WorldWideScience

Sample records for network infrequent participation

  1. Depression and infrequent participation in social activities among older adults: the moderating role of high-quality familial ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtfreter, Kristy; Reisig, Michael D; Turanovic, Jillian J

    2017-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate whether depression is associated with reduced participation in social activities among older adults. Additionally, this study assesses whether high-quality familial ties diminish the negative association between depression and social activities. Using cross-sectional telephone interview data from a sample of individuals 60 years of age and older in Arizona and Florida (N = 2000), this study estimates a series of linear regression models to assess the relationship between depression and social activities, and test whether this association is conditioned by high-quality familial ties using multiplicative interaction terms. As expected, an inverse relationship between depression and social activities is observed. Delving deeper, the regression models reveal that the depression-inactivity association is weaker among older individuals with strong, positive ties to spouses and children. Additional tests demonstrate the mere of existence of familial bonds provides no meaningful benefit - the quality of such ties matters. Findings support the theoretical argument that high-quality familial ties provide supportive coping resources that buffer individuals from the undesirable consequences associated with depression. Moving forward, longitudinal research on the causal links between depression and infrequent participation in social and leisure activities among older adults is warranted.

  2. Core Benefits of Network Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Kheiri Pileh Roud, Ensieh

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the core benefits of network participation from the maritime companies’ perspective. It mainly focuses on the area of innovation, network qualities and absorptive capacities. A single case study has been conducted to address two research questions; 1) what are the core benefits of network participation for a maritime company? 2) Which qualities of network events influence the benefits for the participants? The main findings show that, the networks are valuable communi...

  3. Managerial challenges within networks: emphasizing the paradox of network participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten

    Flexibility and access to numerous resources are essential benefits associated with network participation. An important aspect of managing the network participation of a company is to maintain a dynamic portfolio of partners, and thereby keep up the strategic opportunities for development. However......, maintaining the dynamics within a network seems to be a complex challenge. There is a risk that the network ends up in The Paradox of Network Participation. The desired renewal and flexibility are not utilised because the involved parties preserve the existing networks structure consisting of the same...... companies, and hence, the paradox reduces the potential advantages of the network. The objective of this paper is to analyse the fundamental conditions for a company which depends on an efficient network, and based on this discuss how active use of information can reduce the relative importance of trust...

  4. Managerial Challenges Within Networks - Emphasizing the Paradox of Network Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Flexibility and access to numerous resources are essential benefits associated with network participation. An important aspect of managing the network participation of a company is to maintain a dynamic portfolio of partners, and thereby keep up the strategic opportunities for development. However......, maintaining the dynamics within a network seems to be a complex challenge. There is a risk that the network ends up in The Paradox of Network Participation. The desired renewal and flexibility are not utilised because the involved parties preserve the existing networks structure consisting of the same...... companies, and hence, the paradox reduces the potential advantages of the network. The objective of this paper is to analyse the fundamental conditions for a company which depends on an efficient network, and based on this discuss how active use of information can reduce the relative importance of trust...

  5. The Conceptualization of Digitally Networked Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Theocharis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The conceptualization and measurement of political participation has been an issue vibrantly debated for more than 50 years. The arrival of digital media came to add important parameters to the debate complicating matters further. Digital media have added inexhaustive creative and nonpolitical ways to engage in social and political life that not only often appear to form the basis of political participation but also, in a plethora of everyday contexts, seem to become embedded into what eventually evolves to become a politically meaningful act. This article argues that digitally networked participation—and its manifestations—is a form of political participation and should be conceptualized, identified, and measured as one. Relying on recent conceptual and empirical work, it shows how various common manifestations of digitally networked participation conform to minimalist, targeted, and motivational definitions of political participation. Finally, tackling common misconceptions about the value of such acts, this article argues that nonpolitical forms of digitally networked participation can occasionally be far more impactful than forms of participation commonly accepted as political. This article concludes by recommending the systematic development of measures for digitally networked participation and its formal integration in the study of political participation.

  6. Social Networks and Political Participation: How Do Networks Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chaeyoon

    2008-01-01

    Despite great interest in the role of social networks as channels of political mobilization, few studies have examined which types of social networks work more effectively in recruiting political activists. Using the Citizen Participation Study data, this study shows that contrary to the conventional wisdom in the literature, there is little…

  7. Cohesion network analysis of CSCL participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, Mihai; McNamara, Danielle S; Trausan-Matu, Stefan; Allen, Laura K

    2017-04-13

    The broad use of computer-supported collaborative-learning (CSCL) environments (e.g., instant messenger-chats, forums, blogs in online communities, and massive open online courses) calls for automated tools to support tutors in the time-consuming process of analyzing collaborative conversations. In this article, the authors propose and validate the cohesion network analysis (CNA) model, housed within the ReaderBench platform. CNA, grounded in theories of cohesion, dialogism, and polyphony, is similar to social network analysis (SNA), but it also considers text content and discourse structure and, uniquely, uses automated cohesion indices to generate the underlying discourse representation. Thus, CNA enhances the power of SNA by explicitly considering semantic cohesion while modeling interactions between participants. The primary purpose of this article is to describe CNA analysis and to provide a proof of concept, by using ten chat conversations in which multiple participants debated the advantages of CSCL technologies. Each participant's contributions were human-scored on the basis of their relevance in terms of covering the central concepts of the conversation. SNA metrics, applied to the CNA sociogram, were then used to assess the quality of each member's degree of participation. The results revealed that the CNA indices were strongly correlated to the human evaluations of the conversations. Furthermore, a stepwise regression analysis indicated that the CNA indices collectively predicted 54% of the variance in the human ratings of participation. The results provide promising support for the use of automated computational assessments of collaborative participation and of individuals' degrees of active involvement in CSCL environments.

  8. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2014.In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  9. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  10. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2015. In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  11. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected infrequently reported notifiable diseases (<1,000...

  12. NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table I. infrequently reported notifiable diseases - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected†infrequently reported notifiable diseases...

  13. The Role of Social Networking Services in eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæbø, Øystein; Rose, Jeremy; Nyvang, Tom

    2009-01-01

    investigates the potential of Social Networking Services for the eParticipation area by defining social networking services, introducing the driving forces behind their advance, and discusses the potential use of social networking software in the eParticipation context....... and social networking because democratic systems favour the interests of larger groups of citizens --- the more voices behind a political proposition, the greater its chances of success. In this context of challenges the study of social networking on the internet and social network theory offers valuable...... insights into the practices and theories of citizen engagement. Social network theory focuses on the chains of relationships that social actors communicate and act within. Some social networking services on the internet attract large numbers of users, and apparently sustain a great deal of interaction...

  14. The Role of Social Networking Services in eParticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sæbø, Øystein; Rose, Jeremy; Nyvang, Tom

    A serious problem in eParticipation projects is citizen engagement - citizens do not necessarily become more willing to participate simply because net-services are provided for them. Most forms of eParticipation in democratic contexts are, however, dependent on citizen engagement, interaction and social networking because democratic systems favour the interests of larger groups of citizens - the more voices behind a political proposition, the greater its chances of success. In this context of challenges the study of social networking on the internet and social network theory offers valuable insights into the practices and theories of citizen engagement. Social network theory focuses on the chains of relationships that social actors communicate and act within. Some social networking services on the internet attract large numbers of users, and apparently sustain a great deal of interaction, content-generation and the development of loosely-coupled communities. They provide the forum for much discussion and interaction. In this respect social networking could contribute to solve some of the problems of engaging their users that eParticipation services often struggle with. This paper investigates the potential of Social Networking Services for the eParticipation area by defining social networking services, introducing the driving forces behind their advance, and discusses the potential use of social networking software in the eParticipation context.

  15. [Acute silicosis. An infrequent pneumoconiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vargas, María Martha; Soto-de la Fuente, Andrés Eduardo; Soto-Vera, Eduardo Andrés; Leo-Méndez, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Acute Silicosis was first described in 1900 by Betts. It's also denominated as silicoproteinosis. It's an infrequent way of pneumoconiosis which is produced when sandblasting. 27 year old male who has been working for four years in a glass shop, etching them through sandblasting. Four years before with dyspnea on exertion rapidly progressing. Coughing spell, emetic and wheezing, with daily hyaline expectoration of 50 cc, yearly weight loss of 44 lbs and intense chest pain. Breathing rates 36X'. He was polypneic, with basal bilateral crackling rales. Thorax X-rays shows Mengeaux Festoon, right lung apex, rounded opacities between 3 and 10 mm in diameter, type 2/2 r/r in the ILO 2000 Classification. Opacities in the left lung flux to mix into a honeycomb shape type B silicoma. Cardiac silhouette frayed and Grade 1 Cardiomegaly. Dies five years after his condition started. This kind of operations should be prohibited unless an industrial safety program using a Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) is applied.

  16. [Austrian Network for Psychosomatic Medicine: background, development and participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas, Christian; Stelzig, Manfred; Moser, Gabriele; Matzer, Franziska; Schüssler, Gerhard; Harnoncourt, Karl; Pieringer, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Physicians as well as the general public need easy access to information on regional psychosomatic treatment options as can be provided by a network website. We therefore set out to explore the readiness of the Austrian psychosomatic community to participate in a network for Psychosomatic Medicine and actively contribute to its website. All Austrian psychosomatic societies and all psychosomatic in-patient facilities were addressed personally and/or by letter. Through articles published in medical journals, physicians in private practices specialized in psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic medicine were also invited to participate. All departments of medical psychology and psychotherapy, all psychosomatic societies and all psychosomatic in-patient facilities in Austria decided to participate in this network. In addition, 100 physicians in private practice applied for registration in the network. These results support the network concept and have led to its implementation, and clearly, the network should be further developed. The first precondition for its functioning seems to be met.

  17. Customer as a participant of innovative networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in market conditions and basis for competing have brought the changes in profiling and realizing innovation strategies. Customers are the key subject in the process of generating of innovation. Customers in modern conditions do not wait for initiative of enterprise in value creation and they are not a part of formal processes of marketing research. The new communication technologies help them to be included in voluntary way in innovative activities of enterprise, which is motivated by brand loyalty, enthusiasm, hobby, wish to investigate. The enterprises realize the validity of this important source of new ideas and change their behaviour. The intention of author is to consider the importance of innovative networks for market innovation success, to analyse customer evolution from user to value creator, to identify the characteristics of customer as innovator, and to point to challenges for enterprise in the process of including them in its innovative activities.

  18. Using social network analysis to understand actor participation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainable management of wetland is complex due competing interests and require the participation of different actors. However, there is little attention on systematic analysis of actor participation in wetland management. This paper uses Social Network Analysis (SNA) approach to analyse how actors with different ...

  19. Communication, Social Networks, and Influence in Citizen Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Thomas P.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews and surveys of participants in five community projects investigated whether the communication process for citizen participation is a factor in increasing or decreasing citizen influence in decision making for a project. Findings demonstrate the importance of social-network analysis in assessing the effectiveness of participation…

  20. National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

  1. Irrigation farmers motivation for participating in social networking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and ninety four irrigation farmers were randomly selected from three irrigation farming areas in two states of Kwara and Kogi in north central Nigeria. Data were obtained using a structured questionnaire. The Motivation for undertaking irrigation farming and their level of participation in social networking were ...

  2. Optimized Reputable Sensing Participants Extraction for Participatory Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By collecting data via sensors embedded personal smart devices, sensing participants play a key role in participatory sensor networks. Using information provided by reputable sensing participants ensures the reliability of participatory sensing data. Setting a threshold for the reputation, and those whose reputations are bigger than this value are regarded as reputable. The bigger the threshold value is, the more reliable the extracted reputable sensing participant is. However, if the threshold value is too big, only very limited participatory sensing data can be involved. This may cause unexpected bias in information collection. Existing works did not consider the relationship between the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants and the ratio of usable participatory sensing data. In this work, we propose a criterion for optimized reputable sensing participant extraction in participatory sensor networks. This is achieved based on the mathematical analysis on the ratio of available participatory sensing data and the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants. Our suggested threshold value for reputable sensing participant extraction is only related to the power of sensing participant’s reputation distribution. It is easy to be applied in real applications. Simulation results tested on real application data further verified the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  3. Factors Underlying Farmers’ Decisions to Participate in Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianka Kühne

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 The objective of this elicitation study is to provide insights into farmers’ beliefs which influence their participation in knowledge exchange and innovation networks to enable the enhancement of network participation. A set of facilitating and impeding factors was obtained. Participants identified (a 13 categories of behavioural beliefs (e.g. ‘You learn something’ and ‘Low perceived return on investment’, (b 4 groups of normative beliefs (influence of colleagues, spouses, network coordinators and chain partners and (c 11 control beliefs (facilitators or barriers related to, for example, ‘Network skills’, ‘No time’ and ‘Perceived restraint by farmers in communicating openly and honestly’. Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0pt 5.4pt 0pt 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0pt; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}

  4. Network interventions - How citizens’ social media networks influence their political participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; de Vreese, Claes Holger; Albæk, Erik

    Social media platforms are special places of information exposure because they are structured around a user’s social network and not around content, like other news media. Studies could show that news exposure on social media can affect citizens’ political participation due to the personalized, t...... direct effects of social media exposure on participation but results indeed indicate that such effects are dependent on citizens’ network consistency.......Social media platforms are special places of information exposure because they are structured around a user’s social network and not around content, like other news media. Studies could show that news exposure on social media can affect citizens’ political participation due to the personalized......, targeted, & inadvertent exposure. However, previous research did not strongly focus on how the characteristics of a citizens’ social media network might alter this relationship. We tests how political information exposure via three different media channels affects political participation among Danish...

  5. Social networks and participation with others for youth with learning, attention, and autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Consuelo M; Bendixen, Roxanna M; Young, Mary Ellen; Prudencio, Stephanie M; McCarty, Christopher; Mann, William C

    2016-02-01

    Social participation involves activities and roles providing interactions with others, including those within their social networks. This study sought to characterize social networks and participation with others for 36 youth, ages 11 to 16 years, with (n = 19) and without (n = 17) learning disability, attention disorder, or high-functioning autism. Social networks were measured using methods of personal network analysis. The Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment With Whom dimension scores were used to measure participation with others. Youth from the clinical group were interviewed regarding their experiences within their social networks. Group differences were observed for six social network variables and in the proportion of overall, physical, recreational, social, and informal activities engaged with family and/or friends. Qualitative findings explicated strategies used in building, shaping, and maintaining social networks. Social network factors should be considered when seeking to understand social participation. © CAOT 2015.

  6. Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, Cecil W.

    2010-01-01

    Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of social…

  7. Information spreading in complex networks with participation of independent spreaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kun; Li, Weihua; Guo, Quantong; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Zheng, Zhiming; Gao, Chao; Tang, Shaoting

    2018-02-01

    Information diffusion dynamics in complex networks is often modeled as a contagion process among neighbors which is analogous to epidemic diffusion. The attention of previous literature is mainly focused on epidemic diffusion within one network, which, however neglects the possible interactions between nodes beyond the underlying network. The disease can be transmitted to other nodes by other means without following the links in the focal network. Here we account for this phenomenon by introducing the independent spreaders in a susceptible-infectious-recovered contagion process. We derive the critical epidemic thresholds on Erdős-Rényi and scale-free networks as a function of infectious rate, recovery rate and the activeness of independent spreaders. We also present simulation results on ER and SF networks, as well as on a real-world email network. The result shows that the extent to which a disease can infect might be more far-reaching, than we can explain in terms of link contagion only. Besides, these results also help to explain how activeness of independent spreaders can affect the diffusion process, which can be used to explore many other dynamical processes.

  8. African Americans and Network Disadvantage: Enhancing Social Capital through Participation on Social Networking Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Taana Smith

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the participation of African Americans on social networking sites (SNS, and evaluates the degree to which African Americans engage in activities in the online environment to mitigate social capital deficits. Prior literature suggests that compared with whites, African Americans have less social capital that can enhance their socio-economic mobility. As such, my research question is: do African Americans enhance their social capital through their participation on SNS? I use nationally representative data collected from the Pew Internet and American Life Project to explore the research question. The results suggest that the online environment is potentially a space in which African Americans can lessen social capital deficits.

  9. European Managers' Interpretations of Participation: A Semantic Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohl, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Explores cultural variations in managers' interpretations of a key communicative process: worker participation. Finds that semantic patterns derived from structural analyses indicate cultural differences in meanings managers from five European Community nations attach to the term "participation." Supports two of G. Hofstede's dimensions…

  10. 42 CFR 486.320 - Condition: Participation in Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....320 Condition: Participation in Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. After being designated... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Participation in Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. 486.320 Section 486.320 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  11. Innovation Network Development Model in Telemedicine: A Change in Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Maryam; Torabi, Mashallah; Safdari, Reza; Dargahi, Hossein; Naeimi, Sara

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a telemedicine innovation network and reports its implementation in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The required conditions for the development of future projects in the field of telemedicine are also discussed; such projects should be based on the common needs and opportunities in the areas of healthcare, education, and technology. The development of the telemedicine innovation network in Tehran University of Medical Sciences was carried out in two phases: identifying the beneficiaries of telemedicine, and codification of the innovation network memorandum; and brainstorming of three workgroup members, and completion and clustering ideas. The present study employed a qualitative survey by using brain storming method. Thus, the ideas of the innovation network members were gathered, and by using Freeplane software, all of them were clustered and innovation projects were defined. In the services workgroup, 87 and 25 ideas were confirmed in phase 1 and phase 2, respectively. In the education workgroup, 8 new programs in the areas of telemedicine, tele-education and teleconsultation were codified. In the technology workgroup, 101 and 11 ideas were registered in phase 1 and phase 2, respectively. Today, innovation is considered a major infrastructural element of any change or progress. Thus, the successful implementation of a telemedicine project not only needs funding, human resources, and full equipment. It also requires the use of innovation models to cover several different aspects of change and progress. The results of the study can provide a basis for the implementation of future telemedicine projects using new participatory, creative, and innovative models.

  12. Associative nature of event participation dynamics: A network theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanić, Jelena; Mitrović Dankulov, Marija

    2017-01-01

    The affiliation with various social groups can be a critical factor when it comes to quality of life of each individual, making such groups an essential element of every society. The group dynamics, longevity and effectiveness strongly depend on group’s ability to attract new members and keep them engaged in group activities. It was shown that high heterogeneity of scientist’s engagement in conference activities of the specific scientific community depends on the balance between the numbers of previous attendances and non-attendances and is directly related to scientist’s association with that community. Here we show that the same holds for leisure groups of the Meetup website and further quantify individual members’ association with the group. We examine how structure of personal social networks is evolving with the event attendance. Our results show that member’s increasing engagement in the group activities is primarily associated with the strengthening of already existing ties and increase in the bonding social capital. We also show that Meetup social networks mostly grow trough big events, while small events contribute to the groups cohesiveness. PMID:28166305

  13. Adolescents' Social Networks: Exploring Different Patterns of Socio-Digital Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shupin; Hietajärvi, Lauri; Palonen, Tuire; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess adolescents' participation in various socio-digital activities by using a self-report questionnaire, a social networking questionnaire, and interviews. The participants (n = 253) were grade 6-9 students from a multicultural lower-secondary school in Finland. Three profiles of socio-digital participation were…

  14. Associative nature of event participation dynamics: a network theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanić, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Affiliation with various social groups can be a critical factor when it comes to quality of life of every individual, making these groups an essential element of every society. The group dynamics, longevity and effectiveness strongly depend on group's ability to attract new members and keep them engaged in group activities. It was shown that high heterogeneity of scientist's engagement in conference activities of the specific scientific community depends on the balance between the number of previous attendance and non-attendance and is directly related to scientist's association with that community. Here we show that the same holds for leisure groups of Meetup website and further quantify member's association with the group. We examine how structure of personal social networks is evolving with event attendance. Our results show that member's increasing engagement in group activities is primarily associated with the strengthening of already existing ties and increase of bonding social capital. We also show tha...

  15. Municipal consultants’ participation in building networks to support science teachers’ work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Valero, Paola

    2013-01-01

    of professional learning networks to assess the consultants’ opportunities and constraints in terms of participating in network development. The results indicate that the consultants’ roles in successful network formation is characterized by personal stable contacts within the science teacher community......This paper focuses particularly on the role of municipal science consultants in developing and maintaining network activities and connections among primary school science teachers. The hypothesis is that consultants play a crucial role in supporting strategic planning, and sustaining contacts...... and activities within professional learning networks. The research is framed by a project that involved 80 primary science teachers in 20 schools. The aim of the project was to develop network activities that facilitate sustainable change of the participating schools’ collective culture and practice of science...

  16. Participation in protected areas: A social network case study in Catalonia, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvet-Mir, L.; Maestre Andrés, S.; Molina, J.L.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Local participation of stakeholders in governance of protected areas is considered to be important to natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. Social network analysis (SNA) is a useful tool for analysis because it allows the understanding of stakeholders’ relationships,

  17. Social networks, social participation, and health among youth living in extreme poverty in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Amelia; Barrington, Clare; Abdoulayi, Sara; Tsoka, Maxton; Mvula, Peter; Handa, Sudhanshu

    2016-12-01

    Extensive research documents that social network characteristics affect health, but knowledge of peer networks of youth in Malawi and sub-Saharan Africa is limited. We examine the networks and social participation of youth living in extreme poverty in rural Malawi, using in-depth interviews with 32 youth and caregivers. We describe youth's peer networks and assess how gender and the context of extreme poverty influence their networks and participation, and how their networks influence health. In-school youth had larger, more interactive, and more supportive networks than out-of-school youth, and girls described less social participation and more isolation than boys. Youth exchanged social support and influence within their networks that helped cope with poverty-induced stress and sadness, and encouraged protective sexual health practices. However, poverty hampered their involvement in school, religious schools, and community organizations, directly by denying them required material means, and indirectly by reducing time and emotional resources and creating shame and stigma. Poverty alleviation policy holds promise for improving youth's social wellbeing and mental and physical health by increasing their opportunities to form networks, receive social support, and experience positive influence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cultural Ecosystem of Creative Place: Creative Class, Creative Networks and Participation in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders-Morawska Justyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to conceptualise a data-based research framework for the role of creative networks in cultural exchange. Participation in culture measured as audience per 1000 residents and expenditures on culture-related activities were analysed in relation to such territorial assets as accessibility to creative infrastructure, the economic status of residents, the governance networks of civil society, and cultural capital. The results indicate how accessibility, governance networks, and cultural capital contribute to participation measured via audience indicators while a low poverty rate has explanatory value with respect to expenditures on culture.

  19. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd W. Boonstra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  20. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W; E Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  1. Collaborative Tools for e-Participation across Networks: The Comuno Networking Site for Public Governance and Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kaschesky

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents collaborative tools for public participation across multiple networking sites. The tools are part of the Comuno networking site for public governance and services, which is particularly targeted at the public sector (currently in alpha testing at http://comuno.org. The Broadcast tool allows cross-posting content from Comuno to a wide variety of other networking sites, such as Facebook or Twitter. The UserFeed and TopicFeed tools build RSS feeds from content published by a specific user or under a specific topic. The LifeStream tool gathers a user’s activities across multiple networking sites in the private account section at Comuno. These tools and related aspects of the Comuno networking site are discussed and presented in the context of deliberation and opinion-forming in a Swiss bilingual city.

  2. Public participation in the process of local public health policy, using policy network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yukyung; Kim, Chang-Yup; You, Myoung Soon; Lee, Kun Sei; Park, Eunyoung

    2014-11-01

    To assess the current public participation in-local health policy and its implications through the analysis of policy networks in health center programs. We examined the decision-making process in sub-health center installations and the implementation process in metabolic syndrome management program cases in two districts ('gu's) of Seoul. Participants of the policy network were selected by the snowballing method and completed self-administered questionnaires. Actors, the interactions among actors, and the characteristics of the network were analyzed by Netminer. The results showed that the public is not yet actively participating in the local public health policy processes of decision-making and implementation. In the decision-making process, most of the network actors were in the public sector, while the private sector was a minor actor and participated in only a limited number of issues after the major decisions were made. In the implementation process, the program was led by the health center, while other actors participated passively. Public participation in Korean public health policy is not yet well activated. Preliminary discussions with various stakeholders, including civil society, are needed before making important local public health policy decisions. In addition, efforts to include local institutions and residents in the implementation process with the public officials are necessary to improve the situation.

  3. Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Paletto A.; Graziani A; Brescancin F; De_Meo I

    2017-01-01

    Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences. Natura 2000 is an ecological network of protected areas identified by the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and the Birds Directive (79/409/EC) - recently replaced by the Directive 2009/147/EC - in order to ensure the long-term protection of endangered species in their natural habitats in European Union (EU) territory. EU Member States are responsible for developing and implementing the...

  4. Coeliac disease: the association between quality of life and social support network participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A R; Wolf, R; Contento, I; Verdeli, H; Green, P H R

    2016-06-01

    There is little information available on the use of social support systems for patients with coeliac disease (CD). We performed a cross-sectional study aiming to examine the association between participation in different types of social support networks and quality of life (QOL) in adults with CD. A survey including a validated CD specific QOL instrument was administered online and in-person to adults with CD who were following a gluten-free diet. Participation in social support networks (type, frequency and duration) were assessed. Among the 2138 participants, overall QOL scores were high, averaging 68.9 out of 100. Significant differences in QOL scores were found for age, length of time since diagnosis and level of education. Most (58%) reported using no social support networks. Of the 42% reporting use of social support networks (online 17.9%, face-to-face 10.8% or both 12.8%), QOL scores were higher for those individuals who used only face-to-face social support compared to only online support (72.6 versus 66.7; P networks is associated with greater QOL scores compared to online social support networks. These findings have potential implications for the management of individuals with CD. Emphasis on face-to-face support may improve long-term QOL and patient outcomes. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Development of an Infrequency Index for the CAARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Julie A.; Buelow, Melissa; Riddle, Tara

    2011-01-01

    There is a clinical need for measurement of noncredible self-reporting of symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults presenting for ADHD evaluation. The present study describes the development of initial validity data for an Infrequency Index for the Conner's Adult Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Rating Scale (CII).…

  6. Participation in protected areas: a social network case study in Catalonia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Calvet-Mir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Local participation of stakeholders in governance of protected areas is considered to be important to natural resource management and biodiversity conservation. Social network analysis (SNA is a useful tool for analysis because it allows the understanding of stakeholders' relationships, interactions, and influences through communication networks. We combine quantitative and qualitative data to undertake a SNA for the natural park of Sant Llorenç del Munt in Catalonia, Spain. This is aimed at (1 assessing the structure of the communication network; (2 comparing the informal communication network with the formal participatory bodies of the natural park; and (3 selecting participants for subsequent analyses of the adequate governance structure of the natural park. The results suggest that an informal network of communication, which is reasonably well represented in participatory bodies, exists. However, this communication network is not functioning perfectly because stakeholders experience a lack of trust in the governance bodies of the park, which they perceive to be ineffective. Our results show that SNA is an effective tool to support the creation of a broad representation of stakeholders in participatory processes.

  7. Weak and strong publics: drawing on Nancy Fraser to explore parental participation in neonatal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Andrew J.; Lewando‐Hundt, Gillian; Blaxter, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims  We draw on the work of Nancy Fraser, and in particular her concepts of weak and strong publics, to analyze the process of parental involvement in managed neonatal network boards. Background  Public involvement has moved beyond the individual level to include greater involvement of both patients and the public in governance. However, there is relatively little literature that explores the nature and outcomes of long‐term patient involvement initiatives or has attempted to theorize, particularly at the level of corporate decision making, the process of patient and public involvement. Methods  A repeated survey of all neonatal network managers in England was carried out in 2006–07 to capture developments and changes in parental representation over this time period. This elicited information about the current status of parent representation on neonatal network boards. Four networks were also selected as case studies. This involved interviews with key members of each network board, interviews with parent representatives, observation of meetings and access to board minutes. Results  Data collected show that a wide range of approaches to involving parents has been adopted. These range from decisions not to involve parents at this level to relatively well‐developed systems designed to link parent representatives on network boards to parents in neonatal units. Conclusion  Despite these variations, we suggest that parental participation within neonatal services remains an example of a weak public because the parent representatives had limited participation with little influence on decision making. PMID:22040481

  8. Fostering participation in learning networks by using reward systems and face-to-face meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Burgos, Daniel; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Burgos, D., Brouns, F. M. R., & Koper, E. J. R. (Submitted). Fostering participation in learning networks by using reward systems and face-to-face meetings. In Proceedings of ICALT 2006 Conference. July 5-7, Kerkrade, The Netherlands

  9. Friend me: which factors influence top global brands participation in social network sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araujo, T.; Neijens, P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose - This study focuses on how brands participate in social network sites (SNSs) and investigates both the different strategies they adopt and the factors that influence these strategies. Design/methodology/approach - The activities of top brands in SNSs were investigated through a content

  10. Social networks, social participation and self-perceived health among older people in transitional Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerliu, Naim; Burazeri, Genc; Toçi, Ervin; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Jongen, Wesley; Ramadani, Naser; Brand, Helmut

    2014-04-01

    A number of studies proved that social networks and social participation have beneficial health effects in western countries. However, the evidence from southeast European region is scant. We aimed to assess the extent of social networks and social participation and their relationship with self-perceived health status among older people in post-war Kosovo. A nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted in Kosovo in 2011 including a representative sample of 1890 individuals aged ≥65 years (949 men, mean age 73 ± 6 years; 941 women, mean age 74 ± 7 years; response rate: 83%). Social networks were assessed by means of number of friends and family members that participants had contacts with, whereas social participation by involvement in social groupings/organizations. Information on self-perceived health status and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics was also collected. Overall, 93% of study participants reported that they had at least weekly contacts with more than one family member, and 97% reported daily contacts with their respective friends. Conversely, only 14% of participants reported engagement with social groupings. Generally, individuals who had contacts with friends and/or engaged with social organizations reported a better health status. Our findings point to strong family ties in this patriarchal society. Conversely, levels of social participation were considerably lower in Kosovo compared with the western European countries. The low participation levels in social groupings and their putative deleterious health effects should raise the awareness of policymakers to improve the conditions and increase the degree of social participation among older people in transitional Kosovo.

  11. Political Participation and Power Relations in Egypt: The Scope of Newspapers and Social Network Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Shehata

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation and political power relations. The research employed a mixed methodology, comprised of a survey of 527 Egyptian youth and semi-structured interviews of 12 political activists and journalists. The results showed a significant relationship between reading newspapers and youth’s political participation, but not between using social network sites and political participation. In addition, newspapers and social network sites were platforms for a series of conflicts and coalitions that emerged between pro- and anti-revolution actors. Despite the importance of social network sites as key tools for informing and mobilizing the public, they eventually failed to empower new political actors, and this was because old actors, supported by newspapers and other mainstream media, managed to obstruct the new actors’ progress.

  12. Healthy living champions network: An opportunity for community pharmacy's sustained participation in tackling local health inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Zachariah; Portlock, Jane; Rutter, Paul; Brown, David

    Evaluations recognize healthy living champions (HLCs) as key contributors to the Health Living Pharmacy (HLP) project's success; the project has served to reduce pressure on family doctor services and clients who would have otherwise not sought professional advice have accessed HLP services. To investigate the impact of innovative networking opportunities in supporting HLCs to function within their role and to explore the network's potential in promoting sustained HLP participation. Twenty of Portsmouth's (England) HLCs (n = 33) agreed to participate in focus groups. Transcripts were subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis guided by grounded theory. The transcripts were read repeatedly; recurrent themes were identified and coded manually and consensus was reached by discussion within the research team. Network meetings provide HLCs with professional development, networking opportunities and continued encouragement. Recommendations to develop and sustain the network included the formation of a group committee and establishing of a communication facility accessible between meetings. The successful Portsmouth HLP project informed the design of UK HLP projects. The current focus is to build a successful strategy to sustain the positive outcomes, building on the recognized enablers. This study contributes further lessons learned to guide health commissioners and service implementers to best support staff development, involvement and motivation through innovative practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Infrequent dialysis: a new paradigm for hemodialysis initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M; Unruh, Mark; Chen, Jing; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Zager, Phillip; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Nearly a half-century ago, the thrice-weekly hemodialysis schedule was empirically established as a means to provide an adequate dialysis dose while also treating the greatest number of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients using limited resources. Landmark trials of hemodialysis adequacy have historically been anchored to thrice-weekly regimens, but a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that frequent hemodialysis (six times per week) confers cardiovascular and survival benefits. Based on these collective data and experience, clinical practice guidelines advise against a less than thrice-weekly treatment schedule in patients without residual renal function, yet provide limited guidance on the optimal treatment frequency when substantial native kidney function is present. Thus, during the transition from Stage 5 chronic kidney disease to ESRD, the current paradigm is to initiate hemodialysis on a "full-dose" thrice-weekly regimen even among patients with substantial residual renal function. However, emerging data suggest that frequent hemodialysis accelerates residual renal function decline, and infrequent regimens may provide better preservation of native kidney function. Given the high mortality rates during the first 6 months of hemodialysis and the survival benefits of preserved native kidney function, initiation with twice-weekly treatment schedules ("infrequent hemodialysis") with an incremental increase in frequency over time may provide an opportunity to optimize patient survival. This review outlines the clinical benefits of post-hemodialysis residual renal function, studies of twice-weekly treatment regimens, and the potential risks and benefits of infrequent hemodialysis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Perceived Disagreement and Heterogeneity in Social Networks: Distinct Effects on Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, Margherita; Cavazza, Nicoletta; Graziani, Anna Rita

    2016-01-01

    Although the coexistence of conflicting opinions in society is the very core of democracy, people's tendency to avoid conflict could keep them away from political discussion and participation. On the other hand, being exposed to diverse political views could motivate citizens to participate. We conducted secondary analyses on two 2013 ITANES (Italian National Election Studies) probability samples in order to test the hypotheses that perceived network disagreement (between an individual and her/his discussion partners) and heterogeneity (among discussants holding different political opinions) exert independent and opposite effects on political participation through motivation and knowledge. Results converged in showing that disagreement dampened, while heterogeneity encouraged, political participation (voting, propensity to abstain in future, offline and online activism, and timing of vote decision) by decreasing or increasing, respectively, political interest and, in turn, knowledge.

  15. Using Social Network Analysis To Map Participation And Non-participation In Health Promotion and Community-building Among Vulnerable Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    and capacities for collective and collaborative problemsolving is seen as key to successful community building (Kretzmann and McKnight, 1993). By using social network analysis and Bourdieu’s definition of capital, this study aimed to identify patterns of participation and non-participation in a community...

  16. Investigating Patterns of Participation in an Online Support Group for Problem Drinking: a Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanoski, Karen; van Mierlo, Trevor; Cunningham, John

    2016-08-22

    This study contributes to emerging literature on online health networks by modeling communication patterns between members of a moderated online support group for problem drinking. Using social network analysis, we described members' patterns of joint participation in threads, parsing out the role of site moderators, and explored differences in member characteristics by network position. Posts made to the online support group of Alcohol Help Centre during 2013 were structured as a two-mode network of members (n = 205) connected via threads (n = 506). Metrics included degree centrality, clique membership, and tie strength. The network consisted of one component and no cliques of members, although most made few posts and a small number communicated only with the site's moderators. Highly active members were older and tended to have started posting prior to 2013. The distribution of members across threads varied from threads containing posts by one member to others that connected multiple members. Moderators accounted for sizable proportions of the connectivity between both members and threads. After 5 years of operation, the AHC online support group appears to be fairly cohesive and stable, in the sense that there were no isolated subnetworks comprised of specific types of members or devoted to specific topics. Participation and connectedness at the member-level was varied, however, and tended to be low on average. The moderators were among the most central in the network, although there were also members who emerged as central and dedicated contributors to the online discussions across topics. Study findings highlight a number of areas for consideration by online support group developers and managers.

  17. Comparing Social Network Analysis of Posts with Counting of Posts as a Measurement of Learners' Participation in Facebook Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Yeon; Lee, Hyeon Woo

    2016-01-01

    With the currently growing interest in social network services, many college courses use social network services as platforms for discussions, and a number of studies have been conducted on the use of social network analysis to measure students' participation in online discussions. This study aims to demonstrate the difference between counting…

  18. Infrequent Dialysis: A New Paradigm for Hemodialysis Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M.; Unruh, Mark; Chen, Jing; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Zager, Phillip; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Nearly a half-century ago, the thrice-weekly hemodialysis schedule was empirically established as a means to provide an adequate dialysis dose while also treating the greatest number of end-stage renal disease patients using limited resources. Landmark trials of hemodialysis adequacy have historically been anchored to thrice-weekly regimens, but a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that frequent hemodialysis (six times per week) confers cardiovascular and survival benefits. Based on these collective data and experience, clinical practice guidelines advise against a less than thrice-weekly treatment schedule in patients without residual renal function, yet provide limited guidance on the optimal treatment frequency when substantial native kidney function is present. Thus, during the transition from Stage 5 chronic kidney disease to end-stage renal disease, the current paradigm is to initiate hemodialysis on a “full dose” thrice-weekly regimen even among patients with substantial residual renal function. However, emerging data suggests that frequent hemodialysis accelerates residual renal function decline, and infrequent regimens may provide better preservation of native kidney function. Given the high mortality rates during the first 90 days of hemodialysis and the survival benefits of preserved native kidney function, initiation with twice-weekly treatment schedules (“infrequent hemodialysis”) with an incremental increase in frequency over time may provide an opportunity to optimize patient survival. This review outlines the clinical benefits of post-hemodialysis residual renal function, studies of twice-weekly treatment regimens, and the potential risks and benefits of infrequent hemodialysis. PMID:24016197

  19. CIHR canadian HIV trials network HIV workshop: ethical research through community participation and strengthening scientific validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Slogrove, Amy; Sas, Jacqueline; Kunda, John; Morfaw, Frederick; Mukonzo, Jackson; Thabane, Lehana

    2014-01-01

    The CIHR canadian HIV trials network mandate includes strengthening capacity to conduct and apply clinical research through training and mentoring initiatives of HIV researchers by building strong networks and partnerships on the African continent. At the17th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA), the CTN facilitated a two-day workshop to address ethical issues in the conduct of HIV research, and career enhancing strategies for young African HIV researchers. Conference attendees were allowed to attend whichever session was of interest to them. We report on the topics covered, readings shared and participants' evaluation of the workshop. The scientific aspects of ethical research in HIV and career enhancement strategies are relevant issues to conference attendees.

  20. Characteristics of nurse practitioners interested in participating in a practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Sharon M; Werner, James J

    2010-03-01

    Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs) have emerged as key laboratories for generating new knowledge that reflects community-based practice; however, the representativeness of nurse practitioners (NPs) interested in PBRN participation is not known. This study describes characteristics of NP members interested in participating in a regional PBRN in comparison with state and national data. All 1016 NPs in northeast (NE) Ohio were surveyed by mail and Internet. The survey captured NP demographics, practice characteristics, and gauged interest in participating in future PBRN studies. Survey respondent's data were compared with Ohio and national data obtained from the 2004 AANP National Nurse Practitioner Sample Survey. NE Ohio NPs were similar to an Ohio and national sample of NPs. Northeast Ohio NPs practicing in ambulatory settings who were interested in participating in subsequent PBRN studies were not significantly different from non-interested NPs. NPs interested in participation in a PBRN appear to be representative of the NE Ohio population of ambulatory practice NPs and are similar demographically to a national sample of NPs. Findings from studies conducted in the NE Ohio PBRN may generalize to other NPs practicing in the region and across the country.

  1. The participation of Interactors in Social Network Sites as a News Event Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela da Silva Zago

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The article discusses the possibility of considering the participation of interactors in social network sites as a news event dimension, to the extent that, by the recirculation, interactors can assign different and unexpected meanings to the event. We take as a starting point for the discussion, in an exploratory nature, the inauguration of the first stretch of the bike path from the Avenida Ipiranga, in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in May 2012.

  2. Restrictions of physical activity participation in older adults with disability: employing keyword network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kyo-Man; Kim, Chun-Jong; Park, Chae-Hee; Byeun, Jung-Kyun; Seo, Geon-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Older adults with disability might have been increasing due to the rapid aging of society. Many studies showed that physical activity is an essential part for improving quality of life in later lives. Regular physical activity is an efficient means that has roles of primary prevention and secondary prevention. However, there were few studies regarding older adults with disability and physical activity participation. The purpose of this current study was to investigate restriction factors to regularly participate older adults with disability in physical activity by employing keyword network analysis. Two hundred twenty-nine older adults with disability who were over 65 including aging with disability and disability with aging in type of physical disability and brain lesions defined by disabled person welfare law partook in the open questionnaire assessing barriers to participate in physical activity. The results showed that the keyword the most often used was 'Traffic' which was total of 21 times (3.47%) and the same proportion as in the 'personal' and 'economical'. Exercise was considered the most central keyword for participating in physical activity and keywords such as facility, physical activity, disabled, program, transportation, gym, discomfort, opportunity, and leisure activity were associated with exercise. In conclusion, it is necessary to educate older persons with disability about a true meaning of physical activity and providing more physical activity opportunities and decreasing inconvenience should be systematically structured in Korea.

  3. Public Participation or Social Grooming: A Quantitative Content Analysis of a Local Social Network Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Tanaka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to empirically investigate the structure of a local social network site (SNS by means of a quantitative content analysis. Local SNSs have recently increased in Japan. The Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communication has supported city governments to set up local SNSs with the aim of encouraging public participation of citizens in municipal areas. However, the users of SNSs do not necessarily seem to utilize government-driven local SNSs for this purpose. The authors apply concepts of public participation and social grooming to study a local SNS. A quantitative content analysis was conducted to investigate users’ activity and latent factors that influence them. The result showed three findings. Firstly, the content of a local SNS might relate to three latent factors, namely, social grooming, civic participation, and political participation. Second, the former two factors could relate to users’ emotions. Third, compared to male users, female users might provide content that is more emotional and may be affected by the former two factors.

  4. Simulating the effects of social networks on a population's hurricane evacuation participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widener, Michael J.; Horner, Mark W.; Metcalf, Sara S.

    2013-04-01

    Scientists have noted that recent shifts in the earth's climate have resulted in more extreme weather events, like stronger hurricanes. Such powerful storms disrupt societal function and result in a tremendous number of casualties, as demonstrated by recent hurricane experience in the US Planning for and facilitating evacuations of populations forecast to be impacted by hurricanes is perhaps the most effective strategy for reducing risk. A potentially important yet relatively unexplored facet of people's evacuation decision-making involves the interpersonal communication processes that affect whether at-risk residents decide to evacuate. While previous research has suggested that word-of-mouth effects are limited, data supporting these assertions were collected prior to the widespread adoption of digital social media technologies. This paper argues that the influence of social network effects on evacuation decisions should be revisited given the potential of new social media for impacting and augmenting information dispersion through real-time interpersonal communication. Using geographic data within an agent-based model of hurricane evacuation in Bay County, Florida, we examine how various types of social networks influence participation in evacuation. It is found that strategies for encouraging evacuation should consider the social networks influencing individuals during extreme events, as it can be used to increase the number of evacuating residents.

  5. Online identity: constructing interpersonal trust and openness through participating in hospitality social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ronzhyn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes the results of research on online identity construction during the participation in the hospitality social networks. Specifically the user references are analysed to understand patterns that form the image of a member. CouchSurfing service (couchsurfing.org allows users to leave short texts where the experience of hosting/being hosted by a CS member is described, is an evaluation of the CS members of each other’s personal traits, skills and common experience. Therefore references can become a good instrument for portraying a CouchSurfing member and understanding his or her particular traits. References form an important part of a user’s virtual identity in the network. Using a sample of references of Spanish CouchSurfing users, the research established main characteristics of the references, which are the openness, readiness to share ideas and experiences and trustworthiness. These concepts illustrate the typical traits associated with a user of the network and also shed light on the activities common during offl ine CS meetings

  6. Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paletto A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Public participation in the implementation of the Natura 2000 network in Italy: the stakeholders’ experiences. Natura 2000 is an ecological network of protected areas identified by the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC and the Birds Directive (79/409/EC - recently replaced by the Directive 2009/147/EC - in order to ensure the long-term protection of endangered species in their natural habitats in European Union (EU territory. EU Member States are responsible for developing and implementing the procedures defined by Habitats Directive, but there are no specific recommendations about participation of stakeholders and local community in the decision-making process. Consequently, each country has adopted a different participatory strategy taking into account the principles of integration approach. The integration approach is based on combining human activities and nature conservation purposes in the same area or, at least, in areas in close proximity. In Italy, the implementation of Natura 2000 network was developed at local level (Regions and Autonomous Provinces using different approaches and procedures. Starting from these considerations, the aim of the study was to analyse the stakeholders’ involvement process during the implementation of Habitats Directive in Italy and the management of Natura 2000 sites. This study was realized using three main criteria with the respective indicators: (1 inclusiveness of participatory process; (2 democracy of participatory process; (3 cooperation and conflicts during the implementation process of Natura 2000 network. The data were collected through the administration by email of a semi-structured questionnaire to 56 stakeholders divided in four main groups of interest (public administrations, universities and research centres, environmental associations, private organizations. The results of the survey show that the participatory process was characterized by a low level of inclusiveness despite the existence

  7. Testing moderation in network meta-analysis with individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagne, Getachew A; Brown, C Hendricks; Howe, George; Kellam, Sheppard G; Liu, Lei

    2016-07-10

    Meta-analytic methods for combining data from multiple intervention trials are commonly used to estimate the effectiveness of an intervention. They can also be extended to study comparative effectiveness, testing which of several alternative interventions is expected to have the strongest effect. This often requires network meta-analysis (NMA), which combines trials involving direct comparison of two interventions within the same trial and indirect comparisons across trials. In this paper, we extend existing network methods for main effects to examining moderator effects, allowing for tests of whether intervention effects vary for different populations or when employed in different contexts. In addition, we study how the use of individual participant data may increase the sensitivity of NMA for detecting moderator effects, as compared with aggregate data NMA that employs study-level effect sizes in a meta-regression framework. A new NMA diagram is proposed. We also develop a generalized multilevel model for NMA that takes into account within-trial and between-trial heterogeneity and can include participant-level covariates. Within this framework, we present definitions of homogeneity and consistency across trials. A simulation study based on this model is used to assess effects on power to detect both main and moderator effects. Results show that power to detect moderation is substantially greater when applied to individual participant data as compared with study-level effects. We illustrate the use of this method by applying it to data from a classroom-based randomized study that involved two sub-trials, each comparing interventions that were contrasted with separate control groups. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Loneliness and social isolation among young and late middle-age adults: Associations with personal networks and social participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Stephanie T; Lawton, Leora

    2017-11-24

    Associations between social networks and loneliness or social isolation are well established among older adults. Yet, limited research examines personal networks and participation on perceived loneliness and social isolation as distinct experiences among younger adults. Accordingly, we explore relationships among objective and subjective measures of personal networks with loneliness and isolation, comparing a younger and older cohort. The UC Berkeley Social Networks Study offers unique cohort data on young (21-30 years old, n = 472) and late middle-age adults' (50-70 years old, n = 637) personal network characteristics, social participation, network satisfaction, relationship status, and days lonely and isolated via online survey or in-person interview. Negative binomial regression models were used to examine associations between social network characteristics, loneliness, and isolation by age group. Young adults reported twice as many days lonely and isolated than late middle-age adults, despite, paradoxically, having larger networks. For young adults, informal social participation and weekly religious attendance were associated with fewer days isolated. Among late middle-age adults, number of close kin and relationship status were associated with loneliness. Network satisfaction was associated with fewer days lonely or isolated among both age groups. Distinct network characteristics were associated with either loneliness or isolation for each cohort, suggesting network factors are independently associated with each outcome, and may fluctuate over time. Network satisfaction was associated with either loneliness or isolation among both cohorts, suggesting perceptions of social networks may be equally important as objective measures, and remain salient for loneliness and isolation throughout the life course.

  9. Task and Participant Scheduling of Trading Platforms in Vehicular Participatory Sensing Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Heyuan; Song, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ming; Sun, Jiaguang

    2016-11-28

    The vehicular participatory sensing network (VPSN) is now becoming more and more prevalent, and additionally has shown its great potential in various applications. A general VPSN consists of many tasks from task, publishers, trading platforms and a crowd of participants. Some literature treats publishers and the trading platform as a whole, which is impractical since they are two independent economic entities with respective purposes. For a trading platform in markets, its purpose is to maximize the profit by selecting tasks and recruiting participants who satisfy the requirements of accepted tasks, rather than to improve the quality of each task. This scheduling problem for a trading platform consists of two parts: which tasks should be selected and which participants to be recruited? In this paper, we investigate the scheduling problem in vehicular participatory sensing with the predictable mobility of each vehicle. A genetic-based trading scheduling algorithm (GTSA) is proposed to solve the scheduling problem. Experiments with a realistic dataset of taxi trajectories demonstrate that GTSA algorithm is efficient for trading platforms to gain considerable profit in VPSN.

  10. Ethnic identities, social capital and health inequalities: factors shaping African-Caribbean participation in local community networks in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; McLean, Carl

    2002-08-01

    This paper examines the impact of ethnic identity on the likelihood of peoples' participation in local community networks, in the context of recent policy emphasis on the participation of marginalised communities in such networks as a means of reducing health inequalities. Conceptually, the paper is located against the background of debates about possible links between health and social capital--defined in terms of grassroots participation in local community networks--and an interest in the way in which social exclusion impacts on social capital. The paper draws on lengthy semi-structured, open-ended interviews with 25 African-Caribbean residents of a deprived multi-ethnic area of a south England town. While African-Caribbean identity played a central role in peoples' participation in inter-personal networks, this inter-personal solidarity did not serve to unite people at the local community level beyond particular face-to-face networks. Levels of participation in voluntary organisations and community activist networks were low. Informants regarded this lack of African-Caribbean unity within the local community as a problem, saying that it placed African-Caribbean people at a distinct disadvantage--furthering their social exclusion through limiting their access to various local community resources. The paper examines the way in which the construction of ethnic identities--within a context of institutionalised racism at both the material and symbolic levels--makes it unlikely that people will view local community organisations or networks as representative of their interests or needs, or be motivated to participate in them. Our findings highlight the limitations of policies which simply call for increased community participation by socially excluded groups, in the absence of specific measures to address the obstacles that stand in the way of such participation.

  11. Motivating students' participation in a computer networks course by means of magic, drama and games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilas, Constantinos S; Politis, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    The recent economic crisis has forced many universities to cut down expenses by packing students into large lecture groups. The problem with large auditoria is that they discourage dialogue between students and faculty and they burden participation. Adding to this, students in computer science courses usually find the field to be full of theoretical and technical concepts. Lack of understanding leads them to lose interest and / or motivation. Classroom experience shows that the lecturer could employ alternative teaching methods, especially for early-year undergraduate students, in order to grasp their interest and introduce basic concepts. This paper describes some of the approaches that may be used to keep students interested and make them feel comfortable as they comprehend basic concepts in computer networks. The lecturing procedure was enriched with games, magic tricks and dramatic representations. This approach was used experimentally for two semesters and the results were more than encouraging.

  12. Employing the Gini coefficient to measure participation inequality in treatment-focused Digital Health Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Hyatt, Douglas; Ching, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Digital Health Social Networks (DHSNs) are common; however, there are few metrics that can be used to identify participation inequality. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the Gini coefficient, an economic measure of statistical dispersion traditionally used to measure income inequality, could be employed to measure DHSN inequality. Quarterly Gini coefficients were derived from four long-standing DHSNs. The combined data set included 625,736 posts that were generated from 15,181 actors over 18,671 days. The range of actors (8-2323), posts (29-28,684), and Gini coefficients (0.15-0.37) varied. Pearson correlations indicated statistically significant associations between number of actors and number of posts (0.527-0.835, p inequality. However, as a standalone metric, the Gini coefficient does not indicate optimal numbers or ratios of actors to posts, or effective network engagement. Further, mixed-methods research investigating quantitative performance metrics is required.

  13. The Role of Nonprofit Sector Networks as Mechanisms for Immigrant Political Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Veronis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Issues of immigrant political incorporation and transnational politics have drawn increased interest among migration scholars. This paper contributes to debates in this field by examining the role of networks, partnerships and collaborations of immigrant community organizations as mechanisms for immigrant political participation both locally and transnationally. These issues are addressed through an ethnographic study of the Hispanic Development Council, an umbrella advocacy organization representing settlement agencies serving Latin American immigrants in Toronto, Canada. Analysis of HDC’s three sets of networks (at the community, city and transnational levels from a geographic and relational approach demonstrates the potentials and limits of nonprofit sector partnerships as mechanisms and concrete spaces for immigrant mobilization, empowerment, and social action in a context of neoliberal governance. It is argued that a combination of partnerships with a range of both state and non-state actors and at multiple scales can be significant in enabling nonprofit organizations to advance the interests of immigrant, minority and disadvantaged communities.

  14. Primary duodenal adenocarcinoma: case report of an infrequent tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Moreno-Loaíza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary duodenal adenocarcinoma is an infrequent tumor both in our environment and in the world. There is no conclusive evidence on its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, treatment or prognosis. Clinical case. We report a 77 year-old female patient, of mixed racial origin, native of Cusco (Peru who consulted for abdominal pain, weight loss, nausea, postprandial vomiting and bloating of three months course. At the time of examination she had second to third degree protein malnutrition with a BMI of 16.88 kg/m2, signs of moderate to severe chronic anemia and an 8 cm abdominal tumor in the epigastrium and right hypochondrium. The multislice spiral abdominal CT and ultrasonography revealed the presence of a solid tumor in the second portion of the duodenum. The patient was submitted to a gastroenterostomy without tumor resection. Biopsy confirmed tubular adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, no other primary tumors were found in the stomach, pancreas, biliary tree and colon. The patient was stabilized and was treated with 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and leucovorin. Literature review. The article includes a brief review on the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this condition. Discussion. Management is not straightforward. There is little literature on the subject leaving decisions up to the attending physician’s criteria. We believe that all cases of rare diseases should be studied in depth, give rise to a thorough review of literature and, above all, be brought to the attention of the medical community.

  15. Infarct fogging on immediate postinterventional CT - a not infrequent occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekeyzer, Sven [Onze-Lieve-Vrouw (OLV) Ziekenhuis Aalst, Department of Medical Imaging, Aalst (Belgium); RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Reich, Arno [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Othman, Ahmed E. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiesmann, Martin; Nikoubashman, Omid [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    A pseudo-normalization of infarcted brain parenchyma, similar to the ''fogging effect'' which usually occurs after 2-3 weeks, can be observed on CT performed immediately after endovascular stroke treatment (EST). Goal of this study was to analyze the incidence of this phenomenon and its evolution on follow-up imaging. One hundred fifty-two patients in our database of 949 patients, who were treated for acute stroke between January 2010 and January 2015, fulfilled the inclusion criteria of (a) EST for an acute stroke in the anterior circulation, (b) an ASPECT-score < 10 on pre-interventional CT, and (c) postinterventional CT imaging within 4.5 h after the procedure. Two independent reviewers analyzed imaging data of these patients. Transformation of brain areas from hypoattenuated on pre-interventional CT to isodense on postinterventional CT was seen in 37 patients in a total of 49 ASPECTS areas (Cohen's kappa 0.819; p < 0.001). In 17 patients, the previously hypoattenuated brain areas became isodense, but appeared swollen. In 20 patients (13%), the previously hypodense brain area could not be distinguished from normal brain parenchyma. On follow-up imaging, all isodense brain areas showed signs of infarction. Pseudo-normalization of infarct hypoattenuation on postinterventional CT is not infrequent. It is most likely caused by contrast leakage in infarcted parenchyma and does not represent salvage of ischemic brain parenchyma. (orig.)

  16. Buprenorphine infrequently found in fatal overdose in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paone, Denise; Tuazon, Ellenie; Stajic, Marina; Sampson, Barbara; Allen, Bennett; Mantha, Shivani; Kunins, Hillary

    2015-10-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid agonist medication that is both safe and effective in the treatment of opioid use disorders and the prevention of opioid overdoses. Despite this, media coverage has highlighted public concerns about the potential safety consequences of buprenorphine misuse and diversion. To address the possible contribution of buprenorphine to overdose mortality, we systematically tested post mortem blood specimens from decedents who had died of an unintentional drug overdoses in 2013. We retrospectively tested consecutive drug overdose cases that occurred from June through October 2013. Cases with available blood specimens were tested for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Toxicology results were linked to death certificates and case files from New York City Vital Statistics and New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Of the 98 unintentional drug overdose fatalities tested, only 2 (2.0%) tested positive for buprenorphine metabolites. All 98 unintentional fatalities involved multiple substances. Buprenorphine was infrequently found in drug overdose deaths in New York City. Since the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine are well documented, and overdoses resulting from buprenorphine treatment or diversion are very rare, facilitating access to buprenorphine treatment is strongly recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Digital recovery management: Characterizing recovery-specific social network site participation and perceived benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Brandon G; Kelly, Nathaniel W; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Vilsaint, Corrie L; Kelly, John F

    2017-06-01

    Research shows that digital social network sites (SNSs) may be valuable platforms to effect health behavior change. Little is known specifically about their ability to help address alcohol and other drug problems. This gap is noteworthy, given that individuals are already participating in existing, recovery-specific SNSs (hereafter referred to as recovery SNSs): online communities with the functionality of conventional SNSs (e.g., Facebook) that focus on substance use disorder (SUD) recovery. For example, InTheRooms.com (ITR) is a large, well-known recovery SNS that is available for free 24 hr/day via website and mobile smartphone applications. It offers recovery tools within a digital social milieu for over 430,000 registered users. To augment the knowledge base on recovery SNS platforms, we conducted an online survey of 123 ITR participants (M = 50.8 years old; 56.9% female; 93.5% White; M = 7.3 years of abstinence, range of 0-30 years; 65% cited alcohol as their primary substance). Respondents engaged with ITR, on average, for about 30 min/day several times each week. Daily meditation prompts and live online video meetings were the most commonly utilized resources. Participants generally endorsed ITR as a helpful platform, particularly with respect to increased abstinence/recovery motivation and self-efficacy. Compared to individuals abstinent for 1 or more years, those abstinent less than 1 year (including nonabstinent individuals) showed similar rates of engagement with ITR activities and similar levels of perceived benefit. Our findings suggest that longitudinal studies are warranted to examine the clinical utility of ITR and other recovery SNSs as SUD treatment adjuncts and/or recovery self-management tools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Antiepileptic drug monotherapy for epilepsy: a network meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Sudell, Maria; Weston, Jennifer; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Marson, Anthony G

    2017-06-29

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Approximately 60% to 70% of people with epilepsy will achieve a longer-term remission from seizures, and most achieve that remission shortly after starting antiepileptic drug treatment. Most people with epilepsy are treated with a single antiepileptic drug (monotherapy) and current guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom for adults and children recommend carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line treatment for partial onset seizures and sodium valproate for generalised onset seizures; however a range of other antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments are available, and evidence is needed regarding their comparative effectiveness in order to inform treatment choices. To compare the time to withdrawal of allocated treatment, remission and first seizure of 10 AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, phenobarbitone, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide) currently used as monotherapy in children and adults with partial onset seizures (simple partial, complex partial or secondary generalised) or generalised tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types (absence, myoclonus). We searched the following databases: Cochrane Epilepsy's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and SCOPUS, and two clinical trials registers. We handsearched relevant journals and contacted pharmaceutical companies, original trial investigators, and experts in the field. The date of the most recent search was 27 July 2016. We included randomised controlled trials of a monotherapy design in adults or children with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). This was an individual participant data (IPD) review and network meta-analysis. Our primary outcome was 'time to withdrawal of allocated treatment', and our secondary

  19. Antiepileptic drug monotherapy for epilepsy: a network meta-analysis of individual participant data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Sarah J; Sudell, Maria; Weston, Jennifer; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Marson, Anthony G

    2017-12-15

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Approximately 60% to 70% of people with epilepsy will achieve a longer-term remission from seizures, and most achieve that remission shortly after starting antiepileptic drug treatment. Most people with epilepsy are treated with a single antiepileptic drug (monotherapy) and current guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom for adults and children recommend carbamazepine or lamotrigine as first-line treatment for partial onset seizures and sodium valproate for generalised onset seizures; however a range of other antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments are available, and evidence is needed regarding their comparative effectiveness in order to inform treatment choices. To compare the time to withdrawal of allocated treatment, remission and first seizure of 10 AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, phenobarbitone, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, levetiracetam, zonisamide) currently used as monotherapy in children and adults with partial onset seizures (simple partial, complex partial or secondary generalised) or generalised tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalised seizure types (absence, myoclonus). We searched the following databases: Cochrane Epilepsy's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and SCOPUS, and two clinical trials registers. We handsearched relevant journals and contacted pharmaceutical companies, original trial investigators, and experts in the field. The date of the most recent search was 27 July 2016. We included randomised controlled trials of a monotherapy design in adults or children with partial onset seizures or generalised onset tonic-clonic seizures (with or without other generalised seizure types). This was an individual participant data (IPD) review and network meta-analysis. Our primary outcome was 'time to withdrawal of allocated treatment', and our secondary

  20. The PAGES 2k Network, Phase 3: Introduction, Goals and Call for Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Helen; Phipps, Steven; von Gunten, Lucien; Martrat, Belen; Linderholm, Lars; Abram, Nerilie; Bothe, Oliver; Neukom, Raphael; St. George, Scott; Evans, Michael; Kaufman, Darrell; Goosse, Hugues; Turney, Chris

    2017-04-01

    The past 2000 years (the "2k" interval) provides critical context for recent anthropogenic forcing of the climate, baseline information about Earth's natural climate variability, opportunities to improve the interpretation of proxy observations, and evaluation of climate models. The PAGES 2k Network (2008-2013 Phase 1; 2014-2016 Phase 2) built regional and global surface temperature reconstructions for terrestrial regions and the oceans, and used comparison with realistically forced simulations to identify mechanisms of climate variation on interannual to bicentennial time scales. The goals of Phase 3 (2017-2019), which launches in May 2017 at the PAGES Open Science Meeting, are to: 1) Further understand the mechanisms driving regional climate variability and change on interannual to centennial time scales (Theme: "Climate Variability, Modes and Mechanisms"); 2) Reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of observations imprinted in paleoclimatic archives by environmental sensors (Theme: "Methods and Uncertainties"); and 3) Identify and analyse the extent of agreement between reconstructions and climate model simulations (Theme: "Proxy and Model Understanding") Research will be organized as a linked network of well-defined projects and targeted manuscripts, identified and led by 2k members. The 2k projects will focus on specific scientific questions aligned with Phase 3 goals, rather than being defined along regional boundaries. An enduring element from earlier phases of PAGES 2k will be a culture of collegiality, transparency, and reciprocity. Phase 3 seeks to stimulate community based projects and facilitate collaboration of researchers from different regions and career stages, drawing on breadth and depth of the global PAGES 2k community; support end-to-end workflow transparency and open data and knowledge access; and develop collaborations with other research communities and engage with stakeholders. If you would like to participate in PAGES 2k Phase 3 or

  1. Network organizations of general practitioners: antecedents of formation and consequences of participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Domenico

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network forms of organization are increasingly popular in primary care. At the end of the 1990s General Practitioners (GPs in Italy were given the opportunity to adopt network forms of organization with the aim of improving the quality of their services. However factors affecting GPs' choices to join a network and the consequences of network membership have not been evaluated. Methods Administrative data of a Local Health Authority in Central Italy were analyzed using statistical methods at individual and dyadic levels of analysis. Results Homophily factors seem to influence a GP's choice of network. The consequences of network membership on GP performances seem very limited. Conclusions When considering to foster the diffusion of network organizational forms in health care creating a network structure, like that of Italian GPs, is not sufficient. Other features of the implementation phase, work organization and human resource management should also be considered.

  2. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Larsen, M.E.; Christensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing.

  3. Keratin 1 maintains skin integrity and participates in an inflammatory network in skin through interleukin-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wera; Kumar, Vinod; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Richter, Miriam; Wohlenberg, Claudia; Reuter, Ursula; Thiering, Sören; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Hofmann, Andrea; Kreusch, Fatima; Schultze, Joachim L; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Reichelt, Julia; Hausser, Ingrid; Magin, Thomas M

    2012-11-15

    Keratin 1 (KRT1) and its heterodimer partner keratin 10 (KRT10) are major constituents of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in suprabasal epidermis. KRT1 mutations cause epidermolytic ichthyosis in humans, characterized by loss of barrier integrity and recurrent erythema. In search of the largely unknown pathomechanisms and the role of keratins in barrier formation and inflammation control, we show here that Krt1 is crucial for maintenance of skin integrity and participates in an inflammatory network in murine keratinocytes. Absence of Krt1 caused a prenatal increase in interleukin-18 (IL-18) and the S100A8 and S100A9 proteins, accompanied by a barrier defect and perinatal lethality. Depletion of IL-18 partially rescued Krt1(-/-) mice. IL-18 release was keratinocyte-autonomous, KRT1 and caspase-1 dependent, supporting an upstream role of KRT1 in the pathology. Finally, transcriptome profiling revealed a Krt1-mediated gene expression signature similar to atopic eczema and psoriasis, but different from Krt5 deficiency and epidermolysis bullosa simplex. Our data suggest a functional link between KRT1 and human inflammatory skin diseases.

  4. Examining Social Influence on Participation and Outcomes among a Network of Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention Enrollees

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, T. L.; Eddings, K. E.; Krukowski, R. A.; Love, S. J.; Harvey-Berino, J. R.; West, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that social networks, social support, and social influence are associated with weight trajectories among treatment- and non-treatment-seeking individuals. This study examined the impact of having a social contact who participated in the same group behavioral weight-control intervention in the absence of specific social support training on women engaged in a weight-loss program. Participants (n = 92; 100% female; 54% black; mean age: 46 ? 10 years; mean BMI: 38 ? 6) were grou...

  5. Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Burgos, D., Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Brouns, F., & Koper, R. (2009). Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design). In L. Lockyer, S. Bennett, S. Agostinho & B. Harper (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Learning Design

  6. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; E. Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interac...

  7. Mentoring Entrepreneurial Networks: mapping conceptions of participants in technological-based business incubators in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontes Regis, Helder

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent entrepreneurship research agenda includes the analysis of cognitive structures of successful entrepreneurs, revealing an important tool for the examination of an entrepreneurial career. Using techniques of cognitive maps, this study explores the concepts of a successful career and the network itself, as a whole, for career development. Fifty-three entrepreneurs were studied, in seven technological incubators in the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Specifically, this study aimed to map the shared meanings of the incubated entrepreneurs regarding informal support networks. Such networks support the entrepreneurial career and the present study explores the characteristics and the conceptual model that underlies the networks. The data collection was achieved through interviews through a free evocation technique. The shared meanings indicate the existence of inherent thought categories that support network context in the incubator environment, mainly the mentoring networks. The results endorse the interpretation of an informal mentoring model emerging from the dominant evocations concerning a successful career and of the network itself as promoter of career development.

  8. The community seismic network and quake-catcher network: enabling structural health monitoring through instrumentation by community participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Monica D.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Cheng, Ming-Hei

    2013-04-01

    A new type of seismic network is in development that takes advantage of community volunteers to install low-cost accelerometers in houses and buildings. The Community Seismic Network and Quake-Catcher Network are examples of this, in which observational-based structural monitoring is carried out using records from one to tens of stations in a single building. We have deployed about one hundred accelerometers in a number of buildings ranging between five and 23 stories in the Los Angeles region. In addition to a USB-connected device which connects to the host's computer, we have developed a stand-alone sensor-plug-computer device that directly connects to the internet via Ethernet or wifi. In the case of the Community Seismic Network, the sensors report both continuous data and anomalies in local acceleration to a cloud computing service consisting of data centers geographically distributed across the continent. Visualization models of the instrumented buildings' dynamic linear response have been constructed using Google SketchUp and an associated plug-in to matlab with recorded shaking data. When data are available from only one to a very limited number of accelerometers in high rises, the buildings are represented as simple shear beam or prismatic Timoshenko beam models with soil-structure interaction. Small-magnitude earthquake records are used to identify the first set of horizontal vibrational frequencies. These frequencies are then used to compute the response on every floor of the building, constrained by the observed data. These tools are resulting in networking standards that will enable data sharing among entire communities, facility managers, and emergency response groups.

  9. Increases in New Social Network Ties are Associated with Increased Cohesion among Intervention Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Sabina B.; Barkin, Shari L.; Sommer, Evan C.; Thompson, Jessica R.; Valente, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many behavior change programs are delivered in group settings to manage implementation costs and to foster support and interactions among group members to facilitate behavior change. Understanding the group dynamics that evolve in group settings (e.g., weight management, Alcoholics Anonymous) is important, yet rarely measured. This paper examined the relationship between social network ties and group cohesion in a group-based intervention to prevent obesity in children. Method The data reported are process measures from an ongoing community-based randomized controlled trial. 305 parents with a child (3-6 years) at risk of developing obesity were assigned to an intervention that taught parents healthy lifestyles. Parents met weekly for 12 weeks in small consistent groups. Two measures were collected at weeks 3 and 6: a social network survey (people in the group with whom one discusses healthy lifestyles); and the validated Perceived Cohesion Scale (Bollen & Hoyle, 1990). We used lagged random and fixed effects regression models to analyze the data. Results Cohesion increased from 6.51 to 6.71 (t=4.4, p<0.01). Network nominations tended to increase over the 3-week period in each network. In the combined discussion and advice network, the number of nominations increased from 1.76 to 1.95 (z=2.59, p<0.01). Cohesion at week 3 was the strongest predictor of cohesion at week 6 (b=0.55, p<0.01). Number of new network nominations at week 6 was positively related to cohesion at week 6 (b=0.06, p<.01). In sum, being able to name new network contacts was associated with feelings of cohesion. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate how network changes affect perceived group cohesion within a behavioral intervention. Given that many behavioral interventions occur in group settings, intentionally building new social networks could be promising to augment desired outcomes. PMID:26286298

  10. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-03-01

    This article provides an example of the application of social network analysis method to assess community participation thereby strengthening planning and implementation of health promotion programming. Community health promotion often takes the form of services that reach out to or are located within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people's behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community to achieve social change. However, considerable uncertainty exists over exact levels of participation in these interventions. The article draws on a mixed methods research within a community development project in a vulnerable neighborhood of a town in Denmark. It presents a detailed analysis of the way in which social network analysis can be used as a tool to display participation and nonparticipation in community development and health promotion activities, to help identify capacities and assets, mobilize resources, and finally to evaluate the achievements. The article concludes that identification of interpersonal ties among people who know one another well as well as more tenuous relationships in networks can be used by community development workers to foster greater cohesion and cooperation within an area.

  11. Long-term care facilities: important participants of the acute care facility social network?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Y Lee

    Full Text Available Acute care facilities are connected via patient sharing, forming a network. However, patient sharing extends beyond this immediate network to include sharing with long-term care facilities. The extent of long-term care facility patient sharing on the acute care facility network is unknown. The objective of this study was to characterize and determine the extent and pattern of patient transfers to, from, and between long-term care facilities on the network of acute care facilities in a large metropolitan county.We applied social network constructs principles, measures, and frameworks to all 2007 annual adult and pediatric patient transfers among the healthcare facilities in Orange County, California, using data from surveys and several datasets. We evaluated general network and centrality measures as well as individual ego measures and further constructed sociograms. Our results show that over the course of a year, 66 of 72 long-term care facilities directly sent and 67 directly received patients from other long-term care facilities. Long-term care facilities added 1,524 ties between the acute care facilities when ties represented at least one patient transfer. Geodesic distance did not closely correlate with the geographic distance among facilities.This study demonstrates the extent to which long-term care facilities are connected to the acute care facility patient sharing network. Many long-term care facilities were connected by patient transfers and further added many connections to the acute care facility network. This suggests that policy-makers and health officials should account for patient sharing with and among long-term care facilities as well as those among acute care facilities when evaluating policies and interventions.

  12. Digital Citizen Participation within Schools in the United Kingdom and Indonesia: An Actor–Network Theory (ANT Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yusuf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen engagement and participation are a key focus for government and government agencies, and with the advent of Internet technologies questions arise about the role and impact of technology on citizen participation. This paper aims to explore the role of technology in citizen participation within schools. This research used in-depth comparative case studies using examples from two different schools and school systems, one in the United Kingdom and one in Indonesia. The wider school systems are complex and dynamic environments with multiple stakeholders, media, and supporting systems, and the schools operate under geopolitical and social influences. This paper provides a framework, based on Actor-Network Theory (ANT, for capturing e-participation in schools, particularly identifying the influence of technology as a conduit for enabling, engaging, and empowering stakeholders.

  13. IMPACT OF DISTANCES FROM PARTICIPANTS IN THE SUPPLY NETWORK ON COOPERATION OF INNOVATIVE ENTERPRISES OF FOOD INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tomaszewski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of the article is to show the impact of market location and the distance from the supply network participants on the occurrence of innovative cooperation between the food industry companies and industry- and science-oriented entities. The methodological part of the article is based on probit modelling. The material necessary for the analyses present in this article has been collected by means of a questionnaire sent to the companies all over Poland. The conducted research confi rmed that the situation when the market or other participants of the supply network (suppliers, customers and competitors are localised in close proximity to the food industry company has a negative impact on the occurrence of innovative activity between the company and other food industry companies or science-oriented units. On the other hand, the location outside one’s own region stimulates this kind of collaboration.

  14. Report of International Coastal Atlas Network Workshop 6: Expanding Participation in Coastal Web Atlas Development and Use

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer, Ned; Kopke, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    From June 16th to 17th, 2013, the International Coastal Atlas Network (ICAN) held a workshop on “Expanding Participation in Coastal Web Atlas Development and Use”, at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The workshop (aka “ICAN 6”) engaged 29 participants from 9 countries, representing 22 organizations and multiple areas of scientific and technical expertise. This meeting was a follow-up to the successful 2011 workshop on “Coastal Atlases as Engines for Coastal & Marine Spati...

  15. A GWAS Study on Liver Function Test Using eMERGE Network Participants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Namjou

    Full Text Available Liver enzyme levels and total serum bilirubin are under genetic control and in recent years genome-wide population-based association studies have identified different susceptibility loci for these traits. We conducted a genome-wide association study in European ancestry participants from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE Network dataset of patient medical records with available genotyping data in order to identify genetic contributors to variability in serum bilirubin levels and other liver function tests and to compare the effects between adult and pediatric populations.The process of whole genome imputation of eMERGE samples with standard quality control measures have been described previously. After removing missing data and outliers based on principal components (PC analyses, 3294 samples from European ancestry were used for the GWAS study. The association between each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and total serum bilirubin and other liver function tests was tested using linear regression, adjusting for age, gender, site, platform and ancestry principal components (PC.Consistent with previous results, a strong association signal has been detected for UGT1A gene cluster (best SNP rs887829, beta = 0.15, p = 1.30x10-118 for total serum bilirubin level. Indeed, in this region more than 176 SNPs (or indels had p<10-8 spanning 150Kb on the long arm of chromosome 2q37.1. In addition, we found a similar level of magnitude in a pediatric group (p = 8.26x10-47, beta = 0.17. Further imputation using sequencing data as a reference panel revealed association of other markers including known TA7 repeat indels (rs8175347 (p = 9.78x10-117 and rs111741722 (p = 5.41x10-119 which were in proxy (r2 = 0.99 with rs887829. Among rare variants, two Asian subjects homozygous for coding SNP rs4148323 (G71R were identified. Additional known effects for total serum bilirubin were also confirmed including organic anion transporters SLCO1B1-SLCO1B

  16. Governance networks as a frame for inter-demoi participation and deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    2012-01-01

    By focusing exclusively on the contributions of political participation and deliberation to the enhancement of democratic regulation within a unitary democratic unit-that is, a demos-traditional liberal theories of democracy overlook the democratic value of political participation and deliberation...

  17. Negative and positive association rules mining from text using frequent and infrequent itemsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Sajid; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Guergachi, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Association rule mining research typically focuses on positive association rules (PARs), generated from frequently occurring itemsets. However, in recent years, there has been a significant research focused on finding interesting infrequent itemsets leading to the discovery of negative association rules (NARs). The discovery of infrequent itemsets is far more difficult than their counterparts, that is, frequent itemsets. These problems include infrequent itemsets discovery and generation of accurate NARs, and their huge number as compared with positive association rules. In medical science, for example, one is interested in factors which can either adjudicate the presence of a disease or write-off of its possibility. The vivid positive symptoms are often obvious; however, negative symptoms are subtler and more difficult to recognize and diagnose. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for discovering positive and negative association rules among frequent and infrequent itemsets. We identify associations among medications, symptoms, and laboratory results using state-of-the-art data mining technology.

  18. Associations between sensory loss and social networks, participation, support, and loneliness: Analysis of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Paul; Parfyonov, Maksim; Wittich, Walter; Phillips, Natalie; Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, M

    2018-01-01

    To determine if hearing loss, vision loss, and dual sensory loss were associated with social network diversity, social participation, availability of social support, and loneliness, respectively, in a population-based sample of older Canadians and to determine whether age or sex modified the associations. Cross-sectional population-based study. Canada. The sample included 21 241 participants in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging tracking cohort. The sample was nationally representative of English- and French-speaking, non-institutionalized 45- to 89-year-old Canadians who did not live on First Nations reserves and who had normal cognition. Participants with missing data for any of the variables in the multivariable regression models were excluded from analysis. Hearing and vision loss were determined by self-report. Dual sensory loss was defined as reporting both hearing and vision loss. Univariate analyses were performed to assess cross-sectional associations between hearing, vision, and dual sensory loss, and social, demographic, and medical variables. Multivariable regression models were used to analyze cross-sectional associations between each type of sensory loss and social network diversity, social participation, availability of social support, and loneliness. Vision loss (in men) and dual sensory loss (in 65- to 85-year-olds) were independently associated with reduced social network diversity. Vision loss and dual sensory loss (in 65- to 85-year-olds) were each independently associated with reduced social participation. All forms of sensory loss were associated with both low availability of social support and loneliness. Sensory impairment is associated with reduced social function in older Canadians. Interventions and research that address the social needs of older individuals with sensory loss are needed. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  19. Preservice Teachers' Participation and Perceptions of Twitter Live Chats as Personal Learning Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian; Sickel, Jamie; Cheng, Li

    2017-01-01

    This study presents two cases in which undergraduates were introduced to Twitter in their teacher preparation program as a means of developing a personal learning network. Twitter live chats are synchronous discussions that allow education stakeholders to discuss issues and share resources, engaging on potentially a global scale via the social…

  20. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  1. Knowledge-based network participation in destination and event marketing: A hospitality scenario analysis perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. Go; Ad Breukel

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how enterprises may decide to bring about effective network collaboration even though present mediation forms have proven inadequate. One of the main problems of these enterprises is that they lack a clear picture of the potential future ‘‘modular business’’. The Dutch

  2. Open to Influence: What Counts as Academic Influence in Scholarly Networked "Twitter" Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Within the academy, signals of a scholar's academic influence are made manifest in indices like the "h"-index, which rank output. In open scholarly networks, however, signals of influence are less codified, and the ways in which they are enacted and understood have yet to be articulated. Yet the influence scholars cultivate in open…

  3. Employees’ participation in electronic networks of practice within a corporate group: perceived benefits and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Lukosch, S.; van Splunter, S.; Brazier, F.M.T.; Hamedi, M.; van Beers, C.

    This paper explores benefits and costs of knowledge exchange perceived by individuals in connected electronic networks of practice (ENoP) in a corporate setting. The results of 25 semi-structured interviews show 9 perceived benefits and 5 perceived costs to be of importance for knowledge exchange.

  4. Employees’ participation in electronic networks of practice within a corporate group: perceived benefits and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Lukosch, S.G.; van Splunter, S.; Brazier, F.M.; Hamedi, Mohsen; van Beers, C.P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores benefits and costs of knowledge exchange perceived by individuals in connected electronic networks of practice (ENoP) in a corporate setting. The results of 25 semi-structured interviews show 9 perceived benefits and 5 perceived costs to be of importance for knowledge exchange.

  5. Correlates and Risk Markers for Sleep Disturbance in Participants of the Autism Treatment Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollway, Jill A.; Aman, Michael G.; Butter, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We explored possible cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and physiological risk markers for sleep disturbance in children with autism spectrum disorders. Data from 1,583 children in the Autism Treatment Network were analyzed. Approximately 45 potential predictors were analyzed using hierarchical regression modeling. As medication could confound…

  6. Digital Divides and Social Network Sites: Which Students Participate in Social Media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, June

    2011-01-01

    Social network sites (SNSs) like Myspace and Facebook are now popular online communities with large teenage user populations. Teens use these technologies to interact, play, explore, and learn in significant ways. As scholars become interested in studying these new online communities, I contribute to the emerging conversation by re-examining…

  7. Rasch analysis of the participation scale (P-scale): usefulness of the P-scale to a rehabilitation services network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Mariana Angélica Peixoto; Coster, Wendy Jane; Mancini, Marisa Cotta; Dutra, Fabiana Caetano Martins Silva; Kramer, Jessica; Sampaio, Rosana Ferreira

    2017-12-08

    A person's participation is acknowledged as an important outcome of the rehabilitation process. The Participation Scale (P-Scale) is an instrument that was designed to assess the participation of individuals with a health condition or disability. The scale was developed in an effort to better describe the participation of people living in middle-income and low-income countries. The aim of this study was to use Rasch analysis to examine whether the Participation Scale is suitable to assess the perceived ability to take part in participation situations by patients with diverse levels of function. The sample was comprised by 302 patients from a public rehabilitation services network. Participants had orthopaedic or neurological health conditions, were at least 18 years old, and completed the Participation Scale. Rasch analysis was conducted using the Winsteps software. The mean age of all participants was 45.5 years (standard deviation = 14.4), 52% were male, 86% had orthopaedic conditions, and 52% had chronic symptoms. Rasch analysis was performed using a dichotomous rating scale, and only one item showed misfit. Dimensionality analysis supported the existence of only one Rasch dimension. The person separation index was 1.51, and the item separation index was 6.38. Items N2 and N14 showed Differential Item Functioning between men and women. Items N6 and N12 showed Differential Item Functioning between acute and chronic conditions. The item difficulty range was -1.78 to 2.09 logits, while the sample ability range was -2.41 to 4.61 logits. The P-Scale was found to be useful as a screening tool for participation problems reported by patients in a rehabilitation context, despite some issues that should be addressed to further improve the scale.

  8. Using Social Network Analysis as a Method to Assess and Strengthen Participation in Health Promotion Programs in Vulnerable Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    within communities. The concept of community reflects the idea that people’s behavior and well-being are influenced by interaction with others, and here, health promotion requires participation and local leadership to facilitate transmission and uptake of interventions for the overall community......This paper provides an example of the application of Social Network Analysis (SNA) method to assess community participation thereby strengthening planning and implementation of health promotion programming. Community health promotion often takes the form of services that reach out to or are located...... to achieve social change. However, considerable uncertainty exists over exact levels of participation in these interventions. The paper draws on a mixed methods research within a community development project in a vulnerable neighborhood of a town in Denmark. It presents a detailed analysis of the way...

  9. Examining Social Influence on Participation and Outcomes among a Network of Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention Enrollees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Carson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that social networks, social support, and social influence are associated with weight trajectories among treatment- and non-treatment-seeking individuals. This study examined the impact of having a social contact who participated in the same group behavioral weight-control intervention in the absence of specific social support training on women engaged in a weight-loss program. Participants (n=92; 100% female; 54% black; mean age: 46±10 years; mean BMI: 38±6 were grouped based upon whether or not they reported a social contact enrolled previously/concurrently in our behavioral weight-control studies. Primary outcomes were 6-month weight change and treatment adherence (session attendance and self-monitoring. Half of the participants (53% indicated that they had a social contact; black women were more likely to report a social contact than white women (67.3% versus 39.5%; P<0.01. Among participants with a social contact, 67% reported at least one contact as instrumental in the decision to enroll in the program. Those with a contact lost more weight (5.9 versus 3.7 kg; P=0.04, attended more group sessions (74% versus 54%; P<0.01, and submitted more self-monitoring journals (69% versus 54%; P=0.01 than those without a contact. Participants' weight change was inversely associated with social contacts' weight change (P=0.04. There was no association between participant and contact’s group attendance or self-monitoring. Social networks may be a promising vehicle for recruiting and engaging women in a behavioral weight-loss program, particularly black women. The role of a natural social contact deserves further investigation.

  10. Social Network Analysis of Students' Participation and Presence in a Community of Educational Blogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Tsiotakis, Panagiotis; Roussinos, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on an investigation of university students' participation and learning presence in a blogging activity, designed to support collaborative learning. There are three main reasons justifying the current research: to better understand the structure and the dynamics of students' blogging subgroups; to…

  11. Flipping the Script in Study Abroad Participation: The Influence of Popular Culture and Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Shelbee; Coryell, Joellen E.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores primary perceptions of and motivations to study abroad for adult and higher education learners. A large Hispanic-serving Southwestern university serves as the context of this study where undergraduate students and one graduate student were enrolled in an Italian urbanism study abroad program. The age of the participants ranged…

  12. Exploring the Roles of Social Participation in Mobile Social Media Learning: A Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Helmi; Nordin, Norazah; Din, Rosseni; Ally, Mohamad; Dogan, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Social media is increasingly becoming an essential platform for social connectivity in our daily lives. The availability of mobile technology has further fueled its importance -- making it a ubiquitous tool for social interaction. However, limited studies have been conducted to investigate roles of social participation in this field. Thus, the…

  13. Keratin 1 maintains skin integrity and participates in an inflammatory network in skin via interleukin-18

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Wera; Kumar, Vinod; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Richter, Miriam; Wohlenberg, Claudia; Reuter, Ursula; Thiering, Sören; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Hofmann, Andrea; Kreusch, Fatima; Schultze, Joachim L; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Reichelt, Julia; Hausser, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Keratin 1 (KRT1) and its heterodimer partner keratin 10 (KRT10) are major constituents of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in suprabasal epidermis. KRT1 mutations cause epidermolytic ichthyosis in humans, characterized by loss of barrier integrity and recurrent erythema. In search of the largely unknown pathomechanisms and the role of keratins in barrier formation and inflammation control, we show here that Krt1 is crucial for maintenance of skin integrity and participates in an inflamm...

  14. Infrequent tumor initiative of the Children's Oncology Group: initial lessons learned and their impact on future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappo, Alberto S; Krailo, Mark; Chen, Zhengjia; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Reaman, Gregory

    2010-11-20

    The merger of the Pediatric Oncology Group, Children's Cancer Group, the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group, and the National Wilms Tumor Study Group in 2000 offered the newly formed Children's Oncology Group (COG), an opportunity to study rare cancers that had not been the subject of organized evaluation within the context of a cooperative group. In 2002, the COG formed the rare tumor committee which is comprised of four subcommittees. This article details the experience of the infrequent tumor subcommittee for the period of 2002 to 2007. During the initial implementation of this strategy, we have observed low rates of registration within the COG registry and low levels of participation in open banking, biology, and first-line therapeutic studies. This initial experience has allowed us to develop alternative strategies to increase registration rates and clinical trial enrollments. It is hoped that these new plans will allow us to increase our ability to better understand the biology and improve the treatment outcome of young patients with infrequent cancers. Furthermore, our initial experience has demonstrated to us the potential power of expanded cooperation and collaboration at a global level.

  15. Automated Analysis of e-Participation Data by Utilizing Associative Networks, Spreading Activation and Unsupervised Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufl, Peter; Payer, Udo; Parycek, Peter

    According to [1], the term e-participation is defined as ”the use of information and communication technologies to broaden and deepen political participation by enabling citizens to connect with one another and with their elected representatives”. This definition sounds quite simple and logical, but when considering the implementation of such a service in a real world scenario, it is obvious that it is not possible to evaluate messages, which are generated by thousands of citizens, by hand. Such documents need to be read and analyzed by experts with the required in-depth domain knowledge. In order to enable this analysis process and thereby to increase the number of possible e-particpation applications, we need to provide these experts with automated analysis tools that cluster, pre-screen and pre-evaluate public opinions and public contributions. In this paper we present a framework based on Machine Learning-(ML) and Artificial Intelligence-(AI) techniques that are capable of various analysis mechanisms such as unsupervised clustering of yet unread documents, searching for related concepts within documents and the description of relations between terms. To finish, we show how the proposed framework can be applied to real world data taken from the Austrian e-participation platform mitmachen.at.

  16. The Geoscience Alliance--A National Network for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Geoscience Alliance is a national alliance of individuals committed to broadening participation of Native Americans in the geosciences. Native Americans in this case include American Indians, Alaska Natives and people of Native Hawai'ian ancestry. Although they make up a large percentage of the resource managers in the country, they are underrepresented in degrees in the geosciences. The Geoscience Alliance (GA) members are faculty and staff from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; industry, agency, and corporate representatives; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. The goals of the Geoscience Alliance are to 1) create new collaborations in support of geoscience education for Native American students, 2) establish a new research agenda aimed at closing gaps in our knowledge on barriers and best practices related to Native American participation in the geosciences, 3) increase participation by Native Americans in setting the national research agenda on issues in the geosciences, and particularly those that impact Native lands, 4) provide a forum to communicate educational opportunities for Native American students in the geosciences, and 5) to understand and respect indigenous traditional knowledge. In this presentation, we look at the disparity between numbers of Native Americans involved in careers related to the geosciences and those who are receiving bachelors or graduate degrees in the geosciences. We address barriers towards degree completion in the geosciences, and look at innovative programs that are addressing those barriers.

  17. Participative Teaching with Mobile Devices and Social Networks for K-12 Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article details a set of participatory pedagogical experiments conducted within a research grant PN II IDEI (”Time Maps. Real communities, virtual worlds, experimented pasts” performed with the purpose of helping rural communities in identifying their cultural heritage andtransmitting it to the younger generations by means of modern IT technologies, including web 2.0. In a Danubian rural community, several points of archaeological interest (POIs were identified, which were then included in a geographic Augmented Reality application for smartphones and tablets. Subsequently, the geographic data were collected from the archaeological site by the K-12 children, under the coordination of an academic staff member of the National University of Arts in Bucharest, and stored on their devices using Google Maps. The augmented information provided onthe site was annotated and shared with other K-12 children, through different social networks sites (SNS and content postings. This first stage experiment was extended to the development of a social learning environment complementary to the educational site (www.timemaps.net to support thetransmission of several traditional technologies (textile, ceramic, glass in a collaborative manner. We consider that our experiments can significantly increase the visibility of the information pertaining to the identity of target places and communities among the younger generation. A mobile-learning paradigm, in combination with web 2.0 technologies, was the support for a distributed and low-cost platform for communication and collaboration. Social networks linked thearchaeological heritage and the academic research with the larger community of rural K-12 children. The article analyzes this platform as a solution for creating, collecting and sharingeducational content, and presents conclusions on using social media for effective blended learning and transmittal of the cultural heritage.

  18. Online activity and participation in treatment affects the perceived efficacy of social health networks among patients with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Bergman, Yoav S; Grosberg, Dafna

    2014-01-10

    The use of online health-related social networks for support, peer-to-peer connections, and obtaining health information has increased dramatically. Participation in an online health-related social network can enhance patients' self-efficacy and empowerment, as they are given knowledge and tools to manage their chronic health condition more effectively. Thus, we can deduce that patient activation, the extent to which individuals are able to manage their own health care, also increases. However, little is known about the effects of participation in online health-related social networks and patient activation on the perceived usefulness of a website across disease groups. The intent of the study was to evaluate the effects and benefits of participation in an online health-related social network and to determine which variables predict perceived site usefulness, while examining patient activation. Data were collected from "Camoni", the first health-related social network in the Hebrew language. It offers medical advice, including blogs, forums, support groups, internal mail, chats, and an opportunity to consult with experts. This study focused on the site's five largest and most active communities: diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, spinal injury, and depression/anxiety. Recruitment was conducted during a three-month period in which a link to the study questionnaire was displayed on the Camoni home page. Three questionnaires were used: a 13-item measure of perceived usefulness (Cronbach alpha=.93) to estimate the extent to which an individual found the website helpful and informative, a 9-item measure of active involvement in the website (Cronbach alpha=.84), and The Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13, Cronbach alpha=.86), which assesses a patient's level of active participation in his or her health care. There were 296 participants. Men 30-39 years of age scored higher in active involvement than those 40-49 years (P=.03), 50-64 years (P=.004), or 65+ years (P

  19. Acute effects of THC on time perception in frequent and infrequent cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, R Andrew; Schnakenberg, Ashley; Elander, Jacqueline; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Williams, Ashley; Skosnik, Patrick D; Pittman, Brian; Ranganathan, Mohini; D'Souza, D Cyril

    2013-03-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to alter time perception, but existing literature has several limitations. Few studies have included both time estimation and production tasks, few control for subvocal counting, most had small sample sizes, some did not record subjects' cannabis use, many tested only one dose, and used either oral or inhaled administration of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), leading to variable pharmacokinetics, and some used whole-plant cannabis containing cannabinoids other than THC. Our study attempted to address these limitations. This study aims to characterize the acute effects of THC and frequent cannabis use on seconds-range time perception. THC was hypothesized to produce transient, dose-related time overestimation and underproduction. Frequent cannabis smokers were hypothesized to show blunted responses to these alterations. IV THC was administered at doses from 0.015 to 0.05 mg/kg to 44 subjects who participated in several double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, crossover, placebo-controlled studies. Visual time estimation and production tasks in the seconds range were presented to subjects three times on each test day. All doses induced time overestimation and underproduction. Chronic cannabis use had no effect on baseline time perception. While infrequent/nonsmokers showed temporal overestimation at medium and high doses and temporal underproduction at all doses, frequent cannabis users showed no differences. THC effects on time perception were not dose related. A psychoactive dose of THC increases internal clock speed as indicated by time overestimation and underproduction. This effect is not dose related and is blunted in chronic cannabis smokers who did not otherwise have altered baseline time perception.

  20. Practice benefit from participating in a practice-based research network study of postpartum depression: a national research network (NRN) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Pace, Wilson; Dietrich, Allen; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary; Graham, Deborah; Huff, Jessica; Rocca, Liliana; Wollan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    At the midpoint of a large clinical trial taking place in a practice-based research network (PBRN), we asked leaders of the enrolled practices about the impact of participating in a PBRN study. Using semistructured interviews, the lead study nurse and physician from each site were queried about the impact of study participation on issues related to the study topic of postpartum depression (PPD) as well as any other impacts on the practice not directly related to PPD. From the results, initial themes were identified by 3 of the investigators (BPY, SB, MK) and confirmed by all the authors. Interviewee responses were grouped by theme. Forty-eight study leaders from 28 solo, moderately sized group and residency practices were interviewed during a period of 60 days. Practices were located in 20 different states, and 54% were in rural communities. Six major themes emerged. Study participation led to: ((1)) the recognition of the need for systematic approaches; ((2)) more effective teamwork and communication within the practice; ((3)) adaptation and extension of the PPD study tools and a systematic approach to the care of other chronic conditions; ((4)) increased professional self-worth and community recognition; ((5)) opportunity and support for staff members to "stretch" into new roles; and ((6)) increased research literacy within the practice. Participating in a PBRN research study can provide advantages to practices that extend beyond the study's specific purpose and content. These results provide further support for the value of PBRN research funding.

  1. Infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity in Malaysian school-aged adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Nurul-Fadhilah

    Full Text Available Unhealthy dietary pattern increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in growing children and adolescents. However, the way the habitual pattern of breakfast consumption influences body composition and risk of obesity in adolescents is not well defined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess any associations between breakfast consumption practices and body composition profiles in 236 apparently healthy adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviour and lifestyle practices and a dietary food frequency questionnaire were used. Body composition and adiposity indices were determined using standard anthropometric measurement protocols and dual energy χ-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Mean age of the participants was 15.3±1.9 years. The majority of participants (71.2% fell in the normal body mass index (BMI ranges. Breakfast consumption patterns showed that only half of the participants (50% were consuming breakfast daily. Gender-specific multivariate analyses (ANCOVA showed that in both boys and girls, those eating breakfast at least 5 times a week had significantly lower body weight, body mass index (BMI, BMI z-scores, waist circumference, body fat mass and percent body fat (%BF compared to infrequent breakfast eaters, after adjustment for age, household income, pubertal status, eating-out and snacking practices, daily energy intakes, and daily physical activity levels. The present findings indicate that infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity. Therefore, daily breakfast consumption with healthy food choices should be encouraged in growing children and adolescents to prevent adiposity during these critical years of growth.

  2. A national study predicting licensed social workers' levels of political participation: the role of resources, psychological engagement, and recruitment networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Jessica A

    2008-10-01

    The social work literature is replete with studies evaluating social workers' direct practice interventions, but strikingly few have assessed how well social workers are faring in the political arena. This study tests a major theoretical model, the civic voluntarism model, developed to explain why some citizens become involved in politics, whereas others do not. The study sample consisted of 396 randomly selected social workers licensed in 11 states, all of whom completed a 25-minute telephone survey. Social workers were surveyed to determine the role of the following variables in explaining social workers' political activity levels-resources needed to participate, psychological engagement, and attachment to recruitment networks. The results indicate that the civic voluntarism model was significant and accounted for 42 percent of the variance. The strongest predictors of social workers' political activity were NASW membership and political interest. This study provides empirical support for the idea that being connected to social networks and having a psychological engagement with politics are crucial factors in explaining social workers' political participation. Implications for social work education are included.

  3. Using information technology and social networking for recruitment of research participants: experience from an exploratory study of pediatric Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Sharron; Smaldone, Arlene; Fennoy, Ilene; Reame, Nancy; Grey, Margaret

    2013-03-19

    Recruiting pediatric samples for research may be challenging due to parental mistrust of the research process, privacy concerns, and family time constraints. Recruitment of children with chronic and genetic conditions may further complicate the enrollment process. In this paper, we describe the methodological challenges of recruiting children for research and provide an exemplar of how the use of information technology (IT) strategies with social networking may improve access to difficult-to-reach pediatric research participants. We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of boys between the ages of 8 and 18 years with Klinefelter syndrome. This study presented unique challenges for recruitment of pediatric participants. These challenges are illustrated by the report of recruitment activities developed for the study. We reviewed the literature to explore the issues of recruiting children for research using conventional and IT approaches. Success rates of conventional recruitment approaches, such as brochures, flyers in medical offices, and physician referrals, are compared with IT-based outreach. The IT approaches included teleconferencing via a Klinefelter syndrome support group, services of a Web-based commercial recruitment-matching company, and the development of a university-affiliated research recruitment website with the use of paid advertising on a social networking website (Facebook). Over a 3-month period, dissemination of over 150 recruitment brochures and flyers placed in a large urban hospital and hospital-affiliated clinical offices, with 850 letters to physicians and patients were not successful. Within the same period, face-to-face recruitment in the clinical setting yielded 4 (9%) participants. Using Web-based and social networking approaches, 39 (91%) agreed to participate in the study. With these approaches, 5 (12%) were recruited from the national Klinefelter syndrome advocacy group, 8 (19%) from local and teleconference support groups, 10

  4. Alcohol peer influence of participating in organized school activities: a network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    This study compares the network influences on adolescent substance use from peers who coparticipated in school-sponsored organized activities (affiliation-based peer influence) with the influence both from their "nominated" friends (i.e., the adolescent named the alter as a friend), and only "reciprocated" friends (i.e., both adolescents mutually named each other as friends). The study also attempts to parse affiliation-based peer influence into the influence of both activity members who are also friends and those who are not, to address the potential confounding of these sources of peer influence. The study data consisted of a nationally representative sample of 12,551 adolescents in Grades 7-12 within 106 schools from the Add Health data. Ordinal logistic regression was conducted to estimate the effects of affiliation-based and friends influence on alcohol use and drinking frequency. Peer influence via organized activities (sports or clubs) with drinkers and the influence of friends who drink had significant effects on adolescent drinking. Peer influence through club activities with drinkers had a stronger effect on any drinking behavior than through sports activities with drinkers. After decomposing peer influence through activities by friendship status, influence through sport activities had a significant effect on drinking only when coparticipant drinkers were also reciprocated friends (but not nominated friends), whereas influence through club activities had a significant effect on drinking, regardless of friendship reciprocation. The design and implementation of school based substance use prevention and treatment programs should consider the contextual effects of school-sponsored activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. On the character and production of 'active participation' in neuro-rehabilitation: an Actor-Network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Simon; Mares, Kathryn; Coull, Neil; Poland, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    The importance of patients' active involvement in neuro-rehabilitation after acquired brain injury has been consistently emphasised in recent years. However, most approaches fail to show how 'active participation' is practically enacted, focusing on individualised explanations of patient choice and behaviours, or notions of inherent patient traits. Using actor-network theory (ANT) as a sensitising concept, we investigated neuro-rehabilitation practices, asking how participation is shaped through biological and socio-material specificities, how rights to knowledge and expertise are constructed, and how a body acclimatises and adjusts within an order of participation and transformation. We analysed video-recorded fieldwork extracts, examining the work of adjusting, testing and transforming; the construction of competence and incompetence; and material and social processes involved in the division of the body and its re-composition. Our findings show how an ANT-sensitised approach provides a critical understanding and context-specific characterisation of 'active participation', produced through the association of heterogeneous actors at any one time. Such specificity and the distribution of work suggest that efforts to account for optimum therapy 'dosages', and clinical attention to establishing individually-located levels of 'self-efficacy' or 'motivation' are misdirected. The performance of 'active participation', rather, should be re-imagined as a product of diverse, mutually attuned entities. A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  6. Workplace violence injury in 106 US hospitals participating in the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN), 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewold, Matthew R; Sarmiento, Raymond F R; Vanoli, Kelly; Raudabaugh, William; Nowlin, Susan; Gomaa, Ahmed

    2018-02-01

    Workplace violence is a substantial occupational hazard for healthcare workers in the United States. We analyzed workplace violence injury surveillance data submitted by hospitals participating in the Occupational Health Safety Network (OHSN) from 2012 to 2015. Data were frequently missing for several important variables. Nursing assistants (14.89, 95%CI 10.12-21.91) and nurses (8.05, 95%CI 6.14-10.55) had the highest crude workplace violence injury rates per 1000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers. Nursing assistants' (IRR 2.82, 95%CI 2.36-3.36) and nurses' (IRR 1.70, 95%CI 1.45-1.99) adjusted workplace violence injury rates were significantly higher than those of non-patient care personnel. On average, the overall rate of workplace violence injury among OHSN-participating hospitals increased by 23% annually during the study period. Improved data collection is needed for OHSN to realize its full potential. Workplace violence is a serious, increasingly common problem in OHSN-participating hospitals. Nursing assistants and nurses have the highest injury risk. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. 40 CFR 1033.535 - Adjusting emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration events that occur during testing. See paragraph (e) of... adjust discrete-mode testing. For this section, “regeneration” means an intended event during which... section, “infrequent” refers to regeneration events that are expected to occur on average less than once...

  8. Comparison of the microbial composition of voice prosthesis biofilms from patients requiring frequent versus infrequent replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elving, GJ; Van Der Mei, HC; Van Weissenbruch, R; Busscher, HJ; Albers, FWJ

    This study was performed to establish a possible difference in biofilm composition in patients who require frequent versus infrequent prosthesis replacement. Only Groningen button voice prostheses that were removed because of increased airflow resistance or leakage of food or liquids through the

  9. Social Networks as a New Tool of E-Participation in Local: Example of Facebook and Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent MEMİŞ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on used “what level” and “how” of Facebook and Twitter tools that giving a new impetus to the process of communication or interaction of organizations and individuals, at the level organizations of municipality and mayors of municipality in the context of participation in local public policy. In this context, at the level of personal, Facebook account of 6 mayor and Twitter account of 12 mayor; at the level organizations, Facebook account of 22 municipality and Twitter account of 22 municipality was analyzed by qualitative content analysis method. According to the overall results of study, in this study were determined; even though problems transmitter / requesting information interactions are come forwarded at personal Twitter accounts, examined social networking accounts have the interaction is limited at considering the number of members on accounts and accounts are used form of encourage the direct involvement, form of transfer information which is considered as a first stage.

  10. Exercise-induced left bundle branch block: an infrequent phenomenon: Report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Salah AM; Bultje-Peters, Marisa; Nijhuis, Rogier LG

    2013-01-01

    Exercise-induced left bundle branch block (EI-LBBB) is infrequent phenomenon. We present two patients with angina pectoris who developed EI-LBBB during exercise tolerance test. The first patient with typical angina pectoris had significant obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) requiring percutaneous coronary intervention of multiple lesions including placement of drug eluting stents. The second patient had atypical chest pain without signs of CAD at all. EI-LBBB occurred at a heart rate of 80 bpm and 141 bpm in the first and second patient, respectively. EI-LBBB remained visible through the test till the recovery period in the first patient at a heart rate of 83 bpm and disappeared at 96 bpm in the second patient. Both patients with this infrequent phenomenon are discussed and the literature is reviewed. PMID:24109500

  11. Incremental and infrequent hemodialysis: a new paradigm for both dialysis initiation and conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M; Ghahremani-Ghajar, Mehrdad; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-06-01

    Registry or national dialysis data show that a sizeable proportion of contemporary dialysis patients have substantial levels of residual kidney function especially upon transitioning to dialysis therapy. However, among incident hemodialysis patients, the prevailing paradigm has been to initiate "full-dose" triweekly treatment schedules irrespective of native kidney function in most developed countries. Recognizing the benefits of residual kidney function upon the health and survival of dialysis patients, there has been growing interest in incremental hemodialysis, in which dialysis frequency and dose are tailored according to the degree of patients' residual kidney function. Infrequent hemodialysis can also be used for those who prefer a more conservative approach in managing uremia. Clinical practice guidelines support the use of twice-weekly hemodialysis among patients with adequate residual kidney function (renal urea clearance >3 mL/min/1.73 m2), and a growing body of evidence indicates that incremental hemodialysis is associated with better preservation of residual kidney function without adversely impacting survival. Nonetheless, incremental hemodialysis remains an underutilized approach in this population. In this review, we will discuss the history of the twice- versus triweekly hemodialysis schedules; current clinical practice guidelines regarding infrequent hemodialysis; emerging data on incremental treatment regimens and outcomes; and guidelines for the practical implementation of incremental and infrequent hemodialysis in the clinical setting.

  12. Methods for Collection of Participant-aided Sociograms for the Study of Social, Sexual and Substance-using Networks Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, L M; Birkett, M; Muth, S Q; Latkin, C; Ortiz-Estes, I; Garofalo, R; Mustanski, B

    In this study, we adapted and tested a participant-aided sociogram approach for the study of the social, sexual, and substance use networks of young men who have sex with men (YMSM); a population of increasing and disproportionate risk of HIV infection. We used a combination of two interviewer-administered procedures: completion of a pre-numbered list form to enumerate alters and to capture alter attributes; and a participant-aided sociogram to capture respondent report of interactions between alters on an erasable whiteboard. We followed the collection of alter interactions via the sociogram with a traditional matrix-based tie elicitation approach for a sub-sample of respondents for comparison purposes. Digital photographs of each network drawn on the whiteboard serve as the raw data for entry into a database in which group interactions are stored. Visual feedback of the network was created at the point of data entry, using NetDraw network visualization software for comparison to the network structure elicited via the sociogram. In a sample of 175 YMSM, we found this approach to be feasible and reliable, with high rates of participation among those eligible for the study and substantial agreement between the participant-aided sociogram in comparison to a traditional matrix-based approach. We believe that key strengths of this approach are the engagement and maintenance of participant attention and reduction of participant burden for alter tie elicitation. A key weakness is the challenge of entry of interview-based list form and sociogram data into the database. Our experience suggests that this approach to data collection is feasible and particularly appropriate for an adolescent and young adult population. This builds on and advances visualization-based approaches to social network data collection.

  13. A Novel Use of a Statewide Telecolposcopy Network for Recruitment of Participants in a Phase I Clinical Trial of a Human Papillomavirus Therapeutic Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L.; Spencer, Horace J.; Greenfield, William W.; Low, Gordon; Hitt, W. Chuck; Quick, Charles M.; Jeffus, Susanne K.; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials has been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single arm, single institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolau smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) or cannot rule out HSIL were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed HSIL were also eligible. Colposopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of HSIL was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. Purpose The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Methods Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits, frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails, and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of identifying factor(s) associated with recruitment and retention. Results Thirty-seven participants were

  14. [A case management programme for women with breast cancer: results of a written survey of participating medical and non-medical networking-partners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, C; Thorenz, A; Grochocka, A; Koch, U; Watzke, B

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer patients are as a rule in need of a multiple sequential in-patient, day-patient and out-patient permanent treatment. The required care demands a trans-sectoral networking of all multi-professional persons involved in diagnostics, therapies, rehabilitation and aftercare. A method to develop the integration of treatment processes, as well as thereby resulting in increased effectiveness and efficiency, can constitute the concept of case management. A prerequisite for an effective implementation of case management and thus the starting point of the present survey is a well-functioning network encompassing optimal cooperation. Within the framework of the evaluation of the case management-based integrated care model "mammaNetz" for women with mamma carcinoma as a whole and against the background of the potential for innovation and improvement of case management on the one hand as well as the existence of only few empirical data otherwise, the present survey of members of a trans-sectoral network of the service centre was accomplished. Medical and non-medical networking partners of the service centre (N=168) were questioned by regular mail about different aspects of the cooperation. Identical items in both surveys were compared. The return rate for the medical networking partners is about 59% (n=35), whereby only medical network partners in private practice participated in the survey. For the non-medical networking partners about 60% (n=66) participated. Medical networking partners assess the cooperation with the service centre in reference to the exchange of information slightly more positively (66%) than the non-medical networking partners (59%). Medical networking partners are in significantly more frequent contact with the service centre and see in the cooperation significantly more advantages for their own office/facility (each with p=0.001) than non-medical networking partners. Overall the results suggest that medical as well as non-medical networking

  15. It's better to give than to receive: the role of social support, trust, and participation on health-related social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hether, Heather J; Murphy, Sheila T; Valente, Thomas W

    2014-12-01

    Nearly 60% of American adults and 80% of Internet users have sought health information online. Moreover, Internet users are no longer solely passive consumers of online health content; they are active producers as well. Social media, such as social networking sites, are increasingly being used as online venues for the exchange of health-related information and advice. However, little is known about how participation on health-related social networking sites affects users. Research has shown that women participate more on social networking sites and social networks are more influential among same-sex members. Therefore, this study examined how participation on a social networking site about pregnancy influenced members' health-related attitudes and behaviors. The authors surveyed 114 pregnant members of 8 popular pregnancy-related sites. Analyses revealed that time spent on the sites was less predictive of health-related outcomes than more qualitative assessments such as trust in the sites. Furthermore, providing support was associated with the most outcomes, including seeking more information from additional sources and following recommendations posted on the sites. The implications of these findings, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

  16. Infrequent Reservoir‐Related Complications of Urologic Prosthetics: A Case Series and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cui, MD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Complications involving urologic prosthesis reservoirs, although rare, can have serious implications for patients. A high index of suspicion and familiarity with treatment options is required in order to allow timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Patients with prior major abdominal surgeries seem to be more prone to intestinal complications of reservoirs and warrant special concern. Cui T, Terlecki R, and Mirzazadeh M. Infrequent reservoir‐related complications of urologic prosthetics: A case series and literature review. Sex Med 2015;3:334–338.

  17. The association between active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social network on the development of lung cancer in smokers: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anna; Jung, Julia; Ernstmann, Nicole; Driller, Elke; Neumann, Melanie; Staratschek-Jox, Andrea; Schneider, Christian; Wolf, Jürgen; Pfaff, Holger

    2012-01-04

    This study analyses the effect of active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social networks on the development of lung cancer in patients who smoke. Our hypothesis is that study participants who lack social networks and do not actively participate in a sports club are at a greater risk for lung cancer than those who do. Data for the study were taken from the Cologne Smoking Study (CoSmoS), a retrospective case-control study examining potential psychosocial risk factors for the development of lung cancer. Our sample consisted of n = 158 participants who had suffered lung cancer (diagnosis in the patient document) and n = 144 control group participants. Both groups had a history of smoking.Data on social networks were collected by asking participants whether they participated in a sports club and about the number of friends and relatives in their social environment. In addition, sociodemographic data (gender, age, education, marital status, residence and religion), physical activity and data on pack years (the cumulative number of cigarettes smoked by an individual, calculated by multiplying the number of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked divided by 20) were collected to control for potential confounders. Logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. The results reveal that participants who are physically active are at a lower risk of lung cancer than those who are not (adjusted OR = 0.53*; CI = 0.29-0.97). Older age and lower education seem also to be risk factors for the development of lung cancer. The extent of smoking, furthermore, measured by pack years is statistically significant. Active participation in a sports club, number of friends and relatives had no statistically significant influence on the development of the cancer. The results of the study suggest that there is a lower risk for physically active participants to develop lung cancer. In the study sample, physical activity seemed to

  18. The association between active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social network on the development of lung cancer in smokers: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Anna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study analyses the effect of active participation in a sports club, physical activity and social networks on the development of lung cancer in patients who smoke. Our hypothesis is that study participants who lack social networks and do not actively participate in a sports club are at a greater risk for lung cancer than those who do. Methods Data for the study were taken from the Cologne Smoking Study (CoSmoS, a retrospective case-control study examining potential psychosocial risk factors for the development of lung cancer. Our sample consisted of n = 158 participants who had suffered lung cancer (diagnosis in the patient document and n = 144 control group participants. Both groups had a history of smoking. Data on social networks were collected by asking participants whether they participated in a sports club and about the number of friends and relatives in their social environment. In addition, sociodemographic data (gender, age, education, marital status, residence and religion, physical activity and data on pack years (the cumulative number of cigarettes smoked by an individual, calculated by multiplying the number of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked divided by 20 were collected to control for potential confounders. Logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. Results The results reveal that participants who are physically active are at a lower risk of lung cancer than those who are not (adjusted OR = 0.53*; CI = 0.29-0.97. Older age and lower education seem also to be risk factors for the development of lung cancer. The extent of smoking, furthermore, measured by pack years is statistically significant. Active participation in a sports club, number of friends and relatives had no statistically significant influence on the development of the cancer. Conclusions The results of the study suggest that there is a lower risk for physically active participants to develop

  19. Acceptability and ease of use of mailed HPV self-collection among infrequently screened women in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chelsea; Breithaupt, Lindsay; Des Marais, Andrea; Rastas, Charlotte; Richman, Alice; Barclay, Lynn; Brewer, Noel T; Smith, Jennifer S

    2017-09-02

    Self-collection of cervico-vaginal samples for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has the potential to make cervical cancer screening more accessible to underscreened women. We evaluated the acceptability and ease of use of home-based HPV self-collection within a diverse population of low-income, infrequently screened women. Participants were low-income women from North Carolina who had not received Pap testing in 4 or more years. Eligible women received a self-collection kit containing instructions and a brush for home-based sample collection. A total of 227 women returned a self-collected sample by mail and completed a questionnaire to assess their experiences with HPV self-collection. We described acceptability measures and used logistic regression to identify predictors of overall positive thoughts about the self-collection experience. Nearly all women were willing to perform HPV self-collection again (98%) and were comfortable receiving the self-collection kit in the mail (99%). Overall, 81% of participants reported positive thoughts about home-based self-collection. Women with at least some college education and those who were divorced, separated or widowed were more likely to report overall positive thoughts. Aspects of self-collection that participants most commonly reported liking included convenience (53%), ease of use (32%) and privacy (23%). The most frequently reported difficulties included uncertainty that the self-collection was done correctly (16%) and difficulty inserting the self-collection brush (16%). Home-based self-collection for HPV was a highly acceptable screening method among low-income, underscreened women and holds the promise to increase access to cervical cancer screening in this high-risk population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Strength Gains as a Result of Brief, Infrequent Resistance Exercise in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronological aging is associated with a decrease in skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density, an increase in fat mass, frequency of falls and fractures, and the likelihood of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. Resistance exercise has been shown to counter all of these effects of aging and, in turn, reduce the risk of all-cause mortality. However, variables such as volume and frequency have become contentious issues, with recent publications suggesting that similar physiological adaptations are possible with both high- and low-volume approaches. The aim of this research was to consider strength increases as a result of brief, infrequent resistance exercise. The present study offers data from 33 (14 male and 19 female older adults (M=55 years who underwent brief (<15 minutes per exercise session, infrequent (2×/week, resistance exercise to a high intensity of effort (6-repetition maximum at a controlled repetition duration (10 seconds concentric : 10 seconds eccentric on 5 resistance machines (chest press, leg press, pull-down, seated row, and overhead press. Data is presented for training interventions of 12 weeks (male and 19 weeks (female. Significant strength increases were identified for all exercises. With the detailed health benefits obtainable, the present study suggests that resistance exercise can be efficacious in much smaller volumes than previously considered.

  1. Infrequent enuresis, the uninvestigated majority comparisons between children with enuresis of varying severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederblad, Maria; Sarkadi, Anna; Engvall, Gunn; Nevéus, Tryggve

    2015-02-01

    The main objective was to compare children with frequent enuresis (FE) and children with infrequent enuresis (IE) using anamnestic data and variables related to bladder and kidney function. A secondary aim was to look at the group of children who wet their beds every single night, a phenomenon we chose to call constant enuresis (CE). The parents recorded the number of wet and dry nights for a period of 14 days, and measured the voided volumes as well as nocturnal urine production for 48 h. History data relevant to bladder and bowel function was also recorded. The children could be grouped as follows: IE, n = 14; FE, n = 18; and CE, n = 22. The children with IE were slightly older than the other groups, IE mean 7.57; FE mean 6.22; CE, mean 6.56 (p = 0.004). When comparing the groups in terms of the measured parameters, only one significant difference was found: the FE group had larger average daytime voided volumes, but only when the first morning void was included. The only significantly differing anamnestic variable was previous daytime incontinence, which was more common among the children in the IE group. When comparing children with varying enuresis severity, no major differences regarding bladder function and urine production were found. Furthermore, children with infrequent enuresis tend to be slightly older when they seek medical help. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Perspectives of professionals participating in the Brazilian Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity regarding the implementation of routine surveillance: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Adriana Gomes; Osis, Maria José Martins Duarte; Ribeiro, Meire; Cecatti, José Guilherme; Amaral, Eliana

    2014-04-08

    The Brazilian Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity was developed in Brazil with the participation of 27 centers in different regions of the country. The objective of the network project was to evaluate the frequency of severe maternal morbidity (near-miss and potentially life-threatening conditions) and the factors involved with these clinical conditions. Over the data collection period, this project implemented a surveillance system to identify these cases in the participating institutions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the perspective of the professionals who participated in this network regarding the surveillance of cases of severe maternal morbidity, the facilities and difficulties encountered in involving colleagues in the process, and participants’ proposals to give continuity to this practice of qualifying maternal healthcare. A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was conducted in which coordinators, investigators and managers at all the 27 obstetric units participating in the network were interviewed. Data were collected at 6 and 12 months after implementation of the network during semi-structured telephone interviews that were recorded following verbal informed consent. Thematic content analysis was performed of the responses to the open questions in the interviews. In the opinion of 60% of the participants, involving their colleagues in the surveillance process proved difficult, principally because these professionals were not very interested in the research project, but also because they found it difficult to review concepts and professional practices, because they had an excessive workload or due to operational and technical difficulties. The great majority considered that support from government agencies providing financial resources would be crucial to enable surveillance to be maintained or expanded and also to train a larger number of professionals and improve work conditions. The majority of

  3. Social media in the public sector: a guide to participation, collaboration, and transparency in the networked world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mergel, Ines

    2013-01-01

    ..., networked governance, and information management. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes best practices, the strategic, managerial, administrative, and procedural aspects of using social media, and explains the theoretical dimensions of how...

  4. Social media in the public sector: a guide to participation, collaboration, and transparency in the networked world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mergel, Ines

    2013-01-01

    ..., networked governance, and information management. Comprehensive in scope, the book includes best practices, the strategic, managerial, administrative, and procedural aspects of using social media, and explains the theoretical dimensions...

  5. Neuroendocrine tumors: fascination and infrequency Tumores neuroendocrinos: fascinación e infrecuencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Varas Lorenzo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I review and update of gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which so much fascination have risen among healthcare providers on grounds of their infrequency, hormonal syndromes, and high survival rate, is performed based on references from the past fifteen years.Se efectúa una revisión y puesta al día, basándose en citas bibliográficas de los últimos quince años, de los tumores neuroendocrinos gastroenteropancreáticos, que tanta fascinación han provocado en el estamento médico por su infrecuencia, síndromes hormonales y supervivencia elevada.

  6. Severe pseudomonal keratitis in an infrequent daily disposable contact lens wearer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Priti; Goldstein, Michael H

    2010-05-01

    To report an unusual case of contact lens-associated pseudomonal keratitis in a compliant daily disposable contact lens wearer. A case report is presented of a compliant daily disposable contact lens wearer who developed culture-positive pseudomonal keratitis. A 38-year-old woman who reported compliant and infrequent use of daily disposable contact lenses presented with rapid-onset, severe keratitis consistent with pseudomonal infection. Corneal cultures were positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. She had no identifiable risk factors, although notably had a remote history of contact lens-associated keratitis in the fellow eye. Although extremely rare, pseudomonal keratitis should still be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe keratitis in daily disposable contact lens wearers. Given the history of a previous contact lens-related bacterial keratitis in this compliant patient, it is possible that host susceptibility factors played a role in the case of pseudomonal keratitis described here.

  7. Challenges to Participation in the Sharing Economy: The Case of Local Online Peer-to-Peer Exchange in a Single Parents’ Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airi Lampinen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper depicts an initiative to deploy an online peer-to-peer exchange system for a community network of single parents – a group of people in need of goods, services, and social support in their local neighborhoods. We apply participant observation and semi-structured interviews to uncover key issues that can hinder the emergence of sharing practices in local community networks of this type. Our study illustrates how pressures related to single parenthood can impede opportunities to engage in peer-to-peer exchange, even when community members view the social and material benefits of participation as desirable and necessary. This complicates the prevalent narrative that local peer-to-peer exchange systems are an accessible and convenient alternative to traditional markets. Moreover, we discuss our collaboration with the community as well as the developers of the sharing platform, highlighting the challenges of user-centered design in the sharing economy.

  8. Young adults, social networks, and addiction recovery: post treatment changes in social ties and their role as a mediator of 12-step participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Kelly

    Full Text Available Social factors play a key role in addiction recovery. Research with adults indicates individuals with substance use disorder (SUD benefit from mutual-help organizations (MHOs, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, via their ability to facilitate adaptive network changes. Given the lower prevalence of sobriety-conducive, and sobriety-supportive, social contexts in the general population during the life-stage of young adulthood, however, 12-step MHOs may play an even more crucial recovery-supportive social role for young adults, but have not been investigated. Greater knowledge could enhance understanding of recovery-related change and inform young adults' continuing care recommendations.Emerging adults (N = 302; 18-24 yrs; 26% female; 95% White enrolled in a study of residential treatment effectiveness were assessed at intake, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months on 12-step attendance, peer network variables ("high [relapse] risk" and "low [relapse] risk" friends, and treatment outcomes (Percent Days Abstinent; Percent Days Heavy Drinking. Hierarchical linear models tested for change in social risk over time and lagged mediational analyses tested whether 12-step attendance conferred recovery benefits via change in social risk.High-risk friends were common at treatment entry, but decreased during follow-up; low-risk friends increased. Contrary to predictions, while substantial recovery-supportive friend network changes were observed, this was unrelated to 12-step participation and, thus, not found to mediate its positive influence on outcome.Young adult 12-step participation confers recovery benefit; yet, while encouraging social network change, 12-step MHOs may be less able to provide social network change directly for young adults, perhaps because similar-aged peers are less common in MHOs. Findings highlight the importance of both social networks and 12-step MHOs and raise further questions as to how young adults benefit from 12-step MHOs.

  9. Young adults, social networks, and addiction recovery: post treatment changes in social ties and their role as a mediator of 12-step participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Stout, Robert L; Greene, M Claire; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Social factors play a key role in addiction recovery. Research with adults indicates individuals with substance use disorder (SUD) benefit from mutual-help organizations (MHOs), such as Alcoholics Anonymous, via their ability to facilitate adaptive network changes. Given the lower prevalence of sobriety-conducive, and sobriety-supportive, social contexts in the general population during the life-stage of young adulthood, however, 12-step MHOs may play an even more crucial recovery-supportive social role for young adults, but have not been investigated. Greater knowledge could enhance understanding of recovery-related change and inform young adults' continuing care recommendations. Emerging adults (N = 302; 18-24 yrs; 26% female; 95% White) enrolled in a study of residential treatment effectiveness were assessed at intake, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months on 12-step attendance, peer network variables ("high [relapse] risk" and "low [relapse] risk" friends), and treatment outcomes (Percent Days Abstinent; Percent Days Heavy Drinking). Hierarchical linear models tested for change in social risk over time and lagged mediational analyses tested whether 12-step attendance conferred recovery benefits via change in social risk. High-risk friends were common at treatment entry, but decreased during follow-up; low-risk friends increased. Contrary to predictions, while substantial recovery-supportive friend network changes were observed, this was unrelated to 12-step participation and, thus, not found to mediate its positive influence on outcome. Young adult 12-step participation confers recovery benefit; yet, while encouraging social network change, 12-step MHOs may be less able to provide social network change directly for young adults, perhaps because similar-aged peers are less common in MHOs. Findings highlight the importance of both social networks and 12-step MHOs and raise further questions as to how young adults benefit from 12-step MHOs.

  10. People’s Motivation to Participate in Social Network Sites, Subsequent Behaviours, and Situation Self-Awareness following a Crisis: Evidence from the MH370 Flight Incident

    OpenAIRE

    Xuequn Wang

    2016-01-01

    As people increasingly integrate social network sites (SNSs) into their daily lives, they also turn to these sites for timely information following crises. To date, few studies have examined the effects of different types of motivation on participatory behaviours within SNSs following crises. In this study, self-determination theory (SDT) is applied to examine how individuals are motivated to participate in SNSs following a crisis and how individuals’ participatory behaviours can better assis...

  11. A novel use of a statewide telecolposcopy network for recruitment of participants in a Phase I clinical trial of a human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Shawna L; Spencer, Horace J; Greenfield, William W; Low, Gordon; Hitt, Wilbur C; Quick, Charles M; Jeffus, Susanne K; Blackmon, Victoria; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, recruitment and retention of young women in intervention-based clinical trials have been challenging. In August 2012, enrollment for a clinical trial testing of an investigational human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine called PepCan was opened at our institution. This study was an open-label, single-arm, single-institution, dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial. Women with recent Papanicolaou smear results showing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or results that could not rule out high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were eligible to enroll. Patients with biopsy-confirmed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were also eligible. Colposcopy was performed at the screening visit, and participants became eligible for vaccination when the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was confirmed with biopsy and other inclusion criteria were met. The aim of this study was to identify strategies and factors effective in recruitment and retention of study participants. Potential vaccine candidates were recruited through direct advertisement as well as referrals, including referrals through the Arkansas telecolposcopy network. The network is a federally funded program, administered by physicians and advanced practice nurses. The network telemedically links rural health sites and allows physician-guided colposcopy and biopsies to be conducted by advanced practice nurses. A variety of strategies were employed to assure good retention, including face-to-face contact with the study coordinator at the time of consent and most of study visits; frequent contact using text messaging, phone calls, and e-mails; and creation of a private Facebook page to improve communication among research staff and study participants. A questionnaire, inquiring about motivation for joining the study, occupation, education, household income, number of children, and number of sexual partners, was administered at the screening visit with the intent of

  12. Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

  13. Participation of the Netherlands in the European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care (PaSQ).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, L. van de; Schoten, S. van; Loos, E. de; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    De deelname aan het European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care (PaSQ) betekende een nieuwe impuls voor de implementatie van good practices in deelnemende Nederlandse ziekenhuizen. Met steun van het Nederlandse PaSQ team – bestaande uit het NIVEL en CBO – hebben zeven Nederlandse

  14. Cell culture media supplementation of infrequently used sugars for the targeted shifting of protein glycosylation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, Patrick; Racicot, Christopher; Chumsae, Christopher; McDermott, Sean; Cochran, Keith

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian cells in culture rely on sources of carbohydrates to supply the energy requirements for proliferation. In addition, carbohydrates provide a large source of the carbon supply for supporting various other metabolic activities, including the intermediates involved in the protein glycosylation pathway. Glucose and galactose, in particular, are commonly used sugars in culture media for these purposes. However, there exists a very large repertoire of other sugars in nature, and many that have been chemically synthesized. These sugars are particularly interesting because they can be utilized by cells in culture in distinct ways. In the present work it has been found that many infrequently used sugars, and the corresponding cellular response towards them as substrates, led to differences in the protein N-glycosylation profile of a recombinant glycoprotein. The selective media supplementation of raffinose, trehalose, turanose, palatinose, melezitose, psicose, lactose, lactulose, and mannose were found to be capable of redirecting N-glycan oligosaccharide profiles. Despite this shifting of protein glycosylation, there were no other adverse changes in culture performance, including both cell growth and cellular productivity over a wide range of supplemented sugar concentrations. The approach presented highlights a potential means towards both the targeted shifting of protein glycosylation profiles and ensuring recombinant protein comparability, which up to this point in time has remained under-appreciated for these under-utilized compounds. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:511-522, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Results Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %, never married (83.5 %, unemployed (94.2 %, and without a bank account (66.0 %. Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure, and depression (57.3 %. Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48

  16. The Building Wealth and Health Network: methods and baseline characteristics from a randomized controlled trial for families with young children participating in temporary assistance for needy families (TANF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Patel, Falguni; Kirzner, Rachel; Newton-Famous, Nijah; Owens, Constance; Welles, Seth L; Chilton, Mariana

    2016-07-16

    Families with children under age six participating in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) must participate in work-related activities for 20 h per week. However, due to financial hardship, poor health, and exposure to violence and adversity, families may experience great difficulty in reaching self-sufficiency. The purpose of this report is to describe study design and baseline findings of a trauma-informed financial empowerment and peer support intervention meant to mitigate these hardships. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a 28-week intervention called Building Wealth and Health Network to improve financial security and maternal and child health among caregivers participating in TANF. Participants, recruited from County Assistance offices in Philadelphia, PA, were randomized into two intervention groups (partial and full) and one control group. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline to assess career readiness, economic hardship, health and wellbeing, exposure to adversity and violence, and interaction with criminal justice systems. Baseline characteristics demonstrate that among 103 participants, there were no significant differences by group. Mean age of participants was 25 years, and youngest child was 30 months. The majority of participants were women (94.2 %), never married (83.5 %), unemployed (94.2 %), and without a bank account (66.0 %). Many reported economic hardship (32.0 % very low household food secure, 65.0 % housing insecure, and 31.1 % severe energy insecure), and depression (57.3 %). Exposure to adversity was prevalent, where 38.8 % reported four or more Adverse Childhood Experiences including abuse, neglect and household dysfunction. In terms of community violence, 64.7 % saw a seriously wounded person after an incident of violence, and 27.2 % had seen someone killed. Finally, 14.6 % spent time in an adult correctional institution, and 48.5 % of the fathers of the youngest child spent

  17. Infrequent word classes in the speech of two- to seven-year-old children with cochlear implants and their normally hearing peers: a longitudinal study of adjective use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribushinina, Elena; Gillis, Steven; De Maeyer, Sven

    2013-03-01

    Studies investigating language skills of children after cochlear implantation usually use global language proficiency scores and rarely tackle the acquisition of specific language phenomena (word classes, grammatical constructions, etc.). Furthermore, research is largely restricted to frequent word classes (nouns, verbs). The present study targets the acquisition of adjectives (e.g. big, intelligent) by children implanted before their second birthday. Adjectives constitute a relatively infrequent, but functionally important word class and were shown to be good indicators of language delays and impairments. Nine cochlear-implanted (CI) children and 60 age-matched normally hearing (NH) controls participated in the study. The CI children were followed longitudinally from ages 2 to 7; control data were collected in a cross-sectional manner (10 children per age group). Samples of children's spontaneous interactions with their caregivers were transcribed and analyzed for adjective use (frequency, lexical diversity, complexity of syntactic constructions, and morphological correctness). The performance of the CI subjects was not significantly different from that of NH peers on adjective frequency and lexical diversity. On these measures, both groups reached adult levels by age 3. However, the CI group had a significant delay in the acquisition of complex syntactic constructions. The NH subjects produced adjectives in adult-like grammatical constructions from age 3 onwards, whereas their CI peers lagged behind until age 5. The speech of the CI participants also featured morphological errors that are not characteristic of typical development (inflection of predicative adjectives). However, the overall error rate was low. The findings suggest that CI children have particular difficulty with grammatical items (bound morphemes, copulas) that are less salient in the flow of speech than content words. Nevertheless, children implanted before their second birthday are able to catch

  18. Normal variations in personality are associated with coital orgasmic infrequency in heterosexual women: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Juliette M; Cherkas, Lynn F; Kato, Bernet S; Heiman, Julia R; Spector, Tim D

    2008-05-01

    As many as 20-30% of women report an inability to orgasm during sexual intercourse. Some female sexual problems have been reported to cluster with psychological and social problems. Underlying personality type may play a role in the development or maintenance of such problems. The aim of this study was to investigate whether certain domains of personality are associated with female coital orgasmic infrequency. To our knowledge this is the first such study in a large unselected population. A total of 2632 women (mean age 51) from the TwinsUK registry completed questionnaires relating to personality and sexual behavior. Personality domains were assessed using the validated Ten-Item Personality Index (TIPI). Coital orgasmic frequency was measured using a seven-point Likert scale. Using logistic regression, we investigated whether variations in five domains of personality are associated with female coital orgasmic infrequency. Discordant twin analysis was used to verify findings. Introversion (odds ratio [OR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-3.7), emotional instability (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-3.1), and not being open to new experience (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.6-3.6) were significantly associated with orgasmic infrequency, whereas indices of agreeableness and conscientiousness were not significantly associated with orgasm frequency. Specific personality subtypes appear to be significant risk factors for orgasmic infrequency. Consideration of these behavioral risk factors may need to be incorporated into research into female orgasmic disorder, and possible approaches to its treatment.

  19. 40 CFR 1042.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration... this section for how to adjust discrete-mode testing. For this section, “regeneration” means an... oxidize accumulated particulate matter in a trap. For this section, “infrequent” refers to regeneration...

  20. 40 CFR 1039.525 - How do I adjust emission levels to account for infrequently regenerating aftertreatment devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... adjust emission results from engines using aftertreatment technology with infrequent regeneration events. For this section, “regeneration” means an intended event during which emission levels change while the... section, “infrequent” refers to regeneration events that are expected to occur on average less than once...

  1. Shading and sediment structure effects on stream metabolism resistance and resilience to infrequent droughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanović, Sanja; Fabian, Jenny; Premke, Katrin; Mutz, Michael

    2017-10-22

    land use to mitigate the future impact of unpredictable infrequent droughts on stream metabolism in temperate ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  3. Community Participation, Natural Resource Management and the Creation of Innovative Tourism Products: Evidence from Italian Networks of Reserves in the Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Martini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses value co-creation and social innovation focusing on a new approach to the management of Natura 2000 areas: the Networks of Reserves (NoRs. NoRs have been set up in Trentino (an Italian alpine area to create an ecological network within the territory, with a particular focus on the socio-economic dimensions of nature conservation and with a bottom-up approach. The research investigates the role of NoRs by using a quali-quantitative approach to analyse the attitudes and awareness of private stakeholders, public actors and local communities. In-depth interviews with NoRs coordinators and key players in tourism organizations were carried out. 167 online questionnaires were sent out to local stakeholders. The research investigates community participation and stakeholder engagement in NoRs’ projects and activities, whether and how socio-economic development has occurred, and whether and how innovative sustainable tourism offers have been created. It confirms the role of NoRs in relation to the conservation and valorisation of natural resources through the stimulation of activities such as environmental interpretation and education. The research demonstrates the effectiveness of bottom-up processes for the co-creation of sustainable tourism offers and the fostering of social innovation. NoRs have proved to be successful in overcoming the major impediments to the functioning of the Natura 2000 network highlighted in the literature.

  4. [Study of influences of social support and social networks on participation in periodic health examination of the elderly at home comparison of three regions with different social backgrounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Yuu; Kishi, Reiko; Ecuchi, Teruko; Miyake, Hirotsugu; Sasatani, Harumi; Maeda, Nobuo; Horikawa, Naoko

    2006-02-01

    Periodic health examination are presumed to be important with respect to the well-being of aged individuals. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between elderly at home accepting periodic health examination and their social support and social networks. The survey was performed targeting so-called young elderly persons living at home in 3 regions in Hokkaido Prefecture, a large city (Sapporo), an ex-coalmining town (Yuubari) and a small farming town (Takasu). The study populations were asked about social support and social networks, and the Mantel-Haenszel method was applied to analyze the data. 1) Both males and females who received periodic health examination within the last one year (participants) were members of various groups, such as neighborhood societies, clubs for the elderly and so on, and were more interested in public magazines and political issues than those who had never received periodic health examination (non-participants). Elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were those who were interested in elections, who had a hobby, and who thought that life was worthwhile. 2) Both elderly males and females who accepted periodic health examination were those who had friends, and elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were those who had close relatives and who lived in a friendly neighborhood. 3) Elderly males who accepted periodic health examination were more likely to both receive and supply instrumental and emotional support in interaction with others.

  5. Mortality Rates Among Substance Use Disorder Participants in Clinical Trials: Pooled Analysis of Twenty-Two Clinical Trials Within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Robert; Hu, Lian; Oden, Neal; Wakim, Paul; Rosa, Carmen; VanVeldhuisen, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Most substance use disorders (SUD) treatment clinical trials are too short and small to reliably estimate the incidence of rare events like death. The aim of this study is to estimate the overall mortality rates among a SUD treatment-seeking population by pooling participants from multiple clinical trials conducted through the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)-sponsored National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN). Drug and or alcohol users (N=9866) who sought treatment and participated in one of the twenty-two CTN trials. Data were collected through randomized clinical trials in national community treatment programs for SUD. Pooled analysis was performed to assess age- and gender-standardized mortality rate(s) (SM rate(s)), and mortality ratio(s) (SM ratio(s)) of CTN trial participants compared to the U.S. general population. The age- and gender-SM rate among CTN trials participants was 1403 (95% CI: 862-2074) per 100,000 person years (PY) compared to 542 (95% CI: 541-543) per 100,000 PY among the U.S. general population in 2005. By gender, age-adjusted SM ratio for female CTN trial participants was over five times (SM ratio=5.35, 95% CI: 3.31-8.19)), and for male CTN trial participants, it was over three times (SM ratio=3.39, 95% CI: 2.25-4.90) higher than their gender comparable peers in the U.S. general population. Age and gender-standardized mortality rates and ratios among NIDA CTN SUD treatment-seeking clinical trial participants are higher than the age and gender comparable U.S. general population. The overall mortality rates of CTN trial participants are similar to in-treatment mortality reported in large U.S. and non-U.S. cohorts of opioid users. Future analysis with additional CTN trial participants and risk times will improve the stability of estimates, especially within subgroups based on primary substance of abuse. These SUD mortality rates can be used to facilitate safety monitoring within SUD clinical trials. Copyright © 2016

  6. Defining social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities: an ecological model of social networks and community participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplican, Stacy Clifford; Leader, Geraldine; Kosciulek, John; Leahy, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Social inclusion is an important goal for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, families, service providers, and policymakers; however, the concept of social inclusion remains unclear, largely due to multiple and conflicting definitions in research and policy. We define social inclusion as the interaction between two major life domains: interpersonal relationships and community participation. We then propose an ecological model of social inclusion that includes individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and socio-political factors. We identify four areas of research that our ecological model of social inclusion can move forward: (1) organizational implementation of social inclusion; (2) social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities living with their families, (3) social inclusion of people along a broader spectrum of disability, and (4) the potential role of self-advocacy organizations in promoting social inclusion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Perceived Stress in Online Prostate Cancer Community Participants: Examining Relationships with Stigmatization, Social Support Network Preference, and Social Support Seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising, Camella J; Bol, Nadine; Burke-Garcia, Amelia; Rains, Stephen; Wright, Kevin B

    2017-06-01

    Men with prostate cancer often need social support to help them cope with illness-related physiological and psychosocial challenges. Whether those needs are met depends on receiving support optimally matched to their needs. This study examined relationships between perceived stress, prostate cancer-related stigma, weak-tie support preference, and online community use for social support in a survey of online prostate cancer community participants (n = 149). Findings revealed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress. This relationship, however, was moderated by weak-tie support preference and online community use for social support. Specifically, stigma was positively related to perceived stress when weak-tie support was preferred. Analyses also showed a positive relationship between stigma and perceived stress in those who used their online community for advice or emotional support. Health communication scholars should work collaboratively with diagnosed men, clinicians, and online community administrators to develop online interventions that optimally match social support needs.

  8. Development of an Infrequency-Psychopathology scale for the MMPI-A: the Fp-A Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, R E; Pogge, D L; Stein, L A; Graham, J R; Zaccario, M; Piacentini, T

    2000-04-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of the Infrequency-Psychopathology scale, Fp-A, for the MMPI-A (Butcher et al., 1992). The scale parallels the Infrequency-Psychopathology scale, F(p), that has been developed for the MMPI-2 (Butcher, Dahlstrom, Graham, Tellegen, & Kaemmer, 1989). Results demonstrated that the 40-item Fp-A scale is superior to the F scale at discriminating between faking-bad and accurate reports of psychopathology, although the improvement over F was modest, particularly when compared to the improvement found for the F(p) scale. The difference seemed to reflect the superiority of the MMPI-A F scale to the MMPI-2 F scale. Even so, the findings suggest that the identification of overreporting on the MMPI-A could potentially be enhanced by using Fp-A as an adjunct to the F scale.

  9. Mutations in MYH9 exons 1, 16, 26, and 30 are infrequently found in Japanese patients with nonsyndromic deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishima, Shinji; Matsunaga, Tatsuo; Ito, Yoshimi; Saito, Hidehiko

    2009-10-01

    Mutations in MYH9 result in the autosomal dominant giant platelet disorders with leukocyte inclusion bodies with varying degrees of Alport manifestations, including nephritis, deafness, and cataracts. A specific MYH9 mutation in exon 16, R705H, causes nonsyndromic deafness DFNA17. We searched for mutations in MYH9 exons 1, 16, 26, and 30 in a total of 157 Japanese patients with nonsyndromic deafness without known cause of hearing loss, but no mutations were found. We conclude that mutations in MYH9 are infrequently found in patients with nonsyndromic deafness and suggest that MYH9 mutations infrequently cause isolated sensorineural hearing loss. Thus, MYH9 may not currently be a good candidate gene for efficient screening of genetic causes in nonsyndromic deafness.

  10. Network unites payers, physicians, hospitals. System participants work together to improve access to care and to design cost-saving incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J

    1993-05-01

    Through Sacred Heart Health System (SHHS), Eugene, OR, physicians, payers, and hospitals are designing a network that will integrate care and improve access by reducing healthcare costs. Together, system members design cost-saving incentives and the products the system offers the community. They promote managed care as the most efficient means to coordinate care and reduce costs. All participants share in the risks of a capitated payment system. Since the system pulled together the payers, physician groups, and hospitals, many of these entities' management functions were consolidated at the system level to avoid duplication and reduce administrative costs. Bringing in physicians was the most difficult yet important aspect of forming a successful network. Working with two physician groups in the community, the system's sponsor-the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace, Health and Hospital Services-developed the Physician Practice Board. The board, representing 300 physicians, meets weekly and makes recommendations on issues that affect physicians. SHHS also added innovative new functions such as an integrated medical cost management and continuous quality improvement program. Another key to success is a clinically oriented information system, which will allow the system to track patients once they leave the hospital. It also will provide a better understanding of what things have an impact on outcomes and will reduce paperwork. A portion of the system's revenue is designated for initiatives to improve access. And the system recently appointed a tack force on access to explore what they can do in cooperation with others in the community.

  11. Neuropathologic assessment of participants in two multi-center longitudinal observational studies: the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Nigel J; Perrin, Richard J; Franklin, Erin E; Carter, Deborah; Vincent, Benjamin; Xie, Mingqiang; Bateman, Randall J; Benzinger, Tammie; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brooks, William S; Halliday, Glenda M; McLean, Catriona; Ghetti, Bernardino; Morris, John C

    2015-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that the relatively rare autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD) may be a useful model of the more frequent, sporadic, late-onset AD (LOAD). Individuals with ADAD have a predictable age at onset and the biomarker profile of ADAD participants in the preclinical stage may be used to predict disease progression and clinical onset. However, the extent to which the pathogenesis and neuropathology of ADAD overlaps with that of LOAD is equivocal. To address this uncertainty, two multicenter longitudinal observational studies, the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), leveraged the expertise and resources of the existing Knight Alzheimer Disease Research Center (ADRC) at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, to establish a Neuropathology Core (NPC). The ADNI/DIAN-NPC is systematically examining the brains of all participants who come to autopsy at the 59 ADNI sites in the USA and Canada and the 14 DIAN sites in the USA (eight), Australia (three), UK (one) and Germany (two). By 2014, 41 ADNI and 24 DIAN autopsies (involving nine participants and 15 family members) had been performed. The autopsy rate in the ADNI cohort in the most recent year was 93% (total since NPC inception: 70%). In summary, the ADNI/DIAN NPC has implemented a standard protocol for all sites to solicit permission for brain autopsy and to send brain tissue to the NPC for a standardized, uniform and state-of-the-art neuropathologic assessment. The benefit to ADNI and DIAN of the implementation of the NPC is very clear. The NPC provides final "gold standard" neuropathological diagnoses and data against which the antecedent observations and measurements of ADNI and DIAN can be compared. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Improving adequacy of hemodialysis in Northern California ESRD patients: a final project report. Provider Participants and Medical Review Board of the TransPacific Renal Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J; Josephson, M

    2000-10-01

    with a KT/V below the national benchmark. Only 9% (n = 8) of the 113 providers had a variance in post-BUN sampling methodologies that could be related to the clinical measure of adequacy. In Phase II, a random selection of 12 providers with data below US and Network standards was made for an intensive assessment. A total of 217 patient records were reviewed from a population of 1,027. In addition to comparison of baseline data, each facility was assessed for barriers to achieving adequacy outcomes. The number of problems was extensive and specific to each facility; however, a common reoccurring theme in the majority of events was the lack of supporting documentation for changes to the plan of care when variances occur. The most common occurrences were incorrect blood flow and dialysate flow with no supporting documentation on record for the prescription not being met. In Phase III, Network interventions for facilities not meeting US and Network standards for adequacy as measured by URR and KT/V included required quarterly reporting on their facility-specific quality improvement programs for adequacy. In addition the 12 facilities that participated in the intensive assessment had additional interventions that included an educational "tool box" focused on documentation, legal implications of charting, and general medical records management, and an educational program to review information to be shared with facility staff. All on-site facilities reported ongoing quality improvement programs. In some facilities they did provide a focus on processes and not only a measurement of an indicator. All facilities reported a team concept of some type used in their program. Although there were similarities in the facilities, each facility presented with a unique combination of barriers. In addition to a large patient-to-RN ratio, the lack of technical education for the unlicensed assistive personnel on processes and outcomes appears to play a significant role in the achievement of

  13. The Impact of an Authentic Science Experience on STEM Identity: A Preliminary Analysis of YouthAstroNet and MicroObservatory Telescope Network Participant Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Mary E.; Wright, Erika A.; Sadler, Philip; Sonnert, Gerhard; ITEAMS II Team

    2018-01-01

    Encouraging students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a high priority for national K-12 education improvement initiatives in the United States. Many educators have claimed that a promising strategy for nurturing early student interest in STEM is to engage them in authentic inquiry experiences. “Authentic” refers to investigations in which the questions are of genuine interest and importance to students, and the inquiry more closely resembles the way real science is done. Science education researchers and practitioners at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have put this theory into action with the development of YouthAstroNet, a nationwide online learning community of middle-school aged students, educators, and STEM professionals that features the MicroObservatory Robotic Telescope Network, professional image analysis software, and complementary curricula for use in a variety of learning settings. This preliminary study examines factors that influence YouthAstroNet participants' Science Affinity, STEM Identity, and STEM Career Interest, using the matched pre/post survey results of 261 participants as the data source. The pre/post surveys included some 40 items measuring affinity, identity, knowledge, and career interest. In addition, the post intervention instrument included a number of items in which students reported the instructional strategies they experienced as part of the program. A simple analysis of pre-post changes in affinity and interest revealed very little significant change, and for those items where a small pre-post effect was observed, the average change was most often negative. However, after accounting for students' different program treatment experiences and for their prior attitudes and interests, a predictor of significant student gains in Affinity, STEM Identity, Computer/Math Identity, and STEM Career Interest could be identified. This was the degree to which students reported

  14. Redes de participación e intercambios en la radio pública: los podcasting Networks of Participation and Communicative Interchanges in Public Radio: Podcasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Salgado Santamaría

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available El desarrollo de los podcasting, como sistema añadido de la ciberradio, impulsa a las redes de participación e intercambios comunicativos de interés social, que exhiben numerosas ventajas frente a las prácticas radiofónicas conocidas. La difusión que la radio pública realiza de los podcasts, la colocan en el actual proceso de convergencia tecnológica, y la sitúan en una sociedad de la información y del conocimiento, capaz de ofrecer diferentes servicios al alcance de todos los ciudadanos. Sólo la introducción de nuevos contenidos y servicios que aporten valor añadido a los existentes y satisfagan las necesidades de sus usuarios, procurarán la rentabilidad de este sistema. The development of podcasting as an additional system of cyberradio stimulates the appearance of networks of participation and communicative interchanges of social interest, and has numerous advantages over conventional radio practices. The spreading of podcasts through public radio situates it within the process of technological convergence and in an Information and Knowledge society which is able to offer different services within reach of all citizens. Only the introduction of new contents and services that contribute added value to the existing ones and satisfy the needs of users will make this system profitable.

  15. People’s Motivation to Participate in Social Network Sites, Subsequent Behaviours, and Situation Self-Awareness following a Crisis: Evidence from the MH370 Flight Incident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuequn Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As people increasingly integrate social network sites (SNSs into their daily lives, they also turn to these sites for timely information following crises. To date, few studies have examined the effects of different types of motivation on participatory behaviours within SNSs following crises. In this study, self-determination theory (SDT is applied to examine how individuals are motivated to participate in SNSs following a crisis and how individuals’ participatory behaviours can better assist them understand a crisis. The Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370 incident is selected as the context for this study, and data is collected following the incident. The results show that different types of motivation result in different participatory behaviours. Controlled motivation is positively related to browsing content, commenting and sharing content. Conversely, autonomous motivation is positively associated with browsing and sharing content. Besides, browsing content and commenting are positively related to people’s situational self-awareness. The theoretical and practical implications of this study are discussed.

  16. [Factors associated with infrequent condom use amongst men having sex with other men in Ciudad Juárez].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pérez, Juan C; Ortiz-Hernández, Luis

    2009-10-01

    Analysing the factors associated with inconsistent condom use amongst men having sex with other men (MSM) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua. This was an observational, cross-sectional analytic study using a convenience sample (n=186) of MSM from Ciudad Juarez. Socioeconomic status, attitudes toward condom use, drug use, alcohol consumption, sexual orientation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were sexual behaviour related to HIV infection (inconsistent condom use in anal penetration and receiving semen in the mouth or anus). Whereas 30 % of the MSM interviewed infrequently used a condom when they practiced receptive anal sex, when they had insertive anal sex, 39.1 % reported receiving semen in the mouth and 35.5 % in the anus. Multivariate logistic regression models were used, observing that the groups of men having the highest probability of risky sexual behavior (compared to their counterparts) were younger men (<20 years), those earning medium income, those having a negative attitude towards condom use, men using drugs or alcohol and those who reported homosexual identity. An important percentage of MSM infrequently used a condom. The implications of our findings should be used when designing programmes for promoting condom use amongst MSM.

  17. Methods for antimicrobial dilution and disk susceptibility testing of infrequently isolated or fastidious bacteria; third edition (M45, 3rd ed.)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    "This guideline informs clinical, public health, and research labortories on susceptibility testing of infrequently isolated or fastidious bacteria that are not included in CLSI documents M02, M07, or M100...

  18. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media

  19. Mycoplasma fermentans DNA is infrequently detected in urine specimens from renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutlée, F; Saint-Louis, G; Voyer, H; Daloze, P; Ghadirian, P

    1998-08-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans is a likely causative agent of HIV-associated nephropathy. In a pilot study, M. fermentans DNA was detected with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in urine samples from renal allograft recipients; nine (39.1%) out of 23 renal allograft recipients (most of whom had chronic allograft rejection) and none of the 20 controls, were infected with M. fermentans. A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of M. fermentans in urine samples from renal allograft recipients. Midstream urine samples were centrifuged at 13,000 x g, purified with QIAamp and tested with PCR using RW004/RW005 and an internal control to screen for the presence of inhibitors. Of the 264 participants recruited, 263 completed the questionnaire (172 men, 92 women); 53 had chronic renal allograft rejection, 106 had chronic renal dysfunction without rejection, 69 had a normal renal allograft for more than 3 months and 35 had a renal allograft for less than 3 months. All urine samples yielded positive results for the internal control. Mycoplasma fermentans DNA was detected once i prospectively collected urine samples. The only individual infected with M. fermentans was also seropositive for HIV-1. This study demonstrates that M. fermentans can be at most sporadically detected in urine from patients living with a renal allograft but is not implicated in chronic rejection of allograft.

  20. Das mobilizações às redes de movimentos sociais From social movements to the political participation of network organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Scherer-Warren

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A realidade dos movimentos sociais é bastante dinâmica e nem sempre as teorizações têm acompanhado esse dinamismo. Com a globalização e a informatização da sociedade, os movimentos sociais em muitos países, inclusive no Brasil e em outros países da América Latina, tenderam a se diversificar e se complexificar. Por isso, muitas das explicações paradigmáticas ou hegemônicas nos estudos da segunda metade do século XX necessitam de revisões ou atualizações ante a emergência de novos sujeitos sociais ou cenários políticos. Este estudo busca, inicialmente, uma compreensão acerca da nova configuração da sociedade civil organizada, explicitando os múltiplos tipos de ações coletivas do novo milênio.1A partir desta compreensão, busca-se explorar a diversidade identitária dos sujeitos, a transversalidade nas demandas por direitos, as formas de ativismo e de empoderamento através de articulações em rede e, finalmente, a participação política das organizações em rede.The reality of social movement is quite dynamic, and theorizations do not always follow this dynamism. With globalization and the information age, the social movements in several countries, including Brazil and Latin America, are more diversified and complex. Therefore, many paradigmatic or hegemonic explanations from the last century are in need of revision or updating vis-à-vis the emergence of new social subjects or political scenarios. This study begins by elucidating organized civil society's new forms, aiming to register the multiple types of collective action in the new millennium. From this comprehension the study seeks to explore the diversity of identity of the social subjects, the transverse nature of demands for citizen's rights, the forms of activism and the empowerment through networking and, finally, the political participation of network organizations.

  1. The first year of the Australian Seismometers in Schools Network: Inspiring Students to follow careers in science by participating in a national science experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N.; Sambridge, M.; O'Neill, C.

    2012-12-01

    The first year of The Australian Seismometers in Schools program (AuSIS) has been filled with excitement as we completed installing pilot instruments in schools, launched the program nationally and received over 70 "Expressions of Interest" from schools around Australia. The data quality has exceeded expectations with schools recording local earthquakes down to magnitude 1, and large distant earthquakes. Some students participate in the program by looking up earthquake locations on maps and learning about geography, while other more advanced students have been investigating the frequency characteristics and sources of noise at their school. Both students and the schools are particularly proud that their instrument is contributing to the global scientific community and are actively incorporating seismology into the school curriculum. AuSIS is a four-year project (2011-2014) funded by the Education component of AuScope Australian Geophysical Observing System. Over the next four years we will build a network of 40 seismometers in high schools across the nation to provide real-time monitoring of the Australian continent and raise awareness of geoscience through observing our dynamic earth in motion. This program is unique to other seismometers in schools programs as it uses professional seismometers to provide research quality data to the seismological community. The AuSIS project's educational aims are to: raise community awareness of earthquakes; raise awareness of seismology and geoscience, as a field of study; promote science as a possible career; and, provide a tool to teachers to assist in teaching physics and earth science. The data schools collect will be useful to researchers and could complement networks run by government and state agencies due to the high quality of the instruments and will be stored at internationally accessible and supported data management centres, such as IRIS. Data collected during the pilot program have provided clear recordings of

  2. Researchers set up European computer grid TCD is to participate in creating a vast research network of computers in Europe, but many feel the State should now join CERN, which is driving the project

    CERN Multimedia

    Lillington, K

    2001-01-01

    Trinity College Dublin will participate in the major project to create an European research network of computers. Despite this, Ireland remains the only country along with Luxembourg not to be a full member of CERN. Many researchers would like this to change, so they can have full access to the facilities at CERN (2 pages).

  3. Benchmarking of Percutaneous Injuries at the Ministry of Health Hospitals of Saudi Arabia in Comparison with the United States Hospitals Participating in Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZA Memish

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to blood-borne pathogens from needle-stick and sharp injuries continues to pose a significant risk to health care workers. These events are of concern because of the risk to transmit blood-borne diseases such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and the human immunodeficiency virus. Objective: To benchmark different risk factors associated with needle-stick incidents among health care workers in the Ministry of Health hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia compared to the US hospitals participating in Exposure Prevention Information Network (EPINet ™. Methods: Prospective surveillance of needle-stick and sharp incidents carried out during the year 2012 using EPINet™ ver 1.5 that provides uniform needle stick and sharp injury report form. Results: The annual percutaneous incidents (PIs rate per 100 occupied beds was 3.2 at the studied MOH hospitals. Nurses were the most affected job category by PIs (59.4%. Most PIs happened in patients' wards in the Ministry of Health hospitals (34.6%. Disposable syringes were the most common cause of PIs (47.20%. Most PIs occurred during use of the syringes (36.4%. Conclusion: Among health care workers, nurses and physicians appear especially at risk of exposure to PIs. Important risk factors of injuries include working in patient room, using disposable syringes, devices without safety features. Preventive strategies such as continuous training of health care workers with special emphasis on nurses and physicians, encouragement of reporting of such incidents, observation of sharp handling, their use and implementation of safety devices are warranted.

  4. The mutual influence of managerial ability and social networks of farmers on participation in an organic vegetable group in Khon Kaen province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panatda Utaranakorn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study were to analyze farmers' managerial ability, social networks, and information sharing, and to describe the two-way relationship between managerial ability and social networks. We collected data through face-to-face interviews, using a structured questionnaire with a purposively selected random sample of 34 farmers in Khon Kaen province, Northeastern Thailand, in September 2013. All respondents belonged to an organic vegetable group. The findings revealed that almost all of the farmers have a high ability level in marketing, information searching, communication, and technical skills. Farmers with high ability, especially group leaders and group managers, have more chances to increase their networks through becoming consulters and transferring knowledge/technology. As a result, their social networks are more active and stronger, both inside and outside their villages. In addition, farmers with larger networks have more opportunities to assess information and exchange knowledge, so their ability can become even more effective.

  5. A network of networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iedema, Rick; Verma, Raj; Wutzke, Sonia; Lyons, Nigel; McCaughan, Brian

    2017-04-10

    Purpose To further our insight into the role of networks in health system reform, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how one agency, the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI), and the multiple networks and enabling resources that it encompasses, govern, manage and extend the potential of networks for healthcare practice improvement. Design/methodology/approach This is a case study investigation which took place over ten months through the first author's participation in network activities and discussions with the agency's staff about their main objectives, challenges and achievements, and with selected services around the state of New South Wales to understand the agency's implementation and large system transformation activities. Findings The paper demonstrates that ACI accommodates multiple networks whose oversight structures, self-organisation and systems change approaches combined in dynamic ways, effectively yield a diversity of network governances. Further, ACI bears out a paradox of "centralised decentralisation", co-locating agents of innovation with networks of implementation and evaluation expertise. This arrangement strengthens and legitimates the role of the strategic hybrid - the healthcare professional in pursuit of change and improvement, and enhances their influence and impact on the wider system. Research limitations/implications While focussing the case study on one agency only, this study is unique as it highlights inter-network connections. Contributing to the literature on network governance, this paper identifies ACI as a "network of networks" through which resources, expectations and stakeholder dynamics are dynamically and flexibly mediated and enhanced. Practical implications The co-location of and dynamic interaction among clinical networks may create synergies among networks, nurture "strategic hybrids", and enhance the impact of network activities on health system reform. Social implications Network governance requires more

  6. Modeling aeolian transport of soil-bound plutonium: considering infrequent but normal environmental disturbances is critical in estimating future dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Erika A; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Eisele, William F; Breshears, David D; Kirchner, Thomas B

    2013-06-01

    Dose assessments typically consider environmental systems as static through time, but environmental disturbances such as drought and fire are normal, albeit infrequent, events that can impact dose-influential attributes of many environmental systems. These phenomena occur over time frames of decades or longer, and are likely to be exacerbated under projected warmer, drier climate. As with other types of dose assessment, the impacts of environmental disturbances are often overlooked when evaluating dose from aeolian transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. Especially lacking are predictions that account for potential changing vegetation cover effects on radionuclide transport over the long time frames required by regulations. A recently developed dynamic wind-transport model that included vegetation succession and environmental disturbance provides more realistic long-term predictability. This study utilized the model to estimate emission rates for aeolian transport, and compare atmospheric dispersion and deposition rates of airborne plutonium-contaminated soil into neighboring areas with and without environmental disturbances. Specifically, the objective of this study was to utilize the model results as input for a widely used dose assessment model (CAP-88). Our case study focused on low levels of residual plutonium found in soils from past operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in Los Alamos, NM, located in the semiarid southwestern USA. Calculations were conducted for different disturbance scenarios based on conditions associated with current climate, and a potential future drier and warmer climate. Known soil and sediment concentrations of plutonium were used to model dispersal and deposition of windblown residual plutonium, as a function of distance and direction. Environmental disturbances that affected vegetation cover included ground fire, crown fire, and drought, with reoccurrence rates for current climate based on site historical

  7. From spectator to participant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Kofoed, Jens

    The book collects experiences and methods for citizens’ participation in order to strengthen the local Agenda 21 process. 5 different types of methods is presented: Methods of analyses and evaluation, methods of dialogue, methods for action, methods for networking, and finely methods for involving...... local institutions. In the opening part the book deals with fundamental themes in participation processes such as planning of changes and changes and conflicts....

  8. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  9. A method to calculate sediment fluxes from infrequent data: application to 65 rivers of the French river quality database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Magalie; Cerdan, Olivier; Coynel, Alexandra; Mouchel, Jean Marie; Cheviron, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Improving knowledge of sediment exports represents one major challenge for environmental sciences considering their role in geochemical cycles and their link with Earth's surface processes. Because suspended sediment (SS) fluxes in rivers reflect the integration of combined erosion, transport and deposition processes that occur within the drained area, their calculation is thus essential in surface processes studies. Suspended sediment fluxes are estimated from discharge measurements and SS concentrations, either by averaging methods or by predicting sediment concentration values from continuous discharge data. In the latter case, a power function (or power law relation) is often defined between the observed SS concentrations and the corresponding discharge data. However it seems unrealistic to consider a single relation between SS concentrations and river discharges. The reason is that sediment production processes are not homogeneous in time, showing local and seasonal effects for example in agricultural areas where land cover varies inside a year or in mountainous regions where snow melting has a strong influence. Moreover, these processes are also spatially heterogeneous, due to spatial patterns in landscape characteristics, meteorological phenomena and geomorphology. In addition, important gaps persist when calculating SS fluxes, mainly due to SS measurements are not always carried out with high frequency. Based on 65 river basins in France, with various sizes, geomorphologies and land uses, this study aims at testing methods for an estimation of annual sediment loads, based on infrequent SPM concentration data spanning over several decades.

  10. Short seed longevity, variable germination conditions, and infrequent establishment events provide a narrow window for Yucca brevifolia (Agavaceae) recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, M.; Reynolds, J.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Esque, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The future of long-lived stand-forming desert plants such as Yucca brevifolia (Joshua tree) has come into question in light of climate variation and landscape-scale disturbances such as wildfire. Understanding plant establishment dynamics is important for mitigating the impacts of disturbances and promoting revegetation. • METHODS: We placed Y. brevifolia seeds in shallow caches and manipulated granivore access, nurse shrub effects, and the season of cache placement to determine conditions for seed germination and seedling establishment. • KEY RESULTS: Greatest seedling emergence occurred during spring and summer, when increased soil moisture was accompanied by warm soil temperatures. Late winter-spring emergence for cached seeds was enhanced beneath shrub canopies, but seedling survival declined beneath shrubs as temperatures increased in spring. Germinability of seed remaining in the soil was reduced from 50-68% after 12 mo residence time in soil and declined to plants, seeds are either removed by granivores or lose germinability, imposing substantial losses of potential germinants. • CONCLUSIONS: Specific germination and establishment requirements impose stringent limits on recruitment rates for Y. brevifolia. Coupled with infrequent seed availability, the return rates to prefire densities and demographic structure may require decades to centuries, especially in light of potential changes to regional desert climate in combination with the potential for fire recurrence. Demographic patterns are predicted to vary spatially in response to environmental variability that limits recruitment and may already be apparent among extant populations.

  11. A Brief Review of Infrequent Spontaneous Findings, Peculiar Anatomical Microscopic Features, and Potential Artifacts in Göttingen Minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, E F; McKeag, S

    2016-04-01

    Minipigs are now used in greater numbers in contract research organizations (CROs) as well as in the pharmaceutical industry. Most CROs or pharmaceutical companies use the Göttingen minipig, which displays a number of important background lesions. This review will discuss some of the more infrequent minipig background changes. Porcine stress syndrome is an autosomal recessive pharmacogenetic disorder in minipigs causing malignant hyperthermia and muscle necrosis. Possible triggers, clinical pathology as well as heart, muscle, liver, lung, and kidney histopathology are discussed. Additional spontaneous changes, background findings, and peculiar anatomical and histological features include thrombocytopenic purpura syndrome, spontaneous glomerulonephritis, osteochondritis, ellipsoids, or Schweigger-Seidel sheaths in the spleen, as well as the presence of a perimesenteric plexus adjacent to mesenteric lymph nodes, squamous epithelial metaplasia of the salivary gland, and cupping of the optic disk in the minipig eye. In order to maximize the data gained from minipig studies, the interpretation of pathology findings requires the input of experienced pathologists who understand the significance of artifacts and spontaneous, background lesions in minipigs and can distinguish these from induced lesions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Sport participation styles revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steven Vos; Erik Thibaut; Bart Vanreusel; Julie Borgers; Hanne Vandermeerschen; Jeroen Scheerder

    2013-01-01

    Social changes have been influencing determinants for sports participation since the introduction of the Sport for All ideology in the early 1970s. Consistent with Crum’s sportisation theory, today’s modes of sports practices, as well as the network of sport services, have diversified and

  13. Conceptualizing Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Bruun Jensen, Bjarne

    Although participation is not a new issue, it would be fair to say that consequential participation, which implies young people engaging in meaningful dialogue with adults and institutions and influencing decision-making processes in matters that concern them, is still in its infancy. This document...... aims to set the scene for discussing young people's participation in different domains that have an impact on their lives. It outlines the meaning and different interpretations of the concept of "participation" before reviewing why participation is an important issue in relation to young people...... and society. It then describes different forms, modes or qualities of participation and proposes a specific model of facilitating participatory work with young people - the IVAC approach (Investigation-Vision-Action-Change). The concept of action, types of actions aimed at initiating change and corresponding...

  14. Network workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Evans, Robert Harry

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the background for, realisation of and author reflections on a network workshop held at ESERA2013. As a new research area in science education, networks offer a unique opportunity to visualise and find patterns and relationships in complicated social or academic network data...... research community. With this workshop, participants were offered a way into network science based on authentic educational research data. The workshop was constructed as an inquiry lesson with emphasis on user autonomy. Learning activities had participants choose to work with one of two cases of networks...... network methodology in one’s research might supersede the perceived benefits of doing so. As a response to that problem, we argue that workshops can act as a road towards meaningful engagement with networks and highlight that network methodology promises new ways of interpreting data to answer questions...

  15. Authoring Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Papazu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Samsø, Denmark's Renewable Energy Island since 1997, is world renowned for being self-sufficient in renewable energy and for having achieved energy self-sufficiency and CO2 neutrality through successful processes of public participation. In this article I seek to show how these processes of public participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear. By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate, material participation locates participation in everyday practice and work. On Samsø, the islanders’ participation was not an add-on to the project, it was an indispensable resource in itself. Building on extensive fieldwork I analyse how the islanders came to invest their time and resources in the Renewable Energy Island project, highlighting how, by materializing energy in concrete, local projects, energy and climate change-related projects can gain community-strengthening potentialities reaching beyond goals of energy self-sufficiency.

  16. Authoring Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Samsø, Denmark's Renewable Energy Island since 1997, is world renowned for being self-sufficient in renewable energy and for having achieved energy self-sufficiency and CO2 neutrality through successful processes of public participation. In this article I seek to show how these processes of public...... participation so central to the Renewable Energy Island project can be better understood as instances of material participation motivated first and foremost by a concern for the future of the island as a 'liveable' community; a community in which jobs and institutions are not constantly threatening to disappear....... By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate...

  17. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  18. Identifying the Help Givers in a Community of Learners: Using Peer Reporting and Social Network Analysis as Strategies for Participant Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    The author presents a three-step process for selecting participants for any study of a social phenomenon that occurs between people in locations and at times that are difficult to observe. The process is described with illustrative examples from a previous study of help giving in a community of learners. This paper includes a rationale for…

  19. Helping Citizens Help Themselves : Neighborhood Improvement Programs and the Impact of Social Networks, Trust, and Norms on Neighborhood-Oriented Forms of Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveldt, H.T.

    2004-01-01

    This article analyzes the relationship between social capital and neighborhood-oriented forms of participation within the context of an innovative Dutch neighborhood improvement program. On the basis of a survey among 307 residents, the author studies the link between three dimensions of social

  20. Ambivalent participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes-Green, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in young peoples' sexual cultures in Maputo, Mozambique led to reflections about the field dynamics of power, participation, desire, and discomfort. Structural inequalities of race, gender, and educational status resulted in informants seeing me as a morally righteous person to whom...... they could not give open accounts about sexual practice. Attempting to overcome these barriers, I participated in excessive nightlife activities, and as a consequence they began viewing me as a more accepting and reliable person. Although breaking down these barriers provided invaluable insight...... into their sexual culture, it also caused anxiety and troubling desires vis-à-vis informants. I discuss how anthropologists, through fieldwork are transformed from powerful seducers of informants to objects of informants' seduction. This creates dilemmas for the anthropologist whose fieldwork depends on informants...

  1. Experiences with using information and communication technology to build a multi-municipal support network for informal carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torp, Steffen; Bing-Jonsson, Pia C; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This multi-municipal intervention study explored whether informal carers of frail older people and disabled children living at home made use of information and communication technology (ICT) to gain knowledge about caring and to form informal support networks, thereby improving their health. Seventy-nine informal carers accessed web-based information about caring and an e-based discussion forum via their personal computers. They were able to maintain contact with each other using a web camera and via normal group meetings. After the first 12 months, 17 informal carers participated in focus group interviews and completed a short questionnaire. Four staff members were also interviewed. Participant carers who had prior experiences with a similar ICT-based support network reported greater satisfaction and more extensive use of the network than did participants with no such prior experience. It seems that infrequent usage of the service may be explained by too few other carers to identify with and inappropriate recruitment procedures. Nevertheless, carers of disabled children reported that the intervention had resulted in improved services across the participant municipalities. To achieve optimal effects of an ICT-based support network due attention must be given to recruitment processes and social environment building for which care practitioners require training and support.

  2. Claiming Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, Louise; Samson, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    with participation are currently strong influential factors in Danish planning. The article explores the use of participatory DIY urban design in two cases: the relocation of beer drinkers in Enghave Square and the Carlsberg City development in Copenhagen, Denmark. Carlsberg City is the most thorough Danish example...

  3. Increasing Ethnic Minority Participation in Substance Abuse Clinical Trials: Lessons Learned in the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlew, Kathleen; Larios, Sandra; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Holmes, Beverly; Venner, Kamilla; Chavez, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Underrepresentation in clinical trials limits the extent to which ethnic minorities benefit from advances in substance abuse treatment. The objective of this article is to share the knowledge gained within the Clinical Trials Network (CTN) of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and other research on recruiting and retaining ethnic minorities into substance abuse clinical trials. The article includes a discussion of two broad areas for improving inclusion— community involvement and cultural adaptation. CTN case studies are included to illustrate three promising strategies for improving ethnic minority inclusion: respondent-driven sampling, community-based participatory research, and the cultural adaptation of the recruitment and retention procedures. The article concludes with two sections describing a number of methodological concerns in the current research base and our proposed research agenda for improving ethnic minority inclusion that builds on the CTN experience. PMID:21988575

  4. A Method for Analyzing the Business Case for Provider Participation in the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program and Similar Federally Funded Provider-Based Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L.; Song, Paula H.; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J.; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2011-01-01

    Background The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) efforts to increase enrollment in clinical trials. There is currently little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. This paper presents a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation and provides a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. Methods A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Results Key components of the business case include CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The value of incidental benefits is recognized as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation, but is not currently calculated. Conclusions Providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers’ understanding of the financial implications of participation. PMID:22213241

  5. Student Participation - Simulation or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the concept of student participation in learning processes within the health promoting schools approach. A model that distinguishes between token and genuine participation, which has been conceptualised on the basis of experience gained from the Macedonian Network of Health...

  6. Deriving percentage study weights in multi-parameter meta-analysis models: with application to meta-regression, network meta-analysis and one-stage individual participant data models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Richard D; Ensor, Joie; Jackson, Dan; Burke, Danielle L

    2017-01-01

    Many meta-analysis models contain multiple parameters, for example due to multiple outcomes, multiple treatments or multiple regression coefficients. In particular, meta-regression models may contain multiple study-level covariates, and one-stage individual participant data meta-analysis models may contain multiple patient-level covariates and interactions. Here, we propose how to derive percentage study weights for such situations, in order to reveal the (otherwise hidden) contribution of each study toward the parameter estimates of interest. We assume that studies are independent, and utilise a decomposition of Fisher's information matrix to decompose the total variance matrix of parameter estimates into study-specific contributions, from which percentage weights are derived. This approach generalises how percentage weights are calculated in a traditional, single parameter meta-analysis model. Application is made to one- and two-stage individual participant data meta-analyses, meta-regression and network (multivariate) meta-analysis of multiple treatments. These reveal percentage study weights toward clinically important estimates, such as summary treatment effects and treatment-covariate interactions, and are especially useful when some studies are potential outliers or at high risk of bias. We also derive percentage study weights toward methodologically interesting measures, such as the magnitude of ecological bias (difference between within-study and across-study associations) and the amount of inconsistency (difference between direct and indirect evidence in a network meta-analysis).

  7. Children's participation in Teledialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Lauritsen, Peter; Danholt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Teledialogue is a combined research and design project aimed at improving communications between social workers and children under their custody living in foster care or youth institutions. While social workers are responsible for the welfare of placed children they are under heavy workload...... and often only communicate with children at biannual meetings - the minimum required by law. The purpose of Teledialogue is to use participatory methods to develop an IT-enabled concept for children and social workers to maintain communication between the biannual meetings. Social workers and children...... are thus the primary participants in this design process. This presentation describes the inclusion and participation of the placed children in Teledialogue. With an outset in Actor-Network Theory (ANT) two points are made: 1) that children were participating in shaping the design long before they were...

  8. Why play an active role? A qualitative examination of lay citizens' main motives for participation in health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fienieg, Barbara; Nierkens, Vera; Tonkens, Evelien; Plochg, Thomas; Stronks, Karien

    2012-01-01

    While active participation is regarded essential in health promotion worldwide, its application proves to be challenging. Notably, participants experiences are infrequently studied, and it is largely unknown why lay citizens would want to play an active role in promoting the health of the community

  9. Why play an active role? A qualitative examination of lay citizens’ main motives for participation in health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fienieg, B.; Nierkens, V.; Tonkens, E.; Plochg, T.; Stronks, K.

    2012-01-01

    While active participation is regarded essential in health promotion worldwide, its application proves to be challenging. Notably, participants' experiences are infrequently studied, and it is largely unknown why lay citizens would want to play an active role in promoting the health of the community

  10. Participative Mindscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Katan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In parallel with my social activism, I introduced architecture into my kinetic art and participatory activism into my architecture. Flexibility and participation in architectural design has been a permanent feature of my practice, bringing new opportunities for self-expression in urban living. To form follows function I opposed form follows movement because it is man oriented while function is object oriented. After my 1962–1964 Mecanographs, machine-made images based on an interaction between the movement, the artist and the machine, I joined forces with Len Lye to determine what kind of positive attributes a Museum of Kinetic Art should have, defining three aspects of kinetic movement: illumination, sound, and physical movement. Vasarely and other kinetic artists put their mark on their time by promoting a form of social art, accessible to all, suggesting movement without actual movement. Walking through my medieval village can be a kinetic experience. The sense of wonder you feel at every corner compares with that of optical art. In the past decade, I moved toward a new form of participatory kinetic expression using state-of-the-art technology (plastics, LED, wireless devices. I view my kinetic work as an architectural experience and architecture as a stimulating kinetic experience.

  11. Networking Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    HIDA). Many of these alumni have and will in the future exchange ideas and keep contact not only to Japan, but also to fellow alumni around the globe and, thereby, practice south-south exchanges, which are made possible and traceable by their established alumni network and the World Network of Friends...... (WNF). Through the alumni network, Japan continues to infuse ideas to participants and alumni, who interpret and disseminate these ideas through alumni society networks and activities, but their discussions nationally and regionally also get reported back to Japan and affect future policies...

  12. The Pennsylvania Experience with Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Gas Development: Relatively Infrequent Water Quality Incidents with Lots of Public Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Li, Z.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Vidic, R.

    2015-12-01

    New techniques of hydraulic fracturing - "fracking" - have changed the United States over the last 10 years into a leading producer of natural gas extraction from shale. The first such gas well in Pennsylvania was drilled and completed using high-volume hydraulic fracturing in 2004. By late 2014, more than 8500 of these gas wells had been drilled in the Marcellus Shale gas field in Pennsylvania alone. Almost 1000 public complaints about groundwater quality were logged by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) between 2008 and 2012. Only a fraction of these were attributed to unconventional gas development. The most common problem was gas migration into drinking water, but contamination incidents also included spills, seepage, or leaks of fracking fluids, brine salts, or very occasionally, radioactive species. Many problems of gas migration were from a few counties in the northeastern part of the state. However, sometimes one gas well contaminated multiple water wells. For example, one gas well was reported by the state regulator to have contaminated 18 water wells with methane near Dimock PA. It can be argued that such problems at a relatively small fraction of gas wells initiated pockets of pushback against fracking worldwide. This resistance to fracking has grown even though fracking has been in use in the U.S.A. since the 1940s. We have worked as part of an NSF-funded project (the Shale Network) to share water quality data and publish it online using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System. Sharing data has led to collaborative investigation of specific contamination incidents to understand how problems can occur, and to efforts to quantify the frequency of impacts. The Shale Network efforts have also highlighted the need for more transparency with water quality data in the arena related to the energy-water nexus. As more data are released, new techniques of data analysis will allow better understanding of how to tune best practices to be

  13. Suitability of PCR fingerprinting, infrequent-restriction-site PCR, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, combined with computerized gel analysis, in library typing of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garaizar, J.; Lopez-Molina, N.; Laconcha, I.

    2000-01-01

    Strains of Salmonella enterica (n = 212) of different serovars and phage types were used to establish a library typing computerized system for serovar Enteritidis on the basis of PCR fingerprinting, infrequent-restriction-site PCR (IRS-PCR), or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The rate...... showed an intercenter reproducibility value of 93.3%. The high reproducibility of PFGE combined with the previously determined high discrimination directed its use for library typing. The use of PFGE with enzymes XbaI, BlnI, and SpeI for library typing of serovar Enteritidis was assessed with GelCompar 4...

  14. Higher Education Scholars' Participation and Practices on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veletsianos, G.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars participate in online social networks for professional purposes. In such networks, learning takes the form of participation and identity formation through engagement in and contribution to networked practices. While current literature describes the possible benefits of online participation, empirical research on scholars' use of online…

  15. Technologies for Home Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A broad overview of the home networking field, ranging from wireless technologies to practical applications. In the future, it is expected that private networks (e.g. home networks) will become part of the global network ecosystem, participating in sharing their own content, running IP...

  16. Increased Participation and Conversation Using Networked Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Christopher; Meyer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    For many the phrase "teaching math online" evokes a vision of teaching and learning that is not based in physical classrooms. Perhaps teachers and students are even interacting asynchronously. In math classrooms in the United States, the increasing availability of devices (e.g. laptops, Chromebooks™, smartphones, and tablets) and…

  17. Student Participation: A Democratic Education perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health Promoting Schools, and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Netwo...... and token participation are presented and discussed in the paper. Underpinning values that these models endorse as important for the processes of health promotion in schools include self-determination, participation, democracy, diversity, and equity....

  18. Network Affordances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Audrey; Soon, Winnie

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of network affordance within the context of network art. Building on Gibson's theory (Gibson, 1979) we understand affordance as the perceived and actual parameters of a thing. We expand on Gaver's affordance of predictability (Gaver, 1996) to include ecological...... and computational parameters of unpredictability. We illustrate the notion of unpredictability by considering four specific works that were included in a network art exhibiton, SPEED SHOW [2.0] Hong Kong. The paper discusses how the artworks are contingent upon the parameteric relations (Parisi, 2013......), of the network. We introduce network affordance as a dynamic framework that could articulate the experienced tension arising from the (visible) symbolic representation of computational processes and its hidden occurrences. We base our proposal on the experience of both organising the SPEED SHOW and participating...

  19. Boredom, sustained attention and the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danckert, James; Merrifield, Colleen

    2016-03-15

    Boredom is a ubiquitous human experience that can best be described as an inability to engage with one's environment despite the motivation to do so. Boredom is perceived as a negative experience and demonstrates strong associations with other negatively valenced states including depression and aggression. Although boredom has been shown to be elevated in neurological and psychiatric illnesses, little is known about the neural underpinnings of the state. We scanned the brains of healthy participants under four separate conditions: a resting state scan, a sustained attention task and two video-based mood inductions, one known to produce boredom and another we validated to produce a state of interest or engagement. Using independent components analyses, results showed common regions of correlated activation in posterior regions of the so-called default mode network (DMN) of the brain across all four conditions. The sustained attention and boredom induction scans were differentiated from the resting state scan by the presence of anticorrelated activity-i.e. when DMN regions were active, this region was deactivated-in the anterior insula cortex. This same region demonstrated correlated activity with both the DMN and the regions associated with attentional control during the interest mood induction. We interpret these findings to suggest that boredom represents a failure to engage executive control networks when faced with a monotonous task-in other words, when the task demands some level of engagement (watch the movie, search for infrequent targets), but is so mundane that attempts to do so fail.

  20. An Internet-based intervention for eating disorders consisting of automated computer-tailored feedback with or without supplemented frequent or infrequent support from a coach: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aardoom, Jiska J; Dingemans, Alexandra E; Spinhoven, Philip; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Van Furth, Eric F

    2013-10-17

    Several Internet-based interventions for eating disorders have shown their effectiveness. Still, there is a need to refine such interventions given that most existing programs seem to be limited by their static 'one-size-fits-all' approach. 'Featback', an Internet-based intervention for symptoms of eating disorders provides a more individualized approach. It consists of several components (psychoeducation, a fully automated monitoring and feedback system, and support from a coach), which can be matched to participants' needs and preferences. Until now, it is unclear whether online self-help interventions for eating disorders with support are more effective than those without. The aims of the current study are i) to examine the relative effectiveness of (the different components of) Featback; ii) to examine predictors, moderators and mediators of intervention responses; iii) to report on practical experiences with Featback; and iv) to examine the cost-effectiveness of Featback. Individuals aged 16 years or older, with mild to severe eating disorder symptoms will be randomized to one of the four study conditions. In condition one, participants receive the basic version of Featback, consisting of psychoeducation and a fully automated monitoring and feedback system. In conditions two and three, participants receive the basic version of Featback supplemented with the possibility of infrequent (weekly) or frequent (three times a week) e-mail, chat, or Skype support from a coach, respectively. The fourth condition is a waiting list control condition. Participants are assessed at baseline, post-intervention (8 weeks), and at 3- and 6-month follow-up (the latter except for participants in the waiting list control condition). Primary outcome measures are disordered eating behaviors and attitudes. Secondary outcome measures are (eating disorder-related) quality of life, self-stigma of seeking help, self-esteem, mastery and support, symptoms of depression and anxiety

  1. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), a drug, or their combination: differential therapeutics for persistent depressive disorder: a study protocol of an individual participant data network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Weitz, Erica S; Salanti, Georgia; Efthimiou, Orestis; Michalak, Johannes; Watanabe, Norio; Keller, Martin B; Kocsis, James H; Klein, Daniel N; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite important advances in psychological and pharmacological treatments of persistent depressive disorders in the past decades, their responses remain typically slow and poor, and differential responses among different modalities of treatments or their combinations are not well understood. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only psychotherapy that has been specifically designed for chronic depression and has been examined in an increasing number of trials against medications, alone or in combination. When several treatment alternatives are available for a certain condition, network meta-analysis (NMA) provides a powerful tool to examine their relative efficacy by combining all direct and indirect comparisons. Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis enables exploration of impacts of individual characteristics that lead to a differentiated approach matching treatments to specific subgroups of patients. Methods and analysis We will search for all randomised controlled trials that compared CBASP, pharmacotherapy or their combination, in the treatment of patients with persistent depressive disorder, in Cochrane CENTRAL, PUBMED, SCOPUS and PsycINFO, supplemented by personal contacts. Individual participant data will be sought from the principal investigators of all the identified trials. Our primary outcomes are depression severity as measured on a continuous observer-rated scale for depression, and dropouts for any reason as a proxy measure of overall treatment acceptability. We will conduct a one-step IPD-NMA to compare CBASP, medications and their combinations, and also carry out a meta-regression to identify their prognostic factors and effect moderators. The model will be fitted in OpenBUGS, using vague priors for all location parameters. For the heterogeneity we will use a half-normal prior on the SD. Ethics and dissemination This study requires no ethical approval. We will publish the findings in a peer

  2. Engaged Youth in the Internet. The Role of Social Networks in Social Active Participation/ Jóvenes comprometidos en la Red: El papel de las redes sociales en la participación social activa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Galera, María-Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the analysis of the role that social networks play in civic, social mobilization and solidarity of Spanish young people, considering whether social networks are responsible...

  3. Lifelong learning and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles; Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    in involvement of older people in voluntary social work as mentors for young people. The challenge of the ageing societies is quite often discussed as the ‘burden of the elderly’ and discussed as an economic problem. However, the challenge is not only economical. It is also a social and cultural challenge, among...... other things because a unilateral focus on the economic aspects may cause dissolution of the social cohesion and decrease in well-being for far too many people. The HEAR ME project aimed at developing strategies for lifelong learning and new roles for older people based on their competences, network...... and an assumed desire of generativity. Action learning seems to be an appropriate learning concept in relation to keeping older people engaged in the community. The authors thus point at participating and lifelong learning as part of the answers to the demographic challenges, and they suggest what you might call...

  4. Improbable Outcomes: Infrequent or Extraordinary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teigen, Karl Halvor; Juanchich, Marie; Riege, Anine H.

    2013-01-01

    Research on verbal probabilities has shown that "unlikely" or "improbable" events are believed to correspond to numerical probability values between 10% and 30%. However, building on a pragmatic approach of verbal probabilities and a new methodology, the present paper shows that unlikely outcomes are most often associated with outcomes that have a…

  5. Infrequent cardiac manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Said; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Afonso, Luis

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is found in 2-7% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis (SS). Its diagnosis and treatment is challenging, notwithstanding the poor prognosis and treatment. Hereby, we present a case of systemic sarcoidosis with rare cardiac manifestations of severe mitral incompetence and large coronary aneurysm in a previously healthy woman. She underwent successful mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass surgery and was maintained on low dose glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), a drug, or their combination: differential therapeutics for persistent depressive disorder: a study protocol of an individual participant data network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Toshi A; Schramm, Elisabeth; Weitz, Erica S; Salanti, Georgia; Efthimiou, Orestis; Michalak, Johannes; Watanabe, Norio; Cipriani, Andrea; Keller, Martin B; Kocsis, James H; Klein, Daniel N; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-05-04

    Despite important advances in psychological and pharmacological treatments of persistent depressive disorders in the past decades, their responses remain typically slow and poor, and differential responses among different modalities of treatments or their combinations are not well understood. Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only psychotherapy that has been specifically designed for chronic depression and has been examined in an increasing number of trials against medications, alone or in combination. When several treatment alternatives are available for a certain condition, network meta-analysis (NMA) provides a powerful tool to examine their relative efficacy by combining all direct and indirect comparisons. Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis enables exploration of impacts of individual characteristics that lead to a differentiated approach matching treatments to specific subgroups of patients. We will search for all randomised controlled trials that compared CBASP, pharmacotherapy or their combination, in the treatment of patients with persistent depressive disorder, in Cochrane CENTRAL, PUBMED, SCOPUS and PsycINFO, supplemented by personal contacts. Individual participant data will be sought from the principal investigators of all the identified trials. Our primary outcomes are depression severity as measured on a continuous observer-rated scale for depression, and dropouts for any reason as a proxy measure of overall treatment acceptability. We will conduct a one-step IPD-NMA to compare CBASP, medications and their combinations, and also carry out a meta-regression to identify their prognostic factors and effect moderators. The model will be fitted in OpenBUGS, using vague priors for all location parameters. For the heterogeneity we will use a half-normal prior on the SD. This study requires no ethical approval. We will publish the findings in a peer-reviewed journal. The study results will contribute to more

  7. Suitability of PCR Fingerprinting, Infrequent-Restriction-Site PCR, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Combined with Computerized Gel Analysis, in Library Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaizar, Javier; López-Molina, Nuria; Laconcha, Idoia; Lau Baggesen, Dorte; Rementeria, Aitor; Vivanco, Ana; Audicana, Ana; Perales, Ildefonso

    2000-01-01

    Strains of Salmonella enterica (n = 212) of different serovars and phage types were used to establish a library typing computerized system for serovar Enteritidis on the basis of PCR fingerprinting, infrequent-restriction-site PCR (IRS-PCR), or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The rate of PCR fingerprinting interassay and intercenter reproducibility was low and was only increased when DNA samples were extracted at the same time and amplified with the same reaction mixtures. Reproducibility of IRS-PCR technique reached 100%, but discrimination was low (D = 0.52). The PFGE procedure showed an intercenter reproducibility value of 93.3%. The high reproducibility of PFGE combined with the previously determined high discrimination directed its use for library typing. The use of PFGE with enzymes XbaI, BlnI, and SpeI for library typing of serovar Enteritidis was assessed with GelCompar 4.0 software. Three computer libraries of PFGE DNA profiles were constructed, and their ability to recognize new DNA profiles was analyzed. The results obtained pointed out that the combination of PFGE with computerized analysis could be suitable in long-term epidemiological comparison and surveillance of Salmonella serovar Enteritidis, specially if the prevalence of genetic events that could be responsible for changes in PFGE profiles in this serovar was low. PMID:11097902

  8. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN HEALTH DELIVERY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PHC system and its global programmes and strategies shaped community participation ... global front about the promotion of community participation in health,“ two decades after the Alma-Ata, the strategy ..... cific programmes define the nature of the collaboration and institutional networking. In most NGO programmes, ...

  9. Political Participation and Power Relations in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation...... and political power relations. The research employed a mixed methodology, comprised of a survey of 527 Egyptian youth and semi-structured interviews of 12 political activists and journalists. The results showed a significant relationship between reading newspapers and youth’s political participation......, but not between using social network sites and political participation. In addition, newspapers and social network sites were platforms for a series of conflicts and coalitions that emerged between pro- and anti-revolution actors. Despite the importance of social network sites as key tools for informing...

  10. Clinicopathologic features of adult T-cell leukemias/lymphomas at a North American tertiary care medical center: infrequent involvement of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Andy C; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L; Nguyen, TuDung T

    2014-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Published series of ATLLs seen at a United States medical institution are rare. We present the features of 4 ATLLs diagnosed at our North American tertiary care medical center from 1990 to 2012. Despite the absence of a history of origin from an endemic region, all our ATLLs demonstrated evidence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by ATLL was uncommon in our series, and represented only 1.6% (1/64) of all CNS B-cell or T-cell lymphomas diagnosed over a 20+ year period at our institution. Review of the medical literature reveals that the majority of CNS-involved ATLLs present with the lymphoma or acute subtype, and complete remission is difficult to achieve in these cases. CNS involvement frequently occurs with a systemic disease, which carries an aggressive clinical course with poor prognosis. In addition, CNS involvement by ATLL can be the initial presentation or seen with relapsed disease, can be the only site or be associated with other tissue sites of involvement, and may manifest with variable clinical signs/symptoms. Our retrospective study reveals that ATLLs are rare mature T-cell lymphomas in a native North American population, but the clinical and histopathologic features of ATLLs from this nonendemic region are similar to those seen from other endemic regions. Early recognition of these rare ATLLs involving uncommon sites, such as the CNS, will help optimize treatment for these infrequent mature T-cell lymphomas.

  11. Hipergranulación en heridas crónicas: un problema ocasional pero no infrecuente Hypergranulation of chronic wounds: an occasional but not infrequent problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chaverri Fierro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available La hipergranulación es un problema ocasional, pero a la vez no infrecuente, con el que se enfrentan muchos clínicos responsables del tratamiento de heridas en su práctica diaria. Este fenómeno ocurre en un amplio abanico de heridas que incluyen las incisiones y heridas posquirúrgicas, los estomas (gastrostomías, traqueostomías, etc. y las heridas crónicas. El objetivo del presente artículo es cuantificar y analizar la evidencia generada en torno al tema de la hipergranulación en las heridas crónicas, mediante la búsqueda bibliográfica en diversas bases de datos. Tras el análisis y revisión de los diferentes documentos recuperados se evidencia, tanto cuantitativa como cualitativamente hablando, una escasez importante de investigación en torno a la hipergranulación en heridas crónicas. Esto hace que el problema no se halle lo suficientemente explicado y que no existan evidencias sólidas que justifiquen el uso de un tratamiento sobre otro.Hypergranulation is an occasional but no infrequent problem, which many clinicians face in their daily practice. This phenomenon occurs in a variety of wounds that includes post-surgical incisions and wounds, stomas (gastrostomies, tracheotomies… and chronic wounds. The objective of the present article is to quantify and to analyze the evidence generated around the topic of the hypergranulation in chronic wounds, through the bibliographical search in diverse data bases. After the analysis and revision of the different recovered documents it is demonstrated, both in terms of quantity and quality, an important shortage of investigation around the hypergranulation in chronic wounds. Therefore, the problem is not sufficiently explained and solid evidences do not exist to justify the use of a treatment over another one.

  12. Use of social networking sites and perception and intentions regarding body weight among adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampasa‐Kanyinga, H.; Hamilton, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Social networking sites (SNSs) not only offer users an opportunity to link with others but also allow individuals to compare themselves with other users. However, the link between the use of SNSs and the dissatisfaction with body weight is largely unknown. We investigated the associations between the use of SNSs and the perception of body weight and related behaviours among adolescent men and women. Methods The study sample consisted of 4,468 (48.5% women) 11–19‐year‐old Canadian students in grades 7 to 12 who participated in the 2013 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. Results Overall, 54.6% of students reported using SNSs for 2 h or less per day, 28.0% reported using them for more than 2 h d−1 and 17.4% reported infrequent or no use of SNSs (reference category). After adjustment for covariates, results showed that adolescent women who use SNSs for more than 2 h d−1 had greater odds of dissatisfaction with body weight (odds ratio = 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30–3.16). More specifically, they were more likely to perceive themselves as overweight (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 2.20; 95% CI: 1.34−3.60) compared with those who reported infrequent or no use of SNSs. Conversely, men who use SNSs for 2 h or less per day presented a lower risk for perceiving themselves as overweight (RRR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.47−0.98) but not those who use SNSs for more than 2 h d−1. Women who use SNSs for more than 2 h d−1 reported a greater likelihood of trying to lose weight (RRR = 2.52; 95% CI: 1.62−3.90). Conclusions Our results showed that heavy use of SNSs is associated with dissatisfaction with body weight in adolescent women. PMID:27812377

  13. Improvements in lung function with umeclidinium/vilanterol versus fluticasone propionate/salmeterol in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD and infrequent exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, James F; Worsley, Sally; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Hardaker, Liz; Church, Alison

    2015-07-01

    Umeclidinium (UMEC; long-acting muscarinic antagonist [LAMA])/vilanterol (VI; long-acting beta2-agonist [LABA]) and fluticasone propionate/salmeterol (FP/SAL) (inhaled corticosteroid/LABA) are approved maintenance therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Two studies compared efficacy and safety of UMEC/VI with FP/SAL in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD with no exacerbations in the previous year. In these 12-week, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, double-dummy trials, randomized (1:1) patients received once-daily UMEC/VI 62.5/25 mcg or twice-daily FP/SAL 250/50 mcg (DB2114930 n = 353 and 353; DB2114951 n = 349 and 348, respectively; intent-to-treat). Endpoints included 0-24 h weighted mean (wm) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (Day 84; primary), trough FEV1 (Day 85; secondary), other lung function endpoints, dyspnea, quality of life (QoL) and safety. UMEC/VI demonstrated statistically significant, clinically meaningful improvements in lung function measures versus FP/SAL. For 0-24 h wmFEV1 (Day 84), improvements with UMEC/VI versus FP/SAL were 74 mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: 38-110; DB2114930) and 101 mL (63-139; DB2114951) (both p 1 unit) and QoL (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire Total score >4-unit decrease) in both studies with no statistical differences between treatments. Adverse event rates were similar: 26 and 30% UMEC/VI; 27 and 31% FP/SAL. Once-daily UMEC/VI 62.5/25 mcg over 12 weeks resulted in statistically significant, clinically meaningful improvements in lung function versus twice-daily FP/SAL 250/50 mcg in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD with infrequent exacerbations. Both treatments improved dyspnea and QoL. DB2114930/NCT01817764; DB2114951/NCT01879410. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  15. [Discussion paper participation research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Erik

    2012-12-01

    This contribution introduces the "Diskussionspapier Teilhabeforschung" (discussion paper participation research) of the German Association for Rehabilitation (DVfR) and German Society for Rehabilitation Science (DGRW). The aim of this paper is to more clearly define current scientific research activity on the subject of participation and the significance of interdisciplinary participation research. The authors emphasise the desirability of a stronger scientific basis for instruments designed to improve the participation of disabled individuals. The paper is meant to be understood as an initial basis for the discussion about participation research development, and the authors are open to suggestions and elaboration.Participation research is understood in this discussion paper as an interdisciplinary research field with 7 goals and characteristics: 1. focussing on participation and self-determination; 2. contextual approach (taking environmental and personal factors into consideration that affect participation); 3. the participation of disabled persons in participation research; 4. interdisciplinary cooperation; 5. involving organisations and institutions whose approaches to participation research overlap; 6. referring to social and healthcare policies; 7. national and international orientations.The authors discuss the rationale behind increasing the support for participation research and theoretical models thereof. Fundamental concepts with high relevance to participation research include the biopsychosocial model of the International Classification of Functionality, Disability and Health (ICF), the inclusion concept, empowerment concept, and capabilities concept. The authors conclude their paper with recommendations for strengthening the research funding for participation research, and specify concrete steps toward greater participation research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...

  17. Improving participation rates by providing choice of participation mode: two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijmans, Naomi; van Lieshout, Jan; Wensing, Michel

    2015-04-02

    Low participation rates reduce effective sample size, statistical power and can increase risk for selection bias. Previous research suggests that offering choice of participation mode can improve participation rates. However, few head-to-head trials compared choice of participation mode using telephone interviews and postal questionnaires as modes of interest. Aiming to explore effects of choice of participation, two randomized controlled trials were performed comparing participation rates of patients provided with and without choice of participation mode, using interviews and questionnaires as participation modes. Two trials were embedded in a larger study on cardiovascular risk management in primary care. Patients with a chronic cardiovascular condition recruited for the larger study were invited to participate in an additional survey on social networks, using invitations with and without choice of participation mode. Primary outcome was participation rate. Other outcomes of interest were participation rate conditional on willingness to participate, and initial willingness to participate. In trial 1 we compared outcomes after choice of participation mode (interview or questionnaire) with invitations for participation in a telephone interview. In Trial 2 results for choice of participation mode were compared with postal questionnaires. In Trial 1 no differences were found in participation rates (65% vs 66%, p = 0.853) although conditional participation rate was highest for interviews (90% vs 72%, p choice of participation mode was provided (90% versus 73%, p choice of participation mode was provided (59% vs 46%, p choice of participation mode had benefit on participation rates compared to invitations to participate in questionnaires, but not when compared to invitations to participate in telephone interviews. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89237105 .

  18. User participation in implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical...... system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff...... experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need...

  19. Connecting Participant Observation Positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCurdy, Patrick; Uldam, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue for the importance of considering participant observation roles in relation to both insider/outsider and overt/covert roles. Through combining key academic debates on participant observation, which have separately considered insider/outsider and overt/covert participant...... observation, we develop a reflexive framework to assist researchers in (1) locating the type of participant observation research; (2) identifying implications of participant observation for both the research and the subjects under study; and (3) reflecting on how one’s role as participant observer shifts over...

  20. Learning Networks, Networked Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter; Berlanga, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Sloep, P. B., & Berlanga, A. J. (2011). Learning Networks, Networked Learning [Redes de Aprendizaje, Aprendizaje en Red]. Comunicar, XIX(37), 55-63. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-02-05

  1. Politician2.0 on Facebook: Information Behavior and Dissemination on Social Networking Sites – Gaps and Best-Practice. Evaluation Results of a novel eParticipation toolbox to let politicians engage with citizens online.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wandhoefer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers our findings on information behavior and dissemination of parliamentary decision-makers in terms of using Social Networking Sites like Facebook. The article investigates why politicians use those technologies and integrate them more and more in their everyday workflow. In addition to the purpose of social network usage, the focus of our paper is also on best practices and how to deal with challenges like authenticity of politicians’ online profiles. The results presented within the remit of this paper are the outcome of 16 semi-structured interviews that took place as part of an evaluation effort within the EU research project WeGov [1]. The overall aim of the project is to develop a toolbox that enriches the dialogue between citizens and politicians on the web.

  2. Participation and agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe.......The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe....

  3. Citizen participation manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-13

    The Office of Consumer Affairs has the primary responsibility for managing and coordinating the public-participation efforts of the Department of Energy through public meetings, advisory committee participation, and other outreach mechanisms aimed at assuring all citizens an opportunity to participate in the governmental process relating to energy decisions. The Manual outlines the public-participation policy that should be followed by all offices. All offices are directed to observe the guidance in the manual in shaping and conducting public-participation activities, including the public-participation efforts required by DOE Order 2030, Procedures for the Development and Analysis of Regulations, Standards, and Guidelines. Two chapters included are: Determining Public Participation Needs and Public Participation Plan. (MCW)

  4. Meet Clinical Trial Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Meet Clinical Trial Participants Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table ... Articles Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All / Meet Clinical Trial Participants / North Carolinians Volunteer for Knee ...

  5. Labor Force Participation Rate

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This thematic map presents the labor force participation rate of working-age people in the United States in 2010. The 2010 Labor Force Participation Rate shows the...

  6. Participation in adult learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This entry presents an internationally comparative overview of adult learning patterns. Emphasis is placed on who is participating in adult learning and the observed unequal chances to participate. The entry covers three overarching questions that are central to participation research: a) What...

  7. Representing Participation in ICT4D Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. P.; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    How do the discourses of participation inform deployment of information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D)? Discourses here mean narratives that assign roles to actors, and specify causes and outcomes for events. Based on the theory and practice of international development we...... identify two dimensions to participation and ICT4D: whether participation 1) is hierarchical/top-down or agent-driven/bottom-up, and 2) involves conflict or cooperation. Based on these dimensions we articulate four ideal types of discourse that permeate ICT and development efforts: stakeholder......-based discourses that emphasize consensus, networked efforts among actors collaborating in network arrangements, mobilization discourses that account for contestation over meanings of participation, and oppositional discourses from ׳grassroots׳ actors that also include conflict. We conclude that ICT4D efforts...

  8. Active Versus Passive Academic Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goel, Rajeev K.; Grimpe, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines determinants of networking by academics. Using information from a unique large survey of German researchers, the key contribution focuses on the active versus passive networking distinction. Is active networking by researchers a substitute or a complement to passive networking...... that some types of passive academic networking are complementary to active networking, while others are substitute. Further, we find differences in factors promoting participation in European conferences versus conferences in rest of the world. Finally, publishing bottlenecks as a group generally do...... not appear to be a hindrance to active networking. Implications for academic policy are discussed...

  9. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  10. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  11. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260714; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  12. Networks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks....

  13. ENLIGHT Network

    CERN Multimedia

    Ballantine, A; Dixon-Altaber, H; Dosanjh, M; Kuchina, L

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques borrowed from particle accelerators and detectors are a key element in hadrontherapy and several European projects are actively fostering the collaboration amongst the various disciplines and countries. ENLIGHT was established in 2002 to coordinate these European efforts in hadron therapy. The ENLIGHT network is formed by the European hadrontherapy Community, with more than 300 participants from twenty European countries. A major achievement of ENLIGHT has been the blending of traditionally separate communities so that clinicians, physicists, biologists and engineers with experience and interest in particle therapy are working together.

  14. Predicting User Participation in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Erlandsson, Fredrik; Borg, Anton; Johnson, Henric; Bródka, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Online social networking services like Facebook provides a popular way for users to participate in different communication groups and discuss relevant topics with each other. While users tend to have an impact on each other, it is important to better understand and ...

  15. Underage Children and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Shalynn; Cooke, Bethany; McVey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Despite minimum age requirements for joining popular social networking services such as Facebook, many students misrepresent their real ages and join as active participants in the networks. This descriptive study examines the use of social networking services (SNSs) by children under the age of 13. The researchers surveyed a sample of 199…

  16. eParticipation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an update of the existing eParticipation research state of the art, and a longitudinal analysis of the development of the eParticipation field based on a shared framework of analysis. Drawing on a literature search covering the period from April 2006 to March 2011 included, 123...... articles are identified, analysed and classified within the categories of eParticipation actors, activities, contextual factors, effects, and evaluation. Findings show that the field has a high level of dynamism, as focuses on eParticipation activities, contextual factors and effects have shifted in time...

  17. Social networks, social integration, and social engagement determine cognitive decline in community-dwelling Spanish older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunzunegui, María-Victoria; Alvarado, Beatriz E; Del Ser, Teodoro; Otero, Angel

    2003-03-01

    To examine the influence of social networks and social engagement on cognitive decline in a population-based cohort of elderly people, and to assess gender differences in the effect of social relations on cognition. A longitudinal study of community-dwelling people over 65 was carried out. Cognitive function (orientation and memory) in 1997 and cognitive decline (absent, mild, and severe) over 4 years (1993-1997) were assessed using an instrument previously validated for populations with a low level of education. The effect of social networks, social integration, and social engagement with friends, children, and relatives on cognitive function and cognitive decline was estimated by multiple linear and logistic regressions after adjusting for age, sex, education, depressive symptoms, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and functional status. Poor social connections, infrequent participation in social activities, and social disengagement predict the risk of cognitive decline in elderly individuals. The probability of cognitive decline was lower for both men and women with a high frequency of visual contact with relatives and community social integration. Engagement with friends seemed to be protective for cognitive decline in women but not in men. This longitudinal study indicates that few social ties, poor integration, and social disengagement are risk factors for cognitive decline among community-dwelling elderly persons. The nature of the ties that influence cognition may vary in men and women.

  18. Children's participation in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström professor m.so., Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the 10 planning of/and participation in both education...

  19. Participation beyond observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    , however, the researchers typically uphold the notion that all they methodically engage in is participant observation. The paper argues that important aspects of children’s living and understanding may be lost when considering them mere objects of one’s visual and verbal research practices. First I delve...... on investigating children’s perspectives through participant observation, but also ontological and political ones....

  20. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  1. The body participating:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Hanne; Lund, Lone Blak; Jensen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The literature on participation in rehabilitation by those with the most severe acquired brain injury is very sparse. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore how physiotherapists promote the participation of patients with severe brain injury in therapeutic and daily-...

  2. Depression and Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument-whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group.

  3. Depression and Political Participation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  4. Enhancing Political Participation in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd George Waller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Youth participation through political talk appears to be shifting to the online public sphere in many parts of the world. Many attribute this shift to online social networks such as Facebook. Emerging research seem to suggest that this may be a cure for the problem of political apathy among the youth. This study explores such a possibility in Jamaica. In all, 752 youth ages 15 to 24 were surveyed to ascertain whether Facebook encourages political talk among this age cohort, and what if any are the primary factors that discourage this practice. The findings suggest that (a Facebook is an extension of offline political talk among the civically engaged and politically charged youth of Jamaica; (b Facebook does not substantively encourage political talk among the politically apathetic Jamaican youth; and (c fear of political victimization is the primary factor that discourages many Jamaican youth to engage in political talk on Facebook.

  5. Total design of participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of design as an art made not only for the people, but also by the people is an old dream going back at least to William Morris. It is, however, reappearing vigoriously in many kinds of design activism and grows out of the visions of a Total Design of society. The ideas of participation...... for? To which degree should everyone be educated in ’design literacy’ to participate? Total design of participation is an artistic intervention in society and must be discussed in this utopian tradition....

  6. From understanding to participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents some methodological considerations around the topic of the AFinLA 2012 Autumn Symposium: Multimodal discourses of participation. The aim is to shed theoretical and analytical light on embodied participation in material settings. The research is placed in a relational perspective......, multimodal process in which language together with bodily senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste) and a sense of place contribute to a phenomenon being recognized (as shared). Participation can result in inclusion or exclusion, a claim which is discussed with the help of a pilot study from...

  7. Contact Quality in Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Jensen, Olav Storm

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the concept of participation from the perspective of quality of the contact in the communicative interactions between participants. We argue for the need for an academic-personal competence that qualifies the human contact central in all Participatory Design (PD) activities as a way...... to contribute to “an era of participation.” We describe a contact perspective in PD developed through a collaboration with body-oriented psychotherapeutic research that have specialized experiences in investigating open-minded contact and authentic meetings as body-related experiences....

  8. Characterizing eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanford, Clive Carlton; Rose, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    eParticipation is an emerging research area which, like most emerging areas, lacks a clear literature base or research approach. This study maps out some of the academic theories and disciplines that the new area addresses, using conventional literature study techniques. We identify 99 articles...... that are considered to be highly relevant to eParticipation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging research area, and use this schema to identify key academic articles that help to define eParticipation. We adapt Deetz's [(1996). Describing differences...

  9. Participative Management at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Business Review, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This interview with the chief executive of Donnelly Mirrors, Inc. explains the basis of the company's leadership in participative management and discusses why it is more successful than traditional authority-based management styles. (Author/JG)

  10. Limited Denial of Participation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Limited Denial of Participation (LDP) is an action taken by a HUD Field Office or the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family (DASSF) or Multifamily (DASMF)...

  11. Networks in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. What this means for ATLAS in particular needs to be understood. ATLAS has evolved its computing model since the LHC started based upon its experience with using globally distributed resources. The most significant theme of those changes has been increased reliance upon, and use of, its networks. We will report on a number of networking initiatives in ATLAS including participation in the global perfSONAR network monitoring and measuring efforts of WLCG and OSG, the collaboration with the LHCOPN/LHCONE effort, the integration of network awareness into PanDA, the use of the evolving ATLAS analytics framework to better understand our networks and the changes in our DDM system to allow remote access to data. We will also discuss new efforts underway that are exploring the inclusion and use of software defined networks (SDN) and how ATLAS might benefit from: • Orchestration and optimization of distributed data access and data movement. • Better control of workflows, end to end. • Enabling prioritization of time-critical vs normal tasks • Improvements in the efficiency of resource usage

  12. Size and Political Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, David Dreyer; Serritzlew, Søren

    This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size.......This paper uses a novel research design to re-examine the causal effect of jurisdiction size on political participation. Two waves of municipal consolidation in Denmark, in 1970 and in 2005, provide exogenous variation in jurisdiction size....

  13. Declarative Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Loo, Boon Thau

    2012-01-01

    Declarative Networking is a programming methodology that enables developers to concisely specify network protocols and services, which are directly compiled to a dataflow framework that executes the specifications. Declarative networking proposes the use of a declarative query language for specifying and implementing network protocols, and employs a dataflow framework at runtime for communication and maintenance of network state. The primary goal of declarative networking is to greatly simplify the process of specifying, implementing, deploying and evolving a network design. In addition, decla

  14. Creating and maintaining social networks: women’s participation in Basque pilota. [Creación y mantenimiento de redes sociales: participación de mujeres en pelota vasca].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uxue Fernandez-Lasa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Basque pilota is a traditional sport played mainly by men. A project emerged in 2005 to promote female participation: Emakumea Pilotari (Woman pelota player. In this article we present the main points that emerged from an ethnographic study of the social relationships that playing Basque pilota can provide. The study was carried out in 2011-2012 season with a purposive sample of 28 adult women Basque pilota players (pilotaris (between 22 and 60 years old. 26 participants were pilotaris in recreational groups and the other two were their trainers. The results suggest that a sense of community, team membership, the development of a general reciprocity and group security are the most important aspects for players. A sense of community is the fundamental reason why they practise this sport. The group as a whole is the top priority. Female pilotaris share the desire to relate to each other as women, build relationships, create bonds and help each other. Resumen La pelota vasca es un deporte tradicional practicado mayoritariamente por hombres. En 2005 se puso en marcha un proyecto para promover la participación de las mujeres: Emakumea Pilotari (Mujer Pelotari. En este artículo se presentan los hallazgos de un estudio etnográfico llevado a cabo durante una temporada en torno a las relaciones sociales que genera jugar a pelota vasca. La investigación se realizó con una muestra intencionada de 28 mujeres pelotaris adultas (entre 22 y 60 años, de las cuales 26 eran participantes de un programa recreativo y dos entrenadoras. Los resultados indican que los aspectos más importantes para las participantes son el sentimiento de comunidad, ser miembro de un grupo, el desarrollo de la reciprocidad general y la seguridad que da el grupo. La comunidad es la razón fundamental para practicar este deporte, ya que el grupo es la mayor prioridad. Las mujeres pelotaris comparten el deseo de relacionarse entre ellas como mujeres, construir relaciones, crear

  15. Participation as a matter of concern in participatory design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Danholt, Peter; Halskov, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This article starts from the paradox that, although participation is a defining trait of participatory design (PD), there are few explicit discussions in the PD literature of what constitutes participation. Thus, from a point of departure in Actor-Network Theory (ANT), this article develops...... by individuals and (2) that participation partially exists in all elements of a project. These traits are explicated in a design project called ‘Teledialogue’, where the participants are unfolded as networks of reports, government institutions, boyfriends, social workers and so on. The argument is synthesised...

  16. eParticipation Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medaglia, Rony

    2012-01-01

    Research on the use of information technology to support democratic decision-making (eParticipation) is experiencing ongoing growth, stimulated by an increasing attention from both practitioner and research communities. This study provides the first longitudinal analysis of the development of the e......Participation field based on a shared framework, capturing the directions that the research field of eParticipation is taking in recent developments. Drawing on a literature search covering the period from April 2006 to March 2011, this study identifies, analyzes, and classifies 122 research articles within...... also suggests new analytical categories of research. Drawing on the analysis, inputs for a research agenda are suggested. These include the need to move beyond a technological perspective, encouraging the ongoing shift of research focus from government to citizens and other stakeholders, and the need...

  17. Total design of participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of design as an art made not only for the people, but also by the people is an old dream going back at least to William Morris. It is, however, reappearing vigoriously in many kinds of design activism and grows out of the visions of a Total Design of society. The ideas of participation...... by Tim Brown can be compared to considerations by László Moholy-Nagy and Walter Gropuis on the training and education of active and capable citizens. This opens, though, some dilemmas to discuss: To what extend is the capability of creativity then a (pre)condition to be a citizen of the society wished...... for? To which degree should everyone be educated in ’design literacy’ to participate? Total design of participation is an artistic intervention in society and must be discussed in this utopian tradition....

  18. Participation and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We would like to welcome you to a series of dialogues within the framework of action research (AR) and participatory research (PR), which will be focused on the relationship between participation and power. The basic question in this anthology is ‘What are the possibilities and barriers to partic......We would like to welcome you to a series of dialogues within the framework of action research (AR) and participatory research (PR), which will be focused on the relationship between participation and power. The basic question in this anthology is ‘What are the possibilities and barriers...... to participation conceptualised as various degrees of codetermination in organisations and in research processes?’ The anthology is part of a follow-up on an initiative taken in 2010 by Professor Werner Fricke, editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Action Research for many years. His vision was to create...

  19. European Patterns of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas Fehmerling; Ejrnæs, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Social Survey (ESS) Round 4 (2008), the article finds that satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the government is an important predictor alongside the institutional macro-level variable. The article combines a critical tradition, which suggests that political participation is motivated by a feeling...... of dissatisfaction with the government and feelings of being member of a discriminated group affect the level of extra-parliamentary participation, and second, how different welfare regimes condition the extend to which these groups chose to act. In a comparative multilevel design, using data from the European...... of dissatisfaction with an institutional perspective in which certain institutional conditions are seen as enablers for citizens to actively participate in political life. Our results show that the overall level of extra-parliamentary activity in the Scandinavian countries is higher than in the other European...

  20. Public Access ICT across Cultures: Diversifying Participation in the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Public Access ICT across Cultures: Diversifying Participation in the Network Society. Public Access ICT across ... Jordan, Rwanda). The book documents the impacts of public access, positive and negative, on individuals, society and networks, and women, and examines the policy implications of findings.

  1. Participation in physical planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlata Ploštajner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical planning is also a political activity. Therefore participation is a necessary form of democratic actions undertaken by individuals and groups that strive for democratisation of civil society and strengthening of democratic social values. Public participation of citizens, legal subjects, interest groups and others in physical planning is essential even from the aspect of ensuring success and efficiency of planning documents, if the idea is to devise a plan, which the people would be ready and capable of implementing. Thus the role of the physical planner is changing from technical expert to mediator or anchor-person, who nevertheless has to operate within a normative framework.

  2. Public Participation GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Sten

    2004-01-01

    information in environmental planning and gives an overview over the various approaches to public participation. The current advances in Web-based GIS in many countries contain great possibilities for supporting good governance based on information and knowledge on the one hand and active involvement...... of the citizens on the other hand. One important precondition for success in this field is a well-informed population with access to the Internet. The overall purpose of this paper is to give en overview of how to utilise geographic information and public participation as natural components in environmental...

  3. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Abbas S, Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Ahmed Z, Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Arya A, Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Alok Ashutosh K, Tata Institute of ...

  4. List of Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of Participants. Ajithkumar B P, Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India ajith@nsc.ernet.in. Ansari Q N, Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India qansari 2000@yahoo.com. Ashenfelter Jeffery, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

  5. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Abbas Sohrab, BARC, Mumbai, India. Achary S N, BARC, Mumbai, India. Acharya Prashant G, JMS College, Ahmedabad, India. Aggarwal S K, BARC, Mumbai, India. Agrawal Ashish, BARC, Mumbai, India. Alam Md Sayem, AMU, Aligarh, India. Alamelu D, BARC, Mumbai, India. Aldona Rajewska, IAE ...

  6. List of Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of Participants. Margo Aller. Denis Bastieri. Xiongwei Bi. Weihao Bian. Vera Bychkova. Bo Chai. Jianling Chen. Xuhui Chen. Ye Chen. Zhifu Chen. Yongjun Chen. Liang Chen. Zhaoyu Chen. Kwongsang Cheng. Lang Cui. Benzhong Dai. Zhen Ding. Dimitrios Emmanoulopoulos. Xiaohong Fan. Junhui Fan. Longxing Fan.

  7. Participation and Intermediary NGOs

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    1995-01-01

    Nongovenrmental organizations (NGOs) can be effective intermediaries in Bank funded projects which depend on participation and capacity building at the community level. Successful collaboration depends on identifying an organization with appropriate characteristics, and involving its staff in decisionmaking from as early as possible in the project cycle. Steps must be taken to prevent Bank...

  8. Mapping eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2007-01-01

    Participation. We develop a definitional schema that suggests different ways of understanding an emerging socio-technical research area and use this schema to map the research contributions identified. This allows us make an initial sketch of the scientific character of the area and its central concerns, theories...

  9. Participation som organisatorisk praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Hans Jeppe; Jønsson, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Hensigten med artiklen er at give et bidrag til forståelsen af begrebet organisatorisk participation både teoretisk og ud fra praksis. Det gøres ud fra analyser og tematiseringer af participationens mangfoldighed, participationssystemers konstituering, participationens substans og finalitet samt...

  10. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  11. Participation and environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.; Huitema, Dave; O'Toole, Laurence J.; Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.; Huitema, D.; O'Toole, Laurence J.

    1998-01-01

    The main subject to which this book seeks to contribute is the question of how and under which circumstances public participation can enhance the quality of environmental decision-making. This chapter outlines the issues addressed in the succeeding contributions. The core of the argument is that in

  12. Variation in participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erna Hooghiemstra; J.G.F. Merens

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Variatie in participatie. The four groups of ethnic minority women studied in this report follow the trend of increasing labour market participation. Some of them are however found still to lag (far) behind), while others now work more than the average. All ethnic groups have

  13. Participation under Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudourides, Moses A. [Univ. of Patras, Rio-Patras (Greece). Dept. of Mathematics

    2003-10-01

    This essay reviews a number of theoretical perspectives about uncertainty and participation in the present-day knowledge-based society. After discussing the on-going reconfigurations of science, technology and society, we examine how appropriate for policy studies are various theories of social complexity. Post-normal science is such an example of a complexity-motivated approach, which justifies civic participation as a policy response to an increasing uncertainty. But there are different categories and models of uncertainties implying a variety of configurations of policy processes. A particular role in all of them is played by expertise whose democratization is an often-claimed imperative nowadays. Moreover, we discuss how different participatory arrangements are shaped into instruments of policy-making and framing regulatory processes. As participation necessitates and triggers deliberation, we proceed to examine the role and the barriers of deliberativeness. Finally, we conclude by referring to some critical views about the ultimate assumptions of recent European policy frameworks and the conceptions of civic participation and politicization that they invoke.

  14. Communication Games: Participant's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupar, Karen R.

    Using a series of communicational games, the author leads the participant through self-awareness, verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and skills in perception, listening, and small group, organizational, and cultural communications. The thesis behind the book is that model-making, role-playing, or other forms of…

  15. Participation in decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EG Valoyi

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which employees would like to participate in decision making concerning various organisational issues, especially those concerning: the work itself, working conditions, human resources issues, and corporate policy and planning. The sample consisted of 146 participants, including managers, middle managers, and junior officials from a South African development corporation. A questionnaire to measure employees' desire to participate in decision making was specially constructed for this investigation. It has found that employees with higher academic qualifications were more desirous to participate in decision-making at all levels than employees with lower academic qualifications. This was also true for employees in higher job grades than in lower job grades. Men were more desirous to participate in decision making than women. The implications of the findings are discussed. Opsomming Die doel van die huidige studie was om vas te stel in watter mate werknemers sal wil deelneem aan die besluit- nameproses van organisasies, veral rakende die volgende sake: die werk self, werksomstandighede, menslike hulpbronaangeleenthede en korporatiewe beleid en beplanning. Die steekproef het uit 146 deelnemers, insluitende bestuurders, middelvlakbestuurders en junior amptenare van'n Suid Afrikaanse ontwikkelingskorporasie, bestaan. nVraelys wat die begeerte van werknemers meet om aan die besluitnameproses deel te neem, is spesiaal vir die doel van hierdie ondersoek, ontwerp. Dit is bevind dat werknemers met hoer akademiese kwalifikasies meer begerig is om aan die besluitnameproses op alle vlakke deel te neem as werknemers met laer akademiese kwalifikasies. Dit was ook waar vir werknemers in hoervlakposte vergeleke met werknemers in laervlakposte. Mans was ook meer begerig om aan die besluitnameproses deel te neem as vroue. Die implikasies van die studie word bespreek.

  16. NETS - Danish participation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsen, S. (Grontmij - Carl Bro, Glostrup (Denmark)); Theel, C. (Baltic Sea Solutions, Holeby (Denmark))

    2008-12-15

    Within the NICe-funded project 'Nordic Environmental Technology Solutions (NETS)' a new type of networking at the Nordic level was organized in order to jointly exploit the rapidly growing market potential in the environmental technology sector. The project aimed at increased and professionalized commercialization of Nordic Cleantech in energy and water business segments through 1) closer cooperation and joint marketing activities, 2) a website, 3) cleantech product information via brochures and publications 4) and participating in relevant trade fairs and other industry events. Facilitating business-to-business activities was another core task for the NETS project partners from Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark with the aim to encourage total solutions for combined Cleantech system offers. The project has achieved to establish a Cleantech register of 600 Nordic Cleantech companies, a network of 86 member enterprises, produced several publications and brochures for direct technology promotion and a website for direct access to company profiles and contact data. The project partners have attended 14 relevant international Cleantech trade fairs and conferences and facilitated business-to-business contacts added by capacity building offers through two company workshops. The future challenge for the project partners and Nordic Cleantech will be to coordinate the numerous efforts within the Nordic countries in order to reach concerted action and binding of member companies for reliable services, an improved visibility and knowledge exchange. With Cleantech's growing market influence and public awareness, the need to develop total solutions is increasing likewise. Marketing efforts should be encouraged cross-sectional and cross-border among the various levels of involved actors from both the public and the private sector. (au)

  17. The network researchers' network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C.; Jiang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987). In thi......The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987......). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...

  18. Participating in patient education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Tine Mechlenborg; Antoft, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The paper builds on previous ethnographic research in Denmark focusing on the significance of participating in a locally developed patient education programme for everyday life (Kristiansen et.al. 2015). It presents a secondary analysis. Group based patient education can be understood as a health...... point is applied in order to illustrate two central status passages taking place at the locally developed patient education programme: 1) The status passage from novice to an experienced person with chronic illness, and 2) The transformation from adolescence to adulthood living with a chronic illness...... studies within the field of patient education and how it can enhance our understanding of the social practices at play and the identity transitions occurring as a result of the chronic illness itself and the participation at the programme. Further we reflect on potential practical implications of our...

  19. Invited to Participate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Dam

    This thesis presents an ethnography of e-health and patient participation in heart care. Drawing on Science & Technology Studies (STS) and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), the thesis goes beyond the common narrative of e-health as a solution and vehicle for transforming healthcare...... towards more patient-centered practices and explores what patient-involving e-health, in practice, can become. With the user test of an e-health system for ICD-patients as the pivotal case, the thesis unpacks what happens when patients are invited to become participants and, in particular, information...... providers through e-health as well as other devices. It does so from a highly interventionist approach where the author uses her role as facilitator of the user test to conduct an ethnographic experiment. The thesis consists of four papers. Concurrently but with different analytical devices, the papers...

  20. [Rehabilitation and work participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethge, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Work participation is increasingly seen as a primary outcome of rehabilitation measures. Randomised controlled trials from several different countries and the reviews and meta-analyses based on them show that multidisciplinary rehabilitation programmes improve work participation, return-to-work rates, and reduce sickness absence in patients with back pain, depression, and cancer. In Germany, such programmes were implemented as work-related medical rehabilitation. This intervention targets patients with poor work ability and an increased risk of permanent work disability. Randomised controlled trials have confirmed a reduction of sickness absence and increased rates of sustainable work participation in favour of work-related medical rehabilitation as compared to common medical rehabilitation. Dissemination of these programmes and translation of research evidence into practice progresses. An additional important strategy to support returning to work following rehabilitation is graded return to work. There is emerging evidence of sustainable employment effects in favour of graded return to work. A direct involvement of the workplace and a closer cooperation with employers and occupational health physicians may further improve the outcomes of rehabilitation programmes. Strategies that synergistically integrate safety, health promotion and rehabilitation may achieve more favourable outcomes than separated actions.

  1. Sanitation and Civic Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Peña Barreto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research is proposed in order to propose an action plan for environmental sanitation citizen participation in the "Manuela Sáenz" Concentrating National Basic School Parish Municipality City Bolivia Pedraza Barinas state. It is part of the qualitative approach in the form of participatory action research and supported by a narrative descriptive design. The selected scenario for performance of work was the Concentrating National School "Manuela Sáenz" key informants consist of 1 member of the community, 1 member of the community council and one teacher of the institution. The techniques used are observation and depth interview, using as instruments a field notebook and an interview script. For the presentation and analysis of results he was categorized, triangulated and theorized the information obtained, performing a thorough and detailed report on the integrated management of solid waste diagnosis. Subsequently, the proposal called Action Plan for environmental sanitation was developed with citizen participation in concentrated Manuela Saenz National Basic School. Then the proposal where participants expressed the view that activities allowed to obtain very important basic knowledge on environmental sanitation was run.

  2. Governability and Citizen Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarla de Quiroga

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available bjective conditions that allow for a harmonic relationship between the governors and the governed. We are speaking about a set of conditions for governing by consensus and in harmony. By “citizen participation” we refer to the fact that citizens share in the powerof decision over something that concerns them. In Bolivia, as well in other Latin American countries, citizenship participation in municipal management is a recent phenomena. This article describes the experience of citizenry participation in the municipality ofCochabamba (Bolivia in relation to quality of life and living conditions in a neighborhood. The municipality of Cochabamba has embarked upon a mission of rescue and evaluation of the neighborhood organizations, not only incorporating the population into the processes of participation, but also acting in favor of social integration because this stresses the commitment of the neighborhood citizens in the design of the plans. In conclusion, the unfolding experience in the municipality of Cochabamba makes the fact clear that beyond the concept of governability, the search for a co-government-type relation prevails, one that is more horizontal and equitable and where the population takes on a leading role for bringing about the social cohesion and the sense of belonging needed to face the serious problems that afflict Latin American cities.

  3. Participation: the insider's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret

    2010-09-01

    The insider-outsider distinction is discussed in the context of people with disabilities. Insiders to disability are likely to have different subjective responses to life situations than do those who experience disability as onlookers. The importance of including the insider's perspective is discussed with respect to assessing participation in terms of setting goals, evaluating programs, setting research agendas, and conducting needs assessments. In terms of incorporating the insider's subjective response to participation into assessment, it is argued that both importance and salience are required to reflect the person's values and goals fully. A review of a sample of currently used assessment approaches is provided with a focus on how each instrument either incorporates or fails to incorporate the insider's perspective on participation. A distinction is made between instruments that tap into the perspective of a specific person at the point of assessment versus those that substitute a perspective based on discussions by groups of insiders, such as emerges from focus groups. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Network cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  5. Network Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  6. Redes sociais e participação em uma comunidade referenciada a uma unidade de saúde da família Redes sociales y participación en una comunidad referenciada a una unidad de salud de la familia Social networks and participation in a community referenced to a family health care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Denardin Budó

    2010-12-01

    segunda, las formas de organización y como las personas participan en la comunidad. Se concluye que, a partir de las discusiones y reflexiones presentadas en ese trabajo, podrán ser planeadas estrategias que promuevan la formación de vínculos y una mayor movilización para la participación social.The aim of this research is to describe factors that may influence the constitution of social networks and participation in a community referenced to a Family Health Care Unit, located in a medium-sized city in the South of Brazil. It is a qualitative research developed with key informants, community members, community health agents and other health team personnel. The method used was rapid participative assessment, through semi-structured interviews and field observation. Content analysis was used and two categories emerged: considerations about social networks and community participation. The first category presents factors related to social networks, such as family aggregation, socio-economic structure, alcoholism, among others. The second one presents community organization and the ways people participate in the community. Discussions and reflections presented in this paper enable to conclude that strategies to promote strengthening of bonds and greater mobilization for social participation may be developed.

  7. Lifelong learning and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles; Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    This article is inspired by an EU-founded project on intergenerational mentoring: ‘HEAR ME’, which was conducted from 2009 – 2011 in five European countries. Starting from the demographic challenges that affect all European welfare states, the authors discuss attitudes to and possibilities...... in involvement of older people in voluntary social work as mentors for young people. The challenge of the ageing societies is quite often discussed as the ‘burden of the elderly’ and discussed as an economic problem. However, the challenge is not only economical. It is also a social and cultural challenge, among...... other things because a unilateral focus on the economic aspects may cause dissolution of the social cohesion and decrease in well-being for far too many people. The HEAR ME project aimed at developing strategies for lifelong learning and new roles for older people based on their competences, network...

  8. IMPACT OF GLOBAL RETAILERS ON REGIONAL MARKET PARTICIPANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Evtyugina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The given article is focused on a topical subject of global trade networks and the current trends of their development on a regional retail market. The authors believe that deep integration of international networks in the regions significantly increases the competition among network operators in the trade sector and creates a certain challenge for Russian retailers, and require introduction of innovative management techniques, automation of operational processes, expansion of assortment, better service, lower prices, etc. Research and assessment of the parameters given in the article help verifying an effect of international networks on the development process of regional market participants.

  9. Cultural participation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, David; Kann-Rasmussen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This conclusion has been reached due to the findings of the latest cross national cultural participation survey. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem......’ and instead suggests that there is a shared problematisation across Europe sustained by common discursive archaeology that employs various discursive strands in relation to a dominant institutional discourse. The argument is that the ‘problem’ of ‘non-participation’ legitimates a ‘solution’ that predates its...

  10. The Subjectivity of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    What is a 'we' – a collective – and how can we use such communal self-knowledge to help people? This book is about collectivity, participation, and subjectivity – and about the social theories that may help us understand these matters. It also seeks to learn from the innovative practices and ideas...... practices. Through this dialogue, it develops an original trans-disciplinary critical theory and practice of collective subjectivity for which the ongoing construction and overcoming of common sense, or ideology, is central. It also points to ways of relating discourse with agency, and fertilizing insights...... from interactionism and ideology theories in a cultural-historical framework....

  11. KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER THROUGH NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GYÖRGY ATTILA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a vital intangible asset for any organization and cannot be valued exactly due its special form of materialization. Although we have this drawback, a scientifically established value should be used in order to measure the performance of knowledge holders. A correct valuation helps to know the worth of assets offered in exploitation. Exploitation of this resource could be done in several different ways, but integration in knowledge networks seems to generate best efficiency ratio. Networks offer the possibility to change information, to obtain new information, to build further ideas arose from network partners or to develop together new ideas. Thus, networks assure conditions to optimize the members’ knowledge portfolios. Optimization of knowledge usage creates benefits for network members. These benefits could be profits (if members are private companies or social welfare (if members are looking after collective purposes. Taxonomy of knowledge networks is diverse, permitting an adaptation to the needs of members. Networks permit a large scale of heterogeneity. Since an important part of new knowledge creating costs is covered from public budgetary resources, a special development is recorded at those networks which are exclusively or partly organized in the public sector or benefit by participation from the public sector.

  12. Online Social Network Interactions:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jung Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-cultural comparison of social networking structure on McDonald’s Facebook fan sites between Taiwan and the USA was conducted utilizing the individualism/collectivism dimension proposed by Hofstede. Four network indicators are used to describe the network structure of McDonald’s Facebook fan sites: size, density, clique and centralization. Individuals who post on both Facebook sites for the year of 2012 were considered as network participants for the purpose of the study. Due to the huge amount of data, only one thread of postings was sampled from each month of the year of 2012. The final data consists of 1002 postings written by 896 individuals and 5962 postings written by 5532 individuals from Taiwan and the USA respectively. The results indicated that the USA McDonald’s Facebook fan network has more fans, while Taiwan’s McDonald’s Facebook fan network is more densely connected. Cliques did form among the overall multiplex and within the individual uniplex networks in two countries, yet no significant differences were found between them. All the fan networks in both countries are relatively centralized, mostly on the site operators.

  13. The Participation Decision Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Y. Ficaj

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The 2011 participation decision study involved exploration into the impact of the external education environment on the decision for private school participation in Federal funding, one deliberately declining player in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001(NCLB choice and competition equation. In the qualitative collective case, three religiously triangulated Michigan private school decision-makers submitted to semi-structured interviews. Analysis of the external environmental factors was through the lens of Gould and Eldredge’s (1977 environmentally oriented theory, punctuated equilibria philosophy of change. Analysis involved layering, direct interpretation, categorical aggregation, and cross-comparison of two external environmental categories identified at literature review (NCLB-content and privatization-dynamic with numerous major and sub-groupings and space for newly emergent material. The category privatization-dynamics emerged as significant influence, as did the major theme trust and the sub-themes motivational intent, competency, consistency, grapevine, creativity or inspiration, restrictions on curriculum, lack of awareness of opportunities available, and fear of failure. The study included five specific recommendations for leaders of change to explain, predict, and improve organizational performance toward greater synchronization in operation of the NCLB choice and competition mechanisms.

  14. PARTICIPANTS IN INSOLVENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RARES-SEBASTIAN PUIU-NAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the officials and other participants in insolvency. The main purpose of the insolvency procedure is to cover all the debts of the debtor side, in favor of his creditor side. The most important regulations regarding this issue consist in Law no. 85/2006, according to it in the insolvency procedure are to be appointed the following officials: insolvency courts of justice, insolvency judge, receiver, liquidator. All these officials have to act in celerity, in order to promptly perform acts and operations provided by law and to respect and provide other participants’ rights and obligations. My article present in the beginning the insolvency courts of justice, their material and territorial competence and the procedure rules. Next chapters are dedicated to the insolvency judge, receiver and liquidator and analyze the following issues: their appointment, their powers, their auxiliary officials and their ceasing of the powers. Some regards on the British law and French law are also included. The next chapter is dedicated to the participants to the insolvency procedure: the creditors general assembly, creditors committee and special administrator, followed by conclusions and recommendations.

  15. Spaceflight participant visits CERN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    On 15 July, CERN welcomed spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari.   Anousheh Ansari’s grin stretches from ear to ear, during an intriguing conversation with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at AMS POCC. (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari was the first-ever female spaceflight participant, spending eight days on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006. She now has a new addition to her list of extraordinary sights ­– the home of the world’s largest particle accelerator: CERN.   On 15 July, Anousheh Ansari came to CERN and, unsurprisingly, visited the control room of the experiment attached to the ISS: the AMS. At the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre (AMS POCC) on CERN’s Prévessin site, she met the Nobel laureate Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the AMS experiment. Ansari and her accompanying guests were thrilled to expand their knowledge about CERN, its research and its...

  16. Telecommunication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Iannone, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Many argue that telecommunications network infrastructure is the most impressive and important technology ever developed. Analyzing the telecom market's constantly evolving trends, research directions, infrastructure, and vital needs, Telecommunication Networks responds with revolutionized engineering strategies to optimize network construction. Omnipresent in society, telecom networks integrate a wide range of technologies. These include quantum field theory for the study of optical amplifiers, software architectures for network control, abstract algebra required to design error correction co

  17. Using SNA to map participation and non-participation in vulnerable populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    investigation of social networks in a deprived area, the study aimed at identifying social networks of residents who participated in various community-based activities as well as informal groups. Fisher’s (1982) theoretical definition of relation was used and a scheme for coding respondents on the adequacy......The pursuit of equality in health is an overriding goal and principle in Danish health policy. Inequality in health prevails especially among population groups with low education and income levels. Many municipalities have therefore been focusing on deprived areas attempting to fight inequality...

  18. The networking practices of businesswomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Bogaards

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the networking practices of businesswomen in the Gauteng Province, South Africa. The study of businesswomen's networking practices can provide critical insight into the manner in which networking can assist businesswomen in personal and professional skills development. Problem investigated: An investigation was conducted into the manner in which the concepts of networking and social networking are perceived by businesswomen in Gauteng. The study further investigated the motivation behind businesswomen's networking practices and the contents of their social networks were explored. Design/methodology/approach: A non-probability purposive sample, followed by snowball sampling, was used to select businesswomen for in-depth interviews (n = 31. In-depth interviews were used as a qualitative method to investigate the networking practices of these participants.Findings: The results indicate that businesswomen have various perceptions regarding the concepts of networking and social networking. It was also found that businesswomen include certain types of people in their social networks and that they receive various business and personal benefits when their networking is focused (having a clear objective to networking. Originality/value: These findings provide a background to the manner in which businesswomen perceive networking and social networking. This can serve as a basis for training initiatives to raise businesswomen's awareness of networking and social networking. Aforementioned may also provide insight into the meaning this may hold for them in their work and personal lives (for example, obtaining insight into the manner in which networking can be used to obtain business and personal support. Information derived from this study can further be utilised by businesswomen to assist them in social network development. Conclusion: It was concluded from the study that businesswomen perceive

  19. Democracy and shareholder's participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Vuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Democracy and participation of shareholders or the demand for their active participation in the meetings of the Assemblyhas increasingly gained in importance in modern conditions. This is because, negative trends of passivation, the limitations of democratic potential of shareholders and shareholders' rights abuse by the management body, especially in the work control and compensation policy of shareholders, have been observed in a detailed analysis of the application and results of the Shareholder Rights Directive. The passivity of shareholders, as one of the most striking features of their position in the joint stock company today, is the biggest problem and threat to democratic processes within the company. If we bear in mind that the most common definition of shareholder democracy is 'ability of shareholders to influence the management of the company', we can notice a clear picture of the seriousness and importance of the lack of shareholder participation. This is the reason why the author of this paper gradually examines the causes and consequences of the passivity of shareholders, the proposed changes in this context in the Law of the European Union and the practical implications of such solutions in practice. In addition, the author examines contemporary forms and conditions for shareholder democracy and the legal framework in the European Union and the Republic of Serbia. In this way, we analyze the situation in this area and point out shortcomings of certain solutions, as well as the implications they cause in practice. The main thesis from which starts the scientific work and which will be gradually proven through theoretical and practical analysis is that the wider social processes directly reflect on the state of the joint-stock companies, or the state of corporate governance. This means that the negative trends of modern democracy (in the constitutional sense are almost mirrored in economic capital (EC and our attempt in this paper

  20. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    in a systematic, reproducible fashion using optimized and standardized protocols. The PCBN is funded as a consortium of participating network sites...biospecimens obtained in a systematic, reproducible fashion using optimized and standardized protocols. The PCBN is funded as a consortium of... questionnaires , and surveys, etc. Nothing to report Organization Name: The Brooklyn Hospital Location of Organization: Brooklyn, New York Partner’s

  1. Involvement Without Participation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a case study of a knowledge-intensive company that launched a 2-year project to improve their psychosocial working environment. All parties agreed on the project, and the methods used aimed to promote the involvement of the employees. Surprisingly, the psychosocial working en...... and participation. In order to develop a more sustainable and viable psychosocial working environment, a broader and more democratic notion of organisational learning and managing is proposed....... environment did not improve; on the contrary, it deteriorated. The article highlights cultural and structural obstacles to the process, including an inadequate understanding of organisational learning and a narrow focus on market and competition. The endeavours did not consistently increase delegation...

  2. Paradoxes of participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens Friis

    2015-01-01

    Processes of participatory forestry reform in the Global South in recent decades present us with a paradox. While ostensibly aimed at promoting participation by forest adjacent communities, these reforms more often appear to sustain domination by forest administrations or private enterprises...... and have increasingly been associated with inequitable social outcomes. Part of the explanation for this must be sought in the professionalization promoted by these reforms in the sense of scientific management approaches and structured and detailed systems of information gathering, dissemination...... and procedurally demanding framings that inhibit implementation, downplay politics and promote inequality. The contributions to this special issue illustrate empirical pathways to unpack and question the framing of participatory forestry as professionalization by pointing to its anti-democratic and social...

  3. Participation for Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittrich, Yvonne; De La Harpe, Retha; Korpela, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is more and more promoted as a driver and facilitator of economic growth and development in low and middle income countries. ICT for Development (ICT4D) though has mixed successes. Sustainability of solutions and usability respectively usefulness...... is rare. The workshop aims at bringing together the PD researchers working with under-privileged communities and attracting researchers from the ICT4D communities to the PD conference. The goal is to share experiences and start a discussion on how participation, ICT and development might relate....... for the intended beneficiaries have been reported as causes. Participatory approaches to development have been proposed to address these causes. Participatory Design (PD) seems like a perfect fit. However, at the Participatory Design Conferences, research that addresses PD in low and middle income countries...

  4. (Radio)active participation

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    This year, for the first time, CERN hosted the Rencontres internationales lycéennes de la radioprotection: a three-day event in which some 200 students from 16 schools in France and elsewhere came together to discuss the topic of radiation protection and to deepen their understanding of the field.   Participants of the Rencontres internationales lycéennes de la radioprotection 2014. Each year since 2008, the Centre d’étude sur l’évaluation de la protection dans le domaine nucléaire français (CEPN, the French centre for studies of the evaluation of nuclear protection) and the Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire français (IRSN, the French institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety), in partnership with various other bodies*, have been organising radiation protection workshops. Aimed at students between the ages of 15 and 18 from France and beyo...

  5. Irrigation farmers motivation for participating in social networking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 5 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Using Social Network Analysis to Understand Actor Participation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sylvere

    and Bambu (bamboo) arenas. E-I index results offer a good indicator of actor influence by showing high cross boundary relationships between donors, agencies, ministries and local government organisations. This cooperation is interpreted by Lubell et al. (2014) as vertical influence and prone to sectoral fragmentation and ...

  7. Private Sector Participation in Financing Road Network in Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study identifies such critical issues as contractual incompleteness, financial and political uncertainties. The study recommends that these critical issues have to be addressed before a country like Nigeria with a glaring weak and corrupt legal system, shaky and weak financial system and political instability will begin to ...

  8. Interconnected networks

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides an introduction to and overview of the emerging field of interconnected networks which include multi layer or multiplex networks, as well as networks of networks. Such networks present structural and dynamical features quite different from those observed in isolated networks. The presence of links between different networks or layers of a network typically alters the way such interconnected networks behave – understanding the role of interconnecting links is therefore a crucial step towards a more accurate description of real-world systems. While examples of such dissimilar properties are becoming more abundant – for example regarding diffusion, robustness and competition – the root of such differences remains to be elucidated. Each chapter in this topical collection is self-contained and can be read on its own, thus making it also suitable as reference for experienced researchers wishing to focus on a particular topic.

  9. Bullying Victimization, Social Network Usage, and Delinquent Coping in a Sample of Urban Youth: Examining the Predictions of General Strain Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas; Pelfrey, William V

    2016-12-01

    Guided by the propositions of general strain theory, this study examines the impact of experienced and anticipated strains on the delinquent coping of adolescents while accounting for the usage of social networking sites. Specifically, this study uses self-report survey data collected from 3,195 middle and high school students in a single Midwest city in the United States to explore the effect of experiencing the strains of traditional bullying victimization and cyberbullying victimization on adolescents self-reported soft drug use, hard drug use, and weapon carrying behavior. These relationships are explored among both frequent and infrequent users of social networking sites. Results indicate that cyberbullying victimization and the anticipated strain of feeling unsafe at or on the way to or from school are significantly and positively associated with all three mechanisms of delinquent coping among both frequent and infrequent social network users.

  10. Network maintenance

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    A site wide network maintenance has been scheduled for Saturday 28 February. Most of the network devices of the General Purpose network will be upgraded to a newer software version, in order to improve our network monitoring capabilities. This will result in a series of short (2-5 minutes) random interruptions everywhere on the CERN sites along this day. This upgrade will not affect: the Computer centre itself, building 613, the Technical Network and the LHC experiments dedicated networks at the pits. Should you need more details on this intervention, please contact Netops by phone 74927 or email mailto:Netops@cern.ch. IT/CS Group

  11. Network maintenance

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    A site-wide network maintenance operation has been scheduled for Saturday 28 February. Most of the network devices of the general purpose network will be upgraded to a newer software version, in order to improve our network monitoring capabilities. This will result in a series of short (2-5 minutes) random interruptions everywhere on the CERN sites throughout the day. This upgrade will not affect the Computer Centre itself, Building 613, the Technical Network and the LHC experiments, dedicated networks at the pits. For further details of this intervention, please contact Netops by phone 74927 or e-mail mailto:Netops@cern.ch. IT/CS Group

  12. CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Jimenez M.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available TRIPLE HELIX VII 7TH BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON UNIVERSITY, INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT LINKAGES “THE ROLE OF TRIPLE HELIX IN THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR INNOVATION, COMPETITIVENESS AND SUSTAINABILITY” UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE, GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 17-19 JUNE 2009 CALL FOR PARTICIPATION CLOSING DATE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION – 14 NOVEMBER 2008 Triple Helix VII is an important occasion offering a major platform for the exchange of ideas and experiences - academics will share their insights into the dynamics of collaboration; business and industry will review their plans and indicate future directions; and for government decision makers, will explore new avenues for supporting developments, analysing innovation frameworks and their impact on national and regional economies. A Call for Papers is attached, and further details can be obtained from the Triple Helix VII website: http://www.triple-helix-7.org. We hope the Conference will be of interest to you and look forward to seeing you in Glasgow next year taking part in the Triple Helix VII proceedings. Sheila Forbes Conference Administrator Triple Helix VII

  13. Network Ambivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Jagoda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The language of networks now describes everything from the Internet to the economy to terrorist organizations. In distinction to a common view of networks as a universal, originary, or necessary form that promises to explain everything from neural structures to online traffic, this essay emphasizes the contingency of the network imaginary. Network form, in its role as our current cultural dominant, makes scarcely imaginable the possibility of an alternative or an outside uninflected by networks. If so many things and relationships are figured as networks, however, then what is not a network? If a network points towards particular logics and qualities of relation in our historical present, what others might we envision in the future? In  many ways, these questions are unanswerable from within the contemporary moment. Instead of seeking an avant-garde approach (to move beyond networks or opting out of networks (in some cases, to recover elements of pre-networked existence, this essay proposes a third orientation: one of ambivalence that operates as a mode of extreme presence. I propose the concept of "network aesthetics," which can be tracked across artistic media and cultural forms, as a model, style, and pedagogy for approaching interconnection in the twenty-first century. The following essay is excerpted from Network Ambivalence (Forthcoming from University of Chicago Press. 

  14. An optimization model for the costs allocation in spare parts collaborative networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzoni, Chiara; Ferrara, Andrea; Grassi, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The paper focuses on the aftermarket spare parts in the automotive industry. In particular, only products with infrequent and low quantity demand are considered. This work is an extention of a previuos work by the same authors in which a stochastic model for the optimal inventory policy of spare parts has been presented. In this paper the authors improved what has been called "the second layer" in the previous model, that is the products allocation among a collaborative network of distributors. The improvement is related to the basic model and to the introducion of new products in the network.

  15. Networking Concepts and Cooperation among Legislative Libraries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper argues that military rule does not provide the appropriate environment for the growth and development of legislative libraries. Cooperation and not competition is stated as the driving philosophy for library networks and cooperation. Resource sharing is the premise for participation in library network. Network ...

  16. Network neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Danielle S; Sporns, Olaf

    2017-02-23

    Despite substantial recent progress, our understanding of the principles and mechanisms underlying complex brain function and cognition remains incomplete. Network neuroscience proposes to tackle these enduring challenges. Approaching brain structure and function from an explicitly integrative perspective, network neuroscience pursues new ways to map, record, analyze and model the elements and interactions of neurobiological systems. Two parallel trends drive the approach: the availability of new empirical tools to create comprehensive maps and record dynamic patterns among molecules, neurons, brain areas and social systems; and the theoretical framework and computational tools of modern network science. The convergence of empirical and computational advances opens new frontiers of scientific inquiry, including network dynamics, manipulation and control of brain networks, and integration of network processes across spatiotemporal domains. We review emerging trends in network neuroscience and attempt to chart a path toward a better understanding of the brain as a multiscale networked system.

  17. Organizational Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grande, Bård; Sørensen, Ole Henning

    1998-01-01

    The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept of organizational network are identified and critically discussed. Special focus is placed on how information and communication technologies as communication mediators and cognitive pictures influence...

  18. Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henik Avishai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them. Methods Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test - interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence. Results The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions. Conclusions These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

  19. Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenazi, Sarit; Henik, Avishai

    2010-01-07

    Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them. Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test-interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence. The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions. These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

  20. Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martí, Joan; Zenou, Yves

    2009-01-01

    We survey the literature on social networks by putting together the economics, sociological and physics/applied mathematics approaches, showing their similarities and differences. We expose, in particular, the two main ways of modeling network formation. While the physics/applied mathematics approach is capable of reproducing most observed networks, it does not explain why they emerge. On the contrary, the economics approach is very precise in explaining why networks emerge but does a poor jo...

  1. Network Coding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Network coding is a technique to increase the amount of information °ow in a network by mak- ing the key observation that information °ow is fundamentally different from commodity °ow. Whereas, under traditional methods of opera- tion of data networks, intermediate nodes are restricted to simply forwarding their incoming.

  2. Determinants of social participation of visually impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alma, Manna A; Van der Mei, Sijrike F; Groothoff, Johan W; Suurmeijer, Theo P B M

    2012-02-01

    To assess determinants of social participation among visually impaired older adults. This cross-sectional study included visually impaired persons (≥55 years; n = 173) who were referred to a low-vision rehabilitation center. Determinants (i.e., sociodemographic, physical, social and psychological factors, and personal values) of participation were identified in four domains of participation: (1) domestic life; (2) interpersonal interactions and relationships; (3) major life areas; and (4) community, social, and civic life. Study participants completed telephone interviews. Age, physical fitness, and helplessness were determinants of participation in domestic life. Social network size was associated with participation in major life areas. The personal value attached to participation (i.e., perceived importance) was a determinant of participation in interpersonal interactions and relationships, major life areas, and community, social and civic life. Vision-related characteristics (i.e., self-perceived vision and degree of visual impairment) were not associated with participation. Across the participation domains, perceived importance is a major determinant of social participation among visually impaired older adults. Physical health along with social and psychological status, also affect participation. Knowing how participation is determined can be used to develop rehabilitation interventions to enhance participation of visually impaired older adults.

  3. Will You Accept the Government's Friend Request? Social Networks and Privacy Concerns: e80682

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David A Siegel

    2013-01-01

      Participating in social network websites entails voluntarily sharing private information, and the explosive growth of social network websites over the last decade suggests shifting views on privacy...

  4. Will you accept the government's friend request? Social networks and privacy concerns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siegel, David A

    2013-01-01

    Participating in social network websites entails voluntarily sharing private information, and the explosive growth of social network websites over the last decade suggests shifting views on privacy...

  5. DETERMINANTS OF COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN ORADEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAVEANU TOMINA GABRIELA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is part of the research of the PhD thesis made by the author, having the title: Community Participation in Oradea, registered at the University of Oradea - Faculty of Social and Human Sciences. The general objectives of the paper are the explanation of different types of citizens involvement in the life of their community, the investigation of the existing relationships between different forms of participation, the interpretation of the effects different forms of participation have on the studied communities and the identification of relevant mechanism for the stimulation social involvement. The citizens' political and civil participation, social responsibility, community spirit, civic activism together with other concepts from the civil society's rhetoric entered the agenda of public debates together with the intensifying efforts for adhering to the European Community, being the subject of numerous studies conducted in this field. The need for a strong civic society, with interested and involved citizens in the life of the community which they belong to, for social and economical development belong to the same discourse of the strong democratic society, being challenged in the literature, starting with Tocqueville, Almond and Verba, to Putnam and many others. In parallel to the civil society's rhetoric and the analysis coming from this direction, are the studies and theories of community development, which on one side are based on development policies, regulations, institutional framework of development, but contain also aspects of citizens' involvement in evaluating the community problems, the decision making processes and in the actual implementation of solutions. Moreover the aspects of network belonging and social trust which are reflected in the concept of social capital are sources both for participation as well for economic and social development. The present paper reflects the analysis of the determinant factors which

  6. Student Participation: A Democratic Education Perspective--Experience from the Health-Promoting Schools in Macedonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovska, V.

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health-promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health-Promoting Schools and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Network of Health-Promoting Schools. Student participation…

  7. Participating Technologies? Nonhuman Others and Socio-Material Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    This talk takes up the conversation analytical understanding of participation and combines it with the idea of technical agency developed in actor-network theory (Latour 2005). Rather than depicting nonhumans as objects of human actions, actor-network theory understands actions as socio-material...... the practice of walking can only be establish by the close interplay of a hybrid assemblage consisting of the material affordances of the technology, the bodily affordances of the user and the scaffolding by the accompanying helpers....

  8. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  9. Dynamic Stock Market Participation of Households with Heterogeneous Participation Costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorunzhina, Natalia

    education programs can affect consumers’ investment decisions. Using household data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, I estimate the magnitude of the participation cost, allowing for individual heterogeneity in it. The results show the average stock market participation cost is about 5% of labor......This paper develops and estimates a dynamic model of stock market participation, where consumers’ decisions regarding stock market participation are influenced by participation costs. The practical significance of the participation costs is considered as being a channel through which financial...... income; however, it varies substantially over consumers’ life. The model successfully predicts the level of the observed participation rate and the increasing pattern of stock market participation over the consumers’ life cycle....

  10. Network science

    CERN Document Server

    Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Networks are everywhere, from the Internet, to social networks, and the genetic networks that determine our biological existence. Illustrated throughout in full colour, this pioneering textbook, spanning a wide range of topics from physics to computer science, engineering, economics and the social sciences, introduces network science to an interdisciplinary audience. From the origins of the six degrees of separation to explaining why networks are robust to random failures, the author explores how viruses like Ebola and H1N1 spread, and why it is that our friends have more friends than we do. Using numerous real-world examples, this innovatively designed text includes clear delineation between undergraduate and graduate level material. The mathematical formulas and derivations are included within Advanced Topics sections, enabling use at a range of levels. Extensive online resources, including films and software for network analysis, make this a multifaceted companion for anyone with an interest in network sci...

  11. Vulnerability of network of networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Bashan, A.; Gao, J.; Stanley, H. E.

    2014-10-01

    Our dependence on networks - be they infrastructure, economic, social or others - leaves us prone to crises caused by the vulnerabilities of these networks. There is a great need to develop new methods to protect infrastructure networks and prevent cascade of failures (especially in cases of coupled networks). Terrorist attacks on transportation networks have traumatized modern societies. With a single blast, it has become possible to paralyze airline traffic, electric power supply, ground transportation or Internet communication. How, and at which cost can one restructure the network such that it will become more robust against malicious attacks? The gradual increase in attacks on the networks society depends on - Internet, mobile phone, transportation, air travel, banking, etc. - emphasize the need to develop new strategies to protect and defend these crucial networks of communication and infrastructure networks. One example is the threat of liquid explosives a few years ago, which completely shut down air travel for days, and has created extreme changes in regulations. Such threats and dangers warrant the need for new tools and strategies to defend critical infrastructure. In this paper we review recent advances in the theoretical understanding of the vulnerabilities of interdependent networks with and without spatial embedding, attack strategies and their affect on such networks of networks as well as recently developed strategies to optimize and repair failures caused by such attacks.

  12. Political participation of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhouten, Christine L; Malakar, Crystalmichelle L; Kubsch, Sylvia; Block, Derryl E; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Level of political participation and factors contributing to participation were measured among Midwest RNs (n = 468) via an online survey (Cronbach's α = .95). Respondents reported engaging in primarily "low cost" activities (e.g., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials), with fewer reporting speaking at public gatherings, participating in demonstrations, and membership in nursing organizations. Psychological engagement was most predictive (p political participation with the dimensions of political interest, political efficacy, and political information/knowledge highly significant (p political participation (p political participation. Findings showed that nurse educators and leaders of professional nursing organizations need to model and cultivate greater psychological engagement among students and nurses.

  13. "Hidden" Social Networks in Behavior Change Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Ruth F; McAneney, Helen; Davis, Michael; Mark A. Tully; Valente, Thomas W.; Kee, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether “hidden” (or unobserved) social networks were evident in a 2011 physical activity behavior change intervention in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Results showed evidence of unobserved social networks in the intervention and illustrated how the network evolved over short periods and affected behavior. Behavior change interventions should account for the interaction among participants (i.e., social networks) and how such interactions affect intervention outcome.

  14. "Hidden" social networks in behavior change interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ruth F; McAneney, Helen; Davis, Michael; Tully, Mark A; Valente, Thomas W; Kee, Frank

    2015-03-01

    We investigated whether "hidden" (or unobserved) social networks were evident in a 2011 physical activity behavior change intervention in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Results showed evidence of unobserved social networks in the intervention and illustrated how the network evolved over short periods and affected behavior. Behavior change interventions should account for the interaction among participants (i.e., social networks) and how such interactions affect intervention outcome.

  15. Community-centred Networks and Networking among Companies, Educational and Cultural Institutions and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2010-01-01

    This article presents visions for community-centred networks and networking among companies, educational and cultural institutions and research based on blended on- and off-line collaboration and communication. Our point of departure is the general vision of networking between government, industry...... and research as formulated in the Triple Helix Model (Etzkowitz 2008). The article draws on a case study of NoEL, a network on e-learning among business, educational and cultural institutions and research, all in all 21 partners from all around Denmark. Focus is how networks and networking change character......’ in Networked Learning, Wenger et al. 2009; The analysis concerns the participation structure and how the network activities connect local work practices and research, and how technology and online communication contribute to a change from participation in offline and physical network activities into online...

  16. Labor Education and Organizational Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Higdon C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Most of the leadership throughout the labor movement have been concerned about the lack of rank and file participation in labor unions. An evaluation of the relationship of labor education and union participation is explored. (WL)

  17. Theory of Performance Participation Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Kraus; Philippe Bertrand; Rudi Zagst

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce, analyze and compare two performance participation methods based on a portfolio consisting of two risky assets: Option-Based Performance Participation (OBPP) and Constant Proportion Performance Participation (CPPP). By generalizing the provided guarantee to a participation in the performance of a second risky underlying, the new strategies allow to cope with well-known problems associated with standard portfolio insurance methods, like e.g. the CPPI...

  18. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Krigslund, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    . The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, which may also incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the upcoming 5G networks. This article not only proposes the fundamentals......Software defined networking has garnered large attention due to its potential to virtualize services in the Internet, introducing flexibility in the buffering, scheduling, processing, and routing of data in network routers. SDN breaks the deadlock that has kept Internet network protocols stagnant...... for decades, while applications and physical links have evolved. This article advocates for the use of SDN to bring about 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The latter constitutes a major leap forward compared to the state-of-the- art store and forward Internet paradigm...

  19. Network Coded Software Defined Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Coding (NC) are two key concepts in networking that have garnered a large attention in recent years. On the one hand, SDN's potential to virtualize services in the Internet allows a large flexibility not only for routing data, but also to manage....... This paper advocates for the use of SDN to bring about future Internet and 5G network services by incorporating network coding (NC) functionalities. The inherent flexibility of both SDN and NC provides a fertile ground to envision more efficient, robust, and secure networking designs, that may also...... incorporate content caching and storage, all of which are key challenges of the future Internet and the upcoming 5G networks. This paper proposes some of the keys behind this intersection and supports it with use cases as well as a an implementation that integrated the Kodo library (NC) into OpenFlow (SDN...

  20. Women's Participation in Livestock Markets

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Women's participation in marketing of live animals. (cattle, sheep and goats) tends to be much lower than their participation in the milk market. Generally, they have far more rights over livestock products. Women's Participation in Livestock Markets. Elizabeth Waithanji, Jemimah Njuki and Nabintu Bagalwa. With training and ...

  1. NETWORK, HOW? Perceptions of business people on networking practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia De Klerk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to contribute to literature on networking from a South African perspective. Literature on networking is mainly concentrated on the European and American contexts with homogeneous groups and traditional divisions. The business landscape of South Africa thus requires more investigation. Problem investigated: Literature regarding networking in an South African context with its dynamic business environment is limited. This article addresses the concerns of how South African business owners and managers perceive networking in their businesses and specifically focus on the South African perspective. Therefore, the focus is on the perceptions of business owners and managers on current networking practices in South Africa. Methodology: A qualitative research design to uncover the rich underlying feelings of business owners and managers was used. The qualitative enquiry consisted of five focus group discussions (n=41 participants among prominent business owners and managers in the Gauteng Province, South Africa. The Gauteng Province was selected since it is the economic and innovation hub of South Africa. Findings and implications: The main findings showed the following main themes of networking that emerged from the data, and included (1 networking as a skill versus a natural ability; (2 the motivation behind networking; (3 the loci of networking; (4 the type of relationships that determine the character of the network; and (5 the relationship characteristics of successful networking. The main contribution of this is that there seems to be different networking situations and applications for different circumstances. According to the participants, it seems that networking in the South African landscape appears to be either relationship or business based. Originality and value of the research: The value of these findings lies in the fact that they contribute to networking literature from a South African perspective

  2. Telecommunication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Balachandran, Kartheepan; Hald, Sara Ligaard

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we look into the role of telecommunication networks and their capability of supporting critical infrastructure systems and applications. The focus is on smart grids as the key driving example, bearing in mind that other such systems do exist, e.g., water management, traffic control......, etc. First, the role of basic communication is examined with a focus on critical infrastructures. We look at heterogenic networks and standards for smart grids, to give some insight into what has been done to ensure inter-operability in this direction. We then go to the physical network, and look...... at the deployment of the physical layout of the communication network and the related costs. This is an important aspect as one option to use existing networks is to deploy dedicated networks. Following this, we look at some generic models that describe reliability for accessing dynamic information. This part...

  3. Networked Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Larsen, Malene Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    In this article we take up a critique of the concept of Communities of Practice (CoP) voiced by several authors, who suggest that networks may provide a better metaphor to understand social forms of organisation and learning. Through a discussion of the notion of networked learning and the critique...... of CoPs we shall argue that the metaphor or theory of networked learning is itself confronted with some central tensions and challenges that need to be addressed. We then explore these theoretical and analytic challenges to the network metaphor, through an analysis of a Danish social networking site. We...... argue that understanding meaning-making and ‘networked identities’ may be relevant analytic entry points in navigating the challenges....

  4. Differences in neural crest sensitivity to ethanol account for the infrequency of anterior segment defects in the eye compared with craniofacial anomalies in a zebrafish model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Jessica; Williams, Antionette L; Chawla, Bahaar; Apsey, Christian; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2017-09-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) exposure during pregnancy is associated with craniofacial and neurologic abnormalities, but infrequently disrupts the anterior segment of the eye. In these studies, we used zebrafish to investigate differences in the teratogenic effect of ETOH on craniofacial, periocular, and ocular neural crest. Zebrafish eye and neural crest development was analyzed by means of live imaging, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay, immunostaining, detection of reactive oxygen species, and in situ hybridization. Our studies demonstrated that foxd3-positive neural crest cells in the periocular mesenchyme and developing eye were less sensitive to ETOH than sox10-positive craniofacial neural crest cells that form the pharyngeal arches and jaw. ETOH increased apoptosis in the retina, but did not affect survival of periocular and ocular neural crest cells. ETOH also did not increase reactive oxygen species within the eye. In contrast, ETOH increased ventral neural crest apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production in the facial mesenchyme. In the eye and craniofacial region, sod2 showed high levels of expression in the anterior segment and in the setting of Sod2 knockdown, low levels of ETOH decreased migration of foxd3-positive neural crest cells into the developing eye. However, ETOH had minimal effect on the periocular and ocular expression of transcription factors (pitx2 and foxc1) that regulate anterior segment development. Neural crest cells contributing to the anterior segment of the eye exhibit increased ability to withstand ETOH-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. These studies explain the rarity of anterior segment dysgenesis despite the frequent craniofacial abnormalities in fetal alcohol syndrome. Birth Defects Research 109:1212-1227, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Evolution of the Personal Networks of Novice Librarian Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Marie R.; Kennedy, David P.; Brancolini, Kristine R.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes for the first time the composition and structure of the personal networks of novice librarian researchers. We used social network analysis to observe if participating in the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) affected the development of the librarians' personal networks and how the networks changed over…

  6. Investigating physics learning with layered student interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Traxler, Adrienne

    Centrality in student interaction networks (SINs) can be linked to variables like grades [1], persistence [2], and participation [3]. Recent efforts in the field of network science have been done to investigate layered - or multiplex - networks as mathematical objects [4]. These networks can...

  7. 42 CFR 485.603 - Rural health network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rural health network. 485.603 Section 485.603... Participation: Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) § 485.603 Rural health network. A rural health network is an... quality assurance with at least— (1) One hospital that is a member of the network when applicable; (2) One...

  8. Wireless Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Samaka, Mohammed; Khan, Khaled M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Wireless communication is the fastest-growing field in the telecommunication industry. Wireless networks have grown significantly as an important segment of the communications industry. They have become popular networks with the potential to provide high-speed, high-quality information exchange between two or more portable devices without any wire or conductors. Wireless networks can simply be characterized as the technology that provides seamless access to information, anywhere, anyplace, an...

  9. Enterpreneurial network

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Antonela; Nguyen, Lien; Kupsyte, Valdone

    2014-01-01

    Network has become more and more indispensable in the entrepreneurial world. Especially in startup businesses, network is crucial for new entrepreneurs. This project looks at how entrepreneurs in different sectors use network to become successful. We chose to work with three entrepreneurs from three companies that have been operational for a few years and conducted face to face interviews with them. Through the data from the interviews, we analyzed firstly what type of entrepreneurs they are,...

  10. Network security

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, André

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the security mechanisms deployed in Ethernet, Wireless-Fidelity (Wi-Fi), Internet Protocol (IP) and MultiProtocol Label Switching (MPLS) networks. These mechanisms are grouped throughout the book according to the following four functions: data protection, access control, network isolation, and data monitoring. Data protection is supplied by data confidentiality and integrity control services. Access control is provided by a third-party authentication service. Network isolation is supplied by the Virtual Private Network (VPN) service. Data monitoring consists of applying

  11. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  12. Multifunctional Mesoscale Observing Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabberdt, Walter F.; Schlatter, Thomas W.; Carr, Frederick H.; Friday, Elbert W. Joe; Jorgensen, David; Koch, Steven; Pirone, Maria; Ralph, F. Martin; Sun, Juanzhen; Welsh, Patrick; Wilson, James W.; Zou, Xiaolei

    2005-07-01

    More than 120 scientists, engineers, administrators, and users met on 8 10 December 2003 in a workshop format to discuss the needs for enhanced three-dimensional mesoscale observing networks. Improved networks are seen as being critical to advancing numerical and empirical modeling for a variety of mesoscale applications, including severe weather warnings and forecasts, hydrology, air-quality forecasting, chemical emergency response, transportation safety, energy management, and others. The participants shared a clear and common vision for the observing requirements: existing two-dimensional mesoscale measurement networks do not provide observations of the type, frequency, and density that are required to optimize mesoscale prediction and nowcasts. To be viable, mesoscale observing networks must serve multiple applications, and the public, private, and academic sectors must all actively participate in their design and implementation, as well as in the creation and delivery of value-added products. The mesoscale measurement challenge can best be met by an integrated approach that considers all elements of an end-to-end solution—identifying end users and their needs, designing an optimal mix of observations, defining the balance between static and dynamic (targeted or adaptive) sampling strategies, establishing long-term test beds, and developing effective implementation strategies. Detailed recommendations are provided pertaining to nowcasting, numerical prediction and data assimilation, test beds, and implementation strategies.

  13. Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Program Network, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CALM network includes 168 active sites in both hemispheres with 15 participating countries. This network represents the only coordinated and standardized program...

  14. ESnet and Internet2 to launch next gen research network

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Internet2 will deploy a high capacity nationwide network that will greatly enhance the capabilities of researchers across the country who participate in the DOE's scientific research efforts." (1 page)

  15. Network value and optimum analysis on the mode of networked marketing in TV media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dongpo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the development of the networked marketing in TV media, it is important to do the research on network value and optimum analysis in this field.Design/methodology/approach: According to the research on the mode of networked marketing in TV media and Correlation theory, the essence of media marketing is creating, spreading and transferring values. The Participants of marketing value activities are in network, and value activities proceed in networked form. Network capability is important to TV media marketing activities.Findings: This article raises the direction of research of analysis and optimization about network based on the mode of networked marketing in TV media by studying TV media marketing Development Mechanism , network analysis and network value structure.

  16. Online social networking by patients with diabetes: a qualitative evaluation of communication with Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeremy A; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Kilabuk, Elaine; Shrank, William H

    2011-03-01

    Several disease-specific information exchanges now exist on Facebook and other online social networking sites. These new sources of knowledge, support, and engagement have become important for patients living with chronic disease, yet the quality and content of the information provided in these digital arenas are poorly understood. To qualitatively evaluate the content of communication in Facebook communities dedicated to diabetes. We identified the 15 largest Facebook groups focused on diabetes management. For each group, we downloaded the 15 most recent "wall posts" and the 15 most recent discussion topics from the 10 largest groups. Four hundred eighty unique users were identified in a series of 690 comments from wall posts and discussion topics. Posts were abstracted and aggregated into a database. Two investigators evaluated the posts, developed a thematic coding scheme, and applied codes to the data. Patients with diabetes, family members, and their friends use Facebook to share personal clinical information, to request disease-specific guidance and feedback, and to receive emotional support. Approximately two-thirds of posts included unsolicited sharing of diabetes management strategies, over 13% of posts provided specific feedback to information requested by other users, and almost 29% of posts featured an effort by the poster to provide emotional support to others as members of a community. Approximately 27% of posts featured some type of promotional activity, generally presented as testimonials advertising non-FDA approved, "natural" products. Clinically inaccurate recommendations were infrequent, but were usually associated with promotion of a specific product or service. Thirteen percent of posts contained requests for personal information from Facebook participants. Facebook provides a forum for reporting personal experiences, asking questions, and receiving direct feedback for people living with diabetes. However, promotional activity and personal

  17. Overlay networks toward information networking

    CERN Document Server

    Tarkoma, Sasu

    2010-01-01

    With their ability to solve problems in massive information distribution and processing, while keeping scaling costs low, overlay systems represent a rapidly growing area of R&D with important implications for the evolution of Internet architecture. Inspired by the author's articles on content based routing, Overlay Networks: Toward Information Networking provides a complete introduction to overlay networks. Examining what they are and what kind of structures they require, the text covers the key structures, protocols, and algorithms used in overlay networks. It reviews the current state of th

  18. Participation process and outcome interactions: Exploring participation in water resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, G.; Loucks, D. P.; Blöschl, G.

    2012-04-01

    Evaluating participation programmes, projects and activities aids understanding of effective mechanisms and enables the identification of improvements to current strategies. Characteristics of participation processes, such whether the process is cost effective, adequately facilitated, accessible, includes a representative section of society or interest groups and allocates power equivalently between participants, are commonly described and evaluated in the literature. A key question concerns whether effective processes lead to desirable outcomes. Two types of outcomes can be identified from participation programmes - tangible and non-tangible. Tangible outcomes include resource management changes or resource quality changes. Non tangible outcomes include developing and strengthening communication and action networks, building trust between individuals and/or organisations, developing innovative solutions, or developing shared knowledge and understandings of issues. To better understand how participation impacts upon resource management it is necessary to identify i) how non-tangible outcomes lead to resource management outcomes and ii) which characteristics of the participation process are connected to achieving non-tangible outcomes. This has been attempted with a literature based meta-analysis. Literature has been analysed to identify outcomes from participations programmes, and the process characteristics present that are associated with promoting or inhibiting their achievement. Preliminary analysis shows that process characteristics such as representation, facilitation and accessibility are important for achieving non-tangible outcomes. The relationship between non-tangible outcomes and resource management outcomes is less clear in the literature. This may be due to the different timescales over which the different types of outcomes emerge (resource management outcomes emerge over longer time periods) and the different contexts or settings in which

  19. Heterodox networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lala, Purnima; Kumar, Ambuj

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative for the service providers to bring innovation in the network design to meet the exponential growth of mobile subscribers for multi-technology future wireless networks. As a matter of research, studies on providing services to moving subscriber groups aka ‘Place Time Capacity (PTC...

  20. Sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjea, Supriyo; Thurston, J.; Kininmonth, S.; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the details of a sensor network that is currently being deployed at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The sensor network allows scientists to retrieve sensor data that has a high spatial and temporal resolution. We give an overview of the energy-efficient data aggregation

  1. Network Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Dunng the last ten years, many computer networks have been designed, implemented, and put into service in the United States, Canada, Europe, Japan, and elsewhere. From the experience obtamed with these networks, certain key design principles have begun to emerge, principles that can be used to

  2. Probabilistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Finn Verner; Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the basic ideas and algorithms behind specification and inference in probabilistic networks based on directed acyclic graphs, undirected graphs, and chain graphs.......This article describes the basic ideas and algorithms behind specification and inference in probabilistic networks based on directed acyclic graphs, undirected graphs, and chain graphs....

  3. Organizational Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning; Grande, Bård

    1996-01-01

    The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept are identified and critically discussed.......The paper focuses on the concept of organizational networks. Four different uses of the concept are identified and critically discussed....

  4. Affective Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jodi Dean

    2010-01-01

    This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  5. Proceedings from the Nordcode Seminar. Participation and Dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Merete Nielsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This issue of FORMakademisk is the result of a cooperative effort involving the Nordcode research network, the Department of Product Design at Akershus University College and the FORMakademisk. It builds on the Participation and Dialogue seminar, held in May 2010, which was supported by Nordforsk, The Norwegian Research Council and Kjeller Science Park.

  6. African Youth on the Information Highway: Participation and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Book cover African Youth of the Information Highway:Participation and Leadership in Community Development. Editor(s):. Osita Ogbu ... The 2017 World Conference of Science Journalists was an opportunity for the awardees to develop their skills and network with some of the most influential science journalists in the world.

  7. Public Access ICT across Cultures : Diversifying Participation in the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Public Access ICT across Cultures : Diversifying Participation in the Network Society. Couverture du livre Public Access ICT across Cultures. Directeur(s) : Francisco J. Proenza. Maison(s) d'édition : MIT Press, CRDI. 1 juin 2015. ISBN : 9780262527378. 472 pages. e-ISBN : 9781552505694. Téléchargez le PDF.

  8. Civil Society Participation in EU Gender Policy-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    2008-01-01

    The participation of transnational advocacy networks (TANs) in the policy processes of the European Union (EU) is a potential site of substantial representation of women (SRW). In the article, it is argued that the institutional context can both enable and constrain civil society actors’ claims...

  9. Supporting Effective African Civil Society Participation in the African ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    (Wikipedia) This grant will allow Partnership Africa Canada (PAC) to deliver an 18-month program of support aimed at enabling African civil society to understand and participate in the APRM process. This will be achieved by organizing training workshops; encouraging networking at the national, subregional and regional ...

  10. Towards tailor-made participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    2012-01-01

    Public participation has become an important element of governance in many Western European countries. However, among scholars and practitioners there is a recognition that participatory governance processes tend to produce systematic exclusions. Knowledge about 'who' participates and 'how......' they participate can enhance our understanding of participatory processes. This paper presents some characterisations of citizens based on a review of the literature on participation. In addition, examples of how to tailor participation for different type of citizens are provided based on studies of urban...... regeneration programmes and local environmental initiatives in Denmark. The paper concludes that in order to broaden the inclusion of affected citizens, public authorities need to be tailor participation processes by applying distinct approaches to different types of citizens...

  11. Researching participation in adult education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Sissel

    It is a widespread perception that the challenge of increasing participation in adult education and training has intensified due to the transformation from industrial to knowledge based societies and the transformation implies that it becomes pivotal to increase the supply of highly qualified...... to and participation in adult education and training focusing primarily on unskilled and low skilled workers. I present how the traditions contribute to the perception of what effects participation and argue that the existing traditions must be extended and a new framework must be applied in order to understand how...... labour. This has fostered an interest in examining why and how people engage in adult education, how participation and especially non-participation in adult education can be explained and how participation rates can be increased. In this paper I outline different traditions within research on recruitment...

  12. Employee Participation in Europe: In search of the participative workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poutsma, E.; Hendrickx, J.; Huygen, F.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents an overview of participation schemes in European companies, It is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 1996 EPOC mail survey among managers of profit sector establishments in 10 EU countries. The article describes the diverse extent and nature of participative

  13. Network chemistry, network toxicology, network informatics, and network behavioristics: A scientific outline

    OpenAIRE

    WenJun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In present study, I proposed some new sciences: network chemistry, network toxicology, network informatics, and network behavioristics. The aims, scope and scientific foundation of these sciences are outlined.

  14. Family Ties and Political Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Alesina, Alberto Francesco; Giuliano, Paola

    2011-01-01

    We establish an inverse relationship between family ties and political participation, such that the more individuals rely on the family as a provider of services, insurance, transfer of resources, the lower is one's civic engagement and political participation. We also show that strong family ties appear to be a substitute for generalized trust, rather than a complement to it. These three constructs-civic engagement, political participation, and trust- are part of what is known as social capi...

  15. Leisure Sport Participation in Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Nicos Kartakoullis; Evan Webb; George Karlis; Stavros Pouloukas; Christina Loizou

    2015-01-01

    This study contributes to the limited existing research on the participation patterns of Cypriots in leisure and sports. Leisure and sport are viewed collectively while adapting the notion put forth by The Council of Europe (2007) defining leisure sports as sports activities aimed at the preservation and improvement of physical condition, health and fun. The purpose of this paper is to examine the leisure sport participation patterns of Cypriots, specifically: (1) participation patterns in le...

  16. Citizen participation in public accountability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Bodil; Lewis, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we offer an analytical framework sensitive to the quality of citizen participation, which is measured in terms of transferred power from the governors to the citizens, and in terms of the degree to which citizens have access to accountability measures. We do this by combining...... Arnstein’s (1969) classic ladder of participation with a focus on citizen participation in regard to bureaucratic accountability, centered on efficiency and learning (cf. Bovens et al. 2008)....

  17. Theory of Performance Participation Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, J.; Bertrand, P.; Zagst, R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce, analyze and compare two performance participation methods based on a portfolio consisting of two risky assets: Option-Based Performance Participation (OBPP) and Constant Proportion Performance Participation (CPPP). In contrast to standard portfolio insurance strategies, like OBPI and CPPI, the minimum guaranteed portfolio value at the end of the investment horizon is not deterministic anymore, but subject to systematic risk instead. More precisely,...

  18. Application and Implementation of Network Coding for Cooperative Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Videbæk

    2012-01-01

    . 1) I have suggested the use of network coding as a key-enabler for technology- enabled cooperation. I refer to technology-enabled cooperation when we are able to provide all participating entities in the network a better performance by enabling user cooperation. In order to achieve this goal I apply...... ways that cooperative models may be implemented to cover a wide range of applications. This addresses the development of user cooperative protocols and how we in Device To Device (D2D) communication may reward users that contribute more to the network than they gain. In this area I suggest the use...

  19. Local Groups Online: Political Learning and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Andrea; Zin, Thanthan; Schmitz, Joseph; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kim, B. Joon; Carroll, John M.

    Voluntary associations serve crucial roles in local communities and within our larger democratic society. They aggregate shared interests, collective will, and cultivate civic competencies that nurture democratic participation. People active in multiple local groups frequently act as opinion leaders and create “weak” social ties across groups. In Blacksburg and surrounding Montgomery County, Virginia, the Blacksburg Electronic Village (BEV) community computer network has helped to foster nearly universal Internet penetration. Set in this dense Internet context, the present study investigated whether and how personal affiliation with local groups enhanced political participation in this high information and communication technology environment. This paper presents findings from longitudinal survey data which indicate that as individuals’ uses of information technology within local formal groups increase over time, so do their levels and types of involvement in the group. Furthermore, these increases most often appear among people who serve as opinion leaders and maintain weak social ties in their communities. Individuals’ changes in community participation, interests and activities, and Internet use suggest ways in which group members act upon political motivations and interests across various group types.

  20. Networking: the view from HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. National and global-scale collaborations that characterize HEP would not be feasible without ubiquitous capable networks. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. This paper will briefly discuss the history of networking in HEP, the current activities and challenges we are facing, and try to provide some understanding of where networking may be going in the next 5 to 10 years.

  1. Efficiency of participation in planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Farouk Hassan

    2011-06-01

    A comparison between the two processes will take place in order to indentify the participation activities and their real efficiency. The comparison will be focused on the parameter of participation realized in each case in order to find gaps that have negative effects and needs to be filled.

  2. community participation in health delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Riflcin (1988) summarized the definition of participation to characterize activeness, choice, and the possibility of the choice being ... in a defined geographic area actively pursue identification of their needs, take deci- sions and establish mechanism to meet these nee .... process (needy, 2001). Four community participation ...

  3. Citizen Participation: A Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lede, Naomi W.; Dixon, Hortense W.

    Citizen participation in Model Cities programs in ten southwestern cities is analyzed to determine the impact of federal assistance on housing in urban areas. The first section of the study provides a functional analysis of citizen participation in Model Cities, with special emphasis on performance criteria of resident involvement. Section two…

  4. Participant observation in risk problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, H.; Kluin, M.H.A.; Van Gulijk, C.; Ale, B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Participant observation is a method to collect information through active participation in the social world that is under study, in this case two different risk-related working areas where confidentiality and secrecy are paramount. In reality there is a difference between what people do and say they

  5. Canadian plans for participation in GSETT 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. North

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC is making preparations for Canadian participation in GSETT 3 but will be unable to make a formal commitment until the necessary resources have been secured. As Canada is expected to provide at least four alpha stations, and a significant number of beta stations, the financial resources that will be needed are substantial, even though in many respccts the GSC is, with the recent modernization of the Yellowknife array and the ongoing installation of the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN, well positioned to make a significant contribution to GSETT 3. The CNSN currently (October 1993 consists of 17 broad band stations and will grow to 23 and 33 such stations by December 1993 and December 1994 respectively. Some 40 50 short period stations will complete the network. Data from all sites are continuously telemetered in real time to network acquisition centres in Ottawa and Sidney, British Columbia, archived to optical disk, and kept on line in a 72 h ring buffer. Most of the broadband sites could serve as either alpha or beta stations once the necessary software for continuous data transfer, or on request provision, of data from the selected sites has been completed. This software wili be configured so that changes in station selection are easy to implement, and this will provide considerable flexibility to the GSETT 3 planning and operations working groups in selecting the optimum network. Backup stations can be designated in the case of station failures, and the network centre in British Columbia will serve, at least for beta stations, as a backup NDC to that in Ottawa. Data from. the Yellowknife array are collected in Yellowknife and forwarded in ten minute files to Ottawa, where processing is completed and the results archived. This arrangement would not meet the deadlines for receipt of alpha station data at the IDC and new hardware and software will be needed to forward the data more immediately from

  6. Youth Motivations for Program Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer K. McGuire

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Through their participation in youth programs, young people have access to opportunities to learn and build important skills. A total of 214 youth between the ages of 10-19 (mean 15.5 years completed an online survey about characteristics of youth programs they participated in, didn’t participate in, and had participated in but quit. We found that youth participated in activities that provided a benefit to meet personal goals or develop skills. However, our findings suggest that youth may leave activities, or never join them, based on different sets of motivations than the reasons they stay in activities. There was variability across demographic groups: Males reported more problems with past activities, sexual minority youth were more likely to endorse social problems with past and never joined activities, and ethnic minorities reported less support for personal goals and connection to adults in current activities and more logistic barriers for activities never joined.

  7. Nurses' Journey Toward Genuine Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Simonsen, Jesper; Karasti, Teija Helena

    2016-01-01

    This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on participation in Participatory Design (PD) by drawing on the notion of genuine participation [8]. It clarifies nurses' empirical journey as one of becoming and learning [1, 6], where they move from being reluctant participants, attending only because...... management has instructed them to do so, to taking an interest and finding their voices in the design process. In this way, they are ultimately able to engage in genuine and willing participation. The main discussion points in the paper are the transitions in the nurses' journey toward embracing qualities...... of genuine participation, the nurse-researcher's reflections on her facilitation of the process, and collective learning as an integral part of the process....

  8. Neighbourhood Renewal, Participation and Social Capital in Deprived Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the use of the concept of social capital in neighbourhood renewal programmes which aim to influence social and health-related processes. Based on a social network analysis of 17 groups comprising 133 members, qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 participants to consi......This paper addresses the use of the concept of social capital in neighbourhood renewal programmes which aim to influence social and health-related processes. Based on a social network analysis of 17 groups comprising 133 members, qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 participants...... to consider the kinds of patterns and connections that build up in a neighbourhood renewal project in a small, deprived neighbourhood of a provincial town in Denmark. Results show that outcomes of community participation depend on the kind of social capital generated and on who is excluded from...

  9. Social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Etaner-Uyar, A Sima

    2014-01-01

    The present volume provides a comprehensive resource for practitioners and researchers alike-both those new to the field as well as those who already have some experience. The work covers Social Network Analysis theory and methods with a focus on current applications and case studies applied in various domains such as mobile networks, security, machine learning and health. With the increasing popularity of Web 2.0, social media has become a widely used communication platform. Parallel to this development, Social Network Analysis gained in importance as a research field, while opening up many

  10. Network Warrior

    CERN Document Server

    Donahue, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Pick up where certification exams leave off. With this practical, in-depth guide to the entire network infrastructure, you'll learn how to deal with real Cisco networks, rather than the hypothetical situations presented on exams like the CCNA. Network Warrior takes you step by step through the world of routers, switches, firewalls, and other technologies based on the author's extensive field experience. You'll find new content for MPLS, IPv6, VoIP, and wireless in this completely revised second edition, along with examples of Cisco Nexus 5000 and 7000 switches throughout. Topics include: An

  11. A Theoretical Model for the Associative Nature of Conference Participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Smiljanić

    Full Text Available Participation in conferences is an important part of every scientific career. Conferences provide an opportunity for a fast dissemination of latest results, discussion and exchange of ideas, and broadening of scientists' collaboration network. The decision to participate in a conference depends on several factors like the location, cost, popularity of keynote speakers, and the scientist's association with the community. Here we discuss and formulate the problem of discovering how a scientist's previous participation affects her/his future participations in the same conference series. We develop a stochastic model to examine scientists' participation patterns in conferences and compare our model with data from six conferences across various scientific fields and communities. Our model shows that the probability for a scientist to participate in a given conference series strongly depends on the balance between the number of participations and non-participations during his/her early connections with the community. An active participation in a conference series strengthens the scientist's association with that particular conference community and thus increases the probability of future participations.

  12. Does participation in health information exchange improve hospital efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daniel M

    2017-02-24

    The federal government allocated nearly $30 billion to spur the development of information technology infrastructure capable of supporting the exchange of interoperable clinical data, leading to growth in hospital participation in health information exchange (HIE) networks. HIEs have the potential to improve care coordination across healthcare providers, leading ultimately to increased productivity of health services for hospitals. However, the impact of HIE participation on hospital efficiency remains unclear. This dynamic prompts the question asked by this study: does HIE participation improve hospital efficiency. This study estimates the effect of HIE participation on efficiency using a national sample of 1017 hospitals from 2009 to 2012. Using a two-stage analytic design, efficiency indices were determined using the Malmquist algorithm and then regressed on a set of hospital characteristics. Results suggest that any participation in HIE can improve both technical efficiency change and total factor productivity (TFP). A second model examining total years of HIE participation shows a benefit of one and three years of participation on TFP. These results suggest that hospital investment in HIE participation may be a useful strategy to improve hospital operational performance, and that policy should continue to support increased participation and use of HIE. More research is needed to identify the exact mechanisms through which HIE participation can improve hospital efficiency.

  13. Exploring mHealth Participation for Emergency Response Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Schwartz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the challenges of participation by members of emergency response communities who share a similar condition and treatment, and are called upon to participate in emergency events experienced by fellow members. Smartphones and location-based social networking technologies present an opportunity to re-engineer certain aspects of emergency medical response. Life-saving prescription medication extended in an emergency by one individual to another occurs on a micro level, anecdotally documented. We illustrate the issues and our approach through the example of an app to support patients prone to anaphylaxis and prescribed to carry epinephrine auto-injectors. We address unique participation challenges in an mHealth environment in which interventions are primarily short-term interactions which require clear and precise decision-making and constant tracking of potential participants in responding to an emergency medical event. The conflicting effects of diffused responsibility and shared identity are identified as key factors in modeling participation.

  14. [Participation, knowledge production, and evaluative research: participation by different actors in a mental health study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Juarez Pereira; Campos, Rosana Onocko

    2008-11-01

    This article reflects on the interrelations between participation, knowledge production, and public policy evaluation in light of issues from our own experience with evaluative research on a municipal network of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS) in Brazil. The article discusses the coordination of the complex process and the potentials and limits of partnerships for conducting qualitative evaluative studies in mental health with participation by different social actors. The authors conclude that qualitative evaluative research aligned with the perspective of including different points of view representing various segments is the best approach for understanding the numerous spin-offs from the implementation of services linked to the Brazilian psychiatric reform movement, given the inherent specificities of the mental health field.

  15. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  16. Managing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Heidi; Vintergaard, Christian

    Logically it seems that companies pursuing different business strategies wouldalso manage their relationships with other firms accordingly. Nevertheless, due tothe lack of research in the field of network strategies, this link still remainsinadequately examined. Based on the well-known framework...... isprovided, that the relation between a company's strategy, structure and processesin fact have a considerable influence on its pattern of network behaviour. Threecase studies from the Danish biotech industry exemplify and illustrate how acompany's strategy is directly correlated with how it manages its...... of organisationalbehaviour developed by Miles and Snow (1978), this paper argues that thepatterns of network behaviour practiced by firms greatly depend on the businesstypology of the company. That is, a company's business typology will to a certaindegree dictate the network identity of the company. In this paper evidence...

  17. Heterodox networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lala, Purnima; Kumar, Ambuj

    2016-01-01

    architecture of ‘Hovering Ad-hoc Network (HANET)’ for the latter will be deployed to assist and manage the overloaded primary base stations enhancing the on-demand coverage and capacity of the entire system. Proposed modes can either operate independently or as a cascaded architecture to form a Heterodox......It is imperative for the service providers to bring innovation in the network design to meet the exponential growth of mobile subscribers for multi-technology future wireless networks. As a matter of research, studies on providing services to moving subscriber groups aka ‘Place Time Capacity (PTC......)’ have not been considered much in the literature. In this article we present Heterodox networks as an innovative and alternate approach to handle the PTC congestion. We describe two different approaches to combat the PTC congestion where the traditional terrestrial infrastructure fails to provide...

  18. Exchange Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EIEN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  19. Sentinel Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Sentinel Network is an integrated, electronic, national medical product safety initiative that compiles information about the safe and effective use of medical products accessible to patients and healthcare practitioners.

  20. computer networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we construct a new dynamic model for the Token Bucket (TB algorithm used in computer networks and use systems approach for its analysis. This model is then augmented by adding a dynamic model for a multiplexor at an access node where the TB exercises a policing function. In the model, traffic policing, multiplexing and network utilization are formally defined. Based on the model, we study such issues as (quality of service QoS, traffic sizing and network dimensioning. Also we propose an algorithm using feedback control to improve QoS and network utilization. Applying MPEG video traces as the input traffic to the model, we verify the usefulness and effectiveness of our model.

  1. Affective Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Dean

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  2. Friendship Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jan K. Brueckner

    2004-01-01

    Building upon a long tradition in sociology, economists have recently turned their attention to the analysis of social networks. The present paper adds to this emerging literature by proposing a different approach to social-network formation. As in the model of Jackson and Wolinsky (1996), formation of a link between two individuals requires two-sided investments in the present framework. But in contrast to their approach, where the required investments are exogenously specified and link form...

  3. Developer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-08-21

    NREL's Developer Network, developer.nrel.gov, provides data that users can access to provide data to their own analyses, mobile and web applications. Developers can retrieve the data through a Web services API (application programming interface). The Developer Network handles overhead of serving up web services such as key management, authentication, analytics, reporting, documentation standards, and throttling in a common architecture, while allowing web services and APIs to be maintained and managed independently.

  4. Conventional and unconventional political participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opp, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    A non-recursive model is proposed and empirically tested with data of opponents of nuclear power. In explaining conventional and unconventional participation the theory of collective action is applied and modified in two respects: the perceived influence on the elimination of collective evils are taken into account; the selective incentives considered are non-material ones. These modifications proved to be valid: the collective good variables and non-material incentives were important determinants for the two forms of participation. Another result was that there is a reciprocal causal relationship between conventional and unconventional participation.

  5. Network Power Fault Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Siviero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Network power fault detection. At least one first network device is instructed to temporarily disconnect from a power supply path of a network, and at least one characteristic of the power supply path of the network is measured at a second network device connected to the network while the at least one first network device is temporarily disconnected from the network

  6. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  7. Sentient networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapline, G.

    1998-03-01

    The engineering problems of constructing autonomous networks of sensors and data processors that can provide alerts for dangerous situations provide a new context for debating the question whether man-made systems can emulate the cognitive capabilities of the mammalian brain. In this paper we consider the question whether a distributed network of sensors and data processors can form ``perceptions`` based on sensory data. Because sensory data can have exponentially many explanations, the use of a central data processor to analyze the outputs from a large ensemble of sensors will in general introduce unacceptable latencies for responding to dangerous situations. A better idea is to use a distributed ``Helmholtz machine`` architecture in which the sensors are connected to a network of simple processors, and the collective state of the network as a whole provides an explanation for the sensory data. In general communication within such a network will require time division multiplexing, which opens the door to the possibility that with certain refinements to the Helmholtz machine architecture it may be possible to build sensor networks that exhibit a form of artificial consciousness.

  8. The SIM Time Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Michael A; Novick, Andrew N; Lopez R, J Mauricio; Jimenez, Francisco; de Carlos Lopez, Eduardo; Boulanger, Jean-Simon; Pelletier, Raymond; de Carvalho, Ricardo J; Solis, Raul; Sanchez, Harold; Quevedo, Carlos Andres; Pascoe, Gregory; Perez, Daniel; Bances, Eduardo; Trigo, Leonardo; Masi, Victor; Postigo, Henry; Questelles, Anthony; Gittens, Anselm

    2011-01-01

    The Sistema Interamericano de Metrologia (SIM) is a regional metrology organization (RMO) whose members are the national metrology institutes (NMIs) located in the 34 nations of the Organization of American States (OAS). The SIM/OAS region extends throughout North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean Islands. About half of the SIM NMIs maintain national standards of time and frequency and must participate in international comparisons in order to establish metrological traceability to the International System (SI) of units. The SIM time network (SIMTN) was developed as a practical, cost effective, and technically sound way to automate these comparisons. The SIMTN continuously compares the time standards of SIM NMIs and produces measurement results in near real-time by utilizing the Internet and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Fifteen SIM NMIs have joined the network as of December 2010. This paper provides a brief overview of SIM and a technical description of the SIMTN. It presents international comparison results and examines the measurement uncertainties. It also discusses the metrological benefits that the network provides to its participants.

  9. Enablers and constrainers to participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard; Milana, Marcella

    2007-01-01

    as to construct a tool for analyzing the targeting of adult learning policy, with regard to both its coverage and expected consequences. Our aim is to develop a means for a more in-depth analysis of the match-mismatch of public policy and persisting constraints to participation.......This paper briefly reviews some of evidence on participation patterns in Nordic countries and some of the defining parameters that may explain the observations. This is done in a comparative perspective by contrasting results from the 2003 Eurobarometer data between Nordic countries and a handful...... of non-Nordic countries. An emphasis is placed on the constraining and enabling elements to participation and how these may explain why certain groups participate more or less than others. A central question of interest to this paper is to what extent does (can) government intervention interact...

  10. The Transformation of Employee Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Ole Gunni; Knudsen, Herman; Lind, Jens

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on the relationship between employee participation, influence and the work environment. The main part of the literature points to a positive connection in line with how it has been almost institutionalised in Karasek and Theorell´s demand control......-model. However, more recent research into psychosocial work environment problems questions the model’s assumption of high job control compensating for high job demands. Taking its point of departure in a `deconstruction´ of the concept of participation based on research on employee participation from the past...... few decades, the article discuss what factors and changes have resulted in that increased employee participation does not seem to result in a healthy work environment. The article concludes on the limitations of the demand control-model in modern working life given contextual changes in the employer...

  11. Caring for Participation in STS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen Dam

    2015-01-01

    In this short report from the EASST Conference 2014, I sketch a handful of presentations that engaged with ‘participation’. Two tracks, in particular, offered interesting analyses and conceptual experiments. The first track contained primarily empirically driven studies of ‘technologies...... of participation’ in (health) care and provided illustrations of the conceptual ambiguities and empirical implications that continue to make participation a problematic, yet highly relevant and intriguing STS-topic. The second track featured presentations that more explicitly contributed new analytical tools...... for studying participation - primarily aimed at studies of public participation in deliberative processes, yet of potential relevance for studies of seemingly more ‘private’/less ‘political’ forms of participation....

  12. Electronic Government and Electronic Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambouris, E.; Scholl, H.J.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tarabanis, K.; Gascó, M.; Klievink, A.J.; Lindgren, I.; Milano, M.; Panagiotopoulos, P.; Pardo, T.A.; Parycek, P.; Sæbø, O.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic government and electronic participation continue to transform the public sector and society worldwide and are constantly being transformed themselves by emerging information and communication technologies. This book presents papers from the 14th International Federation for Information

  13. Electronic Government and Electronic Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambouris, E; Scholl, H.J.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tarabanis, K; Gascó, M; Klievink, A.J.; Lindgren, I; Milano, M; Panagiotopoulos, P; Pardo, T.A.; Parycek, P; Sæbø, Ø

    2016-01-01

    Electronic government and electronic participation continue to transform the public sector and society worldwide and are constantly being transformed themselves by emerging information and communication technologies.This book presents papers from the 14th International Federation for Information

  14. Minority Representation, Empowerment, and Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banducci, S.A.; Donovan, Todd; Karp, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    According to the minority empowerment thesis, minority representation strengthens representational links, fosters more positive attitudes toward government, and encourages political participation. We examine this theory from a cross-national perspective, making use of surveys that sampled minorities

  15. Understanding Irish Labour Force Participation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephen Byrne; Martin D O'Brien

    2017-01-01

    .... Given the important role of labour supply in explaining Irish economic growth, we aim to identify the relative influence of structural and cyclical factors in the recent dynamics of Irish labour force participation...

  16. 77 FR 58415 - Large Scale Networking (LSN); Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN); Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... agencies and non-Federal participants with interest in high performance research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating...

  17. 78 FR 70076 - Large Scale Networking (LSN)-Joint Engineering Team (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... Large Scale Networking (LSN)--Joint Engineering Team (JET) AGENCY: The Networking and Information... and non-Federal participants with interest in high performance research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group (CG...

  18. Cultural participation and tourism flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan; Castiglione, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cultural events for attracting tourism has often been posited in research, but rarely rested in relation to non-cultural activities. This paper investigates the association between participation in entertainment activities and tourism flows in Italian provinces, and finds......-cultural activities remain statistically insignificant. The results provide empirical support for the existence of a strong relationship between tourism flows and cultural participation. The findings also imply that the demand for entertainment varies depending on the origin of the tourist....

  19. CYBER HOSTILITIES: CIVILIAN DIRECT PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Iulian VOITAȘEC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The manner in which hostilities are being conducted has changed in recent years. The battle field has transpired beyond the physical realm and now has a virtual component. Because of this, it is now easier than ever for civilians to get involved in hostilities. International Humanitarian Law applies to all situations of armed conflict and according to the principle of distinction, the parties to the conflict must, at all times, distinguish between civilians and combatants. The problem arises when the line between combatants and civilians starts to get blurry. Direct civilian participation in hostilities has been addressed in both Additional Protocols to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and in 2009 the International Committee of the Red Cross published the Interpretive guidance on the notion of Direct Participation in Hostilities under international humanitarian law. Another document that addresses the problem of civilian direct participation is the Tallinn Manual on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Warfare prepared by an international group of experts at the invitation of the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence in 2013. The guide prepared by the ICRC addresses the problem of civilian direct participation during conventional situations of armed conflict, while the Tallinn Manual addresses direct participation in situations of cyber warfare. The purpose of this paper is to study the application of civilian direct participation to situations of cyber warfare.

  20. Assessing Cycling Participation in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Rissel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Planning and evaluating cycling programs at a national or state level requires accurate measures of cycling participation. However, recent reports of cycling participation have produced very different estimates. This paper examines the reported rates of cycling in five recent population surveys of cycling. Three surveys (one national and two from Sydney asking respondents when they last rode a bicycle generated cycling participation (cycled in the past year estimates of 29.7%, 34.1% and 28.9%. Two other national surveys which asked participants to recall (unprompted any physical activity done for exercise, recreation or sport in the previous 12 months, estimated cycling in the past year as 11.1% and 6.5%. While unprompted recall of cycling as a type of physical activity generates lower estimates of cycling participation than specific recall questions, both assessment approaches produced similar patterns of cycling by age and sex with both approaches indicating fewer women and older adults cycling. The different question styles most likely explain the substantial discrepancies between the estimates of cycling participation. Some differences are to be expected due to sampling variability, question differences, and regional variation in cycling.

  1. Emotion processing and social participation following stroke: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Clare L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF defines participation as a person’s performance in life situations, including the size of social networks, and satisfaction with social contacts. Stroke survivors are known to experience a reduction in the number of their social networks and contacts, which cannot be explained solely in terms of activity limitations caused by physical impairment. Problems of emotional processing, including impaired mood, emotion regulation and emotion perception, are known to occur following stroke and can detrimentally influence many aspects of social interaction and participation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether emotion processing impairments predict stroke survivors’ restricted social participation, independent of problems with activity limitation. Methods/design We aim to recruit 125 patients admitted to NHS Grampian with a confirmed diagnosis of stroke. All participants will be assessed on measures of emotion processing, social participation and activity limitation at approximately one month post stroke and again at approximately one year post stroke in order to assess change over time. Discussion It is important to develop a greater understanding of the emotional factors which may underlie key social deficits in stroke recovery in an ageing population where stroke is one of the leading causes of severe, complex disability. This research may enable us to identify those who are risk of participation restriction and target them in the acute stroke phase of stroke so that adverse outcome is avoided and rehabilitation potential is fulfilled.

  2. Effect of two prophylactic bolus vitamin D dosing regimens (1000 IU/day vs. 400 IU/day) on bone mineral content in new-onset and infrequently-relapsing nephrotic syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muske, Sravani; Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Kamalanathan, Sadish Kumar; Rajappa, Medha; Harichandrakumar, K T; Sivamurukan, Palanisamy

    2018-02-01

    To examine the efficacy of two vitamin D dosages (1000 vs. 400 IU/day) for osteoprotection in children with new-onset and infrequently-relapsing nephrotic syndrome (IFRNS) receiving corticosteroids. This parallel-group, open label, randomised clinical trial enrolled 92 children with new-onset nephrotic syndrome (NS) (n = 28) or IFRNS (n = 64) to receive 1000 IU/day (Group A, n = 46) or 400 IU/day (Group B, n = 46) vitamin D (administered as a single bolus initial supplemental dose) by block randomisation in a 1:1 allocation ratio. In Group A, vitamin D (cholecalciferol in a Calcirol® sachet) was administered in a single stat dose of 84,000 IU on Day 1 of steroid therapy (for new-onset NS), calculated for a period of 12 weeks@1000 IU/day) and 42,000 IU on Day 1 of steroid therapy (for IFRNS, calculated for a period of 6 weeks@1000 IU/day). In Group B, vitamin D (cholecalciferol in a Calcirol® sachet) was administered as a single stat dose of 33,600 IU on Day 1 of steroid therapy (for new-onset NS, calculated for a period of 12 weeks@400 IU/day) and 16,800 IU on Day 1 of steroid therapy (for IFRNS, calculated for a period of 6 weeks@400 IU/day). The proportionate change in bone mineral content (BMC) was analysed in both groups after vitamin D supplementation. Of the 92 children enrolled, 84 (n = 42 new onset, n = 42 IFRNS) completed the study and were included in the final analysis. Baseline characteristics including initial BMC, bone mineral density, cumulative prednisolone dosage and serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels were comparable in the two groups. There was a greater median proportionate change in BMC in the children who received 1000 IU/day vitamin D (3.25%, IQR -1.2 to 12.4) than in those who received 400 IU/day vitamin D (1.2%, IQR -2.5 to 3.8, p = 0.048). The difference in proportionate change in BMC was only statistically significant in the combined new-onset and IFRNS, but not for IFRNS alone. There was a greater

  3. Information and Communication Network Among Natural Scientists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study tries to find out the extent of information and communication networks among natural scientists in Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. Their ways of information sharing, and the extent of their participation in information networking were investigated. Using two (2) research questions, data was collected from 299 pure ...

  4. Authority and Responsibilities of a Network Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Maryan E.

    A network director is an individual who: is visionary yet practical; possesses understanding of the human animal; has good interpersonal relationships; is committed to the user not the institution; is knowledgeable in regard to the various types of participating institutions; recognizes the network must be built strength on strength; is a skillful…

  5. Unpacking Coordination Benefits in Supply Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrick, Irene J.; Maitland, Carleen; Pogrebnyakov, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how coordination among firms in supply networks generates benefits in the short and long terms for firms. It focuses on information technology (IT) and process improvement coordination. Analysis was performed on quantitative and qualitative data from a sample of SMEs in plastics......). These results extend the understanding of how participation in supply networks benefits individual firms....

  6. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bonnie E.

    2015-01-01

    In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates…

  7. Social Networks and Mourning: A Comparative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Nissan

    1990-01-01

    Suggests using social network theory to explain varieties of mourning behavior in different societies. Compares participation in funeral ceremonies of members of different social circles in American society and Israeli kibbutz. Concludes that results demonstrated validity of concepts deriving from social network analysis in study of bereavement,…

  8. Social networking for well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.G.D.; Aarts, O.A.J.; Broekman, C.C.M.T.; Prins, S.C.L.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present some of the work that is being done in the WeCare project (in the AAL programme). The project’s goal is to introduce social networking services in the lives of older people, in order to improve their well-being. Participation in social networks, both online and ‘in real

  9. Facilitating value co-creation in networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mette Apollo

    participants in varied ways come to grasp the meaning of networking. The dissertation draws on insights from the Service-Dominant (S-D) Logic to explain how networks can be seen as spheres for value co-creation. Co-creation as a theoretical construct has evolved from varied streams of service marketing...

  10. Architecture in the network society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    Under the theme Architecture in the Network Society, participants were invited to focus on the dialog and sharing of knowledge between architects and other disciplines and to reflect on, and propose, new methods in the design process, to enhance and improve the impact of information technology...

  11. Common Knowledge on Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liddell, Torrin M

    2015-01-01

    Common knowledge of intentions is crucial to basic social tasks ranging from cooperative hunting to oligopoly collusion, riots, revolutions, and the evolution of social norms and human culture. Yet little is known about how common knowledge leaves a trace on the dynamics of a social network. Here we show how an individual's network properties---primarily local clustering and betweenness centrality---provide strong signals of the ability to successfully participate in common knowledge tasks. These signals are distinct from those expected when practices are contagious, or when people use less-sophisticated heuristics that do not yield true coordination. This makes it possible to infer decision rules from observation. We also find that tasks that require common knowledge can yield significant inequalities in success, in contrast to the relative equality that results when practices spread by contagion alone.

  12. Influence of socio-demographic factors on physical activity participation in a sample of adults in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Y K

    2011-12-01

    Given the importance of physical activity to health, this study investigated the socio-demographic determinants of physical activity participation in a sample of adults in Penang. Through convenience sampling, a total of 398 adults agreed to answer a prepared questionnaire on their socio-demographic background and physical activity participation. The data were analysed using the binary logit model. Frequent physical activity participation is defined as taking part more than 11 times in leisure-time physical activity such as swimming and jogging, each time lasting more than 15 minutes in a typical month, whereas participation that is less than the frequency and time duration specified above is referred to as infrequent physical activity. Age, male, being Chinese, high educational attainment, self-rated excellent health status and presence of family illnesses are positively associated with the likelihood of frequent participation in physical activity. On the contrary, being married, having low income and residing in rural areas are inversely related with the propensity of frequent physical activity participation. The majority in this sample of adults do not participate in physical activity frequently, and the reasons given include lack of health awareness, limited leisure time, budget constraints, and lack of sports amenities.

  13. Seasonal variation in sports participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttoff, Ute; Pawlowski, Tim

    2018-02-01

    This study explores indicators describing socio-demographics, sports participation characteristics and motives which are associated with variation in sports participation across seasons. Data were drawn from the German Socio-Economic Panel which contains detailed information on the sports behaviour of adults in Germany. Overall, two different measures of seasonal variation are developed and used as dependent variables in our regression models. The first variable measures the coefficient of (seasonal) variation in sport-related energy expenditure per week. The second variable measures whether activity drops below the threshold as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Results suggest that the organisational setting, the intensity and number of sports practised, and the motive for participation are strongly correlated with the variation measures used. For example, both, participation in a sports club and a commercial facility, are associated with reduced seasonal variation and a significantly higher probability of participating at a volume above the WHO threshold across all seasons. These findings give some impetus for policymaking and the planning of sports programmes as well as future research directions.

  14. The Spanish participation in the SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Garrido, J.; González-García, M.

    2017-03-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be a radio interferometer aiming to answer fundamental questions in Astrophysics, Fundamental Physics, and Astrobiology. It will be composed of thousands of antennas distributed over distances of more than 3000 kilometres on both Africa and Australia. The SKA has been recently identified as a Landmark Project in the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) roadmap. Spain has been participating in SKA-related activities since the 1990s, coordinated since 2011 by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC). Up to now, 21 researchers participate in 7 out of the 11 main SKA Science Working Groups, and a total of 119 researchers from 40 Spanish centres have participated in the Spanish SKA White Book, published in 2015. From a technological point of view, more than 20 research centres and companies are contributing to the design of the SKA as part of 7 international consortia. The Spanish contribution was estimated in 2M euro (2014), officially recognized by the SKA Organisation Director General in a letter to the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. In addition, the Spanish Astronomy Infrastructures Network (RIA from its Spanish initials) issued a recommendation on the interest of the scientific community and industry that Spain explores the possibility to join the SKA project as Full Member before the construction phase starts. In December 2015, the Spanish Secretary of State of Research, Development and Innovation sent a letter to the SKA Organisation Director General proposing to establish a dialogue in order to explore scenarios for Spain to join the SKA, what constitutes a further motivation for the Spanish community to continue its efforts.

  15. Exploring sets of molecules from patents and relationships to other active compounds in chemical space networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, Ryo; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Patents from medicinal chemistry represent a rich source of novel compounds and activity data that appear only infrequently in the scientific literature. Moreover, patent information provides a primary focal point for drug discovery. Accordingly, text mining and image extraction approaches have become hot topics in patent analysis and repositories of patent data are being established. In this work, we have generated network representations using alternative similarity measures to systematically compare molecules from patents with other bioactive compounds, visualize similarity relationships, explore the chemical neighbourhood of patent molecules, and identify closely related compounds with different activities. The design of network representations that combine patent molecules and other bioactive compounds and view patent information in the context of current bioactive chemical space aids in the analysis of patents and further extends the use of molecular networks to explore structure-activity relationships.

  16. Network interruptions

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    On Sunday 12 June 2005, a site-wide security software upgrade will be performed on all CERN network equipment. This maintenance operation will cause at least 2 short network interruptions of 2 minutes on each equipment item. There are hundreds of such items across the CERN site (Meyrin, Prévessin and all SPS and LHC pits), and it will thus take the whole day to treat them all. All network users and services will be affected. Central batch computing services will be interrupted during this period, expected to last from 8 a.m. until late evening. Job submission will still be possible but no jobs will actually be run. It is hoped to complete the computer centre upgrades in the morning so that stable access can be restored to lxplus, afs and nice services as soon as possible; this cannot be guaranteed, however. The opportunity will be used to interrupt and perform upgrades on the CERN Document Servers.

  17. Network Survivability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzo, José L.; Stidsen, Thomas Riis; Ruepp, Sarah Renée

    2010-01-01

    – are vital to modern services such as mobile telephony, online banking and VoIP. This book examines communication networking from a mathematical viewpoint. The contributing authors took part in the European COST action 293 – a four-year program of multidisciplinary research on this subject. In this book...... they offer introductory overviews and state-of-the-art assessments of current and future research in the fields of broadband, optical, wireless and ad hoc networks. Particular topics of interest are design, optimization, robustness and energy consumption. The book will be of interest to graduate students......, researchers and practitioners in the areas of networking, theoretical computer science, operations research, distributed computing and mathematics....

  18. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  19. Innovative forms of citizen participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyseth, Torill; Ringholm, Toril; Agger, Annika

    Formal procedures of citizen participation in planning and urban governance in Norway and Denmark share many similarities. Although the planning laws are intended to give all affected stakeholders a chance to air their concerns within a limited time frame, then few use these channels for voice......: What characterises the new and innovative forms of citizen participation in urban planning in terms of innovation? And in what ways and to what degree is input from these processes fed into the formal planning processes? Theoretically, the paper is inspired by the concept of: ‘planning...... as experimentation’ (Hillier 2007, Nyseth et al 2010), ‘co-creation’ (Voorberg m.fl. 2013), and of the approach to participation offered by Clarke et al. (2014), where the traditional approaches are questioned and a contextualised approach is offered. Empirically, the paper draws on two different cases from Denmark...

  20. Early School Leavers' Attitudes Towards Online Self-Presentation and Explicit Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moekotte, Paulo; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Ritzen, Henk; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Active participation in economic and social settings increasingly demands social–communicative skills, i.e., interactive and interpersonal skills, as well as the networking skills to access and use resources provided by online social networks. The development of these skills both depends upon and

  1. Industrial Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    the focus of operations management from managing the own organization to continuously developing and managing a network of external and internal resources forming a production system. This perspective may be called managing an “extraprise” rather than an “enterprise.” It should be noted that “an industrial...... network” should not be seen as an organizational form but as a perspective that can be used to enrich one's understanding of organizations. The industrial network perspective has three basic building blocks: actors, resources, and activities. The three building blocks and their relations constitute...

  2. 4th International Conference in Network Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Koldanov, Petr; Pardalos, Panos

    2016-01-01

    The contributions in this volume cover a broad range of topics including maximum cliques, graph coloring, data mining, brain networks, Steiner forest, logistic and supply chain networks. Network algorithms and their applications to market graphs, manufacturing problems, internet networks and social networks are highlighted. The "Fourth International Conference in Network Analysis," held at the Higher School of Economics, Nizhny Novgorod in May 2014, initiated joint research between scientists, engineers and researchers from academia, industry and government; the major results of conference participants have been reviewed and collected in this Work. Researchers and students in mathematics, economics, statistics, computer science and engineering will find this collection a valuable resource filled with the latest research in network analysis.

  3. Unemployment Duration and Sport Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Cabane, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    URL des Documents de travail : http://centredeconomiesorbonne.univ-paris1.fr/documents-de-travail/; Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 2011.49R - ISSN : 1955-611X - Version révisée : Novembre 2013; In this study we use the German Socio-Economic Panel to evaluate the impact of leisure sport participation on the unemployment duration. The empirical literature on sport participation has focused on labour market outcomes and job quality while the impact of this activity on j...

  4. Participation patterns in adult education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard; Rubenson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on evidence regarding cross-national patterns of participation in adult education and an interpretation of these patterns from an institutional and public policy perspective. The interpretation follows from the perspective that sustaining high and widely distributed levels...... problems that otherwise lead to underinvestment in skills and/or inequity in the distribution of access to education and training and hence skills. Hence, it is argued that institutional contexts and public policy measures condition participation patterns in adult education, and are thus worthwhile...

  5. Scheduling participants of Assessment Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens; Løber, Janni

      Assessment Centres are used as a tool for psychologists and coaches to observe a number of dimensions in a person's behaviour and test his/her potential within a number of chosen focus areas. This is done in an intense course, with a number of different exercises which expose each participant...... Centres usually last two days and involve 3-6 psychologists or trained coaches as assessors. An entire course is composed of a number of rounds, with each round having its individual duration. In each round, the participants are divided into a number of groups with prespecifed pairing of group sizes...

  6. Entrepreneuriat Social et Participation Citoyenne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Larivet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available L'entrepreneuriat social est un concept émergeant, notamment dans les sciences de l'administration. Pourtant, en dehors d'une pratique directoriale spécifique, il est aussi une forme de participation citoyenne trop méconnue. L'objectif de cet article, basé sur une revue de la littérature et une approche théorique, est de présenter le concept d'entrepreneuriat social afin de mieux saisir son positionnement par rapport à la participation citoyenne. L'entrepreneuriat social constitue une forme particulière de participation à l'espace public par l'action, les entreprises sociales agissant au quotidien pour transformer le paysage social. En particulier, cet article souligne le contexte de développement de l'entrepreneuriat social, définit le concept et les notions connexes d'entreprise sociale et d'entrepreneur social, et, enfin, présente une réflexion sur la contribution de l'entrepreneuriat social à la participation citoyenne. L'article montre que l'entrepreneuriat social est une façon pour les citoyens d'agir directement et avec maîtrise sur la société. / Social entrepreneurship is an emerging concept, notably in administrative sciences. However, not only is it a specific managerial practice but it is also a type of citizen participation that is not well-known. The objective of this article, based on a literature review and a theoretical approach, is to present the concept of social entrepreneurship in order to better understand its relation to citizen participation. Social entrepreneurship represents a specific type of citizen participation involving actions. Social enterprises act daily to transform the social landscape. More specifically, this article presents the context of development of social entrepreneurship, proposes a definition of the concept and of other connected notions like "social enterprise" and "social entrepreneur", and, finally, analyzes the contribution of social entrepreneurship to citizen participation. It

  7. Down syndrome and sport participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyer, Osman N

    2006-12-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) derive measurable physiologic and psychologic benefits from participation in physical activities and sports. Physicians in the position of evaluating these individuals and providing guidance in regard to their competitive or recreational physical activities need to be aware of the physiologic and anatomic concerns specific to this population. Effective screening and evaluation by a physician, accompanied with clearly communicated guidelines for specific activities, can provide an individual with DS the opportunity to safely participate in sports and recreational physical activity.

  8. Privacy Amplification with Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Shishir

    There are a number of scenarios where users wishing to communicate, share a weak secret. Often, they are also part of a common social network. Connections (edges) from the social network are represented as shared link keys between participants (vertices). We propose mechanisms that utilise the graph topology of such a network, to increase the entropy of weak pre-shared secrets. Our proposal is based on using random walks to identify a chain of common acquaintances between Alice and Bob, each of which contribute entropy to the final key. Our mechanisms exploit one-wayness and convergence properties of Markovian random walks to, firstly, maximize the set of potential entropy contributors, and second, to resist any contribution from dubious sources such as Sybill sub-networks.

  9. Involuntary Capture and Voluntary Reorienting of Attention Decline in Middle-Aged and Old Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Jaraba, Kenia S; Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs) associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN) and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component), as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON). Participants were divided into three age groups: (1) Young: 21-29 years old; (2) Middle-aged: 51-64 years old; and (3) Old: 65-84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo) and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel). Reaction times (RTs) to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S) and Deviant minus Standard (D-S) difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1) the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups-an early-P3a (e-P3a) that may reflect the orienting response toward the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a) that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2) the e-P3a, l-P3a, and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of attention to

  10. Involuntary capture and voluntary reorienting of attention decline in middle-aged and old participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Shaily Correa-Jaraba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of aging on event-related brain potentials (ERPs associated with the automatic detection of unattended infrequent deviant and novel auditory stimuli (Mismatch Negativity, MMN and with the orienting to these stimuli (P3a component, as well as the effects on ERPs associated with reorienting to relevant visual stimuli (Reorienting Negativity, RON. Participants were divided into three age groups: (1 Young: 21-29 years old; (2 Middle-aged: 51-64 years old; and (3 Old: 65–84 years old. They performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task in which they were asked to attend to visual stimuli (Go, NoGo and to ignore auditory stimuli (S: standard, D: deviant, N: novel. Reaction times (RTs to Go visual stimuli were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants. In addition, in all three age groups, longer RTs were found when Go visual stimuli were preceded by novel relative to deviant and standard auditory stimuli, indicating a distraction effect provoked by novel stimuli. ERP components were identified in the Novel minus Standard (N-S and Deviant minus Standard (D-S difference waveforms. In the N-S condition, MMN latency was significantly longer in middle-aged and old participants than in young participants, indicating a slowing of automatic detection of changes. The following results were observed in both difference waveforms: (1 the P3a component comprised two consecutive phases in all three age groups - an early-P3a (e-P3a that may reflect the orienting response towards the irrelevant stimulation and a late-P3a (l-P3a that may be a correlate of subsequent evaluation of the infrequent unexpected novel or deviant stimuli; (2 the e-P3a, l-P3a and RON latencies were significantly longer in the Middle-aged and Old groups than in the Young group, indicating delay in the orienting response to and the subsequent evaluation of unattended auditory stimuli, and in the reorienting of

  11. Emergency Exercise Participation and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julie; Black, Lynette; Williams, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Extension is uniquely positioned to participate in emergency exercises, formally or informally, with the goal of engaging community members in emergency and disaster preparedness. With their knowledge of community needs, Extension personnel are valuable resources and can assist emergency managers in the process of identifying local risks and…

  12. User participation in BPM implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, B.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to contribute to the knowledge on how user participation can be effective to improve the quality of work of users when using information systems (IS) and information technology (IT). The focus of this research is from the perspective of the users and from a specific

  13. The Art of Unsolicited Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bala, S.; Fisher, T.; Katsouraki, E.

    2017-01-01

    How do audiences respond to participatory art in unscripted ways? The essay questions the status of participatory art in the developmental context as forging cohesion amongst participants and focuses on its sometimes conflictual potentials. Reflecting on a case study of the Theatre of the Oppressed

  14. Nurses' Journey Toward Genuine Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kija Lin; Simonsen, Jesper; Karasti, Teija Helena

    2016-01-01

    management has instructed them to do so, to taking an interest and finding their voices in the design process. In this way, they are ultimately able to engage in genuine and willing participation. The main discussion points in the paper are the transitions in the nurses' journey toward embracing qualities...

  15. Community consensus: Design beyond participation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Winschiers-Theophilus, H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available as "the designer from within" and "the technologist/researcher/designer" as the "designer from outside" not originating from the community in which the design takes place. In this article, we propose that grappling with meanings about participation...

  16. Women's Participation in American Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Leona

    Women's participation in sport is emphasized in this historical, philosophical, and sociological sketch of sport and physical recreation activities. Various sports are traced from the time of George Washington up through the present noting cultural influences that affected their development. Under the heading "Past Events," American Indian women,…

  17. Editorial: Enterprise Participation (January 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Smith

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In The Role of Participation Architecture in Growing Sponsored Open Source Communities, Joel West and Siobhan O'Mahony argue that "to some extent, firms and technical communities have always collaborated to create standards, shared infrastructure, and innovation outcomes that are bigger than any one firm can achieve." and that "there is increasing evidence that path breaking innovations cannot occur without a community to interpret, support, extend and diffuse them". When considered in this light, it should not be surprising that more enterprises, both large and small, are increasing their participation in open source communities to drive innovation. The theme for this month's issue of the OSBR is enterprise participation and the authors provide practical advice for effective enterprise/community collaboration. Their experiences provide perspectives on: i the Eclipse Foundation, which maintains an ecosystem of over 150 enterprises that participate in Eclipse open source projects; ii an independent software vendor that sells closed source solutions constructed on top of an open source platform to large enterprise customers; iii the impact of major players collaborating on a common open source platform for the mobile industry; iv the role users can play in the very large (over 14 million GNOME community; and v the lessons a scientist from the National Research Council of Canada learned when he released software and started a small open source community.

  18. Municipal Size and Electoral Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritzen, Poul Erik; Rose, Lawrence; Denters, Bas

    are based on a strategy whereby theoretical models are developed and investigated for several different indicators of local democracy in a successive, cumulative fashion using a ‘funnel of causality logic’. This paper reports on results concerning local electoral political participation. We conclude...

  19. Users' participation and social influence during information spreading on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Han, Ding-Ding; Yang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Ziqiao

    2017-01-01

    Online Social Networks generate a prodigious wealth of real-time information at an incessant rate. In this paper we study the empirical data that crawled from Twitter to describe the topology and information spreading dynamics of Online Social Networks. We propose a measurement with three measures to state the efforts of users on Twitter to get their information spreading, based on the unique mechanisms for information retransmission on Twitter. It is noticed that small fraction of users with special performance on participation can gain great influence, while most other users play a role as middleware during the information propagation. Thus a community analysis is performed and four categories of users are found with different kinds of participation that cause the information dissemination dynamics. These suggest that exiting topological measures alone may reflect little about the influence of individuals and provide new insights for information spreading.

  20. Users’ participation and social influence during information spreading on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Han, Ding-Ding; Yang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Ziqiao

    2017-01-01

    Online Social Networks generate a prodigious wealth of real-time information at an incessant rate. In this paper we study the empirical data that crawled from Twitter to describe the topology and information spreading dynamics of Online Social Networks. We propose a measurement with three measures to state the efforts of users on Twitter to get their information spreading, based on the unique mechanisms for information retransmission on Twitter. It is noticed that small fraction of users with special performance on participation can gain great influence, while most other users play a role as middleware during the information propagation. Thus a community analysis is performed and four categories of users are found with different kinds of participation that cause the information dissemination dynamics. These suggest that exiting topological measures alone may reflect little about the influence of individuals and provide new insights for information spreading. PMID:28902906

  1. Dimensionality of civic participation in a convergent media environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; Albæk, Erik; de Vreese, Claes Holger

    of information, altering the media diet for a growing share of the population. In addition, social networks like Facebook or Twitter offer emerging ways of participation, mostly with less effort than traditional forms. Yet, the role social media play in the political media diet was not fully assed by prior...... research. Furthermore, a broadened approach is needed when measuring participatory behavior. Emerging forms of participation on social media platforms but also engagement among the public, not closely connected to the political system, are necessary to include, to see the full picture of civic...

  2. Nepal Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    that their personal networks engage not only their families, but also their home communities and by extension Nepal. The two women constitute weak links between their country and other countries and as such they function as bridges or channels for transmission of practices, ideas, knowledge, and artefacts. However...

  3. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  4. Network Coding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Network Coding. K V Rashmi Nihar B Shah P Vijay Kumar. General Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 604-621. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/07/0604-0621. Keywords.

  5. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  6. distribution network

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This paper examined the acidic properties of distribution transformer oil insulation in service at Jericho distribution network Ibadan, Nigeria. Five oil samples each from six distribution transformers (DT1, DT2, DT3, DT4 and DT5) making a total of thirty samples were taken from different installed distribution transformers all ...

  7. Youth as Content Producers in a Niche Social Network Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Most U.S. teenagers participate in online social network sites, devoting hours to these networks, often at the expense of other leisure-time activities. This article describes young people's activities within one topic-focused niche network, outlining its unique features and the role of young people as content producers within and beyond the…

  8. Involvement, Collaboration and Engagement: Social Networks through a Pedagogical Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tami

    2016-01-01

    Social networks facilitate activities that promote involvement, collaboration and engagement. Modelling of best practices using social networks enhances its usage by participants, increases participants confidence as to its implementation and creates a paradigm shift to a more personalized, participatory and collaborative learning and a more…

  9. Brave new world? Political participation and new media

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Maria João; Barriga, Antónia do Carmo; Jerónimo, Nuno Amaral

    2011-01-01

    This paper intends to highlight the role played by new social media upon citizens’ political participation, their challenges and inequalities, like what has been thoroughly studied for traditional media. New media, also called social networks, like Twitter or Facebook, have been glorified as the universal public sphere, a promising new "café". This paper intends to discuss, in a more realistic and reflexive way, the use of some internet platforms, contradicting the excess...

  10. Dynamic social network analysis using conversational dynamics in social networking and microblogging environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Gabriel; Savell, Robert; Cybenko, George

    2010-04-01

    In many security environments, the textual content of communications may be unavailable. In these instances, it is often desirable to infer the status of the network and its component entities from patterns of communication flow. Conversational dynamics among entities in the network may provide insight into important aspects of the underlying social network such as the formational dynamics of group structures, the active state of these groups, individuals' roles within groups, and the likelihood of individual participation in conversations. To gain insight into the use of conversational dynamics to facilitate Dynamic Social Network Analysis, we explore the use of interevent timings to associate entities in the Twitter social networking and micro-blogging environment. Specifically, we use message timings to establish inter-nodal relationships among participants. In addition, we demonstrate a new visualization technique for tracking levels of coordination or synchronization within the community via measures of socio-temporal coherence of the participants.

  11. Investigating the Evolution of Key Member Roles in Socio-Technical Networks--Introducing the Composite Role Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lid, Viil

    2013-01-01

    The vitality of socio-technical networks, like online communities and social networks, is predominantly dependent upon active member participation. In most socio-technical networks a minority of members participate more than others and thus play key roles that sustain the value of the network. The overarching objective of this study was to extend…

  12. Structural network efficiency predicts conversion to dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, A.; van Uden, I.W.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; van der Holst, H.; van Norden, A.; de Laat, K.; Dijk, E.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Markus, H.S.; Norris, David Gordon; de Leeuw, F.E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether structural network connectivity at baseline predicts incident all-cause dementia in a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly participants with MRI evidence of small vessel disease (SVD). Methods: A total of 436 participants from the Radboud University Nijmegen

  13. Energy efficiency networks; Energieeffizienz-Netzwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Anna [Forschungsgesellschaft fuer Energiewirtschaft mbH (FfE GmbH), Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Energy efficiency networks are an attractive method to increase the energy efficiency and to reduce the costs and CO{sub 2} emissions of the companies operating in this network. A special feature of the energy efficiency networks is the exchange of experiences and training of the energy managers. Energy efficiency networks consist of about ten to fifteen locally domiciled companies. During the project period of three to four years, there are two main phases. In the first phase, the initial consultation phase, the actual state of a company is captured, and measures to increase the efficiency and energy conservation are identified. Parallel to this, in the second phase every three months a meeting with the participating companies takes place. Experience exchange and implementation of energy efficiency measures are the focus of these meetings. Initial studies show that the increase of the energy efficiency during participating in the energy efficiency network almost can be doubled in comparison to the average of the industry.

  14. Redes de aprendizaje, aprendizaje en red Learning Networks, Networked Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sloep

    2011-10-01

    , trust formation and profiling in Learning Networks, and peer-support among Learning Network participants. This discussion will be interspersed with implementation guidelines for Learning Networks and with a discussion of the more extended case of a Learning Network for Higher Education. Taking into consideration research currently carried out at our own centre and elsewhere, the chapter will close off with a look into the future of Learning Networks.

  15. Using Social Network Analysis to Assess Mentorship and Collaboration in a Public Health Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu-Prahova, Miruna; Belza, Basia; Leith, Katherine; Allen, Peg; Coe, Norma B; Anderson, Lynda A

    2015-08-20

    Addressing chronic disease burden requires the creation of collaborative networks to promote systemic changes and engage stakeholders. Although many such networks exist, they are rarely assessed with tools that account for their complexity. This study examined the structure of mentorship and collaboration relationships among members of the Healthy Aging Research Network (HAN) using social network analysis (SNA). We invited 97 HAN members and partners to complete an online social network survey that included closed-ended questions about HAN-specific mentorship and collaboration during the previous 12 months. Collaboration was measured by examining the activity of the network on 6 types of products: published articles, in-progress manuscripts, grant applications, tools, research projects, and presentations. We computed network-level measures such as density, number of components, and centralization to assess the cohesiveness of the network. Sixty-three respondents completed the survey (response rate, 65%). Responses, which included information about collaboration with nonrespondents, suggested that 74% of HAN members were connected through mentorship ties and that all 97 members were connected through at least one form of collaboration. Mentorship and collaboration ties were present both within and across boundaries of HAN member organizations. SNA of public health collaborative networks provides understanding about the structure of relationships that are formed as a result of participation in network activities. This approach may offer members and funders a way to assess the impact of such networks that goes beyond simply measuring products and participation at the individual level.

  16. A Collaborative Learning Network Approach to Improvement: The CUSP Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sallie J; Lofthus, Jennifer; Sawyer, Melinda; Greer, Lee; Opett, Kristin; Reynolds, Catherine; Wyskiel, Rhonda; Peditto, Stephanie; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-04-01

    Collaborative improvement networks draw on the science of collaborative organizational learning and communities of practice to facilitate peer-to-peer learning, coaching, and local adaption. Although significant improvements in patient safety and quality have been achieved through collaborative methods, insight regarding how collaborative networks are used by members is needed. Improvement Strategy: The Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) Learning Network is a multi-institutional collaborative network that is designed to facilitate peer-to-peer learning and coaching specifically related to CUSP. Member organizations implement all or part of the CUSP methodology to improve organizational safety culture, patient safety, and care quality. Qualitative case studies developed by participating members examine the impact of network participation across three levels of analysis (unit, hospital, health system). In addition, results of a satisfaction survey designed to evaluate member experiences were collected to inform network development. Common themes across case studies suggest that members found value in collaborative learning and sharing strategies across organizational boundaries related to a specific improvement strategy. The CUSP Learning Network is an example of network-based collaborative learning in action. Although this learning network focuses on a particular improvement methodology-CUSP-there is clear potential for member-driven learning networks to grow around other methods or topic areas. Such collaborative learning networks may offer a way to develop an infrastructure for longer-term support of improvement efforts and to more quickly diffuse creative sustainment strategies.

  17. Trauma-Exposed Latina Immigrants' Networks: A Social Network Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Serrano, Adriana; Gonzales, Felisa A; Fernandez, Nicole C; Cabling, Mark; Kaltman, Stacey

    2016-11-01

    Trauma exposure among Latina immigrants is common. Social support networks can buffer the impact of trauma on mental health. This study characterizes the social networks of trauma-exposed Latina immigrants using a social network analysis perspective. In 2011-2012 a convenience sample (n=28) of Latina immigrants with trauma exposure and presumptive depression or posttraumatic stress disorder was recruited from a community clinic in Washington DC. Participants completed a social network assessment and listed up to ten persons in their network (alters). E-Net was used to describe the aggregate structural, interactional, and functional characteristics of networks and Node-XL was used in a case study to diagram one network. Most participants listed children (93%), siblings (82%), and friends (71%) as alters, and most alters lived in the US (69%). Perceived emotional support and positive social interaction were higher compared to tangible, language, information, and financial support. A case study illustrates the use of network visualizations to assess the strengths and weaknesses of social networks. Targeted social network interventions to enhance supportive networks among trauma-exposed Latina immigrants are warranted.

  18. Social Networks and Network Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Research in Command & Control • Latent Semantic Analysis – Team communication – Emergent team dynamics – Shared situation awareness • Dynamic Network...requirements – Information technology requirements 28 LSA Essentials of Latent Semantic Analysis 29 Communication Analysis • Goal: Automatically monitor and

  19. Participative Design With Top Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    meetings aimed at aligning top management with the supplier’s analysis. The article describes the MUST method’s anchoring principle and the technique of problem mapping supporting this principle. This participatory approach resulted in mutual learning processes with top management which is rarely reported...... on in the PD community. Top management participated by reviewing, challenging, and reformulating the IT designers’ central suppositions, assumptions, and hypotheses related to the causal relation between identified problems and suggested solutions....

  20. Student teacher training: participant motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; van Diggele, Christie; Mellis, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Teaching, assessment and feedback skills are documented globally as required graduate attributes for medical students. By integrating teacher training into curricula, the importance of teaching and educational scholarship is highlighted. In this study, we used self-determination theory (SDT) to consider medical students' motivation to voluntarily participate in a short teacher training programme. Thirty-eight senior medical students were invited to attend a teacher training programme at a major tertiary teaching hospital. Participating students were asked to respond to one question: 'Why did you volunteer to take part in the teacher training course?' Self-determination theory was used as a conceptual framework to identify and code recurrent themes in the data. In total, 23/38 (61%) of invited students chose to participate in the programme, and 21/23 (91%) of the students responded to the survey. Students' motivation to participate in the teacher training programme were related to: (1) autonomy - their enjoyment of their current voluntary involvement in teaching; (2) competence - a recognition of the need for formal training and certification in teaching, and as an essential part of their future career in medicine; (3) relatedness - the joint recognition of the importance of quality in teaching, as emphasised by their own learning experiences in the medical programme. Students reported being motivated to take part in teacher training because of their enjoyment of teaching, their desire to increase the quality of teaching within medical education, their desire for formal recognition of teaching as a learned skill, plus their recognition of teaching as a requirement within the medical profession. By integrating teacher training into curricula, the importance of teaching and educational scholarship is highlighted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.