WorldWideScience

Sample records for netherlands small countries

  1. Country report: The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, M.; Tros, F.

    2014-01-01

    Young workers have a relatively weak labour market position in the Netherlands, both in terms of high youth unemployment and low quality of employment. For this reason, they could potentially benefit from union representation to improve their wages and working conditions. For the trade unions, young

  2. Country Report - The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermers, G.; Wegman, F.; Vliet, P. van; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Boender, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the most significant developments in the area of road (geometric) design practices and standards and related research in the Netherlands in recent years. The paper describes the importance of the Sustainable Road Safety policy in this context. Furthermore, it

  3. Country report of the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijves, K A

    1997-12-01

    The presentation briefly reviews the following: general situation with nuclear power in the Netherlands; power reactors; research reactors; fuel performance; water chemistry; main research and development programmes.

  4. Country update for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, F.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the status of geothermal energy development in the Netherlands. It provides statistical data on the wells drilled for direct heat utilization of geothermal resources from January 1, 1985 to January 1, 1990. The well types drilled are as follows: thermal gradient or other scientific purpose, exploration, production, injection, and combined electrical and direct use

  5. Globalisation and the Small Economy: The Case of the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hogenbirk Annelies; Narula Rajneesh

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we have examined the importance and implications of globalisation due to FDI for one particular small country: the Netherlands. Although it has limited resources and size, the Netherlands is home to the sixth largest outward FDI stock in the world, and also is one of the most important destinations for inward FDI activity. Its location advantages are, inter alia, a function of its de facto market size, given its central location within the EU, and its well developed infrastruct...

  6. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Ireland or the Netherlands: Which country is more entrepreneurial?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Gorman, Colm; Diaz-Moriana, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    What country was ranked the most entrepreneurial of the EU-15 countries in 2005? Ireland. In 2005, Ireland ranked 1st of the EU-15 countries in terms of the rate of entrepreneurship. The Dutch ranked jointed 9th. Which of the EU-15 countries was the most entrepreneurial in 2012? The Netherlands. Since 2005, the rate of entrepreneurship in the Netherlands has increased. They now rank 1stof the EU-15 countries. Ireland’s rate of entrepreneurship has decreased. By 2012, Ireland ranked 9th of the...

  8. IEA Bioenergy Task 40 country report for the Netherlands 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, C.S.; Junginger, H.M.; Jonker, J.G.G.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2011-01-01

    This country report was written within the frame of IEA Bioenergy Task 40. In summary, the aims of this country report are: (1) To provide a concise overview of biomass policy, domestic resources, biomass users, biomass prices and biomass trade, and (2) To analyse bioenergy trends, and reasons for change in the Netherlands and point out barriers & opportunities for trade in detail, and Current biomass user (energy use) Table ES-1 shows the energy use of biomass in the Netherlands in 2010. The...

  9. Country policy profile - The Netherlands. December 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Main support scheme for renewable energy in the Netherlands is the SDE+, opened in 2011. It is a technology-neutral scheme, promoting the cheapest technologies and allocating the available budget on the basis of competition between renewable electricity, renewable heat and green gas projects. Other measures described in the Dutch Progress Report are: SDE, MEP, EIA (as of 2014 not anymore combined with SDE+), Green Projects Scheme, the Investment subsidy renewable energy (ISDE), Energy Top Sector and Green Deals

  10. Country policy profile - The Netherlands. August 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    Main support scheme for renewable energy in the Netherlands is the SDE+, opened in 2011. It is a technology-neutral scheme, promoting the cheapest technologies and allocating the available budget on the basis of competition between renewable electricity, renewable heat and green gas projects. Other measures described in the Dutch Progress Report are: SDE, MEP, EIA (as of 2014 not anymore combined with SDE+), Green Projects Scheme, Solar Panels Subsidy Scheme, Energy Top Sector and Green Deals

  11. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, the Netherlands' only reactor, the 449 MW(e) PWR at Borssele, provided 3.6 TW·h of electricity, equivalent to 4% of domestic electricity output. Two successive governments ordered the Borssele nuclear power plant to shut down by December 2003, earlier than had originally been foreseen. However, the Government that came into office at the beginning of August 2002 has agreed to postpone closure of this plant, as it said 'taking into account the Kyoto obligations, it would not be sensible to close Borssele prematurely'. The new Cabinet will consult with the owner of the plant to seek an agreement on continuing its operation, taking into account its economic and technical lifetime. Uranium enrichment is carried out by Urenco Nederland B.V., which is located in Almelo. Urenco Nederland is owned by the multinational company Urenco Ltd, which is located in Marlow (UK) and which has three shareholders holding equal shares: Ultra Centrifuge Nederland (UCN) in the Netherlands, Uranit (Germany) and BNFL. The Government of the Netherlands owns 99% of the shares in UCN. The current capacity of Urenco Nederland is 1850 t SWU/a. However, in 1999 the company obtained a licence to expand its capacity to 2500 t SWU/a, for which a fifth enrichment plant has been built at the Almelo site. In early 2003 a new nuclear licence was issued to increase capacity to 2800 t SWU/a. Urenco uses advanced gas ultracentrifuge technology for the enrichment of uranium. Spent fuel is being reprocessed at the BNFL reprocessing facility in the UK and at the Cogema reprocessing facility in France

  12. Country policy profile - The Netherlands. October 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-10-01

    Main support scheme for renewable energy in the Netherlands is the SDE+, opened in 2011. It is a technology-neutral scheme, promoting the cheapest technologies and allocating the available budget on the basis of competition between renewable electricity, renewable heat and green gas projects. Other measures described in the Dutch Progress Report are: SDE, MEP, EIA (as of 2014 not anymore combined with SDE+), Green Projects Scheme, Solar Panels Subsidy Scheme, Energy Top Sector and Green Deals. Most important change reported here from 2014 onwards regards the EIA scheme

  13. Undergraduate Courses in Family Medicine in the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands and the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge

    1993-01-01

    Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries......Almen medicin, Family Medicine, undergraduate Courses, the UK, Ireland, the Netherlands, the Nordic Countries...

  14. IEA Bioenergy task 40. Country report for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, M.; Faaij, A.

    2005-07-01

    Two of the short-term objectives of the IEA Bioenergy Task 40 are to present an overview of development of biomass markets in various parts of the world and to identify existing barriers hampering development of a (global) commodity market (e.g. policy framework, ecology, economics). As in most countries biomass is a relatively new (though quickly growing) commodity, relatively little information is available on e.g. the traded volumes and prices of various biomass streams, policies and regulations on biomass use and trade, and existing and perceived barriers. This country report aims to provide an overview of these issues for the Netherlands, and also sets the first step to make an inventory of barriers as perceived by various Dutch stakeholders. The report organizes as follows. Section 2 and 3 presents a brief overview of the policy setting on renewable energy and bio-energy in the Netherlands and the policy instruments deployed to stimulate renewable energy market penetration. In section 4, the achievements, the current status and the short-term expectations for the use of biomass energy in the Netherlands are described. Next, in section 5, the biomass market and biomass trade in the Netherlands are discussed, including the major biomass streams involved, conversion technologies, import and export volumes, biomass prices, barriers for further import and biomass certification efforts. Section 6 concludes with a general discussion and conclusions.

  15. Social class, ethnicity and other risk factors for small for gestational age and preterm delivery in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, P.H.; Zaadstra, B.M.; Reerink, J.D.; Herngreen, W.P.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    Social class and ethnicity are important risk factors for small-for-gestational-age and preterm delivery in many countries. This study was performed to assess whether this is also the case in the Netherlands, a country with a high level of social security, relatively small income differences and

  16. IEA Bioenergy task 40. Country report for the Netherlands 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikkema, R.; Junginger, M.; Faaij, A.

    2007-12-01

    Short-term objectives of the IEA Bioenergy Task 40 'Sustainable International Bio-energy Trade: Securing Supply and Demand' are amongst other objectives to present an overview of development of biomass markets in various parts of the world and to identify existing barriers hampering development of a (global) commodity market (e.g. policy framework, ecology, economics). As in most countries biomass is a relatively new (though quickly growing) commodity, relatively little information is available on e.g. the traded volumes and prices of various biomass streams, policies and regulations on biomass use and trade, and existing and perceived barriers. This country report aims to provide an overview of these issues for the Netherlands and is an extended update of previous reports (2005 and 2006)

  17. The CAP Mid Term Review and the WTO Doha Round; Analyses for the Netherlands, EU and accession countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, M.

    2004-01-01

    This report analyses the potential impact of the EU CAP reforms that follow the Mid Term Review and the Harbinson Proposal for negotiation modalities in the WTO Doha Round on the Netherlands, EU14 and the accession countries. In welfare terms, the MTR has a rela-tively small impact on the

  18. Energy policies of IEA Countries. The Netherlands 1996 review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    As part of the IEA's on-going analysis of Member countries' energy policies, this review assess the Netherlands and offers recommendations taking account of major reforms announced by the Dutch Government in December 1995. The prominence of environmental objectives in Dutch energy policy and the widespread use of voluntary long-term agreements with industry provide constructive lessons for other countries. Targets for energy efficiency and renewability are especially ambitious. Moreover, the Dutch Government has made an important contribution to environmental policy by striving for a combination of market liberalization and a sustainable energy economy. The review recommends that market reforms be further developed, if necessary in the context of developments in European energy market policy. Gas pricing and a tendency for over-capacity to develop in the electricity sector are particular areas of discussion in the report. The review also draws attention to potentially high economic costs which may arise form energy-environment policies and affect the competitiveness of Dutch industry. (author). 18 figs., 13 tabs

  19. Opioid analgesic use in Australia and The Netherlands: a cross-country comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemaakers, Francisca N; Hollingworth, Samantha A; Kreijkamp-Kaspers, Sanne; Tee, Ernest H L; Leendertse, Anne J; van Driel, Mieke L

    2017-08-01

    Background Increasing use of opioid analgesics (OA) has been reported worldwide. Objective To compare the use of OA in two countries in order to better understand these trends. Setting Outpatient settings in Australia and The Netherlands. Method We analysed publicly available government data on outpatient OA dispensing over 15 years (2000-2014). We compared dispensing trends for specific OA and explored medical (national clinical guidelines), contextual and policy-related factors to explain differences in use between the two countries. Main outcome measure OA prescribing in Australia and The Netherlands, absolute volume of use, preferred types of opioids and changes over time. Results The average annual increase in OA prescribing was 10% in Australia and 8% in The Netherlands between 2000 and 2014. In 2014, the total use of OA was 10.0 daily defined doses (DDD)/1000 population/day in Australia and 9.4 DDD/1000 population/day in The Netherlands. In Australia, the most commonly prescribed opioids were oxycodone and tramadol, compared to fentanyl and tramadol in The Netherlands. We found differences in prescribing guidelines, culture of prescribing and regulatory frameworks that could explain some of the observed differences. Conclusion OA prescribing has increased remarkably in both countries between 2000 and 2014 but the types of prescribed OA vary. Differences in national evidence-based guidelines influenced the types of OA used. Prescribing culture as well as regulatory policies and costs, may also contribute to the different patterns of OA use.

  20. IEA Bioenergy Task 40 country report for the Netherlands 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goh, C.S.; Junginger, H.M.; Jonker, J.G.G.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2011-01-01

    This country report was written within the frame of IEA Bioenergy Task 40. In summary, the aims of this country report are: (1) To provide a concise overview of biomass policy, domestic resources, biomass users, biomass prices and biomass trade, and (2) To analyse bioenergy trends, and reasons for

  1. Country Waste Profile Report for Netherlands. Reporting Year: 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA Country Waste Profile Reports include data on: • Waste in Storage and Disposal (including historical disposal no longer practiced); • Treatment & Conditioning Capabilities; • Major milestones in programme and facility development; • Regulatory Authorities; • Policies, Laws & Regulations; • Disused Radioactive Sources (for some Member States)

  2. Country Waste Profile Report for Netherlands. Reporting Year: 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA Country Waste Profile Reports include data on: • Waste in Storage and Disposal (including historical disposal no longer practiced); • Treatment & Conditioning Capabilities; • Major milestones in programme and facility development; • Regulatory Authorities; • Policies, Laws & Regulations; • Disused Radioactive Sources (for some Member States)

  3. Country Waste Profile Report for Netherlands. Reporting Year: 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA Country Waste Profile Reports include data on: • Waste in Storage and Disposal (including historical disposal no longer practiced); • Treatment & Conditioning Capabilities; • Major milestones in programme and facility development; • Regulatory Authorities; • Policies, Laws & Regulations; • Disused Radioactive Sources (for some Member States)

  4. Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    The energy policy and the institutions of the Netherlands are presented and analyzed. A special attention is given o the enterprises of the energy sector, the supplying of each fossil fuels, the prices policy, the energy consumption and the stakes and forecasts. Statistical data on economical indicators and energy accounting are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  5. Emergence of Film Industries in Small Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jan; Brambini, Annalisa; Maher, Sean

    Studies on the spatial organisation of film industries have grown steadily during the last decade. This has resulted in a highly valuable stream of research concerned with the clustering of the film industry. This literature has, however, neglected to pay attention to the specificities...... of the challenges faced by small countries aimed at building up a film industry in the context of global dominance by media conglomerates located in major audio-visual hubs such as Hollywood, New York and Paris. The conventional cluster and regional innovation systems-literature highlight respectively reduced...

  6. Developing countries: small technology with big effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRobie, G.; Carr, M.

    1978-01-01

    As far the poor countries of the world are concerned, during the past twenty years they have had access only to the technologies developed by the rich to suit the rich. It is now beyond question that some of the most daunting problems confronting the majority of the worlds populations stem directly from the kind of technology transferred to them under current aid and development programs. That the technology of the rich is generally inappropriate to meet the needs and resources of the poor countries is becoming more widley recognized both by aid-givers and aid-receivers. Yet it is this technology that continues to be almost exclusively and most powerfully promoted in the developing countries. To meet their needs a new technology must be discovered or devised: one that lies between the sickle and the combine harvester and is small, simple and cheap enough to harmonise withlocal human and material resources and lends itself to widespread reproduction with the minimum of outside help. What we now need most urgently is a new set of technologies, designed, by people who are informed by the need to develop capital-saving technologies capable of being decentralized to the maximum extend. The technology gap is not only wide, but the knowledge an resources required to fill is, although they exist in the industrialized countries, have not been mobilized to provide the right kind of knowledge and to make it available to those who need it. It was to do this that the Intermediate Technology Development Group was set up ten years ago. (orig.) 891 HP 892 EKI [de

  7. [Euthanasia in Europe--ten countries with special consideration of the Netherlands and Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernstedt, T; Mohr, M; Kettler, D

    2000-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the current situation of euthanasia in Europe. Emphasis is given to the positions discussed in the Netherlands and in Germany. The current situation, the development of the legal positions, and the resulting debate are established by analysing English and German anesthesiological and medical-ethical journals. It has to be noted that many physicians are not satisfied with the terminology of euthanasia. The traditional concepts of euthanasia do not cover the aspect of accompanying terminally ill persons until they have died. The differentiation of active, passive, and indirect euthanasia does not correspond to the practical handling of the problem. Many physicians are in need of an open discussion of euthanasia-related issues. The way euthanasia is practiced in the Netherlands has strongly influenced the further development of the debate in Europe. Even though the Dutch model is rejected by the jurisdications of virtually all other countries, and official statements of medical corporations stick to the disapproval of active euthanasia, studies examining the attitudes towards euthanasia and the treatment of it in daily routine show that active interventions to shorten life are performed to different degrees outside of the Netherlands as well.

  8. Graduates' Experiences of Work in Small Organizations in the UK and the Netherlands : Better than Expected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, J.; Schalk, R.; Bosley, S.; van Overbeek, S.

    2002-01-01

    This project was designed to examine university graduates' expectations and experiences of employment in small organizations in the UK and the Netherlands. Specifically, three predictions were made on the basis of existing literature and tested using self-report questionnaire data gathered from 126

  9. The revised EMEP/EEA Guidebook compared to the country specific inventory system in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, R.; Kuenen, J. J. P.; Pulles, M. P. J.; Heslinga, D. C.

    2010-09-01

    Parties to the LRTAP convention have agreed to annually report atmospheric emissions and are required to set up an emission inventory. As a minimum, parties shall use the latest version of the EMEP/EEA Air Pollutant Inventory Guidebook, but most countries - including the Netherlands - have set up their own inventory, which uses country specific information to supplement the information from the Guidebook. In this study, emissions estimated within the Dutch Emission Inventory are compared to emissions estimated using Guidebook emission factors and Dutch statistics for the year 2005. The objective is to explore the quality of both methods and to find major differences and similarities. The comparison shows that for most sources, emission estimates are within uncertainty ranges for both methodologies, especially for sources where a higher Tier (more detailed) methodology is used to estimate the emissions. This is in line with the Guidelines which indicate that for key categories a more detailed methodology should be used. The comparison also shows some surprising differences, such as large differences in emission factors (especially Tier 1) and missing sources (fireworks and abrasion of railway overhead wires, causing 16% of total copper emissions in the Netherlands) which have not been included in the Guidebook. This comparison is shown to be a useful tool to identify areas where improvements and further research are necessary.

  10. Tariffs and subsidy policy for wind energy in the Netherlands and foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zuylen, E.J.; Van Wijk, A.J.M.

    1993-04-01

    In the European countries different methods are used to stimulate renewable energy, in particular wind energy. In the Netherlands use is made of investment subsidies to install wind turbines on a large scale. In other countries (in this report Denmark, Germany, Great Britain and a few other countries) mainly use is made of the sellback method: electricity, generated by the wind turbines, is supplied to the grid. Also a combination of investment subsidies and sellback is applied. An overview is given of the financial incentive regulations in the above-mentioned countries. Also attention is paid to the underlying motivation and argumentation for the subsidies, the relation between wind energy subsidies and subsidies for other decentralized power generating options, and the impact of the European Union regulations in this matter. Finally an indication is given of how the regulations are financed: out of the general fund, out of environmental levies or directly from the electric companies. Most of the data presented in this report are the results of interviews with representatives of the different countries. 8 tabs

  11. Perinatal mortality rate in the Netherlands compared to other European countries: a secondary analysis of Euro-PERISTAT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Ank; Baron, Ruth; Westerneng, Myrte; Twisk, Jos; Hutton, Eileen K

    2013-08-01

    the poor perinatal mortality ranking of the Netherlands compared to other European countries has led to questioning the safety of primary care births, particularly those at home. Primary care births are only planned at term. We therefore examined to which extent the perinatal mortality rate at term in the Netherlands contributes to its poor ranking. secondary analyses using published data from the Euro-PERISTAT study. women that gave birth in 2004 in the 29 European regions and countries called 'countries' included in the Euro-PERISTAT study (4,328,441 women in total and 1,940,977 women at term). odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the comparison of perinatal mortality rates between European countries and the Netherlands, through logistic regression analyses using summary country data. combined perinatal mortality rates overall and at term. Perinatal deaths below 28 weeks, between 28 and 37 weeks and from 37 weeks onwards per 1000 total births. compared to the Netherlands, perinatal mortality rates at term were significantly higher for Denmark and Latvia and not significantly different compared to seven other countries. Eleven countries had a significantly lower rate, and for eight the term perinatal mortality rate could not be compared. The Netherlands had the highest number of perinatal deaths before 28 weeks per 1000 total births (4.3). the relatively high perinatal mortality rate in the Netherlands is driven more by extremely preterm births than births at term. Although the PERISTAT data cannot be used to show that the Dutch maternity care system is safe, neither should they be used to argue that the system is unsafe. The PERISTAT data alone do not support changes to the Dutch maternity care system that reduce the possibility for women to choose a home birth while benefits of these changes are uncertain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Variation in term birthweight across European countries affects the prevalence of small for gestational age among very preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitlin, Jennifer; Bonamy, Anna-Karin Edstedt; Piedvache, Aurelie

    2017-01-01

    AIM: This study assessed the prevalence of small for gestational age (SGA) among very preterm (VPT) infants using national and European intrauterine references. METHODS: We generated country-specific and common European intrauterine growth references for 11 European countries, according to Gardosi...... with lower term birthweights (39.9%) - Portugal, Italy and France - and higher term birthweights, namely Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden (28.9%; p third...

  13. Small business economics: A perspective from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractIn the analysis of economic phenomena either within or across industries there is room for integrating the role of small business. This contribution can be made by aggregation or generalization of the findings at the meso level, which again are partly based upon analyses at the micro

  14. INTEGRATED DESIGN AND ENGINEERING USING BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING: A PILOT PROJECT OF SMALL-SCALE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT IN THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal Sebastian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available During the design phase, decisions are made that affect, on average, 70% of the life-cycle cost of a building. Therefore, collaborative design relying on multidisciplinary knowledge of the building life cycle is essential. Building information modelling (BIM makes it possible to integrate knowledge from various project participants that traditionally work in different phases of the building process. BIM has been applied in a number of large-scale projects in the industrial real estate and infrastructure sectors in different countries, including The Netherlands. The projects in the housing sector, however, are predominantly small scale and carried out by small and medium enterprises (SMEs. These SMEs are looking for practical and affordable BIM solutions for housing projects. This article reports a pilot project of small-scale housing development using BIM in the province of Zeeland, The Netherlands. The conceptual knowledge derived from European and national research projects is disseminated to the SMEs through a series of experimental working sessions. Action learning protocols within a pilot project are developed to ensure direct impacts in terms of cost reduction and quality improvement. The project shows that BIM can be applied without radical changes to the SMEs' information and communication technology systems or to their business organizations. DOI: 10.3763/aedm.2010.0116 Source: Architectural Engineering and Design Management, Volume 6, Number 2, 2010 , pp. 103-110(8

  15. Perinatal mortality rate in the Netherlands compared to other European countries: a secondary analysis of Euro-PERISTAT data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, J.; Baron, R.; Westerneng, M.; Twisk, J.; Hutton, E.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: the poor perinatal mortality ranking of the Netherlands compared to other European countries has led to questioning the safety of primary care births, particularly those at home. Primary care births are only planned at term. We therefore examined to which extent the perinatal mortality

  16. Partnerships between Dutch municipalities and municipalities in countries of migration to the Netherlands; knowledge exchange and mutuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ewijk, E.; Baud, I.S.A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a growing number of Dutch municipalities have established relations with local governments in the countries of migration to the Netherlands (e.g. Turkey, Suriname and Morocco). In addition to strengthening local governance and improving service delivery in the partner municipalities,

  17. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Fissionable materials, ores, radioactive materials and equipment (Fissionable materials and ores; Radioactive materials and equipment); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of individuals undergoing medical exposure); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment; Minister for Economic Affairs; Minister for Social Affairs and Employment; Minister for Health, Welfare and Sports; Minister for Finance; Minister for Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory body - Health Council of the Netherlands; 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG; Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste - COVRA)

  18. IEA Bioenergy task 40. Country report for the Netherlands. Update 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, M.; De Wit, M.; Faaij, A.

    2006-09-01

    Short-term objectives of the IEA Bioenergy Task 40 'Sustainable International Bio-energy Trade: Securing Supply and Demand' are amongst other objectives to present an overview of development of biomass markets in various parts of the world and to identify existing barriers hampering development of a (global) commodity market (e.g. policy framework, ecology, economics). As in most countries biomass is a relatively new (though quickly growing) commodity, relatively little information is available on e.g. the traded volumes and prices of various biomass streams, policies and regulations on biomass use and trade, and existing and perceived barriers. This country report aims to provide an overview of these issues for the Netherlands, and also sets the first step to make an inventory of barriers as perceived by various Dutch stakeholders. The information gathered in this report is to a large extent based on existing statistics and reports from Dutch institutions. The literature data is complemented by additional information obtained from stakeholders, such as utilities, biomass traders, the port of Rotterdam, policy makers and custom institutions. In some cases, the data source was left anonymous because of the confidential nature of the data concerned. This report was first published in 2005. In this updated 2006 version, additional data has been collected for the year 2005, mainly concerning the import of biomass and renewable electricity. Also the policy section has been updated (situation September 2006), and some information on the use of biofuels has been added.

  19. Carbon and energy taxes in a small and open country

    OpenAIRE

    S. Solaymani

    2017-01-01

    Malaysia, as a small and developing country, must reduce carbon emissions because the country is one of the top CO2-emitting countries in the ASEAN region. Therefore, the current study implements two environmental tax policies; carbon and energy taxes, in order to examine the impacts of these policies on the reduction of carbon emission in the whole of the economy by applying a computable general equilibrium model. Since the whole of the government revenue from these tax policies is transferr...

  20. How can Small Countries in South Asia benefit from Biotechnology ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will help small developing countries in South Asia develop ... and Development) countries and emerging economies like India and China. The second concerns a plan to implement agro-biotechnology businesses based on tissue ... in India, including heat stress, water management, and climate-related migration.

  1. Analysis of conditions concerning the natural gas internal market organization in four european countries: Germany, Spain, Netherlands and United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this economic study is the wording of a synthetic document for the public information in the framework of the 98/30/CE european directive transposition to the gas internal market. It is writing in four main chapters, one for each country concerned: the Germany, the Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Each one presents the historical context, the actors of the natural gas industry and the main provisions. (A.L.B.)

  2. Insurance against climate change and flooding in the Netherlands: present, future, and comparison with other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzen, W J W; van den Bergh, J C J M

    2008-04-01

    Climate change is projected to cause severe economic losses, which has the potential to affect the insurance sector and public compensation schemes considerably. This article discusses the role insurance can play in adapting to climate change impacts. The particular focus is on the Dutch insurance sector, in view of the Netherlands being extremely vulnerable to climate change impacts. The usefulness of private insurance as an adaptation instrument to increased flood risks is examined, which is currently unavailable in the Netherlands. It is questioned whether the currently dominant role of the Dutch government in providing damage relief is justified from an economic efficiency perspective. Characteristics of flood insurance arrangements in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Germany, and France are compared in order to identify possible future directions for arrangements in the Netherlands. It is argued that social welfare improves when insurance companies take responsibility for part of the risks associated with climate change.

  3. To Define or Not to Define; Implications for the Governability of Small-Scale coastal Fisheries in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de B.I.; Kraan, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the need to define the small-scale coastal fisheries sector in the Netherlands. It shows that the fact that there is no clear definition of what small-scale fisheries is, affects its governability. This seems to go hand in hand with the lack of a clear perspective on what the

  4. Subsidiary Role and Skilled Labour Effects in Small Developed Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gammelgaard, Jens; McDonald, Frank; Tuselmann, Heinz; Dorrenbacher, Christoph; Stephan, Andreas; Mc Donald, F.; Dörrenbächer, C.

    This paper considers the proportion of skilled labour employed by subsidiaries in small countries in the context of the strategic role of subsidiaries. Strategic role is connected to autonomy and intra-organisational relationships and the mandates given to the subsidiary. In the paper, we draw on

  5. Rural partnerships in Europe, a differentiated view frm a country perspective: the Netherlands and Wales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derkzen, P.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years partnership has become an established aspect of rural development across rural Europe. Both Wales and the Netherlands have seen similar trends towards more decentralized and territorial modes of rural governance in which policy networks of governmental and societal actors work

  6. Examination on small-sized cogeneration HTGR for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Shimakawa, Satoshi; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Yan, Xing; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Ohashi, Kazutaka; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Goto, Minoru; Ueta, Shohei; Mozumi, Yasuhiro; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Okuda, Hiroyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Kubo, Shinji; Takada, Shoji; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-03-01

    The small-sized and safe cogeneration High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) that can be used not only for electric power generation but also for hydrogen production and district heating is considered one of the most promising nuclear reactors for developing countries where sufficient infrastructure such as power grids is not provided. Thus, the small-sized cogeneration HTGR, named High Temperature Reactor 50-Cogeneration (HTR50C), was studied assuming that it should be constructed in developing countries. Specification, equipment configuration, etc. of the HTR50C were determined, and economical evaluation was made. As a result, it was shown that the HTR50C is economically competitive with small-sized light water reactors. (author)

  7. The Netherlands as a model country? As it is done in a clever way. Proposal of businesses and industry in the Netherlands to realize energy and climate change targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    European heads of government and the Dutch cabinet wish to tackle the climate problem energetically. Our climate must not become more than 2 degrees celsius warmer if we want to prevent catastrophical consequences. Dutch businesses support this ambition. In this document, Dutch businesses, represented by VNO-NCW (The Confederation of Netherlands Industry and Employers), MKB-Nederland (Dutch organization for small businesses) and LTO-Netherlands (Dutch Federation of Agriculture and Horticulture), offers some concrete suggestions.(mk) [nl

  8. Changing costs of metastatic non small cell lung cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keusters, W R; de Weger, V A; Hövels, A; Schellens, J H M; Frederix, G W J

    2017-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify the total intramural cost of illness of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the Netherlands between 2006-2012. Secondary objective was to identify whether changes in cost patterns of metastatic NSCLC have occurred over the last years. Patients diagnosed with metastatic NSCLC between 1-1-2006 and 31-12-2012, who had follow-up to death or the date of data cut-off and no trial participation were included. A structured chart review was performed using a case report form. Data collection started after diagnosis of metastatic NSCLC and ended at death or April first, 2015. Data regarding outpatient visits, clinical attendance, oncolytic drug use, imaging, lab tests, radiotherapy and surgery were collected. Sixty-seven patients were included with a median age of 67 years. The median follow-up was 234days. On average patients had 28 outpatient visits and 11 inpatient days. Oncolytic drugs were administered to 76% of the patients. Mean per patient expenditures amounted up to €17,463, with oncolytic drugs (€6,390) as the main cost driver. In comparison with the time-period of 2003-2005 total per patient per year expenses decreased by 44%. The contribution to total yearly costs of oncolytic drugs increased from 18% to 35%, while costs for inpatient stay decreased from 52% to 28% of total expenditures. Outcomes in this study demonstrate that average treatment costs for metastatic NSCLC in the Netherlands Cancer Institute amount to €17,463. Compared to a prior study the average cost for metastatic NSCLC over time in the Netherlands has decreased. A shift of main cost drivers seems to have occurred from inpatient stay, to oncolytic drugs as main contributor. The shift towards treatment cost might become more visible with the introduction of immunotherapy. These results mark the importance of up-to-date cost of illness studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost-effective climate policy in a small country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagem, C.

    1994-01-01

    Unilateral action to curb CO 2 emissions in a small country or a group of countries has only a limited effect on global CO 2 emissions. However, it could be a first step toward a broader climate treaty. So far, unilateral commitments have been aimed at reducing national consumption of fossil fuels. A country that produces and consumes fossil fuels can also infiuence the global CO 2 emissions by reducing its production. The estimated cost of reducing national CO 2 emissions in Norway, through a reduction infossil fuel consumption, is presented in a report from the Environmental Tax Committee (1992). In this paper, that cost is compared with an estimated cost of reducing fossil fuel production. The calculation reveals that it could be less costly to reduce the production than the consumption, given that the effect on global CO 2 emissions is identical. 23 refs., 4 tabs

  10. FDI in small accession countries: The Baltic states

    OpenAIRE

    Hunya, Gábor

    2004-01-01

    Analysing the evolution and determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, this paper argues that sound economic policies have created an environment conducive for FDI. Overall, FDI has contributed to economic growth in the Baltic economies, having financed around one-fifth of fixed investment. However, their small size makes the Baltic countries relatively less attractive for market-seeking FDI in manufacturing. Moreover, at the outset of transition, their ...

  11. Financing small-scale infrastructure investments in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L. Bond; Daniel Platz; Magnus Magnusson

    2012-01-01

    In most developing countries a shortage of long-term, local-currency financing for small-scale infrastructure projects impedes local economic development. Inadequate fiscal transfers, little own source revenue and low creditworthiness make it difficult for local governments to fully fund projects on their own. This paper proposes the use of project finance as a means to attract financing from domestic banks and institutional investors. Donors can play a catalytic role by providing technical a...

  12. The effectiveness of policies to transform a gas-exporting country into a gas-transit country: The case of The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipperus, Ouren T.; Mulder, Machiel

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands has been a major European natural gas producer and exporter for many decades, but now faces the challenge to deal with diminishing resources. In response, the Dutch government initiated a gas-hub strategy, which is the policy to transform the gas industry from an export-oriented business into a transit-oriented business. This policy included a number of investments in the gas infrastructure as well as institutional reforms to enhance the liquidity of the gas market. We study the effects of this gas-hub policy. Using hourly data on the Dutch gas balance over the period 2006–2013, we find that gas storage and trading have become more important, but that the level of gas in transit in the Netherlands remained fairly constant. Consequently, the Dutch gas industry is still mainly oriented on domestic production and export of gas, while the Dutch gas hub (TTF) has become a key virtual trading place. The policy lesson from the Dutch experience is that implementing a gas-hub strategy requires significant investments in the gas infrastructure, while their effects do not necessarily become visible in the short run. -- Highlights: •The Netherlands has been a major gas producer and exporter for decades. •This country implemented a gas hub policy to deal with diminishing resources. •We study the effects of this policy using hourly data over the period 2006–2013. •Storage and trading became more important, but transit hardly grew. •The investments in the gas hub did not have clear effects in the short term

  13. Monitoring of radiation in airdust, deposition and an overall country milk sample. Results in the Netherlands in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overwater, R.M.W.; Aldenkamp, F.J.; Drost, R.M.S; Glastra, P.; Hiemastra, Y.S.; Kik, M.J.; Koolwijk, A.C.; Koolwijk, A.C.; Kwakman, P.J.M.; Koops, J.C.; Van Lunenburg, A.P.P.A.; Nissan, L.; Ockhuizen, A.; Reinen, H.A.J.M.; Tax, R.B.; Tijsmans, M.H.; Van Zanten, R.

    1998-02-01

    The results of radiation measurements of the atmosphere in the Netherlands by the RIVM Laboratory of Radiation Research (LSO) are presented for the year 1996. The programme of RIVM/LSO includes samples of airdust and deposition taken at the RIVM premises in Bilthoven, Netherlands. An overall country milk sample, a mixture of milk samples from four milk factories in the Netherlands, was also analysed. In 1996, the yearly average gross alpha-activity and gross beta-activity concentrations in airdust sampled with a high volume sampler were 0.0671 ± 0.0009 (SD 0.03) and 0.540 ± 0.003 (SD 0.33) mBq.m -3 , where SD illustrates the variation in weekly averages during the year. These values are of the same order as those of the period 1992-1995. The yearly average activity concentrations in airdust, measured using gamma-spectroscopy, for the nuclides 7Be, 137Cs and 210Pb were 3890 ± 50 (SD 1320), 1.60 ± 0.03 (SD 1.2) and 500 ± 10 (SD 390) mBq.m-3. The yearly total gross alpha- and gross beta-activities of the deposition in Bilthoven, Netherlands, were 16.4 ± 1.5 and 67 ± 5 Bq.m-2, and the yearly total deposition of 3H was 970 ± 50 Bq.m-2. The total activities of 137Cs, 7Be and 210Pb in deposition were 0.55 ± 0.03, 920 ± 20 and 64.9 ± 1.6 Bq.m-2, respectively. The 210Pb-analysis and 210Po-analysis results obtained using alpha-spectroscopy were 57 ± 3 and 9 ± 2 Bq.m-2. These activities are all of the same order as those in previous years. The yearly average concentration of 137Cs in consumer milk from a nationwide sample mix was 0.073 ± 0.010 Bq.L-1, which is almost equal to that of the previous year. The results for 90Sr are lower than the detection limit of 0.2 Bq.L-1. 22 refs

  14. 'Geothermal Energy' - and policies - in the Netherlands. Country update November 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heekeren, Victor van [Van Heekeren and Frima Management Consultants, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    Roughly 40% of Dutch energy demand is consumed in the form of low temperature energy for houses, greenhouses and buildings in general - and practically all in the form of natural gas. However, this low temperature energy demand is increasingly supplied by geothermal energy in its various forms. This situation may improve in the coming years. The Netherlands saw a spectacular rise in shallow geothermal applications in the last twenty years. Now Holland seems set on a similar steep path towards deep geothermal energy use. Exploration licence applications for deep drillings have increased from a modest trickle to a torrent of > 50 in the last year and a major impact is expected from the new guarantee scheme - published in October 2009. This article deals with the Dutch developments in the domain of deep geothermal energy. (orig.)

  15. Carbon and energy taxes in a small and open country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Solaymani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia, as a small and developing country, must reduce carbon emissions because the country is one of the top CO2-emitting countries in the ASEAN region. Therefore, the current study implements two environmental tax policies; carbon and energy taxes, in order to examine the impacts of these policies on the reduction of carbon emission in the whole of the economy by applying a computable general equilibrium model. Since the whole of the government revenue from these tax policies is transferred to all household and labor types through two schemes, a lump sum tax, and a labor tax, respectively, it is assumed that there is revenue neutrality in the model for the government. The findings from simulated scenarios indicate that the carbon tax policy is the more efficient policy for reducing CO2 emission, in both transferring schemes, while its impact on macroeconomic variables is almost lower than the equivalent energy tax. The carbon tax is more effective than the energy tax for Malaysia to achieve 40% carbon reduction target in comparison with its 2005 level. The carbon tax, compared to the energy tax, also leads to more decrease in consumption of fossil fuels. The carbon tax policy, in comparison with the energy tax, due to revenue recycling causes much more increase in the welfare of rural and urban households in Malaysia, especially the welfare of rural (lower income households.

  16. How do psychosocial determinants in migrant women in the Netherlands differ from these among their counterparts in their country of origin? A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierkens, V.; van der Ploeg, M.V.; van Eer, M.Y.; Stronks, K.

    2011-01-01

    Migration of non-Western women into Western countries often results in an increase in smoking prevalence among migrant women. To gain more insight into how to prevent this increase, we compared psychosocial determinants of smoking between Surinamese women in Suriname and those in the Netherlands.

  17. [Baltic connections : archival guide to the maritime relations of the countries around the Baltic Sea (including the Netherlands) 1450-1800)] / Enn Küng

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Küng, Enn

    2009-01-01

    Arvustus: Baltic connections : archival guide to the maritime relations of the countries around the Baltic Sea (including the Netherlands) 1450-1800). Leiden, Boston : Brill, 2007. Lisaks raamatule on arhiivijuht kättesaadav ka elektrooniliselt http://www.balticconnections.net/

  18. Biotechnology in developing countries : Proceedings of the symposium, Delft, The Netherlands, 13-14 October 1982

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hemert, P.A.; Lelieveld, H.L.M.; La Rivière, J.W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Biotechnology in Developing Countries aims to be more than the cleverly chosen combination of two hot topics of today. It is obvious that Biotechnology, as the technology of using microorganisms and tissue cells, has certain intrinsic advantages over other technologies in the setting of a Developing

  19. Small Modular Reactors for Countries with Small to Medium Electric Grids - An Economically Sensible Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.

    2012-01-01

    There has recently been a renewed interest throughout the world in small nuclear units for generating electricity and for other applications. A report by the World Nuclear Association discussing the advantages of small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs) over traditional nuclear reactor designs, states that ''modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production, and reduced siting costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction.'' Since the inception of nuclear power, the size of reactor units has grown from under 100 MWe to more than 1600 MWe. Today, due partly to the high capital cost of large power reactors and partly to the need to service small electricity grids, there is a move to develop smaller units. These may be built individually or as modules in a larger plant. SMRs are a good fit in markets where anticipated electricity demand is projected to increase incrementally, because SMRs could be built in series as needed. SMRs might be particularly attractive in countries that currently rely on diesel generators for producing electricity. Small reactors could make economic sense because of the high cost of diesel generation compared to the low marginal cost of producing electricity from nuclear energy. (Keeping in mind the initial investment costs and the need to establish a national regulatory program.) Some SMR designs are fabricated in a factory and then delivered to the site. This could be a solution for markets that lack the qualified engineers and skilled craft workers needed to construct large reactors on site. This paper will provide an overview of the types and attributes of SMRs in use or under development worldwide, describe the similarities and important differences between designs, discuss potential applications for SMRs, including baseload electricity generation, electricity generation for remote locations and areas with

  20. FASTING IN COUNTRIES WHERE THE DAY IS VERY LONG OR VERY SHORT: A Study of Muslims in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Najib Burhani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan falls both during winter and autumn months, when the days are cool and short, and spring and summer months, when the days are long and hot. Fasting in areas where the climate is extremely hot and the day is more than twenty hours is a double hardship that can be a dangerous assault on physical condition. In contrast to that, fasting in areas where the day is very short is, to some extent, like an interval between breakfast and lunch or between lunch and dinner. This article, therefore, intends to discover how Muslims in the countries where the day is either very long or very short deal with the problem of the fasting time. This research is based on the practices of some Muslims in the Netherlands with a variety of countries of origin. This article attempts to answer the following questions: How did they manage their fasting time in the summer or when the day is very long? How did they manage their fasting time in the winter or when the day is very short? What kind of fiqh book or fatwa did they use as reference? Did they think that fasting obligation was dangerous for their health when the day was very long?   [Bulan Ramadan bisa tiba pada musim dingin dan musim gugur, ketika siang hari pendek dan sejuk, tapi Ramadan juga bisa tiba pada musim semi dan musim panas, ketika siang hari sangat panjang dan panas. Puasa di tempat yang sangat panas dan dengan panjang siang hari lebih dari dua puluh jam adalah beban yang berat dan bisa berbahaya bagi kondisi fisik pelakunya. Sebaliknya, puasa di tempat yang siang harinya sangat pendek terasa tak seperti puasa karena ia hanya seperti interval antara makan pagi dan makan siang atau antara makan siang dan makan malam. Tulisan ini didasarkan pada penelitian terhadap praktik berpuasa orang-orang Islam di Belanda dari berbagai negara asal. Pertanyaan yang ingin dijawab dalam tulisan ini adalah: Bagaimana umat Islam Belanda melaksanakan puasa pada musim panas atau ketika siang hari teramat panjang

  1. Solid waste disposal in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasser, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a small and densely populated country, the disposal of solid waste requires strict precautions. Because the landscape is flat and the watertable just under groundlevel, landfilling and dumping must be avoided as much as possible. Incineration of municipal and industrial waste are

  2. How do psychosocial determinants in migrant women in the Netherlands differ from these among their counterparts in their country of origin? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierkens, Vera; van der Ploeg, Maya V; van Eer, Marja Y; Stronks, Karien

    2011-05-26

    Migration of non-Western women into Western countries often results in an increase in smoking prevalence among migrant women. To gain more insight into how to prevent this increase, we compared psychosocial determinants of smoking between Surinamese women in Suriname and those in the Netherlands. Data were obtained between 2000 and 2004 from two cross-sectional studies, the CVRFO study in Suriname (n = 702) and the SUNSET study in the Netherlands (n = 674). For analyses of determinants, we collected additional data in CVRFO study population (n = 85). Differences between the two groups were analysed by chi-square analyses and logistic regression analyses. As was found in other studies among migrant women, more Surinamese migrant women in the Netherlands smoked (31%) than women in Suriname (16%). More Surinamese women in the Netherlands than in Suriname had a positive affective and cognitive attitude towards smoking (OR = 2.6 (95%CI 1.05;6.39) and OR = 3.3 (95%CI 1.31;8.41)). They perceived a positive norm within their partners and friends regarding smoking more frequently (OR = 6.5 (95%CI 2.7;15.6) and OR = 3.3 (95%CI 1.50;7.25)). Migrant women are more positive towards smoking and perceived a more positive norm towards smoking when compared with women in the country of origin. Interventions targeted at the psychosocial determinants regarding smoking for newly migrated women, in particular the consequences of smoking and the norm towards smoking might help to prevent an increase in smoking in those populations.

  3. Planning nature in urbanized countries. An analysis of monetary and non-monetary impacts of conservation policy scenarios in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijtsma, Frans J; van der Bilt, Willem G M; van Hinsberg, Arjen; de Knegt, Bart; van der Heide, Martijn; Leneman, Hans; Verburg, René

    2017-03-01

    Planning and conserving nature areas are challenging tasks in urbanized and intensively used countries like the Netherlands. This paper supports decision making and public policy debate about these tasks in both an empirical and a methodological way. Empirically, we explore policy alternatives by determining the potential consequences of different nature policy scenarios in the Netherlands. Methodologically, we employ a mixed monetary and non-monetary evaluation method known as multi-criteria cost-benefit analysis (MCCBA). We evaluate four new future directions of Dutch nature policy that address four dominant stakeholder demands: biodiversity conservation, the provision of ecosystem services, recreational potential as well as economic gains. To balance compact presentation of evaluation outcomes on the one hand and information richness of results on the other, we distinguish between two impact indicator sets: three "headline" and ten "elaborate" indicators. Using these indicators we discuss the quantitative assessment of the four nature policy scenarios by comparing them to two other scenarios, reflecting the 2010 stand-still baseline situation (2010) as well as a reference policy (Trend). In total, we evaluate six scenarios; four present new directions and two reflect existing or recently (2010) halted practices. Our findings first of all show that even in an urbanized country like the Netherlands, with its intensive competition among land use functions, serious gains in national and international biodiversity are possible. Second, we find that it is doubtful whether stimulating the provision of regulating ecosystem services in a country which applies intensive and profitable agricultural techniques is beneficial. Other countries or areas that are less suitable for intensive agricultural practices may be more logical for this. Finally we demonstrate that increasing urban recreational green space - a common challenge for many urban areas - can only be achieved at

  4. Electricity and telecommunications regulatory institutions in small and developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, J. [London Business School, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-09-01

    The spread of utility liberalisation and privatisation to middle and low income developing countries raises the problem of whether and how they can establish an effective regulatory capability of whether the supply of regulatory services is likely to be insufficient. The paper presents evidence on the size of electricity regulatory agencies in 24 mainly middle and lower income countries as well as the number of high-level, specialist regulatory staff and the potential resource pool from post-school education. The paper also discusses how far the problem can be alleviated and/or avoided by the use of regulation by contract, regulation by multi-national regulatory agency or contracting-out. The paper concludes that such solutions are unlikely to be generally effective but that informal exchanges of information and pooling of resources between national regulators on a market-driven basis, as seen in Southern Africa and the EU, is a promising option. The paper concludes by pointing to the need to ascertain the minimum required regulatory capability in developing countries as perceived by Governments and potential investors. (author)

  5. Radwaste Management in Small Nuclear Country - National Policy and Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, Tomaz

    2014-01-01

    The lecture will briefly present the Slovene nuclear program and its legal framework focused on the radioactive waste management policy and strategy aspect. Slovenia is an example of small EU member state with small shared nuclear power program demonstrating safe, secure and efficient management of radioactive waste. Different principles of radioactive waste management will be discoursed; among others including: minimization of waste generation, the polluter pays principle, safe storage followed by final disposal and also new findings on research and development of storage, disposal and recycling of radioactive waste. (author)

  6. Abortion in small ruminants in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brom, R; Lievaart-Peterson, K; Luttikholt, S; Peperkamp, K; Wouda, W; Vellema, P

    2012-07-01

    During five successive lambing seasons between 2006 and 2011, 453 submissions of abortion material, 282 of ovine and 171 of caprine origin, were examined at the Animal Health Service in the Netherlands. Infectious agents as the most plausible cause of the abortion were found in 48 percent of the ovine submissions and in 34 percent of the caprine submissions. Submission of both aborted fetus and placental membranes increased the diagnostic yield of laboratory investigations (17 percent and 21 percent for ovine and caprine submissions, respectively). The main infectious causes of abortion in sheep were Chlamydia abortus, Campylobacter spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Listeria spp., and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The main infectious causes of abortion in goats were Coxiella burnetii, Chlamydia abortus, Listeria spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Campylobacter spp. In 42 percent of the ovine and in 56 percent of the caprine submissions a causal agent was not identified. Furthermore, in 12 percent of the ovine and 10 percent of the caprine submissions evidence of placentitis, indicative of an infectious cause of the abortion, was found, but no infectious agent was identified. Most infectious causes of ovine and caprine abortion have zoonotic potential. Humans, especially pregnant women, who are in close contact with lambing sheep or goats should be aware of the importance of precautionary hygiene measures.

  7. Small-scale hydropower in the Netherlands : problems and strategies of system builders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, T.N.; Höffken, J.I.; van der Vleuten, E.B.A.

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale hydroelectricity (hydel) currently receives worldwide attention as a clean, green, and socially just energy technology. People generally assume that downsizing hydel plants reduces harmful impacts. However, recent debates call for careful circumspection of small hydel’s environmental,

  8. Market attractiveness Energy Performance Certificate for Buildings. Analysis of the survey results. Country report for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobben, M.M.H.; Hoogelander, K.J.; Schorel, J.S.; Corpeleijn, M.F.; Hezelmans, A.; Verhoef, L.A.

    2006-09-01

    The STABLE project aims at launching a collaborative effort of national energy agencies and federations of building owners in order to establish a firm basis for market acceptance of building energy certification as defined in the Directive on the Energy Performance of Buildings. This report presents the results of a survey for the Netherlands. [nl

  9. Modern castles and country houses: the use of history in ‘gated communities’ in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuizen, Dewi; Meier, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with the question of why the architecture of new gated communities includes references to built heritage. The emergence of ‘gated communities’ in the Netherlands is especially interesting because its diffusion is not primarily driven by distinct urban segregation and the gap

  10. Lessons of the Past. Development of an alternative fuel infrastructure. The case of LPG/CNG in the Netherlands and other countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, J.; Bunzeck, I.G.

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of an alternative transport fuel always bears a challenge that is often referred to as a 'chicken and egg' problem: while people will only become interested in and start switching to a new fuel if sufficient refuelling stations are available, industry will only start investing in the development of a refuelling infrastructure if the market is sufficiently developed and existing stations are economically viable. Governments have a variety of, for example, fiscal or regulatory measures at hand to facilitate and support the introduction of an alternative transport fuel. This report describes and analyses the introduction of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or compressed natural gas (CNG) in the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Canada and Argentina. In particular, the report pays attention to the development of station coverage and vehicle numbers for these alternative fuels. Drivers and barriers to the introduction of LPG or CNG, such as fuel price developments, supporting policy instruments or a lack thereof were identified. Main focus are the Netherlands where LPG was introduced in the mid-1950s. A comparison of developments in the Netherlands with the other four countries reveals that well concerted efforts by policy makers and industry supporting a parallel development of vehicle uptake and refuelling station availability may lead to the firm establishment of an alternative fuel market. The report concludes with lessons learned for the introduction of hydrogen as an alternative transport fuel.

  11. Small risk of developing symptomatic tick-borne diseases following a tick bite in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofhuis Agnetha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In The Netherlands, the incidence of Lyme borreliosis is on the rise. Besides its causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., other potential pathogens like Rickettsia, Babesia and Ehrlichia species are present in Ixodes ricinus ticks. The risk of disease associated with these microorganisms after tick-bites remains, however, largely unclear. A prospective study was performed to investigate how many persons with tick-bites develop localized or systemic symptoms and whether these are associated with tick-borne microorganisms. Results In total, 297 Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected from 246 study participants who consulted a general practitioner on the island of Ameland for tick bites. Ticks were subjected to PCR to detect DNA of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp. or Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp.. Sixteen percent of the collected ticks were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., 19% for Rickettsia spp., 12% for Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. and 10% for Babesia spp.. At least six months after the tick bite, study participants were interviewed on symptoms by means of a standard questionnaire. 14 out of 193 participants (8.3% reported reddening at the bite site and 6 participants (4.1% reported systemic symptoms. No association between symptoms and tick-borne microorganisms was found. Attachment duration ≥24 h was positively associated with reddening at the bite site and systemic symptoms. Using logistic regression techniques, reddening was positively correlated with presence of Borrelia afzelii, and having 'any symptoms' was positively associated with attachment duration. Conclusion The risk of contracting acute Lyme borreliosis, rickettsiosis, babesiosis or ehrlichiosis from a single tick bite was

  12. The Row Material Policy In Poor And Small Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia ŞARGU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The major tasks concerning economic diversification and modernization mean the importance of priorities for foreign policy regarding economic diplomacy. Thinking about the governmental tasks for prioritizing directions of foreign trade activities, by attracting international investors, by upgrading technology, importing advanced foreign technologies, exporting development, and promoting national economic interests abroad. The Governmental structures and authorized institutions always relay on importance for external economic policy, focusing on achieving concrete economic results. In a globalized industrialization, tasks of economic modernization, development of the resource and infrastructure establishing for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integration, tasks that require intensification of economic cooperation in a widespread area. The particular importance in this research has the close relationship between cooperation within international organizations with universal or regional interests. Achieving the objectives of economic diplomacy will help improve the competitiveness of the economy ultimately, create new industries and jobs and economic growth of the country as a whole.

  13. Basic study of small-scale consumption of natural gas in the Netherlands in 1995 (BAK 1995). Consumer looks for balance between comfort and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, R.; Weegink, R.

    1996-01-01

    From the results of the title study it appears that households in the Netherlands consumed 120 million m 3 natural gas more in 1995 than in 1994. The averaged consumption, however, was a little bit lower in 1995 than in 1994. The consumption of natural gas for cooking purposes and for water heating was the same. The small decrease of the average consumption was caused by space heating. BAK is an annual survey among circa 3,300 households in the Netherlands. Next to data on consumption, also appliances are inventorized as well as consumption patterns and behavioral aspects. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Determinants of Point-Of-Sale system adoption: a survey among small retailers in The Netherlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Huiden, R.P.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Several threats affect the survival of small, independent retail companies. Adoption and use of Point-of-Sale (POS) systems may offer important benefits to counter these threats. POS systems are not widely used by these retailers, however. This research investigates the determinants of the adoption of POS systems using a conceptual model based on existing adoption theories. Based on this, a survey has been held among 37 Dutch small, independent retailers, to answer the question what the most ...

  15. Small hydropower in Southern Africa – an overview of five countries in the region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker Klunne, Wim

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the status of small hydropower in Lesotho, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. For each country, an overview will be given of the electricity sector and the role of hydropower, the potential for small hydropower and the expected future of this technology. Small

  16. A Demo-Genetic Analysis of a Small Reintroduced Carnivore Population: The Otter (Lutra lutra in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maelle Seignobosc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the viability of reintroduced animal populations is a complicated task. Reintroductions are usually carried out with a small number of individuals, thereby, limiting the possibilities for monitoring because of the possible negative effects of intensive monitoring on survival and reproduction. Moreover, reintroduction studies are part of a socioeconomic interplay of forces, thereby, also limiting monitoring possibilities. Also, knowledge of population demography and abundance can be incomplete or unattainable. Here, we illustrate how we combined traditional telemetry and novel non-invasive genetic methodology to construct a detailed life table of a small reintroduced otter population in The Netherlands. Combining an appropriate capture-mark-recapture framework with a matrix modelling approach provides, in general, useful insights for such populations. The data indicated that (i male survival is lower than female survival, (ii the reintroduced population is currently growing (estimated λ=1.26: range [1.06, 1.42] and seems viable, (iii increasing adult survival is currently the critical stage at which efforts of field managers should concentrate, and (iv the modelling framework allowed us to determine the boundary conditions for the vital rates under which the population would go extinct. The applied approach directs at measurements that help field managers to implement the right conservation strategy after reintroductions.

  17. Small places: the home-coming of human rights in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Human rights as Eleanor Roosevelt famously said, begin in small places: 'Unless they have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere'. In this inaugural lecture on the sociology of human rights, Barbara Oomen sets out a model for understanding how human rights acquire meaning in such places.

  18. Implementation of Lean Six Sigma in small- and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timans, W.; Antony, J.; Ahaus, K.; van Solingen, R.

    In this paper we provide an exploration and analysis of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) implementation in Dutch manufacturing/engineering small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Critical success factors (CSFs) and impeding factors are identified and analysed. Exploratory empirical evidence about LSS

  19. Determinants of Point-Of-Sale system adoption: a survey among small retailers in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Huiden, R.P.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Several threats affect the survival of small, independent retail companies. Adoption and use of Point-of-Sale (POS) systems may offer important benefits to counter these threats. POS systems are not widely used by these retailers, however. This research investigates the determinants of the adoption

  20. Innovations on nuclear energy - what can a small country contribute?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, B.; Cercek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Slovenian energy policy gives priority to the use of renewable energy resources. The energy policy defined in the Resolution on the National Energy Program adopted in 2004 foresees increasing of renewable energy (RES) sources in the primary energy consumption up to 12 % in 2010. The share of electricity from RES in total electricity production in the year 2004 was 29,1%. The share of RES in the primary energy balance in the same year was 10,7 %, with about half of this coming from hydropower. The electricity power produced by co-generation is about 8 % and expected to double by 2010. However, the Krsko nuclear power plant produces about one third of electricity needed within the country. Consequently, Slovenia has long tradition in research pertaining to development and utilisation of nuclear technology. Furthermore, Slovenian scientists have long been collaborating in numerous fusion-related projects. The major equipment available include an ion-beam accelerator with material diagnostics installations, the TRIGA nuclear research reactor, high-temperature furnaces, an advanced, dedicated fully-integrated high-resolution microscope facility for investigations of nano structured materials, computer systems for simulations, structural mechanical analysis and CAD, and much more. The researchers at the Jozef Stefan Institute study the processes that occur on plasma facing materials and in the edge plasma of tokamak reactors and involve neutral hydrogen/deuterium molecules. These molecules are typically vibrationally excited that influences respective reaction cross sections. Therefore, a special experimental technique for vibrational spectroscopy of molecules was developed and an ion beam analytical technique ERDA is used for characterizing hydrogen content on and beneath the material surface. Ion beam analytical methods are also being developed for the studies of plasma wall interaction processes such as erosion, deposition, fuel retention and material migration in

  1. Basic study natural gas small-scale consumption 1991 in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weegink, R.J.; Abbing, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    The consumption of natural gas by Dutch households and underlying trends influencing the natural gas consumption are investigated annually by means of a survey involving more than 2,700 households. The small-scale consumption totals some 11,65 billion m 3 in 1991 of which 79% was used for space heating and 18% for hot water production. Data are presented on types of residential buildings, the penetration of several forms of thermal insulation, the penetration of cooking appliances, heating systems, and fireplaces per building type, and natural gas consumption for space heating, also per type of building. 7 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Planning nature in urbanized countries. An analysis of monetary and non-monetary impacts of conservation policy scenarios in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J. Sijtsma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Planning and conserving nature areas are challenging tasks in urbanized and intensively used countries like the Netherlands. This paper supports decision making and public policy debate about these tasks in both an empirical and a methodological way. Empirically, we explore policy alternatives by determining the potential consequences of different nature policy scenarios in the Netherlands. Methodologically, we employ a mixed monetary and non-monetary evaluation method known as multi-criteria cost-benefit analysis (MCCBA. We evaluate four new future directions of Dutch nature policy that address four dominant stakeholder demands: biodiversity conservation, the provision of ecosystem services, recreational potential as well as economic gains. To balance compact presentation of evaluation outcomes on the one hand and information richness of results on the other, we distinguish between two impact indicator sets: three “headline” and ten “elaborate” indicators. Using these indicators we discuss the quantitative assessment of the four nature policy scenarios by comparing them to two other scenarios, reflecting the 2010 stand-still baseline situation (2010 as well as a reference policy (Trend. In total, we evaluate six scenarios; four present new directions and two reflect existing or recently (2010 halted practices. Our findings first of all show that even in an urbanized country like the Netherlands, with its intensive competition among land use functions, serious gains in national and international biodiversity are possible. Second, we find that it is doubtful whether stimulating the provision of regulating ecosystem services in a country which applies intensive and profitable agricultural techniques is beneficial. Other countries or areas that are less suitable for intensive agricultural practices may be more logical for this. Finally we demonstrate that increasing urban recreational green space − a common challenge for many urban areas

  3. Netherlands export country for electricity? New developments in power plants and the impact on the Clean and Efficient programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seebregts, A.J.; Daniels, B.W.

    2008-07-01

    This report explores part of the effects of the Dutch Climate Programme 'Clean and Efficient - Opportunities for Tomorrow' on the emissions of air pollutants, as included in the National Emissions Ceilings. The starting point for the analysis is the ex ante evaluation of Clean and Efficient as published in September 2007. Specifically for the Netherlands, the role of the power generation sector is important. For the near future (up to 2015), about 11 to 15 GW of new fossil generation capacity is being planned. In combination with the Clean and Efficient Programme, this will have a large impact on the resulting national emissions of air pollutants. Strong climate policies and high CO2 prices are likely to result in a lower electricity demand than the original reference projection (the Global Economy High Oil Price scenario). In addition, more renewable electricity generation and more cogeneration are expected. These changes are likely to improve the international competitiveness of the Dutch electricity generation. As a result, electricity exports rise and part of the emission reductions materialize outside the Netherlands, rather than within its borders [nl

  4. Preconception care policy, guidelines, recommendations and services across six European countries: Belgium (Flanders), Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawe, Jill; Delbaere, Ilse; Ekstrand, Maria; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine; Larsson, Margareta; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo; Stern, Jenny; Steegers, Eric; Stephenson, Judith; Tydén, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    Preconception care is important for the screening, prevention and management of risk factors that affect pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pre-pregnancy care policies, guidelines, recommendations and services in six European countries. In 2013, an electronic search and investigation was undertaken of preconception policy, guidelines, recommendations and services available to healthcare professionals and the general public in six European countries: Belgium (Flanders), Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Findings were compared within five categories: Governmental policy and legislation; Professional bodies and organisations; Healthcare providers; Charitable organisations; Web-based public information and internet sites. All countries had preconception recommendations for women with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and epilepsy. Recommendations for healthy women and men were fragmented and inconsistent. Preconception guidance was often included in antenatal and pregnancy guidelines. Differences between countries were seen with regard to nutritional and lifestyle advice particularly in relation to fish, caffeine and alcohol consumption, and vitamin supplementation. Current guidelines are heterogeneous. Collaborative research across Europe is required in order to develop evidence-based guidelines for preconception health and care. There is a need to establish a clear strategy for promoting advice and guidance within the European childbearing population.

  5. The Netherlands as importing country. Land use and emissions of basic materials flows; Nederland importland. Landgebruik en emissies van grondstofstromen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevenster, M.N.; Bijleveld, M.M.; Bergsma, G.C.; Croezen, H.J. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Delahaye, R. [Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek CBS, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    This report analyses the environmental impacts of importing feedstocks for own consumption in the Netherlands and for the feedstocks that are forward after they have been shaped into a product. Based on data from Statistics Netherlands, a closer look is taken at toxic emissions land use and biodiversity. Feedstocks with a larger impact on these themes include: cocoa, chemical chains, coal, grains, wood, paper, cotton, oil seeds, steel, copper, aluminum, zinc transport fuels, fish, meat, dairy and potatoes. For most of these materials chain policy is being developed. Moreover, part of the policy is only focused on energy or on biodiversity. Integrating these themes may prevent contradictory measures from being taken. The report also presents the order of ranking of the materials for different environmental themes. [Dutch] In dit rapport is geanalyseerd wat de milieueffecten zijn van onze import van grondstoffen voor de eigen consumptie in Nederland en ook voor de grondstoffen die wij weer doorvoeren nadat we ze omgevormd hebben tot product. Er is op basis van CBS-data gekeken naar broeikasgassen, toxische emissie, landgebruik en biodiversiteit. Grondstoffen met een grote impact op deze thema's zijn: cacao, chemieketens, kolen, granen, hout, papier, katoen, oliezaden, staal, koper, aluminium, zink, transportbrandstoffen, vis, vlees, zuivel en aardappelen. Voor een groot deel van deze materialen is er ketenbeleid in ontwikkeling. Bovendien is een deel van het beleid alleen gericht op energie of alleen op biodiversiteit. Het integreren van die thema's kan voorkomen dat er tegenstrijdige maatregelen worden genomen. In het rapport zijn de rangordes van de materialen op de verschillende milieuthema's ook apart gepresenteerd.

  6. Proceedings of the International conference: Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference of Croatian Nuclear Society `Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid` was organized with intention to focus on and discuss the specific needs and interests of the countries with small or medium nuclear systems. In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put greater emphasis on their rational and efficient use. For these countries the world wide developments on innovative reactors` systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and cooperation amongst that group of countries would be of great value. As in the future of nuclear energy there will be many more countries with only small or medium nuclear systems, collecting specific experience and cooperation between the like countries will be an additional value to the now prevailing equipment supplier - national utility relationships.

  7. Proceedings of the International conference: Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference of Croatian Nuclear Society 'Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid' was organized with intention to focus on and discuss the specific needs and interests of the countries with small or medium nuclear systems. In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put greater emphasis on their rational and efficient use. For these countries the world wide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and cooperation amongst that group of countries would be of great value. As in the future of nuclear energy there will be many more countries with only small or medium nuclear systems, collecting specific experience and cooperation between the like countries will be an additional value to the now prevailing equipment supplier - national utility relationships

  8. Small Firms in a Small Country: Managerial Factors, Internationalization and Performance of Slovenian SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Mariola Ciszewska-Mlinarič; Franjo Mlinarič

    2010-01-01

    International activities of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) constitute an important research area. To understand this phenomenon, researchers employ different theoretical perspectives. Among them, the resource-based theory has been given much attention. In this study three managerial factors: managerial attitude toward internationalization, internationalization knowledge and international experience, are seen as examples of the firm’s intangible assets. The objectives of this study are tw...

  9. Proceedings of the International Conference: Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    The conference of Croatian Nuclear Society ``Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid`` is based on experience from last conference of Croatian Nuclear Society in Opatija and on the same philosophy of serving the needs of small or medium present or future user countries. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as accommodation of Kyoto restriction on CO{sub 2} emission, or liability and insurance for nuclear damage. In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put greater emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently the world wide developments on innovative reactors` systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and cooperation amongst that group of countries would be of great value. As in the future of nuclear energy there will be many more countries with only small or medium nuclear systems, collecting specific experience and cooperation between the like countries will be an additional value to the now prevailing equipment supplier - national utility relationships. Here is presented nine sessions: 1. Energy Options in Countries with Small and Medium Grids 2. Reactors for Small and Medium Electricity Grids 3. Operation and Maintenance Experience 4. Deterministic Safety Analysis 5. Probabilistic Safety Analysis 6. Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning 7. Public Relations 8. Emergency Preparedness 9. Liability and Insurance for Nuclear Damage

  10. Proceedings of the International Conference: Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The conference of Croatian Nuclear Society ''Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grid'' is based on experience from last conference of Croatian Nuclear Society in Opatija and on the same philosophy of serving the needs of small or medium present or future user countries. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as accommodation of Kyoto restriction on CO 2 emission, or liability and insurance for nuclear damage. In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put greater emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently the world wide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and cooperation amongst that group of countries would be of great value. As in the future of nuclear energy there will be many more countries with only small or medium nuclear systems, collecting specific experience and cooperation between the like countries will be an additional value to the now prevailing equipment supplier - national utility relationships. Here is presented nine sessions: 1. Energy Options in Countries with Small and Medium Grids 2. Reactors for Small and Medium Electricity Grids 3. Operation and Maintenance Experience 4. Deterministic Safety Analysis 5. Probabilistic Safety Analysis 6. Radioactive Waste Management and Decommissioning 7. Public Relations 8. Emergency Preparedness 9. Liability and Insurance for Nuclear Damage

  11. Labour market institutions in small Pacific island countries: Main guidelines for labour market reforms

    OpenAIRE

    Malo, Miguel Á.

    2017-01-01

    This report consists of a comprehensive overview of labour market institutions in the small Pacific island countries in order to propose recommendations to improve the performance of their labour markets. We pay particular attention to three countries: Fiji, Palau and Papua New Guinea. We focus on the main pillars of labour market institutions, as employment protection legislation, minimum wage, and labour organization. The analysis considers the possibilities for institutional change in the ...

  12. Commemorating a ‘Foreign’ War in a Neutral Country The Political Insignificance of World War 1 Memory in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees Ribbens

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent creation of a First World War museum exhibit at Huis Doorn reflects the increased Dutch attention paid to this war, accompanying the international Centenary efforts, although the neutral Netherlands had not been actively involved in the military events of wwi. This initiative, on a small estate where the former German emperor Wilhelm II lived after the defeat of Germany in 1918, was not a natural outcome of the dynamics of Dutch historical culture. This article raises the question of how wwi became increasingly emphasised in the early twenty- first century, and to what extent this reflects a profound change in the national historical culture, which previously displayed no strong connections to wwi. While familiarity with wwi has grown among the Dutch media and the wider public, governmental interest remained limited (very different from the case of wwii, making it rather difficult to actually speak of politics of memory. 

  13. Small hydropower in Southern Africa: an overview of five countries in the region

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available dif- ferent sources, but is incomplete and inconsistent. This lack of information severely hampers the abili- ty to learn from past experiences and creates a bar- rier to the uptake of the technology (Gaul et al., 2010). 14 Journal of Energy... of lack of infor- mation by providing an overview of the status of small hydropower in five southern African countries. Defining small hydropower No internationally agreed definitions exist for the different sizes of hydropower. A generic distinction...

  14. Micro and small enterprises, water and developing countries: a challenge for sustainability in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz Galindo, G.A.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between environmental agencies and polluters is especially challenging in the context of micro and small sized enterprises (McSEs) in developing countries. The focus is mainly at end-of-pipe solutions that are usually unaffordable for McSEs. In order to engage them in achieving

  15. Currency Denomination of Bank Loans : Evidence from Small Firms in Transition Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, M.; Ongena, S.; Yesin, P.

    2008-01-01

    We examine the firm-level and country-level determinants of the currency denomination of small business loans. We introduce an information asymmetry between banks and firms in a model that also features the trade-off between the cost of debt and firm-level distress costs. Banks in our model don’t

  16. Patterns of care and outcomes for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer in the TNM-7 era: Results from the Netherlands Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, C; Dahele, M; Smit, E F; Paul, M A; Senan, S; Hartemink, K J; Damhuis, R A

    2017-08-01

    There is limited data on the pattern of care for locally advanced, clinical (c) IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the TNM-7 staging era. The primary aim of this study was to investigate national patterns of care and outcomes in the Netherlands, with a secondary focus on the use of surgery. Data from patients treated for TNM-7 cIIIB NSCLC between 2010 and 2014, was extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Survival data was obtained from the automated Civil Registry. 43.762 patients with NSCLC were recorded in the NCR during this 5-year period, with cIIIB accounting for 10% (n=4.401). Clinical N2 (37%) and N3 (63%) nodal involvement was pathologically confirmed in 50.8%. The use of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) increased with time from 9% to 29% (pNetherlands, CRT is the most frequent treatment for cIIIB NSCLC in the TNM-7 era. The use of surgery is limited. Accurate staging requires specific attention and the scarce use of radical treatment in elderly patients merits further evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Explaining technical change in a small country the Finnish national innovation system

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Pentti

    1994-01-01

    Technical change is produced by the interaction of a large number of technical, economic, social and institutional factors. One of the starting points is the concept of national innovation systems. The aim of this book is to take Finland as an example illustrating the challenges faced by small countries. The characteristics and performance of the Finnish national innovation system of the last couple of decades are analyzed. The Finnish experience is put in a broader context by comparing it with a few other countries. The development paths possible in the near future are assessed. According to the results, many problems remain despite favourable developments in several technology indicators. The rigidities of the social institutions created during the 1970s and 1980s seem to have become obstacles for economic and technological development. There are fairly large differences between the countries studied, and even between the culturally and historically close Nordic countries. However,Finland and Sweden seem to...

  18. Proceedings of the International conference: Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In order to achieve best safety and operational standards countries with limited human and material resources must put greater emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently the worldwide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are of substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and co-operation amongst that group of countries is of great interest. As in the future use of nuclear energy there will be many more countries with small or medium nuclear systems, exchanging specific experience and co-operation between the like countries will be an additional value to the now prevailing equipment supplier - national utility relationships.

  19. Proceedings of the International conference: Nuclear option in countries with small and medium electricity grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In order to achieve best safety and operational standards countries with limited human and material resources must put greater emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently the worldwide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are of substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and co-operation amongst that group of countries is of great interest. As in the future use of nuclear energy there will be many more countries with small or medium nuclear systems, exchanging specific experience and co-operation between the like countries will be an additional value to the now prevailing equipment supplier - national utility relationships

  20. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Possible Future Role of Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujevic, L.

    2016-01-01

    Small and Medium Sized Reactors (SMRs) could have enormous potential as options for enhancing the energy supply security, as well as providing a lower capital investment compared to conventional Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The trend in SMR development has been towards design certification of small modular reactors, defined as advanced reactors that produce electric power up to 300 MW(e), designed to be built in factories and shipped to utilities for installation as demand arises. The factory-built small modular reactors aim to reduce lengthy construction times while simultaneously increasing quality, thereby minimizing the costs associated with the current time for construction that spans 5 to 8 years. SMR designs include water-cooled reactors, high temperature gas cooled reactors, as well as liquid metal cooled reactors with fast neutron spectrum. Also, many are designed to be emplaced below ground level, giving a high resistance to terrorist threats. The projected timelines of readiness for deployment of SMRs generally range from the present to 2025 - 2030. Currently there are more than 45 SMR designs under development for different application issues. This paper will try to elaborate the benefits and drawbacks of SMRs, as well as describe a couple of designs. Furthermore, some timelines and cost estimates will be provided, depending on the data currently available. Taking all that into account, the conclusion will try to ascertain the suitability of SMRs for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids, namely Croatia. (author).

  2. New to nuclear countries: considerations for adoption of Small Modular Reactors - a guide to future adopters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, A.; Ho, M.; Storr, G., E-mail: adi.paterson@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are under development in a number of countries. This class of reactors, with enhanced safety and security inherent to their design, can potentially offer advantages to countries adopting nuclear power for the first time. This includes countries considering expanding existing nuclear power capability using the benefits of Generation III+ and Generation IV technological advances. For example, public perceptions and engagement in relation to nuclear safety and security are important and need to be addressed. The regulation of nuclear power plants and the management of the nuclear fuel cycle are also important considerations. For some countries, an industrial strategy linked to participation in the nuclear fuel cycle could be a priority, associated with the development of a sophisticated workforce to support the design, construction, commissioning and operation of a fleet of reactors. Some countries will choose to be early adopters of SMRs. Others may prefer to wait until the technologies are more established. This paper will focus on the potential appeal of different SMR designs in relation to the considerations that new to nuclear countries must address and how this underpins effective decision making. (author)

  3. Biomass gasification in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Drift, A. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    This reports summarizes the activities, industries, and plants on biomass gasification in the Netherlands. Most of the initiatives somehow relate to waste streams, rather than clean biomass, which may seem logic for a densely populated country as the Netherlands. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest for the production of SNG (Substitute Natural Gas) from biomass, both from governments and industry.

  4. Perceived discrimination in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iris Andriessen; Henk Fernee; Karin Wittebrood

    2014-01-01

    Only available in electronic version There is no systematic structure in the Netherlands for mapping out the discrimination experiences of different groups in different areas of society. As in many other countries, discrimination studies in the Netherlands mostly focus on the experiences

  5. Marriage migration in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen Sterckx; Jaco Dagevos; Willem Huijnk; Jantine van Lisdonk

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Huwelijksmigratie in Nederland When a man or woman living in the Netherlands embarks on a relationship with a partner from another country and the couple decide to build a married life together in the Netherlands, we call this marriage migration. The foreign partner who moves to

  6. A review of mercury exposure among artisanal small-scale gold miners in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Kasper Bruun; Thomsen, Jane Frølund; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of gold using mercury has been a way out of poverty for millions of people in developing countries. Artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) has expanded during the last decades and is often carried out under primitive conditions. Thus, workers in this industry may be exposed to high...... levels of mercury and suffer from toxic effects from mercury exposure. The objective of this review was to provide an outline of the studies available on elemental mercury exposure among artisanal small-scale gold miners....

  7. The role of small modular reactors in enhancing energy security in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessides, I. N.; Kuznestov, V.

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, small modular reactors (SMRs) have been attracting considerable attention around the world. SMR designs incorporate innovative approaches to achieve simplicity, modularity and speed of build, passive safety features, proliferation resistance, and reduced financial risk. The incremental capacity expansion associated with SMR deployment could provide a better match (than the large-scale reactors) to the limited grid capacity of many developing countries. Because of their lower capital requirements, SMRs could also effectively address the energy needs of small developing countries with limited financial resources. Although SMRs can have substantially higher specific capital costs as compared to large-scale reactors, they may nevertheless enjoy significant economic benefits due to shorter build times, accelerated learning effects and co-siting economies, temporal and sizing flexibility of deployment, and design simplification. (author)

  8. Promoting space research and applications in developing countries through small satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, M.

    The high vantage-point of space offers very direct and tangible benefits to developing countries when carefully focused upon their real and particular communications and Earth observation needs. However, until recently, access to space has been effectively restricted to only those countries prepared to invest enormous sums in complex facilities and expensive satellites and launchers: this has placed individual participation in space beyond the sensible grasp of developing countries. However, during the last decade, highly capable and yet inexpensive small satellites have been developed which provide an opportunity for developing countries realistically to acquire and operate their own independent space assets - customized to their particular national needs. Over the last 22 years, the Surrey Space Centre has pioneered, developed and launched 23 nano-micro-minisatellite missions, and has worked in partnership with 12 developing countries to enable them to take their first independent steps into space. Surrey has developed a comprehensive and in-depth space technology know-how transfer and 'hands-on' training programme that uses a collaborative project comprising the design, construction, launch and operation of a microsatellite to acquire an indigenous space capability and create the nucleus of a national space agency and space industry. Using low cost small satellite projects as a focus, developing countries are able to initiate a long term, affordable and sustainable national space programme specifically tailored to their requirements, that is able to access the benefits derived from Earth observation for land use and national security; improved communications services; catalyzing scientific research and indigenous high-technology supporting industries. Perhaps even more important is the long-term benefit to the country provided by stimulating educational and career opportunities for your scientists and engineers and retaining them inside the country rather the

  9. ECONOMIC PROMOTION OF A SMALL COUNTRY – THE CASE OF SLOVENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Dejan Romih

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the economic promotion of a small country in the case of Slovenia. It also examines the economic diplomacy, whose main activity is the promotion of an economy, in the same case. For Slovenia, economic promotion, especially trade and investment promotion, is particularly important. One of the reasons for this is the importance of foreign trade and investment for its economic growth and development.

  10. ECONOMIC PROMOTION OF A SMALL COUNTRY – THE CASE OF SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan ROMIH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the economic promotion of a small country in the case of Slovenia, which is facing certain economic and social problems. One reason for this is the current financial and economic crisis, which is continuing to affect the country’s economy. Economic promotion is therefore very important for Slovenia and its economic performance in both the short and long run.

  11. Real Exchange Rate Dynamics in a Small, Primary-Exporting Country

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsin S. Khan; Peter J. Montiel

    1987-01-01

    Although the nominal exchange rate is often used as a policy instrument in small, primary-commodity-exporting countries, the real exchange rate is an endogenous variable that responds to both exogenous and policyinduced shocks. This paper examines the dynamic effects on the real exchange rate of various shocks, such as devaluation, fiscal and trade policies, and changes in the terms of trade and foreign real interest rates. Because the path of the real exchange rate differs for different type...

  12. Astronomy in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Wilfried; Habing, Harm

    2013-01-01

    We describe the state of astronomical research in the Netherlands per early 2012. We add some notes on its history of this research and on the strategic choices for the future. Compared to the size of the country (16 million people) the Netherlands is maintaining a high profile in astronomical research over a period of more than one century. The professional research community consists of about 650 people. This includes research staff, postdocs, PhD students, technical staff working on instrumentation projects and people involved in the operations of ground-based telescopes and astronomical space missions. We do not take into account staff working for international organizations based in the Netherlands. Astronomical research in the Netherlands is carried out at four university institutes and two national research institutes that fall under the umbrella of the national funding agency NWO. The Netherlands is the host of two international organizations: ESTEC, the technology division of the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE). The Netherlands are one of the founding members of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and of ESA. This paper will address a number of significant multilateral collaborations.

  13. Small Companies Innovations in Emerging Countries: E-Business Adoption and its Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Novaes Zilber

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations have been taking advantage of e-business as an innovative opportunity to improve business results, but small companies have not been adopting this tool as quickly as large corporations. There are several studies on the adoption of e-business in developed countries, but there are fewer studies in emerging Latin American countries. Thus, the goal of this study was to describe the business model of small companies that have adopted e-business (an innovation to this segment in an emerging Latin American country. For that, we used a quantitative approach trough a survey data. Main results: the owners/shareholders play a central role in making decisions about the adoption of e-business; the main value delivered from using the internet was improved brand and/or product awareness. The companies using e-business achieved increase in business and an expanded geographic scope of sales. The main difficulties encountered were training personnel to work on the internet and defining which web activities can lead to achieve strategic objectives.

  14. The Role of Small Countries in Post-Soviet Territorial Restructuring: the Baltic Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This author analyses the 2013 Lithuanian presidency of the EU in the context of the Ukrainian crisis and evaluates the contribution of Latvia and Estonia (the former Soviet republics set to preside over the EU in 2015 and 2018 to the shift in the power balance in the post-Soviet space. Through assessing the actions of small countries in promoting the Eastern Partnership programme with an emphasis on the anti-Russian agenda, the author concludes that they will inflict harm on the EU in a long-term perspective. These former Soviet republics no longer rely on mere diplomacy, but resort to a whole new problematic narrative, where Russia is described as an “aggressive and unpredictable neighbour” that poses the “threat from the East.” Being more mobile, small countries are able to concentrate power and resources in one or several key areas. This makes it possible for these countries to take advantage of international politics (even if the consequences of such steps are miscalculated and “feed” on it through — so metimes consciously — creating “conflict nodes” in the relations between major players. This is especially true in the case of states that do not bear responsibility for global stability.

  15. Effects of under-development and oil-dependency of countries on the formation of renewable energy technologies: A comparative study of hydrogen and fuel cell technology development in Iran and the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasiri, Masoud; Ramazani Khorshid-Doust, Reza; Bagheri Moghaddam, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Countries face many problems for the development of renewable energy technologies. However these problems are not the same for different countries. This paper provides insight into the development of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology (HFCT) in Iran (1993–2010), as an alternative for increasing sustainability of energy system in long-term. This is done by applying the Technological Innovation System (TIS) approach and studying the structure and dynamics of seven key processes that affect the formation of HFCT TIS. Thereafter, the pattern of HFCT development in Iran is compared with the Netherlands, using a multi-level perspective. Then, it is shown that under-development and oil-dependency, which are two macro-economic factors at landscape level, can explain the main differences between these countries at regime and niche levels. This means that macro-economic factors cause Iran and the Netherlands to experience different ways for the development of HFCT. - Highlights: • Hydrogen and fuel cell technology development is modeled, using innovation systems. • This technology development in Iran and Netherlands are compared. • The causes of underdevelopment of this technology in Iran are explained

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Netherlands is part of the lowlands of Western Europe formed by negative crustal movements that have been offset by sedimentation. This specific area stretching from western Belgium into north-western Germany forms part of an epicontinental area that has been relatively stable since the end of the Hercynian orogeny. In Holland the subsidence has generally been small through- out the Mesozonic and Cenozoic though interrupted by short periods of erosion and non-subsidence. Thus the general geology of the Netherlands is dominated by the fact that throughout the Tertiary and Quaternary what now comprises the Netherlands formed part of a subsiding basin. Most of the surface geology of the country is dominated by f luvio-glacial shallow marine and lacoustine deposits. Prospecting for radioactive minerals in the Netherlands has been very limited. Some work has been carried out by the Geological Survey and by private consultants but this was very preliminary. To-date no uranium reserves or resources have been identified in the Netherlands. One small uranium occurrence has been recorded in Zeeland near Walcheren where some small uranium concentrations were found in association with phosphatic nodules. Apart from very limited targets in the Cretaceous and small phosphatic uranium associations there are no apparent uranium exploration targets in the Netherlands. On this basis we would, at this time, place the uranium potential of the Netherlands in Group I of the IUREP classification

  17. Development of out-of-hours primary care by general practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands: from small-call rotations to large-scale GP cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden, Caro J T; Giesen, Paul H J; Metsemakers, Job F M; Grol, Richard P T M

    2006-09-01

    Over the last 10 years, care outside office hours by primary care physicians in The Netherlands has experienced a radical change. While Dutch general practitioners (GPs) formerly performed these services in small-call rotations, care is nowadays delivered by large-scale GP cooperatives. We searched the literature for relevant studies on the effect of the out-of-hours care reorganization in The Netherlands. We identified research that included before- and afterintervention studies, descriptive studies, and surveys. These studies focused on the consequences of reorganizing several aspects of out-of-hours care, such as patient and GP satisfaction, patient characteristics, utilization of care, and costs. Various studies showed that the reorganization has successfully addressed many of the critical issues that Dutch GPs were confronted with delivering these services. GPs' job satisfaction has increased, and patients seem to be satisfied with current out-of-hours care. Several aspects of out-of-hours care are discussed, such as telephone triage, self referrals, and future expectations, which should receive extra attention by researchers and health policy makers in the near future.

  18. The Role of Small-Scale Biofuel Production in Brazil: Lessons for Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Muniz Kubota

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale biofuel initiatives to produce sugarcane ethanol are claimed to be a sustainable opportunity for ethanol supply, particularly for regions with price-restricted or no access to modern biofuels, such as communities located far from the large ethanol production centers in Brazil and family-farm communities in Sub-Saharan Africa, respectively. However, smallholders often struggle to achieve economic sustainability with ethanol microdistilleries. The aim of this paper is to provide an assessment of the challenges faced by small-scale bioenergy initiatives and discuss the conditions that would potentially make these initiatives economically feasible. Ethanol microdistilleries were assessed through a critical discussion of existent models and through an economic analysis of different sugarcane ethanol production models. The technical-economic analysis showed that the lack of competitiveness against large-scale ethanol distillery, largely due to both low crop productivity and process efficiency, makes it unlikely that small-scale distilleries can compete in the national/international ethanol market without governmental policies and subsidies. Nevertheless, small-scale projects intended for local supply and integrated food–fuel systems seem to be an interesting alternative that can potentially make ethanol production in small farms viable as well as increase food security and project sustainability particularly for local communities in developing countries.

  19. Incentives for small clubs of Arctic countries to limit black carbon and methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Stine; Kallbekken, Steffen; Van Dingenen, Rita; Victor, David G.

    2018-01-01

    Although addressing climate change will ultimately require global cooperation, substantial progress may be achieved through small clubs of countries, where it is easier to forge and implement deals needed for policy coordination. Here we quantify the gains from cooperation in the Arctic region and find that nearly 90% of the potential for abating black carbon can be reached by countries acting in self-interest alone because soot, the main source of black carbon, causes severe harm to human health along with warming. Abating methane, by contrast, requires more cooperation because impacts are more diffused geographically. Well-designed clubs with as few as four members can realize more than 80% of the full group cooperation potential for reducing these pollutants. The pivotal player in every effective club is Russia—most other members of the Arctic Council, the institution most focused on advancing the collective interests of the region, offer little leverage on the problems at hand.

  20. Gambling and problem gambling in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudriaan, Anna E

    2014-07-01

    To provide an overview of gambling in the Netherlands, focusing on historical background, policy, legislation, prevalence of problem gambling, availability of treatment options and research base. Literature review. Contradictions between gambling policy and practice have been present in the past 15-20 years, and have led to an increasingly stricter gambling regulation to retain the government policy to restrict gambling within a national monopoly. Conversely, political efforts have been made to legalize internet gambling, but have not yet been approved. Compared to other European countries, slot machine gambling and casino gambling are relatively popular, whereas betting is relatively unpopular. Last-year problem gambling prevalence (South Oaks Gambling Screen score > 5) is estimated at 0.22-0.15% (2005, 2011). Treatment for problem gambling is covered by health insurance under the same conditions as substance dependence, but only a small proportion of Dutch problem gamblers seeks help at addiction treatment centres. Gambling policy in the Netherlands has become stricter during recent last years in order to maintain the Dutch gambling monopoly. Problem gambling in the Netherlands is relatively stable. Dutch research on problem gambling has a lack of longitudinal studies. Most of the epidemiological gambling studies are reported in non-peer-reviewed research reports, which diminishes control by independent peers on the methodology and interpretation of results. Recent efforts to enhance consistency in research methods between gambling studies over time could enhance knowledge on changes in (problem) gambling in the Netherlands. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. High-Amplitude Atlantic Hurricanes Produce Disparate Mortality in Small, Low-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Caleb; Allison, Jeroan; Broach, John; Smith, Mary-Elise; Milsten, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Hurricanes cause substantial mortality, especially in developing nations, and climate science predicts that powerful hurricanes will increase in frequency during the coming decades. This study examined the association of wind speed and national economic conditions with mortality in a large sample of hurricane events in small countries. Economic, meteorological, and fatality data for 149 hurricane events in 16 nations between 1958 and 2011 were analyzed. Mortality rate was modeled with negative binomial regression implemented by generalized estimating equations to account for variable population exposure, sequence of storm events, exposure of multiple islands to the same storm, and nonlinear associations. Low-amplitude storms caused little mortality regardless of economic status. Among high-amplitude storms (Saffir-Simpson category 4 or 5), expected mortality rate was 0.72 deaths per 100,000 people (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16-1.28) for nations in the highest tertile of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) compared with 25.93 deaths per 100,000 people (95% CI: 13.30-38.55) for nations with low per capita GDP. Lower per capita GDP and higher wind speeds were associated with greater mortality rates in small countries. Excessive fatalities occurred when powerful storms struck resource-poor nations. Predictions of increasing storm amplitude over time suggest increasing disparity between death rates unless steps are taken to modify the risk profiles of poor nations. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:832-837).

  2. Growing medicine: small-scale cannabis cultivation for medical purposes in six different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Pekka; Frank, Vibeke Asmussen; Barratt, Monica J; Dahl, Helle Vibeke; Decorte, Tom; Karjalainen, Karoliina; Lenton, Simon; Potter, Gary; Werse, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The production and consumption of cannabis for the treatment of medical conditions is of increasing importance internationally; however, research on different aspects of the phenomenon is still scarce. In this article, we report findings from a cross-cultural study of small-scale cannabis cultivation for medical purposes. This kind of comparative study has not been done previously. The data were gathered with a help of web surveys conducted by the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium (GCCRC) in Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany and the UK (N=5313). In the analysis we compare reports of medical motives, for what conditions cannabis is used, whether users have diagnoses for these conditions and whether the use of cannabis been recommended as a treatment of those conditions by a medical doctor. Descriptive statistics are used to show the main commonalities and noteworthy disparities across different countries. Findings from countries were quite similar, even though several national differences in details were found. Growing cannabis for medical purposes was widespread. The majority of medical growers reported cultivating cannabis for serious conditions. Most of them did have a formal diagnosis. One fifth had got a recommendation from their doctor, but in most cases cannabis use was self-medication which was not discussed with their doctors. There is a wider demand for licit access for medical cannabis than currently available in these countries. Ideologically, medical growers can be seen distancing themselves from both the legal and illicit drug markets. From a harm reduction perspective, it is worrying that, in the context of present health and control policies in these countries, many medical growers are using cannabis to treat serious medical conditions without proper medical advice and doctor's guidance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Status of small water supplies in the Nordic countries: Characteristics, water quality and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Maria J; Persson, Kenneth M; Andradottir, Hrund O; Gardarsson, Sigurdur M

    2017-11-01

    Access to safe water is essential for public health and is one of the most important prerequisites for good living and safe food production. Many studies have shown that non-compliance with drinking water quality standards in small water supply systems is much higher than in large systems. Nevertheless, people served by small water supply systems have the right to the same level of health protection. Actions are therefore needed to improve the situation. The objective of the present study was to carry out a baseline analysis of the situation in the Nordic region and provide recommendations for governmental policy and actions. Data were gathered on number of water supplies, population served, compliance with regulations and waterborne disease outbreaks from various sources in the Nordic countries. The collected data showed that there are about 12500 regulated water supplies, 9400 of which serve fewer than 500 persons. The number of unregulated and poorly regulated supplies is unknown, but it can be roughly estimated that these serve 10% of the Nordic population on a permanent basis or 2.6 million people. However, this does not tell the whole story as many of the very small water supplies serve transient populations, summerhouse dwellers and tourist sites, with many more users. Non-compliance regarding microbes is much higher in the small supplies. The population weighted average fecal contamination incidence rate in the Nordic region is eleven times higher in the smaller supplies than in the large ones, 0.76% and 0.07%, respectively. Registered waterborne disease outbreaks were also more frequent in the small supplies than in the large ones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of Intermediaries on the Efficiency of Export of Small and Medium Business Production in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Arzik Miqael Suvaryan; Narina Grigorii Mkrtichyan; Hasmik Khachik Manukyan

    2018-01-01

    Small and medium business plays an important role in the national economies of developing countries. From this perspective, to create an effective system for exports is of key importance for these countries. The article provides the basis for the implementation of intermediary export organizations and systems for their interaction with small and medium business entities. On the example of Armenia, the authors proved that the introduction of intermediary organizations to enhance the p...

  5. Direct costs associated with the disease management of patients with unresectable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompen, Marjolein; Gok, Murat; Novák, Annoesjka; van Wuijtswinkel, Rob; Biesma, Bonne; Schramel, Franz; Stigt, Jos; Smit, Hans; Postmus, Pieter

    2009-04-01

    Disease management and costs of treatment of patients with unresectable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands are not well known. A retrospective medical chart review was performed by collecting data from the time of diagnosis until the time of death or the end of the evaluation period. In addition to the demographic data, information was collected on the overall management of the patient. Hospital resource utilisation data collected included number of outpatient specialist visits, number and length of hospitalisation, type and number of diagnostic and laboratory procedures, type and number of radiotherapy cycles and detailed information on chemotherapy. To evaluate the economic impact of second-line treatment, a distinction was made between patients who received only best supportive care (BSC, group A) and those who received chemotherapy as a second-line treatment in addition to BSC (group B). The study was performed from the hospital perspective and reports on 2005 costs. Of 102 patients, 74 belonged to group A and 28 to group B. Patient management included a multidisciplinary approach, the extent of which depended on symptoms of the disease and presence of metastases. The average total treatment cost per patient per year of unresectable advanced NSCLC in The Netherlands was euro32,840 in group A and euro31,187 in group B. In both groups, hospitalisation was the major cost driver. In group B second-line chemotherapy was the second largest contributor of the costs. In spite of the difference in numbers of treatment lines provided to patients in groups A and B the total average costs per patient per year were comparable. Overall, the management of unresectable advanced NSCLC appeared to conform with current guidelines in The Netherlands. These patients show high medical resource consumption, with hospitalisation being the main cost driver in both groups. As economic arguments are becoming increasingly important in medical decision making on

  6. Mosquitoes of the Netherlands Antilles and their hygienic importance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyp, van der Edwin

    1954-01-01

    The Netherlands Antilles may be divided into: (1) The Curaçao Group (or Netherlands Leeward Islands): Curaçao, Aruba and Bonaire. (2) The St. Martin Group (or Netherlands Windward Islands): (Netherlands) St. Maarten, Saba and St. Eustatius. The latter islands are very small, forming together only

  7. Transfer of radioactive waste management expertise from Switzerland to other countries with small nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.; Birkhaeuser, Ph.; Kickmaier, W.; Vomvoris, S.; Zuidema, P.

    2000-01-01

    A legal requirement which coupled demonstration of the feasibility of nuclear waste disposal to the extension of reactor operational licenses beyond 1985 acted to force rapid development of the Swiss radioactive waste management programme. Over a period of almost 30 years and at a cost of approximately 800 M CHF Nagra has become established as a centre of excellence in this field. Resources include highly experienced manpower, literature and databases supporting development of national repositories for L/ILW and HLW/TRU and state-of-the-art R and D infrastructure (including 2 underground laboratories, hot-laboratory facilities at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute), modelling groups at universities etc.). This paper reviews Nagra's experience and considers various ways in which expertise can be transferred to other small countries to minimise duplication of effort and optimise development of their own national programmes. (author)

  8. Comparative Analysis of Football Efficiency Among Two Small European Countries: Portugal and Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANNIS DOUVIS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper estimates changes in total productivity, breaking this down into technically efficient change and technological change by means of data envelopment analysis(DEA applied to a representative sample of football clubs operating in the two small European countries: Portugal and Greece. The aim of this procedure is to seek out those best practices that will lead to improved performance in the market. We rank the football clubs according to their change in total productivity for the period 1999/2000 to 2002/2003,concluding that some clubs experienced productivity growth while others experienced a decrease in productivity. The implications arising from the study are considered in terms of managerial policy.

  9. Access to licensed cannabis supply and the separation of markets policy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, M.; Korf, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, small amounts of cannabis can be lawfully sold to consumers in so-called coffee shops. Many communities in the country do not have coffee shops, and users under 18 years of age are not allowed to enter coffee shops. A field sample of 773 current cannabis users were interviewed in

  10. Can living labs solve the knowledge paradox? A case study of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geenhuizen, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The Netherlands is facing a situation in which much knowledge is created at universities but small amounts are brought to market. Various indicators point to missing links in knowledge valorization in this country. To arrive at a better understanding of knowledge valorization the paper presents an

  11. Small-scale distribution and diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a shallow lake (Lake Naardermeer, the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerbin, S.; Balayla, D.; Van de Bund, W.J.

    2003-01-01

    Small scale distribution and diurnal migration of zooplankton were investigated in lake Naardermeer, a shallow lake largely covered by uniform Chara beds. For sampling, pattern samplers with a number of inverted funnels facing towards the lake bottom and held in a frame were used. Samplers were

  12. Long-Term Excess Mortality for Survivors of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.; van Steenbergen, Liza N.; Steyerberg, Ewout; Visser, Otto; De Ruysscher, Dirk K.; Groen, Harry J.

    Introduction: Most patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years after diagnosis. However, only little is known about those who have survived these first years. We aimed to study conditional 5-year relative survival rates for NSCLC patients during

  13. Determinants of Point-of-Sale System Adoption: A Survey among Small Independent Retailers in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, M.G.A.; Huiden, R.P.; Batenburg, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Several threats affect the survival of small, independent retail companies. Adoption and use of Point-of-Sale (POS) systems may offer important benefits to counter these threats. POS systems are not widely used by these retailers, however. This research investigates the determinants of the adoption

  14. Research on deployed Danish soldiers: why is knowledge derived from a small, Nordic country relevant for other countries?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Andersen, Soren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, the Danish military has deployed more than 40,000 soldiers to war zones, especially to the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan. To the war in Afghanistan alone, the Danish Defense has to date deployed 9,918 unique soldiers with a total of 18,015 deployments. The total...... focusing on the development of posttraumatic stress (PTS) in this sample will be presented, and the relevance and generalizability of these findings to military populations from other countries will be discussed....

  15. HABOG, ATC Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vico, E.

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands has opted for a centralized temporary storage strategy (ATC) for managing all radioactive waste produced in the country, prior to final disposal in deep geological formations. the agency. COVRA national agency with functions similar to those of ENRESA, operates a complex in the industrial area of Vlissingen-Oost, southwest of the country, near the Borssele nuclear power, within which is the centralized temporary storage facility HABOG , Acronym for building for the processing and storage of high level waste in operation since 2003. (Author)

  16. Can Small Countries Benefit from the E-waste Global Value Chain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meine Pieter, Dijk van

    2016-01-01

    E-waste is a term used to cover items of all types of electrical and electronic equipment and its parts that have been discarded by the owners as waste without the intention of re-use, because this equipment has ceased to be of any value to its owners. E-waste is one of the fastestgrowing waste streams globally. Since the Rio Summit Earth summit organized by the United Nations in 1992, the concept of sustainability extends to rendering basic services such as Solid Waste Management and dealing with e-waste. People are afraid of e-waste because of its possible negative effects on health and because it could pollute the environment. Indicators of unsustainable service provision concerninge-waste include irregular collection, open dumping, burning of solid and e-waste in open spaces. Often collection covers a small part of the country, cost recovery is limited or not existent, and one notes poor utilization of available resources with no or very limited reuse and recycling

  17. Growth and oil price: A study of causal relationships in small Pacific Island countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, T.K. [School of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics, The University of the South Pacific, Laucala Bay Road, Suva (Fiji); Choong, Chee-Keong [Department of Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business and Finance, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (Perak Campus), Jalan Universiti, Bandar Barat, 31900 Kampar, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia)], E-mail: choongck@utar.edu.my

    2009-06-15

    This paper investigates the nexus between economic growth and oil price in small Pacific Island countries (PICs). Except Papua New Guinea, none of the 14 PICs has fossil any fuel resources. Consequently, the other 13 PICs are totally dependent on oil imports for their economic activities. Since PICs have limited foreign exchange earning capacities, as they have a very narrow range of exports and are highly dependent on foreign aid, high oil prices in recent months have seriously tested their economic resilience. This paper applies the ARDL bounds testing methodology to four selected PICs, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, which have consistent and reliable time series of data, with a view to assess the impact of oil price on economic growth. The findings are that oil price, gross domestic product and international reserve are cointegrated in all the four PICs. Further, both in the long and short runs, we observe that there is a uni-directional relationship as causality linkage runs only from oil price and international reserves to economic growth. The paper makes some policy recommendations.

  18. Growth and oil price. A study of causal relationships in small Pacific Island countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraman, T.K. [School of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics, The University of the South Pacific, Laucala Bay Road, Suva (Fiji); Choong, Chee-Keong [Department of Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business and Finance, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (Perak Campus), Jalan Universiti, Bandar Barat, 31900 Kampar, Perak Darul Ridzuan (Malaysia)

    2009-06-15

    This paper investigates the nexus between economic growth and oil price in small Pacific Island countries (PICs). Except Papua New Guinea, none of the 14 PICs has fossil any fuel resources. Consequently, the other 13 PICs are totally dependent on oil imports for their economic activities. Since PICs have limited foreign exchange earning capacities, as they have a very narrow range of exports and are highly dependent on foreign aid, high oil prices in recent months have seriously tested their economic resilience. This paper applies the ARDL bounds testing methodology to four selected PICs, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, which have consistent and reliable time series of data, with a view to assess the impact of oil price on economic growth. The findings are that oil price, gross domestic product and international reserve are cointegrated in all the four PICs. Further, both in the long and short runs, we observe that there is a uni-directional relationship as causality linkage runs only from oil price and international reserves to economic growth. The paper makes some policy recommendations. (author)

  19. Growth and oil price: A study of causal relationships in small Pacific Island countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, T.K.; Choong, Chee-Keong

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the nexus between economic growth and oil price in small Pacific Island countries (PICs). Except Papua New Guinea, none of the 14 PICs has fossil any fuel resources. Consequently, the other 13 PICs are totally dependent on oil imports for their economic activities. Since PICs have limited foreign exchange earning capacities, as they have a very narrow range of exports and are highly dependent on foreign aid, high oil prices in recent months have seriously tested their economic resilience. This paper applies the ARDL bounds testing methodology to four selected PICs, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, which have consistent and reliable time series of data, with a view to assess the impact of oil price on economic growth. The findings are that oil price, gross domestic product and international reserve are cointegrated in all the four PICs. Further, both in the long and short runs, we observe that there is a uni-directional relationship as causality linkage runs only from oil price and international reserves to economic growth. The paper makes some policy recommendations.

  20. Can Small Countries Benefit from the E-waste Global Value Chain?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meine Pieter, Dijk van, E-mail: mpvandijk@iss.nl [UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Erasmus University in Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-09

    E-waste is a term used to cover items of all types of electrical and electronic equipment and its parts that have been discarded by the owners as waste without the intention of re-use, because this equipment has ceased to be of any value to its owners. E-waste is one of the fastestgrowing waste streams globally. Since the Rio Summit Earth summit organized by the United Nations in 1992, the concept of sustainability extends to rendering basic services such as Solid Waste Management and dealing with e-waste. People are afraid of e-waste because of its possible negative effects on health and because it could pollute the environment. Indicators of unsustainable service provision concerninge-waste include irregular collection, open dumping, burning of solid and e-waste in open spaces. Often collection covers a small part of the country, cost recovery is limited or not existent, and one notes poor utilization of available resources with no or very limited reuse and recycling.

  1. Book of Abstracts of 6th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavlina, N.; Pevec, D.; Bajs, T.

    2006-01-01

    The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, new reactor technologies, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants, environmental advantages, and organizational, educational and social requirements for countries with small and medium electricity grid. In order to achieve the best safety and operational standards, these countries must put added emphasis on rational and efficient use of human and material resources. Therefore, the conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of safety culture, liability, regulatory practice and radioactive waste management

  2. Book of Abstracts of 6th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavlina, N; Pevec, D; Bajs, T [eds.

    2006-07-01

    The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, new reactor technologies, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants, environmental advantages, and organizational, educational and social requirements for countries with small and medium electricity grid. In order to achieve the best safety and operational standards, these countries must put added emphasis on rational and efficient use of human and material resources. Therefore, the conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of safety culture, liability, regulatory practice and radioactive waste management.

  3. Mechatronics in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van Amerongen, J.; Jongkind, Wim

    1996-01-01

    This article assesses the present situation of mechatronics in the Netherlands. After a short historical survey, it describes the postgraduate ¿mechatronic designer course¿, introduced in 1991. It deals with the principles of this course and how these principles have been implemented. Also, the activities of the Dutch government in cooperation with the industrial mechatronics community to enhance the awareness of mechatronics, especially directed toward small and medium-sized enterprises (SME...

  4. Analytical performance of 17 general chemistry analytes across countries and across manufacturers in the INPUtS project of EQA organizers in Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, United Kingdom and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weykamp, Cas; Secchiero, Sandra; Plebani, Mario; Thelen, Marc; Cobbaert, Christa; Thomas, Annette; Jassam, Nuthar; Barth, Julian H; Perich, Carmen; Ricós, Carmen; Faria, Ana Paula

    2017-02-01

    Optimum patient care in relation to laboratory medicine is achieved when results of laboratory tests are equivalent, irrespective of the analytical platform used or the country where the laboratory is located. Standardization and harmonization minimize differences and the success of efforts to achieve this can be monitored with international category 1 external quality assessment (EQA) programs. An EQA project with commutable samples, targeted with reference measurement procedures (RMPs) was organized by EQA institutes in Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, UK, and Spain. Results of 17 general chemistry analytes were evaluated across countries and across manufacturers according to performance specifications derived from biological variation (BV). For K, uric acid, glucose, cholesterol and high-density density (HDL) cholesterol, the minimum performance specification was met in all countries and by all manufacturers. For Na, Cl, and Ca, the minimum performance specifications were met by none of the countries and manufacturers. For enzymes, the situation was complicated, as standardization of results of enzymes toward RMPs was still not achieved in 20% of the laboratories and questionable in the remaining 80%. The overall performance of the measurement of 17 general chemistry analytes in European medical laboratories met the minimum performance specifications. In this general picture, there were no significant differences per country and no significant differences per manufacturer. There were major differences between the analytes. There were six analytes for which the minimum quality specifications were not met and manufacturers should improve their performance for these analytes. Standardization of results of enzymes requires ongoing efforts.

  5. Consumer choice between common generic and brand medicines in a country with a small generic market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeyman, Jessica; Peeters, Lies; Van Hal, Guido; Beutels, Philippe; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Loof, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Generic medicines offer an opportunity for governments to contain pharmaceutical expenditures, since generics are generally 10%-80% lower in price than brand medicines. Belgium has a small generic market that takes up 15% of the total pharmaceutical market in packages sold. To determine the knowledge of consumers about the different available packages of a common over-the-counter medicine (acetaminophen) with regard to price advantage, quality, and effectiveness in a country with a small generic market. We conducted an online survey in the general Flemish population using a questionnaire with 25 statements. The questionnaire also contained 2 informative interventions. First, we showed the price per package and per tablet that the patient would pay in the pharmacy. Second, we provided the respondent with general information about generic medication (equivalence, effectiveness, price, and recognition). Before and after the interventions, we probed for preferences and knowledge about the different packages. Multivariate logistic models were used to examine the independent effects of consumer characteristics on responses to the survey statements. We obtained a sample of 1,636 respondents. The general attitude towards generic medication was positive-only 5% would rather not use a generic. Nevertheless, only 17% of the respondents were able to recognize a generic medicine. Older consumers (aged 60 years and above) were more often confused about the different packages (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.76-3.80, P ≤ 0.001). Consumers without a higher education degree tended to be more doubtful about the difference in effectiveness and quality between the different brands (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.44-0.79, P ≤ 0.001). Consumer recognition of the name of the active substance of acetaminophen was poor. When different brands were displayed, possible price advantage seemed to be an important motive to switch to a cheaper brand. Consumers generally found medicines

  6. University centres of nuclear competence as TSO's in small non-nuclear countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Montenegro is small, developing 'non-nuclear' country, the use of radiation sources being modest and limited to ordinary medical and industrial applications. Even though - and taking into account current and near-future status of the field - there is (or will be) significant need in nuclear knowledge. It goes about the following areas: (i) medical applications (diagnostics, radiotherapy, palliation, sterilization of equipment, consumables, blood products, etc.), (ii) environmental protection (radioecology, low and medium activity radioactive waste management, analytical and monitoring services, etc.), (iii) industrial, geological, hydrological, agricultural, biochemical and archaeological applications (non-destructive testing, various gauges, radioisotope labeling, etc.), (iv) scientific and educational applications, (v) radiation protection, emphasizing safety and security of radiation sources, (vi) legislative and regulatory aspects, including complying to international safety/ security norms and joining international conventions in the field, (vii) preparedness and response to radiological and nuclear emergency situations, (viii) combating illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials, (ix) forensic applications, (x) security systems based on X-ray and other nuclear methods, (xi) introduction of some future topics (e.g. nuclear power for electricity generation and sea water desalination) and (xii) information and communication with media. At present, there is clear a shortage in NK in the country, resulting i.a. from long lasting poor interest of young students for the subject University of Montenegro - the only state university in the country - effectuates practically complete high education in natural and technical sciences. At the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Department of Physics, there is a basic education in nuclear physics, while some post-graduate curricula offer topics in radioecology, medical physics and radiation protection

  7. Prevalence, risk factors and consequences of cerebral small vessel diseases: data from three Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Mok, Vincent; Youn, Young Chul; Wong, Adrian; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has been suggested to be more common in Asians compared with Caucasians. However, data from population-based studies in Asia are lacking. We report on the prevalence, risk factors and consequences of SVD from contemporary studies in three Asian countries using 3-Tesla MRI for the evaluation of SVD. Clinical, cognitive and 3-Tesla brain MRI assessments were performed among participants of three studies from Singapore, Hong Kong and Korea. SVD markers include white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) using the modified Fazekas scale, lacunes and microbleeds. Cognition was assessed using the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Adjustments were made for age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1797 subjects were available for analysis (mean age: 70.1±6.3 years and 57% women). The prevalence of confluent WMH was 36.6%, lacunes, 24.6% and microbleeds, 26.9%. Presence of all three SVD markers showed a steeper increase with increasing age rising from 1.9% in the lowest to 46.2% in the highest 5-year age strata. The major risk factors for the increased severity of SVD markers were advancing age and hypertension. Moreover, increasing severity of SVD markers was independently associated with worse performance on MMSE and MoCA. Elderly Asians have a high burden of SVD which was associated with cognitive dysfunction. This suggests that SVD markers should be a potential target for treatment in clinical trials so as to delay progression of cerebrovascular disease and potentially cognitive decline. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Proceedings of the 5th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.; Debrecin, N.

    2004-01-01

    The Fifth International Conference 'Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids' is the fifth in a series of meetings on the same topics organized biannually by the Croatian Nuclear Society. This topical conference was initiated in 1996 to be devoted to the needs and interests of countries with small or medium nuclear systems and electricity grids. The first conference took place in Opatija, and the three following in Dubrovnik. Encouraged by the successes of previous conferences in Dubrovnik we decided to organise it once more in Dubrovnik. The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of introduction and usage of nuclear energy by countries with small and medium electricity grids. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as development of small and medium reactors, accommodation of Kyoto restriction on CO 2 emission, nuclear terrorism risk coverage, or cooperation in nuclear fuel cycle. In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put added emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently, the worldwide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are of substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and co-operation amongst that group of countries is of great interest. Exchanging specific experience and co-operation between the like countries will be additional value relative to the still prevailing equipment supplier-national utility relationships

  9. Proceedings of the 5th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pevec, D; Debrecin, N [eds.

    2004-07-01

    The Fifth International Conference 'Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids' is the fifth in a series of meetings on the same topics organized biannually by the Croatian Nuclear Society. This topical conference was initiated in 1996 to be devoted to the needs and interests of countries with small or medium nuclear systems and electricity grids. The first conference took place in Opatija, and the three following in Dubrovnik. Encouraged by the successes of previous conferences in Dubrovnik we decided to organise it once more in Dubrovnik. The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of introduction and usage of nuclear energy by countries with small and medium electricity grids. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as development of small and medium reactors, accommodation of Kyoto restriction on CO{sub 2} emission, nuclear terrorism risk coverage, or cooperation in nuclear fuel cycle. In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put added emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently, the worldwide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are of substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and co-operation amongst that group of countries is of great interest. Exchanging specific experience and co-operation between the like countries will be additional value relative to the still prevailing equipment supplier-national utility relationships.

  10. Small and medium-sized enterprises’ exporting: Home and host country motivators effect on first and successive export venture decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Stouraitis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to investigate the internationalization (particularly exporting of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs taking a sample of United Kingdom (UK SMEs for the use in economic policy, academia and management. It focuses on the critical first and less risky step towards internationalization and separates the motivators into home country and host country. The paper investigates 44 specific, high impact, pre-selected exporting motivators from the literature and tests their effect on the firm’s initial export decision and latest (or sequential export decision. Results show that the first exporting choice affects later exporting choices and both are mostly affected by home country-specific, internal, motivators as opposed to host country-specific reactive motivators. In addition regionalization shows an association as European Union membership of the UK showed a relationship to subsequent entry mode choice. The paper’s results are of use to policy-makers and management.

  11. Establishing national noncommunicable disease surveillance in a developing country: a model for small island nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Rose

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To describe the surveillance model used to develop the first national, population-based, multiple noncommunicable disease (NCD registry in the Caribbean (one of the first of its kind worldwide; registry implementation; lessons learned; and incidence and mortality rates from the first years of operation. Methods Driven by limited national resources, this initiative of the Barbados Ministry of Health (MoH, in collaboration with The University of the West Indies, was designed to collect prospective data on incident stroke and acute myocardial infarction (MI (heart attack cases from all health care facilities in this small island developing state (SIDS in the Eastern Caribbean. Emphasis is on tertiary and emergency health care data sources. Incident cancer cases are obtained retrospectively, primarily from laboratories. Deaths are collected from the national death register. Results Phased introduction of the Barbados National Registry for Chronic NCDs (“the BNR” began with the stroke component (“BNR–Stroke,” 2008, followed by the acute MI component (“BNR–Heart,” 2009 and the cancer component (“BNR–Cancer,” 2010. Expected case numbers projected from prior studies estimated an average of 378 first-ever stroke, 900 stroke, and 372 acute MI patients annually, and registry data showed an annual average of about 238, 593, and 349 patients respectively. There were 1 204 tumors registered in 2008, versus the expected 1 395. Registry data were used to identify public health training themes. Success required building support from local health care professionals and creating island-wide registry awareness. With spending of approximately US$ 148 per event for 2 200 events per year, the program costs the MoH about US$ 1 per capita annually. Conclusions Given the limited absolute health resources available to SIDS, combined surveillance should be considered for building a national NCD evidence base. With prevalence

  12. How sustainable is the Netherlands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    This memo compares the sustainability of the Netherlands to foreign countries. It examines existing studies and benchmarks that tell us about the various components of sustainability. A closer look is taken at environmental aspects, spatial use, CO2 emission, labor participation, life expectancy, welfare and corruption. [nl

  13. Net Neutrality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Netherlands is among the first countries that have put specific net neutrality standards in place. The decision to implement specific regulation was influenced by at least three factors. The first was the prevailing social and academic debate, partly due to developments in the United States. The

  14. Small modular high temperature nuclear reactors: the perfect workhorse for Asean and developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Peter Davis

    2009-01-01

    The ten South East Asian countries of ASEAN with nearly 10% of the world's population need 18 times more electricity to lift the standard of living to the adequate levels enjoyed by Australians. Similarly, all developing countries except those in the humid tropics need enormous quantities of desalinated water, to replace rapidly depleting ground water left over from previous ice ages, to become self-sufficient in food. (Author)

  15. Determinants of Small Enterprises’ Performance in Developing Countries: A Bangladesh Case

    OpenAIRE

    Khondoker, Abdul Mottaleb; Sonobe, Tetsushi

    2011-01-01

    Family-based traditional microenterprises are abundant in developing countries, and in many cases they are a major source of income and employment for both urban and rural poor. With a few exceptions, however, most these family-based traditional microenterprises in the rural areas of developing countries seldom grow in terms of enterprises’ size and product quality. Thus, they tend to perform poorly relative to their growth potentials. The development of these family-based microenterprises wo...

  16. The state of the art of aquatic and semi-aquatic ecological restoration projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, PH; Bakker, JP; Grootjans, AP; Gulati, RD; de Jonge, VN

    The Netherlands are a small, low-lying delta in W. Europe (42 000 km 2;50degrees-54degrees N; 3degrees-8degrees E), mainly consisting of alluvial deposits from the North Sea and from the large rivers Rhine and Meuse. The country was 'created by man'. The conversion of natural aquatic and terrestrial

  17. Radioactive waste management in the Netherlands. A practical solution in full operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codee, H.D.K.

    2000-01-01

    All radioactive waste produced in the Netherlands is managed by COVRA, the central organization for radioactive waste. The Netherlands forms a good example of a country with a small and in the near future ending nuclear power programme. However, radioisotope production, nuclear research and other industrial activities will continue to produce radioactive waste. For the small volume, but broad spectrum of radioactive waste, the Netherlands has developed a management system based on the principles to isolate, to control and to monitor the waste. Long term storage is an important element in the management strategy that will ultimately result in final removal of the waste. Since the waste will remain retrievable for a long time, new technologies and new disposal options can be applied when available and feasible. (author)

  18. Gel Generator Technology Viability for Small Scale Production - Indian Experience [Country report: India - GEL Gen.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.; Kothalkar, C.; Naskar, P.; Sneha, P.; Saraswathy, P.; Dey, A.C.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2015-01-01

    The radioisotope 99m Tc is used in nearly 80% of all diagnostic imaging procedures in nuclear medicine and hence ensuring its uninterrupted availability is of prime importance to the nuclear medicine industry. Of the various options available for accessing 99m Tc from its precursor 99 Mo through a generator system, the 99m Tc generator using a bed of acidic alumina column for column chromatographic separation of 99m Tc from 99 Mo remains the most popular procedure world over. The uninterrupted availability of high specific activity (n,f) 99 Mo, an essential requirement for the alumina column generators and produced by few large scale commercial suppliers, needs to be ensured to avoid frequent disruption in 99m Tc supplies. Alternate technologies that could use (n,γ) 99 Mo to meet partial/complete domestic demands are worth exploring to reduce import dependency/foster self-sufficiency particularly in countries having the necessary infrastructure in place. The Indian pursuit of gel generator technology for 99m Tc was driven mainly by three considerations, namely, (i) reliable, well-established and ease of production of (n,γ) 99 Mo in TBq quantities in the research reactors in Trombay/Mumbai, India, (ii) need for relatively low-cost alternate technology to replace the solvent (MEK) extraction generator system in use in India since 1970s and (iii) minimize dependency on weekly import of fission-produced 99 Mo raw material required for alumina column generator. The development of column type 99m Tc generator based on conversion of (n,γ) 99 Mo as zirconium molybdate- 99 Mo (ZrM) gel matrix and subsequent separation of 99m Tc by elution in normal saline was an important development in this direction, as this combines the advantages of using (n,γ) 99 Mo and a column based separation technique. A considerable volume of work was carried out at the Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) both independently and as a part of IAEA’s CRP [4,9] for standardization

  19. Introduction of small and medium reactors in developing countries. Proceedings of two advisory group meetings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This publication presents material submitted both by vendor and interested buyer organizations and conclusions drawn from the discussions of these contributions at two Advisory Group meetings on the SMR introduction in developing countries. A few papers were prepared as follow-up contributions to the proceedings. The summary presents a review of the main areas related to SMR introduction and of relevant situations and activities in both industrialized and developing countries. It includes an assessment of the expected potential market and of relevant experience that may help developing countries in their efforts to introduce SMRs. Owing to the inclusion of several new designs, this TECDOC provides an update of the SMR status report (IAEA-TECDOC-881) published in 1996. It also reviews real time compact nuclear power plant simulators. Refs, figs, tabs.

  20. Introduction of small and medium reactors in developing countries. Proceedings of two advisory group meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This publication presents material submitted both by vendor and interested buyer organizations and conclusions drawn from the discussions of these contributions at two Advisory Group meetings on the SMR introduction in developing countries. A few papers were prepared as follow-up contributions to the proceedings. The summary presents a review of the main areas related to SMR introduction and of relevant situations and activities in both industrialized and developing countries. It includes an assessment of the expected potential market and of relevant experience that may help developing countries in their efforts to introduce SMRs. Owing to the inclusion of several new designs, this TECDOC provides an update of the SMR status report (IAEA-TECDOC-881) published in 1996. It also reviews real time compact nuclear power plant simulators

  1. Small wind turbines with timber blades for developing countries: Materials choice, development, installation and experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Freere, Peter; Sinha, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    The low cost wind turbines with timber blades represent a good solution for the decentralized energy production in off-grid regions of developing countries. This paper summarizes the results of investigations on the mechanical testing and choice of timber for wind blades, testing of different...... of the blades and turbines. It was further demonstrated that the low cost wind turbines with timber blades represent a promising and viable option for the decentralized energy production in developing countries, which also opens new areas for businesses....

  2. Trends in prescribing systemic treatment and overall survival for non-small cell lung cancer stage IIIB/IV in the Netherlands : 2008-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Bas J M; Cramer-Vd Welle, Christine M; Smit, Arthur A J; Schramel, Franz M N H; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study aims to give a detailed overview of day-to-day practice in the systemic treatment of NSCLC stage IIIB/IV and its clinical outcomes in six large teaching hospitals in the Netherlands in the period 2008-2012. METHODS: A retrospective observational cohort study was

  3. Late Mesolithic hunting of a small female aurochs in the valley of the River Tjonger (the Netherlands) in the light of Mesolithic aurochs hunting in NW Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, W.; Niekus, M.J.L.Th.

    The valley of the River Tjonger, situated in the Province of Friesland (the Netherlands), is rich in prehistoric organic remains. The fill of the valley, consisting of waterlogged sediments (peat, gyttja and sands), presents favourable conditions for the preservation of bone, antler and botanical

  4. Innovativeness of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Republic of Serbia and countries of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Miroljub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a comparative analysis of the results of innovation activities in enterprises of different size from EU member and candidate states during the period 2008-2010. Particularly, the paper considers position of Serbia compared to the EU average and average of some neighboring countries (Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania and Bulgaria. The results confirmed the existence of a high correlation between size of enterprise and its innovation activities. The percentage of innovation activities in large enterprises is higher than in small enterprises. Serbia is lagging behind the EU average, regarding innovativeness level in all types of enterprises (classified by size. However, when Serbia is compared to neighboring countries, the situation is much different. Small enterprises from Serbia are more innovative than small enterprises from neighboring countries. The situation is similar in medium-sized enterprises. Large enterprises from Serbia are more innovative than enterprises from Bulgaria, Hungary and Romania, and less innovative than large enterprises from Slovenia and Croatia.

  5. Electric transport in the Netherlands in an international perspective. Benchmark electric driving 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, P.; Weeda, M.; Appels, D.

    2012-07-01

    This international benchmark on electric mobility has been conducted to compare the Dutch governmental efforts and developments in the field of electric road transport. The countries that have been considered in this benchmark are: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, UK, China, USA and South Korea. The Netherlands has a high ambition level with regard to the number of electric vehicles compared to other countries without a large car industry. As for the envisaged number of charging points, the Netherlands is one of the prominent leaders. In the field of R and D, Germany, South Korea and China take the lead, followed by France, the UK, the USA and Austria. However, the benchmark has only looked at specific funds for electric mobility, and has not looked at general R and D and innovation funds. The Netherlands has several electro-mobility field tests, but is not leading in number. However, regarding general market penetration, the Netherlands is one of the leading countries, next to Norway, based on the relative number of passenger cars and commercial vehicles on the road. Norway and Austria are leading countries when it comes to implementation of public charging infrastructure, but also in this field the Netherlands has a prominent position in the group of countries that follow. In the current pre-commercial phase, the introduction of electric transportation in the Netherlands is supported by a high-level advisory group, the so-called Formula E-Team. This group consists of representatives and experts from industry and (scientific) society, and acts as a figurehead for electric transport. The group advises on coordination of actions to stimulate not only electro- mobility, but also innovation which should lead to new economic activities. Currently, about two hundred companies are already active in the field of electro-mobility in the Netherlands, including some top players and many SMEs (Small Medium Enterprises). The

  6. Influence of Intermediaries on the Efficiency of Export of Small and Medium Business Production in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzik Miqael Suvaryan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium business plays an important role in the national economies of developing countries. From this perspective, to create an effective system for exports is of key importance for these countries. The article provides the basis for the implementation of intermediary export organizations and systems for their interaction with small and medium business entities. On the example of Armenia, the authors proved that the introduction of intermediary organizations to enhance the participation of small and medium business in export operations is expedient. These organizations may be implemented in other developing countries. We used methods of analysis, synthesis, induction, deduction, comparative method, statistical analysis and others. The authors proposed three possible options for establishing intermediary export organizations in developing countries.. Firstly, we considered the intermediary export organizations, established and managed directly by the state. Secondly, intermediary export organizations may be created by uniting of small and medium enterprises (SMEs of a particular industry in association. And the final option is the commercial intermediary organizations for export. By applying a comparative cost analysis of direct and indirect exports, the authors have developed a method for assessing the effectiveness of interaction of intermediary export organizations with small and medium-sized businesses. We defined the following components of the total exports costs: the costs of warehousing, packaging, transportation, information collection, contracts, search for the shadow broker and interaction with him/her, marketing, export documentation, broker services, banking and insurance services, personnel costs, operation of the structure, tax and customs payments. We have analysed possible changes in these costs and defined the value of the cost changes total indicator that shows more effective indirect exports. . The study defines the

  7. A RESOURCE-BASED VIEW OF SMALL EXPORT FIRMS' SOCIAL CAPITAL IN A SOUTHEAST ASIAN COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doren Chadee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study empirically examines the social capital that facilitates the flow of export knowledge, thereby supporting the entrepreneurial stance of small export firms. By applying the VRIO (value, rarity, inimitability and organisation of firm resources framework to the resource-based view (RBV of the firm, this study suggests that superior performance is a function of resources that are valuable, rare, inimitable and sufficiently organised to develop and sustain the firm's competitive advantage. This study argues that small, resource-constrained export firms in a developing economy are able to adopt entrepreneurial tactics and reap positive rates of return by exploiting their relational capital to acquire export knowledge. A survey of 175 small export firms in the Philippines was conducted, and the data were analysed using structural equation modelling. The results suggest positive relationships between the firm's social capital and export knowledge. Export knowledge is associated with entrepreneurial orientation, which then correlates with export performance.

  8. Safety trends in small-scale coal mines in developing countries with particular reference to China, India and Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, K.G.; Akbar, S.; Edwards, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Small-scale mining for coal is practiced all over the world. But major proportions of these mines are located in developing countries in Asia. China, India and Pakistan are the main producers of coal from small- scale mines. Due to prevailing poor safety conditions in these mines, a large number of workers receive injuries ranging from minor to fatal. Gas explosions/outbursts, roof falls, material handling, etc. are the main causes of majority of accidents occurring in small-scale mines. In China, thousands of workers are killed due to gas explosions/outbursts every year. Lack of financial resources, inadequate education and training of workers, contractual labour systems and lack of commitment to improve safety and health are the reasons that mainly contribute to the poor safety performance in this sector of mining. (author)

  9. European framework for tuberculosis control and elimination in countries with a low incidence. Recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO), International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) and Royal Netherlands Tuberculosis Association (KNCV) Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekmans, J F; Migliori, G B; Rieder, H L; Lees, J; Ruutu, P; Loddenkemper, R; Raviglione, M C

    2002-04-01

    As countries approach the elimination phase of tuberculosis, specific problems and challenges emerge, due to the steadily declining incidence in the native population, the gradually increasing importance of the importation of latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis from other countries and the emergence of groups at particularly high risk of tuberculosis. Therefore, a Working Group of the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) and the Royal Netherlands Tuberculosis Association (KNCV) have developed a new framework for low incidence countries based on concepts and definitions consistent with those of previous recommendations from WHO/IUATLD Working Groups. In low-incidence countries, a broader spectrum of interventions is available and feasible, including: 1) a general approach to tuberculosis which ensures rapid detection and treatment of all the cases and prevention of unnecessary deaths; 2) an overall control strategy aimed at reducing the incidence of tuberculosis infection (risk-group management and prevention of transmission of infection in institutional settings) and 3) a tuberculosis elimination strategy aimed at reducing the prevalence of tuberculosis infection (outbreak management and provision of preventive therapy for specified groups and individuals). Government and private sector commitment towards elimination, effective case detection among symptomatic individuals together with active case finding in special groups, standard treatment of disease and infection, access to tuberculosis diagnostic and treatment services, prevention (e.g. through screening and bacille Calmette-Guéria immunization in specified groups), surveillance and treatment outcome monitoring are prerequisites to implementing the policy package recommended in this new framework document.

  10. A comparative study of the financing, provision and quality of care in nursing homes: the approach of four European countries: Belgium, Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Campen, C. van; Kerkstra, A.

    2000-01-01

    As result of an increase in the numbers of frail elderly people, most European countries are facing problems with the financing and provision of services by nursing homes. At the same time, the expectations of quality of these services continue to rise. The main question investigated in this study

  11. The role of small and medium reactors in the energy security of a country, IRIS example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavlina, N.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear options for electricity generations are assessed in this paper. Probabilistic (stochastic) method is used for economic comparison of nuclear power plants, wind plants and natural gas fired plants. Optimal nuclear power plant size is also discussed. IRIS is presented as a representative of small and medium reactors

  12. Management of small-scale fisheries in developing countries : The case of Elephant Marsh in Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosamu, I.B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands provide many ecosystem goods and services which include fish production. The sustainability of small-scale fisheries (SSF) has received considerable attention in recent years because fish is one of the major sources of animal protein to a considerable fraction of the global population which

  13. Book of abstracts of 10th International Conference on Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The International Conference "Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids" is the tenth in a series of meetings on the same topics organized biennially by the Croatian Nuclear Society. This topical conference was initiated in 1996 and the first conference took place in Opatija, the following seven in Dubrovnik and the last one in Zadar. This year, it again takes place in Zadar. The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production in small and medium sized countries. Importance of international cooperation for the assessment of the nuclear option has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result of this recognition, the Conference is organized in co-operation with IAEA. Croatian State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety and University of Zagreb, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing have also participated in Conference organization. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, new reactor technologies, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants. The conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, regulatory practice and liability.

  14. The Question of Instability, Uncompetitiveness and Growth Slowdown of Small Middle –Income Countries in the Euro Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Senjur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The thesis of this article is that a small country with a below-average per capita income is in a disadvantaged macroeconomic position inside the euro area. Small middle-income countries expected an acceleration of growth by joining the EMU. They were hoping to catch up in the convergence process within the euro area. Yet things turned out differently. The crisis in 2009–2012 has led to excessive instability due to exogenous macroeconomic prices and the lack of a lender of last resort for sovereign debtors. Small MICs are more vulnerable to asymmetric shocks from abroad due to the ‘one-size-fits-all’ economic policy at the EMU level. This is reflected in the excessive volatility of real economic variables (such as GDP and unemployment, and excessive financial instability (such as indebtedness and sovereign debt. The crisis also revealed weak price competitiveness of exports due to overvalued exchange rate of the euro and overall under-average productivity of the MICs. MICs had to respond with deflationary internal (surrogate devaluations and depressed aggregate demand. Measures of internal surrogate devaluations may partially improve situation in the medium term, yet they may worsen the competitive growth situation in the long run. A macroeconomic environment of macroeconomic instability and weak competitiveness may trigger a slowdown in growth.

  15. Options open to a small country, like Slovenia, in relation to radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontic, B.

    1996-01-01

    When a society of two million people, who live on scarcely 20500 km 2 , needs to plan, and afterwards to implement, a strategy for radioactive waste management, the first step in the process is to look round and ask its bigger, stronger and more experienced neighbours (neighbouring countries), how they performed that task. Unfortunately, it is usually found that only few of the numerous answers to these questions and sub-questions are suitable for questioner. So what is to be done when the society is a Mediterranean, Central European, relatively highly populated country, where the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita in 1994 exceeded 7000 US dollars, where the territory is mainly intended for residence, tourism and agricultural purposes, and where there is only one nuclear power plant (NPP) and one uranium mill which are responsible for the greatest part of the highly undesired radioactive waste ? The producers of radioactive wastes, and the economy of the country as a whole, cannot afford the costs of seeking a unique way of disposing of those wastes, but nevertheless, answers to the two primary questions concerning radioactive waste management should be given in any case. First: What should be done with the radioactive wastes produced in one NPP (PWR, 632 MWe) during 35 years of operation (up to 8000 m 3 of low - and intermediate - level waste, about 600 tons of spent fuel), and a uranium mill closed after only six years of ore-processing operation (670000 tons of ore-processing wastes)? Second: Where should it be done? Both questions pose the problem of siting, environmental assessment and the appropriateness of (all kinds of) criteria. In this paper the situation in Slovenia is presented with emphasis on the possibility and feasibility of radioactive waste disposal. Methodology and criteria for site evaluation and site selection for low- and intermediate- level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal is described. Fifty-five criteria are included in a decision

  16. A methodology for producing small scale rural land use maps in semi-arid developing countries using orbital imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangenderen, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Lock, B. F.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Results have shown that it is feasible to design a methodology that can provide suitable guidelines for operational production of small scale rural land use maps of semiarid developing regions from LANDSAT MSS imagery, using inexpensive and unsophisticated visual techniques. The suggested methodology provides immediate practical benefits to map makers attempting to produce land use maps in countries with limited budgets and equipment. Many preprocessing and interpretation techniques were considered, but rejected on the grounds that they were inappropriate mainly due to the high cost of imagery and/or equipment, or due to their inadequacy for use in operational projects in the developing countries. Suggested imagery and interpretation techniques, consisting of color composites and monocular magnification proved to be the simplest, fastest, and most versatile methods.

  17. Child Labour Use in a Small Developing Country: Is it Luxury, Distributional or Substitution Axiom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Reddy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Child labour use in developing countries has been increasing over the years. In general, it’s characterized by low wages and long hours of work under dangerous, hazardous, unhealthy and unhygienic conditions, which could lead to poor physical and mental development. It deprives a child of education and natural development. In this paper, we examined the use of child labour in Fiji. The study utilized primary data collected using a structured survey to examine the determinants of child labour. The results from this study demonstrate that the variables such as household size, household income, and the gender of children significantly affect child labour supply. Furthermore, absence of adults from households is also a causal factor contributing towards child labour. Using these results, we make a case for “luxury” and “substitution” axioms for Fiji’s Child labour market.

  18. Multivariant strategy study for the use of plutonium in a nuclear programme: the case of the large and small country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dievoet, J. van; Kunsch, P.; Verraver, J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a multicriteria study into the desirability of introducing a plutonium using FBR programme into two fictitious countries, one large and one small, are presented. The strategy discussed concerns only base load electrical energy production with both fossil and nuclear fuels. A number of independent social, economic and political objectives need to be considered in the choice of power plant programme. These include the price of fuel, the safety of fuel supply, the balance of services, the new investments needed and the impact of new technology. (U.K.)

  19. Data gaps in evidence-based research on small water enterprises in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opryszko, Melissa C; Huang, Haiou; Soderlund, Kurt; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2009-12-01

    Small water enterprises (SWEs) are water delivery operations that predominantly provide water at the community level. SWEs operate beyond the reach of piped water systems, selling water to households throughout the world. Their ubiquity in the developing world and access to vulnerable populations suggests that these small-scale water vendors may prove valuable in improving potable water availability. This paper assesses the current literature on SWEs to evaluate previous studies and determine gaps in the evidence base. Piped systems and point-of-use products were not included in this assessment. Results indicate that SWES are active in urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Benefits of SWEs include: no upfront connection fees; demand-driven and flexible to local conditions; and service to large populations without high costs of utility infrastructure. Disadvantages of SWEs include: higher charges for water per unit of volume compared with infrastructure-based utilities; lack of regulation; operation often outside legal structures; no water quality monitoring; increased potential for conflict with local utilities; and potential for extortion by local officials. No rigorous, evidence-based, peer-reviewed scientific studies that control for confounders examining the effectiveness of SWEs in providing potable water were identified.

  20. Risks of using social media as a marketing tool for small producers in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhitha, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this secondary research is to determine the suitability of social media as an element of marketing communication for craft producers. Secondary research was used to determine the suitability of social media as an element of marketing communication for craft producers in an emerging country. The growth in the craft market is also associated with the rise in local interest in South African craft fuelled by trends towards ethnic, rustic, earthy styles and increasing national pride and the return of local values. The consulted secondary resources confirm that social media has the potential to help crafters to create better brand awareness, better relationships with customers, and increase sales via these mechanisms. However, the major challenge for craft producers to use social media as a communication tool will be limited resources and illiteracy. The research recommends that the South African government provide support in the form of a centralized marketing agency that uses social media to promote craft producers products

  1. IRIS - Generation IV Advanced Light Water Reactor for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    An international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse, is developing a Generation IV Reactor, International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS). IRIS is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. It features innovative, advanced engineering, but it does not require new technology development since it relies on the proven technology of light water reactors. This paper presents the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and four-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. The path forward for possible future extension to a eight-year cycle will be also discussed. IRIS has a large potential worldwide market because of its proven technology, modularity, low financing, compatibility with existing grids and very limited infrastructure requirements. It is especially appealing to developing countries because of ease of operation and because its medium power is more adaptable to smaller grids. (author)

  2. The development of marketing in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe article discusses marketing developments in the Netherlands. The author describes the evolution of marketing in the country from the traditional institutions such as wholesaling, retailing, and auctions, etc. to the nonprofit sectors. Marketing in the country has been described in

  3. Work Ability and Its Related Factors Among Workers in Small and Medium Enterprises: Comparison Among Four ASEAN Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Isahak, Marzuki; Susilowati, Indri; Phuong, Toai Nguyen; Morioka, Ikuharu; Harncharoen, Kitiphong; Low, Wah Yun; Ratanasiripong, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Work ability is related to many factors that might influence one's capacity to work. This study aimed to examine the work ability and its related factors among small and medium enterprises (SME) workers in 4 Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries. The participants in this study included 2098 workers from food and textile industries in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey of anonymous self-administrated questionnaire was designed to collect information on sociodemographic factors, work environment and ergonomic condition, musculoskeletal disorders, and work ability. Bivariate correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression analyses were used to predict the work ability. Results of this study confirm that work ability in 4 ASEAN countries was similar to that in European countries, and that the sociodemographic factors, work environment and ergonomic condition, and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) were associated with work ability. These factors are important for considering occupational health and safety policy to promote work ability in food, textile, and other SME workers. © 2016 APJPH.

  4. Estimates of burden and consequences of infants born small for gestational age in low and middle income countries with INTERGROWTH-21st standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Anne Cc; Kozuki, Naoko; Cousens, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Objectives  To estimate small for gestational age birth prevalence and attributable neonatal mortality in low and middle income countries with the INTERGROWTH-21st birth weight standard. Design  Secondary analysis of data from the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG), including 14...... birth cohorts with gestational age, birth weight, and neonatal follow-up. Small for gestational age was defined as infants weighing less than the 10th centile birth weight for gestational age and sex with the multiethnic, INTERGROWTH-21st birth weight standard. Prevalence of small for gestational age......  CHERG birth cohorts from 14 population based sites in low and middle income countries. Main outcome measures In low and middle income countries in the year 2012, the number and proportion of infants born small for gestational age; number and proportion of neonatal deaths attributable to small...

  5. Analysis of conditions concerning the natural gas internal market organization in four european countries: Germany, Spain, Netherlands and United Kingdom; Analyse des conditions encadrant l'organisation du marche interieur du gaz naturel dans quatre pays europeens: Allemagne, Espagne, Pays-Bas, Royaume-Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this economic study is the wording of a synthetic document for the public information in the framework of the 98/30/CE european directive transposition to the gas internal market. It is writing in four main chapters, one for each country concerned: the Germany, the Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Each one presents the historical context, the actors of the natural gas industry and the main provisions. (A.L.B.)

  6. Buyer's participation and well developed domestic infrastructure. Keys to successful introduction of nuclear power in a small country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numminen, K.; Laine, P.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power is advantageous for a small country such as Finland which does not possess indigenous fossil fuel. For instance, the cost of imports required by nuclear fuel is essentially smaller than the cost of production of electric energy based on coal or fuel oil. In Finland the advantageousness of nuclear power was already proved in the 1950s but before starting the first power plant project it took 15 years to develop step by step the required infrastructure: building the research institutes and training their staff, creating connections to the international organizations and elsewhere abroad, training Finnish design staff, developing the domestic industry to the high quality required by nuclear power, and establishing the necessary authorities and public administration. Thanks to thorough preparation the implementation of the plant projects progressed at a good pace in the 1970s. The lesson learned from operation of the plants is that in a small country - located far from its main supplier - the staff at the plant and the supporting staff in the power company have to be able to analyse the problems occurring, usually in the conventional equipment, and carry out quick repairs without aid from the main supplier. This requires a high level of educational attainment from the staff and the best way to achieve this is for the staff to participate in the design and construction as much as possible already in the implementation phase. In order to maintain high availability, the capability of the domestic industry must also be good - especially in the fields of mechanical industry and electronics. In Finland over 30% of electric energy was produced in 1981 by four nuclear units. Two of these were built as manifold east-west adjustment work with the Soviet supplier and the other two are of Swedish origin

  7. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications

  8. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications.

  9. Proceedings and Book of Abstracts of 8th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production in small and medium countries. Importance of international cooperation for the assessment of the nuclear option has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result of this recognition, the Conference is organized in co-operation with IAEA. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, accommodation on Kyoto restriction on CO 2 emission, new reactor technologies, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants. The conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, regulatory practices and liability and insurance for nuclear damage. All contributed papers are grouped in 10 sessions: Energy planning and nuclear option; Power reactors and technologies; Nuclear energy and environment; Operation and maintenance experience; Safety culture; Nuclear safety analyses; Reactor physics and nuclear fuel cycle; Radioactive waste management and decommissioning; Public relations; Regulatory practice and general papers.

  10. Book of Abstracts of 9th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production in small and medium countries. Importance of international cooperation for the assessment of the nuclear option has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result of this recognition, the Conference is organized in co-operation with IAEA. Croatian State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety and University of Zagreb, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing have also participated in Conference organization. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants. The conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, regulatory practices and liability and insurance for nuclear damage. All contributed papers are grouped in 10 sessions: Energy planning and nuclear option; Power reactors and technologies; Nuclear energy and environment; Operation and maintenance experience; Safety culture; Nuclear safety analyses; Reactor physics and nuclear fuel cycle; Radioactive waste management and decommissioning; Public relations; Regulatory practice and general papers.

  11. Book of Abstracts of 7th International Conference on Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavlina, N; Pevec, D; Bajs, T

    2008-07-01

    The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production in small and medium countries. Importance of international cooperation for the assessment of the nuclear option has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result of this recognition, the Conference is organized in co-operation with IAEA. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, accommodation on Kyoto restriction on CO{sub 2} emission, new reactor technologies, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants. The conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, regulatory practices and liability and insurance for nuclear damage. All contributed papers are grouped in 10 sessions: Energy planning and nuclear option; Power reactors and technologies; Operation and maintenance experience; Safety culture; Nuclear safety analyses; Reactor physics and nuclear fuel cycle; Radioactive waste management and decommissioning; Public relation; Regulatory practice; Liability and insurance for nuclear damage.

  12. Book of Abstracts of 7th International Conference on Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavlina, N.; Pevec, D.; Bajs, T.

    2008-01-01

    The conference is organized with intention to focus on specific aspects of usage of nuclear energy for electricity production in small and medium countries. Importance of international cooperation for the assessment of the nuclear option has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). As a result of this recognition, the Conference is organized in co-operation with IAEA. Session topics reflect some current emphasis, such as country energy needs, accommodation on Kyoto restriction on CO 2 emission, new reactor technologies, operation and safety of the operating nuclear power plants. The conference also focuses on the exchange of experience and co-operation in the fields of fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, regulatory practices and liability and insurance for nuclear damage. All contributed papers are grouped in 10 sessions: Energy planning and nuclear option; Power reactors and technologies; Operation and maintenance experience; Safety culture; Nuclear safety analyses; Reactor physics and nuclear fuel cycle; Radioactive waste management and decommissioning; Public relation; Regulatory practice; Liability and insurance for nuclear damage

  13. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALTMANN, JURGEN

    2000-07-01

    For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

  14. Small country, big business?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Kerstin; Starke, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses New Zealand's role in the global market for tertiary education. The internationalisation and liberalisation of education markets is progressing rapidly in today's globalising world, as reflected by the incorporation of education as a service into the GATS framework. Through...

  15. The Salient History of Dalton Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Piet

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands there are 400 Dalton schools, while Dalton education has all but disappeared elsewhere, including in its country of origin: the USA. Following a brief period in the 1920s in which it enjoyed strong international interest, it disappeared from the scene. How can it be that the Dalton Plan still exists only in the Netherlands? This…

  16. Data literacy and research data management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, Iwan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2018-01-01

    Similar to most European countries, the Netherlands invests heavily in research data management facilities and support for university personnel. For instance, each university in the Netherlands has its program on these issues which is described in policy documents (e.g., Open Universiteit, 2014).

  17. Implementation of coastal erosion management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.P.M. P.M.; Hommes, Saskia; Horstman, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The Netherlands is a low-lying country, in which 9 million people are living below sea level and 70% of the gross domestic product is being earned in areas below sea level. Therefore, protection against flooding is traditionally the primary focus of coastal policy in the Netherlands. Analysis shows

  18. Review of wood fuel from early thinning and plantation cleaning in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelder, A. de

    1998-01-01

    Discussions regarding the use of wood fuels for commercial energy production in the Netherlands began in the 1990's. The main reasons for using wood fuel are: the political demand for using renewable energy, the need to reduce CO 2 emissions, and the lack of markets for surplus timber. Only 10 % of the area of Holland is forested. Therefore, early thinning and cleaning are important management tools for improving growth and producing better quality timber. The energy potential from early thinning and plantation cleaning could be between 400 000 and 570 000 dry tons annually. The Netherlands has not experience in harvesting energy wood. However, through the International Energy Agency/Bioenergy Agreement, knowledge gained in other countries, especially Denmark, Sweden and Finland, is being transferred to Holland. In 1996, there have been made field tests with Danish equipment. Although there are few technical barriers to wood fuel in the Netherlands, the economics of wood fuels consumption are affected by the low costs of fossil fuels and the high natural gas reserves. This is changing however, due to political concerns over the balance of greenhouse gases. In 1996, a small energy tax on fossil fuels was introduced and electricity suppliers are now selling an environmentally friendly 'green electricity'. Energy wood has a future in the Netherlands, although the total forest reserves would satisfy only a small percentage of energy requirements 5 refs

  19. Barriers to reducing climate enhanced disaster risks in Least Developed Country-Small Islands through anticipatory adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kuruppu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Small Island Developing States (SIDS classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs are particularly vulnerable to the projected impacts of climate change. Given their particular vulnerabilities, climate adaptation investments are being made through both national and international efforts to build the capacity of various sectors and communities to reduce climate risks and associated disasters. Despite these efforts, reducing climate risks is not free of various challenges and barriers. This paper aims to synthesise a set of critical socio-economic barriers present at various spatial scales that are specific to Least Developed Country SIDS. It also aims to identify the processes that give rise to these barriers. Drawing on theories from natural hazards, a systematic literature review method was adopted to identify and organise the set of barriers by focussing on both academic papers and grey literature. The data revealed a notable lack of studies on adaptation within African and Caribbean LDC-SIDS. In general, there was a paucity of academic as well as grey literature being produced by authors from LDC-SIDS to challenge existing discourses related to adaptation barriers. The most common barriers identified included those related to governance, technical, cognitive and cultural. Three key findings can be drawn from this study in relation to formal adaptation initiatives. Firstly, the lack of focus on the adaptive capacity needs of Local Government or Island Councils and communities was a key barrier to ensure success of adaptation interventions. Secondly, international adaptation funding modalities did little to address root causes of vulnerability or support system transformations. These funds were geared at supporting sectoral level adaptation initiatives for vulnerable natural resource sectors such as water, biodiversity and coastal zones. Thirdly, there is a need to recognise the significance of cultural knowledge and practices in shaping

  20. Barriers to reducing climate enhanced disaster risks in Least Developed Country-Small Islands through anticipatory adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruppu, N.; Willie, R.

    2015-12-01

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs) are particularly vulnerable to the projected impacts of climate change. Given their particular vulnerabilities, climate adaptation investments are being made through both national and international efforts to build the capacity of various sectors and communities to reduce climate risks and associated disasters. Despite these efforts, reducing climate risks is not free of various challenges and barriers. This paper aims to synthesise a set of critical socio-economic barriers present at various spatial scales that are specific to Least Developed Country SIDS. It also aims to identify the processes that give rise to these barriers. Drawing on theories from natural hazards, a systematic literature review method was adopted to identify and organise the set of barriers by focussing both on academic papers and grey literature. The data revealed a notable lack of studies on adaptation within African and Caribbean LDC-SIDS. In general, there was a paucity of academic as well as grey literature being produced by authors from LDC-SIDS to challenge existing discourses related to adaptation barriers. The most common barriers identified included those related to governance, technical, cognitive and cultural. Three key findings can be drawn from this study in relation to formal adaptation initiatives. Firstly, the lack of focus on the adaptive capacity needs of Local Government or Island Councils and communities was a key barrier to ensuring success of adaptation interventions. Secondly, international adaptation funding modalities did little to address root causes of vulnerability or support system transformations. These funds were geared at supporting sectoral level adaptation initiatives for vulnerable natural resource sectors such as water, biodiversity and coastal zones. Thirdly, there is a need to recognise the significance of cultural knowledge and practices in shaping adaptive choices of

  1. 76 FR 38053 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles (DFARS Case 2011... ``designated country'' due to the change in the political status of the islands that comprised the Netherlands..., 2010, Curacao and Sint Maarten became autonomous territories of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Bonaire...

  2. 76 FR 68039 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ...] RIN 9000-AM11 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles AGENCIES... ``designated country'' due to the change in status of the islands that comprised the Netherlands Antilles... 2011-014. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Netherlands Antilles was designated as a...

  3. Quality improvement initiatives for hospitalised small and sick newborns in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaka, Nabila; Alexander, Emma C; Manikam, Logan; Norman, Irena C F; Akhbari, Melika; Moxon, Sarah; Ram, Pavani Kalluri; Murphy, Georgina; English, Mike; Niermeyer, Susan; Pearson, Luwei

    2018-01-25

    An estimated 2.6 million newborns died in 2016; over 98.5% of deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Neonates born preterm and small for gestational age are particularly at risk given the high incidence of infectious complications, cardiopulmonary, and neurodevelopmental disorders in this group. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives can reduce the burden of mortality and morbidity for hospitalised newborns in these settings. We undertook a systematic review to synthesise evidence from LMICs on QI approaches used, outcome measures employed to estimate effects, and the nature of implementation challenges. We searched Medline, EMBASE, WHO Global Health Library, Cochrane Library, WHO ICTRP, and ClinicalTrials.gov and scanned the references of identified studies and systematic reviews. Searches covered January 2000 until April 2017. Search terms were "quality improvement", "newborns", "hospitalised", and their derivatives. Studies were excluded if they took place in high-income countries, did not include QI interventions, or did not include small and sick hospitalised newborns. Cochrane Risk of Bias tools were used to quality appraise the studies. From 8110 results, 28 studies were included, covering 23 LMICs and 65,642 participants. Most interventions were meso level (district and clinic level); fewer were micro (patient-provider level) or macro (above district level). In-service training was the most common intervention subtype; service organisation and distribution of referencing materials were also frequently identified. The most commonly assessed outcome was mortality, followed by length of admission, sepsis rates, and infection rates. Key barriers to implementation of quality improvement initiatives included overburdened staff and lack of sufficient equipment. The frequency of meso level, single centre, and educational interventions suggests that these interventions may be easier for programme planners to implement. The success of some

  4. Decision based on big data research for non-small cell lung cancer in medical artificial system in developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Tan, Yanlin; Chen, Zhigang; Zhao, Ming

    2018-06-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a high risk cancer and is usually scanned by PET-CT for testing, predicting and then give the treatment methods. However, in the actual hospital system, at least 640 images must be generated for each patient through PET-CT scanning. Especially in developing countries, a huge number of patients in NSCLC are attended by doctors. Artificial system can predict and make decision rapidly. According to explore and research artificial medical system, the selection of artificial observations also can result in low work efficiency for doctors. In this study, data information of 2,789,675 patients in three hospitals in China are collected, compiled, and used as the research basis; these data are obtained through image acquisition and diagnostic parameter machine decision-making method on the basis of the machine diagnosis and medical system design model of adjuvant therapy. By combining image and diagnostic parameters, the machine decision diagnosis auxiliary algorithm is established. Experimental result shows that the accuracy has reached 77% in NSCLC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakley, Stewart M., E-mail: soakley@csuchico.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Chico State University, California State University, Chico, CA 95929 (United States); Jimenez, Ramon, E-mail: rjimenez1958@yahoo.com [Public Works, Municipality of Villanueva, Cortes (Honduras)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m{sup 2}/person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country's total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1-3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in

  6. Regional labour market dynamics in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Lourens; van Dijk, J.

    This article analyzes the response of regional labor markets in the Netherlands to region-specific labor demand shocks. Previous studies show remarkable differences in response between regions in European countries and regions in the United States. The analysis shows that, in Dutch regions, the

  7. Training the physician assistant in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spenkelink-Schut, G.; ten Cate, O.Th.J.; Kort, H.S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of the physician assistant (PA) in the United States has served as a model for other countries in providing one solution for the challenges in their health care systems. In the Netherlands there is a growing shortage of adequately trained health care workers, an increasing demand for

  8. Stimulating medical education research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Debbie; Scherpbier, Albert; Van Der Vleuten, Cees; Ten Cate, Olle

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, the Dutch have been active innovators and researchers in the medical education domain. With regards to the quantity of publications in the medical education literature, the Netherlands rank second among countries in Europe and fourth worldwide over the past years,

  9. Euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Each of the Benelux countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands) has enacted legislation that partially decriminalises euthanasia, defined as an act that intentionally terminates someone's life at their request. In the Netherlands and Luxembourg, but not in Belgium, the legislation partially decriminalised assisted suicide at the same time. In all three countries, euthanasia can only be performed by a doctor, in response to the patient's voluntary and well-considered request, and for patients who have an incurable disease that causes unbearable suffering, without any prospect of relief. In the Netherlands, minors can request euthanasia as of the age of 12 years. In 2011, reported euthanasia accounted for about 1% of deaths in Belgium and 3% in the Netherlands. In 75% of cases, cancer was the disease leading to a request for euthanasia. In the Netherlands, the number of cases of euthanasia reported by doctors in surveys matches the number that is officially declared. In Belgium, it is thought that there are as many unreported as reported cases of euthanasia. Since the enactment of euthanasia legislation, fewer deaths involve the intentional administration of lethal drugs without an explicit request from the patient.

  10. Book Review: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudal Poulsen, René

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk).......Review of: Lenka Krátká: A History of the Czechoslovak Ocean Shipping Company, 1948–1989: How a Small, Landlocked Country Ran Maritime Business During the Cold War. Stuttgart: Ibidem Verlag, 2015. x + 271 pp., tables, notes, bibliography. ISBN: 978-3-8382-0666-0, £23.90 (pbk)....

  11. Les raffineries de petite taille dans les pays en développement Small-Size Refineries in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonchere J. P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les raffineries de petite taille, nombreuses dans le monde, vont connaître un regain d'intérêt dans le contexte d'énergie chère que l'on connaît maintenant. Les pays en développement chercheront, plus que jamais, l'autosuffisance en pétrole, moteur essentiel de leur croissance. Toute découverte; même limitée, sera une aubaine et pourra offrir l'opportunité de réaliser une raffinerie. La déficience de l'infrastructure de transports, le manque chronique de moyens de financement et de devises étrangères inciteront nombre de pays en développement à considérer un projet de taille modeste avec intérêt. Des bénéfices substantiels peuvent en être retirés : délai de réalisation court et récupération rapide de la mise financière, montage financier facilité par sa modestie même, amélioration de la balance en devises étrangères, coûts de mise à la disposition du consommateur minimisés, intégration à une politique d'aménagement du territoire. There are many small-size refineries in the worid. Renewed interest will be shown in such refineries within the present context of expensive energy. More than ever the developing countries will seek to gain self sufficiency in cil, the essential locomotive of their growth. Any discovery, even limited, will be a windfall and will provide an opportunity ta build a refinery. Deficiencies in the transportation infrastructure together with the chronic lack of financing means and hard currency will incite a good many developing countries ta consider a modest-size project with interest. Substantiel benefits may be goined, i. e. short construction time and rapid recovery of the financiel outlay, facilitating of the financing by the very modesty of its size, improvement in the hard-currency balance and integration into a regional-development policy.

  12. National and regional estimates of term and preterm babies born small for gestational age in 138 low-income and middle-income countries in 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Anne C C; Katz, Joanne; Blencowe, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    million low-birthweight babies, 59% were term-SGA and 41% were preterm-SGA. Two-thirds of small-for-gestational-age infants were born in Asia (17·4 million in south Asia). Preterm-SGA babies totalled 2·8 million births in low-income and middle-income countries. Most small-for-gestational-age infants were......BACKGROUND: National estimates for the numbers of babies born small for gestational age and the comorbidity with preterm birth are unavailable. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of term and preterm babies born small for gestational age (term-SGA and preterm-SGA), and the relation to low...... birthweight (age was defined as lower than the 10th centile for fetal growth from the 1991 US national reference population. Data from 22 birth cohort studies (14 low-income and middle-income countries) and from...

  13. The incidence and genetic variability of Small Round-Structured Viruses (SRSV) in outbreaks of gastroenteritis in 1996 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinje J; Altena SA; Lodder WJ; Koopmans MPG; LIO; MGB

    1997-01-01

    Small round-structured viruses (SRSV), ook wel Norwalk-achtige virussen genoemd, zijn belangrijke verwekkers van explosies van gastroenteritis. De detectie van deze groep genetisch uiterst variabele virussen is door de recente ontwikkeling van een generische RT-PCR test sterk vereenvoudigd. Om de

  14. The future energy situation in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This book is the result of a study into the future energy situation in the Netherlands, performed by the electricity companies in the country. The first five chapters sketch the framework within which energy policy is currently forced to operate. Further technical and physical conditions are considered in the following six chapters, including environmental and safety aspects. A prognosis for energy demand in the Netherlands until the end of the century is presented and five different scenarios are discussed, as means of supplying this demand. Nuclear energy is one of the sources considered throughout the text. (C.F.)

  15. Enhancing the innovative capacity of small firms through triple helix interactions : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranga, Liana Marina; Miedema, Joost; Jorna, Rene

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent exploratory study aiming to enhance the innovative capacity of small firms in the Northern Netherlands, a region lagging behind the rest of the country in terms of economic growth and innovative capacity. The triple helix perspective is adopted to examine

  16. Some new evidence on the determinants of large- and small-firm innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Dijk (Bob); R. den Hertog; A.R. Thurik (Roy); A.J. Menkveld (Bert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractEmpirical analyses presented by Acs and Audretsch suggest differences in the market structure determinants of innovation between large and small firms in U.S. manufacturing. The evidence they offer is ambiguous. By using data for a different country (The Netherlands), a different measure

  17. Do interventions targeted at micro-entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized firms create jobs? A systematic review of the evidence for low and middle income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Grimm (Michael); A.L. Paffhausen

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Worldwide, 600 million jobs are needed over the next 15 years to keep employment rates at their current level. Because most employment in low and middle income countries is in micro-, small and medium-sized enterprises, governments, non-governmental organizations and

  18. Risk assessment of metals and organic pollutants for herbivorous and carnivorous small mammal food chains in a polluted floodplain (Biesbosch, The Netherlands)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamers, Timo; Berg, Johannes H.J. van den; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Schooten, Frederik-Jan van; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2006-01-01

    A risk assessment was made for a carnivorous and a herbivorous food chain in a heavily polluted natural estuary (Biesbosch), by determining the most critical pollutants and the food chain most at risk. Exposure of food chains to metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was assessed by analyzing dietary concentrations, internal concentrations, and biomarkers of exposure. Common shrew (Sorex araneus) and bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) were selected as representative small mammal species for the carnivorous and herbivorous food chain, respectively, and earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus) and snails (Cepaea nemoralis) as representative prey species for the carnivorous food chain. Metals contributed most to the total risk for small mammals and earthworms. PCBs, but not PAHs, contributed to the overall risk for S. araneus at regularly flooded locations. The carnivorous food chain appeared most at risk given the higher exposure levels and bioaccumulating potency found for contaminants in S. araneus. - In polluted floodplain areas, dietary exposure to metals poses a larger risk for small mammals in a carnivorous than in a herbivorous food chain

  19. Netherlands' participation in SBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, J.M. van den

    1991-01-01

    The Netherlands are running a Program for Intensifying Nuclear Knowhow (PINK) including design and safety analysis of enhanced-safety LWRs in order to train young engineers. The parties of PINK are: GKN (Operator of Dodewaard), KEMA (Research Institute of the Netherlands' Utilities), ECN (Netherlands' Energy Research Foundation), IRI (Interfaculty Reactor Institute of the Delft University of Technology) and Nucon (a division of Comprimo). The Dodewaard BWR has natural convection coolant circulation. This has influenced the decision by KEMA and Nucon in 1989 in discussion with General Electric Nuclear Energy to contribute to its Simplified BWR program

  20. Different sizes, similar challenges: Out of home care for youth in Germany and the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek T. Harder

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While there is a large difference in the number of young inhabitants in the Netherlands and Germany, their child protection frameworks are quite similar. In both countries, child protection services are mainlyfocused on youth aged 0 to 18 and regulations are aimed at clients' responsibility and their active involvement during care. Youth care services consist of community-based services, day treatment and outof-home care services, which include foster care and residential care. The history of out-of-home care services in both countries is characterized by similar developments. Over the last four decades, similar trends in residential care, towards more small-scale forms of residential care, smaller residential group sizes, and increasing professionalization of staff have emerged. Over the last two decades, a comparable trend towards increasing professionalization can be seen in the context of foster care in both countries. In addition, the number of youths in out-of-home care increased in both countries over the last decade, specifically in foster care. Over the last decade, more studies have been conducted in residential care than in foster care in both countries. Despite similar trends and developments in out-of-home care practice, research mainly shows differences in applied topics and methods between Germany and the Netherlands.

  1. How the Netherlands became a bicycle nation : users, firms and intermediaries, 1860-1940

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Tjin Tai, S.E.; Veraart, F.C.A.; Davids, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 1925, the Netherlands was a country of cyclists and cycle producers, as all classes cycled and almost all cycles were produced domestically. The bicycle was not a Dutch invention and the country had an open economy, and this raises the question ‘how did the Netherlands become a bicycle nation?’

  2. Education as Cultural Mobilisation: The Great War and Its Effects on Moral Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk, Vincent; Los, Willeke; Karsten, Sjoerd

    2014-01-01

    Education during World War I has been a relatively unexplored field of research, especially in the case of countries with a neutral stance in that war. The Netherlands is one such country. This article argues that even though the Netherlands was politically neutral, it was and considered itself a part of western civilisation and shared in the…

  3. Nuclear law Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, W.

    1976-01-01

    This publication gives, in Dutch and German, a comprehensive survey of the Netherland's current law in the field of reactor safety and radiation protection, including a survey of international agreements. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Hoe de Nederlandse wetenschap beter te maken. [Improving the health of scientific research in The netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Biomedical science in the Netherlands and other continental European countries is lagging behind scientific research in English-speaking countries. A comparison between the two systems reveals several crucial differences. Although levels of government funding of scientific research are approximately

  5. Hydrogen for small-scale energy consumers and CO2-storage. Feasibility study of a demonstration project in the Rijnmond, Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsma, G.C.; Van der Werff, T.T.; Rooijers, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    In the future natural gas can be substituted by hydrogen. In the short term hydrogen can be produced from fossil fuels. Released CO 2 can be stored. In the long run it will be possible to produce hydrogen from renewable energy sources (solar cells and wind turbines), which can be transported to the consumer. In the study on the title subject attention is paid to different methods of hydrogen production from natural gas and from residual oils, costs and problems of hydrogen distribution, hydrogen appliances, and CO 2 storage. From the results it appears that a demonstration project to use hydrogen on a small-scale is feasible, although expensive. The costs of the reconstruction of the present natural gas distribution system to a hydrogen distribution system is higher than expected. The price of hydrogen per GJ is higher than the equal energy content of natural gas, in spite of a reduction of the energy levy. The demonstration project will be 25% cheaper per GJ hydrogen when carried out in a newly built area. A demonstration project in which hydrogen is mixed with natural gas is even a factor 2 cheaper. 17 refs., 7 appendices

  6. Touring the Low Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, van Kees

    1998-01-01

    Touring the Low Countries is an anthology of approximately forty travel documents by British tourists - journals, letters, and financial accounts - most of them published here for the first time.The United Provinces and the Spanish Netherlands, with all the variety of their contrasting cultural

  7. Book of Abstracts of 4th International Conference: Nuclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In order to achieve best safety and operational standards these countries with limited human and material resources must put added emphasis on their rational and efficient use. Consequently, the worldwide developments on innovative reactors' systems and improved concepts for fuel utilisation and waste disposal are of substantial interest. Appropriate selections of reactor technology, fuel cycle and decommission strategies are of paramount importance. There are very successful examples of achieving safety and good operational records, so the exchange of experience and co-operation amongst that group of countries is of great interest. Exchanging specific experience and co-operation between the like countries will be additional value relative to the still prevailing equipment supplier-national utility relationships

  8. Estimating quality adjusted progression free survival of first-line treatments for EGFR mutation positive non small cell lung cancer patients in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verduyn S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is an effective treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with an activating mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Randomised clinical trials showed a benefit in progression free survival for gefitinib versus doublet chemotherapy regimens in patients with an activated EGFR mutation (EGFR M+. From a patient perspective, progression free survival is important, but so is health-related quality of life. Therefore, this analysis evaluates the Quality Adjusted progression free survival of gefitinib versus three relevant doublet chemotherapies (gemcitabine/cisplatin (Gem/Cis; pemetrexed/cisplatin (Pem/Cis; paclitaxel/carboplatin (Pac/Carb in a Dutch health care setting in patients with EGFR M+ stage IIIB/IV NSCLC. This study uses progression free survival rather than overall survival for its time frame in order to better compare the treatments and to account for the influence that subsequent treatment lines would have on overall survival analysis. Methods Mean progression free survival for Pac/Carb was obtained by extrapolating the median progression free survival as reported in the Iressa-Pan-Asia Study (IPASS. Data from a network meta-analysis was used to estimate the mean progression free survival for therapies of interest relative to Pac/Carb. Adjustment for health-related quality of life was done by incorporating utilities for the Dutch population, obtained by converting FACT-L data (from IPASS to utility values and multiplying these with the mean progression free survival for each treatment arm to determine the Quality Adjusted progression free survival. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine 95% credibility intervals. Results The Quality Adjusted progression free survival (PFS (mean, (95% credibility interval was 5.2 months (4.5; 5.8 for Gem/Cis, 5.3 months (4.6; 6.1 for Pem/Cis; 4.9 months (4.4; 5.5 for Pac/Carb and 8

  9. Economic and other determinants of infant and child mortality in small developing countries: the case of Central America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, D E

    1996-03-01

    . Structural adjustment variables were found to have small impacts on the birth rate or limited impacts on child survival in poorer countries.

  10. National assessment study in Armenia using innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles methodology for an innovative nuclear systems in a country with small grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargsyan, V.H.; Galstyan, A.A.; Gevorgyan, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was launched in November 2000 under the aegis of the IAEA. Phases 1A and IB (first Part) of the Project were dedicated to elaboration, testing and validation of the INPRO Methodology. At the Technical Meeting in Vienna (13-15 October 2004) Armenia has proposed an assessment using the INPRO Methodology for an Innovative Nuclear Energy System in a country with a small electrical grid. Such kind of study helps Armenia in analysis of Innovative Nuclear Energy System (INS), including fuel cycle options, as well as shows applicability of INPRO methodology for small countries, like Armenia. This study was based on the results given in [3] and [4], and also on the main objectives, declared by the Government of Armenia in the paper 'Energy Sector Development Strategies in the Context of Economic Development in Armenia'

  11. Hunger and microbiology: is a low gastric acid-induced bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine a contributor to malnutrition in developing countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Shafiqul A; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Brüssow, Harald

    2017-09-01

    Underproduction of hydrochloric acid into the stomach is frequently encountered in subjects from developing countries. We explore the hypothesis that hypochlorhydria compromises the gastric barrier and favours bacterial overgrowth in the proximal parts of the small intestine where nutrient absorption takes place. Food calories are thus deviated into bacterial metabolism. In addition to an adequate caloric supply, correcting hypochlorhydria might be needed to decrease childhood malnutrition. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Treatment decision-making for advanced non-small cell lung cancer and differences among European countries: 1st AIOT-ETOP meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare; Stahel, Rolf; Besse, Benjamin; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Felip, Enriqueta; Gasparini, Stefano; Graziano, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; de Marinis, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    The Italian Association of Thoracic Oncology (AIOT) and the European Thoracic Oncology Platform (ETOP) realized the first conjunct educational meeting, open to European oncologists involved in the treatment of thoracic malignancies, entitled "Advanced non-small cell lung cancer: new perspectives in first-line setting". The educational meeting included 8 interactive talks, held by European key opinion leaders, and 5 related clinical cases in which the attendees, divided in working tables based on their country origin, were involved for interactive discussion. The aim of this course was to elucidate the differences or similarities among the European countries in the first-line treatment of patients affected by advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Twenty-two attendees of the following countries participated: Austria, France, Italy, Spain, Swiss, and UK. As expected, some discrepancies between the groups were identified concerning the approach to the diagnostic phase, the choice of first-line regimen, the duration of treatment and the use of maintenance therapy. These discrepancies were mainly due to familiarity with specific therapies and lack of access to certain therapies due to local regulatory issues. The European Medicine Agency grants marketing of drugs in all Europe, regulatory agency of each country can register the drug, but can also deny public reimbursement thus restricting the options of the oncologist. The European Oncology Associations should join to their effort to achieve a uniform access to the cancer therapy for all patients in Europe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immigration-dependent extensive growth in small island tourism economies : The cases of Aruba and Sint Maarten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, A.

    Aruba and Sint Maarten are two countries within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, situated in the Caribbean. Both have embarked on a dedicated tourism-driven and highly immigration-dependent development model starting in the 1970s and 1980s, making them typical examples of ‘Small Island Tourist

  14. Renewable energy projects in small island countries funded under the United Nation trust found for new and renewable source of energy (NRSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gururaja, J.

    1999-01-01

    The NRSE trust fund established with financial support from the Italian Government has succeeded in catalyzing a number of energy projects in small island developing countries. These projects have elicited a great deal of interest by local communities and opened up prospects for further utilization of locally available energy resources. The projects have created a positive impact on the quality of life of people in dispersed locations in small island developing countries by focusing on provision of renewable energy based electricity services such as solar PV lighting for homes, schools, and hospitals; radio, TV, VCR as well as medicine refrigerators. Thus it has become evident that renewable energy technologies such as solar and wind systems can have an important role to play in improving the quality of life of people in these small island countries. Market potential for these technologies is indeed substantial. However constraints and barriers still exist. One of the principal barriers is still the high initial cost of solar devices. Innovative financing including microcredit facilities needs to be explored. Efforts are also needed to strengthen local capacity to undertake assembly of components and systems, and also in the installation, maintenance, and service of renewable energy devices. Entrepreneurial activities need to be fostered through further strengthening of skills in this area. (EHS)

  15. Renewable energy projects in small island countries funded under the United Nation trust found for new and renewable source of energy (NRSE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gururaja, J. [Energy and Transport Branch, Division for Sustainabel Development, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations, NY (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The NRSE trust fund established with financial support from the Italian Government has succeeded in catalyzing a number of energy projects in small island developing countries. These projects have elicited a great deal of interest by local communities and opened up prospects for further utilization of locally available energy resources. The projects have created a positive impact on the quality of life of people in dispersed locations in small island developing countries by focusing on provision of renewable energy based electricity services such as solar PV lighting for homes, schools, and hospitals; radio, TV, VCR as well as medicine refrigerators. Thus it has become evident that renewable energy technologies such as solar and wind systems can have an important role to play in improving the quality of life of people in these small island countries. Market potential for these technologies is indeed substantial. However constraints and barriers still exist. One of the principal barriers is still the high initial cost of solar devices. Innovative financing including microcredit facilities needs to be explored. Efforts are also needed to strengthen local capacity to undertake assembly of components and systems, and also in the installation, maintenance, and service of renewable energy devices. Entrepreneurial activities need to be fostered through further strengthening of skills in this area. (EHS)

  16. Initial and subsequent location choices of immigrants to the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorlu, A.; Mulder, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    The initial settlement behaviour and the subsequent mobility of immigrants who arrived in the Netherlands in 1999 are examined using rich administrative individual data. The study considers the settlement patterns of immigrants from various countries of origin who entered the country as labour,

  17. The interplay between money market development and changes in monetary policy operations in small European countries, 1980 - 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Forssbæck, Jens; Oxelheim, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We study the interplay between money market development and changes in monetary policy operating procedures in 11 European countries from c. 1980 up to the launch of EMU. Aspects of money market development such as the size and structure of different market segments, and institutional and regulatory changes, are addressed. We recount and empirically examine the extent of reorientation of monetary policy instruments away from quantitative direct control instruments toward indirect market-based...

  18. Where do people live longer and shorter lives? An ecological study of old-age survival across 4404 small areas from 18 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana Isabel; Krainski, Elias Teixeira; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Pina, Maria de Fátima de

    2016-06-01

    Further increases in life expectancy in high-income countries depend to a large extent on advances in old-age survival. We aimed to characterise the spatial distribution of old-age survival across small areas of Europe, and to identify areas with significantly high or low survivorship. This study incorporated 4404 small areas from 18 European countries. We used a 10-year survival rate to express the proportion of population aged 75-84 years who reached 85-94 years of age (beyond average life expectancy). This metric was calculated for each gender using decennial census data (1991, 2001 and 2011) at small geographical areas. To address problems associated with small areas, rates were smoothed using a Bayesian spatial model. Excursion sets were defined to identify areas with significantly high (>95th centile) and low (exist, suggesting that European social unity is still to be accomplished. These inequalities could arise from a myriad of population health determinants (eg, poverty, unhealthy lifestyles), which merit further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Psychotraumatology in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Olff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The contribution to psychotrauma literature from Dutch authors has a long tradition. The relatively high lifetime prevalence of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is not unique for the Netherlands and does not fully explain the interest in trauma and its consequences. In this overview of psychotraumatology in the Netherlands, we will discuss some of the key events and processes that contribute to the current interest. We outlined the historical basis and development of the field in the Netherlands, including the impact of World War II, the effects of major man-made or natural disasters, engagement in military conflicts, as well as smaller scale traumatic events like sexual abuse and traffic accidents. The liberal and open culture may have reduced stigma to trauma, while other sociocultural aspects may have contributed to increased prevalence. Finally, we describe Dutch psychotraumatology today and how history and culture have shaped the current scientific basis.

  20. Understanding entrepreneurship at the base of the pyramid in developing countries : insights from small-scale vegetable farmers in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yessoufou, Ahoudou Waliou

    2017-01-01

    Local small-scale entrepreneurship has recently become an important field of study and a tool for policymakers. However, there are some practical and theoretical issues regarding the promotion of local entrepreneurship. First, the dynamics of entrepreneurship are considered to be universal,

  1. Netherlands Reactor Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly reviews the last year's work of the twenty year old Netherlands Reactor Centre (RCN) in the fields of reactor safety, fissile material, nuclear fission, non-nuclear energy systems and overseas co-operation. The annual report thus summarised is the last one to appear under the name of RCN. The terms of reference of the organisation having been broadened to include research into energy supply in general, it is to be known in future as the Netherlands Energy Research Centre (ECN). (D.J.B.)

  2. Coastal Management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Pilarczyk, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    The coast is a very important aspect of life in the Netherlands. 60 % of the Netherlands is below the sea level, everyone lives less than 200 km from a beach, and for most people the sea is less than 50 km away. But in the Netherlands there is officially no Agency for Coastal Zone Management,

  3. Weichselian Aeolian Geoheritage Top 20 of the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Platform Aardkundige Waarden, members

    2016-04-01

    The Netherlands are known world-wide for its engineered landscapes, its deep polders and bulb fields. The deep polders, up to more than 5 meters below sea level, originated by reclaiming peat lakes and peat quarries made for fuel. Its bulb fields are situated on levelled permeable dunes on which the precise water management is possible that growing bulbs requires. The Waddensea and -islands are less widely known (except by German bathers), although they are a World Heritage. The Waddensea is a highly pristine tidal landscape that already occurs along the Dutch coast for over 10,000 years and an important Natura 2000 area. The Wadden islands have an interesting history of erosion and re-growth and old cultural landscapes that show the interaction of land use and small-scale differences in geology and geomorphology during different cultural periods. Therefore, it is time to change the international perception of foreign visitors to The Netherlands and add the high variety of its historical landscapes, partly pristine and partly old cultural landscapes, to its tourism qualities. The poster presents a Top 20 of a less spectacular but another internationally important Dutch landscape: the coversand sites of the Netherlands. The Top 20 is selected by Geoheritage NL's Platform Aardkundige Waarden. The coversands evolved during the Late Weichselian, when the Netherlands was not covered by land ice and for a long period of time was part of a polar desert. The coversand landscape with dunes of 0,5 m up to 15 metres is not spectacular, but very characteristic. The coversands comprise of more than half a kilometre broad and 40 kilometre long dunes, series of river dunes as well as isolated dunes. The coversands and related Holocene drift sands make up about a quarter of the Dutch landscape. Over a century ago more than half of this landscape still had its pristine topography. Now less than a few percent is remaining. Especially the few remaining heathlands on coversand are an

  4. Data Decision and Drug Therapy Based on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in a Big Data Medical System in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In many developing or underdeveloped countries, limited medical resources and large populations may affect the survival of mankind. The research for the medical information system and recommendation of effective treatment methods may improve diagnosis and drug therapy for patients in developing or underdeveloped countries. In this study, we built a system model for the drug therapy, relevance parameter analysis, and data decision making in non-small cell lung cancer. Based on the probability analysis and status decision, the optimized therapeutic schedule can be calculated and selected, and then effective drug therapy methods can be determined to improve relevance parameters. Statistical analysis of clinical data proves that the model of the probability analysis and decision making can provide fast and accurate clinical data.

  5. Human trafficking and legalized prostitution in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegel Dina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available On 1 October 2000, the Netherlands became the first European country to legalize prostitution as a profession, with its rights and duties. On the other hand, this new Dutch law excluded those sex workers, who come from outside the EU. The majority of women working in the sex industry, who are considered illegal migrants in the Netherlands, had two choices: either leaving the country or disappearing into the illegal criminal circuit. For law enforcement and assistant services, it became extremely difficult to control the sector. In this paper, the consequences of the 'Brothel Law' are presented. What happens with illegal non-European sex workers in the Netherlands, how the problem of human trafficking is constructed in Dutch media and combated in the country, what could be learned from the 'Dutch case'? The paper aims to answer these questions and contribute to the general study on human trafficking and voluntary prostitution in Europe.

  6. Evidemce from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masurel, E.

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with different aspects relating to how SMEs in the city and urban surroundings of Amsterdam (the Netherlands) go about creating a more secure environment. Security and criminality appear to be important issues for them. One-third of the entrepreneurs do not feel particularly safe

  7. Mechatronics in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, J.; Jongkind, Wim

    1996-01-01

    This article assesses the present situation of mechatronics in the Netherlands. After a short historical survey, it describes the postgraduate ¿mechatronic designer course¿, introduced in 1991. It deals with the principles of this course and how these principles have been implemented. Also, the

  8. Mousepox in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.S. Teppema; R.M.S. Wirahadiredja; G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractTwo independent outbreaks of ectromelia in mice occurred in The Netherlands. In both cases, the causative virus was isolated and identified as ectromelia virus on the basis of serology, demonstration of antigen by indirect immunofluorescence, negative contrast electron microscopy,

  9. Syrians in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaco Dagevos; Willem Huijnk; Mieke Maliepaard; Emily Miltenburg

    2018-01-01

    Original title: "Syriërs in Nederland" The large influx of refugees between 2014 and 2016 meant the Netherlands was faced with a major challenge in organising sufficient reception facilities, establishing an adequate asylum procedure and for those granted a residence permit,

  10. Morocco and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritschy, W.; Bos, P. (eds.)

    2006-01-01

    This book on aspects of society, economy and culture in Morocco and the Netherlands contains contributions of 28 Moroccan and Dutch authors on religion, family and marriage law, local government and PJD, Abdelkrim, Morocco and the EU, drug trafficking, migration, youth, Dutch-Moroccan writers, and

  11. The Netherlands: [national report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis, W.

    2009-01-01

    The article offers updates related to the activities of the Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation (IAML) in 2009 the Netherlands. It notes that the Muziekcentrum Nederland (MCN) for professional music life was opened. It states that Dutch IAML's board has organized a marketing

  12. Psychotraumatology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermetten, Eric; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    The contribution to psychotrauma literature from Dutch authors has a long tradition. The relatively high lifetime prevalence of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not unique for the Netherlands and does not fully explain the interest in trauma and its consequences. In this overview

  13. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  14. Hosting mega sport events in a small country: The (real impact on the development - cases of Croatia and Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimić-Banović Ružica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of studies on the impact of the sports events on country's development are produced before the events take place and as such are in favour of the bidding process. When comparing these ex ante analyses to the ex post evidence, it has been in most cases obvious that they have been overly optimistic. This paper analyses the ex ante analysis provided by the Croatian bidding committee for the European Football Championship 2012. In addition to that, the ex ante study for the World Handball Championship 2009 in Croatia and (insufficient data for the handball championships that took place in Serbia were analysed as well. This paper contributes both to the debate on the realistic approach of several failed and won bids, and the debate on the future bids for the other sport events.

  15. Global warming and small island nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechte, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Climate change has the potential to raise sea levels, and this could be catastrophic for many small island nations. The threats of climate change are reviewed with emphasis on the impacts on women of these nations. Considerations include land and resource inheritance traditionally held by women, traditional gardening and fishing practices for which women are responsible, deterioration of ground water and consequent health problems, increased incidence of hurricanes, and the potential for large scale resettlement programs. The small, rich European states threatened by sea level rise, such as the Netherlands and Denmark, have been proactive in proposing CO 2 reduction targets that go well beyond the Montreal Protocol. However, the Danes and the Dutch have far greater resources than small Pacific island states, or Bangladesh or the Maldives. These countries' very survivial may depend on the political will of the wealthier nations to reduce their emissions and assist the less developed countries in dealing with the threat of sea level rise

  16. Cost Effectiveness of the Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor Sacubitril/Valsartan for Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction in the Netherlands: A Country Adaptation Analysis Under the Former and Current Dutch Pharmacoeconomic Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Isaac Corro; Versteegh, Matthijs M; de Boer, Rudolf A; Koenders, Jolanda M A; Linssen, Gerard C M; Meeder, Joan G; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2017-12-01

    To describe the adaptation of a global health economic model to determine whether treatment with the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696 is cost effective compared with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril in adult patients with chronic heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction in the Netherlands; and to explore the effect of performing the cost-effectiveness analyses according to the new pharmacoeconomic Dutch guidelines (updated during the submission process of LCZ696), which require a value-of-information analysis and the inclusion of indirect medical costs of life-years gained. We adapted a UK model to reflect the societal perspective in the Netherlands by including travel expenses, productivity loss, informal care costs, and indirect medical costs during the life-years gained and performed a preliminary value-of-information analysis. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio obtained was €17,600 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. This was robust to changes in most structural assumptions and across different subgroups of patients. Probability sensitivity analysis results showed that the probability that LCZ696 is cost-effective at a €50,000 per QALY threshold is 99.8%, with a population expected value of perfect information of €297,128. On including indirect medical costs of life-years gained, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was €26,491 per QALY gained, and LCZ696 was 99.46% cost effective at €50,000 per QALY, with a population expected value of perfect information of €2,849,647. LCZ696 is cost effective compared with enalapril under the former and current Dutch guidelines. However, the (monetary) consequences of making a wrong decision were considerably different in both scenarios. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Je Maintiendrai: The Royal Netherlands Army Within the Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    CHAPTER I Combat History of the Dutch Army The Kir.ngdom of the Netherlands has tended to favor neutrality or abstentionism over involvement in...a small power and the Dutch increasingly favored abstentionism from European conflicts. Subsequently, the wartime organization of the Royal Army was...Netherlands abandoned its traditional policy of abstentionism and became a founding member of the Brussels Treaty (1948) and the North Atlantic

  18. Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakley, Stewart M.; Jimenez, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. ► Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. ► We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. ► Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. ► The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m 2 /person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country’s total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1–3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in Villanueva has operated for 15 years, using a total land area of approximately 11 ha for a population that grew from 23,000 to 48

  19. Mortality from circulatory diseases by specific country of birth across six European countries: test of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhopal, Raj S.; Rafnsson, Snorri B.; Agyemang, Charles; Fagot-Campagna, Anne; Giampaoli, Simona; Hammar, Niklas; Harding, Seeromanie; Hedlund, Ebba; Juel, Knud; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Primatesta, Paola; Rey, Gregoire; Rosato, Michael; Wild, Sarah; Kunst, Anton E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Important differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality by country of birth have been shown within European countries. We now focus on CVD mortality by specific country of birth across European countries. Methods: For Denmark, England and Wales, France, The Netherlands, Scotland

  20. A Matter of Facts...and More: An Exploratory Analysis of the Content of Sexuality Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Rebecca M.; Vanwesenbeeck, Ine; Knijn, Trudie

    2008-01-01

    The Netherlands is often recognized for its approach to adolescent sexual health, noted by the country's low rates of teen pregnancy and high contraceptive use among young people. Different studies have compared the sexual health outcomes of youth in The Netherlands with those of young people in other developed countries, and, to varying degrees,…

  1. Energy Report Netherlands 1999 (EVN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahuis, R.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of developments and events in the Netherlands in 1999 in the field of energy is presented. This edition comprises four parts. In the first part (Chronicle) a chronological overview is given of events in 1999 regarding governmental and energy policy, developments in the sectors natural gas and petroleum exploration, refineries and petroleum products, electric power production and the natural gas industry, the energy distribution sector, renewable energy and energy conservation, and technological developments and research. In part 2 (Focus) three items, which have been in particular important for the energy sector or for the Dutch society, are discussed in more detail. Attention is paid to sustainable industry parks, the production of energy from waste and biomass, and the Implementation Paper for Climate Policy. Part 3 (View) is of a contemplative nature. The subject concerns the options to reduce emission in foreign countries in relation with opportunities in developing countries for economic development. The final part (4, Trends) is based on statistical data and presents trends with regard to energy prices, energy demand, energy supply, energy-related emissions, and the market development of energy technologies and energy efficient products. 36 refs

  2. Regional differences in decline of mortality from selected conditions: The Netherlands, 1969-1984

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackenbach, J. P.; Looman, C. W.; Kunst, A. E.; Habbema, J. D.; van der Maas, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    In The Netherlands, as in many other industrialized countries, recent mortality developments have been characterized by rapid declines for a number of important causes of death. The results of an analysis of regional variation in mortality decline within The Netherlands are reported, covering the

  3. Euthanasia in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, G; Dillmann, R J

    1994-05-21

    The practice of euthanasia in the Netherlands is often used as an argument in debates outside the Netherlands--hence a clear description of the Dutch situation is important. This article summarises recent data and discusses conceptual issues and relevant characteristics of the system of health care. Special emphasis is put on regulation, including relevant data on notification and prosecution. Besides the practice of euthanasia the Dutch are confronted with the gaps in reporting of cases to the public prosecutor and the existence of cases of ending a life without an explicit request. Nevertheless, the "Dutch experiment" need not inevitably lead down the slippery slope because of the visibility and openness of this part of medical practice. This will lead to increased awareness, more safeguards, and improvement of medical decisions concerning the end of life.

  4. Creationism in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Blancke, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    Recent events indicate that creationists are becoming increasingly active in the Netherlands. This article offers an overview of these events. First, I discuss the introduction of Intelligent Design (ID) creationism into the Dutch public sphere by a renowned physicist, Cees Dekker. Later, Dekker himself shifted towards a more evolution-friendly position, theistic evolution. Second, we will see how Dekker was followed in this shift by Andries Knevel, who is an important figure within the Dutch...

  5. Monitor Sustainable Netherlands 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    The Monitor provides an image of the sustainability of the Dutch society. It shows which areas are successful and what the 'concerns for tomorrow' are from the point of view of sustainability. An analysis is conducted of how the Netherlands are doing in the fields of climate change, biodiversity, health, knowledge, graying and social cohesion. These and many other topics are discussed in this monitor by means of a number of sustainability indicators and detail analyses [mk]. [nl

  6. Monitor Sustainable Netherlands 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    The Monitor provides an image of the sustainability of the Dutch society. It shows which areas are successful and what the 'concerns for tomorrow' are from the point of view of sustainability. An analysis is conducted of how the Netherlands are doing in the fields of climate change, biodiversity, health, knowledge, graying and social cohesion. These and many other topics are discussed in this monitor by means of a number of sustainability indicators and detail analyses [mk] [nl

  7. Benchmarking in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In two articles an overview is given of the activities in the Dutch industry and energy sector with respect to benchmarking. In benchmarking operational processes of different competitive businesses are compared to improve your own performance. Benchmark covenants for energy efficiency between the Dutch government and industrial sectors contribute to a growth of the number of benchmark surveys in the energy intensive industry in the Netherlands. However, some doubt the effectiveness of the benchmark studies

  8. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation by the worker. Indirect participation involves employee representation, while direct participation relates to individual involvement in management’s decision-making processes. In the Framework Dir...

  9. Concomitant active tuberculosis prolongs survival in non-small cell lung cancer: a study in a tuberculosis-endemic country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsi Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adjuvant tumor cell vaccine with chemotherapy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC shows limited clinical response. Whether it provokes effective cellular immunity in tumor microenvironment is questionable. Concomitant active tuberculosis in NSCLC (TBLC resembles locoregional immunotherapy of tumor cell vaccine; thus, maximally enriches effective anti-tumor immunity. This study compares the survival and immunological cell profile in TBLC over NSCLC alone. METHODS: Retrospective review of NSCLC patients within 1-year-period of 2007 and follow-up till 2010. RESULTS: A total 276 NSCLC patients were included. The median survival of TBLC is longer than those of NSCLC alone (11.6 vs. 8.8 month, p<0.01. Active tuberculosis is an independent predictor of better survival with HR of 0.68 (95% CI, 0.48 ~ 0.97. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC (55.8 vs. 31.7%, p<0.01 is a significant risk factor for NSCLC with active TB. The median survival of SCC with active tuberculosis is significantly longer than adenocarcinoma or undetermined NSCLC with TB (14.2 vs. 6.6 and 2.8 months, p<0.05. Active tuberculosis in SCC increases the expression of CD3 (46.4 ± 24.8 vs. 24.0 ± 16.0, p<0.05, CXCR3 (35.1 ± 16.4 vs. 19.2 ± 13.3, p<0.01 and IP-10 (63.5 ± 21.9 vs. 35.5 ± 21.0, p<0.01, while expression of FOXP3 is decreased (3.5 ± 0.5 vs. 13.3 ± 3.7 p<0.05, p<0.05. Survival of SCC with high expression of CD3 (12.1 vs. 3.6 month, p<0.05 and CXCR3 (12.1 vs. 4.4 month, p<0.05 is longer than that with low expression. CONCLUSIONS: Active tuberculosis in NSCLC shows better survival outcome. The effective T lymphocyte infiltration in tumor possibly underlies the mechanism. Locoregional immunotherapy of tumor cell vaccine may deserve further researches.

  10. Netherlands Government decides on additional measures to achieve target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkus, H.; Dijk, D. van

    1996-01-01

    The Government of the Netherlands recently informed Parliament about a set of additional measured aimed at achieving the Netherlands' climate targets, set in the Second National Environmental Policy Plan of December 1993. These additional measures should be a further guarantee that 3% reduction in CO 2 emissions will be achieved in 2000 compared to 1990 levels. Energy saving in offices and small companies will be further encouraged. Furthermore, two coal-fired power stations will switch fuels to 10% wood. At present the Netherlands has an installed capacity of about 14,000 MW, about one third of which is coal fired. The Netherlands emission inventory will now be created according to the IPCC methodology, except for temperature correction. 3 tabs

  11. Evaluating financing of forestry in Europe; country-level report - the Netherlands; a description of the Dutch forest policy framework and financial instruments for forestry in the period 1990-1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.N.; Vliet, van C.J.M.; Klein, de J.P.G.; Lusink, M.; Blitterswijk, van H.; Aertsen, E.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The main idea behind the EU-project Evaluating Financing of Forestry in Europe (EFFE) is to find out how forest sector related financial policy instruments are handled in different countries. This report describes the Dutch policy framework and financial instruments for forestry in the period

  12. Prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections in general practice in France and in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosman, S.; Vaillant, M. le; Schellevis, F.; Clerc, P.; Verheij, R.; Pelletier-Fleury, N.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: France and the Netherlands are often presented as two contrasting countries with regard to drug prescriptions and consumption. This study aimed to analyse general practitioners' (GP's) prescription patterns for upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). METHODS: Data on diagnoses and

  13. Need for optimisation of immuniastion strategeis targeting Invasive Meningococcal Disease in the netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, J.C.M.; Ruitenberg, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is a severe bacterial infectious disease with high mortality and morbidity rates worldwide. In recent years, industrialised countries have implemented vaccines targeting IMD in their National Immunisation Programmes (NIPs). In 2002, the Netherlands successfully

  14. Personality characteristics and workplace trust of majority and minority employees in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wöhrle, Joachim; van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The workforce of the Netherlands and other countries is becoming increasingly culturally diverse. Nevertheless, there is a lack of research specifically investigating differences between majority and minority employees’ experiences at the workplace. Particularly comparisons between minority

  15. Personality characteristics and workplace trust of majority and minority employees in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohrle, Joachim; van Oudenhoven, Joannes; Otten, Sabine; van der Zee, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The workforce of the Netherlands and other countries is becoming increasingly culturally diverse. Nevertheless, there is a lack of research specifically investigating differences between majority and minority employees' experiences at the workplace. Particularly comparisons between minority

  16. Estimating the Population-Level Effectiveness of Vaccination Programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijhe, Maarten; McDonald, Scott A; de Melker, Hester E; Postma, Maarten J; Wallinga, Jacco

    There are few estimates of the effectiveness of long-standing vaccination programs in developed countries. To fill this gap, we investigate the direct and indirect effectiveness of childhood vaccination programs on mortality at the population level in the Netherlands.

  17. High incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis persists a decade after immigration, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Annelies M.; Meima, Abraham; Verver, Suzanne; Looman, Caspar W. N.; Bos, Vivian; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Habbema, J. Dik F.

    2004-01-01

    Incidence rates of pulmonary tuberculosis among immigrants from high incidence countries remain high for at least a decade after immigration into the Netherlands. Possible explanations are reactivation of old infections and infection transmitted after immigration. Control policies should be

  18. Developing Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission at Tajoura Research Center-Libya [Country report: Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwaer, Sami M.

    2015-01-01

    The object of this work was to assist the IAEA by providing the Libyan country report about the Coordination Research Project (CRP), on the subject of “Developing techniques for small scale indigenous Mo-99 production using LEU-foil” which took place over five years and four RCMs. A CRP on this subject was approved in early 2005. The objectives of this CRP are to: transfer know-how in the area of 99 Mo production using LEU targets based on reference technologies from leading laboratories in the field to the participating laboratories in the CRP; develop national work plans based on various stages of technical development and objectives in this field; establish the procedures and protocols to be employed, including quality control and assurance procedures; establish the coordinated activities and programme for preparation, irradiation, and processing of LEU targets [a]; and to compare results obtained in the implementation of the technique in order to provide follow up advice and assistance. Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), the daughter product of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo), is the most commonly utilized medical radioisotope in the world, used for approximately 20-25 million medical diagnostic procedures annually, comprising some 80% of all diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. National and international efforts are underway to shift the production of medical isotopes from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) targets. A small but growing amount of the current global 99 Mo production is derived from the irradiation of LEU targets. The IAEA became aware of the interest of a number of developing Member States that are seeking to become small scale, indigenous producers of 99 Mo to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The IAEA initiated Coordinated Research Project (CRP) T.1.20.18 “Developing techniques for small-scale indigenous production of Mo-99 using LEU or neutron activation” in order to assist countries in this field. The more

  19. Innovations in PHWR design, integration of nuclear power stations into power systems and role of small size nuclear power plants in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Kakodkar, A.; Balakrishnan, M.R.; Ray, R.N.; Murthy, L.G.K.; Chamany, B.F.; Kati, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    PHWR concept of thermal reactors has been considered with a view to exploiting the limited resources of natural uranium and keeping in mind the projected nuclear power programme covering fast breeder reactors. Experience in engineering of current PHWR units in India, gradual build up of necessary infrastructure and operational experience with one unit, have helped in building up design and technological capability in the country. The R and D facilities have been so planned that additional data required for the design of bigger reactor units (i.e.500/600 MWe) could be generated with minimal augmentation. Satisfactory operation of a nuclear power station demands certain prerequisites from the connected power system. The grid should have load patterns suitable for base load operation of these stations, should be stiff so far as voltage and frequency fluctuations are concerned and should have high reliability. A typical power grid in this country is characterised by heavy loads during peak hours and very light loads during night. Regional grids are of small size and the few interconnections existing between the regional grids consist of weak tie lines. Amongst all types of the power stations, it is the nuclear system which undergoes maximum strain and economic penalty while operating when connected to such a power system. Consistent with the above, phase installation of small-size power reactor units of about 200 MWe capacity may facilitate setting up of larger unit sizes at a later date. The effect of any possible reduction in the capital cost of a larger unit power station will enable the power station to partially meet the demand of the more productive types of loads. This paper deals with some of the major design changes that are being incorporated in the PHWR type power reactors currently being set up and the research and development back-up required for the purpose. Since the unit sizes of the power reactors presently contemplated are small compared to nuclear

  20. The Association of Workplace Exposures on Quality of Life in Small and Medium Enterprises Workers: A Cross-Sectional Study in Four ASEAN Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isahak, Marzuki; Loh, May Young; Susilowati, Indri Hapsari; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Harncharoen, Kitiphong; Mohd Amin, Nursuhaili; Toai, Nguyen Phuong; Low, Wah-Yun; Ratanasiripong, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Quality of life is associated with several factors, including personal living styles and working conditions. This article aims to investigate the factors associated with quality of life among small and medium enterprises (SME) workers in 4 countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), namely Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam. A total of 2014 workers from food and textile industries were asked to answer a questionnaire about their sociodemographic characteristics, working environment and conditions, and quality of life. Results from showed that lifestyle (ie, alcohol intake and exercising), working characteristics (ie, shift work, working hours, and working days) and workplace conditions were associated with SME workers' quality of life (ie, physical, psychological, social, and environmental domain). Among the 16 types of workplace conditions, "sitting on the chair" and "slippery floor" most affect their quality of life . It is important for these variables to be taken into account in promoting workers' well-being and quality of life.

  1. Short Maternal Stature Increases Risk of Small-for-Gestational-Age and Preterm Births in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozuki, Naoko; Katz, Joanne; Lee, Anne Cc

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and preterm births are associated with adverse health consequences, including neonatal and infant mortality, childhood undernutrition, and adulthood chronic disease. OBJECTIVES: The specific aims of this study were to estimate the association between...... short maternal stature and outcomes of SGA alone, preterm birth alone, or both, and to calculate the population attributable fraction of SGA and preterm birth associated with short maternal stature. METHODS: We conducted an individual participant data meta-analysis with the use of data sets from 12...... population-based cohort studies and the WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health (13 of 24 available data sets used) from low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). We included those with weight taken within 72 h of birth, gestational age, and maternal height data (n = 177,000). For each...

  2. Multiorgan donation in the Netherlands : Limited by consent and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, LJ; Kranenburg, J; deMeester, J; Persijn, GG

    The percentage of multiorgan donors (MOD) versus single organ donors of kidneys only (SOD-K) has remained markedly low in the Netherlands compared to the other countries in the Eurotransplant region, This suggests a possible loss of donor organs. We investigated the causes of this persisting low

  3. Diversity and ecology of lichens on churches in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrius, L.B.; Aptroot, A.; van Herk, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the results of an inventory of lichen species on the walls of 344 medieval and renaissance churches in the Netherlands. In total, 194 species were recorded, of which several are more or less confined to this habitat in the country. We found several regional differences in species

  4. Three species of Microphthalmus (Polychaeta) new to The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, W.J.

    1969-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The excellent monograph by Westheide (1967) of the hesionid genera Hesionides and Microphthalmus provided the means to study these genera in The Netherlands. Until now no species belonging to either of these genera have been recorded from this country. Nevertheless, several species of

  5. Risk-adjusted capitation: Recent experiences in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René); E.M. van Barneveld (Erik); L.M. Lamers (Leida)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe market-oriented health care reforms taking place in the Netherlands show a clear resemblance to the proposals for managed competition in U.S. health care. In both countries good risk adjustment mechanisms that prevent cream skimming--that is, that prevent plans from selecting the

  6. Competition and Educational Quality: Evidence from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond); M. de Jong (Matthijs)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAmple evidence is available for the effect of competition on educational quality as only a few countries allow large scale competition. In the Netherlands free parental choice is present since the beginning of the 20th century, which can be characterized as a full voucher program with

  7. Competition and educational quality: evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dijkgraaf (Elbert); R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond); M. de Jong (Matthijs)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractLittle evidence is available for the effect of competition on educational quality as only a few countries allow large-scale competition. In the Netherlands, free parental choice has been present since the beginning of the twentieth century and can be characterized as a full voucher

  8. Community nursing in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, J. van der; Kramer, K.; Kerkstra, A.; Stevens, F.C.J.; Derksen, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a comparative study on community nursing in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany, carried out in the region around Maastricht, where the borders of the three countries meet. The well-known problem of comparative studies (the incomparability of concepts and data) has been solved

  9. Risk-adjusted capitation: recent experiences in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand); E.M. van Barneveld (Erik); L.M. Lamers (Leida); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe market-oriented health care reforms taking place in the Netherlands show a clear resemblance to the proposals for managed competition in U.S. health care. In both countries good risk adjustment mechanisms that prevent cream skimming--that is, that

  10. Religious trends and social integration: Muslim minorities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maliepaard, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I set out to describe religiosity and religious trends among the Dutch Muslim population, and to assess the influence of the social integration of Muslims in co-ethnic minority and majority social networks. Muslim immigrants in the Netherlands migrated from countries in which

  11. Indigenous infection with Francisella tularensis holarctica in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maraha, B.; Hajer, G.F.; Sjödin, A.; Forsman, M.; Paauw, A.; Roeselers, G.; Verspui, E.; Frenay, H.M.E.; Notermans, D.W.; Vries, M.C. de; Reubsaet, F.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first case of indigenous tularemia detected inTheNetherlands, a nonendemic country, since 1953.Whole genome DNAsequence analysis assigned the isolate BD11-00177 to the genomic group B.FTNF002-00,which previously has been exclusively reported from Spain, France, Italy, Switzerland,

  12. Estimating social travel demand of senior citizens in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den P.E.W.; Arentze, T.A.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Like many other countries, the Netherlands is experiencing a sharp rise in the ageing population. As age increases, people’s mobility may decrease. However, older people have more leisure time compared to their younger (working) counterparts, and potentially spend more time on social activities.

  13. Aging in the Netherlands: State of the art and science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, C.H.M.; van den Beld, H.K.; Aartsen, M.J.; Schroots, J.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The population of the Netherlands is aging, although it is still relatively young in comparison with the population of most other European countries. As Dutch society transitions from a welfare state to a society based more on individual responsibility, the increasingly well-educated and financially

  14. The Netherlands and the Development of International Human Rights Instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiding, H.

    2007-01-01

    When discussing the Netherlands' international human rights policies, the first aspects to come to mind are usually those related to how it addresses and reacts to concrete human rights violations by other countries. In fact, there sometimes appears to be a tendency for public opinion to identify a

  15. Planning of general practitioners in the Netherlands: a simulation model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuningen, M. van; Batenburg, R.S.; Velden, L.F.J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Manpower planning can be an important instrument to control shortages (or oversupply) within the health care labour market. The Netherlands is one of the countries that have a relative long tradition of manpower planning in health care. In 1973 the government introduced the numerus clausus for the

  16. Pharmaceutical care in the Netherlands. History, definition and projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mil, J.W F

    1996-01-01

    The evolving concept of Pharmaceutical Care knows different interpretations in a different countries. In the Netherlands community pharmacists already perform several functions which may be part of the Pharmaceutical Care concept. The Dutch concept of Pharmaceutical care is tested in the TOM and

  17. The Netherlands: childbearing within the context of a "Poldermodel" society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, C.M.; de Valk, H.A.G.; de Beer, J.A.A.; van Duin, C.

    2008-01-01

    Just like all other European countries, the Netherlands has experienced a considerable decline in fertility. The decline, however, is not as sharp as in most other parts of Europe. While especially Southern and Central Eastern Europe is faced with a persistent and pronounced drop in the TPFR to a

  18. Fight or flight : flooding experiences in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaalberg, R.; Midden, C.J.H.; Meijnders, A.L.; McCalley, L.T.

    2007-01-01

    The earth's climate has changed rapidly in recent decades. This will have far-reaching consequences for low-lying countries such as the Netherlands. Sensitivity to warnings is crucial in order to deal with climate change risks adequately and to motivate people to cope with these risks. Our focus is

  19. Fight or flight : experiences with river flooding in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaalberg, R.; Midden, C.J.H.; Meijnders, A.L.; McCalley, L.T.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The earth's climate has changed rapidly in recent decades. This will have far-reaching consequences for low-lying countries such as the Netherlands. Sensitivity to warnings about river flooding is crucial in order to deal with climate change risks adequately and to motivate people to cope

  20. Netherlands Interuniversity Reactor Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Interuniversity Reactor Institute in the Netherlands for the Academic Year 1977-78. Activities of the general committee, the daily committee and the scientific advice board are presented. Detailed reports of the scientific studies performed are given under five subjects - radiation physics, reactor physics, radiation chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation hygiene and dosimetry. Summarised reports of the various industrial groups are also presented. Training and education, publications and reports, courses, visits and cooperation with other institutes in the area of scientific research are mentioned. (C.F.)

  1. Consequences of Market-Based Measures CO2-emission Reduction Maritime Transport for the Netherlands; Gevolgen Market Based Measures CO2-emissiereductie zeevaart voor Nederland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortelboer-van Donselaar, P.; Kansen, M.; Moorman, S. [Kennisinstituut voor Mobiliteitsbeleid KiM, Den Haag (Netherlands); Faber, J.; Koopman, M.; Smit, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    The introduction of Market Based Measures (MBMs) to reduce the CO2 emissions of international sea shipping will have relatively limited economic effects for the Netherlands. Moreover, these effects are largely in line with those in other countries. For the Netherlands, however, the manner in which MBMS are organised and enforced is likely to be particularly important, given the importance of ports to the Dutch economy, the country's relatively large bunker sector, and the fact that Dutch shipowners operate relatively small vessels and on a relatively small scale. MBMs include pricing measures in the form of tax or trade systems, as well as other market-related proposals. In this research study, the consequences are analysed of four international MBM proposals for the Netherlands [Dutch] Om de CO2-uitstoot van de internationale zeevaartsector terug te dringen worden momenteel zogeheten Market Based Measures (MBMs), zoals bijvoorbeeld het veilen van emissierechten of het invoeren van een heffing, overwogen. De invoering van de MBMs zal voor Nederland relatief beperkte economische effecten hebben. Deze effecten wijken bovendien niet bijzonder af van die voor andere landen. De wijze waarop de MBMs worden georganiseerd en gehandhaafd, is voor Nederland mogelijk wel van onderscheidend belang. Dit gezien het belang van de havens voor de Nederlandse economie, de relatief grote bunkersector, en de relatief kleine schepen en kleinschaligheid van de Nederlandse reders.

  2. Guatemala: Country of small producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the antecedents of the private electrification in Guatemala since approval of the General Law of Electricity in 1996 that promoted hydroelectric power generation. The current situation in generation, transmission, and distribution is described as well the rural electrification covering and the financing of projects in this sector. Incentives to private investment is discussed with the proposal of an energy information center, proposal of fiscal incentives and promotion of renewable energy sources

  3. Perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) in home and commercially produced chicken eggs from the Netherlands and Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiraki, Effrosyni; Costopoulou, Danae; Vassiliadou, Irene; Leondiadis, Leondios; Dassenakis, Emmanouil; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; van Leeuwen, Stefan P J

    2016-02-01

    Dietary intake is a major route of human exposure to perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs). However, the available information on PFAS levels in food, including chicken eggs, is limited. In the present study, home produced and commercially produced eggs (organic, battery and free range eggs) were collected from the Netherlands (n = 95) and Greece (n = 76). The egg yolks were analysed for 11 PFASs by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using isotope dilution. PFAS levels in yolk were higher in home produced eggs from the Netherlands (median 3.1, range eggs collected from supermarkets. In these eggs, all PFAS levels were below the LOQ of 0.5 ng g(-1), except for a small amount of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in 1 sample in each country (1.1 ng g(-1) and 0.9 ng g(-1) for the Netherlands and Greece respectively). PFOS was the predominant PFAS, making up on average 85% of ∑PFASs. The highest PFOS concentration was detected in a Dutch home produced egg sample (24.8 ng g(-1)). The contamination pattern was similar in both countries with the long-chain PFASs (C ≥ 8) being most frequently detected, while short-chain PFASs were rarely found. The most likely cause of the contamination of home produced eggs is ingestion of soil through pecking. Although regular consumption of home produced eggs will lead to an increased PFOS exposure, it is not expected that it will lead to exceedance of the tolerable daily intake established by EFSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of after-hours primary care in the Netherlands: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesen, Paul; Smits, Marleen; Huibers, Linda; Grol, Richard; Wensing, Michel

    2011-07-19

    Many Western countries are seeking an organizational model for after-hours primary care that is safe, efficient, and satisfactory for patients and health care professionals. Around the year 2000, Dutch primary care physicians (PCPs) reorganized their after-hours primary care and shifted from small rotation groups to large-scale PCP cooperatives. This article provides a narrative review of studies on a range of issues about after-hours primary care in the Netherlands, including experiences of health care professionals and patients, patient-safety incidents, adherence to practice guidelines, waiting times, and quality of telephone triage. Physicians expressed high satisfaction with PCP cooperatives; their workload decreased, and job satisfaction increased compared with the situation before the reorganization. In general, patients were also satisfied, but areas for improvement included telephone consultations, patient education, and distance to a pharmacy. A study identified patient-safety incidents in 2.4% of all contacts, of which most did not result in harm to patients. The average adherence to clinical guidelines by physicians was 77%, with lowest adherence scores for prescribing antibiotics and treatment in emergency cases. The average waiting time for home visits was 30 minutes. Seventy percent of patients with life-threatening problems were visited within the time target of 15 minutes. Telephone triage by nurses had positive effects on care efficiency by increasing the proportion of telephone consultations and decreasing the proportion of clinic consultations and home visits. The after-hours primary care system in the Netherlands might set an example for other countries struggling to find a good solution for the problems they encounter with after-hours primary care. Future developments in the Netherlands include integration and extensive collaboration with the accident and emergency departments of hospitals, in which PCPs take care of self-referring patients.

  5. The Chinese in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mérove Gijsberts; Willem Huijnk; Ria Vogels

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Chinese Nederlanders This report presents the first national picture of the position of the Chinese community in the Netherlands. A large-scale survey was conducted among persons of Chinese origin living in the Netherlands, with the aim of answering questions on a wide range of

  6. Mission Statements of Christian Elementary Schools in the United States and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandstra, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the mission statements of a small sample of Christian elementary schools in the United States and the Netherlands. In the United States, Christian schools are private schools, while in the Netherlands Christian schools receive state funding, just like public schools. Content analysis of mission statements revealed similarities…

  7. Annotation of Differential Gene Expression in Small Yellow Follicles of a Broiler-Type Strain of Taiwan Country Chickens in Response to Acute Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Tu, Wei-Lin; Wang, Shih-Han; Tang, Pin-Chi; Chen, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hsin-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Pai; Chen, Shuen-Ei; Huang, San-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated global gene expression in the small yellow follicles (6-8 mm diameter) of broiler-type B strain Taiwan country chickens (TCCs) in response to acute heat stress. Twelve 30-wk-old TCC hens were divided into four groups: control hens maintained at 25°C and hens subjected to 38°C acute heat stress for 2 h without recovery (H2R0), with 2-h recovery (H2R2), and with 6-h recovery (H2R6). Small yellow follicles were collected for RNA isolation and microarray analysis at the end of each time point. Results showed that 69, 51, and 76 genes were upregulated and 58, 15, 56 genes were downregulated after heat treatment of H2R0, H2R2, and H2R6, respectively, using a cutoff value of two-fold or higher. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these differentially expressed genes are associated with the biological processes of cell communication, developmental process, protein metabolic process, immune system process, and response to stimuli. Upregulation of heat shock protein 25, interleukin 6, metallopeptidase 1, and metalloproteinase 13, and downregulation of type II alpha 1 collagen, discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2, and Kruppel-like factor 2 suggested that acute heat stress induces proteolytic disintegration of the structural matrix and inflamed damage and adaptive responses of gene expression in the follicle cells. These suggestions were validated through gene expression, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Functional annotation clarified that interleukin 6-related pathways play a critical role in regulating acute heat stress responses in the small yellow follicles of TCC hens.

  8. Management of radioactive waste from non-power applications in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codee, H.D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste results from the use of radioactive materials in hospitals, research establishments, industry and nuclear power plants. The Netherlands forms a good example of a country with a small and in the near future ending nuclear power programme. The radioactive waste from non-power applications therefore strongly influences the management choices. A dedicated waste management company COVRA, the Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste manages all radioactive waste produced in the Netherlands. For the small volume, but broad spectrum of radioactive waste, a management system was developed based on the principle to isolate, to control and to monitor the waste. Long-term storage is an important element in this management strategy. It is not seen as a 'wait and see' option but as a necessary step in the strategy that will ultimately result in final removal of the waste. Since the waste will remain retrievable for a long time new technologies and new disposal options can be applied when available and feasible. (author)

  9. CYGNE, Foundation for Cyclotron Applications in Medicine, Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van de Bosch, R L.P. [Technische Hogeschool Eindhoven (Netherlands). Afdeling Technische Natuurkunde; Smithuis, L O.M.J. [St. Lambertusziekenhuis, Helmond (Netherlands). Afd. Nucleaire Geneeskunde

    1981-01-01

    At the Technical University of Eindhoven (Netherlands) a Foundation named CYGNE is established with the purpose to further the use of the research cyclotrons present in the country for the production of short-living radioisotopes specifically on behalf of nuclear medicine. The cooperation with a hospital and its pharmacist are procured for the production of various radiopharmaceuticals. This is the first time such a facility is available in the Netherlands. The foundation has four working groups to do research on radionuclides for positron emission tomography, neutron therapy, trace element analysis, and routine production or new production methods.

  10. Aspects of the epidemiology, research, and control of lentiviral infections of small ruminants and their relevance to Dutch sheep and goat farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, C; Brinkhof, J M A; Moll, L; Colenbrander, B; Houwers, D J

    2010-08-15

    In 1862, the veterinarian Loman reported the first sheep in The Netherlands with symptoms associated with lentiviral infection, although at the time the symptoms were ascribed to ovine progressive pneumonia. In the following century, similar cases were reported by South African, French, American, and Icelandic researchers. Extensive research into the pathology, aetiology, and epidemiology of this slowly progressive and ultimately fatal disease was initiated in several countries, including the Netherlands. Studies of the causative agents--maedi visna virus (MVV) in sheep and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) in goats, comprising the heterogeneous group of the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV)--prompted the development of diagnostic methods and the initiation of disease control programmes in many European countries including the Netherlands, as a pioneer in 1982, and in the U.S.A. and Canada.

  11. "small ACCELERATORS" 24 May - 2 June 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CERN Accelerator School and Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) Groningen, the Netherlands announce a course on "Small Accelerators", Hotel Golden Tulip Drenthe, Zeegse, the Netherlands, 24 May - 2 June 2005. This specialised course is dedicated to the physics and the main applications of small accelerators. The course will review the different accelerator types as well as their specificities in terms of accelerator physics.

  12. netherland hydrological modeling instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewoud, J. C.; de Lange, W. J.; Veldhuizen, A.; Prinsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Netherlands Hydrological Modeling Instrument A decision support system for water basin management. J.C. Hoogewoud , W.J. de Lange ,A. Veldhuizen , G. Prinsen , The Netherlands Hydrological modeling Instrument (NHI) is the center point of a framework of models, to coherently model the hydrological system and the multitude of functions it supports. Dutch hydrological institutes Deltares, Alterra, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, RWS Waterdienst, STOWA and Vewin are cooperating in enhancing the NHI for adequate decision support. The instrument is used by three different ministries involved in national water policy matters, for instance the WFD, drought management, manure policy and climate change issues. The basis of the modeling instrument is a state-of-the-art on-line coupling of the groundwater system (MODFLOW), the unsaturated zone (metaSWAP) and the surface water system (MOZART-DM). It brings together hydro(geo)logical processes from the column to the basin scale, ranging from 250x250m plots to the river Rhine and includes salt water flow. The NHI is validated with an eight year run (1998-2006) with dry and wet periods. For this run different parts of the hydrology have been compared with measurements. For instance, water demands in dry periods (e.g. for irrigation), discharges at outlets, groundwater levels and evaporation. A validation alone is not enough to get support from stakeholders. Involvement from stakeholders in the modeling process is needed. There fore to gain sufficient support and trust in the instrument on different (policy) levels a couple of actions have been taken: 1. a transparent evaluation of modeling-results has been set up 2. an extensive program is running to cooperate with regional waterboards and suppliers of drinking water in improving the NHI 3. sharing (hydrological) data via newly setup Modeling Database for local and national models 4. Enhancing the NHI with "local" information. The NHI is and has been used for many

  13. Nuclear Knowledge and Competence: Fundamental Prerequisites for the Safe Utilization of Radiation Sources in a Small Non-Nuclear Country — Experience of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Dlabac, A.

    2016-01-01

    Provision of adequate knowledge, competence and expertise represents a major concern when addressing nuclear and radiation safety issues in small countries — if inadequate, safety will eventually be jeopardized. Montenegro is such a small, developing and “nonnuclear” country—the use of radiation sources being modest and limited to a few ordinary applications (primarily in health care). Even though, there is (or will be in the foreseeable future) a significant need in nuclear knowledge, competence and expertise — directly or indirectly related to nuclear/radiation safety and security issues. It goes about the following, the list being not exhaustive: (i) medical applications (diagnostics, radiotherapy, palliation, sterilization of equipment, consumables, blood products, etc.), (ii) radiation protection, including various dosimetry services and QC/QA of radiation sources; (iii) environmental protection (radioecology, analytical and monitoring services, etc.), (iv) low and medium activity radioactive waste management (including a newly licenced storage), (v) industrial, geological, hydrological, agricultural, biochemical and archaeological applications (non-destructive testing, various gauges, radioisotope labeling, harmful insects sterilization, etc.), (vi) scientific and educational uses, (vii) cultural heritage preservation and investigation, (viii) legislative and regulatory aspects, including complying to international safety/security norms and joining international conventions in the field, (ix) preparedness and response to radiological and nuclear emergency situations, (x) combating illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials, (xi) nuclear forensics, (xii) security systems based on X-ray and other nuclear methods, (xiii) introduction of some future topics (e.g., nuclear power for electricity generation and sea water desalination), (xiv) public information and communication with media, etc.

  14. Performance of commercial laying hen genotypes on free range and organic farms in Switzerland, France and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenstra, F; Maurer, V; Bestman, M; van Sambeek, F; Zeltner, E; Reuvekamp, B; Galea, F; van Niekerk, T

    2012-01-01

    1. A total of 257 farmers with free ranging laying hens (organic and conventional) in Switzerland, France and The Netherlands with 273 flocks were interviewed to determine the relationships between the genotype of the hens, management conditions and performance. 2. Almost 20 different genotypes (brands) were present on the farms. In France, all birds were brown feathered hens laying brown eggs. In Switzerland and The Netherlands, there were brown, white (white feathered hens laying white eggs) and silver (white feathered hens laying brown eggs) hens. In Switzerland, mixed flocks were also present. 3. The overall effect of system (organic vs. conventional free range) on egg production and mortality was significant, with higher mortality and lower egg production among organic hens. In pair wise comparisons within country, the difference was highly significant in The Netherlands, and showed a non-significant tendency in the same direction in Switzerland and France. 4. White hens tended to perform better than brown hens. Silver hens appeared to have a higher mortality and lower production per hen housed at 60 weeks of age. 5. There were no significant relationships between production, mortality, feather condition and use of outside run or with flock size. 6. There was more variation in mortality and egg production among farms with a small flock size than among farms with a large flock size.

  15. Energy, Exergy and Performance Analysis of Small-Scale Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Electrical Power Generation Applicable in Rural Areas of Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Baral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the concept of installing a small-scale organic Rankine cycle system for the generation of electricity in remote areas of developing countries. The Organic Rankine Cycle Systems (ORC system uses a commercial magnetically-coupled scroll expander, plate type heat exchangers and plunger type working fluid feed pump. The heat source for the ORC system can be solar energy. A series of laboratory tests were conducted to confirm the cycle efficiency and expander power output of the system. Using the actual system data, the exergy destruction on the system components and exergy efficiency were assessed. Furthermore, the results of the variations of system energy and exergy efficiencies with different operating parameters, such as the evaporating and condensing pressures, degree of superheating, dead state temperature, expander inlet temperature and pressure ratio were illustrated. The system exhibited acceptable operational characteristics with good performance under a wide range of conditions. A heat source temperature of 121 °C is expected to deliver a power output of approximately 1.4 kW. In addition, the system cost analysis and financing mechanisms for the installation of the ORC system were discussed.

  16. Home Care Reform in the Netherlands. Impacts on Unpaid Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. van Staveren (Irene)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction In the Netherlands, about half a million people make use of home care, that is, formally arranged, and publicly financed home care services. Until 1 January 2007, Dutch home care provisioning used to be supplied by relatively small, profit and non-profit home care

  17. First record of Walckenaeria clavicornis (Araneae, Linyphiidae) in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, B.; van Helsdingen, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    An adult male Walckenaeria clavicornis Emerton 1882 (unicornis-group of species in Wackenaeria) was found on 5 February 1998 at about 35 m distance from a parking place on the Amsterdam University grounds in the Netherlands. It was hiding in a dark small cavity in wet ground under a dark plate of

  18. Women in physics in the Netherlands : Recent Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerd, Adrianne R.T. van; Marel, Nienke van der; Rudolf, Petra; Wolf, Els de; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Horton, Renee K.; Kaicher, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Although women are still a small minority in physics in the Netherlands, their visibility has increased markedly over the past five years. The measures put in place after the first IUPAP Women in Physics Conference in 2002 have in fact not increased the total number of female staff, but put the

  19. Netherlands: flexible forms of work: very atypical contractual arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hesselink, J.

    2010-01-01

    Small non-standard forms of employment contracts are becoming more and more accepted in The Netherlands. Four specific groups are identified: students who earn (part of) an income next to their study; women with care obligations; older employees (45-65) losing their regular job; and retired workers

  20. Collective Settlement of Mass Claims in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. van Boom (Willem)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAs far as collective mass claim settlement is concerned, it has been said that ‘the European landscape is a mixed bag of differing collective redress mechanisms’. One of the legal sys-tems in this ‘mixed bag’ is the small jurisdiction of the Kingdom of The Netherlands. With the enactment

  1. Taxes for energy products, electricity and CO2. Consequences of the revision of the Energy Taxation Directive for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, M.J.; Schroten, A.; Geurts, F.

    2011-07-01

    Taxes on energy products, electricity and CO2 are compared for a number of EU countries (Germany, Belgium, Denmark, United Kingdom, France, Luxembourg, Spain, Sweden and the Netherlands) with special focus on the fiscal, economic and environmental impacts of the revision of the European Energy Directive for the Netherlands. [nl

  2. A comparative evaluation of low-energy, passive and zero-energy houses in The Netherlands and Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlecnik, E.; Jansen, S.; Schuetze, T.; De Vries, G.

    2011-01-01

    The presented research aims to evaluate highly energy-efficient dwellings, in particular Passive Houses (PH), in Flanders and in The Netherlands, based on end-user experiences. In the introduction the definition of PH in the Benelux countries Belgium and The Netherlands is compared with the Nordic

  3. Update of emission factors for nitrous oxide from agricultural soils on the basis of measurements in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuikman, P.J.; Hoek, van der K.W.; Smit, A.; Zwart, K.B.

    2006-01-01

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the Netherlands are reported to the UNFCCC on the basis of a country specific methodology. In this study we have identified and analysed the values for emission factors in measurement from in the Netherlands in the period 1993 – 2003. The overall averaged emission

  4. Cost Overruns in Large-Scale Transport Infrastructure Projects : A theoretical and empirical exploration for the Netherlands and worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantarelli, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the costs of railroad infrastructure construction work out 11 per cent higher than forecast; the percentage for roads is 19 and 22 for bridges and tunnels. While this puts the Netherlands in a favourable light compared to other countries, the actual cost overruns are probably far

  5. Dental Education in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Dental education in the Netherlands is reviewed in terms of dental practice, overall development, structure and functioning of a typical school of dentistry, admissions, student finances, curriculum, certification, postgraduate education, and education for related professions. (MSE)

  6. The Netherlands Bid Bood (GBIF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, W.

    2001-01-01

    GBIF=Global Biodiversity Information Facility. The Bid Book was prepared for the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sciences, the Netherlands by a working group, co-ordinated by the University of Amsterdam.

  7. QANU - Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Toft; Maria E., Weber; Vyt, André

    The Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU) underwent an ENQA-coordinated external review in 2016. The review was chaired by Henrik Toft Jensen, Research fellow at Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark....

  8. Netherlands in the spotlight at the ENLIGHT meeting on particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Virginia Greco (CERN) and Manjit Dosanjh (ENLIGHT co-coordinator)

    2016-01-01

    The annual meeting of ENLIGHT, which focuses on particle therapy for cancer treatment, was held in the Netherlands.   Participants of the annual meeting of ENLIGHT, held in the Netherlands from 15-17 September 2016. The annual meeting of ENLIGHT (European Network for Light Hadron Therapy), which gathers experts working worldwide in centres and research institutions for particle therapy for cancer treatment, was hosted this year by the Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef) and the University of Utrecht, in the Netherlands, from 15-17 September. Chaired by the co-coordinator of ENLIGHT, Manjit Dosanjh, and the local organisers, Els Koffeman and Jan Visser from Nikhef, the meeting was attended by almost 100 participants from 15 countries. The Netherlands took centre stage at the ENLIGHT meeting: four brand new centres for proton therapy in the Netherlands are currently at various phases of completion as a consequence of the recent approval by the Dutch government of a plan for mak...

  9. Electric transport in the Netherlands in an international perspective. Benchmark electric driving 2012; Elektrisch vervoer in Nederland in internationaal perspectief. Benchmark elektrisch rijden 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, P.; Weeda, M. [ECN Beleidsstudies, Petten (Netherlands); Appels, D. [Agentschap NL, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    This international benchmark on electric mobility has been conducted to compare the Dutch governmental efforts and developments in the field of electric road transport. The countries that have been considered in this benchmark are: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, UK, China, USA and South Korea. The Netherlands has a high ambition level with regard to the number of electric vehicles compared to other countries without a large car industry. As for the envisaged number of charging points, the Netherlands is one of the prominent leaders. In the field of R and D, Germany, South Korea and China take the lead, followed by France, the UK, the USA and Austria. However, the benchmark has only looked at specific funds for electric mobility, and has not looked at general R and D and innovation funds. The Netherlands has several electro-mobility field tests, but is not leading in number. However, regarding general market penetration, the Netherlands is one of the leading countries, next to Norway, based on the relative number of passenger cars and commercial vehicles on the road. Norway and Austria are leading countries when it comes to implementation of public charging infrastructure, but also in this field the Netherlands has a prominent position in the group of countries that follow. In the current pre-commercial phase, the introduction of electric transportation in the Netherlands is supported by a high-level advisory group, the so-called Formula E-Team. This group consists of representatives and experts from industry and (scientific) society, and acts as a figurehead for electric transport. The group advises on coordination of actions to stimulate not only electro- mobility, but also innovation which should lead to new economic activities. Currently, about two hundred companies are already active in the field of electro-mobility in the Netherlands, including some top players and many SMEs (Small Medium Enterprises). The

  10. A quantitative risk-analysis for introduction of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus in the Netherlands through cattle imports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santman-Berends, I M G A; Mars, M H; Van Duijn, L; Van den Broek, K W H; Van Schaik, G

    2017-10-01

    Many countries have implemented control programmes aiming to eradicate Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV). After obtaining the free status, a risk of re-introduction of the virus through import may remain. Therefore the risk of introduction of BVDV through cattle imports in the Netherlands was quantified and the effectiveness of subsequent intervention measures was assessed. Data, literature and expert opinion were used to estimate values for input parameters to feed a stochastic simulation model. The probability that BVDV was imported was differentiated into persistently infected (PI) cattle, trojan cows that transmitted the virus vertically resulting in a PI foetus (TR) and transient infected cattle (TI). The import risk was stratified to beef, dairy, small scale, suckler, trade, veal and young stock herds. The intervention scenarios that were evaluated consisted of virus testing, a combination of virus testing and antibody testing in pregnant cows, abolishment of imports from high risk countries (i.e. countries with a BVDV prevalence >15%) and a combination of import restrictions and testing prior to import. Each year, 334 (5th and 95th percentile: 65-902) Dutch cattle herds were estimated to be infected with BVDV through import. Veal herds account for most infections associated with import (87%), whereas in the other herd types, only 9 beef, 6 dairy, 2 small scale, 16 suckler, 10 trade and 2 young stock herds are infected through imports per year. Import of PI cattle is the most important risk for introduction in veal herds, while import of TR cows is the main source of BVDV introduction in dairy, small scale and suckler herds. With the intervention scenarios, the number of BVDV infected herds in the Netherlands could be reduced to 81 and 58 herds per year when respectively virus testing or a combination of virus and antibody testing was applied or to 108 herds when import from high risk countries was abolished. With the scenario in which both import from high

  11. Chernobyl, what happened. [Netherlands; contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwigt, A

    1986-01-01

    In this article a description is given of the accident in the Chernobylsk-4 reactor and the resulting effects in the Netherlands. The Chernobylsk-4 reactor is described and the cause of the accident is followed step by step. The contamination of the Netherlands is mapped. The absorbed doses for the Dutch people are calculated. In the discussion the author recommends agreements about uniformity for sampling, activity measurements and follow-up studies. (Auth.). 5 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 table.

  12. The Netherlands: Childbearing within the context of a "Poldermodel" society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coen Van Duin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Netherlands has seen a considerable decline of the period total fertility rate and delayed childbearing, just like all other European countries. The drop in fertility, however, has not been as sharp as in many other regions of Europe. The period total fertility rate in the Netherlands has stabilized since the late 1970s at around 1.6 children per woman, and it has even risen slightly since 1995. In addition, although the Netherlands has one of the oldest first-time mothers, completed fertility is still rather high compared to other European countries, suggesting a strong "catching up" of births by women in their thirties. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the main driving forces behind specific fertility trends in the Netherlands. Among other factors, it focuses on changing patterns of home leaving and union formation, declining partnership stability, and the growing acceptability and use of contraception. The chapter also looks at prolonged education, rising labor-force participation of women, economic uncertainties, the growing migrant population, and family policies. Data allowing, and to the extent possible, we examine the effects of these factors on decision-making about parenthood and the timing of childbearing.

  13. Denmark country report 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Lotte; Rostgaard, Tine

    2016-01-01

    The LP&R network produces an annual review of leave policies and related research, starting in 2004. The review covers Maternity, Paternity and Parental leaves; leave to care for sick children and other employment-related measures to support working parents; and early childhood education and care....... In addition to the new country, these are: Australia, Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal...

  14. Denmark country note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Lotte; Rostgaard, Tine

    2014-01-01

    The LP&R network produces an annual review of leave policies and related research, starting in 2004 (for earlier reviews, go to Archive 2005-2013). The review covers Maternity, Paternity and Parental leaves; leave to care for sick children and other employment-related measures to support working......, Israel. Altogether, it covers 35 countries. In addition to Israel, these are: Austria, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland...

  15. Bargaining for Social Rights (BARSORI) project: Country report on Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos Martin, N.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Barsori project studied social partners' initiatives contributing to the reduction of precarious employment through collective bargaining and social dialogue. The project compared experiences in seven EU countries: Denmark, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Slovakia, Spain and the UK. Trade

  16. Decreasing perinatal mortality in the Netherlands, 2000-2006: a record linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelli , Anita C J; Tromp , Miranda; Van Huis , Marian M; Steegers , Eric A P; Tamminga , Pieter; Eskes , Martine; Bonsel , Gouke J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: The European PERISTAT-1 study showed that in 1999 perinatal mortality, especially fetal mortality, was substantially higher in the Netherlands when compared to other European countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the recent trend in Dutch perinatal mortality and the influence of risk factors. Methods: A nationwide retrospective cohort study of 1,246,440 singleton births in 2000-2006 in the Netherlands. The source data were available fro...

  17. Carbon footprint comparison of innovative techniques in the construction and maintenance of road infrastructure in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, E.E.; Leegwater, G.A.; Vos-Effting, S.E. de; Wit, M.S. de

    2015-01-01

    The ambition of European countries to reduce their national greenhouse gas emissions, has been translated in the Netherlands in green procurement policy of the national road administration. An increasing amount of innovative techniques and approaches in road infrastructure construction and

  18. No evident spatial genetic structuring in the rapidly declining Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trimbos, K.B.; Kentie, R.; Verkuil, Y.; Musters, C.J.M.; Piersma, Th.; Snoo, de G.R.

    2011-01-01

    With 40% of the European Black-tailed Godwit population breeding in The Netherlands, this country harbours internationally significant numbers of this species. However, ongoing agricultural intensification has resulted in the fragmentation of the population and drastic population declines since

  19. No evident spatial genetic structuring in the rapidly declining Black-tailed Godwit Limosa limosa limosa in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trimbos, Krijn B.; Musters, C. J. M.; Verkuil, Yvonne I.; Kentie, Rosemarie; Piersma, Theunis; de Snoo, Geert R.

    With 40% of the European Black-tailed Godwit population breeding in The Netherlands, this country harbours internationally significant numbers of this species. However, ongoing agricultural intensification has resulted in the fragmentation of the population and drastic population declines since

  20. Review of regulatory recommendations for orphan drug submissions in the Netherlands and Scotland : focus on the underlying pharmacoeconomic evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Postema, Roelien; Tolley, Keith; Postma, Maarten J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pharmacoeconomic evaluations of new drug therapies are often required for reimbursement or guidance decisions. However, for orphan drugs, country-specific requirements exist. In the Netherlands, orphan drug developers can be exempted from providing a full pharmacoeconomic evaluation,

  1. [Birds, mosquitoes and West Nile virus: little risk of West Nile fever in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Janneke W; Stroo, C J Arjan; Braks, Marieta A H

    2016-01-01

    Due to increased incidence of West Nile fever (WNF) in Europe and the rapid spread of West Nile virus (WNV) in the US, it is commonly thought that it will only be a matter of time before WNV reaches the Netherlands. However, assessing whether WNV is really a threat to the Dutch population is challenging, due to the numerous factors affecting transmission of the virus. Some of these factors are known to limit the risk of WNF in the Netherlands. This risk is determined by the interaction between the pathogen (WNV), the vectors (Culex mosquitoes), the reservoirs (birds) and the exposure of humans to infected mosquitoes. In this paper, we discuss the factors influencing introduction, establishment and spread of WNV in the Netherlands. The probability that each of these three phases will occur in the Netherlands is currently relatively small, as is the risk of WNF infection in humans in the Netherlands.

  2. Wellbeing in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeroen Boelhouwer

    2010-01-01

    Several countries have recently begun showing a good deal of interest in obtaining a broader perspective on prosperity and national development. This study is concerned with the background and history of the SCP life situation index. SCP has used this index to track trends in the life

  3. A Guide to Bundling Small-scale CDM Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariyappan, J.; Bhardwaj, N.; De Coninck, H.; Van der Linden, N.

    2005-07-01

    Small-scale renewable energy and energy efficiency projects that fit the development needs of many developing countries, can potentially be supported via the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), one of the Kyoto Protocol's flexible mechanisms for tackling climate change. However, there is concern that due to high transaction costs, as well as many existing barriers, very few investments will be made in small-scale projects, which are often the most suitable development option in countries such as India. In view of this, the 'bundling' together of appropriate small-scale projects on a regional basis has been proposed as a way in which funding can be leveraged from international sources and transaction costs reduced. IT Power, IT Power India and the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) are carrying out a 2-year project to establish the capacity within India to enable individual small scale projects to be bundled as a single CDM project. Overall objectives are to develop the necessary institutional capabilities to formulate and implement small scale CDM projects in India; to provide a guide on how to bundle small scale projects under the CDM in developing countries; and to raise the awareness of the potential for investment in small scale energy projects which can gain funding through the CDM

  4. Antimicrobials in small-scale urban pig farming in a lower middle-income country - arbitrary use and high resistance levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, G; Boqvist, S; Albihn, A; Fernström, L-L; Andersson Djurfeldt, A; Sokerya, S; Sothyra, T; Magnusson, U

    2018-01-01

    Administration of antimicrobials to food-producing animals is regarded as a major contributor to the overall emergence of resistance in bacteria worldwide. However, few data are available on global antimicrobial use and resistance (AMR) in livestock, especially from low- and middle-income countries. We conducted a structured survey of 91 small-scale pig farms in the urban and peri-urban areas of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, to assess the farmers' knowledge, attitudes and practices related to antimicrobial use in their pig production. Commensal Escherichia coli was isolated from three healthy pigs from each farm ( n  = 261) and susceptibility testing was performed against 14 antimicrobials, using broth microdilution. Univariable logistic regression and generalized linear mixed models were used to investigate potential associations between farm characteristics, management factors and resistance to different types of antimicrobials. We found a widespread and arbitrary use of antimicrobials, often based on the farmer's own judgment. Around 66% of the farmers reported frequently self-adjusting treatment duration and dosage, and 45% had not heard about the term 'antimicrobial resistance'. The antimicrobials most commonly mentioned or kept by the farmers were amoxicillin, tylosin, gentamicin and colistin. Around 37% used a feed concentrate that contained antimicrobials, while antimicrobials for humans were used as a last-line treatment by 10% of the farmers. Commensal E. coli exhibited high prevalence of resistance to several antimicrobials considered to be of critical importance for human medicine, including ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and colistin, and multidrug-resistance was found in 79% of the samples. Higher prevalence of resistance was observed on farms that administered prophylactic antimicrobials and on farms that treated the entire group or herd in the event of disease. The widespread and arbitrary use of antimicrobials in pig farming in Cambodia is highly worrisome

  5. Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Bot, Mariska; Browne, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the number of people with diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide, a more thorough understanding of the psychosocial aspects of living with this condition has become an important health care priority. While our knowledge has grown substantially over the past two decades with respect...... to the physical, emotional and social difficulties that people with diabetes may encounter, many important issues remain to be elucidated. Under the umbrella of the Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Study International Collaborative, Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands aims...... to examine how Dutch adults with diabetes manage their condition and how it affects their lives. Topics of special interest in Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands include subtypes of depression, Type D personality, mindfulness, sleep and sexual functioning. METHODS/DESIGN: Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands...

  6. The Geodiversity in Drift Sand Landscapes of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The authors carried out detailed field studies of more than twelve drift sand landscapes in The Netherlands. The objective of these studies was to restore Natura-2000 values by restoring the wind activity. Active drift sands occur almost exclusively in The Netherlands, Natura 2000 habitat 2330 'Inland dunes with open Corynephorus and Agrostis grasslands', for which reason our country is largely responsible for this European landscape. Active drift sands had almost disappeared for two reasons: first, the stabilization of the drift sands by air pollution, mainly nitrogen, which stimulates the growth of algae and grasses that initiate soil formation, and second, by the growth of forests surrounding the sands, which decreases the wind force. The restoration studies revealed differences in the geodiversity between and within the drift sand areas. Whereas the drift sands on geological and soil maps show as almost homogenous areas, they have in fact highly variable geo-conditions of which examples will be given. These geodiversity aspects concern differences in geomorphological structure, origin, sediments and age of the drift sands. Differences in wind and water erosion, trampling and soil formation add to the geodiversity within the drift sand areas. Especially in the primary stages of succession the differences in geodiversity are relevant for the Natura-2000 values. We discerned three main types of active sands. Firstly, the impressive drift sands with large parabolic dune structures, often consisting of series of interlocking parabolic dunes. They developed from the northeast towards the southwest, against the direction of the dominant wind, and must have taken centuries to develop. Small parts of these systems are still active, other parts show different degrees of soil formation. Their origin is still unclear but probably dates from medieval times (Heidinga, 1985, Jungerius & Riksen, 2008). Second are the drift sand areas with irregular hills from 0.5 to about 2

  7. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity growth. Throughout

  8. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity

  9. The incidence of anorexia nervosa in Netherlands Antilles immigrants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Smink, Frederique R. E.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Previously we found that the incidence of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the general population was much lower in the Netherlands Antilles than in the Netherlands. As a follow-up we compared the incidence of AN in the Netherlands in persons from the Netherlands Antilles to native Dutch. Method:

  10. The Impacts of Business Support Services for Small and Medium Enterprises on Firm Performance in Low-and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piza C

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES OF THE REVIEW Business support interventions in low and middle-income countries (LMICs direct a large amount of resources to SMEs, with the assumption that institutional constraints impede small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs from generating profits and employment at the firm level, which in turn is thought to impede economic growth and poverty reduction. Yet despite this abundance of resources, very little is known about the impact of such interventions. To address this gap, this systematic review analyses evaluations of SME support services in LMICs to help inform policy debates pertaining to SMEs and business support services. This review examines the available evidence on the effects of SME support services in LMICs on firm-level performance indicators (such as revenues, profits, and productivity, employment generation, and labour productivity. METHODS We systematically searched for available literature. To identify relevant papers for this review, we conducted electronic searches on key platforms; snowball sampling of references from relevant papers and book chapters, and suggestions from recognized experts in the field. We focused on LMICs as defined by the World Bank classifications, and on evidence published since the year 2000, so as to include more sophisticated evaluation techniques. The references retrieved for this review are up-to-date as of December 2014. We included studies that evaluated the effectiveness of business support services on firm level outcomes of SMEs in low- and middle-income countries. We defined SMEs as firms with between two and 250 employees, but also included studies that used annual revenue to classify firms as SMEs instead of employee count. We examined interventions involving tax simplification, exports and access to external markets; support for innovation policies; support to local production systems; training and technical assistance, and SME financing and credit guarantee

  11. Wind energy in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruijne, R. de

    1990-01-01

    Wind energy is a 'winning reality' in the Netherlands. This is apparent from the results by researchers, industry and the market. During recent years the market has acquired confidence in wind energy. At the start of 1987 there was about 15 MW of installed wind power in the Netherlands. Halfway through 1990 this has almost quadrupled, with 45 MW in operation and 35 MW under construction. The power companies have specific capital expenditure plans for further growth to approximately 400 MW by 1995. This investment scheme will consist of existing turbines (< 600 kW). (Author)

  12. Country Report The Netherlands - Assessment Sustainable Governance Indicators Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, Robertus; Hoppe, Thomas; Woldendorp, Jaap; Bandelow, Nils C.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of Dutch democracy, once considered a highly stable product of cooperation, compromise and consensus-seeking practices across socioeconomic and sociocultural lines, has changed. Whereas the accessibility and levels (not forms) of participation have changed little, autocratically led

  13. Energy R and D in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EEM Luiten; JJ Dooley; K Blok

    1999-09-07

    This report documents trends in R and D and in particular (public) energy R and D in the Netherlands. Besides quantitative information on R and D and energy R and D, the report gives an impression of changes in science and technology policy, energy policy and changes in energy research priorities (both organizational and financial). In the Netherlands, 2.09% of GDP (or $6.7 billion) was invested in R and D activities in 1995. The private sector financed 46% of all R and D in that year. A small but significant fraction (9.3%) of the research performed in the Netherlands is financed by foreign public and private sector entities. Energy R and D has been identified by the national Strategic Foresight Activity as an important area of R and D for government support in the future. This is due in part to the overall decline in public support for energy R and D that occurred from 1985 to 1995. However, recent concern over climate change and energy policy has resulted in increased budgets for energy R and D. Recent policy documents (e.g., the Memorandum on Energy R and D in April 1998) and initiatives (e.g., a recent university energy R and D program; intensification of climate policy, partly in R and D) indicate the growing interest in addressing the issue of climate change partly through energy R and D. The Dutch government believes that the liberalization of the energy market in the Netherlands justifies an active role for the government to guarantee the longer-term transformation to a sustainable energy system. In terms of climate policy, the expanded and more efficient use of natural gas is seen as a suitable transition option towards a sustainable energy system. However, energy efficiency (and in particular energy efficiency in the industrial sector) and the introduction of renewable technologies (solar energy, wind energy and biomass) are generally favored for the long term. Recently, additional funding was allocated for research on industrial &apos

  14. Rare cancers in The Netherlands: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Jan M; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Visser, Otto; van Krieken, Han J H J M; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Siesling, Sabine

    2018-07-01

    The conventional definition for rare disease is based on prevalence. Because of differences in prognosis, a definition on the basis of incidence was deemed to be more appropriate for rare cancers. Within the European RARECARE project, a definition was introduced that defines cancers as rare when the crude incidence rate is less than six per 100 000 per year. In this study, we applied the RARECARE definition for rare cancer to the Netherlands; this to identify the usefulness of the definition in a single country and to provide more insight into the burden of rare cancers in the Netherlands. Data for 2004 through 2008 were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and classified according to the RARECARE entities (tumour groupings). Crude and European standardized incidence rates were calculated. Out of the 260 entities, 223 (86%) were rare according to the definition, accounting for 14 000 cancers (17% of all). Considerable fluctuations in crude rates over years were observed for the major group of cancers. Rare tumours in the Netherlands constituted 17% of all newly diagnosed tumours, but were divided over 223 different entities, indicating the challenge that faces clinicians. To make the definition of rare cancers better applicable, it should be refined by taking into consideration the sex-specific incidence for sex-specific cancer sites. Moreover, a mean incidence over 5 years will provide more solid insight into the burden, eliminating large fluctuations in time of most of the cancers.

  15. Influence of physicians' life stances on attitudes to end-of-life decisions and actual end-of-life decision-making in six countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, J; van Delden, J; Mortier, F

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine how physicians' life stances affect their attitudes to end-of-life decisions and their actual end-of-life decision-making. METHODS: Practising physicians from various specialties involved in the care of dying patients in Belgium, Denmark, The Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland......) and Protestants (up to 20.4% in The Netherlands) reported ever having made such a decision. DISCUSSION: The results suggest that religious teachings influence to some extent end-of-life decision-making, but are certainly not blankly accepted by physicians, especially when dealing with real patients...... large life-stance groups in each country. RESULTS: Only small differences in life stance were found in all countries in general attitudes and intended and actual behaviour with regard to various end-of-life decisions. However, with regard to the administration of drugs explicitly intended to hasten...

  16. Petrol war in Nijmegen, Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, E.; Kramer, I.

    2000-01-01

    Since April 2000 a petrol war rages in Nijmegen and surroundings (Netherlands) whereby considerable discounts are given to the national retail prices. The cause of the war is a new unmanned petrol station of the enterprise Tango. In this article the development and the consequences of the discount at petrol stations in Nijmegen and surroundings are analyzed 3 refs

  17. Adaptation strategies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, J.; Klostermann, J.E.M.; Bergsma, E.; Jong, P.; Albrecht, E.; Schmidt, M.; Mißler-Behr, M.; Spyra, S.P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Although climate change has been prominently featured on the global scientific and political agendas since the World Climate Conference in 1979 (WCC 1979), the specific importance of adaptation to climate change has only been underlined about 20 years later. The Netherlands, because it lies largely

  18. The Netherlands: self-employed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.

    2009-01-01

    This is the national contribution to the CAR on self-employed workers in the Netherlands. In this national contribution information is provided on self-employed workers in relation to (1) legal provisions and social security, (2) recent trends in self-employment with no employees, (3) collective

  19. Chinese Companies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, T.M.; Pieke, F.N.; Stam, T.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth of Chinese investment in the Netherlands has been cause for both excitement and anxiety. Many of the companies and other investors are still unknown and the background and objectives of their investment often remain unclear. This research takes a close look at fourteen Chinese

  20. Settling in in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mérove Gijsberts; Marcel Lubbers

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Langer in Nederland What happens to the position of Poles and Bulgarians in the Netherlands in the first years following migration? This publication is based on information from a panel survey which tracks Polish and Bulgarian migrants in the first years after their entry in

  1. Kjeller's impact in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedkoop, J.A.

    1992-08-01

    This lecture is an attempt to assess the impact in the Netherlands of the bilateral co-operation with Norway in the field of nuclear energy during the fifties and sixties. The story about the establishment, development and abolishment of the Joint Establishment for Nuclear Energy Research (JENER) at Kjeller Norway is told

  2. At home in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mérove Gijsberts; Jaco Dagevos

    2010-01-01

    The integration of migrants has been exercising minds in the Netherlands for several decades now. The tone of the debate in both the political and public arena has frequently been sombre, reflecting the widespread feeling that large sections of the migrant population, and especially migrants

  3. The Netherlands : A tax haven?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmeren, Eric; Kuijer, Martin; Werner, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    The taxation of multinational enterprises is currently subject to intensive international and national debates. In these debates the Netherlands has sometimes been labelled as a ‘tax haven’. This term has a strong negative connotation. In any case, a country’s reputation is at stake if it is

  4. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  5. Social innovation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Dhondt, S.; Ooms, M.

    2018-01-01

    The Netherlands is catching up with social innovation. In the former century combating social problems was a task of public organisations and government, largely carried out top down. Today the responsibility to tackle social issues is partly shifting to public-private partnerships, social

  6. Elder abuse in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inger Plaisier; Mirjam de Klerk

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Ouderenmishandeling in Nederland It is twenty years since the last study was carried out on the number of older persons in the Netherlands who are deliberate or accidental victims of abuse in the form of verbal, physical or sexual violence, financial abuse and/or neglect by

  7. Getting practical in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Hendrik Jan; Sonneveld, Wim; Fatih Taşar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Practical work is essential in secondary school science education. Although there is no doubt about that statement, for example in the Netherlands, there is a discussion going on about the efficiency of practical work: what do students learn when they work on practicals, and is this the most

  8. Robotics Activities in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg- de Lange, D.J.B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Since April 2010, in The Netherlands robotics activities are coordinated by RoboNED. This Dutch Robotics Platform, chaired by Prof. Stefano Stramigioli, aims to stimulate the synergy between the robotics fields and to formulate a focus. The goal of RoboNED is three fold: 1) RoboNED aims to bring the

  9. European Bat Lyssaviruses, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der W.H.M.; Heide, van der R.; Verstraten, E.R.A.M.; Kramps, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    To study European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in bat reservoirs in the Netherlands, native bats have been tested for rabies since 1984. For all collected bats, data including species, age, sex, and date and location found were recorded. A total of 1,219 serotine bats, Eptesicus serotinus, were tested, and

  10. Coeliac disease in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, JJ; Blomberg - van der Flier, von B.M.E.; Mesquita, HB Bueno-de; Mearin, ML

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of adult coeliac disease in The Netherlands was studied in the Dutch Coeliac Disease Society and in blood donors but not in the general population. We therefore studied the prevalence of recognized and unrecognized coeliac disease in a large cohort, representative of the

  11. Surgical training in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borel-Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical training in the Netherlands has traditionally been characterized by learning on the job under the classic master-trainee doctrine. Over the past decades, it has become regionally organized with intensive structural training courses, and a peer-based quality control system. Recently, the

  12. Work life in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, S. van den; Dhondt, S.; Genabeek, J. van; Goudswaard, A.; Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.; Klein Hesselink, J.; Korte, E. de; Kraan, K.; Oeij, P.; Pot, F.; Smulders, P.G.W.; Vaas, F.; Wevers, C.; Willems, D.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of work is changing, not only in the Netherlands but throughout Europe. There is a growing demand for different types of products and services. These demands are influenced by technological developments and innovations, but also by globalization, which indicates the integration of

  13. Treatment and survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer Stage IIIA diagnosed in 1989-1994: a study in the region of the Comprehensive Cancer Centre East, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Festen, J.; Kleijn, E.M.H.A. de; Kramer, G.W.P.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the treatment policy and survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical stage IIIA in daily practice. We selected 212 patients, who had been diagnosed between 1989 and 1994 and registered by the Cancer Registry, Comprehensive

  14. Extent and origin of resistance to antituberculosis drugs in the Netherlands, 1993 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesen, C; van Gageldonk-Lafeber, A B; de Vries, G; Erkens, C G; van Rest, J; Korthals Altes, H; de Neeling, H; Kamst, M; van Soolingen, D

    2014-03-20

    The elimination of tuberculosis (TB) is threatened by an apparent increase in the level of resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In the Netherlands, where the majority of TB patients are migrants, resistance may also be increasing. We conducted a retrospective study, using 18,294 M. tuberculosis isolates from TB cases notified between 1993 and 2011. We investigated the trends in antituberculosis drug resistance, focusing on the country of birth of the patients and whether resistance had developed during treatment or was the result of transmission of resistant M. tuberculosis strains. For both scenarios, we determined whether this had happened in or outside the Netherlands. Antituberculosis drug resistance was found in 13% of all cases analysed and showed an increasing trend among patients who had been born in the Netherlands (pNetherlands or before 1993 (when DNA fingerprinting was not systematically performed), in some cases (n=45), resistance was acquired in the Netherlands. We conclude that antituberculosis drug resistance is increasing in the Netherlands, mostly related to migration from high TB-incidence countries, but also to domestic acquisition.

  15. A method to analyze the potential of solar cells on roofs and facades in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Haspel, B.; Winter, R.; Corten, F.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of the study on the title subject is to compile a database in which the surfaces of roofs and facades in the Netherlands can be characterized and calculated in order to analyze the technical potential of photovoltaic systems. The potential can be analyzed by deducting a production-cost curve. The database can be used for national studies, as well as for studies on a provincial level, while data are compiled per province. A brief summary is given of studies in other countries and one study in the Netherlands on the estimation of the potential. An overview is given of the available databases in the Netherlands which can be used in developing the roof and facade surface database. Finally, the method is described by which the most relevant data of surfaces and facades of buildings in the Netherlands can be compiled, put into a database and applied. 3 figs., 3 tabs., 1 appendix, 19 refs

  16. IAEA news: • Newcomer countries face common challenges in nuclear infrastructure development. • Safety and licensing requirements for small modular reactors: IAEA hosts first workshop for regulators. • IAEA reaches milestone in disposal of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollar, Lenka; Dyck, Elisabeth; Dixit, Aabha; Gaspar, Miklos; Gil, Laura

    2016-01-01

    • Newcomer countries face common challenges in nuclear infrastructure development: Countries embarking on a nuclear power programme need to make sure that the development of their legal, regulatory and support infrastructure keeps pace with the construction of the power plant itself. This is the only way to ensure that the programme proceeds in a safe, secure and sustainable way, concluded participants of a workshop on nuclear power infrastructure development hosted at the IAEA last February. • Safety and licensing requirements for small modular reactors: IAEA hosts first workshop for regulators: A new generation of advanced, prefab nuclear power reactors called small modular reactors (SMRs) could be licensed and hit the market as early as 2020, and the IAEA is helping regulators prepare for their debut. In a series of workshops that began earlier this year, the IAEA is working closely with regulators on approaches to safety and licensing ahead of potential SMR deployment worldwide. • IAEA reaches milestone in disposal of radioactive sources: Successful tests of a promising technology for moving and storing low level radioactive sealed sources are paving the way for a new disposal method for dealing with small volumes of radioactive waste around the world. The method, which involves placing and covering sealed sources in a narrow hole a few hundred metres deep, would allow countries to safely and securely take charge of their own disused radioactive sources. The proof of concept for the technology was tested in Croatia late last year — without the use of actual radioactive material.

  17. The feasibility of biomass production for the Netherlands energy economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysen, E.H.; Daey Ouwens, C.; Van Onna, M.J.G.; Blok, K.; Okken, P.A.; Goudriaan, J.

    1992-05-01

    The title study aims at providing a reliable overview of the technical and financial parameters for the available and potential methods of energy production through biomass. In the study the production of biomass has been separated as much as possible from the transport and the conversion of energy carriers such as fuels or electricity. The assessment of the feasibility is based upon data analysis in phase A of the study and subsequent interviews with key institutes and industries in the Netherlands in phase B. The problems in agriculture and environment justify an active policy with respect to the use of biomass for the Netherlands' energy economy. The developments and the programmes in other European countries and the USA, the fact that a good infrastructure is present in the Netherlands, and the possible spin-off for developing countries justify this conclusion. It is recommended to initiate a focused national programme in the field of biomass energy, properly coordinated with the present ongoing Energy from Waste programme (EWAB) and with ongoing international programmes. The programme should encompass both research and development, as well as a few demonstration projects. Research to reduce costs of biomass is important, largely through reaching higher yields. In view of the competitive kWh costs of combined biomass gasifier/steam and gas turbines systems, based upon energy and environmental considerations, development and demonstration of this system is appropriate. 14 figs., 24 tabs., 6 app., 99 refs

  18. Shifting policy responses to domestic violence in the Netherlands and Spain (1980-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggeband, Conny

    2012-07-01

    This article seeks to understand differences in the evolution of policies to combat domestic violence against women in the Netherlands and Spain. Although policy change is often viewed as incremental change toward more progressive policies, the two countries studied here reflect opposing dynamics. The Netherlands moved from being a pioneering country to one that gradually marginalized the policy issue, whereas Spain, in contrast, recently developed innovative and far-reaching policies after a long period of low to moderate state responses. The case study points to the central role of frame negotiation, left-wing governments, and strong feminist mobilization.

  19. Primary small bowel anastomosis in generalised peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGraaf, JS; van Goor, Harry; Bleichrodt, RP

    Objective: To find out if primary small bowel anastomosis of the bowel is safe in patients with generalised peritonitis who are treated by planned relaparotomies. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital, The Netherlands. Subjects. 10 Patients with generalised purulent peritonitis

  20. Sustainable production and consumption, an assessment for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalbers, T.; Brink, C.; Drissen, E.; Faber, A.; Nijdam, D.; Rood, T.; Vringer, K.; Wilting, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Poverty, climate change and loss of biodiversity are among the key issues in relation to global sustainable development. The Netherlands is tightly embedded in a global network of economic relations as well as environmental effects: domestic consumption and production patterns affect environmental pressure not only within the country, but also abroad. This report explores the nature and quantity of economic and environmental embedding of the Netherlands in the world. Following from surveys, support for policy measures is identified and explored. It concludes by the notion that sustainability problems have an increasingly global character, but that the inverse is also true: it makes sense to take up responsibilities to improve the environment in other parts of the world

  1. Assessment of the climate in the Netherlands 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattenberg, A.

    2008-07-01

    An overview is provided of the state of the climate in the Netherlands over the last years. The first chapter pays attention to the weather of the last years and striking events are discussed, such as storms, strikingly hot periods or local flooding due to abundant raining. The events are put in the context of the Dutch climate over a much longer period of time. The research results that are described in Chapter 2 and 3 provide insight in the possible causes of the striking weather events. The observed heating of the Netherlands is compared to observations in surrounding countries and to model calculations. Abundant coastal rains in summer are addressed in more detail as well as dry periods. Chapter four addresses air quality research by addressing the connection between warming and the ozone content in the atmosphere. The end of the report provides information on ranges of temperatures and meteorological language use. [mk] [nl

  2. Fast diffusion and broadening use: A research on residential adoption and usage of broadband internet in the Netherlands between 2001 and 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Netherlands has the second-highest broadband penetration at 22.5 subscribers per 100 inhabitants (OECD, 2005). This rapid adoption process makes the Netherlands an interesting case for other countries. The main goal of this research is to gain insight in the adoption and the use of broadband

  3. Solar energy in Amersfoort, Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eijpe, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    For the first time in the world a newly to be built housing area (Nieuwland in Amersfoort, Netherlands) will be constructed, exclusively on the basis of sustainability. First, the use of three forms of solar energy conversion techniques (thermal solar energy, passive solar energy and photovoltaic energy) is going to be integrated in 50 rental houses. At the end of this century 10,000 m 2 of solar cells will be installed with a capacity of 1 MWp. 2 figs

  4. Application of improved management and nutrition technologies for small-holder dairy production and their adoption by farmers in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The objectives of this presentation are to consider some of the factors concerned in the application of technical change to small-scale dairying and the adoption of change by farmers. The presentation will consider (1) the motives of the small-scale dairy farmer, (2) the small-scale dairy farmer's own perceptions of his problems and needs, (3) how farmers deal with the two fundamental technologies implicit in dairy farming, feeding their animals and getting their cows in calf, and (4) dissemination routes most favoured by small scale dairy farmers. The geographical focus of the presentation is East Africa, a region associated with considerable progress and success in small-scale dairying (Kenya) as well as dairying projects in their early development (Tanzania). The concerns of small-scale farmers have been characterised; thus the farmers have multiple objectives, their households have low capacity to bear risk, their livestock enterprises are often integrated with cropping activities, and their livestock are often expected to be multi-functional. Some of the expected implications for small-scale dairy farmers are that: (1) inputs (including feed) are low and therefore milk yields are expected to be low; (2) inputs are often matched to output so that a reduction in milk price results in a reduction in concentrate allowance for the cows; (3) the use of time and cash are optimised, implying that priority will not be given to cattle if other farm enterprises seem financially more attractive. Perhaps not surprisingly, attitudes and systems vary within the farming community, allowing sub-groups of small-scale dairy farmers to be identified and defined. Thus some farmers emerge as more specialist or entrepreneurial than others, prepared to make greater investment in return for higher outputs. Attitudes and activities also differ according to location. Small-scale farmers close to urban centres may well have off-farm employment, diverting their attention from

  5. Response exercise 2005 in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Hoog Van Beynen, C.; Aldenkamp, F. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: On May, 25 a large scale nuclear exercise was held in The Netherlands. In total 1100 participants from 60 organizations ranging from the local fire department, located near the Borssele Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), up to the Ministerial level, organized in an Inter-departmental Policy Team focused on several aspects of the nuclear off-site emergency management. The scenario was considered challenging by an international observer from the IAEA. In the early morning the exercise started with a simulated small emission of the NPP. Conditions deteriorated and from around 12:00 hours a large emission threatened the southwest of the Netherlands, Belgium and France. Information was exchanged with Belgium, E.U.R.D.E.P. and the IAEA. At 17:00 hours there was simulated a significant release and at 20:00 the exercise ended. In the Netherlands national off-site emergency management is organized in the Unit Planning and Advice (in Dutch: Epan). The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (R.I.V.M.) plays a comprehensive role in the information structure of Epan. R.I.V.M. runs the Back Office for Radiological Information (B.O.R.I.), one of three back-offices of Epan. B.O.R.I gathers and analyses radiological information and processes it into a situation report containing diagnostic and prognosticated situation overviews. B.O.R.I. combines several knowledge institutes into one organization: the National Weather Service, the Institute of Food Safety, the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, the Institute for Inland Water Management and Wastewater Treatment, the National Institute for Coastal and Marine Management, the Nuclear Safety Authority, a Defence Department and R.I.V.M.. The B.O.R.I. activities also include an extensive environmental radiological monitoring program in several matrices. For all these organizations and measurement networks realistic technical data was generated. This added considerably to the realism of

  6. Response exercise 2005 in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Hoog Van Beynen, C.; Aldenkamp, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: On May, 25 a large scale nuclear exercise was held in The Netherlands. In total 1100 participants from 60 organizations ranging from the local fire department, located near the Borssele Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), up to the Ministerial level, organized in an Inter-departmental Policy Team focused on several aspects of the nuclear off-site emergency management. The scenario was considered challenging by an international observer from the IAEA. In the early morning the exercise started with a simulated small emission of the NPP. Conditions deteriorated and from around 12:00 hours a large emission threatened the southwest of the Netherlands, Belgium and France. Information was exchanged with Belgium, E.U.R.D.E.P. and the IAEA. At 17:00 hours there was simulated a significant release and at 20:00 the exercise ended. In the Netherlands national off-site emergency management is organized in the Unit Planning and Advice (in Dutch: Epan). The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (R.I.V.M.) plays a comprehensive role in the information structure of Epan. R.I.V.M. runs the Back Office for Radiological Information (B.O.R.I.), one of three back-offices of Epan. B.O.R.I gathers and analyses radiological information and processes it into a situation report containing diagnostic and prognosticated situation overviews. B.O.R.I. combines several knowledge institutes into one organization: the National Weather Service, the Institute of Food Safety, the Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, the Institute for Inland Water Management and Wastewater Treatment, the National Institute for Coastal and Marine Management, the Nuclear Safety Authority, a Defence Department and R.I.V.M.. The B.O.R.I. activities also include an extensive environmental radiological monitoring program in several matrices. For all these organizations and measurement networks realistic technical data was generated. This added considerably to the realism of

  7. The applicability of space imagery to the small-scale topographic mapping of developing countries: A case study — the Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, G.; El Niweiri, A. E. H.

    After reviewing the current status of topographic mapping in Sudan, the paper considers the possible applications of space inagery to the topographic mapping of the country at 1 : 100,000 scale. A comprehensive series of tests of the geometric accuracy and interpretability of six types of space imagery taken by the Landsat MSS, RBV and TM sensors, the MOMS scanner, the ESA Metric Camera and NASA's Large Format Camera have been conducted over a test area established in the Red Sea Hills area of Sudan supplemented by further interpretation tests carried out over the area of Khartoum and the Gezira. The results of these tests are given together with those from comparative tests carried out with other images acquired by the same sensors over test areas in developed countries (UK and USA). Further collateral information on topographic mapping at 1 : 100,000 scale from SPOT imagery has been provided by the Ordnance Survey based on its tests and experience in North Yemen. The paper concludes with an analysis of the possibilities of mapping the main (non-equatorial) area of Sudan at 1 : 100,000 scale based on the results of the extensive series of tests reported in the paper and elsewhere. Consideration is also given to the infrastructure required to support such a programme.

  8. Physician assistant education: five countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Roderick S; Kuilman, Luppo

    2011-01-01

    Physician assistant (PA) education has undergone substantial change since the late 1960s. After four decades of development, other countries have taken a page from the American experience and launched their own instructional initiatives. The diversity in how different countries approach education and produce a PA for their nation's needs provides an opportunity to make comparisons. The intent of this study was to document and describe PA programs in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and the United States. We reviewed the literature and contacted a network of academics in various institutions to obtain primary information. Each contact was asked a set of basic questions about the country, the PA program, and the deployment of graduates. Information on US PA programs was obtained from the Physician Assistant Education Association. At year's end 2010, the following was known about PA development: Australia, one program; Canada, four programs; United Kingdom, four programs; The Netherlands, five programs; the United States, 154 programs. Trends in program per capita growth remain the largest in the United States, followed by The Netherlands and Canada. The shortest program length was 24 months and the longest, 36 months. Outside the United States, almost all programs are situated in an academic health center ([AHC] defined as a medical university, a teaching hospital, and a nursing or allied health school), whereas only one-third of US PA programs are in AHCs. All non-US programs receive public/government funding whereas American programs are predominately private and depend on tuition to fund their programs. The PA movement is a global phenomenon. How PAs are being educated, trained, and deployed is known only on the basic level. We identify common characteristics, unique aspects, and trends in PA education across five nations, and set the stage for collaboration and analysis of optimal educational strategies. Additional information is needed on

  9. Road deaths in the Netherlands. [Previously known as: Road fatalities in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the development of the number of road deaths in the Netherlands since 1950. After a rise in the 1950s and 1960s, the number of road deaths in the Netherlands has shown a gradual decline since 1973. In 2016, there were 629 road deaths in the Netherlands. After the years of

  10. HIV Transmission Patterns Among The Netherlands, Suriname, and The Netherlands Antilles: A Molecular Epidemiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Merlijn A.; Cornelissen, Marion; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Prins, Maria; Coutinho, Roel A.; van Sighem, Ard I.; Sabajo, Lesley; Duits, Ashley J.; Winkel, Cai N.; Prins, Jan M.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Kauffmann, Robert H.; Op de Coul, Eline L.

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to study patterns of HIV transmission among Suriname, The Netherlands Antilles, and The Netherlands. Fragments of env, gag, and pol genes of 55 HIV-infected Surinamese, Antillean, and Dutch heterosexuals living in The Netherlands and 72 HIV-infected heterosexuals living in Suriname and the

  11. The demand-side innovation policies and sustainable development in the small EU country. Nõudluspoolsed innovatsioonipoliitikad ja jätkusuutlik areng Euroopa Liidu väikeriigis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tõnu Roolaht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various regulations, standards, public procurement activities, subsidies for private demand, and other similar support measures form the demand-side innovation policies. In the modern era, countries and governments dedicate more and more attention to the economic, social, and environmental sustainability of development and entrepreneurship. Sustainable development aims to meet human needs so that economic and social conditions will improve or at least not deteriorate and environment is preserved in order to allow future generations to meet their needs as well. Several demand-side innovation policy measures target also sustainability either as primary or secondary goal. Such policy measures tend to suffer from overshooting effects or fail to influence the behaviour in a desired manner. The purpose of this study is to offer suggestions concerning demand-side policy measures in order to improve their impact on the sustainability of development

  12. Investigating the prevalence and predictors of media multitasking across countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorveld, H.A.M.; Segijn, C.M.; Ketelaar, P.E.; Smit, E.G.

    2014-01-01

    This study provides insight into the prevalence and predictors of different forms of media multitasking across different countries. Results of a survey of 5,973 participants from six countries (the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, and France) demonstrated that

  13. NOx emissions and thermal efficiencies of small scale biomass-fuelled combustion plant with reference to process industries in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, A.S.; Purvis, M.R.I.

    1996-01-01

    Solid biomass materials are an important industrial fuel in many developing countries and also show good potential for usage in Europe within a future mix of renewable energy resources. The sustainable use of wood fuels for combustion relies on operation of plant with acceptable thermal efficiency. There is a clear link between plant efficiency and environmental impacts due to air pollution and deforestation. To supplement a somewhat sparse literature on thermal efficiencies and nitrogen oxide emissions from biomass-fuelled plants in developing countries, this paper presents results for tests carried out on 14 combustion units obtained during field trials in Sri Lanka. The plants tested comprised steam boilers and process air heaters. Biomass fuels included: rubber-wood, fuelwood from natural forests; coconut shells; rice husks; and sugar can bagasse. Average NO x (NO and NO 2 ) emissions for the plants were found to be 47 gNO 2 GJ -1 with 18% conversion of fuel nitrogen. The former value is the range of NO x emission values quoted for combustion of coal in grate-fired systems; some oil-fired systems and systems operating on natural gas, but is less than the emission levels for the combustion of pulverized fuel and heavy fuel oil. This value is significantly within current European standards for NO x emission from large combustion plants. Average thermal efficiency of the plants was found to be 50%. Observations made on operational practices demonstrated that there is considerable scope for the improvement of this thermal efficiency value by plant supervisor training, drying of fuelwood and the use of simple instruments for monitoring plant performance. (Author)

  14. Cost Analyses in the US and Japan: A Cross-Country Comparative Analysis Applied to the PRONOUNCE Trial in Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Rajan, Narayan; Winfree, Katherine; Davey, Peter; Ball, Mark; Knox, Hediyyih; Graham, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Health technology assessment is not required for regulatory submission or approval in either the United States (US) or Japan. This study was designed as a cross-country evaluation of cost analyses conducted in the US and Japan based on the PRONOUNCE phase III lung cancer trial, which compared pemetrexed plus carboplatin followed by pemetrexed (PemC) versus paclitaxel plus carboplatin plus bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab (PCB). Two cost analyses were conducted in accordance with International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research good research practice standards. Costs were obtained based on local pricing structures; outcomes were considered equivalent based on the PRONOUNCE trial results. Other inputs were included from the trial data (e.g., toxicity rates) or from local practice sources (e.g., toxicity management). The models were compared across key input and transferability factors. Despite differences in local input data, both models demonstrated a similar direction, with the cost of PemC being consistently lower than the cost of PCB. The variation in individual input parameters did affect some of the specific categories, such as toxicity, and impacted sensitivity analyses, with the cost differential between comparators being greater in Japan than in the US. When economic models are based on clinical trial data, many inputs and outcomes are held consistent. The alterable inputs were not in and of themselves large enough to significantly impact the results between countries, which were directionally consistent with greater variation seen in sensitivity analyses. The factors that vary across jurisdictions, even when minor, can have an impact on trial-based economic analyses. Eli Lilly and Company.

  15. Adapting Floods Management to Climate Change: Comparing Policy Frames and Governance Practices in the Low Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabbé, A.; Wiering, M.A.; Liefferink, J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Belgium and the Netherlands together form the Low Countries. Empirical research in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) and the Netherlands proves that there are substantive differences in the organization of governance processes regarding flood management in response to climate change.

  16. Information used in the decision-making process regarding influenza vaccination policy: perceptions of stakeholders in France and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, M.L.; Perrier, L.; Paget, J.; Mosnier, A.; Buthion, V.; Cohen, J.M.; Späth, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To minimize the medical and societal impact of influenza, most WHO countries recommend seasonal vaccination in targeted populations; however, little is known about the decision-making procedures at a country-level. In Europe, the Netherlands has the highest rate of influenza vaccination

  17. Policy instruments for energy conservation and environmental policy in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovenberg, A.L. [Tinbergen Inst., Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    1992-03-01

    In this paper it is assumed that the policy objective is not so much to economize on energy as to reduce pollution. In particular, to curb the emissions of carbon dioxide. A number of environmental policy instruments pertaining to fossil fuels are analyzed, mainly in the context of the Dutch economy: regulation, subsidies, voluntary agreements with industry, and taxation. At the moment, most industrial countries, including the Netherlands, rely almost entirely on the first three instruments. More recently, however, there has been a growing interest in environmental taxation. The theory that taxation is always and everywhere the best instrument assumes, however, perfect markets and a closed economy. Most economies, including the Dutch one, are riddled with market imperfections. Hence, policy makers confront a second best case. This implies that in selecting policy instruments, they have to resort to a more pragmatic `case-by-case` approach. A diversified diet is advocated. Taxation is part of that diet. Section 2 explores a number of important advantages of the tax instrument. Section 3 discusses a number of problems if a small open economy like the Netherlands would unilaterally adopt such a tax, especially if that tax would include energy-intensive firms that are subject to international competition. In this connection, some alternative policy instruments are analyzed in Section 4. Section 5 proceeds by investigating the case of international coordination and explores the conditions under which coordinated taxes could be successful. Section 6 analyzes policies targeted at households and at firms that are not subject to international competition. 13 refs.

  18. Determinants of traffic accident mortality in The Netherlands: a geographical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beeck, E. F.; Mackenbach, J. P.; Looman, C. W.; Kunst, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a country with one of the lowest levels of traffic accident mortality in the world, large regional mortality differences can be observed. An analysis was performed of the contribution of regional differences in traffic mobility (kilometers travelled/person-years), injury rate

  19. HOW THE FINANCIAL CRISIS HAS AFFECTED THE ECONOMIC INDICATORS OF THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan Hagimă

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite of being affected by the economic crisis, the Netherlands managed to minimize its effects. This situation is highlighted in a comparison with Romania and the European Union, between the levels of the most important economic indicators. Moreover, when other countries registered negative trends in their economic growth, the Dutch economy succeeded in this matter.

  20. The consequences of implementing a child care voucher: Evidence from Australia, the Netherlands and USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, M.; Gradus, R.H.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the USA and Australia, public funding has promoted parental choice by introducing a voucher scheme for child care, where parents are free to choose the provider. The policy experiments and the outcomes in these three countries provide useful information about the consequences of

  1. Bridging mobilities : ICTs appropriation by Cameroonians in South Africa and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamnjoh, H.

    2013-01-01

    With a focus on Cameroonian migrants from Pinyin and Mankon who are currently living in Cape Town and the Netherlands, this volume examines the workings of the social fabric of mobile communities. It sheds light on how these communities are crafting lives for themselves in the host country and

  2. Bridging Mobilities : ICTs appropriation by Cameroonians in South Africa and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyamnjoh, Henrietta Mambo

    2013-01-01

    With a focus on Cameroonian migrants from Pinyin and Mankon who are currently living in Cape Town and the Netherlands, this volume examines the workings of the social fabric of mobile communities. It sheds light on how these communities are crafting lives for themselves in the host country and

  3. Explaining low uptake for Down syndrome screening in the Netherlands : (and predicting utilisation of other programmes)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crombag, NMTH

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands, only a quarter of all pregnant women take part in the current Down syndrome screening(DSS) programme. Compared to other Northern European countries, Dutch uptake rates are very low. This thesis concentrates on the test-utilisation of DSS, in particular the factors impeding or

  4. Is a Nexit now on the cards? : What the UK's referendum means for the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otjes, Simon

    2016-01-01

    One of the issues raised by the UK’s decision to leave the European Union is the effect it could have on Eurosceptic movements in other countries, with other referendums on EU membership a possibility. Simon Otjes considers the impact Brexit is having in the Netherlands

  5. Increase in imported malaria in the Netherlands in asylum seekers and VFR travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gier, Brechje; Suryapranata, Franciska S. T.; Croughs, Mieke; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Keuter, Monique; Visser, Leo G.; van Vugt, Michele; Sonder, Gerard J. B.

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is a notifiable disease in the Netherlands, a non-endemic country. Imported malaria infections occur regularly among travellers, migrants and visitors. Surveillance data were analysed from 2008 to 2015. Trends in amounts of notifications among risk groups were analysed using Poisson

  6. Increase in imported malaria in the Netherlands in asylum seekers and VFR travellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gier, B. de; Suryapranata, F.S.; Croughs, M.; Genderen, P.J. van; Keuter, M.; Visser, L.G.; Vugt, M. De; Sonder, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria is a notifiable disease in the Netherlands, a non-endemic country. Imported malaria infections occur regularly among travellers, migrants and visitors. Surveillance data were analysed from 2008 to 2015. Trends in amounts of notifications among risk groups were analysed using

  7. A Quantitative Assessment of Educational Integration of Students with Down Syndrome in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Graaf, G.; Van Hove, G.; Haveman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, as in many other countries, there are indications of an inclusive school policy for children with Down syndrome. However, there is a lack of studies that evaluate to what extent this policy has actually succeeded in supporting the mainstreaming of these students. Method: For the period 1984-2011, the number of…

  8. The Dutch secret : How to provide safe drinking water without chlorine in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.W.M.H.; Medema, G.J.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Netherlands is one of the few countries where chlorine is not used at all, neither for primary disinfection nor to maintain a residual disinfectant in the distribution network. The Dutch approach that allows production and distribution of drinking water without the use of chlorine while not

  9. Moroccan associations in the Netherlands: how organisation leaders deal with the stigmatisation of the Moroccan community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heelsum, A.; Handzlik, I.; Sorokowski, Ł.

    2014-01-01

    The key issue of this paper is how representatives of Moroccan associations in the Netherlands have responded to the sudden rise of anti-immigrant sentiments and the stigmatization of Moroccans that has been taking place since the first decade of the twenty-first century in this country. Elaborate

  10. Flood risk, uncertainty and changing river protection policy in the Netherlands: the case of 'calamity polders'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, D.; Warner, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    Extreme river discharges, floods and debates about climate change triggered a shift in flood protection policy in the Netherlands from infrastructural to spatial measures. The new policy directive of `Room for the River¿, details of which were introduced in 2000, should prepare the country for

  11. Cultural and economic determinants of geographical mortality patterns in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackenbach, J. P.; Kunst, A. E.; Looman, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The geographical pattern of mortality in The Netherlands is dominated by an area of relatively high mortality in the southern part of the country. The aim was to analyse the background of this geographical mortality pattern in the early 1980s, and its evolution over time since the

  12. Determinants of regional differences in lung cancer mortality in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, A. E.; Looman, C. W.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Although regional differences in lung cancer mortality are likely to be attributable to regional differences in tobacco smoking, studies in various countries found only weak relationships. This paper aimed at explaining regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the Netherlands. In a first

  13. Comparison and evaluation of the roles of tomato farmer cooperatives in Taiwan and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, B.-S.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato is one of the most popular vegetables all over the world and the production was 145 million tonnes in 2011. In Taiwan and The Netherlands, tomato also became an important vegetable nowadays. In both countries, the farmer cooperatives are the way to help farmers accessing markets. However,

  14. On the presence of Rana ridibunda ridibunda Pallas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Since long there has been a dispute whether in the Netherlands there occur one or two species of green frogs of the genus Rana. There has never been any doubt concerning the presence of Rana esculenta Linnaeus, a species widely distributed throughout the country (Van de Bund, 1964, 1968). The first

  15. Indonesian identities abroad: international engagement of colonial students in the Netherlands, 1908-1931

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stutje, K.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the forging of networks and the articulation of solidarities by Indonesians in the Netherlands with various other colonial organisations and movements in European countries in the 1910s and 1920s. Living in the centre of the Dutch empire multiple factions of Indonesians, each

  16. Uptake of faecal occult blood test colorectal cancer screening by different ethnic groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutekom, M.; van Rijn, A. F.; Dekker, E.; Blaauwgeers, H.; Stronks, K.; Fockens, P.; Essink-Bot, M.-L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the participation rates in CRC screening with a FOBT among various ethnic groups in the Netherlands. Individuals (n = 10 054) were invited by mail and grouped by country of birth. Overall participation rate was 49%. Participation among ethnic minority groups was significantly lower

  17. Results of breast cancer screening in first generation migrants in Northwest Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, O.; van Peppen, AM; Ory, FG; van Leeuwen, F.E.

    2005-01-01

    To determine breast cancer screening results according to country of birth data were used from the breast cancer screening organization of the Comprehensive Cancer Centre Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Overall (age-adjusted) attendance of the breast cancer screening was 76% for women aged 50-69.

  18. Inclusiveness of identification among farmers in The Netherlands and Galicia (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klandermans, P.G.; Sabucedo, J.M.; Rodriguez, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss inclusiveness of identification among farmers in Galicia (Spain) and The Netherlands. Identification with three nested categories - farmers in the local community, farmers in the country, and farmers in Europe was assessed among 167 Dutch and 248 Galician farmers at three

  19. Participation in mental health care by ethnic minority users: Case studies from the Netherlands and Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares de Freitas, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis examines participation in mental health care by users from socially disadvantaged ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands and in Brazil. Despite considerable evidence that minority users are under-represented in health participatory spaces in these and other countries around the world,

  20. Nitrogen consumption, utilisation and losses in pig production in France, The Netherlands, and Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dourmad, J.Y.; SOve, B.; Latimer, P.; Boisen, S.; Fernández, J.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    In highly intensive pig production areas, manure disposal is a major problem especially for nitrogen, because of water pollution by nitrates and air pollution by gaseous ammonia emissions. The situations in three European countries (Denmark, The Netherlands and France) were compared, on average, it

  1. Why Do Tertiary Education Graduates Regret Their Study Program? A Comparison between Spain and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucel, Aleksander; Vilalta-Bufi, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the determinants of regret of study program for tertiary education graduates in Spain and the Netherlands. These two countries differ in their educational system in terms of the tracking structure in their secondary education and the strength of their education-labor market linkages in tertiary education. Therefore, by…

  2. Reforming pension fund governance in the Netherlands: finding a collective voice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwan, N.

    2013-01-01

    As in other European countries, the introduction of more freedom of choice in the pension system has been hotly debated in the Netherlands. Much of the debate has focused on the contents of pension plans, such as flexibility in retirement age, benefits levels and investment options. A second

  3. The Attribution of Income in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article undertakes an extensive comparison of the domestic law of the Netherlands and the United Kingdom in respect of the attribution of income to a person for tax purposes. After a general introduction to both countries, the article looks at a series of specific situations in which the

  4. Geochemical and palaeohydrological controls on the composition of shallow groundwater in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen, J.; Vermooten, S.; Janssen, G.

    2013-01-01

    With the exception of the south of the country, the Netherlands has a strong bipartite hydrogeology: the Holocene part with a coastal dune belt and confining top layer of clay and peat further inland, and the Pleistocene, where thick phreatic aquifers dominate. This research aimed to ascertain the

  5. Fathers in Context: Comparative Analysis of Father Involvement in Bulgaria and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A. Conkova (Nina); B.E. Ory (Brett)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThis report compares father involvement with their children in Bulgaria and the Netherlands by examining country differences in family formation patterns, policy context, and cultural prescriptions regarding family life. In studying the time fathers spend with their children, it is

  6. Media rating systems: do they work? Shop floor compliance with age restrictions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselt, Jordi Franciscus; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2012-01-01

    Media rating systems have been introduced in many countries to protect minors from being exposed to harmful media content. This study examines whether retailers comply with the guidelines of media ratings in the Netherlands. In a mystery shopping study, minors tried to buy or rent media products for

  7. Trends in preterm birth: singleton and multiple pregnancies in the Netherlands, 2000-2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, J. M.; Mol, B. W. J.; Abu-Hanna, A.; Ravelli, A. C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reported increasing trends in preterm birth in developed countries, mainly attributable to an increase in medically indicated preterm births. Our aim was to describe trends in preterm birth among singleton and multiple pregnancies in the Netherlands. Prospective cohort study.

  8. Research on foreign-language teaching and learning in the Netherlands (2002-2006)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspoor, M.; Cremer, M.

    2008-01-01

    This overview of applied linguistics research in the Netherlands between 2002 and 2006 is the fifth in a cyclical series of country-specific reviews of published research on foreign-language teaching and learning. About 75 papers have been selected from about twenty journals, conference proceedings,

  9. Understanding care farming as a swiftly developing sector in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, J.

    2017-01-01

    Care farming or social farming is a swiftly developing sector across Europe. Care farms combine agricultural production with health and social services. The Netherlands is one of the leading countries in care farming. The aim of this study was to better understand how the new sector of care farming

  10. Spatial variation in stage distribution in colorectal cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; Pukkala, E.; Klaase, J.M.; Siesling, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased, mainly in the eastern part of the country. Patient delay due to unawareness or ignorance of symptoms and differences in use of diagnostic tools could have influence on the stage distribution. The aim of this study was

  11. Albinistic common seals (Phoca vitulina) and melanistic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) rehabilitated in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, Nynke; 't Hart, Pieter; Vader, Pieter C. van Voorst

    2010-01-01

    The Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in Pieterburen, The Netherlands, rehabilitates seals from the waters of the Wadden Sea, North Sea and Southwest Delta area. Incidental observations of albinism and melanism in common and grey seals are known from countries surrounding the North Sea.

  12. The Dutch Health Care Performance Report: seven years of health care performance assessment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Michael J.; Kringos, Dionne S.; Marks, Lisanne K.; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2014-01-01

    In 2006, the first edition of a monitoring tool for the performance of the Dutch health care system was released: the Dutch Health Care Performance Report (DHCPR). The Netherlands was among the first countries in the world developing such a comprehensive tool for reporting performance on quality,

  13. A Palynological investigation of the Lower peat in the Province of Friesland, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donselaar, van J.; Jonker, F.P.

    1952-01-01

    Up till now the lower deposits of peat (in Dutch: veen-op-groterediepte = peat at greater depth) have been investigated in the Netherlands mainly in the Western part of the country, viz. in the provinces of Noord-Holland, Zuid-Holland and Zeeland. The analyses have shown that the development of

  14. Spillover effects of supplementary on basic health insurance: Evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.-F. Roos (Anne-Fleur); F.T. Schut (Erik)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLike many other countries, the Netherlands has a health insurance system that combines mandatory basic insurance with voluntary supplementary insurance. Both types of insurance are founded on different principles. Since basic and supplementary insurance are sold by the same health

  15. Cost-effectiveness of universal vaccination ag ainst varicella in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, P.T.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The Netherlands has no varicella vaccination in its National Immunization Program (NIP). Although varicella is regarded as a mild disease, implementation of varicella vaccination in the immunization schedule of several countries has shown to be cost-effective. Dutch children are infected

  16. A programme management approach for supporting a transition to integrated flood management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, J.S.; Van Herk, S.; Zevenbergen, C.; Ashley, R.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands and many other developed countries, flood management is transitioning from sectoral engineering approaches to more integrated approaches. The 2.3 billion Euro Room for the River programme plays an important role in this transition, because it is the first large scale

  17. Temptations of turnout and modernisation: e-voting discourses in the UK and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter; van Haren, R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of the research described was to identify reasons for differences between discourses on electronic voting in the UK and The Netherlands, from a qualitative point of view. Design/methodology/approach – From both countries, eight e-voting experts were interviewed on their

  18. Small hazardous waste generators in developing countries: use of stabilization/solidification process as an economic tool for metal wastewater treatment and appropriate sludge disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcos A R; Mater, Luciana; Souza-Sierra, Maria M; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Sperb, Rafael; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2007-08-25

    The aim of this study was to propose a profitable destination for an industrial sludge that can cover the wastewater treatment costs of small waste generators. Optimized stabilization/solidification technology was used to treat hazardous waste from an electroplating industry that is currently released untreated to the environment. The stabilized/solidified (S/S) waste product was used as a raw material to build concrete blocks, to be sold as pavement blocks or used in roadbeds and/or parking lots. The quality of the blocks containing a mixture of cement, lime, clay and waste was evaluated by means of leaching and solubility tests according to the current Brazilian waste regulations. Results showed very low metal leachability and solubility of the block constituents, indicating a low environmental impact. Concerning economic benefits from the S/S process and reuse of the resultant product, the cost of untreated heavy metal-containing sludge disposal to landfill is usually on the order of US$ 150-200 per tonne of waste, while 1tonne of concrete roadbed blocks (with 25% of S/S waste constitution) has a value of around US$ 100. The results of this work showed that the cement, clay and lime-based process of stabilization/solidification of hazardous waste sludge is sufficiently effective and economically viable to stimulate the treatment of wastewater from small industrial waste generators.

  19. Individual experiences with reintegration policies in Denmark and the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnen, Pernille

    This working paper analyses individual experiences of different models of labour market reintegration in Denmark and in the Netherlands. The paper has two principal aims. First, to make an analysis of experiences of reintegration at an individual level in the two countries, based on qualitative i...... construct these jobs like “ordinary” part time jobs. The working paper is written by senior researcher, Ph.D. Pernille Hohnen in the unit of the Open Labour Market.......This working paper analyses individual experiences of different models of labour market reintegration in Denmark and in the Netherlands. The paper has two principal aims. First, to make an analysis of experiences of reintegration at an individual level in the two countries, based on qualitative...... interviews with Danish and Dutch persons, who have a reduced capacity to work. The second aim is to discuss how the fact that these jobs are very differently constructed both culturally and socially, may be linked to the different political models in the two countries. The Danish model based on a campaign...

  20. Indigenous Infection with Francisella tularensis holarctica in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulos Maraha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the first case of indigenous tularemia detected in The Netherlands, a nonendemic country, since 1953. Whole genome DNA sequence analysis assigned the isolate BD11-00177 to the genomic group B.FTNF002-00, which previously has been exclusively reported from Spain, France, Italy, Switzerland, and Germany. The patient had not been abroad for years, which implies that this is an indigenous infection. The current case might predict an upcoming distribution of Francisella tularensis holarctica genomic group B.FTNF002-00 in Europe.

  1. WP 54 - Temporary agency work in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kea Tijdens; Maarten Klaveren; Marc Meer; Marieke Essen; Hester Houwing

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the result of a study on temp agency workers and on the role that temp agency work played in company’s staffing strategies and on industry and national regulations regarding temp agencies and temp agency work. It was conducted in2004-2006, as part of a larger project on low wage work in the Netherlands, which was part of a five country study for the Russell Sage Foundation, USA. In order to provide a background for understanding temporary agency work, recent developments in and ...

  2. Risk-adjusted capitation: recent experiences in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, W P; van Vliet, R C; van Barneveld, E M; Lamers, L M

    1994-01-01

    The market-oriented health care reforms taking place in the Netherlands show a clear resemblance to the proposals for managed competition in U.S. health care. In both countries good risk adjustment mechanisms that prevent cream skimming--that is, that prevent plans from selecting the best health risks--are critical to the success of the reforms. In this paper we present an overview of the Dutch reforms and of our research concerning risk-adjusted capitation payments. Although we are optimistic about the technical possibilities for solving the problem of cream skimming, the implementation of good risk-adjusted capitation is a long-term challenge.

  3. Nuclear emergency planning and response in the Netherlands after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, L.J.W.M.; Kerkhoven, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    After Chernobyl an extensive project on nuclear emergency planning and response was started in the Netherlands. The objective of this project was to develop a (governmental) structure to cope with accidents with radioactive materials, that can threaten the Dutch community and neighbouring countries. The project has resulted in a new organizational structure for nuclear emergency response, that differs on major points from the existing plans and procedures. In this paper an outline of the new structure is given. Emphasis is placed on accidents with nuclear power plants

  4. Reactor safety in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eendebak, B.Th.

    1983-01-01

    In this book, the author gives a survey of the most important safety aspects of the construction and operation of nuclear power plants in the Netherlands. It deals with concrete questions like how to choose appropriate sites for power plants; what are the risks for people living in their surroundings; what are the consequences of possible accidents; what to do with the nuclear wastes and what are the conseqences for new generations. For answering these questions, the author has presented a fairly well documented outline of the contemporary problems. So, the book is a useful tool for everybody who wants to become acquainted with the nuclear controversy (G.J.P.)

  5. Structure of tariffs for natural gas, electricity and heat for bound customers in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    As a result of the new Dutch Electricity Law and the Natural Gas Law energy consumers in the Netherlands are or will be free to choose an energy supplier. The freedom of choice for small-scale consumers (e.g. households, small businesses) will be realized in a few years. For them, this booklet gives insight into the structure which forms the basis of tariffs for natural gas, electricity and heat in the Netherlands. How final consumption tariffs are determined is explained on the basis of the related starting points, tariffs for buying and selling, taxes and surcharges on the markets for the fore-mentioned energy carriers

  6. The macroeconomic effects of oil price fluctuations on a small open oil-producing country. The case of Trinidad and Tobago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorde, Troy; Thomas, Chrystol; Jackman, Mahalia

    2009-01-01

    Using vector autoregressive (VAR) methodology, this paper empirically investigates the macroeconomic effects of oil price fluctuations on Trinidad and Tobago. Overall, we find that the price of oil is a major determinant of economic activity of the country. Our impulse response functions suggest that following a positive oil price shock, output falls within the first two years followed by positive and growing response. We also investigate the macroeconomic impact of oil price volatility. Results suggest that an unanticipated shock to oil price volatility brings about random swings in the macroeconomy; however, only government revenue and the price level exhibit significant responses. With regard to the magnitude of the responses, shocks to oil price volatility tend to yield smaller macroeconomic impacts in comparison to shocks to oil prices. Variance decompositions suggest that the price of oil is a major component of forecast variation for most macroeconomic variables. Finally, Granger-causality tests indicate causality from oil prices to output and oil prices to government revenue. (author)

  7. Social protection of marginal part-time, self-employment and secondary jobs in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, Gijsbert; Jansen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    In many European countries, marginal part-time, (solo-) self-employment and secondary jobs has been increasing since the last decades. The question about the provision of social protection and labour legislation for these types of employment is the starting point for a project entitled “Hybrid working arrangements in Europe”, directed by the WSI. Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Poland, Italy, Denmark and Austria comprise the group of countries selected in order to investigate “hybrid...

  8. Directive of The Minister of Economic Affairs and the State Secretary for Social Affairs and Public Health of 5 December 1969, Stcrt. 240 in implementation of Section 2 and other Sections of the Fissionable Materials, Ores and Radioactive Materials (Transport) Decree (Designation of Countries)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This Directive designates the countries which are parties to the same international transport agreements as the Netherlands and which may therefore transport fissionable materials, ores and radioactive materials over Netherlands territory and territorial waters. (NEA) [fr

  9. Hydrocarbon Induced Seismicity in Northern Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dost, B.; Spetzler, J.; Kraaijpoel, D.; Caccavale, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Netherlands has been regarded aseismic until the first earthquakes started in 1986, after more than 25 years of gas production from the one of the largest on-shore gas-fields in the World, the Groningen field, and accompanying smaller gas fields. Due to the shallow sources, at approximately 3 km depth, even small magnitude events cause considerable damage to buildings in the region. Since the largest recorded event in the Groningen field in 2012 with ML= 3,6, more than 30.000 damage claims were received by the mining company. Since 1995 a seismic monitoring network is operational in the region, consisting of 8 200m deep boreholes with 4 levels of 3C 4,5 Hz geophones. The network was designed for a location threshold of ML=1,5 over a 40x 80 km region. Average station separation was 20 km. At the end of 2014, 245 events have been recorded with ML ≥ 1,5, out of a total of 1100. Since 2003 a new mining law is in place in the Netherlands, which requires for each gas field in production a seismic risk analysis. Initially, due to the small number of events for specific fields, a general hazard (PSHA) was calculated for all gas-fields and a maximum magnitude was estimated at ML = 3,9. Since 2003 an increase in the activity rate is observed for the Groningen field, leading to the development of new models and a re-assessment of parameters like the maximum magnitude. More recently these models are extended to seismic risk, where also the fragility of the regional buildings is taken into account. Understanding the earthquake process is essential in taking mitigation measures. Continued research is focused on reducing the uncertainties in the hazard and risk models and is accompanied by an upgrade of the monitoring network. In 2014 a new dense network was designed to monitor the Groningen gas field in this region (30*40 km) with an average separation of 4 km. This allows an improved location threshold (M>0,5) and location accuracy (50-100m). A detailed P- and S

  10. The Social State of the Netherlands 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rob Bijl; Jeroen Boelhouwer; Evert Pommer; Peggy Schyns

    2010-01-01

    How is the Dutch population faring? That is the central question addressed in The Social State of the Netherlands 2009. In this book we describe the present status of the Netherlands and the Dutch in a number of key areas of life, and also highlight the changes that have taken place in people's

  11. The Upper Permian in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.

    1955-01-01

    The Upper Permian in the Netherlands, as known from borehole data, is deposited in a mainly evaporitic facies north of the Brabant and Rhenish Massifs. In the extreme south (Belgian Campine, de Peel) a near-shore facies of reef dolomites and elastics occurs. In the western and central Netherlands

  12. The Poor Side of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok Vrooman; Stella Hoff

    2004-01-01

    Poverty is a theme that has attracted a great deal of attention in the Netherlands over the last decade, both in government policy and in academic research and statistics. Since 1997 the Social and Cultural Planning Office (SCP) and Statistics Netherlands (CBS) have published a regular Poverty

  13. Rise in maternal mortality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J. M.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Schuitemaker, N. W. E.; Santema, J. G.; de Boer, K.; Pel, M.; Vermeulen, G.; Visser, W.; van Roosmalen, J.

    2010-01-01

    To assess causes, trends and substandard care factors in maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Design Confidential enquiry into the causes of maternal mortality. Nationwide in the Netherlands. 2,557,208 live births. Data analysis of all maternal deaths in the period 1993-2005. Maternal mortality.

  14. The Netherlands: A Case of Fading Leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefferink, J.D.; Boezeman, D.F.; Coninck, H.C. de; Wurzel, R.K.W.; Connelly, J.; Liefferink, D.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter analyses the relationship between the development of domestic climate policy in the Netherlands and the Dutch efforts in this field in the EU and international arena since the 1980s. Traditionally, the Netherlands has enjoyed a reputation as an environmental and climate leader, based on

  15. The Social State of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rob Bijl; Jeroen Boelhouwer; Evert Pommer

    2007-01-01

    Original title: De sociale staat van Nederland 2007. How is the Dutch population faring? That is the central question addressed in The Social State of the Netherlands 2007. To answer this question, the report describes the position of the Netherlands and the Dutch in a number of key areas of

  16. Agricultural marketing in Belgium and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Viaene, J.

    1993-01-01

    Agriculture in Belgium and the Netherlands has a strong export tradition and has been market oriented for a long time. In this article agricultural markeling in Belgium and the Netherlands is analyzed on the basis of the concepts structure, conduct and performance. In our review of market structure

  17. Assessing the Relationship between Marijuana Availability and Marijuana Use: A Legal and Sociological Comparison between the United States and the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoubian, George S., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The United States and the Netherlands have antithetical marijuana control policies. The United States' laws criminalize the possession of even small amounts of marijuana, while the Netherlands have maintained, over the past several decades, two relatively liberal marijuana policies implemented during the 1970s and 1980s. According to the…

  18. Natural gas in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Voogd, J G

    1965-08-01

    In 1948, the first natural gas was found in Netherlands. Since 1951 it has been supplied by gas undertakings. Originally reserves were limited (c. 350 milliard ftU3D of dry gas in the NE. and c. 175 milliard ftU3D, mostly wet gas, in the SW). These finds have been completely overshadowed by the huge deposits discovered in 1960 in the province of Groningen near the village of Slochteren, these reserves being estimated now at 38.5 billion ftU3D at least. This gas is not of high cal val (894 Btu/ftU3D), but contains only traces of sulfur. The concession is being developed for a partnership formed by Shell (30%), Standard Oil Company of new Jersey (Esso, 30%), and ''Staatsmijnen,'' the Government owned Netherlands State Mining Industry (40%). The natural gas is destined, first, for domestic use, especially, for space heating, and secondly, for industrial purpose, after which important quantities will be available for export.

  19. Assuring nuclear competence in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Santen, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear sphere of activity in the Netherlands is characterised by the size of nuclear programme: small nuclear programme (1 PWR operating, 1 BWR in decommissioning, 3 research reactors, 1 enrichment plant, 1 longer term waste storage facility and 1 nuclear laboratory); small nuclear regulatory authority, connected to 2-4 ministries (Nuclear Safety Department (KFD) ca. 12 experts, 4 inspectors and in total ca. 22 people); scale of nuclear supporting industry also small. A complicating factor in the near future is the closure of the only operating nuclear power plant. The Parliament has decided to permanently close down in end 2003. The early closing down decision was taken not for technical reasons, but because of the political/social situation as a matter of fact right after the end of the large end and complex modification project. The policy of assuring competence of the RA and the Licensees in the near future is based on considerations as: both are explicit responsible for maintaining the necessary competence for their own existing staff, and the RA watches over the effort of the Licensees; incorrect assessments are not tolerated, because of the political sensitivity towards every thing that relates to nuclear; sufficient budget should be available for foreign assistance. Important parts of the assessing of the assurance of the competence are the international contacts and working programmes within the western world. Besides the reason for international or European contacts, the exchange of knowledge and practices because of their contacts are an essential complement to reaching the necessary nuclear competence levels of nuclear safety. (N.C.)

  20. How immigrants adapt their smoking behaviour: comparative analysis among Turkish immigrants in Germany and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Katharina; Sauzet, Odile; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Spallek, Jacob; Razum, Oliver

    2014-08-14

    Smoking behaviour among immigrants is assumed to converge to that of the host country's majority population with increasing duration of stay. We compared smoking prevalence among Turkish immigrants residing in two different countries (Germany (DE)/the Netherlands (NL)) between and within countries by time spent in Turkey and DE/NL. The German 2009 micro-census and the Dutch POLS database (national survey, 1997-2004) were analysed. An interaction variable with dichotomised length of stay (LOS) in Turkey (age: 0-17; 18+) and categorised LOS in the host country (immigration year: 1979 and earlier, 1980-1999, 2000-2009; the latter only for Germany) was generated. Age standardised smoking prevalences and sex-specific logistic regression models were calculated. 6,517 Turkish participants were identified in Germany, 2,106 in the Netherlands. Age-standardised smoking prevalences were higher among Turkish immigrants in the Netherlands compared to those in Germany: 62.3% vs. 53.1% (men/lower education); 30.6% vs. 23.0% (women/lower education). A similar trend was observed for the majority population of both countries. The chance of being a smoker was lower among Turkish men with short LOS in Turkey and middle LOS in Germany/the Netherlands compared to those with short LOS in Turkey and long LOS in Germany/the Netherlands (NL: OR = 0.57[95% CI = 0.36-0.89]; DE: OR = 0.73[95% CI = 0.56-0.95]). Contrary to that, the chance of being a smoker was higher among Turkish men with long LOS in Turkey and middle LOS in Germany/the Netherlands compared to those with long LOS in Turkey and long LOS in Germany/the Netherlands (NL: OR = 1.35[95% CI = 0.79-2.33]; DE: OR = 1.44[95% CI = 1.03-2.02]). The effects for Turkish women were similar, but smaller and often non-significant. Turkish immigrants adapt their smoking behaviour towards that of the Dutch/German majority population with increasing duration of stay. This was particularly obvious among those who left Turkey before the age of 18

  1. Monitoring of radiation in the atmosphere and a food chain. Results in the Netherlands in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The programme of the RIVM/LSO includes samples of air dust and deposition taken at the RIVM premises in Bilthoven. Samples of grass and milk were taken from the surroundings of nuclear installations in the Netherlands and on Dutch territory in the vicinity of such installations situated abroad. An overall country milk sample from four milk factories in the Netherlands was also analyzed. This report also presents the data of the National Radioactivity Monitoring Network (LMR) in 1994. These data are not included in the NMP. 20 figs., 5 tabs., 23 refs., 1 appendix

  2. Monitoring of radiation in the atmosphere and a food chain. Results in the Netherlands in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, R.M.S.; Koolwijk, A.C.; Kwakman, P.J.M.; Koops, J.C.; Van Lunenburg, A.P.P.A.; Nissan, L.; Ockhuizen, A.; Pennders, R.M.J.; Reinen, H.A.J.M.; Tax, R.B.; Tijsmans, M.H.; De Vries, L.J.; Van Zanten, R.; Aldenkamp, F.J.; Van Tuinen, S.T.

    1996-09-01

    The NMP of the CCRX is essential for an adequate assessment of radioactivity in the biosphere. The programme of RIVM/LSO includes samples of airdust and deposition taken at the RIVM premises in Bilthoven. Samples of grass and milk were taken from the surroundings of nuclear installations in the Netherlands and on Dutch territory in the vicinity of such installations situated abroad. An overall country milk sample from four milk factories in the Netherlands was also analysed. In this report also the 1995 data of the National Radioactivity Monitoring Network (LMR) are presented. 20 figs., 4 tabs., 1 appendix, 28 refs

  3. Hydrogen demonstration projects options in the Netherlands. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsma, G.C.; Van der Werff, T.T.; Rooijers, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Based on a survey of hydrogen demonstration projects, contacts with different actors and discussions in a sounding board for the study on the title subject, it is concluded that a conference can be organized where the possibilities of setting up hydrogen demonstration projects in the Netherlands can be discussed. The following projects offer good chances to be realized in the next few years: large-scale CO 2 storage in the underground, applying enhanced gas recovery. It appears to be a relatively cheap CO 2 emission reduction measure with a large potential. It can be combined with a hydrogen mixing project with the sale of hydrogen as a so-called eco-gas to consumers. There is little interest in the other options for CO 2 storage at coal gasification and the prompt supply of 100% H 2 to small-scale consumers. Hydrogen for cogeneration, fuel cells in the industry, hydrogen in road transport and hydrogen as a storage medium are projects in which some actors are interested. Hydrogen for air transport has a large potential to which only few parties in the Netherlands can anticipate. Hydrogen demonstration projects will show important surplus value when it is supported by a hydrogen research program. Such a program can be carried out in cooperation with several other programmes of the International Energy Agency, in Japan, Germany and a number of research programs of the Netherlands Agency for Energy and the Environment (Novem). 10 figs., 4 tabs., 33 refs

  4. Development of Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous 99Mo Production Using LEU Targets at ICN Pitesti-Romania [Country report: Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Development Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous 99 Mo Production Using LEU Fission or Neutron Activation” during 2005 allowed Member States to participate through their research organization on contractor arrangement to accomplish the CRP objectives. Among these, the participating research organization Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti Romania (ICN), was the beneficiary of financial support and Argonne National Laboratory assistance provided by US Department of Energy to the CRP for development of techniques for fission 99 Mo production based on LEU modified CINTICHEM process. The Agency’s role in this field was to assist in the transfer and adaptation of existing technology in order to disseminate a technique, which advances international non-proliferation objectives and promotes sustainable development needs, while also contributing to extend the production capacity for addressing supply shortages from the latest years. The Institute for Nuclear Research, considering the existing good conditions of infrastructure of the research reactor with suitable irradiation conditions for radioisotopes, a post irradiation laboratory with direct transfer of irradiated targets from the reactor and handling of high radioactive sources, and simultaneously the existence of an expanding internal market, decided to undertake the necessary steps in order to produce fission molybdenum. The Institute intends to develop the capability to respond to the domestic needs in cooperation with the IFINN–HH from Bucharest, which is able to perform the last step consisting in the loading of fission molybdenum on chromatography generators and dispensing to the final client. The primary scope of the project is the development of the necessary technological steps and chemical processing steps in order to be able to cover the entire process for fission molybdenum production at the required standard of purity

  5. Deaf leaders’ strategies for working with signed language interpreters: An examination across seven countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haug, T.; Bontempo, K.; Leeson, L.; Napier, J.; Nicodemus, B.; Van den Bogaerde, B.; Vermeerbergen, M.

    In this paper, we report interview data from 14 Deaf leaders across seven countries (Australia, Belgium, Ireland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States) regarding their perspectives on signed language interpreters. Using a semistructured survey questionnaire, seven

  6. Managerial conflict management in five European countries : The importance of power distance, uncertainty avoidance, and masculinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oudenhoven, J.P.; Mechelse, L.; De Dreu, C.K.W.

    This research deals with managerial conflict management in Denmark, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Spain, and Belgium. According to Hofstede (1991). these countries' cultures differ primarily in terms of uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and masculinity-femininity. The differences in

  7. Which Countries Become Tax Havens?

    OpenAIRE

    Dhammika Dharmapala; James R. Hines Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the factors influencing whether countries become tax havens. Roughly 15 percent of countries are tax havens; as has been widely observed, these countries tend to be small and affluent. This paper documents another robust empirical regularity: better-governed countries are much more likely than others to become tax havens. Using a variety of empirical approaches, and controlling for other relevant factors, governance quality has a statistically significant and quantitativel...

  8. Parental experiences and attitudes regarding the management of acute otitis media--a comparative questionnaire between Finland and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tähtinen, Paula A; Boonacker, Chantal W B; Rovers, Maroeska M; Schilder, Anne G M; Huovinen, Pentti; Liuksila, Pirjo-Riitta; Ruuskanen, Olli; Ruohola, Aino

    2009-12-01

    Both treatment guidelines and the amount of antibiotics used for acute otitis media (AOM) vary across western countries. Parental expectations and their awareness of antimicrobial use and resistance, which may also be influenced by the guidelines, are not yet completely known. To compare parental experiences and opinions regarding the management of AOM in children with AOM in Finland and The Netherlands. We sent the questionnaires via public day care in Turku, Finland, and Utrecht, The Netherlands. We asked about family background, child's history of AOM and parental experiences and attitudes about AOM treatment and antimicrobial resistance. Of 1151 participants, 83% in Finland and 49% in The Netherlands had had at least one episode of AOM. Antibiotics were used more frequently in Finland than in The Netherlands, 99% versus 78%, respectively. More Finnish parents reported to believe that antibiotics are necessary in the treatment of AOM as compared to Dutch parents. Use of analgesics for AOM was similar (80% in Finland and 86% in The Netherlands). One-third of the parents had discussed resistance with their doctor. According to parental experiences, antimicrobial resistance had caused more problems in Finland than in The Netherlands (20% versus 2%). Finally, 88% of parents in Finland and 65% in The Netherlands were worried that bacteria could become resistant to antibiotics. Treatment practices and parental expectations seem to interact with each other. Therefore, if we aim to change AOM treatment practices, we have to modify both guidelines and parental expectations.

  9. The role of Surinamese migrants in the transmission of Chlamydia trachomatis between Paramaribo, Suriname and Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bom, Reinier J M; van der Helm, Jannie J; Bruisten, Sylvia M; Grünberg, Antoon W; Sabajo, Leslie O A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; de Vries, Henry J C

    2013-01-01

    The large Surinamese migrant population in the Netherlands is a major risk group for urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Suriname, a former Dutch colony, also has a high prevalence of C. trachomatis. Surinamese migrants travel extensively between the Netherlands and Suriname. Our objective was to assess whether the Surinamese migrants in the Netherlands form a bridge population facilitating transmission of C. trachomatis between Suriname and the Netherlands. If so, joint prevention campaigns involving both countries might be required. Between March 2008 and July 2010, participants were recruited at clinics in Paramaribo, Suriname and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Participants were grouped as native Surinamese, native Dutch, Surinamese migrant, Dutch migrant, or Other, based on country of residence and country of birth of the participant and of their parents. Risk behavior, such as sexual mixing between ethnic groups, was recorded and C. trachomatis positive samples were typed through multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A minimum spanning tree of samples from 426 participants showed four MLST clusters. The MLST strain distribution of Surinamese migrants differed significantly from both the native Surinamese and Dutch populations, but was not an intermediate state between these two populations. Sexual mixing between the Surinamese migrants and the Dutch and Surinamese natives occurred frequently. Yet, the MLST cluster distribution did not differ significantly between participants who mixed and those who did not. Sexual mixing occurred between Surinamese migrants in Amsterdam and the native populations of Suriname and the Netherlands. These migrants, however, did not seem to form an effective bridge population for C. trachomatis transmission between the native populations. Although our data do not seem to justify the need for joint campaigns to reduce the transmission of C. trachomatis strains between both countries, intensified preventive campaigns to

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of anaerobic pathogens in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, A C M; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2015-02-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the Bacteroides fragilis group, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC), Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., Veillonella spp. and Bilophila wadsworthia for amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clindamycin and metronidazole was determined. Human clinical isolates were isolated between 2011 and 2013 at the Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory of the University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS identification and susceptibility testing using E-test for MIC determination. Differences in clindamycin susceptibility between species of the B. fragilis group and GPAC were observed, with Bacteroides ovatus and Peptoniphilus harei having the highest resistance rates. Compared to other European countries, in The Netherlands the MIC90 for clindamycin of fusobacteria is low. Metronidazole resistance was first encountered in the genus Prevotella in 2013, but not in species of GPAC as reported in Belgium and Bulgaria. The differences in clindamycin resistance between the different European countries and reports of metronidazole resistance within the genera Prevotella and GPAC warrant more extensive susceptibility studies on anaerobic pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequent hepatitis E in the Netherlands without traveling or immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koot, H; Hogema, B M; Koot, M; Molier, M; Zaaijer, H L

    2015-01-01

    In several Western countries, silent endemic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is common among blood donors. Immunocompromised persons may develop chronic hepatitis E, but the relevance of endemic HEV for immunocompetent persons remains largely unknown. We investigated the immune status and travel history in cases of hepatitis E in the Netherlands. Between January 2009 and May 2014, physicians throughout the Netherlands submitted samples from 4067 hepatitis patients to Sanquin Diagnostic Services for HEV antibody testing. For the 144 patients testing positive for HEV IgM and HEV RNA, travel behavior and immune status were assessed. Complete information was obtained for 81 patients. Surprisingly, the majority of patients (52/81, 64%) were immunocompetent and did not travel outside Europe. HEV genotyping was obtained for 47 non-traveling patients, all concerned HEV genotype 3. Our findings suggest that currently in Western countries the impact of hepatitis E for non-traveling, immunocompetent persons is underestimated. Historically cases of hepatitis A, B and C, but not cases of hepatitis E, are notifiable and warrant preventive measures. However, in parts of Western Europe HEV may have become the most important source of viral hepatitis, in immunocompetent and in immunosuppressed persons. Pending measures against the ongoing transmission of HEV genotype 3 in parts of Europe, physicians should consider hepatitis E in dealing with new hepatitis patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Real world cost of human epidermal receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients: a longitudinal incidence-based observational costing study in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, G W J; Severens, J L; Hövels, A M; van Hasselt, J G C; Hooiveld, M J J; Neven, P; Raaijmakers, J A M; Schellens, J H M

    2015-05-01

    Currently, no country-specific metastatic breast cancer (MBC) observational costing data are available for the Netherlands and Belgium. Our aim is to describe country-specific resource use and costs of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium, making use of real-world data. The eligibility period for patient selection was from April 2004 to April 2010. Inclusion and retrospective data collection begins at the time of first diagnosis of HER-2-positive MBC during the eligibility period and ends 24 months post-index diagnosis of MBC or at patient death. We identified 88 eligible patients in the Netherlands and 44 patients in Belgium. The total costs of medical treatment and other resource use utilisation per patient was €48,301 in the Netherlands and €37,431 in Belgium. Majority of costs was related to the use of trastuzumab in both countries, which was 50% of the total costs in the Netherlands and 56% in Belgium respectively. Our study provides estimates of resource use and costs for HER-2-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium. We noticed various differences in resource use patterns between both countries demonstrating caution is needed when transferring cost estimates between countries. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Energy prospects in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latzko, D.G.H.

    1976-12-01

    The world situation on energy supplies is surveyed briefly, including problems that might arise concerning production and transport; then, the energy situation in the Netherlands is treated. For the purpose of this article, only relevant primary sources of energy, those whose large-scale utilization had been demonstrated to date, viz., fossil fuels, hydroelectric power, uranium in light-water reactors, and solar radiation came up for discussion. For the pronounced growth in total consumption the model proposed by A.A. De Boer (Econ. Statist. Rep., 59, No. 2954, 469-71(1974)) and inspired by the Dutch economist Prof. Tinbergen was adopted. This model assumes a gradual decrease in the annual growth to 1 or 2 percent about the year 2012. On the basis of this model, meeting the resultant demand for energy until the turn of the century is investigated.

  14. Energy Report Netherlands 2000 (EVN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruijn, A.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of developments and events in the Netherlands in 2000 in the field of energy is presented. This edition comprises three parts. In the first part (Chronicle) a chronological overview is given of events in 2000 regarding governmental and energy policy, developments in the sectors natural gas and petroleum exploration, refineries and petroleum products, electric power production and the natural gas industry, the energy distribution sector, renewable energy and energy conservation. In part 2 (Focus) three items, which have been in particular important for the energy sector or for the Dutch society, are discussed in more detail. Attention is paid to the high oil prices, the Dutch climate policy in an international perspective, energy labels and energy bonuses. The final part (3, Trends) is based on statistical data and presents trends with regard to energy prices, energy demand, energy supply, energy-related emissions, and the market development of energy technologies and energy efficient products. 36 refs

  15. Nucnet experience in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souwer, Corinne

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear Energy is a highly debated issue in the Netherlands. Public opposition has caused many delays in political decision making in relation with the expansion of new power plants. Recently the need for new reactor designs like the inherently safe reactors has become stronger. This is important for the communicators working in the nuclear field. Therefore it is needed to have a communication policy in which the main goal is building community relations focusing to public concerns and needs to gain acceptance. The public needs to be informed on options and benefits. Positive messages can influence attention and understanding, for example newspaper articles and television programs. Nucnet is an important instrument in building these relations

  16. Compliance of national radiation protection regulatory infrastructure with international norms: a prerequisite for self-sustainability of technical support organization in a small 'non-nuclear' country: example of Montenegro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory control of radiation sources in a country is based upon two essential elements of regulatory infrastructure: national RP legislation system (including nuclear law and subsequent regulations) at one side and institutions regulatory authority (RA) and technical support organizations (TSO) at the other. International norms and standards in radiation protection are (or should be, in principle) transposed through international legal instruments (conventions, treaties, directives, codes) into national regulatory systems, thus making radiation protection regulatory practices standardized and omnipresent. We know, however, that this is often not the case, to more or less extent. More one goes down the pyramid (i.e. from international norms via national regulatory infrastructure to actual RP practice), more there is chance that ultimate/bottom practical actions will not be undertaken properly, or even not at all. One of the key elements in the above mentioned (potentially problematic) RP bottom level is how technical support to regulatory authority is organized. RP legal requirements create a market of services to be effectuated by competent professional organizations, TSO 's. In a small country, there is usually not more than one (if any) of the kind not rarely just surviving at the edge of existence. A TSO scope of RP interests/activities typically include: (1) radiation monitoring and measurements in the environment (air, soil, waters, biota), as well as in public areas, working and living places, (2) personal, workplace and field dosimetry, (3) import, export and trade control of radioactivity in food, forage, construction materials, toys, cosmetics and other goods/consumables, (4) quality control (QC) of radiation sources in medicine, industry, etc., (5) low/medium activity radioactive waste management, (6) transport of radioactive materials, (7) a role in national radiological emergency preparedness and response scheme and (8) advisory services

  17. Impacts of climate change in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresser, A.H.M.; Berk, M.M.; Van den Born, G.J.; Van Bree, L.; Van Gaalen, F.W.; Ligtvoet, W.; Van Minnen, J.G.; Witmer, M.C.H.

    2005-10-01

    The main conclusion of the study on the title subject is that the impacts of climatic change in the Netherlands are still limited. However, the impacts will be stronger in the next decades and will be even problematic at the end of this century. In this book an overview is given of probable changes in the climate for the Netherlands, danger for flooding in specific areas of the Netherlands, changes of the nature, impacts for agriculture, tourism and recreation, and industry and businesses, and risks for public health [nl

  18. Aspects of medical migration with particular reference to the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfs, Paul G P

    2014-10-14

    In most countries of the European Economic Area (EEA), there is no large-scale migration of medical graduates with diplomas obtained outside the EEA, which are international medical graduates (IMGs). In the United Kingdom however, health care is in part dependent on the influx of IMGs. In 2005, of all the doctors practising in the UK, 31% were educated outside the country. In most EEA-countries, health care is not dependent on the influx of IMGs.The aim of this study is to present data relating to the changes in IMG migration in the UK since the extension of the European Union in May 2004. In addition, data are presented on IMG migration in the Netherlands. These migration flows show that migration patterns differ strongly within these two EU-countries. This study makes use of registration data on migrating doctors from the General Medical Council (GMC) in the UK and from the Dutch Department of Health. Moreover, data on the ratio of medical doctors in relation to a country's population were extracted from the World Health Organization (WHO). The influx of IMGs in the UK has changed in recent years due to the extension of the European Union in 2004, the expansion of UK medical schools and changes in the policy towards non-EEA doctors.The influx of IMGs in the Netherlands is described in detail. In the Netherlands, many IMGs come from Afghanistan, Iraq and Surinam. There are clear differences between IMG immigration in the UK and in the Netherlands. In the UK, the National Health Service continues to be very reliant on immigration to fill shortage posts, whereas the number of immigrant doctors working in the Netherlands is much smaller. Both the UK and the Netherlands' regulatory bodies have shared great concerns about the linguistic and communication skills of both EEA and non-EEA doctors seeking to work in these countries. IMG migration is a global and intricate problem. The source countries, not only those where English is the first or second language, experience

  19. Telemedicine for Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, Carlo; Pozzani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Developing countries need telemedicine applications that help in many situations, when physicians are a small number with respect to the population, when specialized physicians are not available, when patients and physicians in rural villages need assistance in the delivery of health care. Moreover, the requirements of telemedicine applications for developing countries are somewhat more demanding than for developed countries. Indeed, further social, organizational, and technical aspects need to be considered for successful telemedicine applications in developing countries. Objective We consider all the major projects in telemedicine, devoted to developing countries, as described by the proper scientific literature. On the basis of such literature, we want to define a specific taxonomy that allows a proper classification and a fast overview of telemedicine projects in developing countries. Moreover, by considering both the literature and some recent direct experiences, we want to complete such overview by discussing some design issues to be taken into consideration when developing telemedicine software systems. Methods We considered and reviewed the major conferences and journals in depth, and looked for reports on the telemedicine projects. Results We provide the reader with a survey of the main projects and systems, from which we derived a taxonomy of features of telemedicine systems for developing countries. We also propose and discuss some classification criteria for design issues, based on the lessons learned in this research area. Conclusions We highlight some challenges and recommendations to be considered when designing a telemedicine system for developing countries. PMID:27803948

  20. Importing, productivity and SMEs: firm-level evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297206710

    2013-01-01

    Constructing a comprehensive data set covering Dutch firms over the years 2002-2008 I am the first to investigate the relationship between trade status, firm size and firm-level productivity in the Netherlands, thereby focusing particularly on small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The empirical

  1. Motives for starting up a side activity in rural areas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markantoni, Marianna; Strijker, Derk; Koster, Sierdjan

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the side activities of non-farmers in rural areas in the Netherlands and more specifically their start up motives. A side activity is a small-scale home-based activity, which provides a supplementary income to the household. Side activities may have the potential to diversify the

  2. Genetic impoverishment of the last black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) population in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsson, J.K.; Jansman, H.A.H.; Niewold, F.J.J.; Segelbacher, G.; Höglund, J.; Koelewijn, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied a small isolated bottlenecked population of Black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) in the Netherlands to examine the impact of isolation and reduction in numbers on the genetic diversity. We compared the genetic diversity in the last present Dutch population with Dutch museum samples and three

  3. Investing in workplace innovation pays off for SME's: a regional innovation initiative from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Vroome, E.M.M. de; Bolland, A.; Gründemann, R.W.M.; Teeffelen, L. van

    2014-01-01

    From 2009 to 2013 the workplace innovation project “My Enterprise 2.0” was carried out in the region of Utrecht in the Netherlands in order to strengthen the workplace innovation capability of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Participating enterprises completed a questionnaire regarding

  4. Increasing part-time working hours in the Netherlands. Identifying policy recommendations through Group Model Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Fokkinga, B.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    With 73% of women and 19% of men working part-time,the Netherlands is known as the champion of part-time work. In order to increase especially the working hours of women with small part-time jobs (less than 20 hours per week) the Dutch government installed a thinktank of employers, employees

  5. Wine from the Netherlands: investigating the effect of soil-type on taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vis, Geert-Jan; Maljers, Denise; Beurskens, Stan

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade professional viticulture has seen a strong increase in the Netherlands, reaching 270 ha in 2015. Although on a European scale this is a small area, the number of prize-winning quality wines is steadily growing. This growth can largely be ascribed to new grape varieties from Germany and Switzerland, that are better adapted to the cooler and moister climate at the northern fringe of the viticultural zone, as well as to increasing viticultural expertise. The distribution of vineyards across the Netherlands shows that they occur on a plethora of substrates. Dutch substrate is dominated by typical lowland deposits such as fluvial and marine sands and clays and aeolian sands. Unlike many European countries, bedrock is scarce. Only in the south-eastern extremity and in the east of the country, carbonate bedrock is present at or near the surface. This wide variety of substrate triggered our interest in the effect of the various soil-types on the smell and taste characteristics of wines. An effect which is often mentioned concerning well-known foreign wines. We wondered whether an Auxerrois wine from carbonate rocks tastes significantly different from a wine from the same grape variety from loess. And how about a Johanniter wine from fluvial deposits versus windblown sands? And what happens if you make wine in exactly the same way with the same grape variety and from the same vineyard, but with three different yeast types? To answer our questions, we selected ten Dutch vineyards with varying soil-types and the grape varieties Auxerrois and Johanniter. In October 2014 we harvested the grapes and wine was made under controlled identical conditions (in a double setup). The wines were scientifically tested at the institute of Viticulture and Oenology in Neustadt, Germany. The results show no significant effect of soil-type on the smell and taste of Dutch wines in our experiment. Varying yeast types (Cryarome, 3079, VL2) used on Souvignier Gris grapes from

  6. THE EFFECT OF LAND USE CHANGE ON LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE IN THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Youneszadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Netherlands is a small country with a relatively large population which experienced a rapid rate of land use changes from 2000 to 2008 years due to the industrialization and population increase. Land use change is especially related to the urban expansion and open agriculture reduction due to the enhanced economic growth. This research reports an investigation into the application of remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS in combination with statistical methods to provide a quantitative information on the effect of land use change on the land surface temperature. In this study, remote sensing techniques were used to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST by using the MODIS Terra (MOD11A2 Satellite imagery product. As land use change alters the thermal environment, the land surface temperature (LST could be a proper change indicator to show the thermal changes in relation with land use changes. The Geographical information system was further applied to extract the mean yearly land surface temperature (LST for each land use type and each province in the 2003, 2006 and 2008 years, by using the zonal statistic techniques. The results show that, the inland water and offshore area has the highest night land surface temperature (LST. Furthermore, the Zued (South-Holland province has the highest night LST value in the 2003, 2006 and 2008 years. The result of this research will be helpful tool for urban planners and environmental scientists by providing the critical information about the land surface temperature.

  7. Gambling and problem gambling in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of gambling in the Netherlands, focusing on historical background, policy, legislation, prevalence of problem gambling, availability of treatment options and research base. Literature review. Contradictions between gambling policy and practice have been present in the past

  8. Opteren voor de Netherlands Commercial Court

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, J.; Keirse, A.L.M.; Reijneveld, M.D.

    Internationale contracten leiden tot internationale handelsgeschillen. Deze kunnen onder meer worden beslecht bij een commercial court. In Nederland wordt momenteel een Netherlands Commercial Court (NCC) opgericht. Dit introduceert een keuze voor (contracts)partijen voor een nieuw forum voor

  9. Clinical immunology - Autoimmunity in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking

  10. Space research in the Netherlands 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In 1960, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences established a committee with the task of coordinating space research in the Netherlands and maintaining the necessary international contacts. This committe, usually called GROC, has instituted four working groups, in which most of the Netherlands space research is concentrated. These groups are: Working Group for Solar and Stellar Space Research, Working Group for Cosmic Rays, Working Group for Photometry and the Working Group for Satellite Geodesy. General information on space research in the Netherlands Anno 1980 is given. Detailed data about the working groups, their work during 1980 and their programmes are presented, together with a survey of their scientific publications. A financial summary is also included. (Auth.)

  11. INLAND DUNE VEGETATION OF THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. HAVEMAN

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Drifting sands in the Netherlands are the result of human over-exploitation (sod-cutting, over-grazing of woodlands and heathlands. The most important association of inland sand dune areas is the Spergulo-Corynephoretum (Corynephorion canescentis, which is poor in vascular plants, but in it older stager rich in mosses and especially lichens. In the Netherlands, the area of drifting sand is reduced dramatically in the last 70 years. mainly by afforestation and spontaneous succession.

  12. Integrating care for people with depression: developments in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adri H. Peters

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this article we describe the history and present state of integrated care for people with depression in the Netherlands. The central question is: what are the developments in integrated care for people with depression in the Netherlands?Methods: We describe these developments from the role of an observer, and make use of several sources: important Dutch policy documents and research documents, our own national survey carried out in 2007, a number of reports and project descriptions and searches in PubMed and Google. Also key people were contacted to supply additional information.Results: In the Netherlands two separate phases can be distinguished within integrated care for people with depression. From the beginning of the 1990s, specialized secondary Mental Health Care (MHC began to develop care programmes, including programmes for people with depression. The implementation of these care programmes has taken years. Mass usage of care programmes only went ahead once the large-scale mergers between ambulatory and clinical MHC organizations around 2000 had taken effect. An analysis of these programmes shows, that they did not lead to integration with primary care. This changed in the second phase from around 2000. Then attention was directed more towards strengthening the GP within the treatment of depression, collaboration between primary and specialized care and the development of collective integrated care packages.Discussion: We relate these developments to projects in other countries and discuss the scientific basis by using evidence of international literature reviews and metastudies. Some general recommendations are given about functional costing, the physical presence of MHC specialists in the primary care sector and the use of a common national standard for both primary care and specialized MHC.

  13. Emissions trading in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapfel, P.

    2002-01-01

    In the article 'Emissions trading in the Netherlands. The optimal route towards an international scheme?' (issue 1, 2002) Mulder asks the question to what extent a Dutch national CO2 trading scheme is a worthwhile effort toward an international trading scheme (i.e. is it a first step toward a European-wide emissions trading scheme) when presenting the proposal of the Dutch Commission on CO2 trade and related economic analysis. His conclusion, underlined by modeling results, is that a national scheme along the lines proposed by the Dutch Commission is an expensive policy instrument due to the high transaction costs. The first-best option according to Mulder is to impose CO2-emissions trading with an absolute ceiling on an international level. In the meantime, he states, improving the design of the energy tax system may be an efficient alternative. In this comment I would like to address two issues. First, does the approach proposed by the Dutch Commission make sense from a European perspective towards an EU-wide cap and trade allowance scheme as proposed by the European Commission in October 2001? and Second, what might this Dutch model and philosophy, scaled up to the EU level, look like?

  14. Renewable electricity in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junginger, M.; Agterbosch, S.; Faaij, A.; Turkenburg, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Dutch policy goal is to achieve a share of 17% renewable electricity in the domestic demand in 2020, corresponding to 18-24 TWh. It is uncertain whether and under which conditions this aim can be achieved. This paper aims to explore the feasible deployment of renewable electricity production in the Netherlands until 2020 by evaluating different images representing policies and societal preferences. Simultaneously, the most promising technologies for different settings are investigated and identified. First Dutch policy goals, governmental policy measures and definitions of renewable electricity are discussed. Second, a comparison is made of four existing studies that analyze the possible developments of renewable electricity production in the coming decades. Finally, three images are set up with emphasis on the different key factors that influence the maximum realizable potential. Results indicate onshore wind, offshore wind and large-scale biomass plants as most promising, robust options in terms of economical performance, ecological sustainability and high technical implementation rate. In the image with high implementation rates, an annual production of 42 TWh may be achieved in 2020, while under stringent economical or ecological criteria, about 25 TWh may be reached. When only the robust options are considered, 9-22 TWh can be realized. The analysis illustrates the importance of taking the different key factors mentioned influencing implementation into account. Doing so allows for identification of robust and less robust technological options under different conditions

  15. Optimistic about sustainable growth and employment. An entrepreneurial vision on the opportunities for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    The Dutch economy can benefit from the significant perspectives that are offered by economic developments in Asia and South America by utilizing and expanding its current strengths. Sustainable growth and full employment are within reach. Cutbacks and reforms must not be 'depressing' but deliver additional growth and new opportunities. That is the core message of 'optimistic, the long-term vision of VNO-NCW (The Confederation of Netherlands Industry and Employers), MKB (Netherlands Federation of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises) and LTO Nederland (Dutch Federation of Agriculture and Horticulture). Their thoughts and plans with regard to strengthening the position of the Netherlands in the economic world top should play a role in the run-up to the elections and in forming the cabinet. [nl

  16. Survey of HTR related research at IRI, Delft, Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Wallerbos, E.J.M.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.; Van Dam, H. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute IRI, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Tuerkcan, E. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    High temperature helium-cooled reactors have a large potential for inherent safety. Therefore, several projects on HTR research are being carried out or were carried out at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology in Delft, Netherlands. As part of a larger research programme measurements of core reactivity, reactivity worth of safety rods and of small samples being oscillated in the reactor core were carried out at the PROTEUS facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen, Switzerland. Together with other partners in the Netherlands a small inherently safe co-generation plant with a pebble-bed HTR core was designed and analysed. It was verified that such a reactor can operate continuously for 10 years by adding continuously fuel pebbles until the maximum available core height is reached. As a new, innovative, inherently safe reactor type the design of a fluidized-bed reactor with coated fuel particles on a helium gas stream is discussed and results are shown for the analysis of inherent criticality safety under varying coolant flow rates. IRI is also taking part in the new IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, which involves participation in the start-up experiments of the Japanese HTTR and carrying out calculations for the core physics benchmark test. 11 refs.

  17. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY AND FIRM PERFORMANCE IN DEVELOPED AND EMERGING ECONOMY CONTEXTS: EVIDENCE FROM TURKEY, ITALY AND NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Akpinar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference between types of diversification and performance comparing Turkey, Italy and Netherlands. There are studies with the conclusion that the indicators of the relationship between diversification strategies and firm performance of developed countries differ from the indicators of developing countries. The data of 166 firms in Netherlands, 265 firms in Italy and 128 firms in Turkey were analyzed. The data of 2007-2011 was used in the research. Return on Assets (ROA and Return on Sales (ROS for financial performance and Entropy Index for diversification were used. According to the results, there is no correlation between total entropy and a performance criterion ROA and ROS in Italy and Netherlands. On the other hand, in Turkey, it is understood that there is a low-level positive correlation between total entropy and firm performance.

  18. Netherlands as producer of energy knowledge. Dutch governmental efforts for energy R and D in an international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Duin, A.M.

    2006-04-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs aims to link its transition policy in a broader context to international energy - and climate policy. A clear view on the Dutch position in the field of energy research policy is an important aspect of this international anchoring of the transition policy. For that purpose this report offers a first insight in the scope, the quality and the focus of Dutch energy R and D budget in comparison with the situation in a number of other countries. Furthermore, the attention is directed at recent developments and issues involved in the organisation of energy research. Several instruments for priority setting and organisational issues are recommended for consideration in the process of the international anchoring of transition policy. With regard to the per capita budgets for energy R and D, the Netherlands is leading together with Japan and the United States. Concerning the knowledge position in the field of energy, as of yet no research has been conducted expressing this knowledge position in publications, citations and patents. However, in the programming for the Dutch energy research strategy (EOS) a positive picture is presented. The role of the Netherlands in the European Framework Programmes indirectly indicates a good position as well. However, the scope of the Dutch government budget for energy R and D has been relatively strongly decreasing over the past years. The private contributions to energy R and D in the Netherlands are reasonable (50%), but the Dutch government expects that these - as a result of liberalisation - will decrease as well. In the Netherlands a relatively great part of the budget is spent on sustainable energy and energy conservation (together 70%). The Netherlands spend more on biomass and in particular on wind energy and less on solar energy than is the case in the other countries. Compared to the other countries, the Dutch budget for energy conservation has been remarkably evenly divided over the

  19. Increasing flood exposure in the Netherlands: implications for risk financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongman, B.; Koks, E. E.; Husby, T. G.; Ward, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The effectiveness of disaster risk management and financing mechanisms depends on an accurate assessment of current and future hazard exposure. The increasing availability of detailed data offers policy makers and the insurance sector new opportunities to understand trends in risk, and to make informed decisions on ways to deal with these trends. In this paper we show how comprehensive property level information can be used for the assessment of exposure to flooding on a national scale, and how this information provides valuable input to discussions on possible risk financing practices. The case study used is the Netherlands, which is one of the countries most exposed to flooding globally, and which is currently undergoing a debate on strategies for the compensation of potential losses. Our results show that flood exposure has increased rapidly between 1960 and 2012, and that the growth of the building stock and its economic value in flood-prone areas has been higher than in non-flood-prone areas. We also find that property values in flood-prone areas are lower than those in non-flood-prone areas. We argue that the increase in the share of economic value located in potential flood-prone areas can have a negative effect on the feasibility of private insurance schemes in the Netherlands. The methodologies and results presented in this study are relevant for many regions around the world where the effects of rising flood exposure create a challenge for risk financing.

  20. Energy taxes in the Netherlands. What are the dividends?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, M.H.C.; Peerlings, J.H.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the environmental and economic effects of the introduction of a unilateral energy tax in the Netherlands are analysed using an applied general equilibrium (AGE) model. The effects of a small user energy tax and a general energy tax are compared, while taking into account different tax recycling mechanisms. The model contains a great level of detail with respect to emissions and environmental indicators (greenhouse effect, acidification, eutrophication and waste), which is helpful for assessing environmental quality. The results show that the introduction of a small environmental tax reform not only improves the environment but also raises non-environmental welfare, which is due to an improvement of the efficiency of the tax structure. 24 refs