-Canadian Collaborative Mercury Research Network (COMERN) project was launched in 2001 to address concerns regarding mercury exposure and contamination in the ecosystem. The objective of the project is to develop a framework for researchers, political stakeholders, and communities to create an interdisciplinary association that combines all knowledge on mercury. The project team is currently developing a simple index representative of the specific vulnerability of an ecosystem to mercury bioaccumulation and subsequent transfer to humans. This index includes two concepts. The first addresses the sensitivity to bioaccumulation, induced and influenced by factors such as mercury loadings, the different transport and methylation processes, and human activities. The second addresses the adaptability of the ecosystem, an evaluation of its resilience to cope with the contamination, including considerations on human response to the stress imposed by contaminants. The social and political resources within the communities impacted are considered. This approach was applied to 4 distinct case studies representative of the large spectrums of both mercury contamination and mercury exposure through fish consumption in Canada. This included sports fishers on lakes of the boreal forest; commercial fishers in industrialized regions of the St. Lawrence River; First Nation communities in Labrador; and, seafood consumers in the Bay of Fundy.

  11. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic pollutant and is important to understand its cycling in the environment. In this dissertation, a number of modeling investigations were conducted to better understand the emission from natural surfaces, the source-receptor relationship of the emissions, and emission reduction of atmospheric mercury. The first part of this work estimates mercury emissions from vegetation, soil and water surfaces using a number of natural emission processors and detailed (LAI) Leaf Area Index data from GIS (Geographic Information System) satellite products. East Asian domain was chosen as it contributes nearly 50% of the global anthropogenic mercury emissions into the atmosphere. The estimated annual natural mercury emissions (gaseous elemental mercury) in the domain are 834 Mg yr-1 with 462 Mg yr-1 contributing from China. Compared to anthropogenic sources, natural sources show greater seasonal variability (highest in simmer). The emissions are significant, sometimes dominant, contributors to total mercury emission in the regions. The estimates provide possible explanation for the gaps between the anthropogenic emission estimates based on activity data and the emission inferred from field observations in the regions. To understand the contribution of domestic emissions to mercury deposition in the United States, the second part of the work applies the mercury model of Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling system (CMAQ-Hg v4.6) to apportion the various emission sources attributing to the mercury wet and dry deposition in the 6 United States receptor regions. Contributions to mercury deposition from electric generating units (EGU), iron and steel industry (IRST), industrial point sources excluding EGU and IRST (OIPM), the remaining anthropogenic sources (RA), natural processes (NAT), and out-of-boundary transport (BC) in domain was estimated. The model results for 2005 compared reasonably well to field observations made by MDN (Mercury Deposition Network

  12. Developer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-08-21

    NREL's Developer Network, developer.nrel.gov, provides data that users can access to provide data to their own analyses, mobile and web applications. Developers can retrieve the data through a Web services API (application programming interface). The Developer Network handles overhead of serving up web services such as key management, authentication, analytics, reporting, documentation standards, and throttling in a common architecture, while allowing web services and APIs to be maintained and managed independently.

  13. The Messenger Mission to Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Domingue, D. L

    2007-01-01

    NASA’s MESSENGER mission, launched on 3 August, 2004 is the seventh mission in the Discovery series. MESSENGER encounters the planet Mercury four times, culminating with an insertion into orbit on 18 March 2011. It carries a comprehensive package of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and space environment experiments to complete the complex investigations of this solar-system end member, which begun with Mariner 10. The articles in this book, written by the experts in each area of the MESSENGER mission, describe the mission, spacecraft, scientific objectives, and payload. The book is of interest to all potential users of the data returned by the MESSENGER mission, to those studying the nature of the planet Mercury, and by all those interested in the design and implementation of planetary exploration missions.

  14. Mercury dosing solutions for fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, A.; Boffito, C.

    2008-07-01

    A review of the different technologies used to dose mercury in fluorescent lamps is presented. Conventional liquid mercury dosing is gradually being replaced with more reliable and environmentally friendly solutions that enable a significant reduction of the amount of mercury introduced in the lamp, so as to cope with more stringent regulations issued to minimize the environmental impact of exhausted lamps. This paper will review the most advanced novel methods to assure an accurate and fine dosing of mercury in fluorescent lamps, especially focusing on solutions based on the use of solid alloys.

  15. Ocular disorders among workers exposed to mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabal, M S; Raslan, O A

    1995-01-01

    Mercury vapor exposed workers may show ocular changes, as well as other systems affection. A sample of 84 workers in preparing mercury fulminate were examined for conjunctival corneal and lenticular manifestation of long duration exposure, together with mercury urinary output. Lens changes were found in 50% of the involved workers while keratopathy as recorded in 34.5% of them. No statistically significant association was found between the occurrence of eye lesions and levels of urinary elimination of mercury. These results suggest local absorption of this element is most probably the underlying cause of ocular affection.

  16. Mercury exposure in pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, Tom Daniel; Lindow, Stephen W

    2014-11-01

    Mercury exposure in pregnancy has been associated with both pregnancy complications and developmental problems in infants. Apart from industrial accidents and contaminated food, mercury exposure is likely to arise from predatory fish consumption, environmental contamination and dental amalgam restorations placed before or during pregnancy. It would be prudent to recommend that pregnant women avoid these potential problems and minimize any risk. The available literature indicates a linear relationship with mercury levels and IQ deficit, and therefore a safe limit of mercury cannot be calculated.

  17. Increased mercury emissions from modern dental amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Ulf G; Hylander, Lars D

    2017-04-01

    All types of dental amalgams contain mercury, which partly is emitted as mercury vapor. All types of dental amalgams corrode after being placed in the oral cavity. Modern high copper amalgams exhibit two new traits of increased instability. Firstly, when subjected to wear/polishing, droplets rich in mercury are formed on the surface, showing that mercury is not being strongly bonded to the base or alloy metals. Secondly, high copper amalgams emit substantially larger amounts of mercury vapor than the low copper amalgams used before the 1970s. High copper amalgams has been developed with focus on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance, but has been sub-optimized in other aspects, resulting in increased instability and higher emission of mercury vapor. This has not been presented to policy makers and scientists. Both low and high copper amalgams undergo a transformation process for several years after placement, resulting in a substantial reduction in mercury content, but there exist no limit for maximum allowed emission of mercury from dental amalgams. These modern high copper amalgams are nowadays totally dominating the European, US and other markets, resulting in significant emissions of mercury, not considered when judging their suitability for dental restoration.

  18. Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.; Marcucci, Rudolph V.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

  19. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  20. Mercury dosing solutions for fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, A; Boffito, C [SAES Getters S.p.A., Viale Italia 77, Lainate (MI) 20020 (Italy)], E-mail: alessio_corazza@saes-group.com

    2008-07-21

    A review of the different technologies used to dose mercury in fluorescent lamps is presented. Conventional liquid mercury dosing is gradually being replaced with more reliable and environmentally friendly solutions that enable a significant reduction of the amount of mercury introduced in the lamp, so as to cope with more stringent regulations issued to minimize the environmental impact of exhausted lamps. This paper will review the most advanced novel methods to assure an accurate and fine dosing of mercury in fluorescent lamps, especially focusing on solutions based on the use of solid alloys.

  1. EDITORIAL: Mercury-free discharges for lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverlag, M.

    2007-07-01

    This special Cluster of articles in Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics covers the subject of mercury-free discharges that are being investigated by different light source researchers, as an alternative to existing mercury-containing lamps. The main driving force to move away from mercury-containing discharge light sources is connected to the environmentally unfriendly nature of mercury. After inhalation or direct contact, severe mercury exposure can lead to damage to human brain cells, the kidneys, the liver and the nervous system. For this reason, the use of mercury in products is becoming more and more restricted by different governmental bodies. In the lighting industry, however, many products still make use of mercury, for different reasons. The main reason is that mercury-containing products are, in most cases, more efficient than mercury-free products. For a realistic comparison of the environmental impact, the mercury-contamination due to electricity production must be taken into account, which depends on the type of fuel being used. For an average European fuel-mix, the amount of mercury that is released into the environment is around 29 μg kWh-1. This means that a typical 30 W TL lamp during a lifetime of 20,000 hours will release a total of about 20 mg mercury due to electricity production, which exceeds the total mercury dose in the lamp (more and more of which is being recycled) by a factor of 5-10 for a modern TL lamp. This illustrates that, quite apart from other environmental arguments like increased CO2 production, mercury-free alternatives that use more energy can in fact be detrimental for the total mercury pollution over the lifetime of the lamp. For this reason, the lighting industry has concentrated on lowering the mercury content in lamps as long as no efficient alternatives exist. Nevertheless, new initiatives for HID lamps and fluorescent lamps with more or less equal efficiency are underway, and a number of them are described in this

  2. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to

  3. Rapid Monitoring of Mercury in Air from an Organic Chemical Factory in China Using a Portable Mercury Analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Yasutake, Akira; Cheng, Jin Ping; Kiyono, Masako; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Liu, Xiaojie; Miura, Kyoko; Yasuda, Yoshiaki; Mashyanov, Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m3 in air o...

  4. Multiscale geomorphometric modeling of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinsky, I. V.

    2018-02-01

    Topography is one of the key characteristics of a planetary body. Geomorphometry deals with quantitative modeling and analysis of the topographic surface and relationships between topography and other natural components of landscapes. The surface of Mercury is systematically studied by interpretation of images acquired during the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. However, the Mercurian surface is still little explored by methods of geomorphometry. In this paper, we evaluate the Mercury MESSENGER Global DEM MSGR_DEM_USG_SC_I_V02 - a global digital elevation model (DEM) of Mercury with the resolution of 0.015625° - as a source for geomorphometric modeling of this planet. The study was performed at three spatial scales: the global, regional (the Caloris basin), and local (the Pantheon Fossae area) ones. As the initial data, we used three DEMs of these areas with resolutions of 0.25°, 0.0625°, and 0.015625°, correspondingly. The DEMs were extracted from the MESSENGER Global DEM. From the DEMs, we derived digital models of several fundamental morphometric variables, such as: slope gradient, horizontal curvature, vertical curvature, minimal curvature, maximal curvature, catchment area, and dispersive area. The morphometric maps obtained represent peculiarities of the Mercurian topography in different ways, according to the physical and mathematical sense of a particular variable. Geomorphometric models are a rich source of information on the Mercurian surface. These data can be utilized to study evolution and internal structure of the planet, for example, to visualize and quantify regional topographic differences as well as to refine geological boundaries.

  5. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Guan; Han Dai

    2009-01-01

    Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role o...

  6. Evidence of the direct adsorption of mercury in human hair during occupational exposure to mercury vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queipo Abad, Silvia; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2016-07-01

    We have found clear evidence of direct adsorption of mercury in human hair after the occupational exposure to mercury vapour. We have performed both longitudinal analysis of human hair by laser ablation ICP-MS and speciation analysis by gas chromatography ICP-MS in single hair strands of 5 individuals which were occupationally exposed to high levels of mercury vapour and showed acute mercury poisoning symptoms. Hair samples, between 3.5 and 11cm long depending on the individual, were taken ca. three months after exposure. Single point laser ablation samples of 50μm diameter were taken at 1mm intervals starting from the root of the hairs. Sulfur-34 was used as internal standard. The ratio (202)Hg/(34)S showed a distinct pattern of mercury concentration with much lower levels of mercury near the root of the hair and high levels of mercury near the end of the hair. In all cases a big jump in the concentration of mercury in hair occurred at a given distance from the root, between 32 and 42mm depending on the individual, with a high and almost constant concentration of mercury for longer distances to the root. When we took into account the rate of hair growth in humans, 9-15mm/month, the jump in mercury concentration agreed approximately with the dates when the contamination occurred with the new growing hair showing much lower mercury concentration. In some cases the concentration of mercury at the tip of the hair was ca. 1000 times higher than that near the root. Additionally, speciation studies confirmed that mercury in all hair samples was present as inorganic mercury. The only explanation for these results was the direct adsorption of mercury vapour in hair at the time of exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Remediation of Mercury-Contaminated Storm Sewer Sediments from the West End Mercury Area at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 12061

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremaine, Diana [Science and Ecology Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37931 (United States); Douglas, Steven G. [B and W Y-12, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN has faced an ongoing challenge from mercury entrapped in soils beneath and adjacent to buildings, storm sewers, and process pipelines. Previous actions to reduce the quantity and/or mobilization of mercury-contaminated media have included plugging of building floor drains, cleaning of sediment and sludge from sumps, manholes, drain lines, and storm sewers, lining/relining of storm sewers and replacement of a portion of the storm sewer trunk line, re-routing and removal of process piping, and installation of the Central Mercury Treatment System to capture and treat contaminated sump water. Despite the success of these actions, mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls that discharge to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) continues to pose a threat to long-term water quality. A video camera survey of the storm sewer network revealed several sections of storm sewer that had large cracks, separations, swells, and accumulations of sediment/sludge and debris. The selected remedy was to clean and line the sections of storm sewer pipe that were determined to be primary contributors to the mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls. The project, referred to as the West End Mercury Area (WEMA) Storm Sewer Remediation Project, included cleaning sediment and debris from over 2,460 meters of storm sewer pipe followed by the installation of nearly 366 meters of cure-in-place pipe (CIPP) liner. One of the greatest challenges to the success of this project was the high cost of disposal associated with the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater generated from the storm sewer cleaning process. A contractor designed and operated an on-site wastewater pre-treatment system that successfully reduced mercury levels in 191 cubic meters of sludge to levels that allowed it to be disposed at Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) disposal cell as a non-hazardous, low-level waste. The system was also effective at pre-treating over 1

  8. Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Livengood, C. D.; Martin, K.; Mendelsohn, M. H.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-05-19

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has designed a flue gas simulation system to study the removal of elemental mercury. The simulated flue gas enters the system and combines with the inlet mercury vapor (from a calibrated permeation tube), carried by nitrogen gas. This combined gas continues past the flow meter and the pressure gage to the reactor inlet. Inside the reactor chamber, the flue gas is sprayed with NOXSORB{reg_sign}, a chloric acid solution, which reacts with elemental mercury. The amount of reaction (oxidation) of elemental mercury is important since mercury in an oxidized form is highly soluble, In this form, the Hg can be picked up downstream by a wet scrubber from fossil-fuel burning utilities. Experiments on mercury removal from flue gases have been conducted at ANL, with the participation of a senior design team from Purdue University Calumet. Temperature variations ranging from room temperature to 350 F have been studied. Other parameters, such as the concentration of NOXSORB{reg_sign}, were also tested. Furthermore, pump speed and sprayer droplet sizes of the NOXSORB{reg_sign} solution were studied. A literature survey on the current and proposed mercury control legislation, along with the existing control technologies, has been performed as part of the senior design project. With guidance from ANL, an understanding of the simulation system has been developed. This information has been used to determine the mass transfer. Another literature survey was performed on the reaction kinetics of mercury. The information obtained was

  9. Maternal transfer of mercury to songbird eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Hartman, C Alex; Herzog, Mark P

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the maternal transfer of mercury to eggs in songbirds, determined whether this relationship differed between songbird species, and developed equations for predicting mercury concentrations in eggs from maternal blood. We sampled blood and feathers from 44 house wren (Troglodytes aedon) and 34 tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) mothers and collected their full clutches (n = 476 eggs) within 3 days of clutch completion. Additionally, we sampled blood and feathers from 53 tree swallow mothers and randomly collected one egg from their clutches (n = 53 eggs) during mid to late incubation (6-10 days incubated) to evaluate whether the relationship varied with the timing of sampling the mother's blood. Mercury concentrations in eggs were positively correlated with mercury concentrations in maternal blood sampled at (1) the time of clutch completion for both house wrens (R 2  = 0.97) and tree swallows (R 2  = 0.97) and (2) during mid to late incubation for tree swallows (R 2  = 0.71). The relationship between mercury concentrations in eggs and maternal blood did not differ with the stage of incubation when maternal blood was sampled. Importantly, the proportion of mercury transferred from mothers to their eggs decreased substantially with increasing blood mercury concentrations in tree swallows, but increased slightly with increasing blood mercury concentrations in house wrens. Additionally, the proportion of mercury transferred to eggs at the same maternal blood mercury concentration differed between species. Specifically, tree swallow mothers transferred 17%-107% more mercury to their eggs than house wren mothers over the observed mercury concentrations in maternal blood (0.15-1.92 μg/g ww). In contrast, mercury concentrations in eggs were not correlated with those in maternal feathers and, likewise, mercury concentrations in maternal blood were not correlated with those in feathers (all R 2  mercury concentrations from maternal blood to eggs

  10. Maternal transfer of mercury to songbird eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Josh; Hartman, C. Alex; Herzog, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the maternal transfer of mercury to eggs in songbirds, determined whether this relationship differed between songbird species, and developed equations for predicting mercury concentrations in eggs from maternal blood. We sampled blood and feathers from 44 house wren (Troglodytes aedon) and 34 tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) mothers and collected their full clutches (n = 476 eggs) within 3 days of clutch completion. Additionally, we sampled blood and feathers from 53 tree swallow mothers and randomly collected one egg from their clutches (n = 53 eggs) during mid to late incubation (6–10 days incubated) to evaluate whether the relationship varied with the timing of sampling the mother's blood. Mercury concentrations in eggs were positively correlated with mercury concentrations in maternal blood sampled at (1) the time of clutch completion for both house wrens (R2 = 0.97) and tree swallows (R2 = 0.97) and (2) during mid to late incubation for tree swallows (R2 = 0.71). The relationship between mercury concentrations in eggs and maternal blood did not differ with the stage of incubation when maternal blood was sampled. Importantly, the proportion of mercury transferred from mothers to their eggs decreased substantially with increasing blood mercury concentrations in tree swallows, but increased slightly with increasing blood mercury concentrations in house wrens. Additionally, the proportion of mercury transferred to eggs at the same maternal blood mercury concentration differed between species. Specifically, tree swallow mothers transferred 17%–107% more mercury to their eggs than house wren mothers over the observed mercury concentrations in maternal blood (0.15–1.92 μg/g ww). In contrast, mercury concentrations in eggs were not correlated with those in maternal feathers and, likewise, mercury concentrations in maternal blood were not correlated with those in feathers (all R2 mercury concentrations from maternal blood to eggs (and

  11. Worldwide trend of atmospheric mercury since 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Slemr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Concern about the adverse effects of mercury on human health and ecosystems has led to tightening emission controls since the mid 1980s. But the resulting mercury emissions reductions in many parts of the world are believed to be offset or even surpassed by the increasing emissions in rapidly industrializing countries. Consequently, concentrations of atmospheric mercury are expected to remain roughly constant. Here we show that the worldwide atmospheric mercury concentrations have decreased by about 20 to 38 % since 1996 as indicated by long-term monitoring at stations in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres combined with intermittent measurements of latitudinal distribution over the Atlantic Ocean. The total reduction of the atmospheric mercury burden of this magnitude within 14 years is unusually large among most atmospheric trace gases and is at odds with the current mercury emission inventories with nearly constant anthropogenic emissions over this period. This suggests a major shift in the biogeochemical cycle of mercury including oceans and soil reservoirs. Decreasing reemissions from the legacy of historical mercury emissions are the most likely explanation for this decline since the hypothesis of an accelerated oxidation rate of elemental mercury in the atmosphere is not supported by the observed trends of other trace gases. Acidification of oceans, climate change, excess nutrient input and pollution may also contribute by their impact on the biogeochemistry of ocean and soils. Consequently, models of the atmospheric mercury cycle have to include soil and ocean mercury pools and their dynamics to be able to make projections of future trends.

  12. Analytic Support to Intelligence in Counterinsurgencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Predd, Thomas Sullivan, and John Hollywood helped develop and apply some of the analytic methods described in this monograph. In addi- tion, Caryl ...John Hollywood, Thomas Sullivan, Ryan Keefe, David Nealy, and Walter L. Perry, Tar- geting IED Networks in Iraq, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND...summarizes research conducted by Dr. Caryl Catarious, a research analyst at CNA. xxii Analytic Support to Intelligence in Counterinsurgencies levels

  13. Mercury Methylation and Detoxification by Novel Microorganisms in Mercury Enriched Mesothermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionfriddo, C. M.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Stott, M.; Wick, R. R.; Schultz, M. B.; Holt, K. E.; Moreau, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hot springs and fumaroles release significant quantities of aqueous and gaseous mercury into the environment. Yet few studies have looked at the microbial underpinnings of mercury transformations in geothermal settings. Recent advancements in culture-independent molecular techniques, such as ultra-high-throughput sequencing, allow us to delve deeply into the functional and phylogenetic make-up of these extreme environments. Here we present results from deep metagenomic sequencing of geothermal microbial communities cycling mercury, focussing on the connections between putative metabolisms and mercury methylation, and the evolution of the mer-operon. Presented are data from two adjacent, acidic (pHNew Zealand), extremely enriched in total mercury (>1000 ng L-1), and varying methylmercury concentrations (1-10 ng L-1). Microbial communities of both springs are dominated by mercury resistant acidophilic, sulfur- and iron-cycling microbes: Acidithiobacillus, Thiomonas, and Thermoplasma. Mercury methylation genes (hgcAB) were only detected in the cooler spring (ΔT~10 °C), with an order of magnitude greater methylmercury (10 ng L-1). The hgcAB genes have no known closest relatives (40°C), and methylmercury concentration. We conclude that the relative amount of mercury methylation in each hot spring is controlled by the presence of methylating bacteria and archaea, the release of bioavailable mercury species from sulfide minerals, counterbalanced by microbial mercury demethylation and reduction and mercury sulfide mineralization.

  14. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

    2005-03-01

    There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to

  16. Toxicity of mercury in macrophages. Structure and function of macrophages after experimental mercury exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    Mercury is recognized as an environmental heavy metal pollutant with a toxic effect on living organisms. The toxicity of this heavy metal at cellular level is described for many types of cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in the organism and play a central role in the non-specific defence barrier against intruding micro-organisms. As a first line of defence, macrophages are crucial for the course of generalized infection, for instance with herpes simplex virus. Functions such as phagocytosis, migration, activation during infection and cytokine production are important in this context. Mercury, detectable by auto metallography, is found in the lysosomes of macrophages and this accumulation is dependent upon dose and length of time of mercury exposure. But higher concentrations cause auto interference, which indicates that mercury accumulation is dependent on lysosome functional integrity and that mercury inhibits lysosome functions. In mice intraperitoneally exposed to mercury chloride, mercury is found localized in the lysosomes of macrophages in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and liver as well as in peritoneal macrophages. The effect of mercury on a virus infection was examined in studies of the course of infection in mice treated with mercury and infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) under further exposure to mercury. To further elucidate aspects of interactions between heavy metals and macrophages and their eventual significance for the antiviral effect of macrophages, the effect of mercury on cell respiratory burst capacity and the influence of mercury on cell production of and reaction to cytokines was examined. This thesis shows that mercury is immunotoxic in that it affects macrophages both with regard to the viability and function of the cells. This is also valid for mercury concentrations that do not result in apparent pathological changes. (EG) 98 refs.

  17. Rapid monitoring of mercury in air from an organic chemical factory in China using a portable mercury analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Akira; Cheng, Jin Ping; Kiyono, Masako; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Liu, Xiaojie; Miura, Kyoko; Yasuda, Yoshiaki; Mashyanov, Nikolay

    2011-01-01

    A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m(3) in air over the contaminated area provided evidence of the mercury transformation to volatile Hg(0). Mercury analysis of soil and plant samples demonstrated that the mercury concentrations in soil with vaporized and plant-absorbable forms were higher in the southern area, which was closer to the factory. Our results suggest that air monitoring using a portable mercury analyzer can be a convenient and useful method for the rapid detection and mapping of mercury pollution in advanced field surveys.

  18. Rapid Monitoring of Mercury in Air from an Organic Chemical Factory in China Using a Portable Mercury Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yasutake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m3 in air over the contaminated area provided evidence of the mercury transformation to volatile Hg(0. Mercury analysis of soil and plant samples demonstrated that the mercury concentrations in soil with vaporized and plant-absorbable forms were higher in the southern area, which was closer to the factory. Our results suggest that air monitoring using a portable mercury analyzer can be a convenient and useful method for the rapid detection and mapping of mercury pollution in advanced field surveys.

  19. Mercury soil surveys: a good reconnaissance tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, C.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    Three examples of mercury soil surveys are discussed, along with the gravity data. An excellent correlation was found in southern Arizona between buried structures revealed by gravity and mercury soil surveys. The advantages of the latter over the former as a reconnaissance tool are listed. (MHR)

  20. OCCURENCE OF MERCURY IN PET FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Abete

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mercury levels in 61 complete pet feed containing fish were evaluated. In five samples a mercury content exceeding the maximum residues level (0.4 mg/kg was detected. The statistical evaluation didn’t show a significant correlation between the percentage of fish in feedingstuffs and the contamination level.

  1. EURISOL MERCURY TARGET EXPERIMENT: CERN SAFETY REPORT

    CERN Document Server

    J. Gulley (CERN SC/GS)

    Report on a visit to the mercury-handling lab at IPUL. The aim was to provide recommendations to IPUL on general health and safety issues relatring to the handling of mercury, the objective being to reduce exposure to acceptable levels, so far as is reasonably practical.

  2. Episodic bioavailability of environmental mercury: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perennial wildfires in Africa and other continents contribute an estimated 8 x 105 kg of mercury to the global atmosphere with a residence time of approximately one year. This phenomenon changes the flux of biologically available mercury in natural microbial communities where enzymatic actions, including mercuric ...

  3. Mercury in tropical and subtropical coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Monica F.; Landing, William M.; Kehrig, Helena A.; Barletta, Mário; Holmes, Christopher D.; Barrocas, Paulo R. G.; Evers, David C.; Buck, David G.; Vasconcellos, Ana Claudia; Hacon, Sandra S.; Moreira, Josino C.; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities influence the biogeochemical cycles of mercury, both qualitatively and quantitatively, on a global scale from sources to sinks. Anthropogenic processes that alter the temporal and spatial patterns of sources and cycling processes are changing the impacts of mercury contamination on aquatic biota and humans. Human exposure to mercury is dominated by the consumption of fish and products from aquaculture operations. The risk to society and to ecosystems from mercury contamination is growing, and it is important to monitor these expanding risks. However, the extent and manner to which anthropogenic activities will alter mercury sources and biogeochemical cycling in tropical and sub-tropical coastal environments is poorly understood. Factors as (1) lack of reliable local/regional data; (2) rapidly changing environmental conditions; (3) governmental priorities and; (4) technical actions from supra-national institutions, are some of the obstacles to overcome in mercury cycling research and policy formulation. In the tropics and sub-tropics, research on mercury in the environment is moving from an exploratory “inventory” phase towards more process-oriented studies. Addressing biodiversity conservation and human health issues related to mercury contamination of river basins and tropical coastal environments are an integral part of paragraph 221 paragraph of the United Nations document “The Future We Want” issued in Rio de Janeiro in June 2012. PMID:22901765

  4. Mercury cycling in peatland watersheds. Chapter 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall K. Kolka; Carl P.J. Mitchell; Jeffrey D. Jeremiason; Neal A. Hines; David F. Grigal; Daniel R. Engstrom; Jill K. Coleman-Wasik; Edward A. Nater; Edward B. Swain; Bruce A. Monson; Jacob A. Fleck; Brian Johnson; James E. Almendinger; Brian A. Branfireun; Patrick L. Brezonik; James B. Cotner

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is of great environmental concern due to its transformation into the toxic methylmercury (MeHg) form that bioaccumulates within the food chain and causes health concerns for both humans and wildlife (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2002). Mercury can affect neurological development in fetuses and young children. In adults, exposure to Hg can lead to...

  5. Mercury poisoning | Shamley | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnosis of mercury poisoning requires a high index of suspicion. Mercury poisoning in a patient involved in illicit gold extraction is reported and 6 other cases considered. Some of the clinical features and treatment of this condition are discussed. S Afr Med J 1989; 76: 114-116 ...

  6. How Does Mercury Get into Fish?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cherie Winner

    2010-01-01

    ... poisoned by methyl-mercury dumped from a chemical plant into Minamata Bay, Japan. The biggest single source is the burning of fossil fuels, especially coal, which releases 160 tons of mercury a year into the air in the United States alone...

  7. Terahertz oscillations in mercury cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has been recently reported that the three-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensation of the quasi-particles is valid for the mercury cuprates at liquid helium temperature. In this study, the validity of the interlayer theory in three dimensions has been investigated for optimally oxygen-doped mercury cuprates at the temperature ...

  8. Pneumonitis after Inhalation of Mercury Vapours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JD Glezos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old man presented to hospital with pneumonia but only after discharge from hospital did he admit to deliberate prior inhalation of mercury. His pulmonary involvement appeared to resolve almost completely with antibiotics and supportive care. Nevertheless, persisting elevated urinary excretion of mercury required two courses of chelation therapy. No serious systemic sequelae were observed.

  9. Plant mediated detoxification of mercury and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajesh Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of efficient green chemistry methods for detoxification of metal poisoning has become a major focus of researchers. They have investigated in order to find an eco-friendly and recyclable technique for the removal of heavy metal (Pb2+, Hg2+ contamination from the natural resources. One of the most considered methods is the removal of Pb2+, Hg2+ metal using green plants and their wastes. Among these plant wastes seem to be the best candidates and they are suitable for detoxification of heavy metals. Biosorption by plants involve complex mechanisms, mainly ion exchange, chelation, adsorption by physical forces and ion entrapment in inter and intra fibrillar capillaries and spaces of the structural polysaccharide cell wall network. The advantages of using green plants and their wastes for detoxification of heavy metal have interested researchers to investigate mechanisms of metal ion uptake, and to understand the possible utilization. In this review, we discuss the role of plants and their wastes for minimizing mercury and lead pollution with their toxic effect on both human beings and plants.

  10. The JPL trapped mercury ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide frequency standards for the Deep Space Network (DSN) which are more stable than present-day hydrogen masers, a research task was established under the Advanced Systems Program of the TDA to develop a Hg-199(+) trapped ion frequency standard. The first closed-loop operation of this kind is described. Mercury-199 ions are confined in an RF trap and are state-selected through the use of optical pumping with 194 nm UV light from a Hg-202 discharge lamp. Absorption of microwave radiation at the hyperfine frequency (40.5 GHz) is signaled by atomic fluorescence of the UV light. The frequency of a 40.5 GHz oscillator is locked to a 1.6 Hz wide atomic absorption line of the trapped ions. The measured Allan variance of this locked oscillator is currently gamma sub y (pi) = 4.4 x 10 to the minus 12th/square root of pi for 20 is less than pi is less than 320 seconds, which is better stability than the best commercial cesium standards by almost a factor of 2. This initial result was achieved without magnetic shielding and without regulation of ion number.

  11. High activity carbon sorbents for mercury capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavropoulos George G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available High efficiency activated carbons have been prepared for removing mercury from gas streams. Starting materials used were petroleum coke, lignite, charcoal and olive seed waste, and were chemically activated with KOH. Produced adsorbents were primarily characterized for their porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Their mercury retention capacity was characterized based on the breakthrough curves. Compared with typical commercial carbons, they have exhibited considerably enhanced mercury adsorption capacity. An attempt has been made to correlate mercury entrapment and pore structure. It has been shown that physical surface area is increased during activation in contrast to the mercury adsorption capacity that initially increases and tends to decrease at latter stages. Desorption of active sites may be responsible for this behavior.

  12. A Tropical Paradox - High Mercury Deposition, but Low Mercury Bioaccumulation in Northeastern Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, J. B.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Lane, O.; Arendt, W.; Hall, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    At a "clean air" trade winds site in tropical northeastern Puerto Rico, atmospheric total mercury (THg) deposition averaged 28 µg m-2 yr-1, higher than any site in the USA Mercury Deposition Network, driven by efficient capture of upper tropospheric Hg by high rain-forming clouds. The elevated THg in deposition is reflected in high THg concentrations and flux in streams, but assimilation into the local food web was quite low. There are few mammalian or freshwater fish predators on the island, but 30 faunal samples including fly larvae, freshwater shrimp, spiders, tadpoles, coqui frogs, anole lizards, a scorpion, and a boa constrictor had a median THg concentration of 0.032 µg g-1 (dry weight basis), with the three highest values (near 0.14 µg g-1) from spiders. Avian blood THg concentrations (n=31, from 8 species in various foraging guilds) were also quite low, ranging widely from 0.0002 to 0.032 µg g-1 wet weight, with a median of 0.0043 µg g-1. THg levels in biota were severalfold to more than an order of magnitude lower than comparable values in the continental U.S. These results were surprising given the high Hg inputs and watershed features that would seem to favor methylmercury (MeHg) production (Hg(II)-methylation) - high soil moisture with anoxic zones, ample organic matter and sulfur, and year-round warm temperatures. However, organic soil (0-10 cm) along a hillslope to riparian transect averaged only 0.45 ng/g MeHg, with an average MeHg/THg of only 0.34%. Incubations (n=6) to assess methylation and demethylation indicated that rate constants for demethylation were 6-60 fold greater than those for Hg(II)-methylation, and calculated potential rates of demethylation were 3-9 fold greater than those for Hg(II)-methylation. Thus, the apparent paradox may be resolved by the difference between these rates, whereby MeHg degradation outpaces MeHg production in surface soil and sediment. The interplay of these microbial processes shields the island food web

  13. Croatian Analytical Terminology

    OpenAIRE

    Kastelan-Macan; M.

    2008-01-01

    Results of analytical research are necessary in all human activities. They are inevitable in making decisions in the environmental chemistry, agriculture, forestry, veterinary medicine, pharmaceutical industry, and biochemistry. Without analytical measurements the quality of materials and products cannot be assessed, so that analytical chemistry is an essential part of technical sciences and disciplines.The language of Croatian science, and analytical chemistry within it, was one of the goals...

  14. Clustering in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drab, Klaudia; Daszykowski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Data clustering plays an important role in the exploratory analysis of analytical data, and the use of clustering methods has been acknowledged in different fields of science. In this paper, principles of data clustering are presented with a direct focus on clustering of analytical data. The role of the clustering process in the analytical workflow is underlined, and its potential impact on the analytical workflow is emphasized.

  15. Biomolecular Aspects of Mercury Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Miller, S. M.; Summers, A. O.; Liang, L.

    2008-12-01

    Bacteria participate significantly in mercury transformation in natural and industrial environments. Previous studies have shown that bacterial mercury resistance is mediated by the mer operon, typically located on transposons or plasmids. It encodes specific genes that facilitate uptake of mercury species, cleavage of organomercurials, and reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0). Expression of mer operon genes is regulated by MerR, a metal-responsive regulator protein on the level of transcription. In vitro studies have shown that MerR forms a non-transcribing pre-initiation complex with RNA polymerase and the promoter DNA. Binding of Hg(II) induces conformational changes in MerR and other components of the complex resulting in the transcription of mer operon genes. As part of ongoing investigations on allosteric conformational changes induced by Hg(II) in dimeric MerR, and the implications on the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of the mer operon, we applied small angle scattering to study the regulatory mechanism of MerR in the presence and absence of Hg(II). Our results show that in the presence of Hg(II) the MerR dimer undergoes a significant reorientation from a compact state to a conformation revealing two distinct domains. Bacterial reduction of Hg(II) can also occur at concentrations too low to induce mer operon functions. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter are able to reduce Hg(II) in the presence of mineral oxides. This process has been linked to the activity of outer membrane multiheme cytochromes. We isolated and purified a decaheme outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and characterized its envelope shape in solution by small angle x-ray scattering. Structural features were identified and compared to homology models. These results show that OmcA is an elongated macromolecule consisting of separate modules, which may be connected by flexible linkers.

  16. Estimating mercury emissions from a zinc smelter in relation to China's mercury control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S X; Song, J X; Li, G H; Wu, Y; Zhang, L; Wan, Q; Streets, D G; Chin, Conrad K; Hao, J M

    2010-10-01

    Mercury concentrations of flue gas at inlet/outlet of the flue gas cleaning, electrostatic demister, reclaiming tower, acid plant, and mercury contents in zinc concentrate and by-products were measured in a hydrometallurgical zinc smelter. The removal efficiency of flue gas cleaning, electrostatic demister, mercury reclaiming and acid plant was about 17.4%, 30.3%, 87.9% and 97.4% respectively. Flue gas cleaning and electrostatic demister captured 11.7% and 25.3% of the mercury in the zinc concentrate, respectively. The mercury reclaiming tower captured 58.3% of the mercury in the zinc concentrate. About 4.2% of the mercury in the zinc concentrate was captured by the acid plant. Consequently, only 0.8% of the mercury in the zinc concentrate was emitted to the atmosphere. The atmospheric mercury emission factor was 0.5 g t(-1) of zinc produced for the tested smelter, indicating that this process offers the potential to effectively reduce mercury emissions from zinc smelting. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mercury in food items from the Idrija Mercury Mine area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklavčič, Ana; Mazej, Darja; Jaćimović, Radojko; Dizdarevi, Tatjana; Horvat, Milena

    2013-08-01

    As a consequence of over 500 years of mining and smelting activities (1490-1995), and of its natural geological occurrence, the soil in the Idrija region is highly contaminated with Hg. In order to assess the present situation regarding the Hg levels in local food samples, concentrations of total mercury (THg) and monomethyl mercury (MeHg) were determined in selected vegetables, mushrooms and fish from the Idrija Hg mine area. Hg levels in the foodstuffs analysed were not very high but were elevated compared to the levels in food from non-contaminated areas. The study showed that THg accumulates in mushrooms (X=5680ng/g dry weight, Min=346ng/g dry weight, Max=17,100 dry weight) and chicory (X=1950ng/g dry weight, Min=86ng/g dry weight, Max=17,100ng/g dry weight). In addition, Se and Cd concentrations were determined by ICP-MS in those vegetable and mushroom species in which the highest Hg levels were found. The levels of Cd and Se were below the threshold levels. Based on data from previous studies, we can conclude that the levels of Hg in food have not diminished significantly during the past 15 years after closure of the Hg mine. Special attention should be given to vegetables such as chicory, representing a local seasonal vegetable eaten frequently. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  19. Mercury's rotation axis and period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    Recent measurements made from high-resolution Mariner 10 photography of the planet Mercury yield a rotation period of 58.6461 + or 0.005 days, in excellent agreement with the period required for a precise 2/3 resonance with its orbital period (58.6462 days). The axis of rotation of the planet was calculated to be offset about 2 deg from the perpendicular to its orbital plane within a 50% probability error ellipse of + or - 2.6 deg by + or - 6.5 deg. Dynamical considerations make it most likely that the true displacement from the orbit normal is less than 1 deg.

  20. Legislation, standards and methods for mercury emissions control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-04-15

    Mercury is an element of growing global concern. The United Nations Environment Programme plans to finalise and ratify a new global legally-binding convention on mercury by 2013. Canada already has legislation on mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities and the USA has recently released the new Mercury and Air Toxics Standard. Although other countries may not have mercury-specific legislation as such, many have legislation which results in significant co-benefit mercury reduction due to the installation of effective flue-gas cleaning technologies. This report reviews the current situation and trends in mercury emission legislation and, where possible, discusses the actions that will be taken under proposed or impending standards globally and regionally. The report also reviews the methods currently applied for mercury control and for mercury emission measurement with emphasis on the methodologies most appropriate for compliance. Examples of the methods of mercury control currently deployed in the USA, Canada and elsewhere are included.

  1. Mercury's Internal Magnetic Field: Modeling Core Fields with Smooth Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, H.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    MESSENGER's second flyby (M2) of Mercury on 6 October 2008 will provide significantly improved geographical sampling of the planet's internal magnetic field over previous measurements. Latitudinal coverage and spacecraft altitudes will be similar to those during MESSENGER's first encounter (M1), but the spacecraft trajectory will be displaced by about 180° in longitude, yielding the first magnetic measurements in the western hemisphere. We investigate spatial structure in Mercury's internal magnetic field by applying methods from inverse theory to construct low-degree-and-order spherical harmonic models. External fields predicted by a parameterized magnetospheric model are subtracted from the vector field observations. The approach takes into account noise contributions from long-wavelength uncertainties in the external field models, unexplained short-wavelength features, and spacecraft attitude errors. We investigate the effect of different regularization (smoothness) constraints on our inversions. Analyses of data from M1 and the two Mariner 10 flybys that penetrated the magnetosphere yield a preferred spherical harmonic solution to degree and order eight with the centered, axial dipole term g10 dominating. The model shows structure at low and mid-latitude regions near the flybys. Terms predicted by an analytical model for long- wavelength crustal fields - namely g10, g30 and g32 - are present, but their relative amplitudes are not consistent with such a field. We conclude that structure in our models is dominated by core, rather than by crustal, fields. We also investigate, through simulations, field morphologies that are recoverable while the spacecraft is in orbit about Mercury, under the assumption that the long-wavelength contributions from external sources can be accurately modeled and removed. Although the elliptical orbit of MESSENGER will impede the recovery of southern hemisphere structure, we obtain excellent recovery of the dipole field and of

  2. Substance Flow Analysis of Mercury in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, L. M.; Wang, S.; Zhang, L.; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies, the emission of anthropogenic atmospheric Hg in China as well as single sector have been examined a lot. However, there might have been more Hg released as solid wastes rather than air. Hg stored in solid wastes may be released to air again when the solid wastes experience high temperature process or cause local pollution if the solid wastes are stacked casually for a long time. To trace the fate of Hg in China, this study developed the substance flow of Hg in 2010 covering all the sectors summarized in table 1. Below showed in Figure 1, the total Hg input is 2825t. The unintentional input of Hg, mined Hg, and recycled Hg account for 57%, 32% and 11% respectively. Figure 2 provides the detail information of substance flow of Hg. Byproducts from one sector may be used as raw materials of another, causing cross Hg flow between sectors. The Hg input of cement production is 303 t, of which 34% comes from coal and limestone, 33% comes from non-ferrous smelting, 23% comes from coal combustion, 7% comes from iron and steel production and 3% comes from mercury mining. Hg flowing to recycledHg production is 639 t, mainly from Hg contained in waste active carbon and mercuric chloride catalyst from VCM production and acid sludge from non-ferrous smelting. There are 20 t mercury flowing from spent mercury adding products to incineration. Figure1 and Figure 2 also show that 46% of the output Hg belongs to "Lagged release", which means this part of mercury might be released later. The "Lagged release" Hg includes 809 t Hg contained in stacked byproducts form coal combustion, non-ferrous smelting, iron and steel production, Al production, cement production and mercury mining, 161t Hg stored in the pipeline of VCM producing, 10 t Hg in fluorescent lamps that are in use and 314 t mercury stored in materials waiting to be handled with in recycled mercury plants. There is 112 t Hg stored in landfill and 129 t Hg exported abroad with the export of mercury adding

  3. Mercury concentrations of the Mazama ash : implications for the atmospheric mercury budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, A.K.; Telmer, K.; Spence, J. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the mercury concentrations found in the large quantity of ash that was produced when Mount Mazama erupted. The objective was to better quantify volcanic emissions of mercury in terms of the global mercury budget. The ash plume included a proximal consolidated facies that contained much lower mercury concentrations than the distal unconsolidated facies. Two possible reasons for this were suggested. First, it was suggested that mercury's low volatilization temperature resulted in its thermal release during the volcanic eruption, thereby accounting for the low values of mercury observed within the proximal unit due to its high temperature at the time of deposition. A portion of the thermally released mercury (Hg0) would have been oxidized in the atmosphere to Hg{sup 2+}, rendering it more reactive. Ash particles traveling with the eruption plume would have cooled enough to allow for readsorption of the oxidized mercury. The deposited cooled particles within the distal facies would therefore have contained higher mercury levels compared to the proximal facies. The second possibility was that thermal release occurred for both facies and that the low concentrations found within the proximal unit represent the original concentrations of the whole ash deposit. Concentrations in the distal facies were increased due to postdepositional processes that left the proximal facies unchanged due to buffering by its consolidated nature and its thickness. Mercury mass calculations gave values of 6 megagrams (Mg) of mercury for the consolidated facies and 924 Mg for the unconsolidated facies, for a total of 930 Mg for the whole deposit. The volcano was estimated to contain 12392 Mg of mercury, with 11462 Mg released to the atmosphere. On average, volcanic eruptions around the world account for 70 Mg of mercury/year which is currently unaccounted for in the global mercury budgets. This study demonstrated the mobile nature of the global mercury cycle and showed

  4. Passive air sampling of gaseous elemental mercury: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. McLagan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because gaseous elemental mercury (GEM is distributed globally through the atmosphere, reliable means of measuring its concentrations in air are important. Passive air samplers (PASs, designed to be cheap, simple to operate, and to work without electricity, could provide an alternative to established active sampling techniques in applications such as (1 long-term monitoring of atmospheric GEM levels in remote regions and in developing countries, (2 atmospheric mercury source identification and characterization through finely resolved spatial mapping, and (3 the recording of personal exposure to GEM. An effective GEM PAS requires a tightly constrained sampling rate, a large and stable uptake capacity, and a sensitive analytical technique. None of the GEM PASs developed to date achieve levels of accuracy and precision sufficient for the reliable determination of background concentrations over extended deployments. This is due to (1 sampling rates that vary due to meteorological factors and manufacturing inconsistencies, and/or (2 an often low, irreproducible and/or unstable uptake capacity of the employed sorbents. While we identify shortcomings of existing GEM PAS, we also reveal potential routes to overcome those difficulties. Activated carbon and nanostructured metal surfaces hold promise as effective sorbents. Sampler designs incorporating diffusive barriers should be able to notably reduce the influence of wind on sampling rates.

  5. Development of an electromagnetically actuated mercury microvalve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, D.R.; Wong, C.C.

    1998-08-01

    The development of microscale fluid handling components has been recognized as a crucial element in the design of microscale chemical detection systems. Recently, work has been undertaken at Sandia National Laboratories to construct a valve that uses a small mercury droplet to control the flow of gas through capillary passages. Electromagnetic forces that are provided by small permanent magnets and a current supply are used to drive the mercury into position. Driving the mercury droplet into a tapered passage halts gas flow through a capillary, while surface tension forces prevent the mercury from passing through the passage. Models have been developed to describe the movement of the mercury droplet and the sealing of the gas passage, and millimeter-scale units have been tested to explore design options. Predictions from the model show that a valve with 10 micron sized features can seal against pressures up to 1.5 atmospheres. Experiments have highlighted the promise of mercury valves and demonstrated problems that can arise from contamination of the mercury.

  6. Biomarkers of Mercury Exposure in the Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Santos Serrão de Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury exposure in the Amazon has been studied since the 1980s decade and the assessment of human mercury exposure in the Amazon is difficult given that the natural occurrence of this metal is high and the concentration of mercury in biological samples of this population exceeds the standardized value of normality established by WHO. Few studies have focused on the discovery of mercury biomarkers in the region’s population. In this way, some studies have used genetics as well as immunological and cytogenetic tools in order to find a molecular biomarker for assessing the toxicological effect of mercury in the Amazonian population. Most of those studies focused attention on the relation between mercury exposure and autoimmunity and, because of that, they will be discussed in more detail. Here we introduce the general aspects involved with each biomarker that was studied in the region in order to contextualize the reader and add information about the Amazonian life style and health that may be considered for future studies. We hope that, in the future, the toxicological studies in this field use high technological tools, such as the next generation sequencing and proteomics skills, in order to comprehend basic questions regarding the metabolic route of mercury in populations that are under constant exposure, such as in the Amazon.

  7. Occupational Metallic Mercury Poisoning in Gilders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vahabzadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to elemental mercury vapor usually occurs through inhalation during its utilizations. This leads to a variety of adverse health effects. In some Islamic cities, this type of poisoning may occur during gilding of shrines using elemental mercury with gold. Herein, we report on three male patients aged 20–53 years, who were diagnosed with occupational metallic mercury poisoning due to gilding of a shrine. All patients presented with neuro-psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, loss of memory and concentration, and sleep disorders with high urinary mercury concentrations of 326–760 μg/L upon referring, 3–10 days after cessation of elemental mercury exposure. Following chelating therapy, the patients recovered clinically and their mercury concentrations declined to non-toxic level (<25 μg/L. Health, environmental and labor authorities, as well as the gilders should be aware of the toxicity risk of exposure to metalic mercury during gilding in closed environments and act accordingly.

  8. Biomarkers of mercury exposure in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Nathália Santos Serrão; Lima, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Mercury exposure in the Amazon has been studied since the 1980s decade and the assessment of human mercury exposure in the Amazon is difficult given that the natural occurrence of this metal is high and the concentration of mercury in biological samples of this population exceeds the standardized value of normality established by WHO. Few studies have focused on the discovery of mercury biomarkers in the region's population. In this way, some studies have used genetics as well as immunological and cytogenetic tools in order to find a molecular biomarker for assessing the toxicological effect of mercury in the Amazonian population. Most of those studies focused attention on the relation between mercury exposure and autoimmunity and, because of that, they will be discussed in more detail. Here we introduce the general aspects involved with each biomarker that was studied in the region in order to contextualize the reader and add information about the Amazonian life style and health that may be considered for future studies. We hope that, in the future, the toxicological studies in this field use high technological tools, such as the next generation sequencing and proteomics skills, in order to comprehend basic questions regarding the metabolic route of mercury in populations that are under constant exposure, such as in the Amazon.

  9. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. III. Blood mercury in relation to duration of exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, M.B.; Ladd, A.C.; Goldwater, L.J.

    1963-01-01

    A series of tests were performed to examine the value of blood mercury determinations in predicting toxic manifestations under conditions of occupational exposure to certain mercury compounds. Human subjects working in factories which process a variety of inorganic and organic compounds of mercury formed the basis of this study. Chemical analyses of blood samples were done by the method of Jacobs and statistical analysis of the data was done by the rank correlation method of Spearman. Results indicate that no statistically significant correlation was found between duration of employment and blood mercury levels. It must be pointed out, however, that this may not apply to all situations but only to those in the present study. Even if mercury levels in the blood do not increase with prolonged exposure, it cannot be concluded that there has been no accumultion of mercury in the body.

  11. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. X. Dental amalgams as a source of urinary mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, A.W.; Goldwater, L.J.

    1966-04-01

    A study was made of 114 adults of whom 85 had from 1 to 28 amalgam dental fillings. The average number of fillings was ten. None of the 114 subjects was under active dental treatment. One was using a mercurial diuretic. Only six persons in this group showed detectable mercury in the urine. No evidence was found that amalgam fillings which are more than a few weeks old contribute appreciably to urinary mercury. Of 24 persons in the process of having teeth filled, five showed mercury in the urine before and after treatment. The possibility of mercury appearing in the urine of persons undergoing fillings as a result of sources other than amalgam was demonstrated. Dental amalgams do not appear to be an important source of mercury absorption and excretion.

  12. Mercury flow experiments. 4th report Measurements of erosion rate caused by mercury flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, H; Hino, R; Kaminaga, M

    2002-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) are promoting a construction plan of the Material-Life Science Facility, which is consisted of a Muon Science Facility and a Neutron Scattering Facility, in order to open up the new science fields. The Neutron Scattering Facility will be utilized for advanced fields of Material and Life science using high intensity neutron generated by the spallation reaction of a 1 MW pulsed proton beam and mercury target. Design of the spallation mercury target system aims to obtain high neutron performance with high reliability and safety. Since the target system is using mercury as the target material and contains large amount of radioactive spallation products, it is necessary to estimate reliability for strength of instruments in a mercury flow system during lifetime of the facility. Piping and components in the mercury flow system would be damaged by erosion with mercury flow, since these components will be we...

  13. Methyl mercury, but not inorganic mercury, associated with higher blood pressure during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ellen M; Herbstman, Julie B; Lin, Yu Hong; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Halden, Rolf U; Witter, Frank R; Goldman, Lynn R

    2017-04-01

    Prior studies addressing associations between mercury and blood pressure have produced inconsistent findings; some of this may result from measuring total instead of speciated mercury. This cross-sectional study of 263 pregnant women assessed total mercury, speciated mercury, selenium, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in umbilical cord blood and blood pressure during labor and delivery. Models with a) total mercury or b) methyl and inorganic mercury were evaluated. Regression models adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, prepregnancy body mass index, neighborhood income, parity, smoking, n-3 fatty acids and selenium. Geometric mean total, methyl, and inorganic mercury concentrations were 1.40µg/L (95% confidence interval: 1.29, 1.52); 0.95µg/L (0.84, 1.07); and 0.13µg/L (0.10, 0.17), respectively. Elevated systolic BP, diastolic BP, and pulse pressure were found, respectively, in 11.4%, 6.8%, and 19.8% of mothers. In adjusted multivariable models, a one-tertile increase of methyl mercury was associated with 2.83mmHg (0.17, 5.50) higher systolic blood pressure and 2.99mmHg (0.91, 5.08) higher pulse pressure. In the same models, an increase of one tertile of inorganic mercury was associated with -1.18mmHg (-3.72, 1.35) lower systolic blood pressure and -2.51mmHg (-4.49, -0.53) lower pulse pressure. No associations were observed with diastolic pressure. There was a non-significant trend of higher total mercury with higher systolic blood pressure. We observed a significant association of higher methyl mercury with higher systolic and pulse pressure, yet higher inorganic mercury was significantly associated with lower pulse pressure. These results should be confirmed with larger, longitudinal studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analytical Evaluation of Jamming Transition Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganji, S.S; Barari, Amin; Najafi, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies two powerful analytical approximation methods to the jamming transition problem (JTP) of traffic flow networks. The governing equations are modeled on the Lorentz system and take the form of a nonlinear nonconservative oscillator. We describe and implement the homotopy perturba...

  15. Article Commentary: Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  16. Physical properties of the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Pamela E.

    1988-01-01

    The global physical properties of Mercury are summarized with attention given to its figure and orbital parameters. The combination of properties suggests that Mercury has an extensive iron-rich core, possibly with a still-functioning dynamo, which is 42 percent of the interior by volume. Mercury's three major axes are comparable in size, indicating that the planet is a triaxial ellipsoid rather than an oblate spheroid. In terms of the domination of its surface by an intermediate plains terrane, it is more Venus- or Mars-like; however, due to the presence of a large metallic magnetic core, its interior may be more earth-like.

  17. Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, David K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crye, Jason Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wendel, Mark W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farquharson, George [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jallouk, Philip A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFee, Marshall T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pointer, William David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ruggles, Art E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power linear accelerator built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which incorporates the use of a flowing liquid mercury target. The Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) was constructed to investigate and verify the heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury in a rectangular channel. This report provides a compilation of previously reported results from the water-cooled and electrically heated straight and curved test sections that simulate the geometry of the window cooling channel in the target nose region.

  18. Measurement of mercury in flue gas based on an aluminum matrix sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiaohao; Wang, Wenhua

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of total mercury in flue gas based on an economical aluminum matrix sorbent was developed in this paper. A sorbent trap consisted of three tubes was employed to capture Hg from flue gas. Hg trapped on sorbent was transferred into solution by acid leaching and then detected by CVAAS. Hg adsorbed on sorbent was recovered completely by leaching process. The 87.7% recovery of Hg in flue gas by tube 1 and tube 2 was obtained on the equipment of coal combustion and sampling in lab. In order to evaluate the ability to recover and accurately quantify Hg(0) on the sorbent media, the analytical bias test on tube 3 spiked with Hg(0) was also performed and got the average recovery of 97.1%. Mercury measurements based on this method were conducted for three coal-fired power plants in China. The mercury in coal is distributed into bottom ash, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash, wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) reactant, and flue gas, and the relative distribution varied depending on factors such as the coal type and the operation conditions of plants. The mercury mass balances of three plants were also calculated which were 91.6%, 77.1%, and 118%, respectively. The reliability of this method was verified by the Ontario Hydro (OH) method either in lab or in field.

  19. Determination of total mercury by vapor generation in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Poznan Technical University, Poznan (Poland)

    2008-07-01

    The analytical performance of non-chromatographic coupled hydride generation, integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame absorption spectrometry (FAAS) systems were evaluated for the determination of total mercury in environmental samples. Mercury, using formation of mercury vapors were atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design of vapor generation integrated atom trap flame atomic absorption spectrometry (VG-IAT-FAAS) hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangements was investigated. This novel approach enables to decrease the detection limit down to low pg mL{sup -1} levels. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation was 0.4 ng mL{sup -1}. For a 120 s in situ pre-concentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 750 folds for Hg, using vapor generation-atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed by RSD, was 9.3% (n = 6) for Hg. Reference and real sample materials were analyzed. The accuracy of the method was verified by the use of certified reference materials and by aqueous standard calibration technique. The measured Hg content, in reference materials, were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values, The hyphenated technique was applied for mercury determinations in coal fly ash, sewage and water.

  20. Low-level gestational exposure to mercury and maternal fish consumption: Associations with neurobehavior in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Khoury, Jane C; Sucharew, Heidi; Dietrich, Kim; Yolton, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the effects of low-level gestational methylmercury exposure from fish consumption on infant neurobehavioral outcomes in the offspring are limited and inconclusive. Our objective was to examine the effects of low-level gestational exposure to methylmercury on neurobehavioral outcomes in early infancy. We assessed neurobehavior of 344 infants at 5-weeks using the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS). Gestational mercury exposure was measured as whole blood total mercury (WBTHg) in maternal and cord blood. We collected fish consumption information and estimated polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake. We examined the association between gestational mercury exposure and NNNS scales using regression, adjusting for covariates. Geometric mean of maternal and cord WBTHg were 0.64 and 0.72 μg/L, respectively. Most mothers (84%) reported eating fish during pregnancy. Infants with higher prenatal mercury exposure showed increased asymmetric reflexes among girls (p=0.04 for maternal WBTHg and p=0.03 for cord WBTHg), less need for special handling during the assessment (p=0.03 for cord WBTHg) and a trend of better attention (p=0.054 for both maternal WBTHg and cord WBTHg). Similarly, infants born to mothers with higher fish consumption or estimated PUFA intake also had increased asymmetric reflexes and less need for special handling. In models simultaneously adjusted for WBTHg and fish consumption (or PUFA intake), the previously observed WBTHg effects were attenuated; and higher fish consumption (or PUFA intake) was significantly associated with less need for special handling. In a cohort with low level mercury exposure and reporting low fish consumption, we found minimal evidence of mercury associated detrimental effects on neurobehavioral outcomes during early infancy. Higher prenatal mercury exposure was associated with more frequent asymmetric reflexes in girls. In contrast, infants with higher prenatal mercury exposure and those whose mothers

  1. Bioaccumulation of mercury in benthic communities of a river ecosystem affected by mercury mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, Suzana; Horvat, Milena; Gibicar, Darija; Fajon, Vesna; Toman, Mihael J

    2007-05-15

    The presence of mercury in the river Idrijca (Slovenia) is mainly due to 500 years of mercury mining in this region. In order to understand the cycling of mercury in the Idrijca ecosystem it is crucial to investigate the role of biota. This study is part of an ongoing investigation of mercury biogeochemistry in the river Idrijca, focusing on the accumulation and speciation of mercury in the lower levels of the food chain, namely filamentous algae, periphyton and macroinvertebrates. Mercury analysis and speciation in the biota and in water were performed during the spring, summer and autumn seasons at four locations on the river, representing different degrees of mercury contamination. Total (THg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) were measured. The results showed that the highest THg concentrations in biota correlate well with THg levels in sediments and water. The level of MeHg is spatially and seasonally variable, showing higher values at the most contaminated sites during the summer and autumn periods. The percentage of Hg as MeHg increases with the trophic level from water (0.1-0.8%), algae (0.5-1.3%), periphyton (1.6-8.8%) to macroinvertebrates (0.1-100%), which indicates active transformation, accumulation and magnification of mercury in the benthic organism of this heavily contaminated torrential river.

  2. Diagnosing congenital syphilis using Hutchinson's method: Differentiating between syphilitic, mercurial, and syphilitic-mercurial dental defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Stella; Sassani, Sadaf; Henneberg, Maciej; Henneberg, Renata J

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on the dental abnormalities observed by Sir Jonathan Hutchinson, Henry Moon and Alfred Fournier in patients with congenital syphilis and in those treated with mercury, in order to define alterations in dental morphology attributable to each of these causes. These definitions are applied to reported paleopathological cases, exploring various etiologies behind the defects, in order to aid in the diagnosis of congenital syphilis. Original works were examined for descriptions of dental abnormalities in congenital syphilis and in mercurial treatments. These descriptions were compared with dentitions of paleopathological cases (n = 4) demonstrating abnormalities attributed to congenital syphilis. Distinct morphological differences were recognized between congenital syphilitic teeth and teeth affected by mercury. Mercury produces a pronounced deficiency in enamel of incisors, canines and first permanent molars that become rugged and pitted, and of dirty grey honeycombed appearance. Mercury-induced dental changes are evident in three out of four cases studied here. In one case, only syphilitic changes were present. Dental changes in congenital syphilis range from no visible signs to those beyond the classical models of Hutchinson, Moon and Fournier. Treatment of neonates and infants with mercury produces additional changes. Signs of disease and treatment with mercury on teeth may occur together; permanent incisors, first molars and canines, are typically affected, premolars and second/third molars are usually spared. Signs of treatment with mercury might be the only evidence of the occurrence of the disease as mercury was rarely used to treat other diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. Part IV. Tolerance to mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, L.J.; Jacobs, M.B.; Ladd, A.C.

    1963-11-01

    Selected reports dealing with human tolerance to mercury are reviewed. The results of human observations spanning a period of 21 years is presented. Tolerance to some forms of mercury may be greater than has been believed. The bases for present threshold limit (TL) values for inorganic and organic mercury have been critically examined and found to have inherent weaknesses. It is suggested that the present mercury TL values need to be revised. The use of data from clinical medicine and pharmacology in arriving at TL values is also suggested.

  4. Absorption and excretion of mercury in man. VII. Significance of mercury in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldwater, L.J.; Ladd, A.C.; Jacobs, M.B.

    1964-12-01

    A literature review is presented of mercury in the blood of humans. New findings are described on various aspects of human exposure to mercury. From these findings, the only conclusions that can be drawn are that as a group exposed persons will have more mercury in their blood than unexposed persons, and that some unexposed individuals may have more than some who are exposed. Selected data are presented illustrating mercury blood levels in relation to exposure. Studies on the relationship of mercury in blood and urine indicate that a statistically significant correlation is shown between blood and urine on a group basis. There is no evidence, in these groups, that analysis of blood for mercury yields information of greater significance than that found in studying the urine. The results of studies on mercury in blood and duration of exposure indicate that there is no evidence of accumulation of mercury in the blood with prolongation of exposure. This does not rule out the possibility of a build-up of mercury in the body.

  5. Tundra uptake of atmospheric elemental mercury drives Arctic mercury pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Daniel; Agnan, Yannick; Jiskra, Martin; Olson, Christine L; Colegrove, Dominique P; Hueber, Jacques; Moore, Christopher W; Sonke, Jeroen E; Helmig, Detlev

    2017-07-12

    Anthropogenic activities have led to large-scale mercury (Hg) pollution in the Arctic. It has been suggested that sea-salt-induced chemical cycling of Hg (through 'atmospheric mercury depletion events', or AMDEs) and wet deposition via precipitation are sources of Hg to the Arctic in its oxidized form (Hg(ii)). However, there is little evidence for the occurrence of AMDEs outside of coastal regions, and their importance to net Hg deposition has been questioned. Furthermore, wet-deposition measurements in the Arctic showed some of the lowest levels of Hg deposition via precipitation worldwide, raising questions as to the sources of high Arctic Hg loading. Here we present a comprehensive Hg-deposition mass-balance study, and show that most of the Hg (about 70%) in the interior Arctic tundra is derived from gaseous elemental Hg (Hg(0)) deposition, with only minor contributions from the deposition of Hg(ii) via precipitation or AMDEs. We find that deposition of Hg(0)-the form ubiquitously present in the global atmosphere-occurs throughout the year, and that it is enhanced in summer through the uptake of Hg(0) by vegetation. Tundra uptake of gaseous Hg(0) leads to high soil Hg concentrations, with Hg masses greatly exceeding the levels found in temperate soils. Our concurrent Hg stable isotope measurements in the atmosphere, snowpack, vegetation and soils support our finding that Hg(0) dominates as a source to the tundra. Hg concentration and stable isotope data from an inland-to-coastal transect show high soil Hg concentrations consistently derived from Hg(0), suggesting that the Arctic tundra might be a globally important Hg sink. We suggest that the high tundra soil Hg concentrations might also explain why Arctic rivers annually transport large amounts of Hg to the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Tundra uptake of atmospheric elemental mercury drives Arctic mercury pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Daniel; Agnan, Yannick; Jiskra, Martin; Olson, Christine L.; Colegrove, Dominique P.; Hueber, Jacques; Moore, Christopher W.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Helmig, Detlev

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic activities have led to large-scale mercury (Hg) pollution in the Arctic. It has been suggested that sea-salt-induced chemical cycling of Hg (through ‘atmospheric mercury depletion events’, or AMDEs) and wet deposition via precipitation are sources of Hg to the Arctic in its oxidized form (Hg(II)). However, there is little evidence for the occurrence of AMDEs outside of coastal regions, and their importance to net Hg deposition has been questioned. Furthermore, wet-deposition measurements in the Arctic showed some of the lowest levels of Hg deposition via precipitation worldwide, raising questions as to the sources of high Arctic Hg loading. Here we present a comprehensive Hg-deposition mass-balance study, and show that most of the Hg (about 70%) in the interior Arctic tundra is derived from gaseous elemental Hg (Hg(0)) deposition, with only minor contributions from the deposition of Hg(II) via precipitation or AMDEs. We find that deposition of Hg(0)—the form ubiquitously present in the global atmosphere—occurs throughout the year, and that it is enhanced in summer through the uptake of Hg(0) by vegetation. Tundra uptake of gaseous Hg(0) leads to high soil Hg concentrations, with Hg masses greatly exceeding the levels found in temperate soils. Our concurrent Hg stable isotope measurements in the atmosphere, snowpack, vegetation and soils support our finding that Hg(0) dominates as a source to the tundra. Hg concentration and stable isotope data from an inland-to-coastal transect show high soil Hg concentrations consistently derived from Hg(0), suggesting that the Arctic tundra might be a globally important Hg sink. We suggest that the high tundra soil Hg concentrations might also explain why Arctic rivers annually transport large amounts of Hg to the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Thin mercury film electrodes in dynamic speciation studies of metals =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luciana Sarabando da

    In the present work the performance and applicability of the thin mercury film electrode (TMFE) in the dynamic speciation of trace metals was investigated. Two different electroanalytical stripping techniques were used: the classical anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and a recent developed technique, scanning stripping chronopotentiometry (SSCP). The ion-exchange and the mass transport features of novel mixed coatings of two sulfonated cation-exchange polymers with dissimilar characteristics, Nafion (NA) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were evaluated, prior to its application in the field of trace metal analysis. Suitable NA-PSS polymer coatings could be used in the modification of TMFE, presenting a high sensitivity, reproducibility, mechanical stability and adequate antifouling properties in the ASV determination of trace metal cations in complex media. Also the features of the PSS polyelectrolyte layers for ion-exchange voltammetry (IEV) were evaluated. The goal was to search for the best conditions to obtain stable PSS coated electrodes, which could present high negative charge densities in order to enhance the electrostatic accumulation of cations within the film, thus enlarging the ASV signal. The applicability and performance of the TMFE in the trace metal speciation studies, by SSCP, were for the first time exploited. The optimized TMFE presented a high sensitivity and resolution, being an excellent complement to the conventional mercury electrodes and could be use for 1-day term with no significant variation in the SCP analytical signal and no apparent degradation. The calculated SSCP curves were in excellent agreement with experimental data at the TMFE and the stability constant (K), calculated from the shift in the SSCP half-wave potential, of two labile metal-complex systems were in good agreement with the ones obtained using the conventional Hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and those predicted by theory. Additionally, the experimental

  8. Analytical Chemistry in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Yuri

    2016-09-06

    Research in Russian analytical chemistry (AC) is carried out on a significant scale, and the analytical service solves practical tasks of geological survey, environmental protection, medicine, industry, agriculture, etc. The education system trains highly skilled professionals in AC. The development and especially manufacturing of analytical instruments should be improved; in spite of this, there are several good domestic instruments and other satisfy some requirements. Russian AC has rather good historical roots.

  9. Investigation of subsurface mercury at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothschild, E.R.; Turner, R.R.; Stow, S.H.; Bogle, M.A.; Hyder, L.K.; Sealand, O.M.; Wyrick, H.J.

    1984-11-01

    An investigation of the fate of spills and leaks of elemental mercury at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been carried out through a multiphased well installation and soil boring program. The overall program resulted in the installation of a 43-well monitoring network and the analysis of 430 soil/mud samples and 113 groundwater samples for mercury content. In addition, 59 analyses for uranium in groundwater were made, and 132 anion and cation analyses were run. The hydrogeology of the plant is dominated by the original Upper East Fork Poplar Creek drainage channel and the extensive solution cavity system that underlies the creek the Maynardville Limestone. Although the original hydrologic system at the plant has been altered due to construction and recontouring of the topography, the original drainage still plays an important role in the subsurface movement of water. Results of mercury analyses of soils and fill indicate that high concentrations (up to 1% by weight) of mercury occur in the shallow earth materials at several sites within the plant, but the estimated total quantity located (approx. 7000 lb) represents only about 2% of the amount estimated to have been lost to the ground. Results of mercury analyses of groundwater indicate that mercury does not appear to be moving in significant quantities in an aqueous phase: the highest soluble concentrations found (approx. 1 ..mu..g/L) were limited to three wells. The analyses of the groundwater samples for other chemical constituents revealed the presence of several contaminant plumes within the plant, including sulfates from a large coal pile, nitrates from liquid waste disposal operations, and chlorides from several sources, as well as general increases of electrical conductance and alkalinity. 26 references, 29 figures, 12 tables.

  10. Analytical Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Titan 80-300 is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with spectroscopic detectors to allow chemical, elemental, and other analytical measurements to...

  11. Accumulation route and chemical form of mercury in mushroom species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minagawa, K.; Sasaki, T.; Takizawa, Y.; Tamura, R.; Oshina, T.

    1980-09-01

    Some papers were published on several species of fungi having more accumulating abilities of mercury than other land plants and a relatively small part of mercury being present as methylmercury in most species (Stegnar et al. 1973, Stijve and Roschnik 1974). But, little information is available regarding the routes of mercury in fungi, and also no report on mercury speciation (chemical form and complexation) in them have been published, apart from methylmercury. In order to evaluate accurately their biological characteristics such as absorption, excretion, accumulation and toxicity (The Task Group on Metal Interaction 1978), the mercury speciation present in mushrooms, regardless of edible or nonedible, should be identified. In this report, we present (1) contents of total and methylmercury in mushrooms near the acetaldehyde factory which had the mounds of sludge containing mercury, (2) data or exposure experiment of mercury vapor to raw mushrooms (Shiitake) on the market, and (3) data on mercury speciation of mercury other than methylmercury.

  12. Mercury content in electrum from artisanal mining site of Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murao, Satoshi; Naito, Kazuki; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Sie, Soey H.

    2006-08-01

    In Mongolia, artisanal gold mining, modern gold rush, in which people use mercury to extract gold, is being proliferated rapidly and the mercury contamination of mining site is becoming a serious social issue. For the risk assessment of mercury, it is necessary to understand how much mercury is introduced to the environment from what kind of materials during mining activity. It is already known that major contribution of the contamination comes from mercury that was bought at shops and brought to mining sites by miners. However, no information is available on how much mercury is removed from electrum (natural gold grain) to the environment. Since gold deposit is always accompanied by mercury anomaly, it is anticipated that electrum grains contain some amount of mercury of natural origin, and this mercury (primary mercury) contributes to some extent to the contamination. In order to clarify how much mercury is incorporated in electrum grains, micro-PIXE at CSIRO was used for grain-by-grain analysis. The result showed that electrum from study area contains mercury up to 8260 ppm. It is concluded that for the risk management of mercury contamination, release of natural mercury from electrum grains during smelting must not be ignored.

  13. Waterbury, Conn., Incinerator to Control Mercury Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission control equipment to limit the discharge of mercury pollution to the atmosphere will be installed at an incinerator owned by the City of Waterbury, Conn., according to a proposed agreement between the city and federal government.

  14. Mercury in the South African environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matooane, M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This presentation highlights the toxic effects that over-exposure to mercury (Hg) might have on human health. This includes blindness, deafness, cerebral palsy, mental problems and abnormal reflexes and muscle tone. Hg emissions increasing globally...

  15. Chemistry of impact events on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnoy, Alexey A.

    2018-01-01

    Based on the equilibrium thermochemical approach and quenching theory, formation of molecules and dust grains in impact-produced clouds formed after collisions between meteoroids and Mercury is considered. Based on observations of Al, Fe, and Mn atoms in the exosphere of Mercury and new results of studies of the elemental composition of the surface of Mercury, quenching temperatures and pressures of main chemical reactions and condensation of dust particles were estimated. The behavior of the main Na-, K-, Ca-, Fe-, Al-, Mn-, Mg-, Si-, Ti, Ni-, Cr-, Co, Zn-, O-, H-, S-, C-, Cl-, N-, and P-containing species delivered to the Hermean exosphere during meteoroid impacts was studied. The importance of meteoroid bombardment as a source of Na, K, Ca, Fe, Al, Mn, Mg, and O atoms in the exosphere of Mercury is discussed.

  16. Mercury sorbent delivery system for flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder,; Edgar, B [Bethel Park, PA

    2009-02-24

    The invention presents a device for the removal of elemental mercury from flue gas streams utilizing a layer of activated carbon particles contained within the filter fabric of a filter bag for use in a flue gas scrubbing system.

  17. Filter for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A filter for enriching the .sup.196 Hg content of mercury, including a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill of mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. The reactor is arranged around said filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of quartz, and are transparent to ultraviolet light. The .sup.196 Hg concentration in the mercury fill is less than that which is present in naturally occurring mercury, that is less than about 0.146 atomic weight percent. Hydrogen is also included in the fill and serves as a quenching gas in the filter, the hydrogen also serving to prevent disposition of a dark coating on the interior of the filter.

  18. Mercury exposure: are we at risk?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matooane, M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available . Mercury can also enter the body through the skin (dermal contact). However, the ingestion of Hg contaminated food (particularly fish) remains the principal exposure route. People who regularly eat locally caught fish with elevated Hg concentrations...

  19. Environmental chemistry and toxicology of mercury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2012-01-01

    .... Bringing together information normally spread across several books, this text is unique in covering the entire mercury cycle and providing a baseline for what is known and what uncertainties remain...

  20. Environmental chemistry and toxicology of mercury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2012-01-01

    ... employed in recent studies. The coverage discusses the environmental behavior and toxicological effects of mercury on organisms, including humans, and provides case studies at the end of each chapter...

  1. Why mercury prefers soft ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccardi, Demian M [ORNL; Guo, Hao-Bo [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Summers, Anne [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Miller, S [University of California, San Francisco; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a major global pollutant arising from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Defining the factors that determine the relative affinities of different ligands for the mercuric ion, Hg2+, is critical to understanding its speciation, transformation, and bioaccumulation in the environment. Here, we use quantum chemistry to dissect the relative binding free energies for a series of inorganic anion complexes of Hg2+. Comparison of Hg2+ ligand interactions in the gaseous and aqueous phases shows that differences in interactions with a few, local water molecules led to a clear periodic trend within the chalcogenide and halide groups and resulted in the well-known experimentally observed preference of Hg2+ for soft ligands such as thiols. Our approach establishes a basis for understanding Hg speciation in the biosphere.

  2. Mercury and halogens in coal--Their role in determining mercury emissions from coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Quick, Jeffrey C.; Senior, Connie L.; Belkin, Harvey E.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic pollutant. In its elemental form, gaseous mercury has a long residence time in the atmosphere, up to a year, allowing it to be transported long distances from emission sources. Mercury can be emitted from natural sources such as volcanoes, or from anthropogenic sources, such as coal-fired powerplants. In addition, all sources of mercury on the Earth's surface can re-emit it from land and sea back to the atmosphere, from which it is then redeposited. Mercury in the atmosphere is present in such low concentrations that it is not considered harmful. Once mercury enters the aquatic environment, however, it can undergo a series of biochemical transformations that convert a portion of the mercury originally present to methylmercury, a highly toxic organic form of mercury that accumulates in fish and birds. Many factors contribute to creation of methylmercury in aquatic ecosystems, including mercury availability, sediment and nutrient load, bacterial influence, and chemical conditions. In the United States, consumption of fish with high levels of methylmercury is the most common pathway for human exposure to mercury, leading the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue fish consumption advisories in every State. The EPA estimates that 50 percent of the mercury entering the atmosphere in the United States is emitted from coal-burning utility powerplants. An EPA rule, known as MATS (for Mercury and Air Toxics Standards), to reduce emissions of mercury and other toxic pollutants from powerplants, was signed in December 2011. The rule, which is currently under review, specifies limits for mercury and other toxic elements, such as arsenic, chromium, and nickel. MATS also places limits on emission of harmful acid gases, such as hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid. These standards are the result of a 2010 detailed nationwide program by the EPA to sample stack emissions and thousands of shipments of coal to coal-burning powerplants. The United

  3. Gamma radiation stability studies of mercury fulminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2000-02-17

    Mercury fulminate completely decomposed in a gamma source (0.86 Mrad/h) after a dose of 208 Mrad. This exposure equates to approximately 2.4 years in Tank 15H and 4 years in Tank 12H, one of the vessels of concern. Since the tanks lost the supernatant cover layer more than a decade ago, this study suggests that any mercury fulminate or closely related energetic species decomposed long ago if ever formed.

  4. Evaluation of mercury contamination in Descoberto, MG

    OpenAIRE

    Tinoco, AAP; de Azevedo, ICDD; Marques, EAG; Mounteer, AH; Martins, CD; Nascentes, R; Reis, EL; Natalino, R

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a chemical element considered unessential to any metabolic process; however, it is easily accumulated in most organisms. It is naturally found in both organic and inorganic forms in solid, liquid and vapor states. Its biogeochemical cycle involves processes occurring in the soil, water and the atmosphere. In 2002, elementary mercury was found in the city of Descoberto, Minas Gerais, Brazil, where 70 families live, and its origin may be related to gold exploration that happened in t...

  5. Thermal elastic deformations of the planet Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1972-01-01

    The variation in solar heating due to the resonance rotation of Mercury produces periodic elastic deformations on the surface of the planet. The thermal stress and strain fields under Mercury's surface are calculated after certain simplifications. It is found that deformations penetrate to a greater depth than the variation of solar heating, and that the thermal strain on the surface of the planet pulsates with an amplitude of .004 and a period of 176 days.

  6. Mercury's resonant rotation from secular orbital elements

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Hussmann, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    We used recently produced Solar System ephemerides, which incorporate 2 years of ranging observations to the MESSENGER spacecraft, to extract the secular orbital elements for Mercury and associated uncertainties. As Mercury is in a stable 3:2 spin-orbit resonance, these values constitute an important reference for the planet’s measured rotational parameters, which in turn strongly bear on physical interpretation of Mercury’s interior structure. In particular, we derive a mean orbital period o...

  7. Mercury and monomethylmercury: present and future concerns.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, W F; Clarkson, T W

    1991-01-01

    Global atmospheric changes carry the potential to disrupt the normal cycling of mercury and its compounds. Acid rain may increase methylmercury levels in freshwater fish. Global warming and increased ultraviolet radiation may affect the global budget of methylmercury, including its formation and degradation in both biotic and abiotic environments. In this article we review current knowledge on mercury and monomethylmercury with regard to their environmental fate and the potential for human he...

  8. Fish consumption limit for mercury compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Esmaili-Sari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Methyl mercury can carry out harmful effects on the reproductive, respiratory, and nervous system of human. Moreover, mercury is known as the most toxic heavy metal in nature. Fish and seafood consumption is the major MeHg exposure route for human. The present study tries to cover researches which have been conducted on mercury levels in 21 species of fish from Persian Gulf, Caspian Sea and Anzali Wetland during the past 6 years, and in addition to stating mercury level, it provides recommendations about the restriction of monthly fish consumption for each species separately. Material and methods: Fish samples were transferred to the laboratory and stored in refrigerator under -20oC until they were dissected. Afterwards, the muscle tissues were separated and dried. The dried samples were ground and changed into a homogenous powder and then the mercury concentration rate has been determined by advanced mercury analyzer, model 254. Results: In general, mercury contamination in fishes caught from Anzali Wetland was much more than fishes from Caspian Sea. Also, from among all studied fishes, oriental sole (Euryglossa orientalis, caught from Persian Gulf, allocated the most mercury level to itself with the rate of 5.61ml per kg., therefore, it exercises a severe consumption restriction for pregnant women and vulnerable groups. Conclusion: Based on the calculations, about 50% of fishes, mostly with short food chain, can be easily consumed during the year. However, with regard to Oriental sole (Euryglossa orientalis and shark (Carcharhinus dussumieri, caught from Persian Gulf, special consideration should be taken in their consumption. On the other hand, careful planning should be made for the high rate of fish consumption among fishing community.

  9. Stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, Paul D.; Guest, John E.

    1988-01-01

    The geologic evolution of Mercury based on the Mariner-10 mission data is discussed. As reconstructed through photogeological analysis of global geologic relations of rock-stratigraphic units, Mercury's geologic history is shown to involve intensive early impact bombardment and widespread resurfacing by volcanic lavas. Evidence is presented to indicate that this volcanic activity essentially ended as much as 3 Gyr ago, with most of the major geologic events being completed within the first 1 to 1.5 Gyr of Mercurian history.

  10. Mercury and selenium content of Taiwanese seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G C; Nam, D H; Basu, N

    2011-01-01

    Fish consumption is avid in Taiwan (and other Asian nations), but little is known about the mercury and selenium content in local seafood. This paper reports on total mercury, methylmercury and selenium levels from 14 commonly consumed seafood items obtained from Taichung, Taiwan. Mean total mercury concentrations varied nearly 100-fold across species. Fifty per cent of the marlins sampled and 35% of the sharks exceeded the 0.3 µg g(-1) US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guideline. Methylmercury comprised a majority of the total mercury in all species. In all species studied there was a molar excess of selenium over mercury. The rank order of mean selenium-mercury molar ratios was red tilapia (166.8) > abura (87.9) > river prawn (82.4) > whiteleg shrimp (64.2) > butterfish (44.6) > milkfish (37.0) > tuna (15.6) > grouper (13.9) > ayu (13.4) > coral hind (13.0) > weever (11.8) > saury (9.0) > shark (7.8) > marlin (4.2).

  11. Acute mercury poisoning: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury poisoning can occur as a result of occupational hazard or suicide attempt. This article presents a 36-year-old case admitted to emergency department (ED) due to exposure to metallic mercury. Case Presentatıon A 36-year-old woman presented to the ED with a three-day history of abdominal pain, diarrhea and fever. One week ago her daughter had brought mercury in the liquid form from the school. She had put it on the heating stove. One day later, her 14-month old sister baby got fever and died before admission to the hospital. Her blood pressure was 134/87 mmHg; temperature, 40.2°C; heart rate 105 bpm and regular; respiration, 18 bpm; O2 saturation, 96%. Nothing was remarkable on examination and routine laboratory tests. As serine or urinary mercury levels could not be tested in the city, symptomatic chelation treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was instituted with regard to presumptive diagnosis and history. At the 7th day of admission she was discharged without any sequelae or complaint. At the discharge day blood was drawn and sent for mercury levels which turned out to be 30 μg/dL (normal range: 0 - 10 μg/dL). Conclusion Public education on poisoning and the potential hazards of mercury are of vital importance for community health. PMID:20302609

  12. Acute mercury poisoning: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktas Can

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury poisoning can occur as a result of occupational hazard or suicide attempt. This article presents a 36-year-old case admitted to emergency department (ED due to exposure to metallic mercury. Case Presentatıon A 36-year-old woman presented to the ED with a three-day history of abdominal pain, diarrhea and fever. One week ago her daughter had brought mercury in the liquid form from the school. She had put it on the heating stove. One day later, her 14-month old sister baby got fever and died before admission to the hospital. Her blood pressure was 134/87 mmHg; temperature, 40.2°C; heart rate 105 bpm and regular; respiration, 18 bpm; O2 saturation, 96%. Nothing was remarkable on examination and routine laboratory tests. As serine or urinary mercury levels could not be tested in the city, symptomatic chelation treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC was instituted with regard to presumptive diagnosis and history. At the 7th day of admission she was discharged without any sequelae or complaint. At the discharge day blood was drawn and sent for mercury levels which turned out to be 30 μg/dL (normal range: 0 - 10 μg/dL. Conclusion Public education on poisoning and the potential hazards of mercury are of vital importance for community health.

  13. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  14. Mercury Retention by Fly Ashes from Oxy-fuel Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Miranda, Nuria; Villamil Rumayor, Marta; López Antón, María Antonia; Díaz Somoano, Mercedes; Martínez Tarazona, María Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the mechanism of mercury retention in fly ashes, the main solid waste from coal combustion power plants, and to evaluate the interactions between the type of mercury and fly ashes. The work was based on the results of mercury speciation in the gas and the solid fly ash before and after mercury retention. The identification of the mercury species in the gas was performed using previously validated methods, but the speciation of the mercury retained i...

  15. Quine's "Strictly Vegetarian" Analyticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decock, L.B.

    2017-01-01

    I analyze Quine’s later writings on analyticity from a linguistic point of view. In Word and Object Quine made room for a “strictly vegetarian” notion of analyticity. In later years, he developed this notion into two more precise notions, which I have coined “stimulus analyticity” and “behaviorist

  16. Some Heterodox Analytic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Analytic philosophy has been the most influential philosophical movement in 20th century philosophy. It has surely contributed like no other movement to the elucidation and demarcation of philosophical problems. Nonetheless, the empiricist and sometimes even nominalist convictions of orthodox analytic philosophers have served them to inadequately render even philosophers they consider their own and to propound very questionable conceptions.

  17. The Analytical Hierarchy Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Michael Bruhn

    2007-01-01

    The technical note gathers the theory behind the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and present its advantages and disadvantages in practical use.......The technical note gathers the theory behind the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and present its advantages and disadvantages in practical use....

  18. Validating Analytical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures utilized by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) to develop, evaluate, and validate analytical methods for the analysis of chemical pollutants are detailed. Methods validated by AOAC are used by the EPA and FDA in their enforcement programs and are granted preferential treatment by the courts. (BT)

  19. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  20. European Analytical Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, B.; Grasserbauer, M.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year, we have invited Professor Manfred Grasserbauer of the Vienna University of Technology to present some of the current challenges...... for European analytical chemistry. During the period 2002–07, Professor Grasserbauer was Director of the Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (EC), Ispra, Italy. There is no doubt that many challenges exist at the present time for all of us representing...... a major branch of chemistry, namely analytical chemistry. The global financial crisis is affecting all branches of chemistry, but analytical chemistry, in particular, since our discipline by tradition has many close links to industry. We have already noticed decreased industrial commitment with respect...