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Sample records for netherlands cancer registry

  1. Validity of the stage of lung cancer in records of the Maastricht Cancer Registry, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Leo J.; Langendijk, JA; Jager, JJ; vandenBrandt, PA

    Information collected in a clinical study on a random sample of 99 patients with inoperable lung cancer, treated with radiotherapy, was compared to the staging information in the Maastricht cancer registry. Validity of sex (0% disagreements), date of birth (0%), histology (1% major disagreements)

  2. Variation in incidence and outcome of cervical cancer in the Netherlands: Studies based on cancer registry data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Aa (Maaike Anne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, approximately 2% of all newly diagnosed malignant tumours in women are cancers of the uterine cervix, corresponding to about 700 new cases of invasive carcinoma per year. A general practitioner sees a patient with newly diagnosed cervical cancer only once in 15

  3. Medication use among women with breast cancer in the Netherlands : Pharmacoepidemiological studies based on data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry-PHARMO linkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.P. van Herk-Sukel (Myrthe)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, breast cancer is the most frequent (30%) of all cancers in women. In 2008, around 13,000 women were newly diagnosed with the disease. Worldwide, breast cancer accounted for almost 1.4 million new cancer patients in 20082. Incidence rates of breast cancer have been

  4. Cancer Registry Data

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-24

    Dr. Loria Pollack, a Senior Medical Epidemiologist, talks about the importance of cancer registry data to understanding how cancer affects the United States–now and in the future.  Created: 5/24/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/24/2017.

  5. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  6. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... the results are commented for local, regional, and national audits. Indicator results are supported by descriptive reports with details on diagnostics and treatment. CONCLUSION: DLCR has since its creation been used to improve the quality of treatment of lung cancer in Denmark and it is increasingly used...

  7. Scrotal cancer: Incidence, survival and second primary tumours in the Netherlands since 1989

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H.A. Verhoeven (Rob); W.J. Louwman; E.L. Koldewijn (Evert); T.B.J. Demeyere (Thomas); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Since the 1970s there have been few epidemiological studies of scrotal cancer. We report on the descriptive epidemiology of scrotal cancer in the Netherlands. Methods: Data on all scrotal cancer patients were obtained from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) in the period

  8. Danish Childhood Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Wehner, Peder Skov

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The overall aim is to monitor the quality of childhood cancer care in Denmark; to register late effects of treatment; to analyze complications of permanent central venous catheters (CVCs); to study blood stream infections in children with cancer; and to study acute toxicity of high......, and outcome of antimicrobial chemotherapy. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Since 1985, 4,944 children below 15 years of age have been registered in the database. There has been no significant change in the incidence of childhood cancer in Denmark since 1985. The 5-year survival has increased significantly since 1985...

  9. Danish Childhood Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Wehner, Peder Skov

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The overall aim is to monitor the quality of childhood cancer care in Denmark; to register late effects of treatment; to analyze complications of permanent central venous catheters (CVCs); to study blood stream infections in children with cancer; and to study acute toxicity of high......-dose methotrexate infusions in children with leukemia. STUDY POPULATION: All children below 15 years of age at diagnosis living in Denmark diagnosed after January 1, 1985 according to the International Classification of Diseases 10, including diagnoses DC00-DD48. MAIN VARIABLES: Cancer type, extent of disease......, and outcome of antimicrobial chemotherapy. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Since 1985, 4,944 children below 15 years of age have been registered in the database. There has been no significant change in the incidence of childhood cancer in Denmark since 1985. The 5-year survival has increased significantly since 1985...

  10. Danish Childhood Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Henrik; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Wehner, Peder Skov

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The overall aim is to monitor the quality of childhood cancer care in Denmark; to register late effects of treatment; to analyze complications of permanent central venous catheters (CVCs); to study blood stream infections in children with cancer; and to study acute toxicity of high......, and outcome of antimicrobial chemotherapy. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Since 1985, 4,944 children below 15 years of age have been registered in the database. There has been no significant change in the incidence of childhood cancer in Denmark since 1985. The 5-year survival has increased significantly since 1985......-dose methotrexate infusions in children with leukemia. STUDY POPULATION: All children below 15 years of age at diagnosis living in Denmark diagnosed after January 1, 1985 according to the International Classification of Diseases 10, including diagnoses DC00-DD48. MAIN VARIABLES: Cancer type, extent of disease...

  11. Danish Childhood Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrøder H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Schrøder,1 Catherine Rechnitzer,2 Peder Skov Wehner,3 Steen Rosthøj,4 Jens Kjølseth Møller,5 Birgitte Lausen,2 Gitte Petersen,2 Mette Nørgaard6 1Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 3Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 4Department of Pediatrics, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 5Department of Clinical Microbiology, Vejle Sygehus, Vejle, 6Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim of database: The overall aim is to monitor the quality of childhood cancer care in Denmark; to register late effects of treatment; to analyze complications of permanent central venous catheters (CVCs; to study blood stream infections in children with cancer; and to study acute toxicity of high-dose methotrexate infusions in children with leukemia. Study population: All children below 15 years of age at diagnosis living in Denmark diagnosed after January 1, 1985 according to the International Classification of Diseases 10, including diagnoses DC00–DD48. Main variables: Cancer type, extent of disease, treatment, participation in international studies, recurrence of malignant disease, survival, yearly follow-up status, causes of death, and development of secondary malignancies. Type of CVC, causes for removal of the CVC, type of blood stream infection, pathogens isolated, antimicrobial sensitivity, and outcome of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Descriptive data: Since 1985, 4,944 children below 15 years of age have been registered in the database. There has been no significant change in the incidence of childhood cancer in Denmark since 1985. The 5-year survival has increased significantly since 1985 and is now 86%. The median number of days from diagnosis to initiation of therapy is 7 days

  12. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, J Thomas; Klemann, Nina; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    of the prostate (TUR-Ps), and the remaining 22,028 (13.6%) specimens were derived from radical prostatectomies, bladder interventions, etc. A total of 48,078 (42.2%) males had histopathologically verified prostate cancer, and of these, 78.8% and 16.8% were diagnosed on prostate biopsies and TUR-Ps, respectively....... FUTURE PERSPECTIVES: A validated algorithm was successfully developed to convert complex prostate SNOMED codes into clinical useful data. A unique database, including males with both normal and cancerous histopathological data, was created to form the most comprehensive national prostate database to date......BACKGROUND: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We...

  13. Incidence and treatment of tracheal cancer: a nationwide study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honings, J.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Marres, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and survival of patients with tracheal malignancies in the Netherlands. METHODS: All cases of tracheal cancer entered into the database of the Netherlands Cancer Registry in the period 1989-2002 were selected.

  14. Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) receives and stores information on cancer diagnosis and treatment constraints compiled and sent in by the local...

  15. Linking Medicare, Medicaid, and Cancer Registry Data...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Linking Medicare, Medicaid, and Cancer Registry Data to Study the Burden of Cancers in West Virginia In the United States, the elderly carry an unequal burden of...

  16. Progress against non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Netherlands: Incidence, patterns of care and prognosis since 1989 (Studies with cancer registry data)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A.M. van de Schans (Saskia)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCancers arising from the haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies with diverse clinical and biological features. The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid tissue, classified these cancers based on

  17. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Grizzle, William E.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E.

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a “confederation model” that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  18. Common variables in European pancreatic cancer registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Leede, E. M.; Sibinga Mulder, B. G.; Bastiaannet, E.

    2016-01-01

    Care, is a platform aiming to harmonize cancer data collection and improve cancer care by feedback. After the prior launch of the projects on colorectal, breast and upper GI cancer, EURECCA's newest project is collecting data on pancreatic cancer in several European countries. Methods National cancer...... registries, as well as specific pancreatic cancer audits/registries, were invited to participate in EURECCA Pancreas. Participating countries were requested to share an overview of their collected data items. Of the received datasets, a shared items list was made which creates insight in similarities between...... data. Conclusions A list of 25 shared items on pancreatic cancer coming from eleven participating registries was created, providing a basis for future prospective data collection in pancreatic cancer treatment internationally....

  19. Time-space trends in cancer incidence in The Netherlands in 1989–2003

    OpenAIRE

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A.; Coebergh, Jan W.W.; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-01-01

    Incidence of cancer may vary within a country and over time because of previous differences in exposure to risk factors or interventions for early detection (screening). This study describes time-space trends of incidence of common cancer sites across the Netherlands during the period 1989–2003 and speculates on the reasons for the observations. From the Netherlands Cancer Registry, World standardized incidence rates per municipality were smoothed calculating weighted averages for each 2 km b...

  20. Effect of implementation of the mass breast cancer screening programme in older women in the Netherlands : population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Glas, Nienke A; de Craen, Anton J M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Op 't Land, Ester G; Kiderlen, Mandy; van de Water, Willemien; Siesling, Sabine; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Schuttevaer, Herman M; de Bock, Geertruida Truuske H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of early stage and advanced stage breast cancer before and after the implementation of mass screening in women aged 70-75 years in the Netherlands in 1998. DESIGN: Prospective nationwide population based study. SETTING: National cancer registry, the Netherlands.

  1. Marked improvements in survival of patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands following changes in therapy, 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.; Steenbergen, L.N. van; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Vries, E. de; Siesling, S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1990s, treatment of patients with rectal cancer has changed in the Netherlands. Aim of this study was to describe these changes in treatment over time and to evaluate their effects on survival. METHODS: All patients in the Netherlands Cancer Registry with invasive primary

  2. Marked improvements in survival of patients with stage II-IV rectal cancer in the Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; van Steenbergen, L.N.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; de Vries, E.; Siesling, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Since the 1990s, treatment of patients with rectal cancer has changed in the Netherlands. Aim of this study was to describe these changes in treatment over time and to evaluate their effects on survival. Methods: All patients in the Netherlands Cancer Registry with invasive primary

  3. [History of the cancer registry in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende-López, Aldo; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    A cancer registry is to record the data which let us to know the epidemiology of neoplasm, but led us take a decision in medical policy about this health problem that benefit patients. In this paper we did a brief historical review about models and attempts for having a cancer registry in Mexico. However, since 1940 "the fight against cancer" was declared, we have not had a confident cancer registry today validated and built with data from whole the country. In 1982, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was created. The design and validation of a registration card in four hospitals were the main results. In 1988, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was reinforced with a computerized system for facilitation the data capture. In 1994, it was signed the first interinstitutional agreement that led to Registro Histopatol6gico de Neoplasias Malignas. In 1996, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social established a cancer registry in children in Mexico with the intention to have data from this population.

  4. Use of primary radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2008: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J. J.; Aarts, M. J.; Siesling, S.; Klaase, J.; Louwman, W. J.; Poortmans, P. M. P.; Lybeert, M. L. M.; Koning, C. C. E.; Struikmans, H.; Coebergh, J. W. W.

    2012-01-01

    To describe variation in the utilisation rates of primary radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands, focusing on time trends and age effects. Data on primary non-metastatic rectal cancer were derived from the population-based cancer registries of four comprehensive cancer

  5. Costing Tool for International Cancer Registries

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-21

    A health economist at CDC talks about a new tool for estimating how much it costs to run cancer registries in developing countries.  Created: 11/21/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/21/2016.

  6. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptom severity and sleep problems in adult participants of the Netherlands sleep registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Suzan W N; Bijlenga, Denise; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Kooij, J J Sandra; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined whether current overall attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), inattention, or hyperactivity symptom severities are associated with the current presence and persistent history of sleep problems. METHODS: N = 942 participants of the Netherlands Sleep Registry filled

  7. Site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, A M J; van der Heiden-van der Loo, M; Visser, O; Karim-Kos, H E; Lieverst, J A; de Ridder-Sluiter, J G; Coebergh, J W W; Kremer, L C; Pieters, R

    2017-12-01

    Due to the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, care for children and young adolescents with cancer preferably occurs in specialised paediatric oncology centres with potentially better cure rates and minimal late effects. This study assessed where children with cancer in the Netherlands were treated since 2004. All patients aged under 18 diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and linked with the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) database. Associations between patient and tumour characteristics and site of care were tested statistically with logistic regression analyses. This population-based study of 6021 children diagnosed with cancer showed that 82% of them were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. Ninety-four percent of the patients under 10 years of age, 85% of the patients aged 10-14 and 48% of the patients aged 15-17 were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. All International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC), 3rd edition, ICCC-3 categories, except embryonal tumours, were associated with a higher risk of treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre compared to leukaemia. Multivariable analyses by ICCC-3 category revealed that specific tumour types such as chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), embryonal carcinomas, bone tumours other type than osteosarcoma, non-rhabdomyosarcomas, thyroid carcinomas, melanomas and skin carcinomas as well as lower-staged tumours were associated with treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre. The site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands depends on the age of the cancer patient, type of tumour and stage at diagnosis. Collaboration between paediatric oncology centre(s), other academic units is needed to ensure most up-to-date paediatric cancer care for childhood cancer patients at the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of Primary Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2008: A Population-based Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J.J.; Aarts, M.J.; Siesling, Sabine; Klaase, J.; Louwman, W.J.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Lybeert, M.L.M.; Koning, C.C.E.; Struikmans, H.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To describe variation in the utilisation rates of primary radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands, focusing on time trends and age effects. Materials and methods: Data on primary non-metastatic rectal cancer were derived from the population-based cancer registries of

  9. Age-specific incidence and treatment patterns of head and neck cancer in the Netherlands : A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halmos, G. B.; Bras, L.; Siesling, S.; van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Dijk, Boukje A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the incidence and treatment pattern of head and neck cancer in different age groups. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Netherlands Cancer Registry. Participants: All new primary head and neck cancer cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 were included and categorised into

  10. Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry: Quality assurance in the care of patients with metastatic melanoma in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Anouk; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; Leeneman, Brenda; Franken, Margreet G; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Haanen, John B A G; Gelderblom, Hans; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Aarts, Maureen J B; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C; Groenewegen, Gerard; de Groot, Jan Willem B; Hospers, Geke A P; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Koornstra, Rutger H; Kruit, Wim H; Louwman, Marieke W; Piersma, Djura; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S; Ten Tije, Albert J; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; Wouters, Michel W J M; van der Hoeven, Jacobus J M

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the treatment of metastatic melanoma has changed dramatically due to the development of immune checkpoint and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors. A population-based registry, the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry (DMTR), was set up in July 2013 to assure the safety and quality of melanoma care in the Netherlands. This article describes the design and objectives of the DMTR and presents some results of the first 2 years of registration. The DMTR documents detailed information on all Dutch patients with unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma. This includes tumour and patient characteristics, treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, quality of life, healthcare utilisation, informal care and productivity losses. These data are used for clinical auditing, increasing the transparency of melanoma care, providing insights into real-world cost-effectiveness and creating a platform for research. Within 1 year, all melanoma centres were participating in the DMTR. The quality performance indicators demonstrated that the BRAF inhibitors and ipilimumab have been safely introduced in the Netherlands with toxicity rates that were consistent with the phase III trials conducted. The median overall survival of patients treated with systemic therapy was 10.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.1-11.1) in the first registration year and 12.7 months (95% CI 11.6-13.7) in the second year. The DMTR is the first comprehensive multipurpose nationwide registry and its collaboration with all stakeholders involved in melanoma care reflects an integrative view of cancer management. In future, the DMTR will provide insights into challenging questions regarding the definition of possible subsets of patients who benefit most from the new drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  12. Validity of self-reported data on pregnancies for childhood cancer survivors : a comparison with data from a nationwide population-based registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, A.; van den Berg, M. H.; Hukkelhoven, C. W. P. M.; Kremer, L. C.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.; Tissing, W. J. E.; Loonen, J. J.; Versluys, A. B.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; Lambalk, C. B.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; van Dulmen-den Broeder, E.

    To what degree do records registered in the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (PRN) agree with self-report in a study questionnaire on pregnancy outcomes in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs)? This study suggests that self-reported pregnancy outcomes of CCSs agree well with registry data and that

  13. Recent trends in population-based cancer registries in Japan: the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries and drastic changes in the historical registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tomohiro; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2015-02-01

    Cancer registration in Japan has a long history spanning over 60 years; the first population-based cancer registry was established in Miyagi prefecture in 1951. The progress made in the regional population-based cancer registries in terms of standardization and quality improvement during the 10 years of the third comprehensive strategy for cancer control was highlighted in the history of cancer registration in Japan. However, there were still weak points regarding local government-oriented cancer registries that remained, e.g., the reporting of cancer cases to the population-based cancer registries was not a mandatory task for medical institutions. After the Cancer Control Act in 2006, the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries was finally enacted in Japan on December 6, 2013. According to that Act, hospital managers must report information on any primary cancer that was first diagnosed in their institutions from January 1, 2016 to the prefectural governors. Given the increasing number of cases and amount of information recorded, it would have been almost impossible to maintain our cancer registries using the same system, and changes were required to obtain reliable cancer statistics. This was particularly important in Japan, because the country is facing a hyper-aging society, with two to three million cancer patients requiring entry of detailed information. We appreciate the long history of the Japanese cancer registry, but it is necessary to make dramatic changes to bring the registry up to date and to be able to track the increasing amount of information.

  14. HEREDITARY COLORECTAL CANCER REGISTRY: A CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Church, MBCHB

    2017-07-01

    SUMMARY: the Cleveland Clinic approach to hereditary colorectal cancer is described. This is multidisciplinary, involving several specialties and both genetic counseling and mental health services within the registry.

  15. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  16. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the Netherlands : Results from a population based registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, ADG; Le Cessie, S; Snijder, S; Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Kluin, PM; Noordijk, EM

    2003-01-01

    The Comprehensive Cancer Centre West (CCCW) population based non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) registry contains information on all newly diagnosed NHL patients living in the region covered by the CCCW. Patients were entered from June 1st 1981 to December 31st 1989. Follow-up is still ongoing, median

  17. Use of administrative hospital registry data and a civil registry to measure survival and other outcomes after cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen HT

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Henrik Toft Sørensen, Timothy L LashDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, DenmarkFor many decades, cancer registries have been a cornerstone in monitoring cancer occurrence in different populations. Cancer registries in the Nordic countries are characterized by a high level of completeness and excellent data quality.1 Cancer diagnoses are often validated through several procedures, with documentation of clinical evidence for the diagnosis. Cancer registries have proven very useful in monitoring cancer incidence, contributing significantly to our understanding of its origin and development. Some registries also have been used to monitor cancer survival at the population level.1

  18. Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer : A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Gonzalez, A.; Liu, L.; Voogd, A.C.; Schmidt, M.; Roukema, J.A.; Coebergh, J.W.; de Vries, E.; Soerjomataram, I.

    To compare overall survival between women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Women with UBC (N = 182,562; 95 %) and CBC (N = 8,912; 5 %) recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2008 were included and followed until 2010. We incorporated

  19. Presenting an Evaluation Model for the Cancer Registry Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Asadi, Farkhondeh; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Farough; Shahbodaghi, Reihaneh

    2017-12-01

    As cancer is increasingly growing, cancer registry is of great importance as the main core of cancer control programs, and many different software has been designed for this purpose. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive evaluation model is essential to evaluate and compare a wide range of such software. In this study, the criteria of the cancer registry software have been determined by studying the documents and two functional software of this field. The evaluation tool was a checklist and in order to validate the model, this checklist was presented to experts in the form of a questionnaire. To analyze the results of validation, an agreed coefficient of %75 was determined in order to apply changes. Finally, when the model was approved, the final version of the evaluation model for the cancer registry software was presented. The evaluation model of this study contains tool and method of evaluation. The evaluation tool is a checklist including the general and specific criteria of the cancer registry software along with their sub-criteria. The evaluation method of this study was chosen as a criteria-based evaluation method based on the findings. The model of this study encompasses various dimensions of cancer registry software and a proper method for evaluating it. The strong point of this evaluation model is the separation between general criteria and the specific ones, while trying to fulfill the comprehensiveness of the criteria. Since this model has been validated, it can be used as a standard to evaluate the cancer registry software.

  20. Estimating the cost of operating cancer registries: Experience in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Esther; Pardo, Constanza; Arias, Nelson; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Navarro, Edgar; Uribe, Claudia; Yepez, María Clara; Jurado, Daniel; Garci, Luz Stella; Piñeros, Marion; Edwards, Patrick; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Tangka, Florence; Subramanian, Sujha

    2016-12-01

    Maintaining population-based registries requires adequate and sustained resources; however, to date there has been no systematic evaluation to identify the resource needs for cancer registration in most countries, including Colombia. A systematic assessment of the costs can quantify the funding required and identify processes to improve efficiency of cancer registries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) International Registry Costing Tool (IntRegCosting Tool) was tailored specifically for the Colombian registries and was used to collect resource use data from five regional population-based cancer registries: Barranquilla, Bucaramanga, Cali, Manizales, and Pasto. The registries provided cost data for the year 2013 and cancer cases corresponding to the year 2010. We identified an almost threefold variation in the average cost per case (77,932 to 214,082 Colombian pesos or US $41 to US $113 in 2013) across the registries, but there were also substantial differences in data collection approaches, types of data collected, and activities performed. Cost per inhabitant varied between 95 and 415 Colombian pesos (US $0.05 to US $0.22). Between 20% and 45% of the total cost was due to fixed cost activities. The detailed economic information presented in this study constitutes a valuable source of activity-based cost data that registries can use to compare operations, assess key factors that lead to differences in cost per case, and identify potential approaches to improve efficiencies. Furthermore, the knowledge gained from studying the Colombian registries can help inform the planning and operations of other registries in the region. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Balder, H.F.; Tielemans, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Methods: Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands

  2. Time to diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients in the Netherlands: Room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsper, Charles C W; van Erp, Nicole N F; Peeters, Petra P H M; de Wit, Niek N J

    2017-12-01

    Reducing the duration of the diagnostic cancer care pathway is intensively pursued. The aim of this study was to chart the diagnostic pathway for the five most common cancers in the Netherlands. A retrospective cohort study using cancer patients' anonymised primary care data (free text and coded) linked to the Netherlands Cancer Registry. We determined the median duration of the following: 1. Primary care intervals (IPCs): the first cancer-related general practitioner consultation to referral, 2. Referral intervals (IRs): referral to diagnosis, 3. Treatment intervals (ITs): diagnosis to treatment and the overarching intervals, 4. Diagnostic intervals (IDs): IPC and IR combined and 5. Health care intervals (IHCs): IPC, IR and IT combined. For 465, 309, 197, 237 and 149 patients diagnosed with breast-, colorectal-, lung-, prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively; median IPC, IR and ID durations were shortest for breast cancer and melanoma (ID duration 7 and 21 days, respectively), intermediate for lung- and colon cancer (ID duration 49 and 54 days) and the longest for prostate cancer (ID duration 137 days). For all cancers, the duration of intervals increased steeply for the 10-25% with longest durations. For colorectal cancer, increasing ID durations showed increasing proportions of time attributable to primary care (IPC). Approximately 10-25% of cancer patients show substantially long duration of diagnostic intervals. Reducing primary care delay seems particularly relevant for colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatial variation in stage distribution in colorectal cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink, M A G; Pukkala, E; Klaase, J M; Siesling, S

    2012-05-01

    In the Netherlands the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased, mainly in the eastern part of the country. Patient delay due to unawareness or ignorance of symptoms and differences in use of diagnostic tools could have influence on the stage distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate geographical differences in stage-specific incidence rates of colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands. Age-adjusted incidence rates for cancers of the colon and rectum diagnosed in 2001-2005 and registered in the Netherlands Cancer Registry were calculated for each municipality and stage. The incidence for each 500m by 500m grid was estimated as a weighted average of the incidence rates of the neighbouring municipalities. The incidence rates and the stage distribution are both presented as maps. Geographic variation in stage-specific incidence was evaluated using spatial scan statistic. In both colon and rectal cancer, significant spatial variation in stage-specific incidences was found, except for colon cancer of stages III and IV. The regions with a higher stage-specific incidence were almost all in the south eastern part of the Netherlands, however, these differences were not seen in the stage distribution. There were no differences in stage distribution between large cities and the rest of the country. These maps give insight into differences in stage-specific incidences of colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands. Educational interventions to increase the awareness of symptoms of colorectal cancer may be especially useful for the population in regions with high incidence of advanced stages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of data quality at the Gambia national cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Yusuke; Bah, Ebrima; Wild, Christopher P; Hall, Andrew J

    2013-02-01

    The Gambia National Cancer Registry (GNCR) is one of the few nationwide population-based cancer registries in sub-Saharan Africa. Most registries in sub-Saharan Africa are limited to cities; therefore, the GNCR is important in providing estimates of cancer incidence in rural Africa. Our study assesses the quality of its data. The methods proposed by Bray and Parkin, and Parkin and Bray (Eur J Cancer 2009;45:747-64) were applied to the registry data from 1990 to 2009 to assess comparability, validity and completeness. The system used for classification and coding of neoplasms followed international standards. The percentage of cases morphologically verified was 18.1% for men and 33.1% for women, and that of death certificate only cases was 6.6 and 3.6%, respectively. Incidence rates in rural regions were lower than in the urban part of the country, except amongst young male adults. Comparison with other West African registries showed that the incidences of liver and uterine cervical cancer were comparable, but those of prostate and breast in The Gambia were relatively low. The overall completeness was estimated at 50.3% using the capture-recapture method. The GNCR applies international standard practices to data collection and handling, providing valuable data on cancer incidence in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the data are incomplete in the rural and elderly populations probably because of health care access and use. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  5. Urgent Need for Population—based Cancer Registries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa and assess the need for population-based cancer registries to enhance cancer care .... Conarkry, Bamako, Gambia Kampala, Harare, U.S. .... decades age. This age distribution is similar to that found in other African countries (Mali,. Uganda, Zimbabwe), with the majority of cases occurring in men between ...

  6. Time-space trends in cancer incidence in the Netherlands in 1989-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A; Coebergh, Jan W W; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-05-01

    Incidence of cancer may vary within a country and over time because of previous differences in exposure to risk factors or interventions for early detection (screening). This study describes time-space trends of incidence of common cancer sites across the Netherlands during the period 1989-2003 and speculates on the reasons for the observations. From the Netherlands Cancer Registry, World standardized incidence rates per municipality were smoothed calculating weighted averages for each 2 km by 2 km grid of the population mid-points of neighbouring municipalities and presented as map animations. Spatial relative changes in incidence were estimated by comparing the periods 1989-1994 and 1998-2003. Complete time-space trends can be found as map animations on http://maps.ikcnet.nl. The incidence of cervical and stomach cancer (for both sexes) decreased, being higher in the cities than in the rural areas during all periods and contrasting the trends in colorectal and breast cancer. The relative increase in incidence of lung cancer among females was highest in the rural north, but the incidence remained higher in the cities of the mid-west Netherlands. For males, there was a marked decrease in lung cancer incidence across the country since 1991. Incidence of melanoma increased, rates being twice as high in the coastal area than in the cities. Prostate cancer maps largely replicated the known history of PSA-testing in the Netherlands. Time-space cancer incidence patterns gave insight into effects of changes in exposure to risk determinants and early detection. The maps illustrate marked potential for cancer prevention at the national and regional level. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Regional Variation in Prevalence of Oral Cleft Live Births in the Netherlands 1997-2007 : Time-Trend Analysis of Data from Three Dutch Registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, Anna M.; Mohangoo, Ashna D.; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M.; Buitendijk, Simone E.; Bakker, Marian K.; Vermeij-Keers, Christl

    The Eurocat registry Northern Netherlands (NNL) has been used in regional context, as well as in national/international context, to describe the epidemiology of oral clefts (OC). However, the region NNL seems to have prevalence data different fromDutch national registries and certain other European

  8. Regional variation in prevalence of oral cleft live births in the Netherlands 1997-2007: Time-trend analysis of data from three Dutch registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, A.M.; Mohangoo, A.D.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Buitendijk, S.E.; Bakker, M.K.; Vermeij-Keers, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Eurocat registry Northern Netherlands (NNL) has been used in regional context, as well as in national/international context, to describe the epidemiology of oral clefts (OC). However, the region NNL seems to have prevalence data different from Dutch national registries and certain other European

  9. Validity of self-reported data on pregnancies for childhood cancer survivors: a comparison with data from a nationwide population-based registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, A.; Berg, M.H. van den; Hukkelhoven, C.W.; Kremer, L.C.; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den; Tissing, W.J.; Loonen, J.J.; Versluys, A.B.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Lambalk, C.B.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Dulmen-den Broeder, E. van; Beerendonk, C.C.M.; Bokkerink, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: To what degree do records registered in the Netherlands Perinatal Registry (PRN) agree with self-report in a study questionnaire on pregnancy outcomes in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs)? SUMMARY ANSWER: This study suggests that self-reported pregnancy outcomes of CCSs agree well

  10. Geographical relationships between sociodemographic factors and incidence of cervical cancer in the Netherlands 1989-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Maaike A; Siesling, Sabine; Louwman, Marieke W; Visser, Otto; Pukkala, Eero; Coebergh, Jan Willem W

    2008-10-01

    In many industrialized countries, with some degree of screening, cervical cancer nowadays is most frequent among women of lower socioeconomic status (SES), partly owing to their lower participation in screening. This study aims to provide support for specification of mass screening policy for cervical cancer by describing relationships between sociodemographic factors and the incidence of cervical cancer in the Netherlands based on geographical differences and by analysing the relationship between SES of neighbourhood and individual tumour characteristics. Municipality-specific, age-adjusted incidence rates for cervical cancer were calculated from the Netherlands Cancer Registry, and data on sociodemographic factors were obtained from Statistics Netherlands. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate determinants of variations in incidence at the ecological level. An additional analysis linked individual tumour characteristics to SES estimates at the postal code level by calculating relative risks (RR). The incidence was higher in municipalities with a high prevalence of immigrants [odds ratios 7.9, 1.4-47 95% confidence intervals (CI)] and with more individuals on welfare (odds ratios 8.6, 1.7-43 95% CI). Patients residing in neighbourhoods with lower SES had higher Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (RR 1.4, 1.2-1.6 95% CI) and fewer adenocarcinomas (RR 0.7, 0.6-0.9 95% CI), and were younger at diagnosis (Pimportance of future cervical cancer prevention programmes targeted at women of lower SES who do not participate in opportunistic screening.

  11. Physical activity and risk of ovarian cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesma, R.G.; Schouten, L.J.; Dirx, M.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between nonoccupational physical activity and the risk of ovarian cancer among post-menopausal women. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer consists of 62,573 women aged 55-69 years at baseline. Information regarding baseline

  12. Development of an International Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sue M; Nag, Nupur; Roder, David; Brooks, Andrew; Millar, Jeremy L; Moretti, Kim L; Pryor, David; Skala, Marketa; McNeil, John J

    2016-04-01

    To establish a Prostate Cancer Outcomes Registry-Australia and New Zealand (PCOR-ANZ) for monitoring outcomes of prostate cancer treatment and care, in a cost-effective manner. Stakeholders were recruited based on their interest, importance in achieving the monitoring and reporting of clinical practice and patient outcomes, and in amalgamation of existing registries. Each participating jurisdiction is responsible for local governance, site recruitment, data collection, and data transfer into the PCOR-ANZ. To establish each local registry, hospitals and clinicians within a jurisdiction were approached to voluntarily contribute to the registry following relevant ethical approval. Patient contact occurs following notification of prostate cancer through a hospital or pathology report, or from a cancer registry. Patient registration is based on an opt-out model. The PCOR-ANZ is a secure web-based registry adhering to ISO 27001 standards. Based on a standardised minimum data set, information on demographics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and patient reported quality of life, are collected. Eight of nine jurisdictions have agreed to contribute to the PCOR-ANZ. Each jurisdiction has commenced implementation of necessary infrastructure to support rapid rollout. PCOR-ANZ has defined a minimum data set for collection, to enable analysis of key quality indicators that will aid in assessing clinical practice and patient focused outcomes. PCOR-ANZ will provide a useful resource of risk-adjusted evidence-based data to clinicians, hospitals, and decision makers on prostate cancer clinical practice. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Quality management in oncology supported by clinical cancer registries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Gerken, Michael; Barlag, Hagen; Tillack, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Efforts in nationwide quality management for oncology have so far failed to comprehensively document all levels of care. New organizational structures such as population-based clinical cancer registries or certified organ cancer centers were supposed to solve this problem more sufficiently, but they have to be accompanied by valid trans-sectoral documentation and evaluation of clinical data. To measure feasibility and qualitative effectiveness of guideline implementation we approached this problem with a nationwide investigation from 2000 to 2011. The rate of neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy in stage UICC II/III rectum cancer, cut-off point 80% for separating good from insufficient quality, was used as a quality indicator. The nationwide analysis indicates an increase from 45% to 70%, but only with the implementation strategy of CME. The combination of new structures, evidence-based quality indicators, organ cancer center and clinical cancer registries has shown good feasibility and seems promising. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Treatment strategies and survival of older breast cancer patients - an international comparison between the Netherlands and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiderlen, Mandy; Walsh, Paul M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Kelly, Maria B; Audisio, Riccardo A; Boelens, Petra G; Brown, Chris; Dekkers, Olaf M; de Craen, Anton J M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Forty percent of breast cancers occur among older patients. Unfortunately, there is a lack of evidence for treatment guidelines for older breast cancer patients. The aim of this study is to compare treatment strategy and relative survival for operable breast cancer in the elderly between The Netherlands and Ireland. From the Dutch and Irish national cancer registries, women aged ≥65 years with non-metastatic breast cancer were included (2001-2009). Proportions of patients receiving guideline-adherent locoregional treatment, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy were calculated and compared between the countries by stage. Secondly, 5-year relative survival was calculated by stage and compared between countries. Overall, 41,055 patients from The Netherlands and 5,826 patients from Ireland were included. Overall, more patients received guideline-adherent locoregional treatment in The Netherlands, overall (80% vs. 68%, adjusted pIreland, where endocrine therapy was prescribed to 92% of hormone receptor-positive patients, compared to 59% in The Netherlands. In The Netherlands, only 6% received chemotherapy, as compared 24% in Ireland. But relative survival was poorer in Ireland (5 years relative survival 89% vs. 83%), especially in stage II (87% vs. 85%) and stage III (61% vs. 58%) patients. Treatment for older breast cancer patients differed significantly on all treatment modalities between The Netherlands and Ireland. More locoregional treatment was provided in The Netherlands, and more systemic therapy was provided in Ireland. Relative survival for Irish patients was worse than for their Dutch counterparts. This finding should be a strong recommendation to study breast cancer treatment and survival internationally, with the ultimate goal to equalize the survival rates for breast cancer patients across Europe.

  15. Reporting Melanoma: A Nationwide Surveillance of State Cancer Registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde O. Raji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our study was to determine current melanoma reporting methods available to dermatologists and dermatopathologists and quantify changes in reporting methods from 2012 to 2014. A cross-sectional study design was utilized consisting of website perusal of reporting procedures, followed up by telephone and email inquiry of reporting methods from every state cancer registry. This study was conducted over a six-month period from February to August 2014. A previous similar survey was conducted in 2012 over the same time frame and results were compared. Kansas state cancer registry provided no data. As of August 2014, 96% of 49 state cancer registries had electronic methods available to all designated reporters. Seven (14% states required an electronic-only method of reporting melanoma cases. Eighty-six percent allowed hard copy pathology report submission. Compared to the 2012 survey, 2 additional states were found to have initiated electronic reporting methods by 2014. In conclusion, a variety of methods exist for reporting diagnosed melanoma cases. Although most state cancer registries were equipped for electronic transmission of cases for mandated reporters, a number of states were ill-equipped for electronic submission from outpatient dermatologists. There was a general trend towards electronic versus nonelectronic reporting from 2012 to 2014.

  16. [News from the French cancer registry of Doubs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, S; Hurteloup, P; hurteloup, P; Carbillet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Cancer Registry of Doubs (471 845 h, 5 260 km2), an area located in east part of France close the Swiss frontier, gave cancer rates in 1977 and 1978, for male and female, for urban and rural areas, with interesting comparisons with death in the period. Histological information was available in a percentage of 0.88, cases variable with different locations. It is possible to analyse the different histological sub types and grading among some cancer sites (gastric, large bowel, bronchus). Different modalities of treatment (surgery, radiotherapy, hormono and immunotherapy) applied to the 2 783 cases of cancer are analysed.

  17. Cancer incidence and mortality in Mongolia - National Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandagdorj, Tuvshingerel; Sanjaajamts, Erdenechimeg; Tudev, Undarmaa; Oyunchimeg, Dondov; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Roder, David

    2010-01-01

    The National Cancer Registry of Mongolia began as a hospital-based registry in the early 1960s but then evolved to have a population-wide role. The Registry provides the only cancer data available from Mongolia for international comparison. The descriptive data presented in this report are the first to be submitted on cancer incidence in Mongolia to a peer-reviewed journal. The purpose was to describe cancer incidence and mortality for all invasive cancers collectively, individual primary sites, and particularly leading sites, and consider cancer control opportunities. This study includes data on new cancer cases registered in Mongolia in 2003-2007. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated as mean annual numbers per 100,000 residents. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and age-standardized mortality (ASMR) rates were calculated from age-specific rates by weighting directly to the World Population standard. Between 2003 and 2007, 17,271 new cases of invasive cancer were recorded (52.2% in males, 47.7% in females). The five leading primary sites in males were liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, and colon/rectum; whereas in females they were liver, cervix, stomach, esophagus and breast. ASRs were lower in females than males for cancers of the liver at 63.0 and 99.1 per 100,000 respectively; cancers of the stomach at 19.1 and 42.1 per 100,000 respectively; and cancers of the lung at 8.3 and 33.2 per 100,000 respectively. Liver cancer was the most common cause of death in each gender, the ASMR being lower for females than males at 60.6 compared with 94.8 per 100,000. In females the next most common sites of cancer death were the stomach and esophagus, whereas in males, they were the stomach and lung. Available data indicate that ASRs of all cancers collectively have increased over the last 20 years. Rates are highest for liver cancer, at about four times the world average. The most common cancers are those with a primary site of liver, stomach and esophagus, for which

  18. Scientific contributions toward successful cancer immunotherapy in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melief, C.J.; Scheper, R.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    This historical overview shows that immunologists and clinicians from The Netherlands have contributed in a major way to better insights in the nature of cancer immunity. This work involved elucidation of the nature of cancer-associated antigens in autologous and allogeneic settings in addition to

  19. Protecting Confidentiality in Cancer Registry Data With Geographic Identifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mandi; Reiter, Jerome Phillip; Zhu, Li; Liu, Benmei; Cronin, Kathleen A; Feuer, Eric J Rocky

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program releases research files of cancer registry data. These files include geographic information at the county level, but no finer. Access to finer geography, such as census tract identifiers, would enable richer analyses-for example, examination of health disparities across neighborhoods. To date, tract identifiers have been left off the research files because they could compromise the confidentiality of patients' identities. We present an approach to inclusion of tract identifiers based on multiply imputed, synthetic data. The idea is to build a predictive model of tract locations, given patient and tumor characteristics, and randomly simulate the tract of each patient by sampling from this model. For the predictive model, we use multivariate regression trees fitted to the latitude and longitude of the population centroid of each tract. We implement the approach in the registry data from California. The method results in synthetic data that reproduce a wide range (but not all) of analyses of census tract socioeconomic cancer disparities and have relatively low disclosure risks, which we assess by comparing individual patients' actual and synthetic tract locations. We conclude with a discussion of how synthetic data sets can be used by researchers with cancer registry data. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Reporting Melanoma: A Nationwide Surveillance of State Cancer Registries

    OpenAIRE

    Kehinde O. Raji; Lauren Payne; Suephy C. Chen

    2015-01-01

    The goal of our study was to determine current melanoma reporting methods available to dermatologists and dermatopathologists and quantify changes in reporting methods from 2012 to 2014. A cross-sectional study design was utilized consisting of website perusal of reporting procedures, followed up by telephone and email inquiry of reporting methods from every state cancer registry. This study was conducted over a six-month period from February to August 2014. A previous similar survey was cond...

  1. Breast cancer survival rate according to data of cancer registry and death registry systems in Bushehr province, 2001-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rampisheh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common female cancer worldwide. Survival rate of breast cancer, especially as an indicator of the successful implementation of screening, diagnosis and treatment programs, has been at the center of attention of public health experts Material and Methods: In a survival study, the records of breast cancer cases in cancer registry system of Bushehr Province were extracted during 2001, March to 2013, September. These records were linked and matched with records of death registry system. After determining patients, status regarding being alive or dead, survival analysis was done. Life table, Kaplan-Mayer analysis, log rank and Breslow tests were used for computing and comparing survival rates. Results: In 300 recorded breast cancer cases, mean and standard deviation of age was 51.26±13.87. Survival rates were 95, 88, 78, 73 and 68 percent since the first year through the fifth year, respectively. Mean survival was 87.20 months (95% CI= 81.28- 93.12. There was no significant difference in mean survival regarding age and different geographical areas. Conclusion: Although survival rates of registered breast cancer patients in Bushehr Province are similar to other provinces, they are far from those of developed countries. This situation demands more extensive efforts regarding public education and improving the process of diagnosis, treatment and care of patients especially during first two years after diagnosis.

  2. Hereditary cancer registries improve the care of patients with a genetic predisposition to cancer : Contributions from the Dutch Lynch syndrome registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Velthuizen, Mary E; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Menko, Fred H; Nagengast, Fokke M; Cats, Annemieke; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Breuning, Martijn H; Roukema, J.A.; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, Inge; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch Hereditary Cancer Registry was established in 1985 with the support of the Ministry of Health (VWS). The aims of the registry are: (1) to promote the identification of families with hereditary cancer, (2) to encourage the participation in surveillance programs of individuals at high risk,

  3. Harms of cervical cancer screening in the United States and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbema, Dik; Weinmann, Sheila; Arbyn, Marc; Kamineni, Aruna; Williams, Andrew E; M C M de Kok, Inge; van Kemenade, Folkert; Field, Terry S; van Rosmalen, Joost; Brown, Martin L

    2017-03-01

    We studied harms related to cervical cancer screening and management of screen-positive women in the United States (US) and the Netherlands. We utilized data from four US integrated health care systems (SEARCH), the US National Health Interview Survey, New Mexico state, the Netherlands national histopathology registry, and included studies on adverse health effects of cervical screening. We compared the number of Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests, abnormal test results, punch biopsies, treatments, health problems (anxiety, pain, bleeding and discharge) and preterm births associated with excisional treatments. Results were age-standardized to the 2007 US population. Based on SEARCH, an estimated 36 million Pap tests were performed in 2007 for 91 million US women aged 21-65 years, leading to 2.3 million abnormal Pap tests, 1.5 million punch biopsies, 0.3 million treatments for precancerous lesions, 5 thousand preterm births and over 8 million health problems. Under the Netherlands screening practice, fewer Pap tests (58%), abnormal test results (64%), punch biopsies (75%), treatment procedures (40%), preterm births (60%) and health problems (63%) would have occurred. The SEARCH data did not differ much from other US data for 2007 or from more recent data up to 2013. Thus compared to the less intensive screening practice in the Netherlands, US practice of cervical cancer screening may have resulted in two- to threefold higher harms, while the effects on cervical cancer incidence and mortality are similar. The results are also of high relevance in making recommendations for HPV screening. Systematic collection of harms data is needed for monitoring and for better incorporation of harms in making screening recommendations. © 2016 UICC.

  4. Evaluation of The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme for women aged 50-75 years was gradually implemented during 1989-1997. Short-term indicators for this mammography screening are 80% attendance (800 000 examinations yearly), and for the subsequent screening examinations 7.4 referrals for clinical

  5. The Impact of Electronic Health Record Usage on Cancer Registry Systems in Alabama

    OpenAIRE

    Houser, Shannon H; Colquitt, Shannon; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2012-01-01

    As the use of information technology within the healthcare setting increases, the impact of bridging registry data with electronic health records (EHRs) must be addressed. Current EHR implementation may create benefits as well as challenges to cancer registries in areas such as policies and regulations, data quality, reporting, management, staffing, and training. The purpose of this study was to assess 1) the status of EHR usage in cancer registries, 2) the impact of EHR usage on cancer regis...

  6. Melanoma of the skin in the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Klausen, Siri

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database both record data on melanoma for purposes of monitoring, quality assurance and research. However, the data quality of the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database has not been formally evaluated. METHODS: We...... estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of melanoma diagnosis for random samples of 200 patients from the Cancer Registry (n=200) and the Melanoma Database (n=200) during 2004-2014, using the Danish Pathology Registry as 'gold-standard' reference. We further validated tumor characteristics...... in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database. Additionally, we estimated the PPV of in situ melanoma diagnoses in the Melanoma Database, and the sensitivity of melanoma diagnoses in 2004-2014. RESULTS: The PPVs of melanoma in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database were 97% (95% CI, 94-99) and 100...

  7. Effect of implementation of the mass breast cancer screening programme in older women in the Netherlands: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glas, Nienke A; de Craen, Anton J M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Op 't Land, Ester G; Kiderlen, Mandy; van de Water, Willemien; Siesling, Sabine; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Schuttevaer, Herman M; de Bock, Geertruida Truuske H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2014-09-14

    To assess the incidence of early stage and advanced stage breast cancer before and after the implementation of mass screening in women aged 70-75 years in the Netherlands in 1998. Prospective nationwide population based study. National cancer registry, the Netherlands. Patients aged 70-75 years with a diagnosis of invasive or ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer between 1995 and 2011 (n=25,414). Incidence rates were calculated using population data from Statistics Netherlands. Incidence rates of early stage (I, II, or ductal carcinoma in situ) and advanced stage (III and IV) breast cancer before and after implementation of screening. Hypotheses were formulated before data collection. The incidence of early stage tumours significantly increased after the extension for implementation of screening (248.7 cases per 100,000 women before screening up to 362.9 cases per 100,000 women after implementation of screening, incidence rate ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 1.52, Pbreast cancers decreased to a far lesser extent (58.6 cases per 100,000 women before screening to 51.8 cases per 100,000 women after implementation of screening, incidence rate ratio 0.88, 0.81 to 0.97, Pbreast cancer, while that of early stage tumours has strongly increased. © de Glas et al 2014.

  8. Perceived causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, van I.M.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands to obtain insight into the common beliefs and perceptions of risk factors for prostate cancer. Materials and methods A total of 956 prostate cancer survivors,

  9. Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Boukje A C; Brands, Marieke T; Geurts, Sandra M E; Merkx, Matthias A W; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2016-08-01

    Information on epidemiology is essential to evaluate care for the growing group of oral cancer patients. We investigated trends in incidence, mortality and relative survival rates for oral cavity cancer (OCC) and its subsites in the Netherlands from 1991 to 2010, and relate these to changes in stage and treatment. Patient (age, sex), tumour (subsite, stage) and treatment characteristics of patients diagnosed with OCC (ICD-O-3: C02-C06) in 1991-2010 were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Incidence, mortality and 5-year relative survival rates over time are presented, as well as trends in type of treatment. The incidence of OCC increased with +1.2% (95%CI: +0.9%;+1.6%) per year: more strongly in women, stage I and IV disease, and in cancers of the tongue and gum. The mortality rate slightly rose (+0.8%, 95%CI: +0.3%;+1.3% per year), but differed by subsite. The 5-year relative survival improved from 57% in 1991-1995 to 62% in 2006-2010. The 5-year relative survival was better for women compared with men (64% and 55%, respectively), decreased with increasing stage, was the best for tongue cancer (63%) and the worst for cancer of the gum (56%) and floor of mouth cancer (55%). The relative excess risk of dying was higher for non-surgery-based treatments. Surgery was the main treatment option and the proportion of "surgery only" rose in stage I and III disease. The incidence and, to a lesser extent, mortality of OCC are increasing and therefore, even with slightly improving survival rates, OCC is an increasingly important health problem. © 2016 UICC.

  10. The history and use of cancer registry data by public health cancer control programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary C; Babcock, Frances; Hayes, Nikki S; Mariotto, Angela B; Wong, Faye L; Kohler, Betsy A; Weir, Hannah K

    2017-12-15

    Because cancer registry data provide a census of cancer cases, registry data can be used to: 1) define and monitor cancer incidence at the local, state, and national levels; 2) investigate patterns of cancer treatment; and 3) evaluate the effectiveness of public health efforts to prevent cancer cases and improve cancer survival. The purpose of this article is to provide a broad overview of the history of cancer surveillance programs in the United States, and illustrate the expanding ways in which cancer surveillance data are being made available and contributing to cancer control programs. The article describes the building of the cancer registry infrastructure and the successful coordination of efforts among the 2 federal agencies that support cancer registry programs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. The major US cancer control programs also are described, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. This overview illustrates how cancer registry data can inform public health actions to reduce disparities in cancer outcomes and may be instructional for a variety of cancer control professionals in the United States and in other countries. Cancer 2017;123:4969-76. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Cancer Patterns In Ilorin: An Analysis Of Ilorin Cancer Registry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of the common cancer cases registered at Cancer, a non communicable disease of mankind our center are controllable and their burden could be has become a major public health issue. Yet reliable data minimized. Therefore, there is need for country-wide on cancer incidence in Nigeria is lacking due to dearth of ...

  12. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, L; Balder, H F; Tielemans, E; van den Brandt, P A; Goldbohm, R A

    2008-04-01

    To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study. 1920 incident lung cancer cases were available after 11.3 years of follow-up. Based on a case-cohort design, and using Cox proportional hazards models, risks were estimated for blue collar workers in 26 industrial sectors. Adjustment for individual smoking habits affected risk estimates for some sectors, but adjustment for fruit/vegetables and alcohol intake did not. Adjusted for confounders, an increased risk of lung cancer was observed for employment for >/=15 years in blue collar jobs in the "electronics and optical instruments" industry (rate ratio (RR) 1.99; 95% CI 1.18 to 3.35), "construction and homebuilding business" (RR 1.64; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.22) and "railway company" (RR 2.40; 95% CI 1.00 to 5.73). The attributable fraction for working for >/=15 years in these three industries was 5%. In three other sectors there was a statistically non-significant elevated RR of >1.5. Male lung cancer risk is increased in several industrial sectors. Approximately 2000 lung cancer cases between 1986 and 1997 in the 55-69-year-old age group in the Netherlands may be attributable to working for >/=15 years in the three sectors with increased risk. In addition, estimates for occupational lung cancer risks for sectors may be biased if no individual information is available on smoking habits.

  13. Dairy consumption and ovarian cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommers, M.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Ovary cancer risk in relation to consumption of dairy products was investigated using a self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk factors for cancer, which was completed in 1986 by 62 573 postmenopausal women participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Follow-up for cancer

  14. The impact of electronic health record usage on cancer registry systems in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Shannon H; Colquitt, Shannon; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2012-01-01

    As the use of information technology within the healthcare setting increases, the impact of bridging registry data with electronic health records (EHRs) must be addressed. Current EHR implementation may create benefits as well as challenges to cancer registries in areas such as policies and regulations, data quality, reporting, management, staffing, and training. The purpose of this study was to assess 1) the status of EHR usage in cancer registries, 2) the impact of EHR usage on cancer registries, and 3) the benefits and challenges of EHR usage for cancer registries in Alabama. The study method consisted of a voluntary survey provided to participants at the Alabama Cancer Registry Association 2009 annual conference. Forty-three respondents completed the survey. Data indicated that the major benefits of EHR use for the cancer registry included more complete treatment information available to clinicians and researchers, more time for retrieving and analyzing data for clinicians and researchers, and better tracking of patient follow-up. The major challenges included lack of adequate resources, lack of medical staff support, and changing data standards. The conclusion of the study indicates that understanding the impacts and challenges of EHR usage within cancer registries has implications for public health data management, data reporting, and policy issues.

  15. The impact of organisational external peer review on colorectal cancer treatment and survival in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, M. J.; van Dijk, B. A. C.; Otter, R.; Siesling, S.; van Harten, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organisational external peer review was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve multidisciplinary cancer care. We examined the clinical impact of this programme on colorectal cancer care. Methods: Patients with primary colorectal cancer were included from 23 participating

  16. Burden and Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Hollestein (Loes)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractThe incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the Netherlands since 1989, the first year of the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). In 2010 more than 43,000 patients were newly diagnosed with skin cancer in the Netherlands. During a life time at least 1 in 5 persons living in

  17. Small but significant socioeconomic inequalities in axillary staging and treatment of breast cancer in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, M J; Hamelinck, V C; Bastiaannet, E; Coebergh, J W W; Liefers, G J; Voogd, A C; van der Sangen, M; Louwman, W J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use of sentinel node biopsy (SNB), lymph node dissection, breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment for breast cancer was evaluated in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) in the Netherlands, where access to care was assumed to be equal. Methods: Female breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1994 and 2008 were selected from the nationwide population-based Netherlands Cancer Registry (N=176 505). Socioeconomic status was assessed based on income, employment and education at postal code level. Multivariable models included age, year of diagnosis and stage. Results: Sentinal node biopsy was less often applied in high-SES patients (multivariable analyses, ⩽49 years: odds ratio (OR) 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56–0.89); 50–75 years: 0.85 (0.73–0.99)). Additionally, lymph node dissection was less common in low-SES patients aged ⩾76 years (OR 1.34 (0.95–1.89)). Socioeconomic status-related differences in treatment were only significant in the age group 50–75 years. High-SES women with stage T1–2 were more likely to undergo breast-conserving surgery (+radiotherapy) (OR 1.15 (1.09–1.22) and OR 1.16 (1.09–1.22), respectively). Chemotherapy use among node-positive patients was higher in the high-SES group, but was not significant in multivariable analysis. Hormonal therapy was not related to SES. Conclusion: Small but significant differences were observed in the use of SNB, lymph node dissection and breast-conserving surgery according to SES in Dutch breast cancer patients despite assumed equal access to health care. PMID:22596236

  18. [Importance of the National Childhood Cancer Registry in the field of paediatric oncology care in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garami, Miklós; Schuler, Dezső; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2014-05-11

    National Childhood Cancer Registry has been operated since 1971 by the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network. This Registry collects data on epidemiology, treatment modalities and effectiveness, as well as late follow-up of childhood cancers. An internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network has been introduced in April, 2010. The National Childhood Cancer Registry contains data of all paediatric cancer patients (0-18 yrs) who have insurance covered by the Hungarian Social Security Card. Creation (1971) and operation of the National Childhood Cancer Registry have been very important steps in the field of childhood oncology to evaluate the efficiency of paediatric oncology treatments as well as maximize return on medical investment.

  19. Tribal linkage and race data quality for American Indians in a state cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer C; Soliman, Amr S; Tadgerson, Dan; Copeland, Glenn E; Seefeld, David A; Pingatore, Noel L; Haverkate, Rick; Banerjee, Mousumi; Roubidoux, Marilyn A

    2009-06-01

    Racial misclassification of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals as non-AI/AN in cancer registries presents problems for cancer surveillance, research, and public health practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of tribal linkages in enhancing the quality of racial information in state cancer registries. Registry Plus Link Plus 2.0 probabilistic record linkage software was used to link the Michigan state cancer registry data (1985-2004; 1,031,168 cancer cases) to the tribal membership roster (40,340 individuals) in July of 2007. A data set was created containing AI/AN cancer cases identified by the state registry, Indian Health Service (IHS) linkages, and tribal linkage. The differences between these three groups of individuals were compared by distribution of demographic, diagnostic, and county-level characteristics using multilevel analysis (conducted in 2007-2008). From 1995 to 2004, the tribal enrollment file showed linkages to 670 cancer cases (583 individuals) and the tribal linkage led to the identification of 190 AI/AN cancer cases (168 individuals) that were classified as non-AI/AN in the registry. More than 80% of tribal members were reported as non-AI/AN to the registry. Individuals identified by IHS or tribal linkages were different from those reported to be AI/AN in terms of stage at diagnosis, tumor confirmation, and characteristics of the county of diagnosis, including contract health services availability, tribal health services availability, and proportion of AI/AN residents. The data linkage between tribal and state cancer registry data sets improved racial classification validity of AI/AN Michigan cancer cases. Assessing tribal linkages is a simple, noninvasive way to improve the accuracy of state cancer data for AI/AN populations and to generate tribe-specific cancer information.

  20. Plant sterol intakes and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands : cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normén, A.L.; Brants, H.A.M.; Voorrips, L.E.; Andersson, H.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Background: Plant sterols in vegetable foods might prevent colorectal cancer. Objective: The objective was to study plant sterol intakes in relation to colorectal cancer risk in an epidemiologic study. Design: The study was performed within the framework of the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and

  1. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  2. Dietary folate and folate vitamers and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszei, András P; Verhage, Bas A J; Heinen, Mirjam M; Goldbohm, Royle A; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2009-06-01

    An association between high intake of folate and reduced risk of cancer has been suggested by previous research. However, epidemiologic data from cohort studies regarding the relationship between dietary folate and pancreatic cancer are sparse and inconsistent. We examined the association between dietary folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. Men and women (120,852), ages 55 to 69 years, were recruited. Information on diet was collected at baseline by means of food frequency questionnaires, and the cohort was followed for 13.3 years. Total folate and vitamer intake were calculated using folate contents of food items derived from a validated liquid chromatography trienzyme method. Cases (n = 363) were identified by record linkage with regional cancer registries and the Dutch National Database of Pathology Reports. A case-cohort approach was used using the follow-up data of a random subcohort (n = 5,000) identified at the onset of the cohort. Multivariable hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards model. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, number of years smoked, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and intake of added sugar multivariate hazard ratio comparing the highest and lowest quintiles of folate intake for pancreatic cancer risk was 1.37 (confidence interval, 0.97-1.94; P(trend) = 0.07). When folate vitamers were analyzed separately, results did not show a difference in association. Our results do not support a protective association of total dietary folate or individual folate vitamers on the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Risk of prostate cancer among cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Schans, van de S.A.; Liu, L.; Kampman, E.; Coebergh, J.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Soerjomataram, I.; Aben, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    In parallel with increasing numbers of cancer patients and improving cancer survival, the occurrence of second primary cancers becomes a relevant issue. The aim of our study was to evaluate risk of prostate cancer as second primary cancer in a population-based setting. Methods Data from the

  4. Risk of prostate cancer among cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.; Schans, S.A. van de; Liu, L.; Kampman, E.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Soerjomataram, I.; Aben, K.K.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parallel with increasing numbers of cancer patients and improving cancer survival, the occurrence of second primary cancers becomes a relevant issue. The aim of our study was to evaluate risk of prostate cancer as second primary cancer in a population-based setting. METHODS: Data from

  5. Breast and stomach cancer incidence and survival in migrants in the Netherlands, 1996-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Melina; Aarts, Mieke Josepha; Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike; Visser, Otto; Coebergh, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    Migrant populations experience a health transition that influences their cancer risk, determined by environmental changes and acculturation processes. In this retrospective cohort study, we investigated differences in breast and stomach cancer risk and survival in migrants to the Netherlands.

  6. Completeness of T, N, M and stage grouping for all cancers in the Mallorca Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, M; Franch, P; Zaforteza, M; Artero, J; Durán, M

    2015-11-04

    TNM staging of cancer is used to establish the treatment and prognosis for cancer patients, and also allows the assessment of screening programmes and hospital performance. Collection of staging data is becoming a cornerstone for cancer registries. The objective of the study was to assess the completeness of T, N, M and stage grouping registration for all cancers in the Mallorca Cancer Registry in 2006-2008 and to explore differences in T, N, M and stage grouping completeness by site, gender, age and type of hospital. All invasive cancer cases during the period 2006-2008 were selected. DCO, as well as children's cancers, CNS, unknown primary tumours and some haematological cases were excluded. T, N, M and stage grouping were collected separately and followed UICC (International Union Against Cancer) 7th edition guidelines. For T and N, we registered whether they were pathological or clinical. Ten thousand two hundred fifty-seven cases were registered. After exclusions, the study was performed with 9283 cases; 39.4 % of whom were women and 60.6 % were men. T was obtained in 48.6 % cases, N in 36.5 %, M in 40 % and stage in 37.9 %. T and N were pathological in 71 % of cases. Stage completeness exceeded 50 % in lung, colon, ovary and oesophagus, although T also exceeded 50 % at other sites, including rectum, larynx, colon, breast, bladder and melanoma. No differences were found in TNM or stage completeness by gender. Completeness was lower in younger and older patients, and in cases diagnosed in private clinics. T, N, M and stage grouping data collection in population-based cancer registries is feasible and desirable.

  7. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The ENSAT registry: a digital repository supporting adrenal cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stell, Anthony; Sinnott, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The very nature of rare diseases means that information is often sparse and highly distributed, and as a result progress in the field is more challenging to conduct. ENSAT-CANCER is an EU-FP7 funded initiative to develop a virtual research environment (VRE) offering a digitally interconnected infrastructure for distributed clinicians specialising in rare adrenal tumours to communicate and collaborate with distributed biomedical research communities. The core of the VRE is a registry that holds vital patient information from specialist centres around Europe, covering different types of adrenal tumours. The VRE also hosts a range of other enabling services including sample barcoding, bio-sample exchange mechanisms, an integrated linkage scheme to other trials and studies, summary statistics and report generation, image hosting - all of which are available in a seamless, security-driven environment. This paper presents the key challenges of this endeavour, the technical solutions that have been developed to address them and reporting the uptake and adoption of the work (currently at 2472 patient records and rising).

  9. Diabetes mellitus type 2 and subsite-specific colorectal cancer risk in men and women: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kort, Sander; Simons, C C J M; van den Brandt, Piet A; Goldbohm, R Alexandra Sandra; Arts, Ilja C W; de Bruine, Adriaan P; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L G; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Masclee, Ad A M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, studies differentiating between subsites of CRC are limited. We investigated how diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with subsite-specific CRC risk in men and women. The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer is a prospective study among 120 852 men and women aged 55-69 years old at baseline in 1986. Information on DM, anthropometric, dietary and lifestyle factors was self-reported at baseline. T2DM was defined as the diagnosis of DM after 30 years of age. Incident CRC cases were identified by record linkage with the Netherlands cancer registry and the Dutch pathology registry. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 1735 incident male CRC cases and 1321 female CRC cases were available for analyses. Subsite-specific hazard ratios (HRs) for CRC were estimated in case-cohort analyses using Cox regression. At baseline, 3.1% of subcohort members reported T2DM, of whom 80% were diagnosed after 50 years of age. Multivariable-adjusted models showed that the risk of proximal colon cancer was significantly increased in women with T2DM versus women without T2DM (HR=1.80, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-2.94). There was no association between T2DM and the risk of overall CRC, distal colon cancer and rectal cancer in women. In men, T2DM was not associated with overall CRC (HR=0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.64-1.50), or with risk at any subsite. This prospective study showed an increased risk of proximal colon cancer in women with T2DM compared with non-T2DM women.

  10. [Incidence and mortality of cancers appeared in the Hebei provincial cancer registry system in 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yutong; Liang, Di; Li, Daojuan; Zhai, Jingbo; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Junqing; Shan, Baoen

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the cancer incidence and mortality in Hebei cancer registry available areas in 2011. Data were collected from 8 population-based cancer registries systems in Hebei province. Incidence and mortality rates stratified by areas (urban/rural), sex, age group and cancer site were analyzed. 10 common cancers in different groups, proportions and cumulative rates were calculated. The Chinese population census in the year 2000 and Segi's populations were used for age-standardized incidence/mortality rates. In all the 8 cancer registries that covering a total of 4 573 293 population (2 139 779 in urban and 2 433 514 in rural areas), data was used for the analysis. The total new cancer incidence cases and deaths were 11 269 and 7 477, respectively. All the morphologically verified cancer cases (MV%) accounted for 75.26% while 3.85% of the incident cases were identified only through death certification records (DCO%). The mortality to incidence ratio appeared as 0.66. The crude incidence appeared in the Hebei cancer registration areas was 246.41/10⁵ (264.55/10⁵ in males and 227.75/10⁵ in females). The age-standardized incidence rates by Chinese standard population (ASIRC) and by world standard population (ASIRW) appeared as 207.13/10⁵ and 206.61/10⁵ respectively, with the cumulative incidence rates as (0-74 age years old) 23.57%. The cancer incidence and ASIRC were 242.64/10⁵ and 200.19/10⁵ in urban areas, whereas 249.72/10⁵ and 214.11/10⁵, respectively in rural areas. The crude mortality in Hebei cancer registration areas was 163.49/10⁵ (196.54/10⁵ in male, 129.51/10⁵ in female), with age-standardized mortality rates by Chinese standard population (ASMRC) and by world standard population (ASMRW) as 144.48/10⁵ and 147.69/10⁵. The cumulative mortality rate (0-74 age years old) was 14.71%. The cancer mortality (167.91/10⁵) in rural areas seemed higher than the mortality (158.47/10⁵) in urban areas. The most common sites of cancers were

  11. Melanoma of the skin in the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Sidsel Arnspang; Schmidt, Sigrun Alba Johannesdottir; Klausen, Siri; Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Gaist, David

    2018-01-15

    The nationwide Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Melanoma Database both record data on melanoma for purposes of monitoring, quality assurance and research. However, the data quality of the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database has not been formally evaluated. We estimated the positive predictive value (PPV) of melanoma diagnosis for random samples of 200 patients from the Cancer Registry (n=200) and the Melanoma Database (n=200) during 2004-2014, using the Danish Pathology Registry as 'gold-standard' reference. We further validated tumor characteristics in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database. Additionally, we estimated the PPV of in situ melanoma diagnoses in the Melanoma Database, and the sensitivity of melanoma diagnoses in 2004-2014. The PPVs of melanoma in the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database were 97% (95% CI, 94-99) and 100%. The sensitivity was 90% in the Cancer Registry and 77% in the Melanoma Database. The PPV of in situ melanomas in the Melanoma Database was 97% and the sensitivity was 56%. In the Melanoma Database, we observed PPVs of ulceration of 75% and Breslow thickness of 96%. The PPV of histologic subtypes varied between 87%-100% in the Cancer Registry and 93%-100% in the Melanoma Database. The PPVs for anatomical localization were 83%-95.0% in the Cancer Registry and 93%-100% in the Melanoma Database. The data quality in both the Cancer Registry and the Melanoma Database are high, supporting their use in epidemiologic studies.

  12. A Suitable Approach to Estimate Cancer Incidence in Area without Cancer Registry

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    Nicolas Mitton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Use of cancer cases from registries and PMSI claims database to estimate Département-specific incidence of four major cancers. Methods. Case extraction used principal diagnosis then surgery codes. PMSI cases/registry cases ratios for 2004 were modelled then Département-specific incidence for 2007 estimated using these ratios and 2007 PMSI cases. Results. For 2007, only colon-rectum and breast cancer estimations were satisfactorily validated for infranational incidence not ovary and kidney cancers. For breast, the estimated national incidence was 50,578 cases and the incidence rate 98.6 cases per 100,000 person per year. For colon-rectum, incidence was 21,172 in men versus 18,327 in women and the incidence rate 38 per 100,000 versus 24.8. For ovary, the estimated incidence was 4,637 and the rate 8.6 per 100,000. For kidney, incidence was 6,775 in men versus 3,273 in women and the rate 13.3 per 100.000 versus 5.2. Conclusion. Incidence estimation using PMSI patient identifiers proved encouraging though still dependent on the assumption of uniform cancer treatments and coding.

  13. Cancer survival in adult patients in Spain. Results from nine population-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirlaque, M D; Salmerón, D; Galceran, J; Ameijide, A; Mateos, A; Torrella, A; Jiménez, R; Larrañaga, N; Marcos-Gragera, R; Ardanaz, E; Sant, M; Minicozzi, P; Navarro, C; Sánchez, M J

    2017-07-17

    With the aim of providing cancer control indicators, this work presents cancer survival in adult (≥15 years) patients in Spain diagnosed during the period 2000-2007 from Spanish cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE project. Cancer cases from nine Spanish population-based cancer registries were included and analysed as a whole. All primary malignant neoplasms diagnosed in adult patients were eligible for the analysis. Cancer patients were followed until 31 December 2008. For each type of cancer, 1-, 3- and 5-year observed and relative survival were estimated by sex, age and years from diagnosis. Furthermore, age-standardized 5-year relative survival for the period 2000-2007 has been compared with that of the period 1995-1999. Skin melanoma (84.6 95% CI 83.0-86.2), prostate (84.6% 95% CI 83.6-85.6) and thyroid (84.2% CI 95% 82.0-86.6) cancers showed the highest 5-year relative survival, whereas the worst prognosis was observed in pancreatic (6% 95% CI 5.1-7.0) and oesophageal (9.4% 95% CI 7.9-11.1) cancers. Overall, survival is higher in women (58.0%) than in men (48.9%). The absolute difference in relative survival between 2000-2007 and 1995-1999 was positive for all cancers as a whole (+4.8% in men, +1.6% in women) and for most types of tumours. Survival increased significantly for chronic myeloid leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rectum cancer in both sexes, and for acute lymphoid leukaemia, prostate, liver and colon cancers in men and Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer in women. Survival patterns by age were similar in Europe and Spain. A decline in survival by age was observed in all tumours, being more pronounced for ovarian, corpus uteri, prostate and urinary bladder and less for head and neck and rectum cancers. High variability and differences have been observed in survival among adults in Spain according to the type of cancer diagnosed, from above 84% to below 10%, reflecting high heterogeneity. The differences in prognosis by age, sex

  14. Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry : Quality assurance in the care of patients with metastatic melanoma in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, Anouk; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; Leeneman, Brenda; Franken, Margreet G; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Haanen, John B A G; Gelderblom, Hans; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Aarts, Maureen J B; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C; Groenewegen, Gerard; de Groot, Jan Willem B; Hospers, Geke A P; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Koornstra, Rutger H; Kruit, Wim H; Louwman, Marieke W; Piersma, Djura; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S; Ten Tije, Albert J; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; Wouters, Michel W J M; van der Hoeven, Jacobus J M

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, the treatment of metastatic melanoma has changed dramatically due to the development of immune checkpoint and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors. A population-based registry, the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry (DMTR), was set up in July 2013 to assure

  15. Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry : Quality assurance in the care of patients with metastatic melanoma in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, Anouk; Schouwenburg, Maartje G.; Leeneman, Brenda; Franken, Margreet G.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Gelderblom, Hans; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A.; Aarts, Maureen J. B.; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W. P. J.; Blokx, Willeke A. M.; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Groenewegen, Gerard; de Groot, Jan Willem B.; Hospers, Geke A. P.; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Koornstra, Rutger H.; Kruit, Wim H.; Louwman, Marieke W. J.; Piersma, Djura; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S.; ten Tije, Albert J; Vreugdenhil, Gerard; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.; van der Hoeven, Jacobus J M

    Background: In recent years, the treatment of metastatic melanoma has changed dramatically due to the development of immune checkpoint and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors. A population-based registry, the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry (DMTR), was set up in July 2013 to assure

  16. Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry: Quality assurance in the care of patients with metastatic melanoma in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, A.; Schouwenburg, M.G.; Leeneman, B.; Franken, M.G.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Haanen, J.B.; Gelderblom, H.; Groot, C.A; Aarts, M.J.; Berkmortel, F.W. van den; Blokx, W.A.M.; Cardous-Ubbink, M.C.; Groenewegen, G.; Groot, J.W. de; Hospers, G.A.; Kapiteijn, E.; Koornstra, R.H.; Kruit, W.H.; Louwman, M.W.; Piersma, D.; Rijn, R.S. van; Tije, A.J. Ten; Vreugdenhil, G.; Wouters, M.W.; Hoeven, J.J.M. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, the treatment of metastatic melanoma has changed dramatically due to the development of immune checkpoint and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors. A population-based registry, the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry (DMTR), was set up in July 2013 to assure

  17. Cancer incidence in Arkhangelskaja Oblast in northwestern Russia. The Arkhangelsk Cancer Registry

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    Tkatsjov Anatolij V

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data concerning incidence and prevalence of cancer in the different regions of Russia have traditionally not been provided on a basis that facilitated comparison with data from countries in western parts of Europe. The oncological hospital in Arkhangelsk, in co-operation with Universitetet i Tromsø (Norway, has established a population based cancer registry for Arkhangelskaja Oblast (AO. AO is an administrative unit with 1.3 million inhabitants in northwestern Russia. The aim of this investigation was to assess the content and quality of the AO cancer registry (AKR, and to present the site-specific cancer-incidence rates in AO in the period 1993–2001. Methods The population in this study consisted of all individuals registered as residents of AO. All new cancer cases in the period 1993 – 2001, registered the AKR, were included in the study (ICD-10: C00-C95, except for C77-78. The annual gender and age-group-specific population figures were obtained from the AO statistics office. Results A total of 34 697 cases of primary cancers were included. The age-adjusted (world standard incidence rate for all sites combined was 164/100 000 for women and 281/100 000 for men. The highest incidence was for cancer of the trachea, bronchus and lung (16.3% of all cases, whereof 88.6 % of the cases were among men. Among women, cancer of the breast constituted 15.9 percent of all cases. The age-adjusted incidences of the most frequent cancer sites among men were: lung (77.4/100 000; stomach (45.9; rectum (13.4; oesophagus (13.0; colon (12.2; bladder (11.6; and prostate cancer (11.1. Among women they were: breast (28.5; stomach (19.7; colon (12.2; and ovary cancer (9.0. Conclusion Our findings confirm and strengthen the indication that the incidences of stomach, larynx, liver, pancreas, prostate, colon, bladder and melanoma cancer are quite different in male populations in Russia compared to many other European countries. Among women, most

  18. Prediagnostic smoking history, alcohol consumption, and colorectal cancer survival: the Seattle Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Baron, John; Newcomb, Polly A

    2011-11-01

    Smoking and alcohol consumption are associated with an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, it is unclear whether these exposures are associated with survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis. Men and women diagnosed with incident colorectal cancer between 1998 and 2007 in 13 counties in western Washington State were identified by using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registry. Information on smoking history and alcohol consumption was collected by telephone interview. Follow-up for mortality was completed through linkage to the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for associations among smoking, alcohol consumption, and mortality after colorectal cancer diagnosis. Stratified analyses were conducted by sex, age at diagnosis (cancer (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61) or those diagnosed before age 50 years (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.67-1.48). Alcohol consumption was not associated with disease-specific or all-cause mortality, regardless of patient or tumor characteristics. In addition to an association with disease risk, smoking is associated with increased mortality after colorectal cancer diagnosis. This association is especially pronounced for colorectal cancer with high microsatellite instability. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  19. Cancer Incidence in Egypt: Results of the National Population-Based Cancer Registry Program

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    Amal S. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper aims to present cancer incidence rates at national and regional level of Egypt, based upon results of National Cancer Registry Program (NCRP. Methods. NCRP stratified Egypt into 3 geographical strata: lower, middle, and upper. One governorate represented each region. Abstractors collected data from medical records of cancer centers, national tertiary care institutions, Health Insurance Organization, Government-Subsidized Treatment Program, and death records. Data entry was online. Incidence rates were calculated at a regional and a national level. Future projection up to 2050 was also calculated. Results. Age-standardized incidence rates per 100,000 were 166.6 (both sexes, 175.9 (males, and 157.0 (females. Commonest sites were liver (23.8%, breast (15.4%, and bladder (6.9% (both sexes: liver (33.6% and bladder (10.7% among men, and breast (32.0% and liver (13.5% among women. By 2050, a 3-fold increase in incident cancer relative to 2013 was estimated. Conclusion. These data are the only available cancer rates at national and regional levels of Egypt. The pattern of cancer indicated the increased burden of liver cancer. Breast cancer occupied the second rank. Study of rates of individual sites of cancer might help in giving clues for preventive programs.

  20. Trends in treatment, incidence and survival of hypopharynx cancer: a 20-year population-based study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Japke F; Timmermans, Adriana J; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Overbeek, Lucy I H; Smit, Laura A; Hilgers, Frans J M; Stuiver, Martijn M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2017-10-28

    Hypopharynx cancer has the worst prognosis of all head and neck squamous cell cancers. Since the 1990s, a treatment shift has appeared from a total laryngectomy towards organ preservation therapies. Large randomized trials evaluating treatment strategies for hypopharynx cancer, however, remain scarce, and frequently this malignancy is evaluated together with larynx cancer. Therefore, our aim was to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival of hypopharynx cancer. We performed a population-based cohort study including all patients diagnosed with T1-T4 hypopharynx cancer between 1991 and 2010 in the Netherlands. Patients were recorded by the national cancer registry database and verified by a national pathology database. 2999 patients were identified. The incidence increased significantly with 4.1% per year until 1997 and decreased non-significantly afterwards. For women, the incidence increased with 1.7% per year during the entire study period. Total laryngectomy as primary treatment significantly decreased, whereas radiotherapy and chemoradiation increased. The 5-year overall survival significantly increased from 28% in 1991-2000 to 34% in 2001-2010. Overall survival for T3 was equal for total laryngectomy and (chemo)radiotherapy, but for T4-patients the survival was significantly better after primary total laryngectomy (± adjuvant radiotherapy). This large population-based study demonstrates a shift in treatment preference towards organ preservation therapies. The 5-year overall survival increased significantly in the second decade. The assumed equivalence of organ preservation and laryngectomy may require reconsideration for T4 disease.

  1. Total energy intake and breast cancer risk in sisters: the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; John, Esther M; Knight, Julia A; Kaur, Manleen; Daly, Mary; Buys, Saundra; Andrulis, Irene L; Stearman, Beth; West, Dee; Terry, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    Energy restriction inhibits mammary tumor development in animal models. Epidemiologic studies in humans generally do not support an association between dietary energy intake and breast cancer risk, although some studies suggest a more complex interplay between measures of energy intake, physical activity, and body size. We examined the association between total energy intake jointly with physical activity and body mass index (BMI) and the risk of breast cancer among 1,775 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1995 and 2006 and 2,529 of their unaffected sisters, enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry. We collected dietary data using the Hawaii-Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort food frequency questionnaire. Using conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) associated with total energy intake, we observed an overall 60-70 % increased risk of breast cancer among women in the highest quartile of total energy intake compared to those in the lowest quartile (Q4 vs. Q1: OR = 1.6, 95 % CI: 1.3-2.0; P (trend) total energy intake and breast cancer risk across different strata of physical activity and BMI. Our results suggest that within sisters, high energy intake may increase the risk of breast cancer independent of physical activity and body size. If replicated in prospective studies, then these findings suggest that reductions in total energy intake may help in modifying breast cancer risk.

  2. Prediagnostic alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer survival: The Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Robinson, Jamaica R; Campbell, Peter T; Win, Aung Ko; Figueiredo, Jane C; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A

    2017-05-15

    Although previous studies have noted an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among moderate to heavy alcohol consumers in comparison with nondrinkers, the relation between alcohol consumption and CRC survival remains unclear. Cases of incident invasive CRC diagnosed between 1997 and 2007 were identified via population-based cancer registries at 4 study sites in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Study participants completed a risk-factor questionnaire on prediagnostic behaviors, including wine, beer, and liquor consumption, at the baseline. Prospective follow-up for survival was conducted for 4966 CRC cases. Cox regression was used to compare nondrinkers with individuals who consumed, on average, 1 or more servings of alcohol per day in the years preceding their CRC diagnosis with respect to overall and disease-specific survival. Separate analyses by beverage type, stratified by patient and tumor attributes, were also performed. All models were adjusted for the age at diagnosis, sex, study site, year of diagnosis, smoking history, body mass index, and education. Prediagnostic beer and liquor consumption was not associated with CRC survival; however, higher levels of wine consumption were modestly associated with a better prognosis overall (CRC-specific hazard ratio [HR], 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-1.03; overall HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.94). Similar patterns were noted in stratified analyses. These findings suggest that prediagnostic wine consumption is modestly associated with more favorable survival after CRC. Cancer 2017;123:1035-43. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Renal Cancer Patients with Unknown Ethnicity in Cancer Registry Data: Comparisons to Patients with Known Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Butts, Elizabeth; Rockswold, Paul D; Shriver, Craig D; Zhu, Kangmin

    2015-01-01

    Information on ethnicity is important for health disparity research and health service planning. However, information on ethnicity is often incomplete in large routine databases such as cancer registries. This study aimed to compare survival status and other characteristics between cancer patients with and without information on Hispanic ethnicity in cancer registry data. The study included 2,426 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed between 1988 and 2004 and identified from the US Department of Defense (DoD)'s Automated Central Tumor Registry (ACTUR) database. There were 1,353 non-Hispanic patients, 134 Hispanic patients, and 939 patients with unknown ethnicity. Patients were followed through death, date of last contact, or censored on December 31, 2007. Patients with unknown ethnicity exhibited significantly shorter survival than non-Hispanic or Hispanic patients (Log Rank P ethnicity, patients with unknown ethnicity were more likely to have advanced tumor stage at diagnosis and more likely to have missing information on tumor grade, size, and some demographic characteristics. After adjustment for demographic, tumor and treatment variables, patients with unknown ethnicity still exhibited significantly higher mortality than non-Hispanic patients (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69; 95% CI, 1.48-1.92), while Hispanic patients were not different from non-Hispanic patients (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.71-1.28). The shorter survival in the unknown ethnicity group was consistently observed in subgroups by age, race, stage, grade, and surgical treatment, suggesting factors other than those investigated in the current study may play a role in the survival differences between patients with and without information on Hispanic ethnicity. The poor survival of patients with unknown ethnicity in ACTUR warrants further research to elucidate missing mechanisms. Improvement in collection of data by reaching out for more engagement of patients, clinicians and registrars and

  4. [External evaluation of population-based cancer registries: the REDEPICAN Guide for Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Carmen; Molina, José Antonio; Barrios, Enrique; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Loria, Dora; Cueva, Patricia; Sánchez, María José; Chirlaque, María Dolores; Fernández, Leticia

    2013-11-01

    Evaluate the feasibility of the REDEPICAN Guide (Red Iberoamericana de Epidemiología y Sistemas de Información en Cáncer) and its adaptation to the current situation of population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) in Latin America and the Caribbean as a useful tool to improve these registries. Experts in cancer registries and health audits designed the guide and developed seven domains to evaluate in PBCRs. Several criteria were selected for each domain, with corresponding standards, scored according to three levels of compliance. Two training courses for external evaluators and three discussion panels for experts were organized. The guide was tested in six PBCRs in Latin America and Spain. The guide contains 68 criteria, 10 of which are considered essential for a PBCR. Based on its score, a registry is regarded as acceptable (41-199), good (200-299), or excellent (300-350). The registry methods domain accounts for 25% of the score, followed by completeness and validity (19%), dissemination of outcomes (19%), structure (13%), confidentiality and ethical aspects (11%), comparability (9%), and the procedures manual (3%). The pilot project enabled (1) enhancement of criteria and standards, (2) expansion of the quality concept to include client needs, and (3) strengthening the dissemination of outcomes section. Two of the Latin American registries that were evaluated improved their quality, meeting the standards of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Development of the REDEPICAN Guide has taken into account the context of the registries in Latin America and is a useful and innovative tool for improving the quality of PBCRs. Furthermore, it is ready for use in other countries and registries.

  5. Do Cervical Cancer Patients Diagnosed with Opportunistic Screening Live Longer? An Arkhangelsk Cancer Registry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena E. Roik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to compare cervical cancer (СС patients diagnosed with and without screening in terms of: (i sociodemographic and clinical characteristics; (ii factors associated with survival; and (iii, and levels of risk. A registry-based study was conducted using data from the Arkhangelsk Cancer Registry. It included women with newly diagnosed malignant neoplasm of the uterine cervix during the period of 1 January 2005 to 11 November 2016 (N = 1548. The Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Cox regression were applied. Most participants who were diagnosed by screening were at stage I and died less frequently from CC than those diagnosed without screening. The latter group was also diagnosed with СС at a younger age and died younger. Younger individuals and urban residents diagnosed with stage I and II, squamous cell carcinoma had longer survival times. Cox regression modeling indicated that the hazard ratio for death among women with CC diagnosed without screening was 1.61 (unadjusted and 1.37 (adjusted. CC diagnosed by screening, cancer stage, patient residence, histological tumor type, and age at diagnosis were independent prognostic variables of longer survival time with CC. Diagnosis of CC made within a screening program improved survival.

  6. Adding value to clinical trial registries: insights from Australian Cancer Trials Online, a website for consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, Rachel; Barratt, Alexandra; Askie, Lisa; McGeechan, Kevin; Arora, Sheena; Crossing, Sally; Currow, David; Tattersall, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Clinical trials registries are now operating in the USA, Europe, Australia, China, and India and more are planned. Trial registries could be an excellent source of information about clinical trials for patients and others affected by cancer as well as health care professionals, but may be difficult for patients to navigate and use. An opportunity arose in Australia to develop a consumer friendly cancer clinical trials website (Australian Cancer Trials Online (ACTO), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au) using an automated data feed from two large clinical trial registries. In this article, we describe aspects of this new website, and explore ways in which such a website may add value to clinical trial data which are already collected and held by trial registries. The development of ACTO was completed by a Web company working in close association with staff at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), and with consumer representatives. Data for the website were sourced directly and only from clinical trial registries, thus avoiding the creation of an additional trials database. It receives an automated, daily data feed of newly registered cancer clinical trials from both the ANZCTR and Clinical Trials.gov. The development of ACTO exemplifies the advantage of a local clinical trial registry working with consumers to provide accessible information about cancer clinical trials to meet consumers' information needs. We found that the inclusion of a lay summary added substantial value for consumers, and recommend that consideration be given to adding a lay summary to the mandatory data items collected by all trial registries. Furthermore, improved navigation, decision support tools, and consistency in data collection between clinical trial registries will also enable consumer websites to provide additional value for users. Clinical trial registration is not compulsory in Australia. If the additional cancer items (including a lay summary) are not provided

  7. Spatial-temporal analysis of prostate cancer incidence from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, 2000-2011

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    Ming Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among males, and the incidence in Pennsylvania, USA is considerably higher than nationally. Knowledge of regional differences and time trends in prostate cancer incidence may contribute to a better understanding of aetiologic factors and racial disparities in outcomes, and to improvements in preventive intervention and screening efforts. We used Pennsylvania Cancer Registry data on reported prostate cancer diagnoses between 2000 and 2011 to study the regional distribution and temporal trends of prostate cancer incidence in both Pennsylvania White males and Philadelphia metropolitan area Black males. For White males, we generated and mapped county-specific age-adjusted incidence and standardised incidence ratios by period cohort, and identified spatial autocorrelation and local clusters. In addition, we fitted Bayesian hierarchical generalised linear Poisson models to describe the temporal and aging effects separately in Whites state-wide and metropolitan Philadelphia blacks. Incidences of prostate cancer among white males declined from 2000-2002 to 2009-2011 with an increasing trend to some extent in the period 2006-2008 and significant variation across geographic regions, but less variation exists for metropolitan Philadelphia including majority of Black patients. No significant aging effect was detected for White and Black men, and the peak age group for prostate cancer risk varied by race. Future research should seek to identify potential social and environmental risk factors associated with geographical/racial disparities in prostate cancer. As such, there is a need for more effective surveillance so as to detect, reduce and control the cancer burden associated with prostate cancer.

  8. Spatial-temporal analysis of prostate cancer incidence from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Matthews, Stephen A; Iskandarani, Khaled; Li, Yimei; Li, Zheng; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-11-28

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among males, and the incidence in Pennsylvania, USA is considerably higher than nationally. Knowledge of regional differences and time trends in prostate cancer incidence may contribute to a better understanding of aetiologic factors and racial disparities in outcomes, and to improvements in preventive intervention and screening efforts. We used Pennsylvania Cancer Registry data on reported prostate cancer diagnoses between 2000 and 2011 to study the regional distribution and temporal trends of prostate cancer incidence in both Pennsylvania White males and Philadelphia metropolitan area Black males. For White males, we generated and mapped county-specific age-adjusted incidence and standardised incidence ratios by period cohort, and identified spatial autocorrelation and local clusters. In addition, we fitted Bayesian hierarchical generalised linear Poisson models to describe the temporal and aging effects separately in Whites state-wide and metropolitan Philadelphia blacks. Incidences of prostate cancer among white males declined from 2000-2002 to 2009-2011 with an increasing trend to some extent in the period 2006-2008 and significant variation across geographic regions, but less variation exists for metropolitan Philadelphia including majority of Black patients. No significant aging effect was detected for White and Black men, and the peak age group for prostate cancer risk varied by race. Future research should seek to identify potential social and environmental risk factors associated with geographical/racial disparities in prostate cancer. As such, there is a need for more effective surveillance so as to detect, reduce and control the cancer burden associated with prostate cancer.

  9. Quality of record linkage in a highly automated cancer registry that relies on encrypted identity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidtmann, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the absence of unique ID numbers, cancer and other registries in Germany and elsewhere rely on identity data to link records pertaining to the same patient. These data are often encrypted to ensure privacy. Some record linkage errors unavoidably occur. These errors were quantified for the cancer registry of North Rhine Westphalia which uses encrypted identity data. Methods: A sample of records was drawn from the registry, record linkage information was included. In parallel, plain text data for these records were retrieved to generate a gold standard. Record linkage error frequencies in the cancer registry were determined by comparison of the results of the routine linkage with the gold standard. Error rates were projected to larger registries.Results: In the sample studied, the homonym error rate was 0.015%; the synonym error rate was 0.2%. The F-measure was 0.9921. Projection to larger databases indicated that for a realistic development the homonym error rate will be around 1%, the synonym error rate around 2%.Conclusion: Observed error rates are low. This shows that effective methods to standardize and improve the quality of the input data have been implemented. This is crucial to keep error rates low when the registry’s database grows. The planned inclusion of unique health insurance numbers is likely to further improve record linkage quality. Cancer registration entirely based on electronic notification of records can process large amounts of data with high quality of record linkage.

  10. Recruitment of representative samples for low incidence cancer populations: Do registries deliver?

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    Sanson-Fisher Rob

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruiting large and representative samples of adolescent and young adult (AYA cancer survivors is important for gaining accurate data regarding the prevalence of unmet needs in this population. This study aimed to describe recruitment rates for AYAs recruited through a cancer registry with particular focus on: active clinician consent protocols, reasons for clinicians not providing consent and the representativeness of the final sample. Methods Adolescents and young adults aged 14 to19 years inclusive and listed on the cancer registry from January 1 2002 to December 31 2007 were identified. An active clinician consent protocol was used whereby the registry sent a letter to AYAs primary treating clinicians requesting permission to contact the survivors. The registry then sent survivors who received their clinician's consent a letter seeking permission to forward their contact details to the research team. Consenting AYAs were sent a questionnaire which assessed their unmet needs. Results The overall consent rate for AYAs identified as eligible by the registry was 7.8%. Of the 411 potentially eligible survivors identified, just over half (n = 232, 56% received their clinician's consent to be contacted. Of those 232 AYAs, 65% were unable to be contacted. Only 18 AYAs (7.8% refused permission for their contact details to be passed on to the research team. Of the 64 young people who agreed to be contacted, 50% (n = 32 completed the questionnaire. Conclusions Cancer registries which employ active clinician consent protocols may not be appropriate for recruiting large, representative samples of AYAs diagnosed with cancer. Given that AYA cancer survivors are highly mobile, alternative methods such as treatment centre and clinic based recruitment may need to be considered.

  11. Alcohol and ovarian cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study alcohol consumption in relation to ovarian cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer was initiated in 1986. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk factors for cancer was completed by 62,573

  12. Progress against laryngeal cancer in The Netherlands between 1989 and 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Marres, Henri A. M.; de Vries, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the larynx is a frequently occurring head and neck cancer in The Netherlands. The main risk factors are smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. The aim of our study was to evaluate the progress against laryngeal cancer by studying trends in incidence, mortality and survival in The

  13. Breast cancer diagnosis and death in the Netherlands: a changing burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, D. van der; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Heeten, GJ. den; Ripping, T.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lifetime risks are often used in communications on cancer to the general public. The most-cited estimate for breast cancer risk (1 in 8 women), however, appears to be outdated. Here we describe the breast cancer burden in the Netherlands over time by means of lifetime and age-conditional

  14. Burden of cancer in Malawi; common types, incidence and trends: National population-based cancer registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Msyamboza Kelias

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a majority of cases and deaths occurring in developing countries. While cancer of the lung, breast, colorectum, stomach and prostate are the most common types of cancer globally, in east and southern Africa these are less common and comprehensive data to inform policies are lacking. Methods Nationwide cancer registry was conducted between September and October 2010 in Malawi. New cancer cases registered from 2007 to 2010 were identified from hospital and clinic registers of 81 out of 84 health facilities providing cancer diagnosis, treatment or palliative care services. Demographic and cancer data were extracted from registers and case notes using a standard form. Results A total of 18,946 new cases of cancer were registered in Malawi from 2007-2010. Of these 55.9% were females, 7.2% were children aged less than 15 years, 76.5% were adults aged 15-59 years and 16.4% were elderly aged 60 years or more. Only 17.9% of the cases had histologically verified diagnosis, 33.2% were diagnosed clinically and 49.6% based on clinical and some investigations. Amongst females, cancer of the cervix was the commonest accounting for 45.4% of all cases followed by Kaposi sarcoma (21.1%, cancer of the oesophagus (8.2%, breast (4.6% and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (4.1%. In males, Kaposi sarcoma was the most frequent (50.7% then cancer of oesophagus (16.9%, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7.8, prostate (4.0% and urinary bladder (3.7%. Age-standardised incidence rate per 100,000 population for all types of cancer in males increased from 31 in 1999-2002 to 56 in 2007-2010. In females it increased from 29 to 69. Kaposi sarcoma and cancer of the oesophagus, cervical cancer and Kaposi sarcoma were the main causes for the increased incidence in males and females respectively. It was estimated that, annually at least 8,151 new cases of cancer (all types occur in Malawi. Conclusions This study provided

  15. Using cancer registry data for recruitment of sexual minority women: successes and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehmer, Ulrike; Clark, Melissa; Glickman, Mark; Timm, Alison; Sullivan, Mairead; Bradford, Judy; Bowen, Deborah J

    2010-07-01

    To identify and recruit an unknown and presumably small subgroup of survivors, that is, lesbian or bisexual women with breast cancer. This report describes our multistep approach to recruit a representative sample of heterosexual and sexual minority breast cancer survivors. We used census data to identify geographic areas with a greater prevalence of sexual minority women (SMW), that is, lesbian and bisexual women. We then obtained the breast cancer cases from a cancer registry for these geographic areas. In the absence of sexual orientation data in cancer registries, all potentially eligible women with breast cancer needed to be contacted by telephone to determine their sexual orientation. Among the 1341 women screened who answered the question about sexual orientation, 6.3% were SMW. Overall, we processed 4143 cases to obtain completed data on 69 SMW and 257 heterosexual women with breast cancer. Our findings suggest that it is resource intensive but feasible to recruit a representative sample of breast cancer survivors of different sexual orientations. Our findings can inform future studies that seek to recruit sexual minority populations from cancer registries about some of the limitations to this approach.

  16. Establishment of the Fox Chase Network Breast Cancer Risk Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thompson, W.D. Autosomal Dominant Inheritance of Early-Onset Breast Cancer. Cancer, 73(3):643-651, 2/1/94. Ezzell, Carol . Breast Cancer Genes: Cloning...Promotion and Risk Prevention: Applications for Cancer Survivors. 0 N F 16(3):335-340, 1989. Van Riper, Marcia, Pridham, K., and Ryff , C. Symbolic

  17. Cost of breast cancer based on real-world data: a cancer registry study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Stefano; Russo, Antonio

    2017-01-26

    In European countries, it is difficult for local health organizations to determine the resources allocated to different hospitals for breast cancer. The aim of the current study was to examine the costs of breast cancer during the different phases of the diagnostictherapeutic sequence based on real world data. To identify breast cancer cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2011, we used the cancer registry of the Agency for Health Protection of the Province of Milan (3.2 million inhabitants). A generalized linear model controlling for patient age, cancer stage and Charlson co-morbidity index was used to calculate the adjusted mean costs for each hospital and for each study phase. Regression analyses were based on dependent variables of individual costs (diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and total cost were logtransformed. The following independent variables were included as covariates: age at diagnosis, hospital volume, stage, job category, educational level, marital status, comorbidities, deprivation index. Total and mean costs were computed for several variables and for each phase. On average for each subject, the costs were collected over 2.5 years. A total of 12,580 breast cancer cases were studied. The mean cost of diagnosis was €414, the mean cost of treatment was €8,780, the mean overall cost of follow-up was approximately €2,351, and the mean total direct medical cost was €10,970. The age of the patients, stage of tumor and employment level of the patient were significantly correlated with the variability of the costs. The highest variability in costs was observed for the follow-up costs, in which 38% of hospitals fell outside the 95% confidence interval. In the overspending-hospitals, patients received an intensive follow-up regimen with scintigraphy and thoracic CAT (computerized axial tomography). In this study, which represents the first population-level study of its kind in Italy, we estimated all direct medical costs for the 6-month period before

  18. [Surgical health care patterns and cancer cost: two studies using population registry data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, S; Arveux, P; Mercier, M; Gauthier, M

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the first study was to analyze the surgical health care patterns for operated cases colorectal cancer. The role of surgery was analyzed for 732 cases diagnosed between 1988 and 1991 and recorded by the Doubs Cancer Registry, France. Young patients were more inclined to surgery than the older patients: 41% before 65 years and 27% after 65 (p Doubs MSA (the rural branch of the French Social Security). The average cost of a cancer varied from 53,800 FF to 82,600 FF, according to cancer site. Transportation costs represented from 7% to 15% of the total cost. These two studies outline the usefulness of cancers registries as a tool for health authorities looking for a better efficiency of the health care system.

  19. Cancer incidence rates in Turkey in 2006: a detailed registry based estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Sultan; Yakut, Cankut; Özdemir, Raziye; Karakilinç, Hülya; Özalan, Saniye; Marshall, Sarah F; Karaoğlanoğlu, Okan; Anbarcioğlu, Zehra; Üçüncü, Nurşen; Akin, Ümit; Özen, Emire; Özgül, Nejat; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Tuncer, Murat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a detailed report on cancer incidence in Turkey, a relatively large country with a population of 72 million. We present the estimates of the cancer burden in Turkey for 2006, calculated using data from the eight population based cancer registries which have been set up in selected provinces representative of sociodemographic patterns in their regions. We calculated age specific and age adjusted incidence rates (AAIR-world standard population) for each of registries separately. We assigned a weighting coefficient for each registry proportional to the population size of the region which the registry represents. We pooled a total of 24,428 cancers (14,581 males, 9,847 females). AAIRs per 100 000 were: 210.1 in men and 129.4 in women for all cancer sites excluding non-melanoma skin cancer. The AAIR per 100 000 men was highest for lung cancer (60.3) followed by prostate (22.8), bladder (19.6), stomach (16.3) and colo-rectal (15.4) cancers. Among women the rate per 100 000 was highest for breast cancer (33.7) followed by colorectal (11.5), stomach (8.8), thyroid (8.8) and lung (7.7). The most striking findings about the cancer incidence in the provinces were the high incidence rates for stomach and esophageal cancers in Erzurum and high stomach cancer incidence rates in Trabzon for both sexes. We are thus able to present the most accurate and realistic estimations for cancer incidence in Turkey so far. Lung, prostate, bladder, stomach, colorectal, larynx cancers in men and breast, colorectal, stomach, thyroid, lung, corpus uteri cancers in women are the leading cancers respectively. This figure shows us tobacco related cancers, lung, bladder and larynx, predominate in men. Concurrently, we analyzed the data for each province separately, giving us the opportunity to present the differences in cancer patterns among provinces. The high incidences of stomach and esophageal cancers in East and high incidence of stomach cancer in

  20. Antegrade Dissection and Reentry as Part of the Hybrid Chronic Total Occlusion Revascularization Strategy: A Subanalysis of the RECHARGE Registry (Registry of CrossBoss and Hybrid Procedures in France, the Netherlands, Belgium and United Kingdom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeremans, Joren; Dens, Jo; Spratt, James C; Bagnall, Alan J; Stuijfzand, Wynand; Nap, Alexander; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Wilson, William; Hanratty, Colm G; Wilson, Simon; Faurie, Benjamin; Avran, Alexandre; Bressollette, Erwan; Egred, Mohaned; Knaapen, Paul; Walsh, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Development of the CrossBoss and Stingray devices for antegrade dissection and reentry (ADR) of chronic total occlusions has improved historically suboptimal outcomes. However, the outcomes, safety, and failure modes of the technique have to be studied in a larger patient cohort. This preplanned substudy of the RECHARGE registry (Registry of CrossBoss and Hybrid Procedures in France, the Netherlands, Belgium and United Kingdom) aims to evaluate the value and use of ADR and determine its future position in contemporary chronic total occlusion intervention. Patients were selected if an ADR strategy was applied. Outcomes, safety, and failure modes of the technique were assessed. The ADR technique was used in 23% (n=292/1253) of the RECHARGE registry and was mainly applied for complex lesions (Japanese chronic total occlusion score=2.7±1.1). ADR was the primary strategy in 30% (n=88/292), of which 67% were successful. Bail-out ADR strategies were successful in 63% (n=133/210). The Controlled ADR (ie, combined CrossBoss-Stingray) subtype was applied most frequently (32%; n=93/292) and successfully (81%; n=75/93). Overall per-lesion success rate was 78% (n=229/292), after use of additional bail-out strategies. The inability to reach the distal target zone (n=48/100) or to reenter (n=43/100) most commonly led to failure. ADR-associated major events occurred in 3.4% (n=10/292). Although mostly applied as a bail-out strategy for complex lesions, the frequency, outcomes, and low complication rate of the ADR technique and its subtypes confirm the benefit and value of the technique in hybrid chronic total occlusion percutaneous coronary intervention, especially when antegrade wiring or retrograde approaches are not feasible. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02075372. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  2. Phenotypic heterogeneity of hereditary gynecologic cancers: a report from the Creighton hereditary cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie; Stacy, Mark; Watson, Patrice

    2013-12-01

    To determine the validity of observations suggesting a significant dichotomy of gynecologic cancers determined by linkage to specific genetic defects associated with two major autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndromes; the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for female carriers of germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, associated with the Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, and in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6, associated with Lynch syndrome, who were registered with invasive uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancers between January 1, 1959 and December 31, 2010. From 217 such cases, a total of 174 subjects, consisting of 95 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and 79 carriers of mutations in MMR genes, were identified who had current signed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act forms and complete primary diagnostic pathology reports and clinical records. Data meticulously extracted from these cases were categorized and statistically analyzed. There were highly significant differences between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and carriers of MMR gene mutations in the proportion of serous carcinomas compared with endometrioid carcinomas of the uterus, including cervix and endometium (p cancers (p cancer, and endometrioid carcinoma was found in two of four MMR gene mutation carriers with fallopian tube cancers. All other fallopian tube cancers were serous carcinomas. Seven BRCA1 and one BRCA2 mutation carriers were diagnosed with primary peritoneal serous carcinoma; no peritoneal carcinomas were registered in MMR gene mutation carriers. Nine of 14 gynecologic cancers with associated endometriosis in mutation carriers were endometrioid or endometrioid mixed carcinomas compared with just three of other histologic types. Primary breast cancers, that characterize the HBOC syndrome, were much more frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; while multiple gynecologic cancers and

  3. Unraveling of the major genetic defects in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G.L. Hermans (Karin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn developed countries, prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and a major cause of cancer-related death (1). In The Netherlands 93 new cases per 100,000 men were detected in 2003 (The Netherlands Cancer Registry). Prostate cancer incidence varies between different ethnic

  4. Epidemiology of Breast Cancer among Bahraini Women; Data from the Bahrain Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randah R. Hamadeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of breast cancer among the Bahraini female population in the years 2000‒2010 and examine its health policy implications. Methods: All breast cancer cases in the Bahrain Cancer Registry from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2010 were included. Results: There were 1,005 cases, 12.7% of which were detected by screening. The overall mean age at diagnosis was 50.9 years (95% confidence interval 50.1–51.6. The age-standardised incidence rate declined from 58.2 per 100,000 in 2000 to 44.4 per 100,000 in 2010. The majority of cases were infiltrating ductal carcinoma (76.9%. Of the registered cases, 44.1% and 48.1% had an unknown grade and stage, respectively. The five-year survival rate was 63 ± 2%. Conclusion: The low percentage of cases detected by screening merits further evaluation of Bahrain’s screening programme. More effort should be made to reduce the proportion of unknown stage and grade breast cancers. Future research has to be directed towards understanding the reasons for Bahrain having the highest incidence rate of breast cancer in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.

  5. Japan Pancreatic Cancer Registry; 30th year anniversary: Japan Pancreas Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Shinichi; Toma, Hiroki; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Okusaka, Takuji; Nakao, Akimasa; Hatori, Takashi; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Akio; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-10-01

    Since 1981, the Japan Pancreas Society has been hosting a nationwide pancreatic cancer registry. To commemorate its 30th anniversary, we review its history and latest achievement. During 3 decades, more than 350 leading institutions in Japan contributed voluntarily to register and periodic follow-up. The registry was modified to protect privacy by encrypting and hash algorithm. From 1981 to 2007, 32,619 cumulative records were analyzed. The overall survival of invasive cancer was improved significantly. More patients with earlier stage or with intraductal and cystic neoplasms underwent resection. The strongest prognostic factor of Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) stage IIA and IIB tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head was histological grade, followed by tumor size, extent of lymph node dissection, and postoperative chemotherapy. The 5-year survival rate of Union for International Cancer Control stage 0 reached 85%. The improvement of survival of patients with invasive cancer in Japan can be attributed to the introduction of effective chemotherapies, regionalization, and the earlier diagnosis and treatment. Simple definition of "early pancreatic cancer" is needed. At the 30th year anniversary, the Japan Pancreas Society nationwide pancreatic cancer registry is more shining than ever for current perspectives and for future diagnostic and treatment tactics.

  6. Hyperthermia-related clinical trials on cancer treatment within the ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; van Rhoon, Gerard; Crezee, Hans; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Bodis, Stephan; Beck, Marcus; Nadobny, Jacek; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. This paper summarises all recent clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. The records of 175,538 clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were

  7. Trends in treatment and survival for advanced laryngeal cancer: A 20-year population-based study in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Adriana J; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Overbeek, Lucy I H; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F; van Tinteren, Harm; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine time trends for primary treatment modalities in advanced laryngeal cancer, overall survival (OS), and laryngectomy-free interval (LFI) over the last 2 decades in The Netherlands. We conducted an analysis of T3 to T4 laryngeal cancer data from 2 combined national (population-based and pathology-based) cancer registries. A total of 2072 T3 cases (14.7%) and 1722 T4 cases (12.2%) were identified. Total laryngectomy as primary treatment modality decreased, whereas radiotherapy (RT) increased. For T3 disease, 5-year OS after primary total laryngectomy (+/- adjuvant RT), RT, and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) was 49%, 47%, and 45%, respectively. For T4 disease, this was 48%, 34%, and 42% (overall p < .0001), respectively. Five-year LFI for T3 disease was 81% (RT) and 77% (CRT), and for T4 disease it was 81% and 87%, respectively. From 1991 to 2010 total laryngectomy as primary treatment modality for advanced laryngeal cancer decreased and RT increased. T3 disease showed similar survival rates for all primary treatment modalities. For T4 disease, total laryngectomy (+ adjuvant RT) showed the best survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1247-E1255, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Determinants of treatment waiting times for head and neck cancer in the Netherlands and their relation to survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten, Michel C; Hoebers, Frank J P; Kross, Kenneth W; van Werkhoven, Erik D; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; van Dijk, Boukje A C

    2015-03-01

    Waiting to start treatment has been shown to be associated with tumor progression and upstaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). This diminishes the chance of cure and might lead to unnecessary mortality. We investigated the association between waiting times and survival in the Netherlands and assessed which factors were associated to longer waiting times. Patient (age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), tumor (site, stage) and treatment (type, of institute of diagnosis/treatment) characteristics for patients with HNSCC who underwent treatment were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) for 2005-2011. Waiting time was defined as the number of days between histopathological diagnosis and start of treatment. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression was used to evaluate survival. In total, 13,140 patients were included, who had a median waiting time of 37days. Patients who were more likely to wait longer were men, patients with a low SES, oropharynx tumors, stage IV tumors, patients to be treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation, and patients referred for treatment to a Head and Neck Oncology Center (HNOC) from another hospital. The 5-year overall survival was 58% for all patients. Our multivariable Cox regression model showed that longer waiting time, was significantly related to a higher hazard of dying (p<0.0001). This is the first large population-based study showing that longer waiting time for surgery, radiotherapy or chemoradiation is a significant negative prognostic factor for HNSCC patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Global Cancer Surveillance Framework Within Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance: Making the Case for Population-Based Cancer Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, Marion; Znaor, Ariana; Mery, Les; Bray, Freddie

    2017-01-01

    The growing burden of cancer among several major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) requires national implementation of tailored public health surveillance. For many emerging economies where emphasis has traditionally been placed on the surveillance of communicable diseases, it is critical to understand the specificities of NCD surveillance and, within it, of cancer surveillance. We propose a general framework for cancer surveillance that permits monitoring the core components of cancer control. We examine communalities in approaches to the surveillance of other major NCDs as well as communicable diseases, illustrating key differences in the function, coverage, and reporting in each system. Although risk factor surveys and vital statistics registration are the foundation of surveillance of NCDs, population-based cancer registries play a unique fundamental role specific to cancer surveillance, providing indicators of population-based incidence and survival. With an onus now placed on governments to collect these data as part of the monitoring of NCD targets, the integration of cancer registries into existing and future NCD surveillance strategies is a vital requirement in all countries worldwide. The Global Initiative for Cancer Registry Development, endorsed by the World Health Organization, provides a means to enhance cancer surveillance capacity in low- and middle-income countries. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Cancer Prevalence in Aichi, Japan for 2012: Estimates Based on Incidence and Survival Data from Population-Based Cancer Registries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa-Senda, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Michiyo; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Koide, Kayoko; Kondo, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Hideo; Ito, Hidemi

    2017-08-27

    Background: Cancer is the leading cause of death among both men and women in Japan. Monitoring cancer prevalence is important because prevalence data play a critical role in the development and implementation of health policy. We estimated cancer prevalence in 2012 based on cancer incidence and 5-year survival rate in Aichi Prefecture using data from a population-based cancer registry, the Aichi Cancer Registry, which covers 7.4 million people. Methods: The annual number of incident cases between 2008 and 2012 was used. Survival data of patients diagnosed in 2006–2008 and followed up until the end of 2012 were selected for survival analysis. Cancer prevalence was estimated from incidence and year-specific survival probabilities. Cancer prevalence was stratified by sex, cancer site (25 major cancers), and age group at diagnosis. Results: The estimated prevalence for all cancers in 2012 was 68,013 cases among men, 52,490 cases among women, with 120,503 cases for both sexes. Colorectal cancer was the most incident cancer with 6,654 cases, accounting for 16.0% of overall incident cases, followed by stomach cancer with 5,749 cases (13.8%) and lung cancer with 5,593 cases (13.4%). Prostate cancer was the most prevalent among men, accounting for 21.5%, followed by colorectal and stomach cancers. Breast cancer was the most prevalent among women, accounting for 28.6%, followed by colorectal, stomach, and uterine cancers. Conclusion: This study provides cancer prevalence data that could serve as useful essential information for local governments in cancer management, to carry out more practical and reasonable countermeasures for cancer. Creative Commons Attribution License

  11. [Risk of second cancer after germinal cell testicular cancer: study from the data of Doubs cancer registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Langlois-Jacques, Carole; Bontemps, Patrick; Cléro, Enora; Bosset, Jean-François; Danzon, Arlette

    2007-07-01

    Testicular cancer, both seminoma and nonseminoma tumours, account for 1 to 1.5 % of male cancers. Many studies have shown that the risk of a second cancer after radiotherapy is dependent on the size of the exposure fields and the strength of delivered doses of radiotherapy. According to the literature, the relative risk of second cancer among patients treated by irradiation for seminoma limited to the testis varies from 1.5 to 1.9. We conducted a retrospective epidemiological study to measure the risk of second cancer in a population treated for both seminoma and nonseminoma tumours. The study period included patients who were diagnosed from 1978 to 2002. Data were provided by the Doubs cancer registry. Among these 291 cases of testicular cancer, we found 11 cases of second cancer after 157 seminomas (stomach, lungs, testis, ORL, kidney and oesophagus), and 3 cases after 134 nonseminomas (thyroid, kidney and testis). We found a high risk for second pulmonary and testicular cancers (standardised incidence ratio almost statistically significant). While our results are not conclusive regarding the etiology of these second cancers, they do form a useful, comparative basis for further study. They constitute the first step of a study that will be carried out on the risk related to radiation after orchidectomy.

  12. Height, weight weight change, and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brandt, P. A.; Dirx, M. J.; Ronckers, C. M.; van den Hoogen, P.; Goldbohm, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The association between several anthropometric indices and breast cancer risk was evaluated within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, which began in 1986 and is conducted among 62,573 women aged 55 to 69 years at baseline. After 4.3 years of follow-up, data on 626 women with incident

  13. Time-space trends in cancer incidence in The Netherlands in 1989–2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A.; Coebergh, Jan W.W.; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-01-01

    Incidence of cancer may vary within a country and over time because of previous differences in exposure to risk factors or interventions for early detection (screening). This study describes time-space trends of incidence of common cancer sites across the Netherlands during the period 1989–2003 and

  14. Determinants of regional differences in lung cancer mortality in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, A. E.; Looman, C. W.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Although regional differences in lung cancer mortality are likely to be attributable to regional differences in tobacco smoking, studies in various countries found only weak relationships. This paper aimed at explaining regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the Netherlands. In a first

  15. Active and passive smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Background: To date, cigarette smoking is the most consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. We prospectively examined the role of active cigarette smoking, smoking cessation, and passive smoking as determinants for pancreatic cancer. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852

  16. Dietary folate and folate vitamers and the risk of prostate cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, B.A.J.; Cremers, P.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine the association between intake of folate, and specific folate vitamers, and the risk of advanced and total prostate cancer. Methods: The association between dietary folate and prostate cancer risk was evaluated in The Netherlands Cohort Study

  17. Fat and K-ras mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Schouten, L.J.; Koedijk, F.D.H.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Associations between dietary intake of various fats and specific K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) were investigated within the framework of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (NLCS). After 7.3 years of follow-up and with exclusion of the first 2.3 years, 448 colon and 160

  18. Anthropometry, physical activity, and endometrial cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Although obesity is an established risk factor for endometrial cancer, evidence linking risk to height, weight change since age 20, and physical activity is limited. In this case-cohort study, 62 573 women from The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer were followed up from 1986 to 1995, and

  19. Magnesium intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P.A. van den; Smits, K.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Energy-adjusted magnesium intake was nonsignificantly inversely related to risk of colorectal cancer (n=2328) in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer that started in 1986 (n=58 279 men and 62 573 women). Statistically significant inverse trends in risk were observed in overweight subjects

  20. Modest improvement in 20 years of kidney cancer care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, S.A. van de; Aben, K.K.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Haanen, J.B.; Herpen, C.M. van; Verhoeven, R.H.A.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Oosterwijk, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: For an evaluation of the progress achieved in the field of kidney cancer care in the Netherlands in the last decades, we described trends in incidence, treatment, mortality and relative survival. METHODS: All adult patients newly diagnosed with kidney cancer between 1989 and 2009 (N=32,545)

  1. Dietary patterns associated with male lung cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, H.F.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to study the association between dietary patterns and lung cancer incidence in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer. The baseline measurement of this prospective case cohort study that was completed by 58,279 men in 1986 included a self-administered

  2. Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Brands, Marieke T.; Geurts, Sandra M. E.; Merkx, Matthias A. W.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Information on epidemiology is essential to evaluate care for the growing group of oral cancer patients. We investigated trends in incidence, mortality and relative survival rates for oral cavity cancer (OCC) and its subsites in the Netherlands from 1991 to 2010, and relate these to changes in stage

  3. Gastric Cancer Trends and Treatment: Strategies in the Netherlands: Challenges Ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Dassen (A. E.)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In this thesis trends and treatment of gastric cancer in the Netherlands are discussed. Gastric cancer is a challenging disease, because outcome with respect to postoperative mortality and long-term survival remains dismal; improvement of diagnostics and treatment

  4. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerbroks, A.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and endometrial cancer. Methods: In 1986, the Netherlands Cohort Study was initiated. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other cancer risk factors was completed by 62,573 women. Follow-up for

  5. Specialized care and survival of ovarian cancer patients in The Netherlands: Nationwide cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vernooij (Flora); A.P.M. Heintz (Peter); P.O. Witteveen (Petronella); M. van der Heiden-Van der Loo (Margriet); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is much debate on the necessity of regionalization of ovarian cancer care. We investigated the association between hospital type and survival of patients with ovarian cancer in The Netherlands. Methods: A retrospective, population-based cohort study was performed on all

  6. Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues represented 11% of all cancers (skin excluded); some presented unusual sex ratios. For breast, cervical, colorectal and thyroid cancer, respectively 57%, 42%, 28% and 60% of the cases were under 50 years of age. This was attributable to particularly low numbers of cases ...

  7. The incidence and histo-pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer in a population based cancer registry in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsidzira, Leolin; Chokunonga, Eric; Gangaidzo, Innocent T; Rusakaniko, Simbarashe; Borok, Margaret; Matsena-Zingoni, Zvifadzo; Thomson, Sandie; Ramesar, Raj; Matenga, Jonathan A

    2016-10-01

    Data on colorectal cancer (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa is mainly based on hospital series which suggest low incidence and frequent early onset cancers. This study characterises colorectal cancer in a population-based cancer registry in Zimbabwe. Cases of CRC recorded by the Zimbabwe National Cancer Registry between 2003 and 2012 were analysed. Demographic and pathological characteristics were compared according to ethnicity and age. Trends in age standardised incidence rates (ASR) were determined. There were 886 and 216 cases of CRC among black Africans and Caucasians respectively, and 26% of the black Africans were younger than 40 years. Signet ring cell carcinomas were more common among black Africans compared to Caucasians (4% vs 1%, p=0.027). ASR increased by 1.9%/year and 3.9%/year among black African males and females respectively. CRC incidence is rising among black Africans and has unique demographic and pathological characteristics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Establishment of the Fox Chase Network Breast Cancer Risk Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    its prevalence in this population, whether certain segments of this population share an excessive risk, and implications for genetic testing. -1- The...the true prevalence of breast cancer gene(s) in the population. Despite widespread public interest in breast cancer, many first degree relatives of...of relatives c. ethnicity and/or ancestral origins d. consanguinity e. confirmation of full sibship, relations f. medical, reproductive, and surgical

  9. Suicide death and hospital-treated suicidal behaviour in asylum seekers in the Netherlands: a national registry-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oostrum Irene EA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several suicide and suicidal behaviour risk factors are highly prevalent in asylum seekers, but there is little insight into the suicide death rate and the suicidal behaviour incidence in this population. The main objective of this study is to assess the burden of suicide and hospital-treated non-fatal suicidal behaviour in asylum seekers in the Netherlands and to identify factors that could guide prevention. Methods We obtained data on cases of suicide and suicidal behaviour from all asylum seeker reception centres in the Netherlands (period 2002-2007, age 15+. The suicide death rates in this population and in subgroups by sex, age and region of origin were compared with the rate in the Dutch population; the rates of hospital-treated suicidal behaviour were compared with that in the population of The Hague using indirect age group standardization. Results The study included 35 suicide deaths and 290 cases of hospital-treated suicidal behaviour. The suicide death rate and the incidence of hospital-treated suicidal behaviour differed between subgroups by sex and region of origin. For male asylum seekers, the suicide death rate was higher than that of the Dutch population (N = 32; RR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.37-2.83. No difference was found between suicide mortality in female asylum seekers and in the female general population of the Netherlands (N = 3; RR = 0.73; 95%CI 0.15-2.07. The incidence of hospital-treated suicidal behaviour was high in comparison with the population of The Hague for males and females from Europe and the Middle East/South West Asia, and low for males and females from Africa. Health professionals knew about mental health problems prior to the suicidal behaviour for 80% of the hospital-treated suicidal behaviour cases in asylum seekers. Conclusions In this study the suicide death rate was higher in male asylum seekers than in males in the reference population. The incidence of hospital-treated suicidal behaviour

  10. Accuracy of cause of death data routinely recorded in a population-based cancer registry: impact on cause-specific survival and validation using the Geneva cancer registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Information on the underlying cause of death of cancer patients is of interest because it can be used to estimate net survival. The population-based Geneva Cancer Registry is unique because registrars are able to review the official cause of death. This study aims to describe the difference between the official and revised cause-of-death variables and the impact on cancer survival estimates. Methods The recording process for each cause of death variable is summarised. We describe the differences between the two cause-of-death variables for the 5,065 deceased patients out of the 10,534 women diagnosed with breast cancer between 1970 and 2009. The Kappa statistic and logistic regression are applied to evaluate the degree of concordance. The impact of discordance on cause-specific survival is examined using the Kaplan Meier method. Results The overall agreement between the two variables was high. However, several subgroups presented a lower concordance, suggesting differences in calendar time and less attention given to older patients and more advanced diseases. Similarly, the impact of discordance on cause-specific survival was small on overall survival but larger for several subgroups. Conclusion Estimation of cancer-specific survival could therefore be prone to bias when using the official cause of death. Breast cancer is not the more lethal cancer and our results can certainly not be generalised to more lethal tumours. PMID:24373194

  11. Building cancer registries in a lower resource setting: The 10-year experience of Golestan, Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandel, Gholamreza; Semnani, Shahryar; Fazel, Abdolreza; Honarvar, Mohammadreza; Taziki, MohammadHossein; Sedaghat, SeyedMehdi; Abdolahi, Nafiseh; Ashaari, Mohammad; Poorabbasi, Mohammad; Hasanpour, Susan; Hosseini, SeyedAhmad; Mansuri, SeyedMohsen; Jahangirrad, Ataollah; Besharat, Sima; Moghaddami, Abbas; Mirkarimi, Honeyehsadat; Salamat, Faezeh; Ghasemi-Kebria, Fatemeh; Jafari, Nastaran; Shokoohifar, Nesa; Gholami, Masoomeh; Sadjadi, Alireza; Poustchi, Hossein; Bray, Freddie; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2018-02-01

    The Golestan population-based cancer registry (GPCR) was established in Golestan province, Northern Iran, within the Asian belt with predominance of upper-gastrointestinal cancers. We aimed to present the experiences of the registry in a resource-limited setting over the 10 years since its inception (2004-2013). The GPCR was established as a research project to enable sustainable funding. A clear plan was developed for use of the GPCR data. New primary cancers were registered based on international standards, indices of data quality were routinely assessed and age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) per 100,000 person-years calculated using IARC's CanReg-5 software. Overall, 19807 new cancer cases were registered during the study period, an average of 1981 cases per annum, with overall ASR of 175.0 and 142.4 in males and females, respectively. The GPCR data suggested gastrointestinal and breast cancers as the most common malignancies in Golestan province. We observed increasing incidence rates of breast and colorectal cancers but declining trends of esophageal cancer. Overall, indices of data quality were within acceptable ranges. The GPCR data have been included in IARC's Cancer Incidence in Five Continents series, were used in 21 research projects, and published as 30 research papers. The key ingredients for the successful establishment and maintenance of the GPCR included sustainable sources of funding, a clear action plan for the use of data as well as stakeholder cooperation across all areas of the registration. The GPCR may be considered as a model for planning population-based cancer registries in lesser-resourced settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting RET in Patients With RET-Rearranged Lung Cancers: Results From the Global, Multicenter RET Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautschi, O.; Milia, J.; Filleron, T.; Wolf, J.; Carbone, D.P.; Owen, D.; Camidge, R.; Narayanan, V.; Doebele, R.C.; Besse, B. de; Remon-Masip, J.; Janne, P.A.; Awad, M.M.; Peled, N.; Byoung, C.C.; Karp, D.D.; Heuvel, M. van den; Wakelee, H.A.; Neal, J.W.; Mok, T.S.K.; Yang, J.C.H.; Ou, S.I.; Pall, G.; Froesch, P.; Zalcman, G.; Gandara, D.R.; Riess, J.W.; Velcheti, V.; Zeidler, K.; Diebold, J.; Fruh, M.; Michels, S.; Monnet, I.; Popat, S.; Rosell, R.; Karachaliou, N.; Rothschild, S.I.; Shih, J.Y.; Warth, A.; Muley, T.; Cabillic, F.; Mazieres, J.; Drilon, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In addition to prospective trials for non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that are driven by less common genomic alterations, registries provide complementary information on patient response to targeted therapies. Here, we present the results of an international registry of patients with

  13. Height, weight, weight change, and ovarian cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the relation between anthropometry and the risk of ovarian cancer, their results have been inconsistent. The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer was initiated in 1986. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk

  14. Misclassification of race/ethnicity in a population-based cancer registry (United States).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Scarlett L; Glaser, Sally L

    2006-08-01

    Cancer registry data on race/ethnicity are vital for understanding cancer patterns in population subgroups, as they inform public health policies for allocating resources and form the bases of etiologic hypotheses. However, accuracy of cancer registry data on race/ethnicity has not been systematically evaluated. By comparing race/ethnicity in the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry to self-reported race/ethnicity for patients from 14 racial/ethnic groups, we determined the accuracy of this variable and the patient and hospital characteristics associated with disagreement. The extent of misclassification (measured by sensitivity and predictive value positive (PV+)) varied across racial/ethnic groups (total n=11,676). Sensitivities and PV+'s were high (exceeding 90%) for non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks, moderate for Hispanics and some Asian subgroups (70-90%), and very low for American Indians (race/ethnicity disagreed for 11% of the sample. In a multivariate model, disagreement was associated with non-White race/ethnicity, younger age, being married, being foreign-born but preferring to speak English, and diagnosis in a large hospital. Improving data quality for race/ethnicity will be most effectively attempted at the reporting source. We advocate a concerted effort to systematize collection of these patient data across all facilities, which may be more feasible given electronic medical admissions forms.

  15. Using a statistical process control chart during the quality assessment of cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Zachary M; German, Robert R; Wilson, Reda J; Wu, Manxia

    2011-01-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) charts may be used to detect acute variations in the data while simultaneously evaluating unforeseen aberrations that may warrant further investigation by the data user. Using cancer stage data captured by the Summary Stage 2000 (SS2000) variable, we sought to present a brief report highlighting the utility of the SPC chart during the quality assessment of cancer registry data. Using a county-level caseload for the diagnosis period of 2001-2004 (n=25,648), we found the overall variation of the SS2000 variable to be in control during diagnosis years of 2001 and 2002, exceeded the lower control limit (LCL) in 2003, and exceeded the upper control limit (UCL) in 2004; in situ/localized stages were in control throughout the diagnosis period, regional stage exceeded UCL in 2004, and distant stage exceeded the LCL in 2001 and the UCL in 2004. Our application of the SPC chart with cancer registry data illustrates that the SPC chart may serve as a readily available and timely tool for identifying areas of concern during the data collection and quality assessment of central cancer registry data.

  16. Comparison of Naturally Conceived and IVF-DZ Twins in the Netherlands Twin Registry: A Developmental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E. M.; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2011-01-01

    In a large set of twin pairs, we compared twins born after IVF to naturally conceived twins with respect to birth characteristics, growth, attainment of motor milestones, and emotional and behavioral problems. Twin families were registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. We included 1534 dizygotic (DZ) twins born after IVF, 5315 naturally conceived (NC) DZ twins, and 1504 control NC DZ twins who were matched to the IVF twins based on maternal age, maternal educational level, smoking during pregnancy, gestational age, and offspring sex. Data were obtained by longitudinal surveys sent to fathers, mothers, and teachers at ages 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, and 12 years. Results showed no differences in growth, in attainment of motor milestones, and in behavioral development between IVF and matched NC twins. It can be concluded that for nearly all aspects, development in IVF and NC children is similar. PMID:22132337

  17. Comparison of Naturally Conceived and IVF-DZ Twins in the Netherlands Twin Registry: A Developmental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina E. M. van Beijsterveldt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a large set of twin pairs, we compared twins born after IVF to naturally conceived twins with respect to birth characteristics, growth, attainment of motor milestones, and emotional and behavioral problems. Twin families were registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. We included 1534 dizygotic (DZ twins born after IVF, 5315 naturally conceived (NC DZ twins, and 1504 control NC DZ twins who were matched to the IVF twins based on maternal age, maternal educational level, smoking during pregnancy, gestational age, and offspring sex. Data were obtained by longitudinal surveys sent to fathers, mothers, and teachers at ages 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, and 12 years. Results showed no differences in growth, in attainment of motor milestones, and in behavioral development between IVF and matched NC twins. It can be concluded that for nearly all aspects, development in IVF and NC children is similar.

  18. Survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer: twenty-year data from two SEER registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cserni Gábor

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many researchers are interested to know if there are any improvements in recent treatment results for metastatic breast cancer in the community, especially for 10- or 15-year survival. Methods Between 1981 and 1985, 782 and 580 female patients with metastatic breast cancer were extracted respectively from the Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER database. The lognormal statistical method to estimate survival was retrospectively validated since the 15-year cause-specific survival rates could be calculated using the standard life-table actuarial method. Estimated rates were compared to the actuarial data available in 2000. Between 1991 and 1995, further 752 and 632 female patients with metastatic breast cancer were extracted respectively from the Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland registries. The data were analyzed to estimate the 15-year cause-specific survival rates before the year 2005. Results The 5-year period (1981–1985 was chosen, and patients were followed as a cohort for an additional 3 years. The estimated 15-year cause-specific survival rates were 7.1% (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.8–12.4 and 9.1% (95% CI, 3.8–14.4 by the lognormal model for the two registries of Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland respectively. Since the SEER database provides follow-up information to the end of the year 2000, actuarial calculation can be performed to confirm (validate the estimation. The Kaplan-Meier calculation for the 15-year cause-specific survival rates were 8.3% (95% CI, 5.8–10.8 and 7.0% (95% CI, 4.3–9.7 respectively. Using the 1991–1995 5-year period cohort and followed for an additional 3 years, the 15-year cause-specific survival rates were estimated to be 9.1% (95% CI, 3.8–14.4 and 14.7% (95% CI, 9.8–19.6 for the two registries of Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland respectively. Conclusions For the period 1981–1985, the 15

  19. Survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer: twenty-year data from two SEER registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Patricia; Yu, Edward; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Vlastos, Georges

    2004-09-02

    Many researchers are interested to know if there are any improvements in recent treatment results for metastatic breast cancer in the community, especially for 10- or 15-year survival. Between 1981 and 1985, 782 and 580 female patients with metastatic breast cancer were extracted respectively from the Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The lognormal statistical method to estimate survival was retrospectively validated since the 15-year cause-specific survival rates could be calculated using the standard life-table actuarial method. Estimated rates were compared to the actuarial data available in 2000. Between 1991 and 1995, further 752 and 632 female patients with metastatic breast cancer were extracted respectively from the Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland registries. The data were analyzed to estimate the 15-year cause-specific survival rates before the year 2005. The 5-year period (1981-1985) was chosen, and patients were followed as a cohort for an additional 3 years. The estimated 15-year cause-specific survival rates were 7.1% (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.8-12.4) and 9.1% (95% CI, 3.8-14.4) by the lognormal model for the two registries of Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland respectively. Since the SEER database provides follow-up information to the end of the year 2000, actuarial calculation can be performed to confirm (validate) the estimation. The Kaplan-Meier calculation for the 15-year cause-specific survival rates were 8.3% (95% CI, 5.8-10.8) and 7.0% (95% CI, 4.3-9.7) respectively. Using the 1991-1995 5-year period cohort and followed for an additional 3 years, the 15-year cause-specific survival rates were estimated to be 9.1% (95% CI, 3.8-14.4) and 14.7% (95% CI, 9.8-19.6) for the two registries of Connecticut and San Francisco-Oakland respectively. For the period 1981-1985, the 15-year cause-specific survival for the Connecticut and the San Francisco

  20. Genetic variations in SMAD7 are associated with colorectal cancer risk in the colon cancer family registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejuan Jiang

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide studies identified a risk locus for colorectal cancer at 18q21, which maps to the SMAD7 gene. Our objective was to confirm the association between SMAD7 SNPs and colorectal cancer risk in the multi-center Colon Cancer Family Registry.23 tagging SNPs in the SMAD7 gene were genotyped among 1,592 population-based and 253 clinic-based families. The SNP-colorectal cancer associations were assessed in multivariable conditional logistic regression.Among the population-based families, both SNPs rs12953717 (odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.49, and rs11874392 (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.92 were associated with risk of colorectal cancer. These associations were similar among the population- and the clinic-based families, though they were significant only among the former. Marginally significant differences in the SNP-colorectal cancer associations were observed by use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cigarette smoking, body mass index, and history of polyps.SMAD7 SNPs were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. There was evidence suggesting that the association between rs12953717 and colorectal cancer risk may be modified by factors such as smoking and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  1. Cancer patterns among children of Turkish descent in Germany: A study at the German Childhood Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaatsch Peter

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer risks of migrants might differ from risks of the indigenous population due to differences in socioeconomic status, life style, or genetic factors. The aim of this study was to investigate cancer patterns among children of Turkish descent in Germany. Methods We identified cases with Turkish names (as a proxy of Turkish descent among the 37,259 cases of childhood cancer registered in the German Childhood Cancer Registry (GCCR during 1980–2005. As it is not possible to obtain reference population data for children of Turkish descent, the distribution of cancer diagnoses was compared between cases of Turkish descent and all remaining (mainly German cases in the registry, using proportional cancer incidence ratios (PCIRs. Results The overall distribution of cancer diagnoses was similar in the two groups. The PCIRs in three diagnosis groups were increased for cases of Turkish descent: acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (PCIR 1.23; CI (95% 1.02–1.47, Hodgkin's disease (1.34; 1.13–1.59 and Non-Hodgkin/Burkitt lymphoma (1.19; 1.02–1.39. Age, sex, and period of diagnosis showed no influence on the distribution of diagnoses. Conclusion No major differences were found in cancer patterns among cases of Turkish descent compared to all other cases in the GCCR. Slightly higher proportions of systemic malignant diseases indicate that analytical studies involving migrants may help investigating the causes of such cancers.

  2. Cancer incidence and incidence rates in Japan in 2009: a study of 32 population-based cancer registries for the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Megumi; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Shibata, Akiko; Katanoda, Kota; Sobue, Tomotaka; Nishimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    The Japan Cancer Surveillance Research Group aimed to estimate the cancer incidence in Japan in 2009 based on data collected from 32 of 37 population-based cancer registries, as part of the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) project. The incidence of only primary invasive cancer in Japan for 2009 was estimated to be 775 601. Stomach cancer and breast cancer were the leading types of cancer in males and females, respectively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Williams, Melanie [Texas Cancer Registry, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas (United States); Jiang, Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niu, Jiangong [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad [Florida Cancer Data System, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J. [New York State Cancer Registry, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  4. International incidence of childhood cancer, 2001-10: a population-based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Colombet, Murielle; Ries, Lynn A G; Moreno, Florencia; Dolya, Anastasia; Bray, Freddie; Hesseling, Peter; Shin, Hee Young; Stiller, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death in children worldwide, and the recorded incidence tends to increase with time. Internationally comparable data on childhood cancer incidence in the past two decades are scarce. This study aimed to provide internationally comparable local data on the incidence of childhood cancer to promote research of causes and implementation of childhood cancer control. This population-based registry study, devised by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in collaboration with the International Association of Cancer Registries, collected data on all malignancies and non-malignant neoplasms of the CNS diagnosed before age 20 years in populations covered by high-quality cancer registries with complete data for 2001-10. Incidence rates per million person-years for the 0-14 years and 0-19 years age groups were age-adjusted using the world standard population to provide age-standardised incidence rates (WSRs), using the age-specific incidence rates (ASR) for individual age groups (0-4 years, 5-9 years, 10-14 years, and 15-19 years). All rates were reported for 19 geographical areas or ethnicities by sex, age group, and cancer type. The regional WSRs for children aged 0-14 years were compared with comparable data obtained in the 1980s. Of 532 invited cancer registries, 153 registries from 62 countries, departments, and territories met quality standards, and contributed data for the entire decade of 2001-10. 385 509 incident cases in children aged 0-19 years occurring in 2·64 billion person-years were included. The overall WSR was 140·6 per million person-years in children aged 0-14 years (based on 284 649 cases), and the most common cancers were leukaemia (WSR 46·4), followed by CNS tumours (WSR 28·2), and lymphomas (WSR 15·2). In children aged 15-19 years (based on 100 860 cases), the ASR was 185·3 per million person-years, the most common being lymphomas (ASR 41·8) and the group of epithelial tumours and melanoma (ASR 39·5

  5. Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchbika, Zineb; Haddad, Houssam; Benchakroun, Nadia; Eddakaoui, Houda; Kotbi, Souad; Megrini, Anis; Bourezgui, Hanane; Sahraoui, Souha; Corbex, Marilys; Harif, Mhamed; Benider, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    Few population-based cancer registries are in place in developing countries. In order to know the burden of cancer in Moroccan population, cancer registry initiative was put in place in the Casablanca district, the biggest city of Morocco. The data collected covers 3.6 millions inhabitant and included Casablanca city and the administrative region. The data collected in the years 2005-07 show that the top 5 forms of cancers in women were breast (ASR: 36.4 per 100,000), cervical (15.0), thyroid (6.7), colon-rectum (5.8), and ovarian (5.3); the top 5 cancers in men were lung (25.9), prostate (13.5), bladder (8.7), colon-rectum (8.1) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7.2). Tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues represented 11% of all cancers (skin excluded); some presented unusual sex ratios. For breast, cervical, colorectal and thyroid cancer, respectively 57%, 42%, 28% and 60% of the cases were under 50 years of age. This was attributable to particularly low numbers of cases recorded among old people, and the young age of the general population; the observed age-specific incidences under age 50 were not higher than in western countries. Cancers at young ages were particularly common in women: 67% of the cases were under 50. Stage at diagnosis could be obtained for 82% of the breast cancer cases and was as follows: 28% local, 63% regional and 9% distant, in the absence of screening. These first population-based data have provided an invaluable resource for the national cancer control plan of Morocco, and will be useful tool to its future evaluation.

  6. Cancer incidence in Morocco: report from Casablanca registry 2005-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchbika, Zineb; Haddad, Houssam; Benchakroun, Nadia; Eddakaoui, Houda; Kotbi, Souad; Megrini, Anis; Bourezgui, Hanane; Sahraoui, Souha; Corbex, Marilys; Harif, Mhamed; Benider, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Few population-based cancer registries are in place in developing countries. In order to know the burden of cancer in Moroccan population, cancer registry initiative was put in place in the Casablanca district, the biggest city of Morocco. Methods The data collected covers 3.6 millions inhabitant and included Casablanca city and the administrative region. Results The data collected in the years 2005-07 show that the top 5 forms of cancers in women were breast (ASR: 36.4 per 100,000), cervical (15.0), thyroid (6.7), colon-rectum (5.8), and ovarian (5.3); the top 5 cancers in men were lung (25.9), prostate (13.5), bladder (8.7), colon-rectum (8.1) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (7.2). Tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues represented 11% of all cancers (skin excluded); some presented unusual sex ratios. For breast, cervical, colorectal and thyroid cancer, respectively 57%, 42%, 28% and 60% of the cases were under 50 years of age. This was attributable to particularly low numbers of cases recorded among old people, and the young age of the general population; the observed age-specific incidences under age 50 were not higher than in western countries. Cancers at young ages were particularly common in women: 67% of the cases were under 50. Stage at diagnosis could be obtained for 82% of the breast cancer cases and was as follows: 28% local, 63% regional and 9% distant, in the absence of screening. Conclusion These first population-based data have provided an invaluable resource for the national cancer control plan of Morocco, and will be useful tool to its future evaluation. PMID:24570792

  7. Socioeconomic status and breast cancer survival in the southeastern Netherlands, 1980-1989

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Th.M. Schrijvers (Carola); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); L.H. van der Heijden (L.); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSocioeconomic differences in breast cancer survival in the southeastern Netherlands between 1980 and 1989 were studied (n = 3928), as was the impact of prognostic factors (stage at diagnosis, morphology, and treatment) on such differences. An area-based measure of Socioeconomic status

  8. Conditional survival for long-term colorectal cancer survivors in the Netherlands: who do best?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erning, F.N. van; Steenbergen, L.N. van; Lemmens, V.E.; Rutten, H.J.; Martijn, H.; Spronsen, D.J. van; Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: With the increase in the number of long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, there is a growing need for subgroup-specific analysis of conditional survival. METHODS: All 137,030 stage I-III CRC patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2008 aged 15-89years were selected from the

  9. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Jonker, Marianne A.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E. M.; Moll, Annette C.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  10. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, C.J.; Henneman, L.; Hout, A.H. van der; Jonker, M.A.; Tops, C.M.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Luijt, R.B. van der; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Redeker, E.J.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Moll, A.C.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  11. Prostate cancer: trends in incidence, survival and mortality in the Netherlands, 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Houterman, S.; Verhoeven, R.H.A.; Schroder, F.H.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Kil, P.J.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer occurrence and stage distribution changed dramatically during the end of the 20th century. This study aimed to quantify and explain trends in incidence, stage distribution, survival and mortality in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2006. METHODS: Population-based data

  12. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  13. Animal products, calcium and protein and prostate cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Prostate cancer risk in relation to consumption of animal products, and intake of calcium and protein was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study. At baseline in 1986, 58,279 men aged 55-69 years completed a self-administered 150-item food frequency questionnaire and a questionnaire on other

  14. Vegetable and fruit consumption and prostate cancer risk: A cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Dorant, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    The association between 21 vegetables and eight fruits and prostate cancer risk was assessed in the Netherlands Cohort Study among 58,279 men of ages 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. After 6.3 years of follow-up, 610 cases with complete vegetable data and 642 cases with complete fruit data were

  15. Spatial variation in stage distribution in colorectal cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M. A. G.; Pukkala, E.; Klaase, J. M.; Siesling, S.

    Background: In the Netherlands the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased, mainly in the eastern part of the country. Patient delay due to unawareness or ignorance of symptoms and differences in use of diagnostic tools could have influence on the stage distribution. The aim of this study was

  16. Surgery for Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in the Netherlands: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, R. van de; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Hout, J. in't; Zusterzeel, P.L.M.; Gorp, T. Van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The value of secondary cytoreductive surgery (SCS) in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer is controversial. The aim of this population-based study was to investigate the role of SCS in the Netherlands. METHODS: Data of 408 patients who underwent SCS between 2000 and 2013

  17. Salt intake, cured meat consumption, refrigerator use and stomach cancer incidence: A prospective cohort study (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P.A. van den; Botterweck, A.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Many case-control studies have reported that salt and cured meat intake are positively, and refrigerator use is inversely, associated with stomach cancer risk. In the current prospective study these associations were evaluated. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852

  18. Disparities in quality of care for colon cancer between hospitals in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Jansen-Landheer, M.L.E.A.; van de Velde, C.J.H.; Siesling, Sabine; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Aim of this study was to describe treatment patterns and outcome according to region, and according to hospital types and volumes among patients with colon cancer in the Netherlands. Methods: All patients with invasive colon carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2001–2006 were selected from

  19. Estimating the variance of cancer prevalence from population-based registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigli, Anna; Mariotto, Angela; Clegg, Limin X; Tavilla, Andrea; Corazziari, Isabella; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Hachey, Mark; Steve, Scoppa

    2006-06-01

    Cancer prevalence is the proportion of people in a population diagnosed with cancer in the past and still alive. One way to estimate prevalence is via population-based registries, where data on diagnosis and life status of all incidence cases occurring in the covered population are collected. In this paper, a method to estimate the complete prevalence and its variance from population-based registries is presented. In order to obtain unbiased estimates of the complete prevalence, its calculation can be thought as made by three steps. Step 1 counts the incidence cases diagnosed during the period of registration and still alive. Step 2 estimates the expected number of survivors among cases lost to follow-up. Step 3 estimates the complete prevalence by taking into account cases diagnosed before the start of registration. The combination of steps 1+2 is defined as the counting method, to estimate the limited duration prevalence; step 3 is the completeness index method, to estimate the complete prevalence. For early established registries, steps 1+2 are more important than step 3, because observation time is long enough to include all past diagnosed cases still alive in the prevalence data. For more recently established registries, step 3 is by far the most critical because a large part of prevalence might have been diagnosed before the period of registration (Corazziari I, Mariotto A, Capocaccia R. Correcting the completeness bias of observed prevalence. Tumori 1999; 85: 370-81). The work by Clegg LX, Gail MH, Feuer EJ. Estimating the variance of disease-prevalence estimates from population-based registries. Biometrics 2002; 55: 1137-44. considers the problem of the variability of the estimated prevalence up to step 2. To our knowledge, no other work has considered the variability induced by correcting for the unobserved cases diagnosed before the period of registration, crucial to estimate the prevalence in recent registries. An analytic approach is considered to

  20. Progression of a solitary plasmacytoma to multiple myeloma. A population-based registry of the northern Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Esther G M; Leene, Marnix; Veeger, Nic; Vos, Hanneke J; Ong, Francisca; Smit, Wilma G J M; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Hogenes, Marieke; Beijert, Max; Diepstra, Arjan; Vellenga, Edo

    2016-11-01

    Plasmacytoma is characterized by a local accumulation of monoclonal plasma cells without criteria for multiple myeloma (MM). The current treatment regimen is local radiotherapy. However, more than 50% of patients develop MM within 2 years after treatment. A population-based registry was consulted for the diagnosis of solitary plasmacytoma between 1988 and 2011. Progression to MM and prognostic features for progression to MM were scored, including hypoxia inducible factors (HIF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, also termed VEGFA) and micro-vessel density (MVD) expression in biopsy material. A total of 76 patients were included, 34% having extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) while 66% had a solitary plasmacytoma of the bone (SBP). Median follow-up was 89 months, (7-293 months). In Seventy per cent of SBP patients developed MM with a median time to progression of 19 months (5-293). Three patients (12%) with EMP developed MM. High expression of VEGF and HIF-2α (also termed EPAS1) was demonstrated in conjunction with an increased MVD in 66% of the patients. No association could be shown between angiogenesis parameters and progression to MM. In conclusion, this population-based study demonstrates that SBP patients have a higher risk of developing MM following local radiotherapy, indicating that this group might benefit from added systemic chemotherapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Euthanasia requests and cancer types in the Netherlands: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarshi, Ebun; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2009-02-01

    Cancer patients have generally requested for euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) more frequently than others. However, different terminal cancers are accompanied by different clinical courses. This study seeks to explore the relationship, if any, between EAS requesters and cancer types, as relates to the provision of end-of-life care in the Netherlands. Standardized questionnaires were retrospectively sent to all general practitioners (GPs) in 10 of 23 GP-districts in the Netherlands. Of the 3614 respondents (60%), 1442 could describe a most recent EAS request from a cancer patient. Compared to all home cancer deaths, lung, pancreas, stomach oesophagus, lip-mouth-throat cancers and melanomas occur more frequently in the group of cancer patients who requested for EAS; while prostate, haemo-lymphatic, urinary tract, bladder and uterus cancer occur relatively less frequently. Vomiting, shortness of breath and anxiousness were symptoms positively associated, and old age was negatively associated with cancers in which patients relatively frequently request for EAS. There are differences in the extent to which patients with different cancer types request for EAS. Although shortness of breath, vomiting and anxiousness are associated with cancer types in which patients relatively frequently request for EAS, most symptoms are not associated with this. Possibly a common pathway, including more existential concerns, is important in the last stages of life.

  2. Denominators: An attempt to adjust for cancer incidence and mortality rates and its role in cancer registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kalita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is an important public health burden in India and around the Globe. Incident cases of cancer are reported continuously, and trends in incidence rates vary among five yearly age group. In India National census is carried out after every 10 years since 1951, the latest census is carried out in 2011. As Incident cases of cancer are reported continuously for 5 year age group and estimation of rates and trends for a given year of interest fall in-between two census period population estimation of five yearly age group, which serves as Denominator sense importance. Denominator serves as the most essential part of any cancer registry program as it used for calculation of various rates for five yearly age group such as age-standardized rate, crude rate, truncated rate, cumulative risk etc., Calculated by different registries and Individual Researchers, Government organizations, etc. Currently most of the registries used individual exponential growth rate and differential distribution method to estimate the growth rate. However, it is found that the calculated rates and risk be suffering from bias most of the time since some method over and underestimate the growth rate while some does not able to maintain consistency. Here, an attempt is made to adjust the world standard population with two census period to estimate the five yearly age group for a given year of interest of a geographical region falls in-between two census period. It is also shown here that how the proposed model "age-adjusted population growth model" maintain the overall growth as in exponential growth model and difference distribution method also maintains the estimated growth rate is as found in difference distribution method. Further, it is tried to highlight the points how these method overcomes the problems compared with other methods that are currently used by registries.

  3. Denominators: An attempt to adjust for cancer incidence and mortality rates and its role in cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Manoj; Nirmolia, Tulika

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is an important public health burden in India and around the Globe. Incident cases of cancer are reported continuously, and trends in incidence rates vary among five yearly age group. In India National census is carried out after every 10 years since 1951, the latest census is carried out in 2011. As Incident cases of cancer are reported continuously for 5 year age group and estimation of rates and trends for a given year of interest fall in-between two census period population estimation of five yearly age group, which serves as Denominator sense importance. Denominator serves as the most essential part of any cancer registry program as it used for calculation of various rates for five yearly age group such as age-standardized rate, crude rate, truncated rate, cumulative risk etc., Calculated by different registries and Individual Researchers, Government organizations, etc. Currently most of the registries used individual exponential growth rate and differential distribution method to estimate the growth rate. However, it is found that the calculated rates and risk be suffering from bias most of the time since some method over and underestimate the growth rate while some does not able to maintain consistency. Here, an attempt is made to adjust the world standard population with two census period to estimate the five yearly age group for a given year of interest of a geographical region falls in-between two census period. It is also shown here that how the proposed model "age-adjusted population growth model" maintain the overall growth as in exponential growth model and difference distribution method also maintains the estimated growth rate is as found in difference distribution method. Further, it is tried to highlight the points how these method overcomes the problems compared with other methods that are currently used by registries.

  4. Cancer-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome: analysis of 85 cases from a national registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesesne, J B; Rothschild, N; Erickson, B; Korec, S; Sisk, R; Keller, J; Arbus, M; Woolley, P V; Chiazze, L; Schein, P S

    1989-06-01

    A registry of suspected cases of cancer-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (C-HUS) was established in May 1984. Records of 85 patients from the registry, all with history of cancer, hematocrit less than or equal to 25%, platelet count less than 100,000, and serum creatinine greater than or equal to 1.6 mg/dL were subjected to in-depth analysis. Eighty-nine percent of patients had adenocarcinoma, including 26% with gastric cancer. Microangiopathic hemolysis was reported in 83 patients; coagulation studies were normal with rare exception. Bone marrow examination ruled out chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression in 68 of 85. Thirty-five percent of patients were without evident cancer at time of syndrome development. Mitomycin (MMC) was part of the treatment regimen in 84 patients; all but nine received a cumulative dose greater than 60 mg. Pulmonary edema, generally noncardiogenic, developed in 65% of patients, often after blood product transfusions. C-HUS has a high mortality: over 50% of patients died of or with syndrome, most within 8 weeks of syndrome development. Conventional treatment was ineffective, although ten of 21 treated with staphylococcal protein A (SPA) immunopheresis showed significant responses. Statistical analysis found only absence of obvious tumor and treatment with SPA to suggest favorable prognosis. C-HUS is distinguishable from related syndromes such as childhood HUS, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), consumption coagulopathy, and microangiopathic hemolysis associated with advanced carcinoma. MMC is likely involved in the development of C-HUS; the risk of developing C-HUS after treatment with MMC is between 4% and 15%. However, possible bias in patients referred to the registry and reports of non-MMC C-HUS cases must be remembered. Recommendations include careful monitoring of renal and hematologic function in patients treated with MMC, aggressive nontransfusion in patients with suspected C-HUS, and consideration of treatment with SPA

  5. Genomics of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learnt from 25 Years of the Singapore Polyposis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Min Hoe; Tan, Wah Siew; Liu, Yanqun; Cheah, Peh Yean; Loi, Carol Tt; Tang, Choong Leong

    2015-08-01

    The Singapore Polyposis Registry (SPR) was established in 1989 in Singapore General Hospital (SGH). The aims were to provide a central registry service to facilitate identification, surveillance and management of families and individuals at high risk of colorectal cancer. This is a review of published literature in the department. The registry currently has 253 families with several genetic conditions-93 familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) families, 138 Amsterdam-criteria positive presumed Lynch syndrome (LS) families, 12 families with Peutz Jeghers syndrome, 2 families with Cowden's syndrome, and 8 families with hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS). There are also 169 families with a strong family history of colorectal cancer but no abnormal genes yet identified. In FAP, a diagnostic tool developed has allowed a 94% local APC germline detection rate in FAP families. Knowledge obtained studying the phenotype of FAP patients has allowed better choice of surgery between ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) against an ileal-rectal anastomosis (IRA). In LS, our review has noted a highly heterogenous mutational spectrum and novel variants made up 46.7% (28/60) of all variants identified in this cohort. This may suggest that our Southeast Asian ethnic groups have distinct mutational variants from Western populations. Pathogenic mutations were only confined to MLH1 and MSH2, and identified in 28.8% of families. The impact of predictive gene testing for hereditary cancer risk in clinical practice has allowed evolution of care. Risk-reducing surgery and aggressive surveillance allows reduction in morbidity and mortality of patients. The SPR will continue to grow and improve outcomes in hereditary colorectal cancer patients and families.

  6. Lung cancer and occupation: A New Zealand cancer registry-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Marine; McLean, David; Mannetje, Andrea 't; Dryson, Evan; Walls, Chris; McKenzie, Fiona; Maule, Milena; Cheng, Soo; Cunningham, Chris; Kromhout, Hans; Blair, Aaron; Pearce, Neil

    2011-02-01

    There are many proven and suspected occupational causes of lung cancer, which will become relatively more important over time, as smoking prevalence decreases. We interviewed 457 cases aged 20-75 years notified to the New Zealand Cancer Registry during 2007-2008, and 792 population controls. We collected information on demographic details, potential confounders, and employment history. Associations were estimated using logistic regression adjusted for gender, age, ethnicity, smoking, and socio-economic status. Among occupations of a priori interest, elevated odds ratios (ORs) were observed for sawmill, wood panel and related wood-processing plant operators (OR 4.63; 95% CI 1.05-20.29), butchers (OR 8.77, 95% CI 1.06-72.55), rubber and plastics products machine operators (4.27; 1.16-15.66), heavy truck drivers (2.24; 1.19-4.21) and workers in petroleum, coal, chemical and associated product manufacturing (1.80; 1.11-2.90); non-significantly elevated risks were also observed for loggers (4.67; 0.81-27.03), welders and flame-cutters (2.50; 0.86-7.25), pressers (5.74; 0.96-34.42), and electric and electronic equipment assemblers (3.61; 0.96-13.57). Several occupations and industries not of a priori interest also showed increased risks, including nursing associate professionals (5.45; 2.29-12.99), enrolled nurses (7.95; 3.10-20.42), care givers (3.47; 1.40-8.59), plant and machine operators and assemblers (1.61; 1.20-2.16), stationary machine operators and assemblers (1.67; 1.22-2.28), food and related products processing machine operators (1.98; 1.23-3.19), laborers and related elementary service workers (1.45; 1.05-2.00), manufacturing (1.34; 1.02-1.77), car retailing (3.08; 1.36-6.94), and road freight transport (3.02; 1.45-6.27). Certain occupations and industries have increased lung cancer risks in New Zealand, including wood workers, metal workers, meat workers, textile workers and drivers. Am. J. Ind. Med. 54:89-101, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Copyright

  7. Vegetable and fruit consumption and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands : cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, L.E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Verhoeven, D.T.H.; Poppel, G.A.F.C. van; Sturmans, F.; Hermus, R.J.J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The purpose was to study the association between vegetable and fruit consumption and lung cancer incidence using 1074 cases after 6.3 years of follow-up in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: Dietary intake was assessed using a 150-item food-frequency questionnaire. Multivariate models

  8. The long-term financial consequences of breast cancer: a Danish registry-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Laura Schärfe; Overgaard, Charlotte; Bøggild, Henrik; Garne, Jens Peter; Lund, Thomas; Overvad, Kim; Fonager, Kirsten

    2017-10-30

    A breast cancer diagnosis affects an individual's affiliation to labour market, but the long-term consequences of breast cancer on income in a Danish setting have not been examined. The present study investigated whether breast cancer affected future income among Danish women that participated in the work force. We also examined the roles of sociodemographic factors and prior psychiatric medical treatment. This registry-based cohort study was based on information retrieved from linked Danish nationwide registries. We compared the incomes of 13,101 women (aged 30-59 years) diagnosed with breast cancer (exposed) to those of 60,819 women without breast cancer (unexposed). Changes in income were examined during a 10-year follow-up; for each follow-up year, we calculated the mean annual income and the relative change compared to the income earned one year prior to diagnosis. Expected changes in Danish female income, according to calendar year and age, were estimated based on information from Statistics Denmark. For exposed and unexposed groups, the observed income changes were dichotomized to those above and those below the expected change in income in the Danish female population. We examined the impact of breast cancer on income each year of follow-up with logistic regression models. Analyses were stratified according to educational level, marital status, and prior psychiatric medical treatment. Breast cancer had a temporary negative effect on income. The effect was largest during the first three years after diagnosis; thereafter, the gap narrowed between exposed and unexposed cohorts. The odds ratio for an increase in income in the cancer cohort compared to the cancer-free cohort was 0.81 (95% CI 0.77-0.84) after three years. After seven years, no significant difference was observed between cohorts. Stratified analyses demonstrated that the negative effect of breast cancer on income lasted longest among women with high educational levels. Being single or having

  9. A mixed linear model controlling for case underascertainment across multiple cancer registries estimated time trends in survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Stefan; Bertz, Joachim; Barnes, Benjamin; Kraywinkel, Klaus

    2018-01-10

    Large temporal and geographical variation in survival rates estimated from epidemiological cancer registries coupled with heterogeneity in death certificate only (DCO) notifications makes it difficult to interpret trends in survival. The aim of our study is to introduce a method for estimating such trends while accounting for heterogeneity in DCO notifications in a cancer site-specific manner. We used the data of 4.0 million cancer cases notified in 14 German epidemiological cancer registries. Annual 5-year relative survival rates from 2002 through 2013 were estimated, and proportions of DCO notifications were recorded. "DCO-excluded" survival rates were regressed on DCO proportions and calendar years using a mixed linear model with cancer registry as a random effect. Based on this model, trends in survival rates were estimated for Germany at 0% DCO. For most cancer sites and age groups, we estimated significant positive trends in survival. Age-standardized survival for all cancers combined increased by 7.1% units for women and 10.8% units for men. The described method could be used to estimate trends in cancer survival based on the data from epidemiological cancer registries with differing DCO proportions and with changing DCO proportions over time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prostate Cancer in South Africa: Pathology Based National Cancer Registry Data (1986–2006 and Mortality Rates (1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Babb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986–2006 and data on mortality (1997–2009 from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma. There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  11. Prostate cancer in South Africa: pathology based national cancer registry data (1986-2006) and mortality rates (1997-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Chantal; Urban, Margaret; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kellett, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA) from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986-2006) and data on mortality (1997-2009) from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR) using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma). There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  12. Incidence of esophageal cancer in Sri Lanka: Analysis of cancer registry data and comparison with other South Asian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Dakshitha P; Samarasekera, Dharmabandhu N

    2017-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to report the incidence of Carcinoma of Esophagus (CaE) in Sri Lanka and to compare these values with other cancer registry data of the region and with migrant populations. We compared the data published by the National Cancer Control Program over the last two decades with data from the National Cancer Registry Programme of the Indian Council of Medical Research and Karachi Cancer Registry. SEERstat was used to analyze the surveillance, epidemiology and end results database to analyze data on Indian migrant population. CaE was the fourth most common cancer overall and among females and third most common cancer among males. The incidence of CaE rises with age in both sexes, with a peak in the 70-74 year age group. There was a disproportionately higher number of CaE in the Tamil population (chi-square test, P Sri Lanka was squamous cell carcinoma, Not otherwise specified (NOS) (n = 750, 70.5%), followed by adenocarcinoma, NOS (n = 83, 7.8%). India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka have comparable age-adjusted incidence and age distribution of CaE. All migrant populations had lower incidence of CaE than original population or population in their present country. Both cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption are more prevalent in Sri Lankan males than females. The incidence of CaE and its distribution among age groups in Sri Lanka was comparable to other countries of the region. Persons of Tamil ethnicity have a higher risk of developing CaE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Statin use and risk of endometrial cancer: a nationwide registry-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Cecilie D; Verdoodt, Freija; Friis, Søren; Dehlendorff, Christian; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2017-02-01

    Laboratory and epidemiological evidence have suggested that statin use may protect against the development of certain cancers, including endometrial cancer. In a nationwide registry-based case-control study, we examined the association between statin use and risk of endometrial cancer. Cases were female residents of Denmark with a primary diagnosis of endometrial cancer during 2000-2009. For each case, we selected 15 female population controls matched on date of birth (±one month) using risk-set sampling. Ever use of statin was defined as two or more prescriptions on separate dates. Conditional logistic regressions were used to estimate age-matched (by design) and multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for endometrial cancer associated with statin use. The multivariable-adjusted models included parity, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), obesity, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and education. We evaluated whether the association between statin use and endometrial cancer varied with duration and intensity of statin use, type of endometrial cancer or patient characteristics. The study population comprised 5382 endometrial cancer cases and 72 127 population controls. We observed no association between ever use of statins and endometrial cancer risk (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.94-1.14). In addition, endometrial cancer risk did not vary substantially with duration or intensity of statin use. Stratification by type of endometrial cancer also yielded neutral ORs. In our nationwide case-control study, we found no association between statin use and risk of endometrial cancer. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Bevacizumab with chemotherapy in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer: Czech registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubáčková, Kateřina; Bortlíček, Zbyněk; Pikus, Tomáš; Linke, Zdeněk; Pokorná, Petra; Vyzula, Rostislav; Prausová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective analysis investigated the effectiveness of combination therapy with bevacizumab and chemotherapy in the first-line treatment of patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer in the CORECT registry who initiated treatment with bevacizumab between 2008 and 2012 were enrolled. Overall survival and progression-free survival were the main effectiveness end points. A total of 981 patients were enrolled. Median progression-free survival was 11.3 months (95% CI: 10.7-11.8) and median overall survival was 28.4 months (95% CI: 26.2-30.6). The most common adverse events were thromboembolic disease (4%) and hypertension (3.5%). This retrospective analysis shows the effectiveness of bevacizumab with chemotherapy in patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer.

  15. The natural history of Leydig cell testicular tumours: an analysis of the National Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, G J; Redmond, E J; Considine, S W; Omer, S I; Power, D; Sweeney, P

    2017-07-19

    Leydig cell tumour (LCT) of the testis is a rare histological subtype of stromal tumours, accounting for 1 to 3% of testicular neoplasms. The natural history of LCT is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and natural history of Leydig cell tumours (LCT) of the testes. A search of the National Cancer Registry of Ireland database was performed regarding Leydig cell testicular tumours. Recurrence free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analysed. Between 1994 and 2013, 2755 new cases of testicular cancer were diagnosed in Ireland. Of these, 22 (0.79%) were Leydig cell tumours. Nineteen were invasive (stage T1) and three were in situ (stage Tis). One patient developed a local recurrence following an organ preserving procedure and underwent a completion orchidectomy 107 days after initial diagnosis. No further treatment was required. There have been no disease-specific deaths. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 95.5, 88.2 and 73.3%, respectively. The 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 100% and the 5-year recurrence free survival (RFS) was 93.3%. From the National Cancer Registry, LCT has been shown to be a rare subtype of testicular tumour. Due to the relatively favourable natural history, it may be possible to tailor less aggressive surveillance regimens in these patients.

  16. Intake of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene and stomach cancer risk : results from analyses in the Netherlands : cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Verhagen, H.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kleinjans, J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    Both carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic properties have been reported for the synthetic antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The association between dietary intake of BHA and BHT and stomach cancer risk was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS)

  17. Accuracy of Self-Reported Breast Cancer Information among Women from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriana Barisic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining complete medical record information can be challenging and expensive in breast cancer studies. The current literature is limited with respect to the accuracy of self-report and factors that may influence this. We assessed the agreement between self-reported and medical record breast cancer information among women from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Women aged 20–69 years diagnosed with incident breast cancer 1996–1998 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry, sampled on age and family history. We calculated kappa statistics, proportion correct, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values and conducted unconditional logistic regression to examine whether characteristics of the women influenced agreement. The proportions of women who correctly reported having received a broad category of therapy (hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery as well as sensitivity and specificity were above 90%, and the kappa statistics were above 0.80. The specific type of hormonal or chemotherapy was reported with low-to-moderate agreement. Aside from recurrence, no factors were consistently associated with agreement. Thus, most women were able to accurately report broad categories of treatment but not necessarily specific treatment types. The finding of this study can aid researchers in the use and design of self-administered treatment questionnaires.

  18. Systematic Review of Hospital Based Cancer Registries (HBCRs): Necessary Tool to Improve Quality of Care in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Nahvijou, Azin; Rostam Niakan Kalhori, Sharareh; Davoodi, Somayeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-08-27

    Introduction: Incidence and mortality rate of cancer is increasing in all countries including low and middle-income countries. Hospital based cancer registry (HBCR) is an important tool for administration purpose and improvement of the quality of care. It is also important resource for population based cancer registries. In this study we reviewed HBCRs in different countries. Methods: We searched the published literature using the MEDLINE (PubMed), Google scholar, Scopus, ProQuest and Google. We also reviewed websites of the HBCRs in different countries. The search was carried out based on proper keywords in English for all motor engines including “hospital-based”, “clinical” and “data quality” combined with “registry”, “cancer” and “tumor” including all subheadings. We reviewed objectives, developer institutions, minimum datasets, data sources, quality control indicators and processes. Results: In total we found 163 papers in the first step. After screening of the titles, abstracts and the full texts, 14 papers remained for analysis. Analysis of the 14 papers showed that the improvement of the quality of the care were the most important objectives among the registries. HBCRs collect information about patients, tumor diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Generally, indicators such as completeness and validity were used for quality control. Conclusion: Because of the increases in cancer burden in the world, more attention is needed to be paid on cancer surveillance systems, including HBCRs. We evaluated and highlighted the importance and characteristics HBCRs and believe that this paper would help the hospitals and policy makers for planning and establishment of new HBCRs. We suggest the establishment of a worldwide network for coordination and collaboration between HBCRs. Creative Commons Attribution License

  19. Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer in the Netherlands: a population-based study on treatment patterns and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, E; van Haalen, H G M; Sparreboom, W; Overbeek, J A; Ezendam, N P M; Pijnenborg, J M A; Severens, J L; van Herk-Sukel, M P P

    2017-04-01

    Information on treatment patterns for ovarian cancer (OC) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe current patterns of chemotherapy and other systemic treatments for OC in the Netherlands and evaluate survival outcomes following subsequent lines of treatment. Data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry, including on newly diagnosed cancer patients, were linked to the PHARMO Database Network, including information on in- and out-patient drug use. Patients diagnosed with OC between January 2000 and December 2010 were selected. An algorithm was used to identify separate lines of treatment. Data were studied descriptively. Detailed data on systemic drug use were available for 261 patients (17%) with OC. In first-line treatment, 87% of the patients (227/261) received platinum-based chemotherapy. Of the 161 patients receiving second-line treatment, 101 patients (63%) received platinum-based chemotherapy. In third line, this was 51% (53/103). The median number of treatment lines received by patients was two (interquartile range 1-3), and eight or more lines of chemotherapy were identified for 12 patients. Median survival from diagnosis onwards was 47 months from the end of first-line treatment, median survival was 32 months, and from the end of second-line treatment, it was 14 months. Predominantly beyond second-line treatment, there is much variety in treatment patterns with chemotherapy for OC. Although uncertainty remains regarding the desirability of this observed treatment variation, there seems a need for detailed clinical guidance, assuring that physicians can properly choose the most suitable treatment for each patient.

  20. Using cancer registries to assess the accuracy of primary liver or intrahepatic bile duct cancer as the underlying cause of death, 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polednak, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Inaccuracies in primary liver cancer (ie, excluding intrahepatic bile duct [IHBD]) or IHBD cancer as the underlying cause of death on the death certificate vs the cancer site in a cancer registry should be considered in surveillance of mortality rates in the population. Concordance between cancer site on the death record (1999-2010) and diagnosis (1973-2010) in the database for 9 cancer registries of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program was examined for decedents with only 1 cancer recorded. Overreporting of deaths coded to liver cancer (ie, lack of confirmation in SEER) was largely balanced by underreporting (ie, a cancer site other than liver cancer in SEER). For IHBD cancer, overreporting was much more frequent than underreporting. Using modified rates, based on the most accurate numerators available, had little impact on trends for liver cancer in the SEER population, which were similar to trends for the entire US population based on routine statistics. An increase in the death rate for IHBD cancer, however, was no longer evident after modification. The findings support the use of routine data on underlying cause of death for surveillance of trends in death rates for liver cancer but not for IHBD cancer. Additional population-based cancer registries could potentially be used for surveillance of recent and future trends in mortality rates from these cancers.

  1. Recruiting families at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer from a statewide cancer registry: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapodi, Maria C; Duquette, Deb; Yang, James J; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari; Anderson, Beth; Nikolaidis, Christos; Mancewicz, Emily; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia; Ronis, David; Milliron, Kara J; Probst-Herbst, Nicole; Merajver, Sofia D; Janz, Nancy K; Copeland, Glenn; Roberts, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Cancer genetic services (counseling/testing) are recommended for women diagnosed with breast cancer younger than 45 years old (young breast cancer survivors-YBCS) and at-risk relatives. We present recruitment of YBCS, identification and recruitment of at-risk relatives, and YBCS willingness to contact their cancer-free, female relatives. A random sample of 3,000 YBCS, stratified by race (Black vs. White/Other), was identified through a population-based cancer registry and recruited in a randomized trial designed to increase use of cancer genetic services. Baseline demographic, clinical, and family characteristics, and variables associated with the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) were assessed as predictors of YBCS' willingness to contact at-risk relatives. The 883 YBCS (33.2% response rate; 40% Black) who returned a survey had 1,875 at-risk relatives and were willing to contact 1,360 (72.5%). From 853 invited at-risk relatives (up to two relatives per YBCS), 442 responded (51.6% response rate). YBCS with larger families, with a previous diagnosis of depression, and motivated to comply with recommendations from family members were likely to contact a greater number of relatives. Black YBCS were more likely to contact younger relatives and those living further than 50 miles compared to White/Other YBCS. It is feasible to recruit diverse families at risk for hereditary cancer from a population-based cancer registry. This recruitment approach can be used as a paradigm for harmonizing processes and increasing internal and external validity of large-scale public health genomic initiatives in the era of precision medicine.

  2. Assessing effects of structural zeros on models of canine cancer incidence: a case study of the Swiss Canine Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Boo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological research of canine cancers could inform comparative studies of environmental determinants for a number of human cancers. However, such an approach is currently limited because canine cancer data sources are still few in number and often incomplete. Incompleteness is typically due to under-ascertainment of canine cancers. A main reason for this is because dog owners commonly do not seek veterinary care for this diagnosis. Deeper knowledge on under-ascertainment is critical for modelling canine cancer incidence, as an indication of zero incidence might originate from the sole absence of diagnostic examinations within a given sample unit. In the present case study, we investigated effects of such structural zeros on models of canine cancer incidence. In doing so, we contrasted two scenarios for modelling incidence data retrieved from the Swiss Canine Cancer Registry. The first scenario was based on the complete enumeration of incidence data for all Swiss municipal units. The second scenario was based on a filtered sample that systematically discarded structural zeros in those municipal units where no diagnostic examination had been performed. By means of cross-validation, we assessed and contrasted statistical performance and predictive power of the two modelling scenarios. This analytical step allowed us to demonstrate that structural zeros impact on the generalisability of the model of canine cancer incidence, thus challenging future comparative studies of canine and human cancers. The results of this case study show that increased awareness about the effects of structural zeros is critical to epidemiological research.

  3. [New developments in the treatment and rehabilitation of head and neck cancer in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, A J Jacqueline; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; van der Molen, Lisette; Navran, Arash; Nijssen, Theo F; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is relatively rare: in the Netherlands, some 2600 newly diagnosed cases are registered annually. Its treatment is centralised and is actually performed only in Dutch Head and Neck Society (DHNS) accredited medical centres. Although survival rates have improved only marginally, treatment regimens have changed over the past few years. Treatment has become increasingly focused on the preservation of organs and their functionalities. The effects of both a tumour and its treatment can have a serious impact on the functioning and quality of life of a patient. Therefore, sufficient attention to post-treatment rehabilitation is necessary. The Netherlands Cancer Institute has recently collaborated with the Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research Center Reade in developing a structured multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. This programme has also been made available to other DHNS centres.

  4. Dietary folate intake and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Engeland, M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    We studied the association between dietary folate and specific K-ras mutations in colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. After 7.3 years of follow-up, 448 colon and 160 rectal cancer patients and 3,048 sub-cohort members (55-69 years at baseline) were available

  5. [Lung cancer in the Netherlands in the period 1989-1997: the epidemic is not over yet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Siesling, S.; Schipper, R.M.; Damhuis, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and interpret changes in incidence, mortality and survival of lung cancer in the Netherlands in the period 1989-1997. DESIGN: Secondary data analysis. METHODS: Data on the incidence of lung cancer were collected from the Dutch Cancer Registration (1989-1997), on mortality from

  6. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? A study from the population-based PROFILES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wal, Marieke; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke; Prins, Judith; Gielissen, Marieke

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics, information provision and health-related quality of life. Cross-sectional data were obtained from the Patient Reported Outcomes Following Initial Treatment and Long-Term Evaluation of Survivorship registry. We included stage I and II survivors diagnosed with melanoma (n = 469), colorectal cancer (n = 861), endometrial cancer (n = 688), thyroid cancer (n = 218), Hodgkin (n = 103) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 276). Cancer survivors completed questionnaires on FCR (Impact of Cancer scale - Health Worries subscale), satisfaction with information provision (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ) INFO25, satisfaction scale) and health-related quality of life (EORTC-QLQ C30, Short Form 36-item). A total of 2615 survivors completed the Impact of Cancer scale - Health Worries subscale. No significant differences in FCR severity were found between any of the cancer types (p = 0.063). A younger age, female gender, stage II disease, a shorter time since diagnosis, scheduled follow-up appointments and comorbidity were associated with higher FCR (p Fear of cancer recurrence seems to be a universal concern of cancer survivors rather than a cancer type-specific problem. Gender, age and medical factors were identified as risk factors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Long-term quality of life after breast cancer: a French registry-based controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Delphine; Mercier, Mariette; Abeilard, Edwige; Puyraveau, Marc; Danzon, Arlette; Dalstein, Véronique; Pozet, Astrid; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Henry-Amar, Michel; Velten, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Population-based studies on quality of life (QOL) of long-term breast cancer survivors are quite recent and insufficient attention has been paid to the effect of time since diagnosis. We compared long-term QOL of population-based breast cancer survivors 5, 10, and 15 years after diagnosis with that of healthy controls. Breast cancer survivors were randomly selected from three population-based cancer registries (Bas-Rhin, Calvados and Doubs, France) along with healthy controls, stratified for age and place of residence, randomly selected from electoral rolls. Participants completed five self-administered questionnaires: the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), Short Form-36 (SF-36), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) and a life conditions questionnaire. An analysis of variance was used to compare QOL scores of breast cancer survivors by period (5, 10, or 15 years) of diagnosis with those of controls, adjusted for sociodemographic data and comorbidities. Six hundred and fifty-two cases and 1,188 controls participated in the study. For many QOL scales, scores were significantly different between cancer survivors and controls. A clinically significant difference was evidenced for the fatigue scales, the SF36 physical functioning, role-physical, and role-emotional scales, with more favorable results for controls. Differences decreased with time and 15-year cancer survivors were generally not different from controls. Scores were particularly influenced by age and mean household income. More efforts should be made, specifically during the first 5 to 10 years after diagnosis, to help women with breast cancer to overcome their impairment in QOL.

  8. Lung cancer and tobacco smoking in Crete, Greece: reflections from a population-based cancer registry from 1992 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaki-Pistolla, D; Lionis, C; Georgoulias, V; Kyriakidis, P; Koinis, F; Aggelaki, S; Tzanakis, N

    2017-01-01

    The Cancer Registry of Crete is a regional population database that collects cancer morbidity/mortality data along with several risk factors. The current study assessed the geographical variation of lung cancer among ever and never smokers in Crete during the last 20 years. Lung cancer patient records (1992-2013) including information on medical history and smoking habits were obtained from the Cancer Registry of Crete. Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates (AAIR), prevalence of smoking among lung cancer patients and the Population-Attributable Fraction (PAF%) of tobacco smoking were estimated. Kaplan-Meier curves, grouped per smoking status were constructed, and spatio-temporal analyses were carried out to assess the geographical variations of lung cancer and smoking (a = 0.05). New lung cancer cases in Crete accounted for 9% of all cancers (AAIRboth genders = 40.2/100,000/year, AAIRmales = 73.1/100,000/year, AAIRfemales = 11.8/100,000/year). Ever smokers presented significantly higher incidence compared to ex-smokers (p = 0.02) and never smokers (p AAIR1992 = 19.2/100,000/year, AAIR2013 = 25.4/100,000/year, p = 0.03), while never smokers presented the lowest increase from 1992 to 2013 (AAIR1992 = 5.3/100,000/year, AAIR2013 = 6.8/100,000/year, p = 0.2). The PAF% of lung cancer mortality is 86% for both genders (males: 89%, females: 78%). AAIRs ranged from 25 to 50/100,000/year, while significant geographical differences were observed among the municipalities of Crete (p = 0.02). Smokers living in the south-east urban regions presented higher risk of dying from lung cancer (RR = 2.2; 95%CI = 1.3-3.5). The constant increase of lung cancer rates among both genders, especially in females, outlines the need for targeted, geographically-oriented, life-style preventive measures. Design of population-based screening programs, tobacco awareness campaigns and smoking cessation programs in lung cancer hot spots could be guide

  9. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, S.H.A.; Goldbohm, R A; Schouten, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study on this topic so far, the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors in 1986. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 395 HNC (1...

  10. Initial results of the oesophageal and gastric cancer registry from the Comunidad Valenciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrig, Javier; Mingol, Fernando; Martí, Roberto; Puche, José; Trullenque, Ramón; Barreras, José Antonio; Asencio, Francisco; Aguiló, Javier; Navarro, José Manuel; Alberich, Carmen; Salas, Dolores; Lacueva, Francisco Javier

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the initial results of the oesophagogastric cancer registry developed for the Sociedad Valenciana de Cirugía and the Health Department of the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain). Fourteen of the 24 public hospitals belonging to the Comunidad Valenciana participated. All patients with diagnosis of oesophageal or gastric carcinomas operated from January 2013 to December 2014 were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and pathological data were analysed. Four hundred and thirty-four patients (120 oesophageal carcinomas and 314 gastric carcinomas) were included. Only two hospitals operated more than 10 patients with oesophageal cancer per year. Transthoracic oesophaguectomy was the most frequent approach (84.2%) in tumours localized within the oesophagus. A total gastrectomy was performed in 50.9% patients with gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) carcinomas. Postoperative 30-day and 90-day mortality were 8% and 11.6% in oesophageal carcinoma and 5.9 and 8.6% in gastric carcinoma. Before surgery, middle oesophagus carcinomas were treated mostly (76,5%) with chemoradiotherapy. On the contrary, lower oesophagus and GOJ carcinomas were treated preferably with chemotherapy alone (45.5 and 53.4%). Any neoadjuvant treatment was administered to 73.6% of gastric cancer patients. Half patients with oesophageal carcinoma or gastric carcinoma received no adjuvant treatment. This registry revealed that half patients with oesophageal cancer were operated in hospitals with less than 10 cases per year at the Comunidad Valenciana. Also, it detected capacity improvement for some clinical outcomes of oesophageal and gastric carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Population-based incidence and mortality cancer trends (1986-1997) from the network of Italian cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, E; Capocaccia, R; Casella, C; Guzzinati, S; Ferretti, S; Rosso, S; Sacchettini, C; Spitale, A; Stracci, F; Tumino, R

    2004-08-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse incidence and mortality cancer trends in the Italian Network of Cancer Registries (about 8,000,000 inhabitants) during the period 1986-1997. Included were 525,645 newly diagnosed cancers and 269,902 cancer deaths (subjects > 14 years). Joinpoints (points in time where trend significantly changes from linearity) were found and estimated annual percentage changes (EAPC) used to summarize tendencies. Overall cancer incidence increased in both sexes and cancer mortality significantly decreased (since 1991 among men). Lung cancer showed significantly decreasing incidence (EAPC = -1.4%) and mortality (EAPC = -1.6%) among men and increasing trends among women. In women, breast cancer incidence significantly increased (EAPC= +1.7%) and mortality decreased since 1989 (EAPC= -2.0%). Stomach cancer incidence and mortality decreased in both sexes. Prostate incidence sharply increased since 1991 and mortality decreased. Colon cancer incidence increased and rectum mortality decreased significantly in both sexes. Significant increases in incidence were also found for kidney (up to 1991 among men), urinary bladder, skin epithelioma, melanoma, liver (up to 1993 among men), pancreas, mesothelioma, Kaposi's sarcoma (up to 1995 among men), testis, thyroid, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mortality significantly decreased for cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, oesophagus, liver (women), larynx (men), bone, cervix (since 1990), central nervous system, urinary bladder, thyroid, Hodgkin's lymphomas and leukaemias (men). Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mortality increased in both sexes. In conclusion, most of the changes seen can be explained as the effect of changes in smoking habits and of the extension of secondary prevention activities. The Italian health care system will also have to cope with growing cancer diagnostic and therapeutic needs due to population ageing.

  12. Protective effect of periconceptional folic acid supplements on the risk of congenital heart defects: a registry-based case-control study in the northern Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beynum, Ingrid M; Kapusta, Livia; Bakker, Marian K; den Heijer, Martin; Blom, Henk J; de Walle, Hermien E K

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the potentially protective of periconceptional folic acid use on the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs) relative to other non-folate related malformations. We analysed data from a large regional register of birth defects (EUROCAT-Northern Netherlands), over a 10 year period (1996-2005) for a case-control study. The cases were mothers who had delivered infants with isolated or complex heart defects, without any related syndrome or genetic abnormality (n = 611). We used two control groups; one from the EUROCAT database and another from the general population. The registry controls consisted of mothers of children with a known chromosomal or genetic defect, and with infants with other non-folate related congenital malformations (n = 2401). Additional folic acid was taken as a single supplement or as a multivitamin containing folic acid in a dose of >or=400 microg daily. Mothers who had used folate antagonists or who had diabetes, and mothers of children with oral clefts, hypospadias, limb reduction- or neural tube defects, were excluded from both groups. Potentially confounding factors of periconceptional folic acid use in relation to CHD were explored, including baby's birth year, maternal body mass index, education, maternal age at delivery of index baby, smoking behaviour, and alcohol use during pregnancy. Periconceptional folic acid use revealed an odds ratio (OR) of 0.82 (95% CI 0.68-0.98) for all types of CHD relative to other malformations. The estimated relative risk for CHDs of additional folic acid use compared with the general population was comparable [OR 0.74 (95%CI 0.62-0.88)]. Subgroup analysis showed an OR of 0.62 (95% CI 0.47-0.82) for isolated septal defects. The proportions of the potential confounders between mothers of case and control infants did not differ significantly. Our results support the hypothesis that additional periconceptional folic acid use reduces CHD risk in infants. Use of periconceptional folic acid

  13. The association of active smoking with multiple cancers: national census-cancer registry cohorts with quantitative bias analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tony; Barendregt, Jan J; Foster, Rachel H; Hill, Sarah; Atkinson, June; Sarfati, Diana; Edwards, Richard

    2013-06-01

    (1) Determine the association of multiple cancers with smoking, focusing on cancers with an uncertain association; and (2) illustrate quantitative bias analysis as applied to registry data, to adjust for misclassification of smoking and residual confounding by alcohol and obesity. New Zealand 1981 and 1996 censuses, including smoking questions, were linked to cancer registry data giving 14.8 million person-years of follow-up. Rate ratios (RR) for current versus never smokers, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity and socioeconomic factors were calculated and then subjected to quantitative bias analysis. RR estimates for lung, larynx (including ear and nasosinus), and bladder cancers adjusted for measured confounders and exposure misclassification were 9.28 (95 % uncertainty interval 8.31-10.4), 6.14 (4.55-8.30), and 2.22 (1.94-2.55), respectively. Moderate associations were found for cervical (1.82; 1.51-2.20), kidney (1.29; 1.07-1.56), liver cancer (1.75; 1.37-2.24; European only), esophageal (2.14; 1.73-2.65), oropharyngeal (2.30; 1.94-2.72), pancreatic (1.68; 1.44-1.96), and stomach cancers (1.42; 1.22-1.66). Protective associations were found for endometrial (0.67; 0.56-0.79) and melanoma (0.72; 0.65-0.81), and borderline association for thyroid (0.76; 0.58-1.00), colon (0.89; 0.81-0.98), and CML (0.66; 0.44-0.99). Remaining cancers had near null associations. Adjustment for residual confounding suggested little impact, except the RRs for endometrial, kidney, and esophageal cancers were slightly increased, and the oropharyngeal and liver (European/other) RRs were decreased. Our large study confirms the strong association of smoking with many cancers and strengthens the evidence for protective associations with thyroid cancer and melanoma. With large data sets, considering and adjusting for residual systematic error is as important as quantifying random error.

  14. Nationwide registry-based analysis of cancer clustering detects strong familial occurrence of Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eevi Kaasinen

    Full Text Available Many cancer predisposition syndromes are rare or have incomplete penetrance, and traditional epidemiological tools are not well suited for their detection. Here we have used an approach that employs the entire population based data in the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR for analyzing familial aggregation of all types of cancer, in order to find evidence for previously unrecognized cancer susceptibility conditions. We performed a systematic clustering of 878,593 patients in FCR based on family name at birth, municipality of birth, and tumor type, diagnosed between years 1952 and 2011. We also estimated the familial occurrence of the tumor types using cluster score that reflects the proportion of patients belonging to the most significant clusters compared to all patients in Finland. The clustering effort identified 25,910 birth name-municipality based clusters representing 183 different tumor types characterized by topography and morphology. We produced information about familial occurrence of hundreds of tumor types, and many of the tumor types with high cluster score represented known cancer syndromes. Unexpectedly, Kaposi sarcoma (KS also produced a very high score (cluster score 1.91, p-value <0.0001. We verified from population records that many of the KS patients forming the clusters were indeed close relatives, and identified one family with five affected individuals in two generations and several families with two first degree relatives. Our approach is unique in enabling systematic examination of a national epidemiological database to derive evidence of aberrant familial aggregation of all tumor types, both common and rare. It allowed effortless identification of families displaying features of both known as well as potentially novel cancer predisposition conditions, including striking familial aggregation of KS. Further work with high-throughput methods should elucidate the molecular basis of the potentially novel predisposition conditions

  15. Breast cancer in a multi-ethnic Asian setting : Results from the Singapore-Malaysia hospital-based breast cancer registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah; Hartman, Mikael; Saxena, Nakul; Lau, Philip; Bulgiba, Awang M.; Lee, Soo Chin; Lim, Siew Eng; Wong, John E. L.; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    Two hospital-based breast cancer databases (University Malaya Medical Center, Malaysia [n = 1513] and National University Hospital, Singapore [n = 2545]) were merged into a regional registry of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2007. A review of the data found 51% of patients

  16. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands : aims, design and interim results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, L M; Kuipers, I M; van den Heuvel, F; Mendes, R; Berger, R.M.F.; van Beynum, I M; Rozendaal, L; Rammeloo, L A J; van Iperen, G. G.; Schokking, M; Frerich, S; Blom, N A; Breur, J M P J; Helbing, W A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for children with

  17. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands: aims, design and interim results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, L. M.; Kuipers, I. M.; van den Heuvel, F.; Mendes, R.; Berger, R. M. F.; van Beynum, I. M.; Rozendaal, L.; Rammeloo, L. A. J.; van Iperen, G. G.; Schokking, M.; Frerich, S.; Blom, N. A.; Breur, J. M. P. J.; Helbing, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for children with heart diseases.

  18. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands: Aims, design and interim results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Silva (Lindsay); I.M. Kuipers (Irene); F. van den Heuvel (F.); Mendes, R.; R.M.F. Berger (Rolf); I.M. van Beynum (I.); Rozendaal, L.; L. Rammeloo (Lukas); G.G. van Iperen (Gabrielle); M. Schokking (Michiel); Frerich, S.; N.A. Blom (Nico); J.M.P.J. Breur (Johannes M.P.J.); W.A. Helbing (Willem)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for

  19. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands: aims, design and interim results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, L.M.; Kuipers, I.M.; Heuvel, F. van den; Mendes, R.; Berger, R.M.; Beynum, I.M. van; Rozendaal, L.; Rammeloo, L.A.; Iperen, G.G. van; Schokking, M.; Frerich, S.; Blom, N.A.; Breur, J.M.; Helbing, W.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for children with

  20. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands : aims, design and interim results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, L. M.; Kuipers, I. M.; van den Heuvel, F.; Mendes, R.; Berger, R. M. F.; van Beynum, I. M.; Rozendaal, L.; Rammeloo, L. A. J.; van Iperen, G. G.; Schokking, M.; Frerich, S.; Blom, N. A.; Breur, J. M. P. J.; Helbing, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for children with heart

  1. Use of Multicenter Data in a Large Cancer Registry for Evaluation of Outcome and Implementation of Novel Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Schubert-Fritschle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Large clinical cancer registries (CCRs in Germany shall be strengthened by the German Social Code Book V (SGB V and implemented until the end of 2017. There are currently several large cancer registries that support clinical data for outcome analysis and knowledge acquisition. The various examples of the Munich Cancer Registry outlined in this paper present many-sided possibilities using and analyzing registry data. The main objective of population-based cancer registration within a defined area and the performance of outcomes research is to provide feedback regarding the results to the broad public, the reporting doctors, and the scientific community. These tasks determine principles of operation and data usage by CCRs. Each clinical department delivers its own findings and applied therapy. The compilation of these data in CCRs provides information on patient progress through the regional network of medical care and delivers meaningful information on the course of oncological diseases. Successful implementation of CCRs allows for presenting the statistical outcomes of health-care delivery, improving the quality of care within the region, accelerating the process of implementing innovative therapies, and generating new hypotheses as a stimulus for research activities.

  2. RAD51 and breast cancer susceptibility: no evidence for rare variant association in the Breast Cancer Family Registry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Le Calvez-Kelm

    Full Text Available Although inherited breast cancer has been associated with germline mutations in genes that are functionally involved in the DNA homologous recombination repair (HRR pathway, including BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, ATM, BRIP1, CHEK2 and PALB2, about 70% of breast cancer heritability remains unexplained. Because of their critical functions in maintaining genome integrity and already well-established associations with breast cancer susceptibility, it is likely that additional genes involved in the HRR pathway harbor sequence variants associated with increased risk of breast cancer. RAD51 plays a central biological function in DNA repair and despite the fact that rare, likely dysfunctional variants in three of its five paralogs, RAD51C, RAD51D, and XRCC2, have been associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk, no population-based case-control mutation screening data are available for the RAD51 gene. We thus postulated that RAD51 could harbor rare germline mutations that confer increased risk of breast cancer.We screened the coding exons and proximal splice junction regions of the gene for germline sequence variation in 1,330 early-onset breast cancer cases and 1,123 controls from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, using the same population-based sampling and analytical strategy that we developed for assessment of rare sequence variants in ATM and CHEK2. In total, 12 distinct very rare or private variants were characterized in RAD51, with 10 cases (0.75% and 9 controls (0.80% carrying such a variant. Variants were either likely neutral missense substitutions (3, silent substitutions (4 or non-coding substitutions (5 that were predicted to have little effect on efficiency of the splicing machinery.Altogether, our data suggest that RAD51 tolerates so little dysfunctional sequence variation that rare variants in the gene contribute little, if anything, to breast cancer susceptibility.

  3. Lung Cancer Occurrence in Never-Smokers: An Analysis of 13 Cohorts and 22 Cancer Registry Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thun, Michael J; Hannan, Lindsay M; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L; Boffetta, Paolo; Buring, Julie E; Feskanich, Diane; Flanders, W. Dana; Jee, Sun Ha; Katanoda, Kota; Kolonel, Laurence N; Lee, I-Min; Marugame, Tomomi; Palmer, Julie R; Riboli, Elio; Sobue, Tomotaka; Avila-Tang, Erika; Wilkens, Lynne R; Samet, Jon M

    2008-01-01

    Background Better information on lung cancer occurrence in lifelong nonsmokers is needed to understand gender and racial disparities and to examine how factors other than active smoking influence risk in different time periods and geographic regions. Methods and Findings We pooled information on lung cancer incidence and/or death rates among self-reported never-smokers from 13 large cohort studies, representing over 630,000 and 1.8 million persons for incidence and mortality, respectively. We also abstracted population-based data for women from 22 cancer registries and ten countries in time periods and geographic regions where few women smoked. Our main findings were: (1) Men had higher death rates from lung cancer than women in all age and racial groups studied; (2) male and female incidence rates were similar when standardized across all ages 40+ y, albeit with some variation by age; (3) African Americans and Asians living in Korea and Japan (but not in the US) had higher death rates from lung cancer than individuals of European descent; (4) no temporal trends were seen when comparing incidence and death rates among US women age 40–69 y during the 1930s to contemporary populations where few women smoke, or in temporal comparisons of never-smokers in two large American Cancer Society cohorts from 1959 to 2004; and (5) lung cancer incidence rates were higher and more variable among women in East Asia than in other geographic areas with low female smoking. Conclusions These comprehensive analyses support claims that the death rate from lung cancer among never-smokers is higher in men than in women, and in African Americans and Asians residing in Asia than in individuals of European descent, but contradict assertions that risk is increasing or that women have a higher incidence rate than men. Further research is needed on the high and variable lung cancer rates among women in Pacific Rim countries. PMID:18788891

  4. Trends in treatment and survival for advanced laryngeal cancer : A 20-year population-based study in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Adriana J.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Overbeek, Lucy I. H.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.; van Tinteren, Harm; Hilgers, Frans J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine time trends for primary treatment modalities in advanced laryngeal cancer, overall survival (OS), and laryngectomy-free interval (LFI) over the last 2 decades in The Netherlands. METHODS: We conducted an analysis of T3 to T4 laryngeal cancer

  5. Meat consumption and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Case-cohort analyses were performed on meat and fish consumption in relation to K-ras mutations in 448 colon and 160 rectal cancers that occurred during 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years, and 2948 subcohort members of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. Adjusted

  6. Red and processed meat consumption and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes in the netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszei, A.P.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on red and processed meat in relation to risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer are scarce. We present analyses of association between red and processed meat and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes within The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and

  7. Coupled variable selection for regression modeling of complex treatment patterns in a clinical cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, I; Elsäßer, A; Weinmann, A; Binder, H

    2014-12-30

    For determining a manageable set of covariates potentially influential with respect to a time-to-event endpoint, Cox proportional hazards models can be combined with variable selection techniques, such as stepwise forward selection or backward elimination based on p-values, or regularized regression techniques such as component-wise boosting. Cox regression models have also been adapted for dealing with more complex event patterns, for example, for competing risks settings with separate, cause-specific hazard models for each event type, or for determining the prognostic effect pattern of a variable over different landmark times, with one conditional survival model for each landmark. Motivated by a clinical cancer registry application, where complex event patterns have to be dealt with and variable selection is needed at the same time, we propose a general approach for linking variable selection between several Cox models. Specifically, we combine score statistics for each covariate across models by Fisher's method as a basis for variable selection. This principle is implemented for a stepwise forward selection approach as well as for a regularized regression technique. In an application to data from hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the coupled stepwise approach is seen to facilitate joint interpretation of the different cause-specific Cox models. In conditional survival models at landmark times, which address updates of prediction as time progresses and both treatment and other potential explanatory variables may change, the coupled regularized regression approach identifies potentially important, stably selected covariates together with their effect time pattern, despite having only a small number of events. These results highlight the promise of the proposed approach for coupling variable selection between Cox models, which is particularly relevant for modeling for clinical cancer registries with their complex event patterns. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons

  8. Rare skin cancer: a population-based cancer registry descriptive study of 151 consecutive cases diagnosed between 1980 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou-Gotta, Marie Odile; Fournier, Evelyne; Danzon, Arlette; Pelletier, Fabien; Levang, Julien; Mermet, Isabelle; Blanc, Dominique; Humbert, Philippe; Aubin, François

    2009-01-01

    There are few epidemiological data available on rare skin cancer, including Merkel cell carcinoma, Paget's disease, adnexal carcinoma, and sarcoma. We conducted this study to investigate the epidemiology of rare skin cancer diagnosed in the department of Doubs from 1980 to 2004. Data were collected from a population-based cancer registry from 1980 to 2004. Diagnosis was based on the 3(rd) edition of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology. The incidence rates were standardized on world population. One hundred and fifty one patients were investigated (88 women and 63 men). Median age for the diagnosed disease was 63 years. The standardized incidence rate was 0.82/100 000 person-year (95% CI = 0.68-0.96) and increased from 0.25 in 1980-1984 to 1.50 in 2000-2004. Fifty nine cases (39%) were sarcomas, 35 (23%) adnexal carcinomas, 27 (18%) Merkel cell carcinoma and 27 (18%) Paget's disease. The standardized incidence rates were 0.37/100 000 (0.27-0.47) for sarcomas, 0.16 (0.10-0.22) for adnexal tumors, 0.13 (0.08-0.18) for Merkel cell carcinoma, and 0.15 (0.09-0.21) for Paget's disease. Our results based on a population-based cancer registry showed an increase of the standardized incidence rate for all types of rare skin tumors. These results may be useful when considering the growing interest in rare diseases in identifying risk factors and planning scientific research programmes.

  9. Evaluation from population registry data of health care expenditure during the 6 months after cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, S; Mougeot, M; Mercier, M; Bourgeois, P

    1991-08-01

    It is currently estimated in France, that the cost of cancer has risen to $3.8 billion, with an annual growth of 5-10%. This represents approximately 6% of all health expenditure. The data from the Registry of Tumors in the Doubs region have enabled us to make an evaluation of health expenditure, reimbursed by the French Securite Sociale (S.S.), and its distribution in relation to different activities (diagnosis, type of treatment, follow-up, transport), according to cancer site. In 1984, the average cost per patient within the first 6 months of the illness was evaluated at $4,000. The results show major differences for the cancer sites, care facilities and budget items. Diagnosis assessment represents 27% of all expenditure, surgery 37%, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and transport, 11% each. All kinds of expenses are fully reimbursed by the French S.S. and transportation, which at the beginning used to avoid hospitalization, is now used as a comfort system and represents a high cost to the S.S. The different costs for the same illness between private, general public and university hospitals do not reflect a difference in care, but rather different systems of calculating and functioning. Till now there has not been any logical evaluation of care in the French health system.

  10. Validity of self-reported cancer history in the health examinees (HEXA) study: A comparison of self-report and cancer registry records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sooyoung; Shin, Aesun; Song, Daesub; Park, Jae Kyung; Kim, Yeonjung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Kang, Daehee; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2017-10-01

    To assess the validity of the cohort study participants' self-reported cancer history via data linkage to a cancer registry database. We included 143,965 participants from the Health Examinees (HEXA) study recruited between 2004 and 2013 who gave informed consent for record linkage to the Korean Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). The sensitivity and the positive predictive value of self-reported histories of cancer were calculated and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. A total of 4,860 participants who had at least one record in the KCCR were included in the calculation of sensitivity. In addition, 3,671 participants who reported a cancer history at enrollment were included in the calculation of positive predictive value. The overall sensitivity of self-reported cancer history was 72.0%. Breast cancer history among women showed the highest sensitivity (81.2%), whereas the lowest sensitivity was observed for liver cancer (53.7%) and cervical cancer (52.1%). The overall positive predictive value was 81.9%. The highest positive predictive value was observed for thyroid cancer (96.1%) and prostate cancer (96.1%), and the lowest was observed for cervical cancer (43.7%). The accuracy of self-reported cancer history varied by cancer site and may not be sufficient to ascertain cancer incidence, especially for cervical and bladder cancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Thyroid cancer and multiple primary tumors in the SEER cancer registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronckers, Cécile M.; McCarron, Peter; Ron, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence rates have increased steadily in the United States and elsewhere. Radiation exposure at a young age is a strong risk factor, but otherwise the etiology is unclear. To explore etiologic clues, we studied the risk of thyroid cancer after an earlier primary cancer, as well as

  12. Cancer in Nigeria: A 10-Year Analysis of the Kano Cancer Registry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cancer is a major health problem in developed countries and epidemiological evidence shows the emergence of a similar tend in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where HIV/AIDS is predicted to augment the cancer burden. The present study analyses the profile of cancers recorded in ...

  13. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry – methodology and early results from a novel national database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgstr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available JT Helgstrand,1 N Klemann,1 MA Røder,1 BG Toft,2 K Brasso,1 B Vainer,2 P Iversen1 1Copenhagen Prostate Cancer Center, Department of Urology, 2Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We present the methodology and early results from a new national Danish prostate database containing clinical data from all males who had evaluation of prostate tissue from 1995 to 2011.Materials and methods: SNOMED codes were retrieved from the Danish Pathology Register. A total of 26,295 combinations of SNOMED codes were identified. A computer algorithm was developed to transcode SNOMED codes into an analyzable format including procedure (eg, biopsy, transurethral resection, etc, diagnosis, and date of diagnosis. For validation, ~55,000 pathological reports were manually reviewed. Prostate-specific antigen, vital status, causes of death, and tumor-node-metastasis classification were integrated from national registries.Results: Of the 161,525 specimens from 113,801 males identified, 83,379 (51.6% were sets of prostate biopsies, 56,118 (34.7% were transurethral/transvesical resections of the prostate (TUR-Ps, and the remaining 22,028 (13.6% specimens were derived from radical prostatectomies, bladder interventions, etc. A total of 48,078 (42.2% males had histopathologically verified prostate cancer, and of these, 78.8% and 16.8% were diagnosed on prostate biopsies and TUR-Ps, respectively.Future perspectives: A validated algorithm was successfully developed to convert complex prostate SNOMED codes into clinical useful data. A unique database, including males with both normal and cancerous

  14. Improving patient data quality by integrating oncology practice and state cancer registry tumor staging information: Feasibility and future value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess G

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transition in oncology to electronic charting offers the potential to improve the quality of patient care and value of observational research. Data fields that are more complete, have common standards, and are searchable are critical to help meet these goals. As a key data field, and proof-of-concept we studied the additional gain in recorded stage and agreement in cancer staging by adding ‘missing’ stage information into an oncology practice’s electronic medical records (EMR from a state cancer registry. Methods: In this observational study, patient records were matched and compared between a practice-based (EMR database (Georgia Cancer Specialists [GCS] and a state cancer registry (Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry [GCCR]. Impact on recorded cancer stage following a merge of the EMR and registry data was assessed. Eligible patients had ≥1 visit to any GCS practice site during the study period (1/1/2005-12/31/2008 and a diagnosis of a primary, malignant solid neoplasm (except brain or spine. Results: The final sample included 38,248 patients from GCS files, with 13,486 matched to patients with a solid malignant tumor in the GCCR files. There were 3,424 (25% patients without staging information prior to GCCR integration, which was reduced to 12% after GCCR integration - a relative gain of 52%. Differences between initial GCS stage and initial GCCR stage occurred in 45% of the sample, and varied by cancer type. Conclusions: Adding information from external data sources can help create more complete patient records. The concept is feasible and has the potential to improve data quality. Patient data collected in different systems for different reasons will often be discordant.

  15. Incidence and histological patterns of thyroid cancer in Sri Lanka 2001-2010: an analysis of national cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajah, Umesh; Fernando, Ashan; Prabashani, Saumyakala; Fernando, Eshani A; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa A

    2018-02-07

    An increasing incidence of thyroid cancer is observed in many developed countries. Increasing incidence may also reflect better reporting or increased diagnostic scrutiny. We conducted this study to examine trends in thyroid cancer incidence and histological patterns in Sri Lanka. A retrospective cohort evaluation of patients with thyroid cancer during 2001-2010 was performed using population based data published from the Sri Lanka National Cancer Registry. Trends in incidence and histological patterns were analysed by age and gender. The age-standardized incidence of thyroid cancer increased from 2.44 per 100,000 in 2001 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 2.21-2.67) to 5.16 per 100,000 in 2010 (95% CI: 4.85-5.47); a 2.1-fold increase (p < 0.05 for trend). A greater part of this increase is attributable to increase in incidence of papillary thyroid cancer, which increased from 1.64 to 3.61 per 100,000; a 2.2-fold increase (p < 0.05 for trend). Follicular cancer showed lesser, yet a significant increase from 0.56 to 0.95 per 100,000 (p < 0.05). Other varieties of thyroid cancer showed no significant increases in incidence. Trends in the increases in incidence of papillary cancer in females showed a much greater increase compared with males (from 2.45 to 5.60 per 100,000, a 2.28-fold increase in females compared with from 0.82 to 1.55; a 1.89-fold increase in males, p < 0.001). Highest incidence of papillary cancer was observed in 30-39-year age group, which has increased from 5.56 to 12.9 per 100,000; a 2.32-fold increase (p < 0.001). The increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in Sri Lanka is predominantly due to the increasing incidence of papillary cancers. These trends may reflect increased detection and better reporting, although an inherent increase in the incidence is the likely main contributor. Further studies including tumour stage and mortality may help answer these questions.

  16. Estimating breast cancer-specific and other-cause mortality in clinical trial and population-based cancer registry cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, James J; Huang, Lan; Ries, Lynn; Reichman, Marsha; Mariotto, Angela; Feuer, Eric

    2009-11-15

    To compute net cancer-specific survival rates using population data sources (eg, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results [SEER] Program), 2 approaches primarily are used: relative survival (observed survival adjusted for life expectancy) and cause-specific survival based on death certificates. The authors of this report evaluated the performance of these estimates relative to a third approach based on detailed clinical follow-up history. By using data from Cancer Cooperative Group clinical trials in breast cancer, the authors estimated 1) relative survival, 2) breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) determined from death certificates, and 3) BCSS obtained by attributing cause according to clinical events after diagnosis, which, for this analysis was considered the benchmark "true" estimate. Noncancer life expectancy also was compared between trial participants, SEER registry patients, and the general population. Among trial patients, relative survival overestimated true BCSS in patients with lymph node-negative breast cancer; whereas, in patients with lymph node-positive breast cancer, the 2 estimates were similar. For higher risk patients (younger age, larger tumors), relative survival accurately estimated true BCSS. In lower risk patients, death certificate BCSS was more accurate than relative survival. Noncancer life expectancy was more favorable among trial participants than in the general population and among SEER patients. Tumor size at diagnosis, which is a potential surrogate for screening use, partially accounted for this difference. In the clinical trials, relative survival accurately estimated BCSS in patients who had higher risk disease despite more favorable other-cause mortality than the population at large. In patients with lower risk disease, the estimate using death certificate information was more accurate. For SEER data and other data sources where detailed postdiagnosis clinical history was unavailable, death

  17. Endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome kindreds: report from the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry with review of the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Stacey, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to categorize and report endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer families. Our Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for gynecologic and peritoneal cancers linked to mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Invasive cancers were registered in 101 mutation carriers with complete pathology reports. Efforts were made to secure diagnostic surgical pathology tissues for review. All records and available diagnostic slides were meticulously studied, and primary cancers were classified. Eight malignancies were classified as primary endometrial cancers. Five of these were low- or intermediate-grade endometrioid carcinomas, and 3 were pure serous carcinomas or contained serous carcinoma elements mixed with high-grade endometrioid carcinoma. Breast cancers were diagnosed in 5 patients before and in 1 patient after endometrial carcinoma. Three endometrioid carcinomas were preceded by estrogen treatment, 2 for many years and the other for only 2 months, and 2 of the patients with serous carcinoma had been treated with tamoxifen. The finding that 8 of gynecologic and peritoneal cancers in 101 mutation carriers were endometrial cancers with a smaller proportion of endometrioid carcinomas than reported in general populations is added to the current controversial literature on endometrial cancer, particularly regarding serous carcinomas, in hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome. Well-designed prospective programs for standardized surgical and pathologic handling, processing, and reporting are essential for working out the pathogenesis, true risks, and best management of this disease in carriers of deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations.

  18. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: a nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen, L. N.; Elferink, M. A. G.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Siesling, S.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Richel, D. J.; Karim-Kos, H. E.; Coebergh, J. W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989-2006. Patients and methods: All 103 744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989-2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from The

  19. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: A nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N. van Steenbergen (Liza); M.A.G. Elferink; P. Krijnen (Pieta); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); S. Siesling (Sabine); H.J.T. Rutten (Harm); D.J. Richel (Dirk); H.E. Karim-Kos (Henrike); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989-2006. Patients and methods: All 103 744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989-2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from

  20. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: a nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen, L.N.; Elferink, M.A.G.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Siesling, S.; Siesling, Sabine; Rutten, H.J.T.; Richel, D.J; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989–2006. Patients and methods: All 103 744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989–2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from The

  1. [The use of the Epidemiology Cancer registry Baden-Württemberg in the follow-up of the EPIC cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, G; Zoller, D; Wiedmann, T; Bussas, U; El Idrissi-Lamghari, C; Kneisel, J; Batzler, W U; Becker, N

    2004-01-01

    The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) is a prospective multicentre study that has been implemented to further the understanding of the association between diet and chronic diseases with emphasis on cancer. In Heidelberg from June 1994 until October 1998 about 25,500 subjects aged 35 to 65 years in women and 40 to 65 years in men were recruited. Apart from extensive questions about food intake, the participants were also asked to provide detailed information about their smoking habits, physical activity, subjective well-being, medical history and use of medications. As well as completing the questionnaire and a personal interview, the participants also gave blood samples and anthropometiric measures and the blood pressure were taken in standardized manner. The analyses of the EPIC study will depend on achieving a comprehensive record of all new cancer cases, and all deaths, together with the corresponding cause of death, within the study population. To date all self-reported incident cancer cases are verified by comparing them with pathology reports and hospital records. They are then coded according to the coding list for the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-O2) issued by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Since at begin of the investigation in the study region no cancer registration existed, the participants are followed -up by interval questioning ('active follow-up'). In order to integrate increasingly the data of the Cancer registry Baden-Württemberg (EKR-BW) attempts were made to explore record linkage systems. For this purpose, in the years 2000, 2002, 2003 record linkages between EPIC-Heidelberg and EKR-BW were performed. Procedures were evaluated for performing an anonymous linkage of the EPIC data with the data of the EKR-BW. After a pilot project on the feasibility of the linkage the program was evaluated on the EPIC data, record linkages are performed regularly. Different coding systems were applied

  2. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands: aims, design and interim results

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, L.M.; Kuipers, I.M.; Heuvel, F. van den; Mendes, R.; Berger, R.M.; Beynum, I.M. van; Rozendaal, L.; Rammeloo, L.A.; Iperen, G.G. van; Schokking, M.; Frerich, S.; Blom, N.A.; Breur, J.M.; Helbing, W.A.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for children with heart diseases. This paper presents the aims, design and interim results of the KinCor project. Methods All children presenting at a Dutch university medical centre with a diagnosis of heart...

  3. Cancer survival among children of Turkish descent in Germany 1980–2005: a registry-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razum Oliver

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the effect of migrant status on childhood cancer survival. We studied cancer survival among children of Turkish descent in the German Cancer Childhood Registry, one of the largest childhood cancer registries worldwide. Methods We identified children of Turkish descent among cancer cases using a name-based approach. We compared 5-year survival probabilities of Turkish and other children in three time periods of diagnosis (1980–87, 1988–95, 1996–2005 using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank tests. Results The 5-year survival probability for all cancers among 1774 cases of Turkish descent (4.76% of all 37.259 cases was 76.9% compared to 77.6% in the comparison group (all other cases; p = 0.15. We found no age- or sex-specific survival differences (p-values between p = 0.18 and p = 0.90. For the period 1980–87, the 5-year survival probability among Turkish children with lymphoid leukaemia was significantly lower (62% versus 75.8%; p Conclusion Our results suggest that nowadays Turkish migrant status has no bearing on the outcome of childhood cancer therapies in Germany. The inclusion of currently more than 95% of all childhood cancer cases in standardised treatment protocols is likely to contribute to this finding.

  4. Incidence, mortality and receptor status of breast cancer in African Caribbean women: Data from the cancer registry of Guadeloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloumeaux, J; Gaumond, S; Bhakkan, B; Manip M'Ebobisse, Nsome; Lafrance, W; Lancelot, Pierre; Vacque, D; Negesse, Y; Diedhiou, A; Kadhel, P

    2017-04-01

    Geographical disparities in breast cancer incidence and outcomes are reported worldwide. Women of African descent show lower incidence, higher mortality rates and earlier age of onset. We analyzed data from the cancer registry of Guadeloupe for the period 2008-2013. We describe breast cancer characteristics by molecular subtype, as well as estimated observed and net survival. We used Cox proportional hazard models to determine associations between cancer subtypes and death rate, adjusted for variables of interest. Overall, 1275 cases were recorded with a mean age at diagnosis of 57(±14) years. World standardized incidence and mortality were respectively 71.9/100,000 and 14.1/100,000 person-years. Age-specific incidence rates were comparable to European and US populations below the age of 45, and higher in Guadeloupean women aged between 45 and 55 years. Overall, 65.1% of patients were hormone receptor (HR)+ and 20.1% were HR-. Triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) accounted for 14% of all cases, and were more frequent in patients under 40 (21.6% vs. 13.4%, p=0.02). Five-year net survival was 84.9% [81.4-88.6]. It was higher for HR+/Her2+ and HR+/Her2- subtypes, and lower for HR-/Her2+ and TNBC patients. We found high age-specific incidence rates of breast cancer in women aged 45 to 55 years, which warrants further investigation in our population. However, this population of mainly African descent had good overall survival rates, and data according to subtypes are consistent with those reported internationally. These results may suggest that poorer survival in other African descent populations may not be an inherent feature of the disease but may be amenable to improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Mirjam M; Verhage, Bas A J; Ambergen, Ton A W; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2009-05-15

    To examine prospectively the relation between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk, the authors analyzed data from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Participants were 120,852 persons who completed a baseline questionnaire in 1986. After 13.3 years of follow-up, 350 cases of pancreatic cancer (67% microscopically confirmed) were available for analysis. Compared with abstention, the highest category of alcohol consumption (> or =30 g/day of ethanol) was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (for all cases, rate ratio = 1.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 2.39; P(trend) = 0.12; for microscopically confirmed cases, rate ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.94, 2.54; P(trend) = 0.22). In a subgroup of stable alcohol users (no change during the 5 years before baseline), a similarly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found. This increased risk was limited to the first 7 years of follow-up. No associations were observed between consumption of specific alcoholic beverages and risk of pancreatic cancer. The associations were not modified by folate intake or smoking. Overall, these findings suggest an increased pancreatic cancer risk for persons with a high ethanol intake (> or =30 g/day). However, this increased risk was observed only during the first 7 years of follow-up.

  6. Comparable survival outcome of metastatic colorectal cancer in Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients: Retrospective analysis of the South Australian metastatic colorectal cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoko; Karapetis, Christos S; Roder, David; Beeke, Carol; Hocking, Christopher; Roy, Amitesh C; Townsend, Amanda R; Padbury, Rob; Maddern, Guy; Price, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate disparities in demographics, disease characteristics, treatment and overall survival between South Australian (SA) Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This employs a retrospective population study using the SA mCRC registry. The SA mCRC registry identifies mCRC patients from hospital encounters, histopathology reports, medical oncology letters, clinician notification, attendances at multidisciplinary meetings and death audits by the SA Cancer Registry. A total of 2865 adult mCRC patients including 14 Indigenous patients were identified through the SA mCRC registry between February 2006 and August 2013. Patients were linked to the SA Cancer Registry to obtain Indigenous status. Demographic, disease and treatment characteristics were compared using Chi-squared test and t-test; while overall survival defined as time to any cause of death was analysed using Cox regression. No difference was observed for clinical characteristics, except for a higher proportion of Indigenous patients receiving chemotherapy (85.7% versus 58.5%; P = 0.04). The rate of liver surgery was similar across the two groups (21.0% versus 15.1%; P = 0.40). The median overall survivals were equivalent (11.9 months versus 15.1 months; hazard ratio = 1.00; 95% confidence interval for hazard ratio, 0.54-1.86). Clinical characteristics and survival outcomes were similar between Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients captured on the SA mCRC registry, and outcome of those who have an access to comprehensive cancer care appeared independent of Indigenous status and in line with large clinical trials. Underestimation of Indigenous cases due to their lower utilisation of cancer service could not be excluded and ultimately the accurate reporting of these patients is crucial. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  7. Breast Density Notification Legislation and Breast Cancer Stage at Diagnosis: Early Evidence from the SEER Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ilana; Asch, Steven M; Bendavid, Eran; Bhattacharya, Jay; Owens, Douglas K

    2017-06-01

    Twenty-eight states have passed breast density notification laws, which require physicians to inform women of a finding of dense breasts on mammography. To evaluate changes in breast cancer stage at diagnosis after enactment of breast density notification legislation. Using a difference-in-differences analysis, we examined changes in stage at diagnosis among women with breast cancer in Connecticut, the first state to enact legislation, compared to changes among women in control states. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) registry, 2005-2013. Women ages 40-74 with breast cancer. Breast density notification legislation, enacted in Connecticut in October of 2009. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Our study included 466,930 women, 25,592 of whom lived in Connecticut. Legislation was associated with a 1.38-percentage-point (95 % CI 0.12 to 2.63) increase in the proportion of women in Connecticut versus control states who had localized invasive cancer at the time of diagnosis, and a 1.12-percentage-point (95 % CI -2.21 to -0.08) decline in the proportion of women with ductal carcinoma in situ at diagnosis. Breast density notification legislation was not associated with a change in the proportion of women in Connecticut versus control states with regional-stage (-0.09 percentage points, 95 % CI -1.01 to 1.02) or metastatic disease (-0.24, 95 % CI -0.75 to 0.28). County-level analyses and analyses limited to women younger than 50 found no statistically significant associations. Single intervention state, limited follow-up, potential confounding from unobserved trends. Breast density notification legislation in Connecticut was associated with a small increase in the proportion of women diagnosed with localized invasive breast cancer in individual-level but not county-level analyses. Whether this finding reflects potentially beneficial early detection or potentially harmful overdiagnosis is not known. Legislation was not

  8. Site of metastasis and breast cancer mortality: a Danish nationwide registry-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Nørgaard, Mette; Acquavella, John; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2017-01-01

    Survival among patients with metastatic breast cancer may vary according to the site of metastasis and receptor status. We used Danish nationwide medical registries to establish a cohort of patients with metastatic breast cancer (870 with de novo metastatic disease and 3518 with recurrent disease with distant metastasis) diagnosed during 1997-2011. We examined 1-year and >1 to 5-year mortality associated with first site of metastasis and receptor expression status of the primary tumor. Cox proportional regression was used to compute confounder-adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs) associated with site of metastasis, stratified by receptor status. Overall 1-year and >1 to 5-year mortality risks were 36 and 69 %, respectively. Risk of death within 1 year was highest for brain-only (62 %) and liver-only (43 %) involvement and nearly the same for patients with lung-only (32 %), bone-only (32 %) involvement, and other/combination of sites (34 %). Using bone-only metastasis as reference, women with brain-only metastasis had more than two-fold increased risk of dying. The adjusted MRR for women with liver-only metastasis also was increased, though less pronounced. Patients with lung-only [adjusted MRR 0.9 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.8, 1.1)] or other metastases [adjusted MRR 1.0 (95 % CI 0.9, 1.2)] had similar mortality as patients with bone-only metastasis. Positive hormonal receptor status was a favorable prognostic factor. Metastatic breast cancer has a serious prognosis. Patients with brain-only metastasis had the highest mortality. Positive hormonal receptor status on the primary tumor was a favorable prognostic factor for all metastatic sites.

  9. End-of-life care and circumstances of death in patients dying as a result of cancer in Belgium and the Netherlands: a retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeussen, Koen; Van den Block, Lieve; Echteld, Michael A; Boffin, Nicole; Bilsen, Johan; Van Casteren, Viviane; Abarshi, Ebun; Donker, Gé; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje; Deliens, Luc

    2011-11-10

    To examine and compare end-of-life care in patients with cancer dying in Belgium and the Netherlands. A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2008 via representative nationwide sentinel networks of general practitioners (GPs) in Belgium and the Netherlands. By using similar standardized procedures, GPs reported on aspects of end-of-life care and the circumstances of nonsudden death of patients with cancer in their practice. Of the 422 reported patients with cancer, most resided at home during the last year of life (Belgium, 91%; the Netherlands, 95%). Death occurred at home in 34% (Belgium) and 61% (the Netherlands) and in the hospital in 29% (Belgium) and 19% (the Netherlands). In the last month of life, end-of-life issues were more often discussed in the Netherlands (88%) than in Belgium (68%). In both countries, physical problems were discussed most often (Belgium, 49%; the Netherlands, 78%) and spiritual issues least often (Belgium, 20%; the Netherlands, 32%). Certain end-of-life treatment preferences were known for 43% (Belgium) and 67% (the Netherlands) of patients. In the last week of life, treatment was most often focused on palliation (Belgium, 94%; the Netherlands, 91%). Physical distress was reported in 84% (Belgium) and 76% (the Netherlands) of patients and psychological distress in 59% and 36%. Most distressing was lack of energy (Belgium, 73%; the Netherlands, 71%) and lack of appetite (Belgium, 61%; the Netherlands, 53%). Two thirds of patients were bedridden (Belgium, 67%; the Netherlands, 69%). Although place of death and communication about end-of-life issues differ substantially, a palliative treatment goal is adopted for the vast majority of patients in both countries. However, GPs reported that the majority of patients experienced symptom distress at the end of life, which suggests important challenges remain for improving end-of-life care.

  10. [Assessing the economic impact of cancer in Chile: a direct and indirect cost measurement based on 2009 registries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Camilo; Herrera, Cristian; Rodríguez, Rodrigo; Bastías, Gabriel; Jiménez, Jorge

    2016-08-02

    This paper aims to determine the economic impact that cancer represents to Chile, exploring the share of costs for the most important cancers and the differences between the public and private sector. We used the cost of illness methodology, through the assessment of the direct and indirect costs associated with cancer treatment. Data was obtained from 2009 registries of the Chilean Ministry of Health and the Superintendence of Health. Indirect costs were calculated by days of job absenteeism and potential years of life lost. Over US$ 2.1 billion were spent on cancer in 2009, which represents almost 1% of Chile’s Gross Domestic Product. The direct per capita cost was US$ 47. Indirect costs were 1.92 times more than direct costs. The three types of cancer that embody the highest share of costs were gastric cancer (17.6%), breast cancer (7%) and prostate cancer (4.2%) in the public sector, and breast cancer (14%), lung cancer (7.5%) and prostate cancer (4.1%) in the private sector. On average men spent 30.33% more than women. There are few studies of this kind in Chile and the region. The country can be classified as having a cancer economic impact below the average of those in European Union countries. We expect that this information can be used to develop access policies and resource allocation decision making, and as a first step into further cancer-costing studies in Chile and the Latin American and Caribbean region.

  11. Treatment Patterns and Differences in Survival of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Between Academic and Non-Academic Hospitals in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Naomi; Bongers, Mathilda L; Coupé, Veerle M H; Smit, Egbert F; Groen, Harry J M; Welling, Alle; Schramel, Franz M N H; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to analyze differences in survival between academic and non-academic hospitals and to provide insight into treatment patterns for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results show the state of NSCLC survival and care in the Netherlands. The Netherlands Cancer Registry provided data on NSCLC survival for all Dutch hospitals. We used the Kaplan-Meier estimate to calculate median survival time by hospital type and a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the relative risk of mortality (expressed as hazard ratios) for patients diagnosed in academic versus non-academic hospitals, with adjustment for age, gender, and tumor histology, and stratifying for disease stage. Data on treatment patterns in Dutch hospitals was obtained from 4 hospitals (2 academic, 2 non-academic). A random sample of patients diagnosed with NSCLC from January 2009 until January 2011 was identified through hospital databases. Data was obtained on patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, and treatments. The Cox proportional hazards model shows a significantly decreased hazard ratio of mortality for patients diagnosed in academic hospitals, as opposed to patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals. This is specifically true for primary radiotherapy patients and patients who receive systemic treatment for non-metastasized NSCLC. Patients diagnosed in academic hospitals have better median overall survival than patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals, especially for patients treated with radiotherapy, systemic treatment, or combinations. This difference may be caused by residual confounding since the estimates were not adjusted for performance status. A wide variety of surgical, radiotherapeutic, and systemic treatments is prescribed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Germline TP53 Mutations in Patients With Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer in the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Masciari, Serena; Joshi, Victoria A; Mercado, Rowena C; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Haile, Robert W; Kucherlapati, Raju; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-05-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome, usually characterized by germline TP53 mutations, is associated with markedly elevated lifetime risks of multiple cancers, and has been linked to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal cancer. To examine the frequency of germline TP53 alterations in patients with early-onset colorectal cancer. This was a multicenter cross-sectional cohort study of individuals recruited to the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) from 1998 through 2007 (genetic testing data updated as of January 2015). Both population-based and clinic-based patients in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand were recruited to the CCFR. Demographic information, clinical history, and family history data were obtained at enrollment. Biospecimens were collected from consenting probands and families, including microsatellite instability and DNA mismatch repair immunohistochemistry results. A total of a 510 individuals diagnosed as having colorectal cancer at age 40 years or younger and lacking a known hereditary cancer syndrome were identified from the CCFR as being potentially eligible. Fifty-three participants were excluded owing to subsequent identification of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (n = 47) or biallelic MUTYH mutations (n = 6). Germline sequencing of the TP53 gene was performed. Identified TP53 alterations were assessed for pathogenicity using literature and international mutation database searches and in silico prediction models. Frequency of nonsynonymous germline TP53 alterations. Among 457 eligible participants (314, population-based; 143, clinic-based; median age at diagnosis, 36 years [range, 15-40 years]), 6 (1.3%; 95% CI, 0.5%-2.8%) carried germline missense TP53 alterations, none of whom met clinical criteria for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Four of the identified TP53 alterations have been previously described in the literature in probands with clinical features of Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and 2 were novel alterations. In a

  13. Cancer surveillance using registry data: Results and recommendations for the Lithuanian national prostate cancer early detection programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondos, Adam; Krilaviciute, Agne; Smailyte, Giedre; Ulys, Albertas; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-08-01

    We describe long term trends in prostate cancer epidemiology in Lithuania, where a national prostate specific antigen (PSA) test based early detection programme has been running since 2006. We used population-based cancer registry data, supplemented by information on PSA testing, life expectancy and mortality from Lithuania to examine age-specific prostate cancer incidence, mortality and survival trends among men aged 40+ between 1978 and 2009, as well as life expectancy of screening-eligible men, and the proportion of men with a first PSA test per year since the programme started. The number of prostate cancer patients rose from 2.237 in 1990-1994 to 15.294 in 2005-2009. By 2010, around 70% of the eligible population was tested, on average around two times. The early detection programme brought about the highest prostate cancer incidence peaks ever seen in a country to date. Recent incidence and survival rises in the age groups 75-84 suggest PSA testing in the elderly non-eligible population. Life expectancy of men aged 70-74 indicates that less than 30% of patients will live for 15 years and may have a chance to benefit from early detection. Early detection among men aged 70-74, and particularly among the elderly (75+) may have to be reconsidered. Life expectancy assessment before testing, avoiding a second test among men with low PSA values and increasing the threshold for further evaluation and the screening interval may help reducing harm. Publishing information on treatment modalities, side-effects and patient reported quality of life is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Name Recognition to Identify Patients of South Asian Ethnicity within the Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitri Singh-Carlson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The goal of this project was to develop a list of forenames and surnames of South Asian (SA women that could be used to identify SA breast cancer patients within the cancer registry. This list was compiled, evaluated, and validated to ensure comprehensiveness, accuracy, and applicability of SA names. Methods: This project was conducted by Canadian researchers who are immersed in conducting behavioral studies with SA women diagnosed with cancer in the province of British Columbia. Recruiting SA cancer patients for research can be a difficult task due to social and cultural factors. Methods used by other researchers to identify ethnicity related unique names were employed to filter surnames and forenames that were not common to this ethnic group. Co-author (Gurpreet Oshan of SA ethnicity rigorously identified and deleted multiple lists and redundant entries along with common English forenames which resulted in a list of 16,888 SA forenames. All co-authors of Indian ethnicity (Gurpreet Oshan, Savitri Singh-Carlson, Harajit Lail were involved in critiquing and manually reviewing the names list throughout this process. Comprehensive lists of SA surnames and women′s forenames were reviewed to identify those that were unique to SA ethnicity. Accuracy was ensured by constantly filtering the redundancy by using an Excel program which helped to illustrate the number of times each name was spelled in different ways. Results: The final lists included 9112 surnames and 16,888 forenames of SA ethnicity. On the basis of the surname linkage only, the sensitivity of the list was 76.6%, specificity was 62.9%, and the positive predictive value was 58.5%. On the basis of both the surname and forename linkage, the specificity of the list was 88.6%. These lists include variations in spelling forenames and surnames as well. Conclusions: The list of surnames and forenames can be useful tools to identify SA ethnic groups from large population database in

  15. Reproductive and Hormonal Factors in Association With Ovarian Cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, M. G. M.; Onland-Moret, N. C.; van den Brandt, P. A.; Goldbohm, R. A.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Kruitwagen, R. F. P. M.; Schouten, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    Parity, oral contraceptive use, and hysterectomy are known to protect against ovarian cancer, whereas the effect of other reproductive factors remains unclear. The authors investigated the association between several reproductive and hormonal factors and the risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer among postmenopausal women participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer. Information on reproductive history and exogenous hormone use was obtained through a self-administered questionnaire at baseline in 1986. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 375 cases and 2,331 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis. Ovarian cancer risk was reduced for parous women, with increasing parity, and for hysterectomized women. Moreover, the authors found evidence that oral contraceptive use is protective against ovarian cancer, even when initiated at an older age. In addition, a reduced risk was observed for each year reduction in age at natural menopause and per year reduction in total menstrual life span. A small increased risk was observed with prolonged time to pregnancy, but no difference was found between ever-married nulliparous women and never-married nulliparous women. Moreover, no associations were observed for age at first birth, age at menarche, age at first and last use of oral contraceptives, and use of hormone replacement therapy. PMID:20861144

  16. Estimating cancer incidence, prevalence, and the number of cancer patients treated with antitumor therapy in 2015 and 2020 -  analysis of the Czech National Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, L; Pavlík, T; Májek, O; Büchler, T; Muzik, J; Maluskova, D; Koptíková, J; Bortlicek, Z; Abrahámová, J

    2015-01-01

    Cancer burden in the Czech population ranks among the highest worldwide, which introduces a strong need for a prospective modelling of cancer incidence and prevalence rates. Moreover, a prediction of number of cancer patients requiring active antitumor therapy is also an important issue. This paper presents the stage-specific predictions of cancer incidence and prevalence, and the stage- and region-specific patients requiring active antitumor therapy for the most common cancer diagnoses in the Czech Republic for years 2015 and 2020. The stage-specific estimates are also presented with regard to the treatment phase as newly diagnosed patients, patients treated for non-terminal recurrence, and patients treated for terminal recurrence. Data of the Czech National Cancer Registry from 1977 to 2011 has been used for the analysis, omitting the records of patients diagnosed as death certificate only or at autopsy. In total, 1,777,775 incidences have been considered for the estimation using a statistical model utilizing solely the population-based cancer registry data. All estimates have been calculated with respect to the changing demographic structure of the Czech population and the clinical stage at diagnosis. Considering year 2011 as the baseline, we predict 89%, 15%, 31% and 32% increase in prostate, colorectal, female breast and lung cancer incidence, respectively, in 2020 resulting in 13,153, 9,368, 8,695, and 8,604 newly dia-g--nosed cancer patients in that year, respectively. Regarding cancer prevalence in 2020, the estimated increase is 140%, 40%, 51%, and 17% for prostate, colorectal, female breast and lung cancer, respectively, meaning that more than 100,000 prevalent female breast cancer patients as well as more than 100,000 prevalent prostate cancer patients are expected in the Czech Republic. The estimated numbers of patients requiring active antitumor therapy for prostate, colorectal, female breast and lung cancer in the Czech Republic in 2020 are 23,652, 14

  17. Hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada: report from the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada consensus meeting; Montreal, Quebec; October 28, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenmund, H.; Singh, H.; Candas, B.; Chodirker, B.N.; Serfas, K.; Aronson, M.; Holter, S.; Volenik, A.; Green, J.; Dicks, E.; Woods, M.O.; Gilchrist, D.; Gryfe, R.; Cohen, Z.; Foulkes, W.D.

    2013-01-01

    At a consensus meeting held in Montreal, October 28, 2011, a multidisciplinary group of Canadian experts in the fields of genetics, gastroenterology, surgery, oncology, pathology, and health care services participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing consensus statements pertaining to the development and maintenance of hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada. Five statements were approved by all participants. PMID:24155632

  18. Protective effect of periconceptional folic acid supplements on the risk of congenital heart defects : a registry-based case-control study in the northern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beynum, Ingrid M.; Kapusta, Livia; Bakker, Marian K.; den Heijer, Martin; Blom, Henk J.; de Walle, Hermien E. K.

    To investigate the potentially protective of periconceptional folic acid use on the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs) relative to other non-folate related malformations. We analysed data from a large regional register of birth defects (EUROCAT-Northern Netherlands), over a 10 year period

  19. Protective effect of periconceptional folic acid supplements on the risk of congenital heart defects: a registry-based case-control study in the northern Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijnum, I.M. van; Kapusta, L.; Bakker, M.K.; Heijer, M. den; Blom, H.J.; Walle, H.E. de

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the potentially protective of periconceptional folic acid use on the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs) relative to other non-folate related malformations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analysed data from a large regional register of birth defects (EUROCAT-Northern Netherlands),

  20. Current practice in the management of superficial bladder cancer in the Netherlands and Belgian Flanders: a survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Melissen, D.O.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because there is no national guideline for the diagnosis, therapy and follow up of (superficial) bladder cancer in the Netherlands and Belgium, the actual patient management may differ between urologists. The purpose of this study is to get insight in the current way urologists diagnose,

  1. Large variation between hospitals in immediate breast reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, A.C.M.; Mureau, Marc A.M.; Schreuder, K.; van Dalen, T.; Vrancken Peeters, M.T.F.D.; Schrieks, M.; Maduro, J.H.; Siesling, Sabine

    Background The present study aimed to describe the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in hospitals in the Netherlands and determine whether patient and tumor factors account for the variation. Methods Patients

  2. Implementation of trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, L.; Schaapveld, M.; Siesling, Sabine; Wessling, J.; Voogd, A.C.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.; Otter, R.; Willemse, P.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy markedly improves outcome. In the Netherlands, a national guideline was released in September 2005 stating that trastuzumab should be given in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Aim of this study was

  3. Implementation of trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, L.; Schaapveld, M.; Siesling, S.; Wesseling, J.; Voogd, A. C.; Tjan-Heijnen, V. C. G.; Otter, R.; Willemse, P. H. B.

    Trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy markedly improves outcome. In the Netherlands, a national guideline was released in September 2005 stating that trastuzumab should be given in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Aim of this study was

  4. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Oort, I.M. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Coenen, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of

  5. Validity of Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry data used in the predictors of breast cancer recurrence (ProBeCaRe) premenopausal breast cancer cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Kjærsgaard, Anders; Ahern, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Validation studies of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry show good agreement with medical records for adjuvant treatment data, but inconsistent recurrence information. No studies have validated changes in menopausal status or endocrine therapy during follow-up. In a longit......BACKGROUND: Validation studies of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG) registry show good agreement with medical records for adjuvant treatment data, but inconsistent recurrence information. No studies have validated changes in menopausal status or endocrine therapy during follow......-up. In a longitudinal study, we validated DBCG data using medical records as the gold standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From a cohort of 5959 premenopausal women diagnosed during 2002-2010 with stage I-III breast cancer, we selected 151 patients - 77 estrogen-receptor-positive and 74 estrogen-receptor-negative - from......). The PPV for DBCG-recorded recurrence was 100%. However, of 19 patients who had a recurrence documented in their medical record, 13 had the recurrence registered in DBCG. CONCLUSIONS: DBCG data are valid for most epidemiological studies of breast cancer treatment. Data on menopausal transition may be less...

  6. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Pregnancy-Associated Breast Cancer: Results of Analysis of a Nationwide Breast Cancer Registry Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Gyoung; Jeon, Ye Won; Ko, Byung Kyun; Sohn, Guiyun; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Moon, Byung-In; Youn, Hyun Jo; Kim, Hyun-Ah

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinicopathological characteristics of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) in comparison with non-pregnancy associated breast cancer (non-PABC). A total of 344 eligible patients with PABC were identified in the Korean Breast Cancer Society Registry database. PABC was defined as ductal carcinoma in situ , invasive ductal carcinoma, or invasive lobular carcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year after the birth of a child. Patients with non-PABC were selected from the same database using a 1:2 matching method. The matching variables were operation, age, and initial stage. Patients with PABC had significantly lower survival rates than patient with non-PABC (10-year survival rate: PABC, 76.4%; non-PABC, 85.1%; p =0.011). PABC patients had higher histologic grade and were more frequently hormone receptor negative than non-PABC patients. Being overweight (body mass index [BMI], ≥23 kg/m 2 ), early menarche (≤13 years), late age at first childbirth (≥30 years), and a family history of breast cancer were more common in the PABC group than in the non-PABC group. Multivariate analysis showed the following factors to be significantly associated with PABC (vs. non-PABC): early menarche (odds ratio [OR], 2.165; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.566-2.994; p <0.001), late age at first childbirth (OR, 2.446; 95% CI, 1.722-3.473; p <0.001), and being overweight (OR, 1.389; 95% CI, 1.007-1.917; p =0.045). Early menarche, late age at first childbirth, and BMI ≥23 kg/m 2 were more associated with PABC than non-PABC.

  7. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niekerk, G.C. van; Bulten, J.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the

  8. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  9. EUROCOURSE lessons learned from and for population-based cancer registries in Europe and their programme owners : Improving performance by research programming for public health and clinical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coebergh, J.W.; van den Hurk, C.J.; Rosso, S.; Comber, H.; Storm, H.; Zanetti, R.; Sacchetto, L.; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Thong, M.S.Y.; Siesling, S.; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Population-based cancer registries (CRs) in Europe have played a supportive, sometimes guiding, role in describing geographic variation of cancer epidemics and comparisons of oncological practice and preventive interventions since the 1950s for all types of cancer, separate and simultaneously. This

  10. Living with the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy : A study among 1–10-year rectal cancer survivors from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, F.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Bosscha, K.J.; Broek van den, W.; Thong, M.S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study examined the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy among 1–10-year rectal cancer survivors. Methods Patients with rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000 to 2009, as registered in the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry, received a questionnaire on quality of life

  11. Long-term weight loss after colorectal cancer diagnosis is associated with lower survival: The Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Hua, Xinwei; Hardikar, Sheetal; Robinson, Jamaica; Lindor, Noralane M; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Figueiredo, Jane C; Potter, John D; Campbell, Peter T; Gallinger, Steven; Cotterchio, Michelle; Adams, Scott V; Cohen, Stacey A; Phipps, Amanda I; Newcomb, Polly A

    2017-12-01

    Body weight is associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and survival, but to the authors' knowledge, the impact of long-term postdiagnostic weight change is unclear. Herein, the authors investigated whether weight change over the 5 years after a diagnosis of CRC is associated with survival. CRC cases diagnosed from 1997 to 2008 were identified through 4 population-based cancer registry sites. Participants enrolled within 2 years of diagnosis and reported their height and weight 2 years prior. Follow-up questionnaires were administered approximately 5 years after diagnosis. Associations between change in weight (in kg) or body mass index (BMI) with overall and CRC-specific survival were estimated using Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage of disease, baseline BMI, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, smoking, time between diagnosis and enrollment, and study site. At the 5-year postdiagnostic survey, 2049 participants reported higher (53%; median plus 5 kg), unchanged (12%), or lower (35%; median -4 kg) weight. Over a median of 5.1 years of subsequent follow-up (range, 0.3-9.9 years), 344 participants died (91 of CRC). Long-term weight loss (per 5 kg) was found to be associated with poorer overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.21) and CRC-specific survival (hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.39). Significantly lower survival was similarly observed for relative weight loss (>5% vs ≤5% change), BMI reduction (per 1 unit), or BMI category change (overweight to normal vs remaining overweight). Weight loss 5 years after a diagnosis of CRC was found to be significantly associated with decreased long-term survival, suggesting the importance of avoiding weight loss in survivors of CRC. Future research should attempt to further evaluate this association, accounting for whether this weight change was intentional or represents a marker of declining health. Cancer 2017

  12. Hormone receptor status of contralateral breast cancers: analysis of data from the US SEER population-based registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezencev, Roman; Švajdler, Marián

    2017-05-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer display higher propensity to develop second primary cancer in the contralateral breast (CBC). Identification of patients with increased risk of CBC and understanding relationships between hormone receptor (HR) statuses of the first and second breast cancers is desirable for endocrine-based prevention strategies. Using 1992-2012 data from 13 SEER registries, the risk of developing CBC was determined as ratio of observed and expected second breast cancers (SIR). Association between HR statuses was examined by exploratory data analysis and multivariable logistic regression. Women with ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers have increased risk of developing CBC with SIR values 2.09 (CI 95 = 1.97-2.21) and 2.40 (CI 95 = 2.18-2.63), respectively. ER statuses of the CBC are moderately positively associated. In metachronous CBC, most cases with ER-positive first cancers had ER-positive second breast cancers (81.6 %; CI 95 = 80.2-82.9 %); however, considerable proportion of cases with ER-negative first cancers had ER-positive second cancers (48.8 %; CI 95 = 46.2-51.4 %). Some women with ER-negative breast cancers may benefit from endocrine-based prevention of ER-positive CBC.

  13. Breast cancer trends differ by ethnicity: a report from the South African National Cancer Registry (1994-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, E; Joffe, M; Cubasch, H; Ruff, P; Norris, S A; Pisa, P T

    2017-02-01

    To describe breast cancer (BC) incidence and mortality by ethnicity in South Africa (SA). Sources of data included the South African National Cancer Registry (NCR) pathology-based reports (1994–2009) and Statistics South Africa (SSA) mortality data (1997–2009). Numbers of cases, age-standardised incidence rates (ASIR) and lifetime risk (LR) were extracted from the NCR database for 1994–2009. Age-specific incidence rates were calculated for five-year age categories. The direct method of standardisation was employed to calculate age-standardised mortality rates (ASMR) using mortality data. Between 1994 and 2009, there were 85 561 female BC. For the Black, Coloured and Asian groups, increases in ASIR and LR were observed between 1994 and 2009. In 2009, the ASIR for the total population, Blacks, Whites, Coloureds and Asians were 26.9, 18.7, 50.2, 40.9 and 51.2 per 100 000, respectively. For Asians, an increase in proportion of BC as a percentage of all female cancers was observed between 1994 and 2002 (11.1%) and continued to increase to 2009 (a further 4.5%). Whites and Asians presented higher incidences of BC at earlier ages compared with Blacks and Coloureds in 2009. In 1998, there were 1618 BC deaths in SA compared with 2784 deaths in 2009. ASMR between 1997 and 2004 increased but stabilised thereafter. This paper demonstrated that SA BC incidence rates are similar to other countries in the region, but lower than other countries with similar health systems. Ethnic differences in BC trends were observed. However, the reasons for observed ethnic differences are unclear.

  14. Estimation of cancer incidences in Aichi prefecture: use of a model area with good quality registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidemi; Inoue, Manami; Shibata, Kazuaki; Tajima, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    In Japan, local government is responsible for organization of population-based cancer registries and the quality of the registration remains modest, mainly due to dependence on voluntary-based operations without legal obligations. Aichi Prefecture cancer registry covers a large population, estimated at 7 million, and its quality has yet to reach the level required internationally. The derived cancer incidences for Aichi Prefecture therefore tend to be underestimated. In the present study we set up a model area, located in the central part of Aichi Prefecture, with a good quality of registry data, covering a reasonable population, including both urban and rural areas. Our model area has typical demographic features of Aichi Prefecture. The materials were data on cancer incidence and deaths during the period of 1996-2000 in this model area of Aichi prefecture, with a population of approximately one million, under the jurisdiction of three public health centers, covering nine municipalities. The percentage of death certificated notified (DCN) cases for all sites was around 14% and the incidence/death ratio was around 1.9. Estimated age-adjusted incidence rates were found to be 256.0 (per 100,000) for males and 177.6 for females, these values being 10-15 % higher than those generated using data for the whole prefecture, and quite close to incidence rates in Japan estimated from the highest quality of data available. It is suggested that the cancer incidence in the Aichi prefecture is indeed being underestimated and that the actual figures may be closer to the estimates provided here.

  15. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    OpenAIRE

    André L. M. Verbeek; Johan Bulten; van Niekerk, Catharina C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large population-based dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7% (95% CI: 2.3–3.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset...

  16. End-of-Life Care and Circumstances of Death in Patients Dying As a Result of Cancer in Belgium and the Netherlands: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, K.; van den Block, L.; Echteld, M.A.; Boffin, N.; Bilsen, J.; van Casteren, V.; Abarshi-Fatiregun, E.A.B.; Donker, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine and compare end-of-life care in patients with cancer dying in Belgium and the Netherlands. Patients and Methods: A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2008 via representative nationwide sentinel networks of general practitioners (GPs) in Belgium and the Netherlands. By

  17. End-of-life care and circumstances of death in patients dying as a result of cancer in Belgium and the Netherlands: a retrospective comparative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, K.; Block, L. van den; Echteld, M.A.; Boffin, N.; Bilsen, J.; Casteren, V. van; Abarshi, E.; Donker, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine and compare end-of-life care in patients with cancer dying in Belgium and the Netherlands. Patients and methods: A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2008 via representative nationwide sentinel networks of general practitioners (GPs) in Belgium and the Netherlands. By

  18. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommering, Charlotte J; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jonker, Marianne A; Tops, Carli M J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Redeker, Egbert J W; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands. Uptake for retinoblastoma (Rb) was compared with uptake for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC). A questionnaire was completed by all nine DNA-diagnostic laboratories assessing the number of independent mutation-positive families identified from the start of diagnostic testing until May 2013, and the number of PNDs performed for these syndromes within these families. Of 187 families with a known Rb-gene mutation, 22 had performed PND (11.8%), this was significantly higher than uptake for FAP (1.6%) and HBOC (cancer syndromes PND started 10-15 years after the introduction and uptake for PND showed an increase after 2009. We conclude that uptake of PND for Rb was significantly higher than for FAP and HBOC, but not different from VHL and LFS. Early onset, high penetrance, lack of preventive surgery and perceived burden of disease may explain these differences.

  19. Toenail selenium status and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: The Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; Schouten, Leo J; Kremer, Bernd; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2016-06-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between selenium status and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) and HNC subtypes (i.e., oral cavity cancer [OCC], oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer [OHPC] and laryngeal cancer [LC]). Therefore, we investigated the association between toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and HNC risk within the Netherlands Cohort Study. At baseline, 120,852 participants completed a self-administered questionnaire about diet and other cancer risk factors and were asked to provide toenail clippings. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 294 cases of HNC (95 OCC, 62 OHPC, two oral cavity/pharynx unspecified or overlapping and 135 LC) and 2,164 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Toenail selenium status was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall (multivariate RR for quartile four versus one: 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37-0.82, P trend = 0.001). The association between toenail selenium and risk of HNC overall was stronger among men than women, but no statistically significant interaction with sex was found. Toenail selenium level was also associated with a decreased risk of all HNC subtypes, with statistically significant associations in OHPC and LC. No statistically significant interaction was found between toenail selenium level and cigarette smoking or alcohol consumption for HNC overall. In this large cohort study, we found an inverse association between toenail selenium level and HNC risk. Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OHPC and LC. Furthermore, the association of toenail selenium status with HNC risk was stronger among men than women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk of second primary cancers in women diagnosed with endometrial cancer in German and Swedish cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianhui; Brenner, Hermann; Fallah, Mahdi; Jansen, Lina; Castro, Felipe A; Geiss, Karla; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Luttmann, Sabine; Sundquist, Kristina; Ressing, Meike; Xu, Leiting; Hemminki, Kari

    2017-12-01

    Along with the increasing incidence and favorable prognosis, more women diagnosed with endometrial cancer may develop second primary cancers (SPCs). We aimed at investigating risk of SPCs after endometrial cancer in Germany and Sweden to provide insight into prevention strategies for SPCs. Endometrial cancer patients diagnosed at age ≥15 years in Germany during 1997-2011 and in Sweden nationwide during 1997-2012 were selected. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), calculated as the ratio of observed to expected numbers of cases, were used to assess the risk of a specific second cancer after endometrial cancer for both German and Swedish datasets. Among 46,929 endometrial cancer survivors in Germany and 18,646 in Sweden, overall 2,897 and 1,706 SPCs were recorded, respectively. Significantly elevated SIRs were observed in Germany for ovarian (SIR = 1.3; 95%CI:1.1-1.5) and kidney cancers [1.6 (1.3-1.8)], while in Sweden the SIRs were 5.4 (4.6-6.3) and1.4 (1.0-1.9), respectively. Elevated risk for second ovarian endometrioid carcinoma was pronounced after early (endometrial cancer in Germany [9.0 (4.8-15)] and Sweden [7.7 (5.1-11)]. In Germany elevated risks were found for second ovarian endometrioid carcinoma after endometrioid histology of first endometrial cancer [6.3 (4.0-9.4)] and for second kidney cancer after clear cell histology of endometrial cancer [4.9 (1.6-11)]. We found exceptionally elevated risk of second ovarian endometrioid carcinoma after endometrial cancer of the same histology or of early onset. Risk for second kidney cancer was also increased, particularly after endometrial cancer of clear cell histology. Cancer prevention strategies should focus on these cancers after endometrial cancer diagnosis. © 2017 UICC.

  1. Usability Assessment of the Missouri Cancer Registry's Published Interactive Mapping Reports: Round One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ramadan, Awatef Ahmed; Jackson-Thompson, Jeannette; Schmaltz, Chester Lee

    2017-08-04

     Many users of spatial data have difficulty interpreting information in health-related spatial reports. The Missouri Cancer Registry and Research Center (MCR-ARC) has produced interactive reports for several years. These reports have never been tested for usability.  The aims of this study were to: (1) conduct a multi-approach usability testing study to understand ease of use (user friendliness) and user satisfaction; and (2) evaluate the usability of MCR-ARC's published InstantAtlas reports.   An institutional review board (IRB) approved mixed methodology usability testing study using a convenience sample of health professionals. A recruiting email was sent to faculty in the Master of Public Health program and to faculty and staff in the Department of Health Management and Informatics at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The study included 7 participants. The test included a pretest questionnaire, a multi-task usability test, and the System Usability Scale (SUS). Also, the researchers collected participants' comments about the tested maps immediately after every trial. Software was used to record the computer screen during the trial and the participants' spoken comments. Several performance and usability metrics were measured to evaluate the usability of MCR-ARC's published mapping reports. Of the 10 assigned tasks, 6 reached a 100% completion success rate, and this outcome was relative to the complexity of the tasks. The simple tasks were handled more efficiently than the complicated tasks. The SUS score ranged between 20-100 points, with an average of 62.7 points and a median of 50.5 points. The tested maps' effectiveness outcomes were better than the efficiency and satisfaction outcomes. There was a statistically significant relationship between the subjects' performance on the study test and the users' previous experience with geographic information system (GIS) tools (P=.03). There were no statistically significant relationships between users

  2. Meat intake, cooking methods, dietary carcinogens, and colorectal cancer risk: findings from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit D; Kim, Andre; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D; Cotterchio, Michelle; Le Marchand, Loic; Stern, Mariana C

    2015-01-01

    Diets high in red meat and processed meats are established colorectal cancer (CRC) risk factors. However, it is still not well understood what explains this association. We conducted comprehensive analyses of CRC risk and red meat and poultry intakes, taking into account cooking methods, level of doneness, estimated intakes of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) that accumulate during meat cooking, tumor location, and tumor mismatch repair proficiency (MMR) status. We analyzed food frequency and portion size data including a meat cooking module for 3364 CRC cases, 1806 unaffected siblings, 136 unaffected spouses, and 1620 unaffected population-based controls, recruited into the CRC Family Registry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for nutrient density variables were estimated using generalized estimating equations. We found no evidence of an association between total nonprocessed red meat or total processed meat and CRC risk. Our main finding was a positive association with CRC for pan-fried beefsteak (Ptrend meat types and cooking practices as possible sources of human carcinogens relevant for CRC risk. PMID:25846122

  3. Employment and insurance outcomes and factors associated with employment among long-term thyroid cancer survivors: a population-based study from the PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, S. J.; Bültmann, U.; Husson, O.; Kuijpens, J. L. P.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; de Boer, A. G. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    To obtain insight into employment and insurance outcomes of thyroid cancer survivors and to examine the association between not having employment and other factors including quality of life. In this cross-sectional population-based study, long-term thyroid cancer survivors from the Netherlands

  4. Employment and insurance outcomes and factors associated with employment among long-term thyroid cancer survivors : a population-based study from the PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, S. J.; Bultmann, U.; Husson, O.; Kuijpens, J. L. P.; Frings-Dresen, M. H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    To obtain insight into employment and insurance outcomes of thyroid cancer survivors and to examine the association between not having employment and other factors including quality of life. In this cross-sectional population-based study, long-term thyroid cancer survivors from the Netherlands

  5. Quality measures of the population-based Finnish Cancer Registry indicate sound data quality for solid malignant tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Maarit K; Miettinen, Joonas; Heikkinen, Sanna; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Malila, Nea

    2017-05-01

    The Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) has collected population-based data on cancer incidence for scientific research and statistical purposes since 1953. Our aim was to provide a comprehensive quality assessment of the current cancer registry data in Finland. We used established quantitative and semi-quantitative techniques to address four main dimensions of data quality: completeness, comparability, validity and timeliness for the period 1953-2013, with a special focus on cancers diagnosed in 2009-2013. For completeness, hospital admissions and outpatient visits were used as an independent data source. In 2009-2013, 153 147 incident tumours were registered in the FCR. Of them, 91% were solid tumours. The completeness for all solid tumours was estimated at 96%, and for non-solid tumours at 86%. Potential underreporting was most prominent for tumours which are not typically histologically verified such as haematological malignancies and non-malignant tumours of the central nervous system. Of all cancers, 93% were morphologically verified, with variation by primary site. The proportion of cancers with uncertain or ill-defined primary site and the proportion of death certificate only registrations were both low at 1.9% and 2.6%, respectively. The FCR provides overall accurate and close to complete national cancer data for solid malignant tumours. Registration of tumours with no histology is still compromised. This warrants continuous communication with clinicians to ensure undisturbed data flow, and active trace-back using external data sources such as hospital administrative data. In addition, broad diagnosis categories would be less sensitive to diversity of input and data quality when international comparisons are made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Meat consumption and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; de Goeij, A.F.; Roemen, G M J M; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; de Bruine, A.P.; Goldbohm, R. A.; van den Brandt, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    Case-cohort analyses were performed on meat and fish consumption in relation to K-ras mutations in 448 colon and 160 rectal cancers that occurred during 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years, and 2948 subcohort members of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. Adjusted incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed for colon and rectal cancer and for K-ras mutation status subgroups. Total fresh meat, most types of fresh meat and fish were not associ...

  7. KinCor, a national registry for paediatric patients with congenital and other types of heart disease in the Netherlands: aims, design and interim results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L M; Kuipers, I M; van den Heuvel, F; Mendes, R; Berger, R M F; van Beynum, I M; Rozendaal, L; Rammeloo, L A J; van Iperen, G G; Schokking, M; Frerich, S; Blom, N A; Breur, J M P J; Helbing, W A

    2016-11-01

    Studies in children with heart disease have been hampered by a lack of easily identifiable patient groups. Currently, there are few prospective population-based registries covering the entire spectrum of heart disease in children. KinCor is a Dutch national registry for children with heart diseases. This paper presents the aims, design and interim results of the KinCor project. All children presenting at a Dutch university medical centre with a diagnosis of heart disease from 2012 onwards were eligible for registration in the KinCor database. Data entry is through a web-based portal. Entry codes have been synchronised with the European Paediatric Cardiac Coding system, allowing coupling with similar databases for adults, such as CONCOR. Between June 2012 and July 2015, 8421 patients were registered (76 % of those eligible). Median age of the patients was 9.8 years, 44.7 % were female; 6782 patients had morphological congenital heart disease. The most prevalent morphological congenital heart defects were ventricular septal defects (18 %), Tetralogy of Fallot (10 %) and transposition of great arteries (9 %). For 42 % of the patients additional diagnoses were registered. Sixty percent of patients had undergone at least one intervention (catheter intervention or surgery). The KinCor database has developed into a large registry of data of children with all types of heart disease and continues to grow. This database will provide the opportunity for epidemiological research projects on congenital and other types of heart disease in children. Entry codes are shared with the CONCOR database, which may provide a unique dataset.

  8. Investigating the risk of cancer in 1990-1991 US Gulf War veterans with the use of state cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather A; Maillard, Jessica D; Levine, Paul H; Simmens, Samuel J; Mahan, Clare M; Kang, Han K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether proportional cancer incidence is greater among Gulf War veterans compared with non-Gulf War veterans. Files obtained from the Defense Manpower Data Center included data for 621,902 veterans who were deployed to the Persian Gulf during the 1990 to 1991 Gulf War (August 2, 1990, to March 1, 1991) and 746,248 non-Gulf War veteran controls. Identification of veterans who received a cancer diagnosis between 1991 and 2006 was accomplished through record linkage of the Defense Manpower Data Center dataset with files from 28 state cancer registries and the Department of Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry. By the use of logistic regression, proportional incidence ratios adjusted for demographic and military characteristics were calculated by comparing the proportion of a specific cancer among all cancers in the Gulf War veterans to the proportion of that specific cancer among all cancers in the non-Gulf War veterans. Only lung cancer showed a statistically significant relative excess among Gulf War veterans compared with non-Gulf War veterans (adjusted proportional incidence ratios, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.29). When adjusted for race, age, and sex, the overall proportion of cancers among Gulf War and non-Gulf War veterans was similar (odds ratio, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.96-1.02). With the exception of lung cancer, there is little evidence of excess risk of cancer associated with Gulf War deployment. A follow-up study is warranted to confirm this finding and to evaluate the role of greater smoking rates among deployed personnel. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer risk and the prognostic significance of contralateral breast cancer : a population based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapveld, Michael; Visser, Otto; Louwman, W. J.; Willemse, Pax H. B.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Otter, Renee; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    Background The impact of age and adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk and prognostic significance of CBC were evaluated. Patients and Methods In 45,229 surgically treated stage I-IIIA patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2002 CBC risk was quantified using

  10. The impact of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer risk and the prognostic significance of contralateral breast cancer: a population based study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapveld, M.; Visser, O.; Louwman, W.J.; Willemse, P.H.; Vries, EG de; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Otter, R.; Coebergh, J.W.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of age and adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk and prognostic significance of CBC were evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 45,229 surgically treated stage I-IIIA patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2002 CBC risk was quantified using

  11. The impact of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer risk and the prognostic significance of contralateral breast cancer: A population based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schaapveld (Michael); O.J. Visser (Otto); W.J. Louwman; P.H.B. Willemse (Pax); E.G.E. de Vries (Elisabeth); W.T.A. van der Graaf (Winette); R. Otter (Renée); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The impact of age and adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk and prognostic significance of CBC were evaluated. Patients and Methods: In 45,229 surgically treated stage I-IIIA patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2002 CBC risk was

  12. Body Mass Index and von Hippel-Lindau Gene Mutations in Clear-cell Renal Cancer: Results of the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, K.M.; Schouten, L.J.; Hudak, E.; Verhage, B.; Dijk, B.A.C. van; Hulsbergen - Kaa, C.A. van de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Body mass index (BMI) is an important risk factor for clear-cell renal cancer (cc-RCC). A common molecular alteration in cc-RCC is loss-of-function of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. We evaluated the association between BMI and VHL mutations in cc-RCC by using data from the Netherlands

  13. Long-term dietary sodium, potassium and fluid intake; Exploring potential novel risk factors for renal cell cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, I.A.G.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Engeland, M. van; Soetekouw, P.M.M.B.; Baldewijns, M.M.L.L.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background:As sodium, potassium and fluid intake are related to hypertension, an established risk factor for renal cell cancer (RCC), they may be independent risk factors for RCC.Methods:The Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) with case-cohort design included 120 852 participants aged 55-69 years. At

  14. Oral cancer trends in a single head-and-neck cancer center in the Netherlands; decline in T-stage at the time of admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, M.; Leemans, C.R.; Aartman, I.H.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study we evaluated the possible epidemiologic changes of oral cancer patients in the Netherlands between the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004. We specifically studied the differences in male-female ratio, age, TNM-stage, site distribution, and alcohol and tobacco use. MATERIALS AND

  15. Large variation between hospitals in immediate breast reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, A C M; Mureau, M A M; Schreuder, K; van Dalen, T; Vrancken Peeters, M T F D; Schrieks, M; Maduro, J H; Siesling, S

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to describe the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in hospitals in the Netherlands and determine whether patient and tumor factors account for the variation. Patients undergoing mastectomy for primary invasive breast cancer or DCIS diagnosed between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013 were selected from the NABON Breast Cancer Audit. All the 92 hospitals in the Netherlands were included. The use of IBR in all hospitals was compared using unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Patient and tumor factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 16,953 patients underwent mastectomy: 15,072 for invasive breast cancer and 1881 for DCIS. Unadjusted analyses revealed considerable variation between hospitals in postmastectomy IBR rates for invasive breast cancer (mean 17%; range 0-64%) and DCIS (mean 42%; range 0-83%). For DCIS, younger age and multifocal disease were factors that significantly increased IBR rates. For patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, IBR was more often used in younger patients, multifocal tumors, smaller tumors, tumors with a lower grade, absence of lymph node involvement, ductal carcinomas, or hormone-receptor positive/HER2-positive tumors. After case-mix adjustments for these factors, the variation in the use of IBR between hospitals remained large (0-43% for invasive breast cancer and 0-74% for DCIS). A large variation between hospitals was found in postmastectomy IBR rates in the Netherlands for both invasive breast cancer and DCIS even after adjustment for patient and tumor factors. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Design, functionality, and validity of the SWInCaRe, a web-based application used to administer cancer registry records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Giovanni; Prima, Alessia Di; Sciacca, Salvatore; Grosso, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    We described the design of a web-based application (the Software Integrated Cancer Registry-SWInCaRe) used to administer data in a cancer registry and tested its validity and usability. A sample of 11,680 records was considered to compare the manual and automatic procedures. Sensibility and specificity, the Health IT Usability Evaluation Scale, and a cost-efficiency analysis were tested. Several data sources were used to build data packages through text-mining and record linkage algorithms. The automatic procedure showed small yet measurable improvements in both data linkage process and cancer cases estimation. Users perceived the application as useful to improve the time of coding and difficulty of the process: both time and cost-analysis were in favor of the automatic procedure. The web-based application resulted in a useful tool for the cancer registry, but some improvements are necessary to overcome limitations observed and to further automatize the process.

  17. The association between mammographic calcifications and breast cancer prognostic factors in a population-based registry cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyante, Sarah J; Lee, Sheila S; Benefield, Thad S; Hoots, Tiffany N; Henderson, Louise M

    2017-01-01

    Mammographic calcifications can be a marker of malignancy, but their association with prognosis is less well established. In the current study, the authors examined the relationship between calcifications and breast cancer prognostic factors in the population-based Carolina Mammography Registry. The current study included 8472 invasive breast cancers diagnosed in the Carolina Mammography Registry between 1996 and 2011 for which information regarding calcifications occurring within 2 years of diagnosis was reported. Calcification-specific Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessments were reported prospectively by a radiologist. Tumor characteristic data were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry and/or pathology reports. Multivariable-adjusted associations between the presence of calcifications in the breast affected by cancer and tumor characteristics were estimated using logistic regression. Statistical tests were 2-sided. The presence of calcifications was found to be positively associated with tumors that were high grade (vs low grade: odds ratio [OR], 1.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.10-1.88) or had an in situ component (vs without: OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.81-2.55). Calcifications were found to be inversely associated with hormone receptor-negative status (vs positive status: OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.93), size >35 mm (vs ≤8 mm: OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.37-0.61), and lobular tumors (vs ductal: OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.22-0.69). The association between the presence of calcifications and an in situ component was limited to BI-RADS category 4 and 5 calcifications and was absent for BI-RADS category 2 or 3 calcifications (P for heterogeneity association with tumor size was found to be strongest for BI-RADS categories 3 and 4 (P for heterogeneity associated with both unfavorable (high grade) and favorable (small size, hormone receptor positivity) prognostic factors. Detailed analysis of the biological features of

  18. Clinical auditing as an instrument for quality improvement in breast cancer care in the Netherlands: The national NABON Breast Cancer Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Spronk, Pauline E R; Vrancken Peeters, Marie-Jeanne T F D; Jager, Agnes; Lobbes, Marc; Maduro, John H; Mureau, Marc A M; Schreuder, Kay; Smorenburg, Carolien H; Verloop, Janneke; Westenend, Pieter J; Wouters, Michel W J M; Siesling, Sabine; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; van Dalen, Thijs

    2017-03-01

    In 2011, the NABON Breast Cancer Audit (NBCA) was instituted as a nation-wide audit to address quality of breast cancer care and guideline adherence in the Netherlands. The development of the NBCA and the results of 4 years of auditing are described. Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or in situ carcinoma (DCIS) and information regarding diagnosis and treatment are collected in all hospitals (n = 92) in the Netherlands. Thirty-two quality indicators measuring care structure, processes and outcomes were evaluated over time and compared between hospitals. The NBCA contains data of 56,927 patients (7,649 DCIS and 49,073 invasive cancers). Patients being discussed in pre- and post-operative multidisciplinary team meetings improved (2011: 83% and 91%; 2014: 98% and 99%, respectively) over the years. Tumour margin positivity rates after breast-conserving surgery for invasive cancer requiring re-operation were consistently low (∼5%). Other indicators, for example, the use of an MRI-scan prior to surgery or immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy showed considerable hospital variation. Results shown an overall high quality of breast cancer care in all hospitals in the Netherlands. For most quality indicators improvement was seen over time, while some indicators showed yet unexplained variation. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:243-249. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Low tobacco-related cancer incidence in offspring of long-lived siblings: a comparison with Danish national cancer registry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jacob K; Skytthe, Axel; McGue, Matt; Honig, Lawrence S; Franceschi, Claudio; Kirkwood, Thomas BL; Passarino, Giuseppe; Slagboom, P Eline; Vaupel, James W; Christensen, Kaare

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Familial clustering of longevity is well documented and includes both genetic and other familial factors, but the specific underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We examined whether low incidence of specific cancers is a mechanism for familial clustering of longevity. Methods The study-population of individuals from longevity-enriched families consisted of 3267 offspring from 610 Danish long-lived families defined by two siblings attaining an age of 90+. The offspring of the long-lived siblings were followed 1968–2009. Using high quality registry data, observed numbers of cancers were compared to expected numbers based on gender-, calendar period-, and age-specific incidence rates in the general population. Results During the 41 year follow-up period, a total of 423 cancers occurred in 397 individuals. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) (95% confidence interval) for offspring of long-lived individuals were 0.78 (0. 70, 0.86) for overall cancer; 0.66 (0.56, 0.77) for tobacco-related cancer; 0.34 (0.22, 0.51) for lung cancer; 0.88 (0.71, 1.10) for breast cancer; 0.91 (0.62, 1.34) for colon cancer. Conclusions The low incidence of tobacco-related cancers in long-lived families compared to non-tobacco-related cancers suggests that health behavior plays a central role in lower early cancer incidence in offspring of long-lived siblings in Denmark. PMID:25890797

  20. Incidence of Bladder Cancer in Sri Lanka: Analysis of the Cancer Registry Data and Review of the Incidence of Bladder Cancer in the South Asian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Daswin; De Silva, M.V.C.; Ranasinghe, Tamra I J; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien; Persad, Raj

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence of bladder cancer (BC) in Sri Lanka and to compare risk factors and outcomes with those of other South Asian nations and South Asian migrants to the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US). Materials and Methods The incidence of BC in Sri Lanka was examined by using two separate cancer registry databases over a 5-year period. Smoking rates were compiled by using a population-based survey from 2001 to 2009 and the relative risk was calculated by using published data. Results A total of 637 new cases of BC were diagnosed over the 5-year period. Sri Lankan BC incidence increased from 1985 but remained low (1.36 and 0.3 per 100,000 in males and females) and was similar to the incidence in other South Asian countries. The incidence was lower, however, than in migrant populations in the US and the UK. In densely populated districts of Sri Lanka, these rates almost doubled. Urothelial carcinoma accounted for 72%. The prevalence of male smokers in Sri Lanka was 39%, whereas Pakistan had higher smoking rates with a 6-fold increase in BC. Conclusions Sri Lankan BC incidence was low, similar to other South Asian countries (apart from Pakistan), but the actual incidence is likely higher than the cancer registry rates. Smoking is likely to be the main risk factor for BC. Possible under-reporting in rural areas could account for the low rates of BC in Sri Lanka. Any genetic or environmental protective effects of BC in South Asians seem to be lost on migration to the UK or the US and with higher levels of smoking, as seen in Pakistan. PMID:22670188

  1. Adenoid cystic breast carcinoma: is axillary staging necessary in all cases? Results from the California Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kari; Grabowski, Julia; Saltzstein, Sidney L; Sadler, Georgia R; Blair, Sarah L

    2011-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an uncommon type of breast cancer. There are limited data about its epidemiology, tumor characteristics, and outcomes. Using a large, population-based data base, this study aimed to identify specific characteristics of patients with adenoid cystic breast cancer, investigate its natural history, and determine its long-term prognosis. The California Cancer Registry, a population-based registry, was reviewed from the years 1988 to 2006. The data were analyzed with relation to patient age, tumor size and stage, and overall survival. Relative cumulative actuarial survival was determined using the Berkson-Gage life table method. A total of 244 cases of invasive adenoid cystic cancer were identified in women during this time period. The patients' median age was 61.9 years. Most cases were diagnosed in non-Hispanic White women (82%, n = 200), followed by African American (6%, n = 15), Asian/Pacific-Islander (5.7%, n = 14) and Hispanic women (4.4%, n = 12). The remainder of the patients was of unknown or other ethnicity. Tumors were between 1 and 140 mm in size. At the time of diagnosis, 92% (n = 225) of patients had localized disease, 5% (n = 12) of patients had regional disease, and even fewer (n = 7) had either distant or unknown staged disease. Lymph node involvement was not present in any tumors smaller than 1.4 cm. The relative cumulative survival of patients with adenoid cystic breast carcinoma was 95.6% at 5 years and 94.9% at 10 years. ACC of the breast is a rare disease with an overall good prognosis. Knowing that this cancer usually presents as localized disease, with lymph node involvement seen only with larger tumors, can help clinicians plan the operative management of these tumors. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Relating cause of death with place of care and healthcare costs in the last year of life for patients who died from cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure and dementia: A descriptive study using registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Annicka Gm; Oosterveld-Vlug, Mariska G; Pasman, H Roeline W; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2017-04-01

    The four main diagnostic groups for palliative care provision are cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure and dementia. But comparisons of costs and care in the last year of life are mainly directed at cancer versus non-cancer or within cancer patients. Our aim is to compare the care and expenditures in their last year of life for Dutch patients with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure or dementia. Data from insurance company Achmea (2009-2010) were linked to information on long-term care at home or in an institution, the National Hospital Registration and Causes of Death-Registry from Statistics Netherlands. For patients who died of cancer ( n = 8658), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( n = 1637), heart failure ( n = 1505) or dementia ( n = 3586), frequencies and means were calculated, Lorenz curves were drawn up and logistic regression was used to compare patients with high versus low expenditures. For decedents with cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the highest costs were for hospital admissions. For decedents with heart failure, the highest costs were for the care home (last 360 days) and hospital admissions (last 30 days). For decedents with dementia, the highest costs were for the nursing home. Patients with dementia had the highest expenditures due to nursing home care. The number of dementia patients will double by the year 2030, resulting in even higher economic burdens than presently. Policy regarding patients with chronic conditions should be informed by research on expenditures within the context of preferences and needs of patients and carers.

  3. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  4. Pulmonary metastasectomy for sarcoma: a systematic review of reported outcomes in the context of Thames Cancer Registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Fiorentino, Francesca; Scarci, Marco; Møller, Henrik; Utley, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoma has a predilection to metastasis to the lungs. Surgical excision of these metastases (pulmonary metastasectomy) when possible has become standard practice. We reviewed the published selection and outcome data. Systematic review of published reports that include survival rates or any other outcome data. Survival data were put in the context of those in a cancer registry. Specialist thoracic surgical centres reporting the selection and outcome for pulmonary metastasectomy in 18 follow-up studies published 1991-2010. Patients having one or more of 1357 pulmonary metastasectomy operations performed between 1980 and 2006. All patients had surgical pulmonary metastasectomy. A first operation was reported in 1196 patients. Of 1357 patients, 43% had subsequent metastasectomy, some having 10 or more thoracotomies. Three studies were confined to patients having repeated pulmonary metastasectomy. Survival data to various time points usually 5 years and sometimes 3 or 10 years. No symptomatic or quality of life data were reported. About 34% and 25% of patients were alive 5 years after a first metastasectomy operation for bone or soft tissues sarcoma respectively. Better survival was reported with fewer metastases and longer intervals between diagnosis and the appearance of metastases. In the Thames Cancer Registry for 1985-1994 and 1995-2004 5 year survival rates for all patients with metastatic sarcoma were 20% and 25% for bone, and for soft tissue sarcoma 13% and 15%. The 5 year survival rate among sarcoma patients who are selected to have pulmonary metastasectomy is higher than that observed among unselected registry data for patients with any metastatic disease at diagnosis. There is no evidence that survival difference is attributable to metastasectomy. No data were found on respiratory or any other symptomatic benefit. Given the certain harm associated with thoracotomy, often repeated, better evidence is required.

  5. Automated Cancer Registry Notifications: Validation of a Medical Text Analytics System for Identifying Patients with Cancer from a State-Wide Pathology Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anthony N; Moore, Julie; O'Dwyer, John; Philpot, Shoni

    2016-01-01

    The paper assesses the utility of Medtex on automating Cancer Registry notifications from narrative histology and cytology reports from the Queensland state-wide pathology information system. A corpus of 45.3 million pathology HL7 messages (including 119,581 histology and cytology reports) from a Queensland pathology repository for the year of 2009 was analysed by Medtex for cancer notification. Reports analysed by Medtex were consolidated at a patient level and compared against patients with notifiable cancers from the Queensland Oncology Repository (QOR). A stratified random sample of 1,000 patients was manually reviewed by a cancer clinical coder to analyse agreements and discrepancies. Sensitivity of 96.5% (95% confidence interval: 94.5-97.8%), specificity of 96.5% (95.3-97.4%) and positive predictive value of 83.7% (79.6-86.8%) were achieved for identifying cancer notifiable patients. Medtex achieved high sensitivity and specificity across the breadth of cancers, report types, pathology laboratories and pathologists throughout the State of Queensland. The high sensitivity also resulted in the identification of cancer patients that were not found in the QOR. High sensitivity was at the expense of positive predictive value; however, these cases may be considered as lower priority to Cancer Registries as they can be quickly reviewed. Error analysis revealed that system errors tended to be tumour stream dependent. Medtex is proving to be a promising medical text analytic system. High value cancer information can be generated through intelligent data classification and extraction on large volumes of unstructured pathology reports.

  6. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: A comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; FRANZIN, LUISA; Cormier, Janice N.; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute?s SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 ...

  7. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in cancer immunotherapy: report of the international registry on CIK cells (IRCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Coch, Christoph; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2015-05-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent an exceptional T cell population uniting a T cell and natural killer cell like phenotype in their terminally differentiated CD3(+)CD56(+) subset, which features non-MHC-restricted tumor-killing activity. CIK cells are expandable from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mature following the addition of certain cytokines. CIK cells have provided encouraging results in initial clinical studies and revealed synergistic antitumor effects when combined with standard therapeutic procedures. Therefore, we established the international registry on CIK cells in order to collect and evaluate data about clinical trials using CIK cells for the treatment of cancer patients. Moreover, our registry is expected to set new standards on the reporting of results from clinical trials using CIK cells. Clinical responses, overall survival (OS), adverse reactions and immunologic effects were analyzed in 45 studies present in our database. These studies investigated 22 different tumor entities altogether enrolling 2,729 patients. A mean response rate of 39 % and significantly increased OS, accompanied by an improved quality of life, were reported. Interestingly, side effects of CIK cell treatment were minor. Mild fevers, chills, headache and fatigue were, however, seen regularly after CIK cell infusion. Moreover, CIK cells revealed numerous immunologic effects such as changes in T cell subsets, tumor markers, cytokine secretion and HBV viral load. Due to their easy availability and potent antitumor activity, CIK cells emerged as a promising immunotherapy approach in oncology and may gain major importance on the prognosis of cancer.

  8. Oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young patients: the Netherlands Cancer Institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Monsjou, Hester S; Lopez-Yurda, Marta I; Hauptmann, Michael; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J M; Wreesmann, Volkert B

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) mainly affects patients between the fifth and seventh decade of life but is increasingly seen in young patients (<40 years old). Controversy exists in the literature regarding outcomes for younger patients with HNSCC. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed comparing survival of 54 early-onset (<40 years) and 1708 older patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) treated at The Netherlands Cancer Institute between 1977 and 2008. Survival analysis was performed using univariable and multivariable weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. The primary endpoint for the survival analysis was disease-specific survival (DSS). There was no difference in DSS between patients who were 40 years or younger and those older than 40 years (p = .878), although young patients had significantly better overall survival (OS). In this series, patients younger than 40 years with oral and oropharyngeal SCC showed no significant difference in DSS compared with patients older than 40 years, even when adjusted for tobacco and alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. New developments in EPID-based 3D dosimetry in The Netherlands Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnheer, B.; Rozendaal, R.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; González, P.; van Oers, R.; Mans, A.

    2017-05-01

    EPID-based offline 3D in vivo dosimetry is performed routinely in The Netherlands Cancer Institute for almost all RT treatments. The 3D dose distribution is reconstructed using the EPID primary dose in combination with a back-projection algorithm and compared with the planned dose distribution. Recently the method was adapted for real-time dose verification, performing 3D dose verification in less than 300 ms, which is faster than the current portal frame acquisition rate. In this way a possibility is created for halting the linac in case of large delivery errors. Furthermore, a new method for pre-treatment QA was developed in which the EPID primary dose behind a phantom or patient is predicted using the CT data of that phantom or patient in combination with in-air EPID measurements. This virtual EPID primary transit dose is then used to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution within the phantom or patient geometry using the same dose engine as applied offline. In order to assess the relevance of our clinically applied alert criteria, we investigated the sensitivity of our EPID-based 3D dose verification system to detect delivery errors in VMAT treatments. This was done through simulation by modifying patient treatment plans, as well as experimentally by performing EPID measurements during the irradiation of an Alderson phantom, both after deliberately introducing errors during VMAT delivery. In this presentation these new developments will be elucidated.

  10. Conditional survival for longer-term survivors from 2000?2004 using population-based cancer registry data in Osaka, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yuri; Nakayama, Tomio; Miyashiro, Isao; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Background We usually report five-year survival from population-based cancer registries in Japan; however these survival estimates may be pessimistic for cancer survivors, because many patients with unfavourable prognosis die shortly after diagnosis. Conditional survival can provide relevant information for cancer survivors, their family and oncologists. Methods We used the period approach to estimate the latest 10-year survival of 38,439 patients with stomach, colorectal, lung, breast and pr...

  11. The prospective association between health anxiety and cancer detection: A cohort study linking the Hordaland Health Study (HUSK) with the Norwegian Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Ann Kristin; Berge, Line Iden; Skogen, Jens Christoffer; Veddegjærde, Kari-Elise; Wilhelmsen, Ingvard

    2015-08-01

    Health anxiety is associated with distress and disability, and overutilization of health services, but it is not known whether high levels of health anxiety may lead to increased detection of severe diseases such as cancer. By linking a large population based health study with the national cancer registry, the aim of the study was to investigate a potential prospective association between health anxiety in men and women and later cancer detection and tumour metastasis at the time of diagnosis. A longitudinal study with a 13.2 year follow-up linking the population-based Hordaland Health Study (HUSK) and the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN) was conducted. Health anxiety was measured with the Whiteley Index. Associations were examined through gender stratified Cox regression analyses adjusted for relevant covariates. No association was found between baseline health anxiety and cancer detection for women (adjusted HR: 1.21, 95% CI: 0.42-3.50), but a positive association was found between health anxiety at baseline and cancer detection for men (adjusted HR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.06-2.91). No statistically significant association was demonstrated between health anxiety and cancer metastasis for either gender. An increased level of health anxiety in men may be advantageous, as it may motivate to self-examination and healthcare seeking when disturbing symptoms arise. Research is needed to investigate whether health anxiety has a protective effect on cancer metastasis at the time of detection, or whether health anxiety increases the risk of over-diagnosis and overtreatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Surveillance for cancer recurrence in long-term young breast cancer survivors randomly selected from a statewide cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tarsha; Duquette, Debra; Underhill, Meghan; Ming, Chang; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari E; Anderson, Beth; Milliron, Kara J; Copeland, Glenn; Janz, Nancy K; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia M; Merajver, Sofia D; Katapodi, Maria C

    2018-01-20

    This study examined clinical breast exam (CBE) and mammography surveillance in long-term young breast cancer survivors (YBCS) and identified barriers and facilitators to cancer surveillance practices. Data collected with a self-administered survey from a statewide, randomly selected sample of YBCS diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ younger than 45 years old, stratified by race (Black vs. White/Other). Multivariate logistic regression models identified predictors of annual CBEs and mammograms. Among 859 YBCS (n = 340 Black; n = 519 White/Other; mean age = 51.0 ± 5.9; diagnosed 11.0 ± 4.0 years ago), the majority (> 85%) reported an annual CBE and a mammogram. Black YBCS in the study were more likely to report lower rates of annual mammography and more barriers accessing care compared to White/Other YBCS. Having a routine source of care, confidence to use healthcare services, perceived expectations from family members and healthcare providers to engage in cancer surveillance, and motivation to comply with these expectations were significant predictors of having annual CBEs and annual mammograms. Cost-related lack of access to care was a significant barrier to annual mammograms. Routine source of post-treatment care facilitated breast cancer surveillance above national average rates. Persistent disparities regarding access to mammography surveillance were identified for Black YBCS, primarily due to lack of access to routine source of care and high out-of-pocket costs. Public health action targeting cancer surveillance in YBCS should ensure routine source of post-treatment care and address cost-related barriers. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT01612338.

  13. Pharmaceutically treated anxiety but not depression prior to cancer diagnosis predicts the onset of cardiovascular disease among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoormans, Dounya; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke; Vissers, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    in a population-based observational study. METHODS: Adult 1-year breast cancer survivors (n = 7227), diagnosed between 01-01-1999 and 12-31-2010, with no history of CVD, were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Drug dispensing data were derived from the PHARMO Database Network and used as proxy for CVD...

  14. No Decreased Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancers in Users of Metformin in The Netherlands; A Time-Varying Analysis of Metformin Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Roy G; Burden, Andrea M; de Kort, Sander; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P; Vissers, Pauline A; Janssen, Paddy K; Haak, Harm R; Masclee, Ad A; de Vries, Frank; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies on metformin use and gastrointestinal (GI) cancer risk have yielded inconclusive results on metformin's chemoprotective effects. We aimed to evaluate GI cancer risk in users of metformin in The Netherlands using a time-varying approach in a large population-based database. A cohort

  15. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: a prospective cohort study (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, de A.F.P.M.; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruine, de A.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods:The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  16. Cost-effectiveness of the prophylactic HPV vaccine : An application to the Netherlands taking non-cervical cancers and cross-protection into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttjeboer, J.; Westra, T.A.; Wilschut, J.C.; Nijman, H.W.; Daemen, T.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an effective screening programme, 600-700 women are still diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Netherlands each year. In 2009 a prophylactic vaccine against HPV-type 16 and 18 was implemented in the national immunisation programme to decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. There is

  17. Regional variation in breast cancer treatment in the Netherlands and the role of external peer review : a cohort study comprising 63,516 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Otter, Renee; van Harten, Wim H.; Siesling, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment variation is an important issue in health care provision. An external peer review programme for multidisciplinary cancer care was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve the multidisciplinary organisation of cancer care in hospitals. So far the clinical impact of

  18. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: A prospective cohort study (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods: The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  19. Access to Lung Cancer Screening Services: Preliminary Analysis of Geographic Service Distribution Using the ACR Lung Cancer Screening Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkhchi, Paniz; Kolenic, Giselle E; Carlos, Ruth C

    2017-11-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate among all types of cancer in the United States. The National Lung Screening Trial demonstrated that low-dose CT for lung cancer screening decreases both lung cancer-related mortality and all-cause mortality. Currently, the only CMS-approved lung cancer screening registry is the Lung Cancer Screening Registry (LCSR) administered by the ACR. The aims of this study were to assess access to lung cancer screening services as estimated by the number and distribution of screening facilities participating in the LCSR, by state, and to evaluate state-level covariates that correlate with access. The ACR LCSR list of participating lung cancer screening facilities was used as a proxy for the availability of lung cancer screening facilities in each state. Additionally, we normalized the number of facilities by state by the number of screening-eligible individuals using Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data. State-level demographics were obtained from the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: poverty level, insured population, unemployed, black, and Latino. State-specific lung cancer incidence and death rates, number of active physicians per 100,000, and Medicare expenditure per capita were obtained. Linear regression models were performed to examine the influence of these state-level covariates on state-level screening facility number. QGIS, an open-source geographic information system, was used to map the distribution of lung cancer screening facilities and to estimate the nearest neighbor index, a measure of facility clustering within each state. As of November 18, 2016, 2,423 facilities participated in the LCSR. When adjusted by the rate of screening-eligible individuals per 100,000, the median population-normalized facility number was 15.7 (interquartile range, 10.7-19.3). There was a positive independent effect (coefficient = 12.87; 95% confidence interval, 10.93-14.8) between state-level number of screening

  20. Incidence of the myelodysplastic syndromes using a novel claims-based algorithm: high number of uncaptured cases by cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogle, Christopher R; Craig, Benjamin M; Rollison, Dana E; List, Alan F

    2011-06-30

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are hematologically diverse hematopoietic stem cell malignancies primarily affecting older individuals. The incidence of MDS in the United States is estimated at 3.3 per 100 000; however, evidence suggests underreporting of MDS to centralized cancer registries. Contrary to clinical recommendations, registry guidelines from 2001-2010 required the capture of only one malignancy in the myeloid lineage and did not require blood count (BC) or bone marrow (BM) biopsy for MDS confirmation. To address these potential limitations, we constructed 4 claims-based algorithms to assess MDS incidence, applied the algorithms to the 2000-2008 Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, and assessed algorithm validity using SEER-registered MDS cases. Each algorithm required one or more MDS claims and accounted for recommended diagnostic services during the year before the first claim: 1+, 2+, 2 + BC, and 2 + BCBM (ordered by sensitivity). Each had moderate sensitivities (78.05%-92.90%) and high specificities (98.49%-99.84%), with the 2 + BCBM algorithm demonstrating the highest specificity. Based on the 2 + BCBM algorithm, the annual incidence of MDS is 75 per 100 000 persons 65 years or older-much higher than the 20 per 100 000 reported by SEER using the same sample.

  1. The contemporary management of prostate cancer in the United States: lessons from the cancer of the prostate strategic urologic research endeavor (CapSURE), a national disease registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Broering, Jeanette M; Litwin, Mark S; Lubeck, Deborah P; Mehta, Shilpa S; Henning, James M; Carroll, Peter R

    2004-04-01

    The epidemiology and treatment of prostate cancer have changed dramatically in the prostate specific antigen era. A large disease registry facilitates the longitudinal observation of trends in disease presentation, management and outcomes. The Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) is a national disease registry of more than 10000 men with prostate cancer accrued at 31 primarily community based sites across the United States. Demographic, clinical, quality of life and resource use variables are collected on each patient. We reviewed key findings from the data base in the last 8 years in the areas of disease management trends, and oncological and quality of life outcomes. Prostate cancer is increasingly diagnosed with low risk clinical characteristics. With time patients have become less likely to receive pretreatment imaging tests, less likely to pursue watchful waiting and more likely to receive brachytherapy or hormonal therapy. Relatively few patients treated with radical prostatectomy in the database are under graded or under staged before surgery, whereas the surgical margin rate is comparable to that in academic series. CaPSURE data confirm the usefulness of percent positive biopsies in risk assessment and they have further been used to validate multiple preoperative nomograms. CaPSURE results strongly affirm the necessity of patient reported quality of life assessment. Multiple studies have compared the quality of life impact of various treatment options, particularly in terms of urinary and sexual function, and bother. The presentation and management of prostate cancer have changed substantially in the last decade. CaPSURE will continue to track these trends as well as oncological and quality of life outcomes, and will continue to be an invaluable resource for the study of prostate cancer at the national level.

  2. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK Background: The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by region and year of diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted of all the corpus uteri cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and a simple linear model. Results: A total of 1,060 corpus uteri cancer cases were included. Women aged 60–74 years of age were most affected by the disease. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 4.4 cases per 100,000 female patients, followed by the eastern region, at 4.2, and Makkah, at 3.7. Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest average ASIRs, ranging from 0.8 to 1.4. A Poisson regression model using Jazan as the reference revealed that the corpus uteri cancer incidence rate ratio was significantly higher for the regions of Makkah, at 16.5 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0–23.0, followed by Riyadh, at 16.0 times (95% CI: 9.0–22.0, and the eastern region, at 9.9 times (95% CI: 5.6–17.6. The northern region experienced the highest changes in ASIRs of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi patients between 2001 and 2008. Conclusion: There was a slight increase in the crude incidence rates and ASIRs for corpus uteri cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Older Saudi women were most affected by the disease. Riyadh, the eastern region, and Makkah

  3. 10 year survival after breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer in the Netherlands: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaren, M.C. van; Munck, L.; Bock, G.H. de; Jobsen, J.J.; Dalen, T. van; Linn, S.C.; Poortmans, P.; Strobbe, L.J.A.; Siesling, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Investigators of registry-based studies report improved survival for breast-conserving surgery plus radiotherapy compared with mastectomy in early breast cancer. As these studies did not present long-term overall and breast cancer-specific survival, the effect of breast-conserving

  4. 2D AND 3D dose verification at The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital using EPIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Tielenburg, Rene; Van Herk, Marcel; Vijlbrief, Ron; Stroom, Joep, E-mail: b.mijnheer@nki.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-11-01

    A review is given of the clinical use of EPID dosimetry in the Department of Radiation Oncology of The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital. All curative plans (almost all IMRT or VMAT) are verified with EPID dosimetry, mostly in vivo. The 2D approach for IMRT verification and the 3D method for VMAT verification are elucidated and their clinical implementation described. It has been shown that EPID dosimetry plays an important role in the total chain of verification procedures that are implemented in our department. It provides a safety net for advanced treatments such as IMRT and VMAT, as well as a full account of the dose delivered.

  5. Using the Benford's law as a first step to assess the quality of a Cancer Registry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Crocetti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benford's law states that the distribution of the first digit different from zero (first significant digit, FSD in many collections of numbers is not uniform. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether population-based cancer incidence rates follow Benford's law, and if this can be used in their data quality check process. MethodsWe sampled forty-three population-based cancer registry populations (CRP from the Cancer Incidence in 5 Continents- volume X (CI5-X. The distribution of cancer incidence rate FSD was evaluated overall, by sex and CRP. Several statistics, including Pearson's coefficient of correlation and distance measures, were applied to check the adherence to the Benford's law.ResultsIn the whole dataset (146,590 incidence rates and for each sex (70,722 male and 75,868 female incidence rates, the FSD distributions were Benford-like. The coefficient of correlation between observed and expected FSD distributions was extremely high (0.999, and the distance measures low. Considering single CRP (from 933 to 7,222 incidence rates, the results were in agreement with the Benford's law, and only a few CRPs showed possible discrepancies from it.ConclusionsThis study demonstrated for the first time that cancer incidence rates follow Benford's law. This characteristic can be used as a new, simple and objective tool in data quality evaluation. The analysed data had been already checked for publication in CI5-X. Therefore, their quality was expected to be good. In fact, only for a few CRPs several statistics were consistent with possible violations.

  6. Worry Is Good for Breast Cancer Screening: A Study of Female Relatives from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Rita Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few prospective studies have examined associations between breast cancer worry and screening behaviours in women with elevated breast cancer risks based on family history. Methods. This study included 901 high familial risk women, aged 23–71 years, from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported breast screening behaviours at year-one followup were compared between women at low (N=305, medium (N=433, and high (N=163 levels of baseline breast cancer worry using logistic regression. Nonlinear relationships were assessed using likelihood ratio tests. Results. A significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was observed between breast cancer worry and mammography screening (P=0.034 for all women, where women at either low or high worry levels were less likely than those at medium to have a screening mammogram. A similar significant non-linear inverted “U” relationship was also found among all women and women at low familial risk for worry and screening clinical breast examinations (CBEs. Conclusions. Medium levels of cancer worries predicted higher rates of screening mammography and CBE among high-risk women.

  7. Variation in mutation spectrum partly explains regional differences in the breast cancer risk of female BRCA mutation carriers in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Teixeira, Natalia; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Mourits, Marian J E; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Collée, Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez-Garcia, Encarna B; Vasen, Hans F; Brohet, Richard M; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Prostate cancer clinical presentation, incidence, mortality and survival in Guadeloupe over the period 2008-2013 from a population-based cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloumeaux, J; Bhakkan, B; Eyraud, R; Braud, F; Manip M'Ebobisse, N; Blanchet, P; Brureau, L

    2017-11-01

    The Caribbean population of Guadeloupe has one of the highest incidence rates of prostate cancer worldwide. In 2008, a population-based cancer registry was set up for the monitoring of cancer incidence in the aftermath of the environmental pollution with chlordecone, a persistent organochlorine insecticide formerly used in banana plantations. We describe the clinical presentation, incidence, mortality and survival of prostate cancer for the period 2008-2013. The Guadeloupe cancer registry has been routinely collecting all incident cases of cancer since 2008. We compared age-specific incidence rates between different populations, and calculated incidence and mortality rates standardized to the world population. Kaplan-Meier observed survival and estimated age-standardized net survival were calculated by category for age, PSA level, and Gleason score using the Pohar-Perme method. Overall, 3,295 cases of prostate cancer were recorded. World-standardized incidence and mortality were respectively 184.1 [177.8-190.4] and 23.9 [21.9-25.7] per 100,000 person-years. At diagnosis, the mean age of patients was 68 ± 9.6 years old and 22% were aged over 75. Median PSA level was 8.9 [IQR: 6.0-16.0] and 13.6% of the patients had a Gleason ≥ 8. Five-year observed and net survivals were, respectively, 79.6% [77.9-81.2] and 90.7% [88.6-92.8]. The incidence of prostate cancer in Guadeloupe is among the highest in the world, along with those of the neighboring Caribbean countries and US African-Americans. We observed no decrease in incidence rates, and a decreasing but non-significant trend in mortality rates, which nonetheless remain higher than in high-income countries. Many Genome-Wide Association Studies are conducted to identify genetic markers involved in prostate cancer risk. In the Caribbean, complementary studies on both lifestyle and behavioral factors should highlight potential common risks among populations who share both genetic and environmental

  9. [Automatic coding of pathologic cancer variables by the search of strings of text in the pathology reports. The experience of the Tuscany Cancer Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Sacchettini, Claudio; Caldarella, Adele; Paci, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluates the application of an automatic system for variables coding by means of strings reading in the text of the pathology reports, in the database of the Tuscany Cancer Registry. Incidence data for the years 2000 (n. 6297) and 2001 (n. 6291) for subjects for whom computerised pathology reports were available were included. The system is based on Queries (SQL language) linked to Functions (Visual Basic for Applications) that work on Windows Access. The agreement between original data inputted by the registrars and variables coded by means of automatic reading has been evaluated by means of Cohen's kappa. The following variables were analysed: cancer site (kappa = 0.87 between "manual" and automatic coding, for cases incident in the year 2001), morphology (kappa=0.75), Berg's morphology groups (kappa=0.87), behaviour (kappa=0.70), grading (kappa=0.90), Gleason (kappa=0.90), focality (kappa=0.86), lateralily (kappa=0.36), pT (kappa=0.92), pN (kappa=0.76), pM (kappa=0.28), number of lymph nodes (kappa=0.69), number of positive lymph nodes (kappa=0.70), Breslow thickness (kappa=0.94), Clark level (kappa=0.91), Dukes (kappa=0.74). The system of automatic reading of strings allows to collect a very huge amount of reliable information and its use should be implemented by the Registries.

  10. [Epidemiology and incidence of primary lung cancer in a region with low tobacco consumption: Guadeloupe (French West Indies). Data from the cancer registry 2008-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelis, G; Kaddah, S; Bhakkan, B; Quellery, M; Deloumeaux, J

    2013-09-01

    Few data are available about primary lung cancer in the Caribbean. The purpose of this study was to provide, for the first time, the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of primary lung cancer in the archipelago of Guadeloupe (French West Indies). From the cancer registry, we identified in this retrospective study, all incident cases of primary lung cancer that had occurred between 1st January 2008 and 31st December 2009 in Guadeloupe. Over the period from 2008 to 2009, 106 patients with primary lung cancer were identified. Males accounted for 72.6% and the women for 27.4%. Mean incidence rate over the 2 years was estimated at 13.4/100000 persons-years (95% CI: [6.0-20.8]) in men (world standardized) and 4.2/100000 persons-years (95% CI: [0.3-8.1]) in women. The median age at initial diagnosis was 65 years for men and 66 years for women. We noted a proportion of 61.3% of current smokers, 4.7% of passive smokers and 34% of non-smokers. The comorbidities were present in 41% of patients. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounted for 88.7% of lung cancers and small cell lung cancer for 7.5%. The most common histological type was adenocarcinoma (43%) followed by squamous cell (24%). Stage III and IV patients accounted for 64.1% of individuals with NSCLC. The incidence of primary lung cancer in Guadeloupe is relatively low compared to metropolitan France. Guadeloupe is also a French department where the rate of tobacco consumption is one of the lowest. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Is centralization of ovarian cancer care warranted? A cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, Jacoba P.; Vernooji, Flora; Heintz, A. Peter M.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Buskens, Erik

    Objective. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of tertiary referral care for ovarian cancer patients in the Netherlands. Methods. We collected clinical and registry data on 1077 newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients treated from 1996-2003 in a random sample of Dutch hospitals. Decision modelling

  12. Survival Prediction in Head and Neck Cancer: Impact of Tumor and Patient Specific Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Datema (Frank)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHead and neck cancer accounts for almost 5% of all malignant tumors in the Netherlands. The most up‐todate Dutch Cancer Registry (NCR) database from 2009 reported 2878 new patients with an invasive carcinoma of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx and larynx (general incidence 17:100.000). In

  13. Survival Prediction in Head and Neck Cancer: Impact of Tumor and Patient Specific Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Datema (Frank)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHead and neck cancer accounts for almost 5% of all malignant tumors in the Netherlands. The most up‐todate Dutch Cancer Registry (NCR) database from 2009 reported 2878 new patients with an invasive carcinoma of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx and larynx (general incidence 17:100.000).

  14. Cancer Diagnoses after Living Kidney Donation: Linking United States Registry Data and Administrative Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentine, Krista L.; Vijayan, Anitha; Xiao, Huiling; Schnitzler, Mark A.; Davis, Connie L.; Garg, Amit X.; Axelrod, David; Abbott, Kevin C.; Brennan, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mortality records identify cancer as the leading cause of death among living kidney donors, but information on the burden of cancer outside of death records is limited in this population. Methods We examined a database wherein OPTN identifiers for 4,650 living kidney donors in 1987–2007 were linked to administrative data of a U.S. private health insurer (2000–2007 claims) to identify post-donation cancer diagnoses. Skin and non-skin cancer diagnoses were ascertained from ICD-9-CM codes on billing claims. Donors were also matched one-to-one with general insurance beneficiaries by sex and age when benefits began. Diagnosis rates within observation windows were compared as rate ratios. Results The median time from donation to the end of plan insurance enrollment was 7.7 years, with a median observation period of 2.1 years. Skin cancer rates were similar among prior living donors in the observation period and non-donor controls (rate ratio 0.91, 95% CI 0.59–1.40). In contrast, the rate of total non-skin cancers was significantly less common among donors than controls (rate ratio 0.74, 95% CI 0.55–0.99), although reduced relative risk was limited to donors captured earlier in relation to donation. Several cases of cancer diagnosis (uterine, melanoma, other) were identified within the first year after donation. Prostate cancer was significantly more common among living donors compared with controls (rate ratio 3.80, 95% CI 1.42–10.2). Conclusions Continued study of cancer after kidney donation is warranted to ensure that evaluation, selection, and long-term follow-up support overall good health of the donor. PMID:22825543

  15. Validity of Race, Ethnicity, and National Origin in Population-based Cancer Registries and Rapid Case Ascertainment Enhanced With a Spanish Surname List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lisa C; Rull, Rudolph P; Ayanian, John Z; Boer, Robert; Deapen, Dennis; West, Dee W; Kahn, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    Accurate information regarding race, ethnicity, and national origins is critical for identifying disparities in the cancer burden. To examine the use of a Spanish surname list to improve the quality of race-related information obtained from rapid case ascertainment (RCA) and to estimate the accuracy of race-related information obtained from cancer registry records collected by routine reporting. Self-reported survey responses of 3954 participants from California enrolled in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and percent agreement. We used logistic regression to identify predictors of underreporting and overreporting of a race/ethnicity. Use of the Spanish surname list increased the sensitivity of RCA for Latino ethnicity from 37% to 83%. Sensitivity for cancer registry records collected by routine reporting was ≥95% for whites, blacks, and Asians, and specificity was high for all groups (86%-100%). However, patterns of misclassification by race/ethnicity were found that could lead to biased cancer statistics for specific race/ethnicities. Discordance between self-reported and registry-reported race/ethnicity was more likely for women, Latinos, and Asians. Methods to improve race and ethnicity data, such as using Spanish surnames in RCA and instituting data collection guidelines for hospitals, are needed to ensure minorities are accurately represented in clinical and epidemiological research.

  16. Diagnostic validity of high-density barium sulfate in gastric cancer screening: follow-up of screenees by record linkage with the Osaka Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenyu; Yamazaki, Hideo; Kuroda, Chikazumi; Kubo, Tsugio; Oshima, Akira; Katsuda, Toshizo; Kuwano, Tadao; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The use of high-density barium sulfate was recommended by the Japan Society of Gastroenterological Cancer Screening (JSGCS) in 2004. We evaluated the diagnostic validity of gastric cancer screening that used high-density barium sulfate. The study subjects were 171 833 residents of Osaka, Japan who underwent gastric cancer screening tests at the Osaka Cancer Prevention and Detection Center during the period from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2001. Screening was conducted using either high-density barium sulfate (n = 48 336) or moderate-density barium sulfate (n = 123 497). The subjects were followed up and their medical records were linked to those of the Osaka Cancer Registry through 31 December 2002. The results of follow-up during 1 year were defined as the gold standard, and test performance values were calculated. The sensitivity and specificity of the screening test using moderate-density barium sulfate were 92.3% and 91.0%, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of the high-density barium test were 91.8% and 91.4%, respectively. The results of area under receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed no significant difference between the 2 screening tests. Screening tests using high- and moderate-density barium sulfate had similar validity, as determined by sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curve analysis.

  17. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, M.A. van de; Poll-Franse, L. van de; Prins, J.B.; Gielissen, M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics,

  18. Post-surgery radiation in early breast cancer: survival analysis of registry data

    OpenAIRE

    Vinh-Hung, Vincent; BURZYKOWSKI, Tomasz; Van de Steene, Jan; Storme, Guy; Soete, Guy

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Overviews of randomized trials have shown a small survival advantage with post-surgery radiation in early breast cancer. The present study attempts to extend this observation through a systematic analysis of population data.Materials and METHODS: This retrospective cohort study used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data on 83,776 women with breast cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 1997, stage T1-T2, node negative or node positive. The analysis was...

  19. Cancer incidence among Arab Americans in California, Detroit, and New Jersey SEER registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmans, Rachel; Soliman, Amr S; Ruterbusch, Julie; Meza, Rafael; Hirko, Kelly; Graff, John; Schwartz, Kendra

    2014-06-01

    We calculated cancer incidence for Arab Americans in California; Detroit, Michigan; and New Jersey, and compared rates with non-Hispanic, non-Arab Whites (NHNAWs); Blacks; and Hispanics. We conducted a study using population-based data. We linked new cancers diagnosed in 2000 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) to an Arab surname database. We used standard SEER definitions and methodology for calculating rates. Population estimates were extracted from the 2000 US Census. We calculated incidence and rate ratios. Arab American men and women had similar incidence rates across the 3 geographic regions, and the rates were comparable to NHNAWs. However, the thyroid cancer rate was elevated among Arab American women compared with NHNAWs, Hispanics, and Blacks. For all sites combined, for prostate and lung cancer, Arab American men had a lower incidence than Blacks and higher incidence than Hispanics in all 3 geographic regions. Arab American male bladder cancer incidence was higher than that in Hispanics and Blacks in these regions. Our results suggested that further research would benefit from the federal recognition of Arab Americans as a specified ethnicity to estimate and address the cancer burden in this growing segment of the population.

  20. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  1. Cancer burden with ageing population in urban regions in China: projection on cancer registry data from World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Hirai, Hoyee W; Chan, Felix C H; Griffiths, Sian; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2017-01-01

    China is facing the challenges of an expanding ageing population and the impact of rapid urbanization, cancer rates are subsequently increasing. This study focuses on the changes of the ageing population and projects the incidence of common ageing-related cancers in the urban regions in China up to 2030. Cancer incidence data and population statistics in China were extracted from the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Due to improving longevity in China, continuous and remarkable increasing trends for the lung, colorectal and prostate cancers are expected. The rate of expanding ageing population was taken into account when predicting the trend of cancer incidence; the estimations of ageing-related cancers were more factual and significant than using the conventional approach of age standardization. The incidence rates of lung, colorectal and prostate cancers will continue to rise in the future decades due to the rise of ageing population. Lifestyle modification such as cutting tobacco smoking rates and promoting healthier diets as well as cancer screening programs should be a health system priority in order to decrease the growing burden of cancer-related mortality and morbidity.

  2. Understanding long-term protection of human papillomavirus vaccination against cervical carcinoma: Cancer registry-based follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Muhammad Mohsin; Huhtala, Heini; Apter, Dan; Eriksson, Tiina; Luostarinen, Tapio; Natunen, Kari; Paavonen, Jorma; Pukkala, Eero; Lehtinen, Matti

    2013-06-15

    Phase III clinical trials of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination have shown ≥95% efficacy against HPV16/18 associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) Grade 2/3. Long-term surveillance is, however, needed to determine the overall vaccine efficacy (VE) against CIN3 and invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC). During population-based recruitment between September 2002 and March 2003, 1,749 16- to 17-year old Finns participated in a multi-national randomized Phase III HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (FUTURE II) trial for the determination of VE against HPV16/18 positive CIN2/3. The passive follow-up started at the country-wide, population-based Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) six months after the active follow-up and voluntary cross-vaccination in April 2007. A cluster randomized, population-based reference cohort of 15,744 unvaccinated, originally 18-19 year old Finns was established in two phases in 2003 and 2005 after the FUTURE II recruitment. We linked these cohorts with the FCR in 2007-2011 (HPV vaccine and placebo cohorts) and 2006-2010 and 2008-2012 (unvaccinated reference cohorts 1 and 2) to compare their incidences of CIN3 and ICC. The four years passive follow-up resulted in 3,464, 3,444 and 62,876 person years for the HPV6/11/16/18, original placebo and reference cohorts, after excluding cases discovered during the clinical follow-up and individuals not at risk. The numbers of CIN3 and ICC cases identified were 0 and 0, 3 and 0, 59 and 3 for the HPV6/11/16/18, placebo and the unvaccinated reference cohorts. The corresponding CIN3 incidence rates were 0/100,000 (95% confidence interval 0.0-106.5), 87.1/100,000 (95% CI 17.9-254.5) and 93.8/100,000 (95% CI 71.4-121), respectively. Long-term surveillance up to 8 years (and longer) post vaccination of the HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine and placebo cohorts, and the unvaccinated reference cohort (not exposed to interventions) for the most stringent efficacy end-points by passive cancer registry-based follow-up is feasible

  3. Real world cost of human epidermal receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients: a longitudinal incidence-based observational costing study in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, G W J; Severens, J L; Hövels, A M; van Hasselt, J G C; Hooiveld, M J J; Neven, P; Raaijmakers, J A M; Schellens, J H M

    2015-05-01

    Currently, no country-specific metastatic breast cancer (MBC) observational costing data are available for the Netherlands and Belgium. Our aim is to describe country-specific resource use and costs of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium, making use of real-world data. The eligibility period for patient selection was from April 2004 to April 2010. Inclusion and retrospective data collection begins at the time of first diagnosis of HER-2-positive MBC during the eligibility period and ends 24 months post-index diagnosis of MBC or at patient death. We identified 88 eligible patients in the Netherlands and 44 patients in Belgium. The total costs of medical treatment and other resource use utilisation per patient was €48,301 in the Netherlands and €37,431 in Belgium. Majority of costs was related to the use of trastuzumab in both countries, which was 50% of the total costs in the Netherlands and 56% in Belgium respectively. Our study provides estimates of resource use and costs for HER-2-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium. We noticed various differences in resource use patterns between both countries demonstrating caution is needed when transferring cost estimates between countries. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The incidence rate of female breast cancer in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, United Kingdom; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Lincoln Hospital, Research and Development, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, United Kingdom Background: This study presents descriptive epidemiological data related to breast cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi women, including the frequency and percentage of cases, the crude incidence rate (CIR, and the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by the region and year of diagnosis. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological study of all Saudi female breast cancer cases from 2001 to 2008. The statistical analyses were conducted using descriptive statistics, a linear regression model, and analysis of variance with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA. Results: A total of 6,922 female breast cancer cases were recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The highest overall percentages (38.6% and 31.2% of female breast cancer cases were documented in women who were 30–44 and 45–59 years of age, respectively. The eastern region of Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 26.6 per 100,000 women, followed by Riyadh at 20.5 and Makkah at 19.4. Jazan, Baha, and Asir had the lowest average ASIRs, at 4.8, 6.1, and 7.3 per 100,000 women, respectively. The region of Jouf (24.2%; CIR 11.2, ASIR 17.2 had the highest changes in CIR and ASIR from 2001 to 2008. While Qassim, Jazan and Tabuk recorded down-trending rates with negative values. Conclusion: There was a significant increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for female breast cancer between 2001 and 2008. The majority of breast cancer cases occurred among younger women. The region of Jouf had the greatest significant

  5. Are retinol, vitamin C, vitamin E, folate and carotenoids intake associated with bladder cancer risk? : results from the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    In the Netherlands Cohort Study among 120 852 subjects aged 55-69 years at baseline (1986), the association between vitamins and carotenoids intake, vitamin supplement use, and bladder cancer incidence was examined. Exposure status was measured with a food-frequency questionnaire. After 6.3 years of

  6. Incidence rate of ovarian cancer cases in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Ahlam A Dohal,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy51School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Al-Baha University, Kingdom of Saudia Arabia; 3Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital–Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals, National Health Service Trust, Lincoln, UKPurpose: This study provides descriptive epidemiological data, such as the percentage of cases diagnosed, crude incidence rate (CIR, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR of ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Patients and methods: A retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all ovarian cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR from January 2001–December 2008 was performed. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance tests, Poisson regression, and simple linear modeling.Results: A total of 991 ovarian cancer cases were recorded in the SCR from January 2001–December 2008. The region of Riyadh had the highest overall ASIR at 3.3 cases per 100,000 women, followed by the Jouf and Asir regions at 3.13 and 2.96 cases per 100,000 women. However, Hail and Jazan had the lowest rates at 1.4 and 0.6 cases per 100,000 women, respectively. Compared to Jazan, the incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases was significantly higher (P<0.001 in the Makkah region at 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.13–9.83, followed by Riyadh at 6.3 (95% CI: 4.10–9.82, and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia at 4.52 (95% CI: 2.93–6.98. The predicted annual CIR and ASIR for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia could be defined by the equations 0.9 + (0.07× years and 1.71 + (0.09× years, respectively.Conclusion: We observed a slight increase in the CIRs and

  7. Prevalentie van schisis in Nederland en Noord-Nederland in 1997-2007: Trendanalyse van gegevens uit drie Nederlandse registraties [ The prevalence of cleft in the Netherlands and Northern Netherlands in 1997-2007: Trend analysis of data from three Dutch registries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, A.M.; Mohangoo, A.D.; Luijsterburg, A.J.M.; Bakker, M.K.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Vermeij-Keers, C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the prevalence of oral cleft live births in the Netherlands, we analyzed time-trends in the Netherlands and Northern Netherlands (NNL) over the period 1997-2007 and stratified these trends by cleft category (cleft lip/alveolus ± cleft palate: CL±P; cleft palate only: CP).

  8. Patient survival and healthcare utilization costs after diagnosis of triple-negative breast cancer in a United States managed care cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Onur; Wei, Wenhui; Henk, Henry J; Teitelbaum, April; Xie, Lin

    2012-03-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) makes up 10-17% of all breast cancers and, due to lack of receptor expression, is unresponsive to therapies that target hormonal receptors or HER2. Unique in its tumor aggression and high rates of recurrence, TNBC is less likely to be detected by mammogram and has a poorer prognosis than other breast cancer subtypes (non-TNBC). To examine the survival, healthcare utilization, and healthcare cost for women with TNBC compared with non-TNBC breast cancer. The study population was derived from a US managed care cancer registry linked to health insurance claims and social security mortality data. Based on initial type and stage at diagnosis, patients were divided into two cohorts: patients with TNBC and those with non-TNBC. Records were analyzed from initial diagnosis until death, disenrollment, or end of observation period. Survival and annual healthcare utilization and costs were estimated and compared between cohorts after adjusting for baseline demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and prior resource use. Subgroup analyses were performed in patients diagnosed with stage I-III and IV breast cancer. The study included women diagnosed with TNBC (n = 450) and non-TNBC (n = 1807). Median follow-up time for all patients was 716 days (688.5 and 733 days for TNBC and non-TNBC patients, respectively). After initial diagnosis, overall mortality risk for the TNBC cohort was twice as high as the non-TNBC cohort (HR = 2.02, p healthcare costs, adjusted inpatient costs for patients with non-TNBC averaged 77% higher ($8395 vs. $4745, p healthcare costs.

  9. Cancer incidence, morbidity, and survival in Canadian first nation children: a Manitoba population-based study from the cancer in young people in Canada (CYP-C) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammers, David M; Israels, Sara J; Lambert, Pascal J; Cuvelier, Geoff D E

    2014-12-01

    Health disparities between Canadian First Nation (FN) people and the rest of the national population exist. No studies have specifically documented cancer-related health outcomes in Canadian FN children. The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence of pediatric malignancies in Manitoba FN children, and to compare morbidity patterns and survival between FN and non-FN children with cancer in the Canadian province of Manitoba. A retrospective, population-based review of all children (0-14.99 years) diagnosed with malignancy (2001-2008) in Manitoba, Canada was undertaken using the Cancer in Young People in Canada registry. FN children were compared to the non-FN population for markers of morbidity and survival. The average annual age-standardized incidence rate for all childhood cancers in FN children was 132 per 1,000,000 per year. 240 children were included in the morbidity and survival analyses (38 FN; 202 non-FN). No differences were found between FN and non-FN children in time from first presentation of symptoms to consultation with an oncology specialist or diagnosis, or number of hospital admissions / total days of admission for treatment complications. Overall survival was inferior for FN children in univariable analysis (P = 0.048) but not when risk group was included in a multivariable analysis (P = 0.15). No difference in event free survival or cumulative incidence of relapse was identified. The estimated incidence of childhood cancers in the Manitoba FN population is similar to provincial incidence rates. No differences in morbidity patterns or survival were found between Manitoba FN and non-FN children with cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Does fear of cancer recurrence differ between cancer types? : A study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wal, M.A.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Prins, J.; Gielissen, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Knowledge of factors associated with fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) may inform intervention development and improve patient care. The aims were (1) to compare FCR severity between cancer types and (2) to identify associations between FCR, demographics, medical characteristics, information

  11. Comparing Health-Care Providers' Perspectives on Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Childhood Cancer Between Netherlands and Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Stefanus; Arnoldussen, Marijn; Gordijn, Maartje S; Sitaresmi, Mei N; van de Ven, Peter M; Ten Broeke, Chloé A M; Veerman, Anjo J P; Mantik, Max; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Mostert, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients with childhood cancer. Health-care providers (HCP) should address this need properly. Geographical and cultural differences seem likely. This study explores perspectives on CAM of HCP involved in the care of children with cancer in Netherlands and Indonesia. Health beliefs, components of CAM, encouraging or discouraging CAM, and knowledge about CAM were assessed. We conducted a cross-sectional study using semi-structured questionnaires at a Dutch and Indonesian academic hospital. A total of 342 HCP participated: 119 Dutch (response rate 80%) and 223 Indonesian (response rate 87%). Chemotherapy can cure cancer according to more Dutch than Indonesian HCP (87% vs. 53% respectively, P cancer according to more Indonesian than Dutch HCP (45% vs. 25%, P < 0.001). Dutch and Indonesian HCP recommend and discourage CAM use differently. Most Dutch (77%) and Indonesian HCP (84%) consider their knowledge about CAM to be inadequate (P = ns). Fewer Dutch doctors than other HCP want to learn more about CAM (51% vs. 76%, P = 0.007), whereas there is no significant difference in eagerness to learn about CAM between Indonesian doctors (64%) and other HCP (72%). Indonesian HCP have more positive views about CAM than their Dutch colleagues. Both Dutch and Indonesian HCP consider their knowledge about CAM to be inadequate. Therefore, education programs about CAM tailored to the needs of HCP are recommended, knowing that CAM is used frequently. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Consumption of vegetables and fruits and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-03-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between consumption of vegetables and fruits and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes [i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC) and laryngeal cancer (LC)]. Therefore, we investigated these associations within the Netherlands Cohort Study, in which 120,852 participants completed a 150-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 415 cases of HNC (131 OCC, 88 OHPC, three oral cavity/pharynx unspecified or overlapping and 193 LC) and 3,898 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Total vegetable and fruit consumption was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall [multivariable-adjusted rate ratios for highest vs. lowest quartile: 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.85, p trend 0.002] and all HNC subtypes, with the strongest associations for OCC. Total vegetable intake and total fruit intake were also associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall and HNC subtypes. No significant interaction was found between vegetable and fruit intake and alcohol consumption or cigarette smoking. In conclusion, in this large-scale cohort study, consumption of vegetables and fruits was associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall and all subtypes. Consumption of vegetables and fruits (or of specific groups of them) may protect against HNC and its subtypes. © 2014 UICC.

  13. Evaluation of an ICD-10 algorithm to detect osteonecrosis of the jaw among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrenstein, Vera; Gammelager, Henrik; Schiødt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to validate a predefined algorithm for osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) among cancer patients in the Danish National Registry of Patients and to assess the nature of clinical information recorded in medical charts of ONJ patients. METHODS: We identified potential ONJ cases......%-81%]). CONCLUSIONS: The predefined algorithm is not adequate for monitoring ONJ in pharmacovigilance studies. Additional case-finding approaches, coupled with adjudication, are necessary to estimate ONJ incidence accurately....

  14. Conditional survival for longer-term survivors from 2000-2004 using population-based cancer registry data in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuri; Nakayama, Tomio; Miyashiro, Isao; Ioka, Akiko; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2013-06-22

    We usually report five-year survival from population-based cancer registries in Japan; however these survival estimates may be pessimistic for cancer survivors, because many patients with unfavourable prognosis die shortly after diagnosis. Conditional survival can provide relevant information for cancer survivors, their family and oncologists. We used the period approach to estimate the latest 10-year survival of 38,439 patients with stomach, colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancer diagnosed between 1990 and 2004 and followed-up from 2000-04 in Osaka, Japan. Conditional survival is an estimate, with the pre-condition of having already survived a certain length of time. Conditional five-year relative survival of one to five years after diagnosis was calculated by site, age and stage for survivors under the age of 70. Five-year relative survival for stomach cancer was 60%. Conditional five-year relative survival was 77% one year after diagnosis and 97% five years after diagnosis. This means that 97% of patients who survive five years after diagnosis can survive a further five years. Conditional five-year relative survival improved successively with each additional year that patients lived after diagnosis for stomach, colorectal and lung cancer. These figures for breast and prostate cancer were stable at high survival. Liver cancer did not show an increase in conditional five-year survival. Conditional five-year survival is a relevant figure for long-term cancer survivors in Japan. It is important for population-based cancer registries to provide figures which cancer patients and oncologists really need.

  15. Glandularity and mean glandular dose determined for individual women at four regional breast cancer screening units in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoetelief, J.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Thijssen, M. A. O.; Jansen, J. T. M.

    2006-04-01

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in The Netherlands since 1997. There is concern that the mean glandular doses due to mammography might be differing between different regions of the country due to differences in glandularity and compressed breast thickness. To investigate regional differences, glandularity, compressed breast thickness and mean glandular dose were determined for individual breasts during screening at mammography units at four locations in The Netherlands. Differences in glandularity were observed, which could be related qualitatively to differences in age of the participants at the different locations. Mean glandular dose depends on compressed breast thickness, glandularity and technical conditions of screening. The lowest average value of the mean glandular dose was found for the unit in Amsterdam. This is most likely due to the use of the Mo/Rh anode/filter combination at this unit, in addition to the Mo/Mo combination. At the other three units, almost exclusively the Mo/Mo anode/filter combination was used. Differences in mean glandular dose averaged per unit could be related mainly to differences in tube-current exposure-time product values. Consequently, it is concluded that differences in mean glandular dose at different units are marginal.

  16. Childhood osteosarcoma: Incidence and survival in Argentina. Report from the National Pediatric Cancer Registry, ROHA Network 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, F; Cacciavillano, W; Cipolla, M; Coirini, M; Streitenberger, P; López Martí, J; Palladino, M; Morici, M; Onoratelli, M; Drago, G; Schifino, A; Cores, M; Rose, A; Jotomliansky, J; Varel, M; García Lombardi, M

    2017-10-01

    Differences in incidence and survival in osteosarcoma reports are considerable worldwide. This study describes the incidence and survival of patients with osteosarcoma in Argentina with data from the National Pediatric Cancer Registry (ROHA), and the impact of age, gender, stage, regional, and socioeconomic indicators on outcome. Pediatric patients with osteosarcoma reported to ROHA from 2000 through 2013 were analyzed, the annual age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) was calculated using the National Vital Statistics, and survival was estimated. The extended human development index (EHDI) for each reporting region was used as an indicator of socioeconomic status. There were 515 cases of osteosarcoma identified, yielding an ASR of 3.2/1,000,000 children (0-14 years old). The ASR did not vary significantly by year of diagnosis but ranged from 4.0/1,000,000 in the Cuyo/Western Central region to 2.7/1,000,000 in the northeast region (P 0.1 in all cases). Survival rate for localized disease was 52% (95% CI 45-57%) and for metastatic 22% (95% CI 15-30%). In Argentina, ASR of osteosarcoma is similar to that in high-income countries, but survival is lower in all regions. Future work will focus on identification and reduction of causes of preventable treatment failure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genital squamous cell carcinoma in men treated by photochemotherapy. A cancer registry-based study from 1978 to 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, F; Puzenat, E; Arveux, P; Louvat, P; Quencez, E; Humbert, P

    2001-06-01

    One single report from the U.S. 16-centre-trial indicated that psoralen and ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy may induce an increased risk of genital tumours in men, and protection of the genital area is, therefore, recommended. To evaluate the relevance of this risk in routine clinical practice. Two groups of patients were included in a 1978-98 retrospective study. Case records of men with genital squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) identified from the Cancer Registry of the Doubs area of France were examined for a history of PUVA therapy, topical tar treatment, psoriasis, human papillomavirus infection or genital dermatitis. In addition, all the dermatologists of the Doubs area (in public and private practice) using PUVA therapy were asked to provide information on the number of patients having received PUVA therapy and whether the genital area was exposed during treatment. Between 1978 and 1998, among the 48 men who had developed a genital SCC in the Doubs area, only one had a history of intensive PUVA therapy. About 150,000 treatments with PUVA therapy had been performed by 15 dermatologists in the Doubs area for 5400 patients since 1978. No case of genital SCC had been reported, despite the fact that the genital area had not been protected during UVA exposure. Although retrospective, our study demonstrates that the occurrence of genital SCC in men treated with PUVA therapy is a very rare event in common dermatological practice.

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma: a population-based cancer registry descriptive study of 57 consecutive cases diagnosed between 1977 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laresche, Claire; Fournier, Evelyne; Dupond, Anne Sophie; Woronoff, Anne Sophie; Drobacheff-Thiebaut, Christine; Humbert, Philippe; Aubin, Francois

    2014-12-01

    There are few epidemiological data available on rare skin cancer, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), which is a multifocal illness affecting the skin, mucosa, and viscera. Four different types of KS have been described: classic, AIDS-associated, iatrogenic, and African. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology and evolution of the different types of KS in the Doubs region of France. A retrospective population-based study was conducted, including 57 patients with KS from the Doubs region between 1977 and 2009. These patients were identified by the tumor registry of the Doubs region. A larger proportion of AIDS-associated KS (61%) was observed compared to classic KS (30%) and iatrogenic KS (9%). No cases of African KS were observed. Most new cases were observed between 1987 and 1996 due to the AIDS explosion. The patients were predominantly male, with a male/female ratio at 10 : 4 (34 for AIDS-associated KS). The mean age of patients was 50.2 (higher in classic and iatrogenic KS and lower in AIDS-associated KS). Mucosal and visceral forms were more common in AIDS-associated KS, explaining the higher rate of mortality due to KS (21%). KS, which used to be a rare illness, as it existed only in the classic form, has become more common since the appearance of HIV and, to a lesser extent, of immunosuppressive treatment. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Laakmann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001. Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021, whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038. The localization of Brain metastases (BMs was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025. A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012. Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment.

  20. Difference of stage at cancer diagnosis by socioeconomic status for four target cancers of the National Cancer Screening Program in Korea: Results from the Gwangju and Jeonnam cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Sun-Seog; Kim, Min-Gyeong; Kang, Mi-Ran; Shin, Min-Ho; Choi, Jin-Su

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether stage at cancer diagnosis differed according to patient economic status. A total of 10,528 patients with cancer of the stomach, colorectum, breast, or cervix, which are target organs of the Korean National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP; fully implemented in 2005) were extracted from population-based cancer registries. The patients were classified into four groups based on socioeconomic status (SES), as determined using their National Health Insurance (NHI) monthly premium at the time of cancer diagnosis. Cancer stage at diagnosis was defined as early (in situ/local) or late stage (regional/distant) based on the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) summary stage. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the risk of non-local stage using age, residential area, and community deprivation index as covariates. The lowest SES subjects showed significantly higher risks of being diagnosed at a later stage for stomach, colorectal, and female breast cancer, but not for cervical cancer, compared with the highest SES subjects. The estimated ORs were 1.28 (95% CI, 1.10-1.49), 1.29 (95% CI, 1.03-1.61), and 1.35 (95% CI, 1.02-1.81) in the lowest SES subjects with stomach, colorectal, and breast cancer, respectively. In conclusion, later stage diagnoses of stomach, colon, and female breast cancer are still associated with SES in Korea in the era of the NCSP for the lower SES population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Incidence rate of ovarian cancer cases in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; Alghamdi, Mansour M; Dohal, Ahlam A; El-Sheemy, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study provides descriptive epidemiological data, such as the percentage of cases diagnosed, crude incidence rate (CIR), and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) of ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Patients and methods A retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all ovarian cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) from January 2001–December 2008 was performed. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance tests, Poisson regression, and simple linear modeling. Results A total of 991 ovarian cancer cases were recorded in the SCR from January 2001–December 2008. The region of Riyadh had the highest overall ASIR at 3.3 cases per 100,000 women, followed by the Jouf and Asir regions at 3.13 and 2.96 cases per 100,000 women. However, Hail and Jazan had the lowest rates at 1.4 and 0.6 cases per 100,000 women, respectively. Compared to Jazan, the incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the Makkah region at 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.13–9.83), followed by Riyadh at 6.3 (95% CI: 4.10–9.82), and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia at 4.52 (95% CI: 2.93–6.98). The predicted annual CIR and ASIR for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia could be defined by the equations 0.9 + (0.07× years) and 1.71 + (0.09× years), respectively. Conclusion We observed a slight increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Riyadh, Jouf, and Asir had the highest overall ASIR, while Jazan and Hail had the lowest rates. Makkah, Riyadh, and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia had the highest incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases. Further analytical studies are required to determine the potential risk factors of ovarian cancer among Saudi women. PMID:25028565

  2. The incidence rate of female breast cancer in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; El-Sheemy, Mohamed A

    2013-01-01

    Background This study presents descriptive epidemiological data related to breast cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi women, including the frequency and percentage of cases, the crude incidence rate (CIR), and the age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR), adjusted by the region and year of diagnosis. Methods This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological study of all Saudi female breast cancer cases from 2001 to 2008. The statistical analyses were conducted using descriptive statistics, a linear regression model, and analysis of variance with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. Results A total of 6,922 female breast cancer cases were recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The highest overall percentages (38.6% and 31.2%) of female breast cancer cases were documented in women who were 30–44 and 45–59 years of age, respectively. The eastern region of Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 26.6 per 100,000 women, followed by Riyadh at 20.5 and Makkah at 19.4. Jazan, Baha, and Asir had the lowest average ASIRs, at 4.8, 6.1, and 7.3 per 100,000 women, respectively. The region of Jouf (24.2%; CIR 11.2, ASIR 17.2) had the highest changes in CIR and ASIR from 2001 to 2008. While Qassim, Jazan, and Tabuk recorded down-trending rates with negative values. Conclusion There was a significant increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for female breast cancer between 2001 and 2008. The majority of breast cancer cases occurred among younger women. The region of Jouf had the greatest significant differences of CIR and ASIR during 2001 to 2008. Jazan, Baha, and Najran had the lowest average CIRs and ASIRs of female breast cancer, whereas the linear trend upward is a concern in certain regions, such as the eastern region, Makkah, and Riyadh. However, further analytical epidemiological research is needed to identify the potential risk factors involved in the increase in the prevalence of breast cancer among Saudi women

  3. Intake of vegetables, fruits, carotenoids and vitamins C and E and pancreatic cancer risk in The Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Mirjam M; Verhage, Bas A J; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological data investigating the relation between fruit and vegetable consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have shown inconsistent results so far. Most case-control studies observed an inverse association with total fruit and vegetable consumption, whereas results from most cohort studies have largely been null. We examined prospectively the relation between pancreatic cancer risk and intake of vegetables, fruits, carotenoids and vitamins C and E. The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852 men and women who completed a questionnaire at baseline in 1986, including a validated 150-item food-frequency questionnaire. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 423 cases were available for analysis. Total vegetable and total fruit consumption were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintile, multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval: 0.86-1.75 and multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratio = 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.66-1.24, respectively). Also, for cooked vegetables, raw vegetables and vegetables and fruits classified into subgroups, no associations were observed. Dietary carotenoids, vitamin C and E intake and supplements containing vitamin C or E were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. The results were not modified by sex, smoking status and body mass index. In conclusion, we observed no association between a high consumption of vegetables and fruits and pancreatic cancer risk in this large cohort study, which is in agreement with previous prospective studies. Furthermore, we observed no association between the intake of carotenoids, vitamins and vitamin supplements and pancreatic cancer risk. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  4. The incidence rate of thyroid cancer among women in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; Dohal, Ahlam A; Almalki, Shaia S; El-Sheemy, Mohammed A

    2015-06-01

    This study provides a descriptive epidemiological data of thyroid cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi women, including the frequency and percentage of cases, the crude incidence rate (CIR) and the age-standardised incidence rate (ASIR) stratified by the region and year of diagnosis. This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all Saudi thyroid cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were applied using descriptive statistics with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. A total of 2,930 cases were recorded in the SCR between January 2001 and December 2008. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR at 9.43 per 100,000 women, followed by Tabuk at 7.11 and eastern region at 6.5, while Jazan and Jouf had the lowest average ASIRs at 1.97 and at 2.72, respectively. The region of Qassim recorded the greatest changes of ASIR at 5.5 per 100,000 women from 2001 to 2008. There was a slight increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for thyroid cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Riyadh, Tabuk and eastern region were the highest overall ASIR in Saudi Arabia. While, Jazan and Hail had the lowest rates. Finally, the region of Qassim had the highest changes in CIR and ASIR from 2001 to 2008. Further analytical studies are needed to determine the potential risk factors of thyroid cancer disease among Saudi women.

  5. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Using Clinical Models and 77 Independent Risk-Associated SNPs for Women Aged Under 50 Years: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dite, Gillian S; MacInnis, Robert J; Bickerstaffe, Adrian; Dowty, James G; Allman, Richard; Apicella, Carmel; Milne, Roger L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Giles, Graham G; Terry, Mary Beth; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L

    2016-02-01

    The extent to which clinical breast cancer risk prediction models can be improved by including information on known susceptibility SNPs is not known. Using 750 cases and 405 controls from the population-based Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry who were younger than 50 years at diagnosis and recruitment, respectively, Caucasian and not BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers, we derived absolute 5-year risks of breast cancer using the BOADICEA, BRCAPRO, BCRAT, and IBIS risk prediction models and combined these with a risk score based on 77 independent risk-associated SNPs. We used logistic regression to estimate the OR per adjusted SD for log-transformed age-adjusted 5-year risks. Discrimination was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Calibration was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. We also constructed reclassification tables and calculated the net reclassification improvement. The ORs for BOADICEA, BRCAPRO, BCRAT, and IBIS were 1.80, 1.75, 1.67, and 1.30, respectively. When combined with the SNP-based score, the corresponding ORs were 1.96, 1.89, 1.80, and 1.52. The corresponding AUCs were 0.66, 0.65, 0.64, and 0.57 for the risk prediction models, and 0.70, 0.69, 0.66, and 0.63 when combined with the SNP-based score. By combining a 77 SNP-based score with clinical models, the AUC for predicting breast cancer before age 50 years improved by >20%. Our estimates of the increased performance of clinical risk prediction models from including genetic information could be used to inform targeted screening and prevention. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; Franzin, Luisa; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

  7. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: A comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, ZHEYU; ZHANG, YEFEI; FRANZIN, LUISA; CORMIER, JANICE N.; CHAN, WENYAW; XU, HUA; DU, XIANGLIN L.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute’s SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995–2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995–1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER. PMID:25672365

  8. Dying from cancer or other chronic diseases in the Netherlands: ten-year trends derived from death certificate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hingstman Lammert

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the further development of palliative care, it is relevant to gain insight into trends in non-acute mortality. The aim of this article is twofold: (a to provide insight into ten-year trends in the characteristics of patients who died from cancer or other chronic diseases in the Netherlands; (b to show how national death statistics, derived from physicians' death certificates, can be used in this type of investigations. Methods Secondary analysis of data from 1996 to 2006 on the "primary" or "underlying" cause of death from official death certificates filled out by physicians and additional data from 2003 to 2006 on the place of death from these certificates. Results Of the 135,000 people who died in the Netherlands in 2006, 77,000 (or 57% died from a chronic disease. Cancer was the most frequent cause of death (40,000. Stroke accounted for 10,000 deaths, dementia for 8,000 deaths and COPD and heart failure each accounted for 6,000 deaths. Compared to 1996, the number of people who died from chronic diseases has risen by 6%. Of all non-acute deaths, almost three quarters were at least 70 years old when they died. Almost one third of the people died at home (31%, 28% in a hospital, 25% in a nursing home and 16% somewhere else. Conclusion Further investments to facilitate dying at home are desirable. Death certificate data proved to be useful to describe and monitor trends in non-acute deaths. Advantages of the use of death certificate data concern the reliability of the data, the opportunities for selection on the basis of the ICD-10, and the availability and low cost price of the data.

  9. Global surveillance of cancer survival 1995–2009: analysis of individual data for 25 676 887 patients from 279 population-based registries in 67 countries (CONCORD-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemani, Claudia; Weir, Hannah K; Carreira, Helena; Harewood, Rhea; Spika, Devon; Wang, Xiao-Si; Bannon, Finian; Ahn, Jane V; Johnson, Christopher J; Bonaventure, Audrey; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Stiller, Charles; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo e; Chen, Wan-Qing; Ogunbiyi, Olufemi J; Rachet, Bernard; Soeberg, Matthew J; You, Hui; Matsuda, Tomohiro; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Storm, Hans; Tucker, Thomas C; Coleman, Michel P

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Methods Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15–99 years) and 75 000 children (age 0–14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995–2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. Findings 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005–09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15–19% in North America, and as low as 7–9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10–20% between 1995–99 and 2005–09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer

  10. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; El-Sheemy, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR), adjusted by region and year of diagnosis. Methods A retrospective, descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted of all the corpus uteri cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and a simple linear model. Results A total of 1,060 corpus uteri cancer cases were included. Women aged 60–74 years of age were most affected by the disease. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 4.4 cases per 100,000 female patients, followed by the eastern region, at 4.2, and Makkah, at 3.7. Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest average ASIRs, ranging from 0.8 to 1.4. A Poisson regression model using Jazan as the reference revealed that the corpus uteri cancer incidence rate ratio was significantly higher for the regions of Makkah, at 16.5 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0–23.0), followed by Riyadh, at 16.0 times (95% CI: 9.0–22.0), and the eastern region, at 9.9 times (95% CI: 5.6–17.6). The northern region experienced the highest changes in ASIRs of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi patients between 2001 and 2008. Conclusion There was a slight increase in the crude incidence rates and ASIRs for corpus uteri cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Older Saudi women were most affected by the disease. Riyadh, the eastern region, and Makkah had the highest overall disease ASIRs and incidence rate ratios, while Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest rates. Finally, the northern region experienced the greatest changes in ASIR during the studied period. Further analytical studies are necessary to determine potential risk factors of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi

  11. Incidence of cancer in children residing in ten jurisdictions of the Mexican Republic: importance of the Cancer registry (a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejía-Arangure Juan

    2007-04-01

    will be necessary to carry out studies concerning the causes of cancer in children. Due to the little that is known about the incidence of cancer in Mexican children, it will be necessary to develop a national program to establish a cancer registry for the whole of the country.

  12. Effect of chemotherapy on health-related quality of life among early-stage ovarian cancer survivors: a study from the population-based PROFILES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhugwandass, C S; Pijnenborg, J M A; Pijlman, B; Ezendam, N P M

    2016-12-01

    There is wide variation in the application of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Our aim was to assess differences in health-related quality of life (hrqol) between patients with early-stage ovarian cancer who did or did not receive chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment. All patients diagnosed with early-stage ovarian cancer between 2000 and 2010 within the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry (n = 191) were enrolled in this study. Patients were requested to complete questionnaires, including the cancer-specific (qlq-C30) and ovarian cancer-specific (qlq-OV28) quality of life measures from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Primary outcome measures were the generic-and cancer-specific domain scores for hrqol in ovarian cancer survivors. Of the 107 patients (56%) who returned the questionnaires, 57 (53.3%) had received adjuvant chemotherapy and 50 (46.7%) had been treated with surgery alone. Significant differences in hrqol between those groups were found in the symptom scales for peripheral neuropathy, attitude toward sickness, and financial situation, with worse scores in the chemotherapy group. Results of our study show that patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy have a significantly worse score for 3 aspects of hrqol. Efforts should be made to reduce use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage ovarian cancer. Moreover, preventive strategies to improve long-term quality of life for those who need adjuvant chemotherapy should be explored.

  13. Oral malignant melanomas and other head and neck neoplasms in Danish dogs - data from the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Annemarie T

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck cancers (HNC are relatively common and often very serious diseases in both dogs and humans. Neoplasms originating in the head and neck region are a heterogeneous group. HNC often has an unfavourable prognosis and the proximity of the tissue structures renders extirpation of tumours with sufficient margins almost incompatible with preservation of functionality. In humans oral malignant melanoma (OMM is extremely rare, but represents a particular challenge since it is highly aggressive as is the canine counterpart, which thus may be of interest as a spontaneous animal model. Methods Canine cases entered in the Danish Veterinary Cancer Registry (DVCR from May 15th 2005 through February 29th 2008 were included in this study. Fisher's exact test was used to compare proportions of HNC in dogs and humans as well as proportions of surgically treated cases of OMM and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC. Also the proportions of benign and malignant neoplasms of different locations in dogs were compared using Fisher's exact test. Results A total of 1768 cases of neoplasias (679 malignant, 826 benign, 263 unknown were submitted. Of all neoplasias HNC accounted for 7.2% (n = 128. Of these, 64 (50% were malignant and 44 (34% benign. The most common types of malignant neoplasia were SCC (18; 28% of malignant, OMM (13; 20% of malignant, soft tissue sarcoma (11; 17% of malignant and adenocarcinoma (5; 11% of malignant. The most common types of benign neoplasms were adenoma (7; 16% of benign, polyps (6; 14% of benign and fibroma (5; 11% of benign. Conclusions In the current study, the proportion of neoplasia in the head and neck region in dogs in Denmark was similar to other canine studies and significantly more common than in humans with a large proportion of malignancies. Spontaneous HNC in dogs thus, may serve as a model for HNC in humans. Canine OMM is a spontaneous cancer in an outbred, immune-competent large mammal population and

  14. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, Nadine S M; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Burdorf, Alex; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Kauppinen, Timo; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; van den Brandt, Piet a

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and

  15. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kauppinen, T.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and smoking.

  16. Design and implementation of an ICU incident registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Sabine; Cornet, Ronald; de Jonge, Evert

    2007-01-01

    Due to its complexity intensive care is vulnerable to errors. On the ICU adults of the AMC (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) the available registries used for error reporting did not give insight in the occurrence of unwanted events, and did not lead to preventive measures. Therefore, a new registry has

  17. Design and implementation of an ICU incident registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veer, Sabine; Cornet, Ronald; de Jonge, Evert

    2005-01-01

    Due to its complexity intensive care is vulnerable to errors. On the ICU Adults of the AMC (Amsterdam, the Netherlands) the available registries used for error reporting did not give insight in the occurrence of unwanted events, and did not lead to preventive measures. Therefore, a new registry has

  18. Physical activity, energy restriction, and the risk of pancreatic cancer: Prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Lumey, L.H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Background: Because of their influence on insulin concentrations, we hypothesized that both physical activity and energy restriction may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We examined the associations between physical activity, proxies for energy restriction, and pancreatic cancer

  19. Diverging breast and stomach cancer incidence and survival in migrants in The Netherlands, 1996–2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.; Aarts, M.J.; Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, M.A.; Visser, O.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Migrant populations usually experience a health transition with respect to their cancer risk as a result from environmental changes and acculturation processes. We investigated potentially contrasting experiences with breast and stomach cancer risk and survival in migrants to the

  20. Design and implementation of a mobile system for lung cancer patient follow-up in China and initial report of the ongoing patient registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiangyun; Wei, Jia; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaomin; Wang, Jiemin; Chen, Yunqin; Guo, Zongming; Lu, Shun

    2017-01-17

    Management of lung cancer remains a challenge. Although clinical and biological patient data are crucial for cancer research, these data may be missing from registries and clinical trials. Biobanks provide a source of high-quality biological material for clinical research; however, linking these samples to the corresponding patient and clinical data is technically challenging. We describe the mobile Lung Cancer Care system (mLCCare), a novel tool which integrates biological and clinical patient data into a single resource. mLCCare was developed as a mobile device application (app) and an internet website. Data storage is hosted on cloud servers, with the mobile app and website acting as a front-end to the system. mLCCare also facilitates communication with patients to remind them to take their medication and attend follow-up appointments. Between January 2014 and October 2015, 5,080 patients with lung cancer have been registered with mLCCare. Data validation ensures all the patient information is of consistently high-quality. Patient cohorts can be constructed via user-specified criteria and data exported for statistical analysis by authorized investigators and collaborators. mLCCare forms the basis of establishing an ongoing lung cancer registry and could form the basis of a high-quality multisite patient registry. Integration of mLCCare with SMS messaging and WeChat functionality facilitates communication between physicians and patients. It is hoped that mLCCare will prove to be a powerful and widely used tool that will enhance both research and clinical practice.

  1. [Linkage of secondary data with cancer registry data on the basis of encrypted personal identifiers - results from a pilot study in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajüter, H; Batzler, W U; Krieg, V; Heidinger, O; Hense, H-W

    2012-08-01

    The Cancer Registry of North-Rhine-Westphalia stores exclusively encrypted personal identifiers of registered cancer patients. Therefore, comparisons with secondary data sets can only be performed by record linkage procedures that are based on encrypted personal identifiers. We report on a pilot study which linked encrypted personal data from the disease management program for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMP-DM2) with the database of the EKR NRW in order to test the feasibility and efficiency of these record linkage procedures. Personal identifying variables of the DMP records were encrypted in a 2-stage process before being sent electronically to the EKR NRW where they were subsequently submitted to a probabilistic record linkage with the registry data. The study included 27 450 participants who were insured at the AOK NordWest, residents of the district Münster and who were aged 40-79 years at the time of first enrolment to the DMP-DM2 between June 2003-July 2008. The electronic processing time of the semi-automatic record linkage procedure took about 24 h. Approximately 2% of the records had to be reviewed manually. After exclusion of prevalent cancer cases, multiple primaries and inadequate data, 26 742 participants (47.3% men; 52.7% women) remained in the data set. About 1 364 cohort members (759 men, 605 women) were diagnosed with cancer after submission to the disease management program. The DMP-DM2 records were encrypted and linked to cancer registry data with a moderate personnel and financial input and high efficiency. Linked records were instantly usable for epidemiological analyses. Experiences of the pilot study suggest that future linkage studies can further advance the level of data protection, without losses in efficiency, by moderately complex software modifications and amendments of the data flow. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Vitamin and carotenoid intake and risk of head-neck cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munter, Leonie; Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-08-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the seventh most-common type of cancer worldwide. Evidence regarding the potential protective effect of vitamins and carotenoids on HNC is limited and mostly based on case-control studies. We evaluated the association of intake of dietary vitamins C and E (including supplementation) and the most-common carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein plus zeaxanthin, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin) and risk of HNC and HNC subtypes in a large prospective study. The Netherlands Cohort Study included 120,852 participants. For efficiency reasons, a case-cohort design was used. At baseline in 1986, participants completed a food-frequency questionnaire. A subcohort was randomly selected from the total cohort. After 20.3 y of follow-up, 3898 subcohort members and 415 HNC cases [131 oral cavity cancer (OCCs), 88 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPs), and 193 laryngeal cancer cases] were available for analysis. Rate ratios and 95% CIs for highest (quartile 4) compared with lowest (quartile 1) quartiles of vitamin and carotenoid intake were estimated by using the Cox proportional hazards model. A strong inverse association was shown between vitamin C and HNC overall (multivariable-adjusted rate ratio for quartile 4 compared with quartile 1: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.66; P-trend vitamin E, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin. The association of vitamin E and HNC was modified by alcohol status (P-interaction = 0.003) with lower risks in alcohol abstainers. With this study, we show an inverse association between intake of vitamin C and the incidence of HNC and HNC-subtypes. Future research is recommended to investigate the underlying mechanisms and to confirm our results, which may be promising for the prevention of HNC. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Goldbohm, R Alexandra Sandra; Schouten, Leo J

    2014-03-14

    Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study on this topic so far, the Netherlands Cohort Study. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors in 1986. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 395 HNC (110 OCC, 83 OHPC, and 199 LC) cases and 4288 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. For total HNC, the multivariable adjusted incidence rate ratio (RR) was 2.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.85-4.06) for those drinking ≥30 g ethanol/day compared with abstainers; in subtypes, RRs were 6.39 for OCC, 3.52 for OHPC, and 1.54 for LC. Compared with never cigarette smokers, current cigarette smokers had a RR of 4.49 (95%CI 3.11-6.48) for HNC overall, and 2.11 for OCC, 8.53 for OHPC, and 8.07 for LC. A significant, positive, multiplicative interaction between categories of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking was found for HNC overall (P interaction 0.03). Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking were independently associated with risk of HNC overall, with a positive, multiplicative interaction. The strength of these associations differed among HNC-subtypes: OCC was most strongly associated with alcohol consumption but most weakly with cigarette smoking, whereas LC was not statistically significantly associated with alcohol consumption.

  4. Influence of demographic and tumour variables on prostate cancer treatment with curative intent in Spain. Results of the 2010 national prostate cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M; Castelló-Porcar, A; González-Baena, A C; Cózar-Olmo, J M; Miñana-López, B; Gómez-Veiga, F; Rodriguez-Antolín, A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine which cancer and demographic criteria influence the indication for surgery (radical prostatectomy) or radiation therapy (external or brachytherapy) in the treatment of prostate cancer. An analysis of the 2714 patients of the 2010 National Prostate Cancer Registry treated with curative intent. The analysed variables were age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), prostate volume, the number of biopsy cores, the percentage of positive cores, the stage, Gleason score, the type of pathologist, the presence of perineural invasion and the study centre. We analysed the association among these variables and the type of treatment (surgery vs. radiation therapy/brachytherapy), using a univariate analysis (Student's t test and chi-squared) and a binary multiple logistic regression. The 48.12% of the patients (1306/2714) were treated with surgery, and 51.88% (1,408/2,714) underwent radiation therapy/brachytherapy. Differences were observed between the patients treated with prostatectomy and those treated with radiation therapy/brachytherapy (p<.05) in age (63.50±6.5 vs. 69.0±6.7), PSA (8.76±16.97 vs. 13.21±15.88), biopsied cores, percentage of positives cores (30.0±22 vs. 38.7±29), Gleason score (G6: 53.9% vs. 46.1%; G7: 45% vs. 55% G8-10: 26.6%, 73.4%), stage (localised: 50% vs. 50%; locally advanced: 14.6% vs. 85.4%), perineural invasion and hospital centre. In the multivariate analysis, the selected independent variables were age, PSA, percentage of positives cores, stage, Gleason score and hospital centre. According to our study, age, tumour aggressiveness and stage and the centre where the patient will be treated affect the selection of curative treatment for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. 4-IHC classification of breast cancer subtypes in a large cohort of a clinical cancer registry: use in clinical routine for therapeutic decisions and its effect on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inwald, Elisabeth Christine; Koller, M; Klinkhammer-Schalke, M; Zeman, F; Hofstädter, F; Gerstenhauer, M; Brockhoff, G; Ortmann, O

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate to what extent the combination of standard histopathological parameters determines the biology of breast cancer and the effect on therapy and prognosis. The Clinical Cancer Registry Regensburg (Bavaria, Germany) included n = 4,480 female patients with primary, non-metastatic (M0) invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. Immuno-histochemical analyses, i.e., estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), HER2, and Ki-67 (4-IHC), defined the tumor biological subtypes Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-like, and Basal-like. Subtype-related differences in therapies and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using multivariable statistical methods. 4344 patients (97.0 %) could be classified into the four common tumor biological subtypes. The two most frequent entities were Luminal A (48.4 %), Luminal B (24.8 %), HER2-like (17.8 %), and Basal-like subtype (9.0 %). A multivariable Cox regression model showed that the best 7-year OS was seen in Luminal A patients and that OS of Luminal B and HER2-like patients was comparable (HR = 1.59, P < 0.001 versus HR = 1.51, P = 0.03). Lowest OS was seen in patients with Basal-like tumors (HR = 2.18, P < 0.001). In conclusion, the classification of tumor biological subtypes by the ER, PR, HER2, and Ki-67 biomarkers is practical in routine clinical work. Providing that quality assurance of these markers is ensured, this classification is useful for making therapy decisions in the routine clinical management of breast cancer patients.

  6. Does lowering the screening age for cervical cancer in The Netherlands make sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; de Kok, Inge M.C.M.; Siesling, Sabine; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    Recommendations for the age to initiate cervical cancer screening should be directed towards maximum detection of early cervical cancer. However, the screening programme should do more good than harm. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether the target age for cervical cancer screening

  7. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The

  8. Overdiagnosis by mammographic screening for breast cancer studied in birth cohorts in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripping, T.M.; Verbeek, A.L.; Fracheboud, J.; Koning, H.J. de; Ravesteyn, N.T. van; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    A drawback of early detection of breast cancer through mammographic screening is the diagnosis of breast cancers that would never have become clinically detected. This phenomenon, called overdiagnosis, is ideally quantified from the breast cancer incidence of screened and unscreened cohorts of women

  9. Surgical options for Chinese patients with early invasive breast cancer: Data from the Hong Kong Breast Cancer Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon W.W. Chan

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Chinese patients have lower BCS and breast reconstruction rate. Besides cultural difference, patient-related factors such as age, education, marital status, mammography screening, the use of private medical facilities, and clinical characteristics including smaller tumor size and peripherally located tumor were significant predictors for type of surgical treatments in Chinese women with early breast cancer.

  10. Racial comparison of receptor-defined breast cancer in Southern African women: subtype prevalence and age-incidence analysis of nationwide cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Caroline; Duarte, Raquel; Zietsman, Annelle; Cubasch, Herbert; Kellett, Patricia; Schüz, Joachim; Kielkowski, Danuta; McCormack, Valerie

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-defined breast cancer proportions vary across Africa. They have important implications for survival prospects and research priorities. We studied estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 receptor statuses in two multiracial Southern African countries with routine diagnostic immunohistochemistry. A total of 12,361 women with histologically confirmed breast cancer diagnosed at age ≥20 years during (i) 2009-2011 from South Africa's national cancer registry (public sector) and (ii) 2011-2013 from Namibia's only cancer hospital were included. Crude, age, and age + laboratory-adjusted ORs of receptor status were analyzed using logistic regression, and age-incidence curves were analyzed using Poisson regression. A total of 10,047 (81%) women had known ER status. Ranking of subtypes was consistent across races: ER(+)/PR(+)HER2(-) was most common (race-specific percentage range, 54.6%-64.8%), followed by triple-negative (17.4%-21.9%), ER(+)/PR(+)HER2(+) (9.6%-13.9%), and ER(-)PR(-)HER2(+) (7.8%-10.9%). Percentages in black versus white women were 33.8% [95% confidence (CI), 32.5-35.0] versus 26.0% (24.0-27.9) ER(-); 20.9% (19.7-22.1) versus 17.5% (15.4-19.6) triple-negative; and 10.7% (9.8-11.6) versus 7.8% (6.3-9.3) ER(-)PR(-)HER2(+). Indian/Asian and mixed-ancestry women had intermediate values. Age-incidence curves had similar shapes across races: rates increased by 12.7% per year (12.2-13.1) across ER subtypes under the age of 50 years, and thereafter slowed for ER(+) (1.95%) and plateaued for ER(-) disease (-0.1%). ER(+) breast cancer dominates in all Southern African races, but black women have a modest excess of aggressive subtypes. On the basis of the predominant receptor-defined breast tumors in Southern Africa, improving survival for the growing breast cancer burden should be achievable through earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Use of low-value radiotherapy practices in Canada: an analysis of provincial cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, K; Rahal, R; Brundage, M; Fung, S; Louzado, C; Milosevic, M; Xu, J; Bryant, H

    2016-10-01

    As part of Choosing Wisely Canada (a national campaign to encourage patient-provider conversations about unnecessary medical tests, treatments, and procedures), a list of ten oncology practices that could be low-value in some instances was developed. Of those practices, two were specific to radiation therapy (rt): conventional fractionation as part of breast-conserving therapy (bct) for women with early-stage breast cancer, and multifraction radiation for palliation of uncomplicated painful bone metastases. Here, we report baseline findings for the current utilization rates of those two rt practices in Canada. The use of conventional fractionation as part of bct varied substantially from province to province. Of women 50 years of age and older, between 8.8% (Alberta) and 36.5% (Saskatchewan) received radiation in 25 fractions (excluding boost irradiation) as part of bct. The use of hypofractionated rt (that is, 16 fractions excluding boost irradiation)-a preferred approach for many patients-was more common in all 6 reporting provinces, ranging from 43.2% in Saskatchewan to 94.7% in Prince Edward Island. The use of multifraction rt for palliation of bone metastases also varied from province to province, ranging from 40.3% in British Columbia to 69.0% in Saskatchewan. The most common number of fractions delivered to bone metastases was 1, at 50.2%; the second most common numbers were 2-5 fractions, at 41.7%. Understanding variation in the use of potentially low-value rt practices can help to inform future strategies to promote higher-value care, which balances high-quality care with the efficient use of limited system resources. Further work is needed to understand the factors contributing to the interprovincial variation observed and to develop benchmarks for the appropriate rate of use of these rt practices.

  12. Adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet and cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Ellen A; May, Anne M; Beulens, Joline W J; Fransen, Heidi P; de Wit, G Ardine; Boer, Jolanda M A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hoekstra, Jeljer; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the association between adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet created by the Dutch Health Council in 2006 and overall and smoking-related cancer incidence. Prospective cohort study. Adherence to the guidelines, which includes one recommendation on physical activity and nine on diet, was measured using an adapted version of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. The score ranged from 0 to 90 with a higher score indicating greater adherence to the guidelines. We estimated the hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals for the association between the DHD index (in tertiles and per 20-point increment) at baseline and cancer incidence at follow-up. We studied 35 608 men and women aged 20-70 years recruited into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) study during 1993-1997. After an average follow-up of 12·7 years, 3027 cancer cases were documented. We found no significant association between the DHD index (tertile 3 v. tertile 1) and overall (HR = 0·97; 95 % CI 0·88, 1·07) and smoking-related cancer incidence (HR = 0·89; 95 % CI 0·76, 1·06) after adjustment for relevant confounders. Excluding the components physical activity or alcohol from the score did not change the results. None of the individual components of the DHD index was significantly associated with cancer incidence. In the present study, participants with a high adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet were not at lower risk of overall or smoking-related cancer. This does not exclude that other components not included in the DHD index may be associated with overall cancer risk.

  13. "A Somali girl is Muslim and does not have premarital sex. Is vaccination really necessary?" A qualitative study into the perceptions of Somali women in the Netherlands about the prevention of cervical cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salad, Jihan; Verdonk, Petra; de Boer, Fijgje; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-01-01

    .... This qualitative study, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and an intersectionality-based framework, explores the perceptions of Somali women living in the Netherlands regarding measures to prevent cervical cancer...

  14. Recruiting end-of-life cancer patients in the Netherlands for a study on suffering and euthanasia requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijs, C D M; Goedhart, J; Kerkhof, A J F M; van der Wal, G; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D

    2011-12-01

    In the Netherlands, GPs performed euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) in ∼1 of 10 end-of-life cancer patients in their care. Of all explicit requests for EAS directed at GPs, ∼44% resulted in EAS. However, the suffering of patients who do and do not request EAS has never been studied. An important barrier for such research is the low prevalence of end-of-life cancer patients per practice (on average two/year). We studied whether it is possible to recruit end-of-life cancer patients, following-up for requests for EAS (if any), in an interview study in general practice, whether selection occurred and which were the threats and opportunities to recruitment. Our target was to recruit at least 50 patients. Characteristics of all eligible patients were monitored. One in every three eligible patients were recruited by 44 GPs in a 3-year inclusion period, resulting in 64 patients in the interview study with follow-up until death. The prevalence of explicit requests for EAS was higher (27%; P = 0.026) in the interview sample, and the presence of a depressed mood according to the GP was lower (5%; P = 0.013) than in the sample with eligible but not participating patients. Recruitment of slightly more than the minimal target number of end-of-life cancer patients in this study in general practice was realized. Monitoring of all eligible patients permitted to evaluate the selection which occurred. Recruitment through GPs who were direct professional colleagues of one of the researchers was a positive recruitment factor.

  15. Intake of meat and fish and risk of head-neck cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloy, Andy; Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2017-06-01

    To date, the role of meat and fish intake in head-neck cancer (HNC) etiology is not well understood and prospective evidence is limited. This prompted us to study the association between meat, fish, and HNC subtypes, i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro- and hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), within the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). In 1986, 120,852 participants (aged 55-69 years) completed a baseline 150-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), from which daily meat and fish intake were calculated. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 430 HNC overall (134 OCC, 90 OHPC and 203 LC) cases and 4,111 subcohort members were found to be eligible for case-cohort analysis. Multivariate hazard ratios were calculated using Cox's proportional hazards model within quartiles of energy-adjusted meat and fish intake. Processed meat intake, but not red meat intake, was positively associated with HNC overall [HR(Q4 vs. Q1) = 1.46, 95% CI 1.06-2.00; ptrend = 0.03]. Among HNC subtypes, processed meat was positively associated with OCC, while no associations were found with OHPC and LC. Fish intake was not associated with HNC risk. Tests for interaction did not reveal statistically significant interaction between meat, fish, and alcohol or smoking on HNC overall risk. In this large cohort study, processed meat intake was positively associated with HNC overall and HNC subtype OCC, but not with OHPC and LC.

  16. The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Anthon K.

    1975-01-01

    Examines early childhood education in the Netherlands: its history, general conceptions of child upbringing and developmental psychology, organizational patterns, main research projects, and goals. (JH)

  17. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maasland, Denise H. E.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Bernd Kremer; Schouten, Leo J.

    2015-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer ...

  18. Incidence trends for potentially human papillomavirus-related and -unrelated head and neck cancers in France using population-based cancer registries data: 1980-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jéhannin-Ligier, Karine; Belot, Aurélien; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Bossard, Nadine; Launoy, Guy; Uhry, Zoé

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recently recognised as a carcinogenic factor for a subset of head and neck cancers (HNC). In Europe, France has one of the highest incidence rates of HNC. The aim of this study is to explore changes in HNC incidence in France, potentially in relation with infection by HPV. HNC were classified into two anatomical groups: potentially HPV-related and HPV-unrelated. Trends over the period 1980-2012 were analysed by an age-period-cohort model based on data from eleven French cancer registries. Among men, the age-standardised incidence rate (ASR) of HNC decreased in both groups, but less so for HPV-related sites as compared to unrelated sites, especially in recent years (annual percentage change [APC] over the period 2005-2012: -3.5% vs. -5.4%). Among women, the ASR increased in both groups, but more rapidly for HPV-related as compared to unrelated sites (APC over the period 2005-2012: +1.9% vs. -0.4%). This preferential growth of HPV-related versus unrelated HNC was observed in the cohorts born from 1930 to 1935. The differences in trends between possible HPV-related and HPV-unrelated sites suggest an increasing incidence of HNC due to HPV infection. The difference was less marked in men as compared to women, most likely because of a higher contamination in the HPV-related group by cancers due to tobacco or alcohol consumption. The pattern observed is consistent with observations made in other countries, with studies of HPV prevalence in HNC and the evolution of sexual behaviour in France. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Are Associated With Satisfaction With Information Provision and Internet Use Among 3080 Cancer Survivors: Results of the PROFILES Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekers, Nienke; Husson, Olga; Mols, Floortje; van Eenbergen, Mies; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2015-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with information provided by healthcare providers may be a reason for cancer survivors to seek health information on the Internet and may also result in more symptoms of anxiety and depression among this population. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anxious and depressive symptoms are associated with satisfaction with information provision and Internet use among cancer survivors. All individuals diagnosed with endometrial or colorectal cancer between 1998 and 2007 or lymphoma or multiple myeloma between 1999 and 2008 as registered in the Eindhoven Cancer Registry were invited for participation. In total, 4 446 survivors received a questionnaire including the 25-item European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group Information questionnaire and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; 69% responded (n = 3080). Having anxious (odds ratio [OR], 0.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-0.9; P information. Having depressive symptoms or having both depressive and anxious symptoms were negatively associated with satisfaction with information (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.4-0.7; OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.4-0.7, respectively; P information provision is suboptimal, either because it is not adjusted to the mental health status of cancer patients or because it is unsatisfactory and thereby causing anxious and depressive symptoms among cancer patients. More attention should be paid to optimally adjust the information provision to the individual needs of the cancer patients for better mental health.

  20. [Is cancer incidence different between type 2 diabetes patients compared to non-diabetics in hemodialysis? A study from the REIN registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, Aurélie; Pladys, Adelaide; Kihal, Wahida; Siebert, Muriel; Haddj-Elmrabet, Atman; Cernon, Charlotte; Bernard, Anne; Charasse, Christophe; Mandart, Lise; Hamel, Didier; Tanquerel, Tugdual; Strullu, Bernard; Richer, Christine; Siohan, Pascale; Sawadogo, Théophile; Baleynaud, Juliette; Baluta, Simona; Bayat, Sahar; Vigneau, Cécile

    2017-12-06

    In France, diabetes mellitus is now the second cause of end stage renal disease. In a large previous French national study, we observed that dialyzed diabetics have a significant lower risk of death by cancer. This first study was focused on cancer death but did not investigate cancer incidence. In this context, the aim of this second study was to compare the incidence of cancer in diabetic dialyzed patients compared to non-diabetic dialyzed patients in a French region. This epidemiologic multicentric study included 588 diabetic and non-diabetic patients starting hemodialysis between 2002 and 2007 in Bretagne. Data were issued from REIN registry and cancer incidence were individually collected from medical records. Diabetics and non-diabetics were matched one by one on age, sex and year of dialysis initiation. During the follow-up, we observed 28 cancers (9.4%) in diabetic patients and 26 cancers (8.9%) in non-diabetics patients. The cumulative incidence to develop a cancer 2 years after the dialysis start was approximately 6% in both diabetics and non-diabetics patients. In univariate Fine and Gray analysis, BMI, hemoglobin, statin use had P-valuediabetic and non-diabetic patients after hemodialysis start. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary folate and folate vitamers and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszei, A.P.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Heinen, M.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    An association between high intake of folate and reduced risk of cancer has been suggested by previous research. However, epidemiologic data from cohort studies regarding the relationship between dietary folate and pancreatic cancer are sparse and inconsistent. We examined the association between

  2. Progress against cancer in the Netherlands since the late 1980s: an epidemiological evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim-Kos, H.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Louwman, M.W.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Vries, E. de

    2012-01-01

    Progress against cancer through prevention and treatment is often measured by survival statistics only instead of analyzing trends in incidence, survival and mortality simultaneously because of interactive influences. This study combines these parameters of major cancers to provide an overview of

  3. Determinants of regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Kunst (Anton); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAlthough regional differences in lung cancer mortality are likely to be attributable to regional differences in tobacco smoking, studies in various countries found only weak relationships. This paper aimed at explaining regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the

  4. Alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk : results from the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Volovics, A.; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Although several epidemiologic studies have been conducted on alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk, the risk according to quantity and type of alcohol consumed is not clear. The authors investigated these associations in a large prospective cohort study on diet and cancer among 120,852

  5. A prospective study on active and environmental tobacco smoking and bladder cancer risk (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Objective: In a prospective cohort study among 120,852 adult subjects the authors investigated the associations between cigarette, cigar, pipe, environmental tobacco smoking (ETS), and bladder cancer. Methods: In 1986 all subjects completed a questionnaire on cancer risk factors. Follow-up for

  6. Socioeconomic status and stomach cancer incidence in men: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.J.M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    Study objective - To study the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and stomach cancer incidence (cardia and non-cardia) and the role of lifestyle factors in explaining this association. Design - Prospective cohort study on diet and cancer that started in 1986. Data were collected by means

  7. Survival of non-Western first generations immigrants with stomach cancer in North East Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, E.J.M.; van der Aa, M.A.; Siesling, Sabine; Hospers, G.A.P.; Mulder, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Isolated groups, such as first generation non-Western immigrants, are at risk for suboptimal utilisation of the health care system resulting in a worse outcome. Methods: From 1989 to 2007, all patients with stomach cancer were selected from the Comprehensive Cancer Centre North-East

  8. Trend breaks in incidence of non-cardia gastric cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holster, I.L.; Aarts, M.J.; Tjwa, E.T.; Lemmens, V.E.; Kuipers, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The incidence of gastric cancer declined over the past decades. Recently, unfavorable trend breaks (i.e. rise in incidence) were seen for non-cardia cancer in younger age groups in the US. It is unclear whether these also occur in other Western countries. We aimed to analyze the

  9. Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, M.P.; Mullie, P.F.F.; Brants, H.A.M.; Heinen, M.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinemia is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer, determinants of serum insulin levels, like the glycemic load and the glycemic index of the diet, could influence cancer risk. Our objective was to evaluate whether a diet with a high glycemic load or glycemic index is

  10. Consumption of dietary fat and meat and risk of ovarian cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilsing, A.M.J.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Schouten, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evidence that links dietary factors to ovarian cancer is conflicting, but several epidemiologic studies suggested that consumption of dietary fat and meat may increase risk of ovarian cancer. Objective: We studied associations of intakes of total fat and sources and subtypes of fat,

  11. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery : An evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs-Boer, FM; de Kruif, ATC; van de Wiel, HBM

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals

  12. The impact of HPV vaccination on HPV and cervical cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Matthijsse (Suzette)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted virus, of which 150 types have been completely sequenced. Currently, about 14 HPV-types are considered ‘high risk’ for their potential to cause cervical cancer, the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. In

  13. Occupational exposure to silica and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Bosch, L.M.C. van den; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kauppinen, T.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The lung cancer carcinogenicity of crystalline silica dust remains the subject of discussion. Epidemiological evidence is based on occupational cohort studies and population-based case-control studies. The aim of this study was to assess associations between male lung cancer risk and

  14. Using a state cancer registry to recruit young breast cancer survivors and high-risk relatives: protocol of a randomized trial testing the efficacy of a targeted versus a tailored intervention to increase breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapodi, Maria C; Northouse, Laurel L; Schafenacker, Ann M; Duquette, Debra; Duffy, Sonia A; Ronis, David L; Anderson, Beth; Janz, Nancy K; McLosky, Jennifer; Milliron, Kara J; Merajver, Sofia D; Duong, Linh M; Copeland, Glenn

    2013-03-01

    The Michigan Prevention Research Center, the University of Michigan Schools of Nursing, Public Health, and Medicine, and the Michigan Department of Community Health propose a multidisciplinary academic-clinical practice three-year project to increase breast cancer screening among young breast cancer survivors and their cancer-free female relatives at greatest risk for breast cancer. The study has three specific aims: 1) Identify and survey 3,000 young breast cancer survivors (diagnosed at 20-45 years old) regarding their breast cancer screening utilization. 2) Identify and survey survivors' high-risk relatives regarding their breast cancer screening utilization. 3) Test two versions (Targeted vs. Enhanced Tailored) of an intervention to increase breast cancer screening among survivors and relatives. Following approval by human subjects review boards, 3,000 young breast cancer survivors will be identified through the Michigan Cancer Registry and mailed an invitation letter and a baseline survey. The baseline survey will obtain information on the survivors': a) current breast cancer screening status and use of genetic counseling; b) perceived barriers and facilitators to screening; c) family health history. Based on the family history information provided by survivors, we will identify up to two high-risk relatives per survivor. Young breast cancer survivors will be mailed consent forms and baseline surveys to distribute to their selected high-risk relatives. Relatives' baseline survey will obtain information on their: a) current breast cancer screening status and use of genetic counseling; and b) perceived barriers and facilitators to screening. Young breast cancer survivors and high-risk relatives will be randomized as a family unit to receive two versions of an intervention aiming to increase breast cancer screening and use of cancer genetic services. A follow-up survey will be mailed 9 months after the intervention to survivors and high-risk relatives to evaluate

  15. Alcohol consumption and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality in women diagnosed with breast cancer at the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Zeinomar

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is an established and important risk factor for breast cancer incidence in the general population. However, the relationship between alcohol and mortality among women with breast cancer is less clear. This study examines the effect of alcohol consumption on mortality in women affected with breast cancer at baseline from a high-risk family breast and ovarian cancer registry.We studied 1116 women affected with breast cancer at baseline from the Metropolitan New York Registry. The examined reported alcohol consumption (total of beer, wine, liquor was defined as the average number of drinks per week reported from age 12 to age at baseline. We assessed vital status of each participant using participant or family reported data and we used the National Death Index to supplement deaths reported through family updates. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the association between alcohol intake and overall mortality (HRO, breast cancer-specific mortality (HRBC, and non-breast cancer mortality (HRNBC, adjusted for confounders.After a mean follow-up of 9.1 years, we observed 211 total deaths and 58 breast cancer deaths. Compared to non-drinkers, we found that both low and moderate to heavy levels of alcohol intake were not associated with greater overall mortality (≤3 drinks/week: HRO: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.38-1.14; > 3 drinks/week: HRO: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.85-1.58, breast cancer-specific mortality (≤ 3 drinks/week: HRBC:0.62, 95% CI: 0.19-2.03; >3 drinks/week: HR BC: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.49-1.89, or non-breast cancer-specific mortality (≤3 drinks/week: HR NBC: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.32-1.6; >3 drinks/week: HRNBC: 1.18, 95% CI: 0.75-1.86.Alcohol intake reported from age 12 to age at baseline was not associated with overall or breast cancer-specific mortality in this cohort of affected women with a family history of breast cancer.

  16. End-of-Life Services Among Patients With Cancer: Evidence From Cancer Registry Records Linked With Commercial Health Insurance Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Cara L; Fedorenko, Catherine; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Sun, Qin; Smith, Bruce; Curtis, J Randall; Conklin, Ted; Ramsey, Scott D

    2017-11-01

    Despite guidelines emphasizing symptom management over aggressive treatment, end-of-life care for persons with cancer in the United States is highly variable. In consultation with a regional collaboration of patients, providers, and payers, we investigated indicators of high-quality end-of-life care to describe patterns of care, identify areas for improvement, and inform future interventions to enhance end-of-life care for patients with cancer. We linked insurance claims to clinical information from the western Washington SEER database. We included persons ≥ 18 years of age who had been diagnosed with an invasive solid tumor between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2015, and who had a recorded death date, were enrolled in a commercial plan for the last month of life, and made at least one insurance claim in the last 90 days of life. In the last month of life, among 6,568 commercially insured patients, 56.3% were hospitalized and 48.6% underwent at least one imaging scan. Among patients younger than 65 years of age, 31.4% were enrolled in hospice; of those younger than 65 years of age who were not enrolled in hospice, 40.5% had received an opioid prescription. Over time, opioid use in the last 30 days of life among young adults not enrolled in hospice dropped from 44.7% in the period 2007 to 2009 to 42.5% in the period 2010 to 2012 and to 36.7% in the period 2013 to 2015. Hospitalization and high-cost imaging scans are burdensome to patients and caregivers at the end of life. Our findings suggest that policies that facilitate appropriate imaging, opioid, and hospice use and that encourage supportive care may improve end-of-life care and quality of life.

  17. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Lando L J; Geuskens, Goedele A; Pronk, Anjoeka; Vermeulen, Roel C H; de Vroome, Ernest M M

    2014-08-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on specific populations, such as nurses. We used data on night work collected in the Dutch Labor Force Surveys of 1996 until 2009, and individually linked these with National registers on hospital admission. Among 285,723 women without breast cancer at baseline, 2,531 had a hospital admission for breast cancer during an average of 7 years of follow up in the registers. Occasional and regular night work were not associated with the risk of hospital admission for breast cancer (adjusted hazard ratios 1.04; 95 % confidence interval 0.85-1.27, and 0.87; 0.72-1.05, respectively). Working more hours per week, or more years in a job entailing night work did not show increased breast cancer risks. Hazard ratios neither differed between nurses and women with other occupations. Our results show no association of night work with incident breast cancer, and suggest that night work generally does not increase the risk of breast cancer among women in the Dutch working population.

  18. Vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jessie; Schouten, Leo J; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2011-12-01

    Prospective epidemiologic data on vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer are sparse. We studied the association between vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA) in the Netherlands Cohort Study. In 1986, 120,852 Dutch men and women aged 55-69 filled out a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 101 ESCC, 144 EAC, 156 GCA, 460 GNCA cases and 4,035 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Multivariable adjusted incidence rate ratios (RRs) were generally below unity. Total vegetable consumption was nonsignificantly inversely associated with EAC and ESCC risk, but not with GCA and GNCA risk. Significant inverse associations were observed for raw vegetables and EAC risk [RR per 25 g/day: 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.98], and Brassica vegetables and GCA risk (RR per 25 g/day: 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.95). Total fruit consumption was associated with a nonsignificantly decreased EAC risk. Citrus fruits were inversely associated with EAC and GCA risk (RRs for highest vs. lowest intake: 0.55, 95% CI 0.31-0.98 and 0.38, 95% CI 0.21-0.69, respectively). Specifically for current smokers, vegetables and possibly also fruits intake was inversely associated with ESCC and EAC risk. Consumption of (specific groups of) vegetables and fruits may protect against subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  19. Glycemic load, glycemic index, and pancreatic cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Lumey, L.H.; Brants, H.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent studies of pancreatic cancer suggest a role for hyperinsulinemia in carcinogenesis. Because insulin is secreted in response to elevated blood glucose concentrations, dietary factors that increase these concentrations may be important in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Objective: The

  20. Reproductive and hormonal factors in association with ovarian cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braem, M.G.M.; Onland-Moret, N.C.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Schouten, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Parity, oral contraceptive use, and hysterectomy are known to protect against ovarian cancer, whereas the effect of other reproductive factors remains unclear. The authors investigated the association between several reproductive and hormonal factors and the risk of epithelial invasive ovarian

  1. Calculation of lung cancer incidence in the Netherlands by smoking and radon exposure. Implications for the effect of radon; Berekening van de longkankerincidentie in Nederland door roken en blootstelling aan radon. Implicaties voor het effect van radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenhouts, H.P.; Brugmans, J.P. [Laboratorium voor Stralingsonderzoek, Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2001-09-01

    Although the main cause of lung cancer is smoking cigarettes, part of the cases are subscribed to radon exposure, in particular {alpha}-radiation from daughter products. However, the relation between lung cancer and radon exposure is rather insecure. Based on international reports (e.g. BEIR VI) and extrapolation of lung cancer incidence in uranium mine workers to the population of the USA and subsequently to the Netherlands, the number of lung cancer cases in the Netherlands is estimated to be circa 800 per year, varying between 200-2000. Results of the analysis are summarized in this article. 10 refs.

  2. Cardiotoxicity and Cardiac Monitoring During Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Daily Dutch Practice: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; de Boer, Maaike; Derksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; Joore, Manuela; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the incidence and timing of first cardiac events, impact on trastuzumab prescription, and role of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) monitoring in daily practice of trastuzumab-treated patients with human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2)-positive early breast cancer. We included all patients with stage I-III breast cancer diagnosed in the early years (2005-2007) after the introduction of adjuvant trastuzumab in five hospitals in Southeast Netherlands. We studied the incidence and timing of cardiotoxicity in patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab, using similar cardiac endpoints as in the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial. Of 2,684 included patients, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 269 (56.9%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and of these, 230 (85.5%) also received trastuzumab. Cardiotoxicity was observed in 29 of 230 patients (12.6%). Twenty of the 230 patients (8.7%) had symptomatic cardiotoxicity, defined as a drop in LVEF of at least 10 percentage points and to below 50%, accompanied by symptoms of congestive heart failure. Trastuzumab was definitely discontinued because of supposed cardiotoxicity in 36 patients (15.6%), of whom only 15 (6.5%) had a significant LVEF drop. Of the 36 patients who prematurely discontinued trastuzumab (including the 29 in whom cardiotoxicity was observed), 84.8% stopped in the first 6 months. No cardiac deaths were seen. In the first years after implementation of trastuzumab for treatment of early breast cancer, physicians frequently based their decision to discontinue treatment on patient symptoms apart from LVEF outcome. We suggest that focusing LVEF monitoring on the first 6 months might be more cost-effective without compromising patient safety. Nonetheless, further research is needed. Knowledge of when cardiotoxicity occurs in daily practice will help shape the best follow-up method for cardiac monitoring in trastuzumab-treated patients with human epidermal growth receptor 2

  3. The risk of cancer in recipients of living-donor, standard and expanded criteria deceased donor kidney transplants: a registry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Maggie K M; Lim, Wai H; Turner, Robin M; Chapman, Jeremy R; Craig, Jonathan C; Wong, Germaine

    2014-12-27

    Kidneys from expanded criteria deceased donors may elicit a strong inflammatory response, predisposing recipients to an increased risk of cancer after transplantation. We aimed to determine the association between donor types and cancer risk after kidney transplantation. Using the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, we assessed the association between different donor types (living donor, standard, and expanded criteria deceased donors) and the risk of cancer after kidney transplantation using adjusted Cox proportional hazard and competing risk models. Over a median follow-up period of 4.4 years in 7,040 patients (34,684 patient-years), 468 patients (6.6%) developed cancer. The overall risks for cancer were 1,080, 1,444, and 2,018 per 100,000 patient-years for recipients of living donor, standard, and expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys, respectively. Compared to recipients of living-donor kidneys, recipients of expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys were at an increased risk of cancer (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.52; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.15-2.02; P = 0.004), particularly for genitourinary cancer (adjusted HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.10; P = 0.038) and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (adjusted HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.38-5.37; P = 0.004). Recipients of expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys are at substantially increased risk of cancer, especially cancers with a viral etiology. Allocation of expanded criteria deceased donor kidneys to potential recipients should balance the harms, such as the excess risk of cancer against the survival gains and quality-of-life benefits associated with transplantation.

  4. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-12-04

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40-7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2), compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m(2). Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found.

  5. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leensen, Monique C J; Groeneveld, Iris F; Heide, Iris van der; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Berkel, Sietske van; Snoek, Aernout; Harten, Wim van; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2017-06-15

    To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to evaluate changes in work-related quality of life and physical outcomes. Longitudinal prospective intervention study using a one-group design. Two hospitals in the Netherlands. Of the eligible patients, 56% participated; 93 patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer receiving chemotherapy and on sick leave were included. Patients completed questionnaires on RTW, the importance of work, work ability (WAI), RTW self-efficacy, fatigue (MFI), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30) at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months follow-up. Before and after the exercise programme 1-repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) were assessed. Six months after the start of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme that combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme, 59% of the cancer patients returned to work, 86% at 12 months and 83% at 18 months. In addition, significant improvements (pfatigue levels were significantly reduced. After completing the exercise programme, 1RM muscle strength was significantly increased but there was no improvement in VO 2 peak level. RTW rates of cancer patients were high after completion of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme which combines occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme is likely to result in RTW, reduced fatigue and increased importance of work, work ability, and quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Treatment patterns and survival analysis in 9014 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma from Belgium, the Netherlands and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damhuis, R A; Khakwani, A; De Schutter, H; Rich, A L; Burgers, J A; van Meerbeeck, J P

    2015-08-01

    Pleural mesothelioma has a dismal prognosis and is refractory to local treatment. Combination chemotherapy can increase median survival by several months and was gradually introduced in the period 2003-2006. Elderly patients may be unfit for chemotherapy but little is known about age-related treatment practice. To determine treatment patterns and current survival outcome, three large population-based registries were queried in a uniform manner. Data from the Belgian Cancer Registry, the Netherlands Cancer Registry and the UK National Lung Cancer Audit were analyzed for patients diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma since 2007. Treatment patterns and survival rates were compared between countries and age-groups. The study included 900, 2306 and 5808 patients from Belgium, the Netherlands and England, respectively. Fifty-nine percent of patients were 70 years or older and 84% were men. Chemotherapy use decreased with advancing age and was used more often in Belgium (60%) than in the Netherlands (41%) and England (37%). For patients aged 70-79 years, chemotherapy use was 55%, 36% and 34% in the respective countries. Median survival was 10.7 months in Belgium versus 9.2 months for the Netherlands and 9.5 months for England. Survival rates decreased with advancing age. On average, median survival was 5.6 months longer for patients treated with chemotherapy, irrespective of age. Combined analysis of data from three countries with high mesothelioma rates demonstrates that chemotherapy has become standard treatment for younger patients. Elderly patients currently account for more than half of all cases and less toxic treatment options will be required to improve their prospects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thirty-day mortality rate in women with cancer and venous thromboembolism. Findings from the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Monreal, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at increased risk of mortality. Estimating the risks for specific causes of death may help to weigh the risks and benefits of different therapeutic strategies in an individual patient. In the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica Registry of 15 520 consecutive patients with VTE, cancer was present in 20% and was associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism. In a subsequent study including 2474 women with cancer, 329 (13%) died during the first month. The incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (n = 71) exceeded that of fatal bleeding (n = 22), except in women with cancer of the bladder or vulva. Then, we compared the mortality rate according to initial presentation in 3978 women with cancer and VTE, of whom 438 (11%) died during the first month. The risk of fatal bleeding was twice as high as the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism (12 vs. 5 deaths) in those with deep-vein thrombosis alone. The higher risk of dying from bleeding than from pulmonary embolism in some women with cancer and VTE suggests that a less aggressive anticoagulant strategy might reduce fatal bleeding more than it would increase fatal pulmonary embolism during this period.

  8. Dietary Acrylamide Intake and the Risk of Lymphatic Malignancies: The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Mathilda L.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; Schouten, Harry C.; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in many everyday foods. Since the finding of its presence in foods in 2002, epidemiological studies have found some suggestive associations between dietary acrylamide exposure and the risk of various cancers. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate for the first time the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of several histological subtypes of lymphatic malignancies. Methods The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer includes 120,852 men and women followed-up since September 1986. The number of person years at risk was estimated by using a random sample of participants from the total cohort that was chosen at baseline (n  = 5,000). Acrylamide intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire combined with acrylamide data for Dutch foods. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for acrylamide intake as a continuous variable as well as in categories (quintiles and tertiles), for men and women separately and for never-smokers, using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Results After 16.3 years of follow-up, 1,233 microscopically confirmed cases of lymphatic malignancies were available for multivariable-adjusted analysis. For multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma, HRs for men were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.27) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.61) per 10 µg acrylamide/day increment, respectively. For never-smoking men, the HR for multiple myeloma was 1.98 (95% CI: 1.38, 2.85). No associations were observed for women. Conclusion We found indications that acrylamide may increase the risk of multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma in men. This is the first epidemiological study to investigate the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of lymphatic malignancies, and more research into these observed associations is warranted. PMID:22723843

  9. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of lymphatic malignancies: the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilda L Bongers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in many everyday foods. Since the finding of its presence in foods in 2002, epidemiological studies have found some suggestive associations between dietary acrylamide exposure and the risk of various cancers. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate for the first time the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of several histological subtypes of lymphatic malignancies. METHODS: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer includes 120,852 men and women followed-up since September 1986. The number of person years at risk was estimated by using a random sample of participants from the total cohort that was chosen at baseline (n =5,000. Acrylamide intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire combined with acrylamide data for Dutch foods. Hazard ratios (HRs were calculated for acrylamide intake as a continuous variable as well as in categories (quintiles and tertiles, for men and women separately and for never-smokers, using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: After 16.3 years of follow-up, 1,233 microscopically confirmed cases of lymphatic malignancies were available for multivariable-adjusted analysis. For multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma, HRs for men were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.27 and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.61 per 10 µg acrylamide/day increment, respectively. For never-smoking men, the HR for multiple myeloma was 1.98 (95% CI: 1.38, 2.85. No associations were observed for women. CONCLUSION: We found indications that acrylamide may increase the risk of multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma in men. This is the first epidemiological study to investigate the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of lymphatic malignancies, and more research into these observed associations is warranted.

  10. Geographical relationships between sociodemographic factors and incidence of cervical cancer in the Netherlands 1989–2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; Siesling, Sabine; Louwman, Marieke W.; Visser, Otto; Pukkala, Eero; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    In many industrialized countries, with some degree of screening, cervical cancer nowadays is most frequent among women of lower socioeconomic status (SES), partly owing to their lower participation in screening. This study aims to provide support for specification of mass screening policy for

  11. Nitrate intake does not influence bladder cancer risk: The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.; Selen, R.F.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: N-nitroso compounds, endogenously formed from nitrate-derived nitrite, are suspected to be important bladder carcinogens. However, the association between nitrate exposure from food or drinking water and bladder cancer has not been substantially investigated in epidemiologic studies.

  12. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, Lando L J; Geuskens, Goedele A.; Pronk, Anjoeka; Vermeulen, Roel C H; De Vroome, Ernest M M

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on

  13. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, L.L.J.; Geuskens, G.A.; Pronk, A.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.; Vroome, E.M.M. de

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on

  14. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); C. Tops (Carli); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); Mensenkamp, A.R. (Arjen R.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J.W. Redeker (Egbert); C. de Die-Smulders (Christine); A.C. Moll (Annette); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSince the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the

  15. Epidemiological studies on postpartum thyroid dysfunction and thyroid cancer in Southeastern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.P. Kuijpens (Hans)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe studies described in this thesis concentrate OIl epidemiological and pathogenetic aspects of postpartum thyroid dysfunction (PPTD) and related topics, and on epidemiological and treatment aspects of thyroid cancer. The studies were petfonned in the southeastern part of the

  16. Heme and chlorophyll intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, H.F.; Vogel, J. de; Jansen, M.C.J.F.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Westenbrink, S.; Meer, R.D. van der; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The evidence for red meat as a determinant of colorectal cancer remains equivocal, which might be explained by differences in heme content. Heme is the prooxidant, iron-containing porphyrin pigment of meat and its content depends on the type of meat. Chlorophyll from green vegetables

  17. Cost utility analysis of everolimus in the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlović, J.; Minović, I.; Bruinsma, A.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) is becoming an important part of Dutch health care expenditure due to expensive pharmaceutical options for disease control and lack of adequate prevention methods. New targeted therapeutics, such as sunitinib, sorafenib and everolimus, have recently

  18. Population-based Results of Chemoradiotherapy for Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, R.; Widder, J.; Senan, S.

    Aims: Treatment guidelines for limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) favour early concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Little is known about contemporary, real-world treatment patterns and outcome. We evaluated population-based practice patterns of CRT and corresponding survival in the

  19. Meat and fat intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    Meat contains numerous carcinogens, such as heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and N-nitroso compounds, which can be derived either from natural food or during the process of food preparation. These carcinogens may increase pancreatic cancer risk. Furthermore, studies in animals

  20. Implementation and Feasibility of Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome (ePRO) Data Entry in the PRAEGNANT Real-Time Advanced and Metastatic Breast Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwiener, Markus; Heindl, Felix; Brucker, Sara Y; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Hartkopf, Andreas; Overkamp, Friedrich; Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Hadji, Peyman; Tesch, Hans; Ettl, Johannes; Lux, Michael P; Rauh, Claudia; Blum, Simon; Nabieva, Naiba; Brodkorb, Tobias F; Faschingbauer, Cornelia; Langemann, Hanna; Schulmeyer, Carla; Volz, Bernhard; Rübner, Matthias; Lüftner, Diana; Müller, Volkmar; Belleville, Erik; Janni, Wolfgang; Fehm, Tanja N; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Ganslandt, Thomas; Beckmann, Matthias W; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Fasching, Peter A; Gass, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have been incorporated into clinical trials for many symptoms and medical conditions. A transition from paper-based capture of PROs to electronic PROs (ePROs) has recently started. This study reports on the feasibility of ePRO assessment in a prospective registry including molecular data for patients with advanced breast cancer. As part of the PRAEGNANT network, patients were invited by clinical trial staff, physicians, and nurses to complete three standardized Internet-based questionnaires (EQ 5D 5 L, CES-D and IPAQ). Feasibility was assessed by the staff members who assigned the user accounts by the patients. The completeness of the questionnaires was also assessed. Fifteen of 17 patients who were asked agreed to participate to complete the PRO questionnaires (EQ-5D-5L and CES-D). However, the IPAQ (physical activity) questionnaire was only validly completed by 9 patients. Feasibility was ranked better by the physicians and dedicated clinical trial staff than by the nursing staff. Incorporating ePRO questionnaires into an advanced breast cancer registry is feasible, and no major hurdles were reported. Involving stakeholders from the start, the application is tailored to the capacities and abilities of both patients and clinical staff. The patients' compliance was better with some questionnaires, but others may present difficulties.

  1. Hepatitis C virus infection and the risk of cancer among elderly US adults: A registry-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Parag; Torres, Harrys A; Kramer, Jennifer R; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Li, Ruosha; Brown, Eric L; Engels, Eric A

    2017-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Associations with other cancers are not established. The authors systematically assessed associations between HCV infection and cancers in the US elderly population. This was a registry-based case-control study using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data in US adults aged ≥66 years. Cases (n = 1,623,538) were patients who had first cancers identified in SEER registries (1993-2011). Controls (n = 200,000) were randomly selected, cancer-free individuals who were frequency-matched to cases on age, sex, race, and calendar year. Associations with HCV (documented by Medicare claims) were determined using logistic regression. HCV prevalence was higher in cases than in controls (0.7% vs 0.5%). HCV was positively associated with cancers of the liver (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 31.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 29.0-34.3), intrahepatic bile duct (aOR, 3.40; 95% CI, 2.52-4.58), extrahepatic bile duct (aOR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.41-2.57), pancreas (aOR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.09-1.40), and anus (aOR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.42-2.73); nonmelanoma nonepithelial skin cancer (aOR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.15-2.04); myelodysplastic syndrome (aOR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.33-1.83); and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (aOR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.34-1.84). Specific skin cancers associated with HCV were Merkel cell carcinoma (aOR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.30-2.85) and appendageal skin cancers (aOR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.29-3.16). Inverse associations were observed with uterine cancer (aOR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.51-0.80) and prostate cancer (aOR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.66-0.82). Associations were maintained in sensitivity analyses conducted among individuals without documented alcohol abuse, cirrhosis, or hepatitis B or human immunodeficiency virus infections and after adjustment for socioeconomic status. Associations of HCV with other cancers were not observed. HCV is associated with increased risk of

  2. Influence of BMI on short-term surgical outcome after colorectal cancer surgery: a study based on the Swedish national quality registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hede, Per; Sörensson, Marina Åkerblom; Polleryd, Per; Persson, Kamilla; Hallgren, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that an increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with cancer development. Results from studies on colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment outcome and BMI are however conflicting. Our hypothesis was that a high as well as a low BMI will have negative effects on short-term outcome after CRC surgery. Data from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry from 2007 to 2012 was analyzed. A total of 24,587 patients operated on for CRC were included in the study and divided into one of five categories for BMI. Operative bleeding, operating time, surgical complications, and 30-day mortality were compared between groups. Operative bleeding as well as operating time was significantly increased when comparing normal-weight patients to overweight (p < 0.001). 15.1% of normal-weight patients suffered from postoperative surgical complications. This was significantly increased with each BMI step but did not affect the 30-day mortality. However, underweight patients, on the other hand, had fewer complications (13.3%) but an increased 30-day mortality. Longer operating times and increased perioperative bleeding may be explanatory factors behind increased postoperative complication rates for CRC patients with higher BMI. In underweight patients, advanced disease may be a reason for a higher 30-day mortality. To improve outcome, specific precautions are suggested when operating on under- as well as overweight CRC patients. We also suggest that the registry introduces a better marker than BMI for central visceral fat-the link between obesity and cancer development. Further studies are needed to analyze the findings in detail and to study long-term effects.

  3. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  4. Clinical Case Registries (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Clinical Case Registries (CCR) replaced the former Immunology Case Registry and the Hepatitis C Case Registry with local and national databases. The CCR:HIV and...

  5. Converged Registries Solution (CRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Converged Registries platform is a hardware and software architecture designed to host individual patient registries and eliminate duplicative development effort...

  6. Costs of complications after colorectal cancer surgery in the Netherlands: Building the business case for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaert, J A; Fiocco, M; van Dijk, W A; Scheffer, A C; de Graaf, E J R; Tollenaar, R A E M; Wouters, M W J M

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare providers worldwide are struggling with rising costs while hospitals budgets are under stress. Colorectal cancer surgery is commonly performed, however it is associated with a disproportionate share of adverse events in general surgery. Since adverse events are associated with extra hospital costs it seems important to explicitly discuss the costs of complications and the risk factors for high-costs after colorectal surgery. Retrospective analysis of clinical and financial outcomes after colorectal cancer surgery in 29 Dutch hospitals (6768 patients). Detailed clinical data was derived from the 2011-2012 population-based Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit database. Costs were measured uniform in all participating hospitals and based on Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing. Of total hospital costs in this study, 31% was spent on complications and the top 5% most expensive patients were accountable for 23% of hospitals budgets. Minor and severe complications were respectively associated with a 26% and 196% increase in costs as compared to patients without complications. Independent from other risk factors, ASA IV, double tumor, ASA III, short course preoperative radiotherapy and TNM-4 stadium disease were the top-5 attributors to high costs. This article shows that complications after colorectal cancer surgery are associated with a substantial increase in costs. Although not all surgical complications can be prevented, reducing complications will result in considerable cost savings. By providing a business case we show that investments made to develop targeted quality improvement programs will pay off eventually. Results based on this study should encourage healthcare providers to endorse quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of general practice, diagnostic investigations and hospital services before and after cancer diagnosis - a population-based nationwide registry study of 127,000 incident adult cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Karina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of patterns in cancer patients’ health care utilisation around the time of diagnosis may guide health care resource allocation and provide important insights into this groups’ demand for health care services. The health care need of patients with comorbid conditions far exceeds the oncology capacity and it is therefore important to elucidate the role of both primary and secondary care. The aim of this paper is to describe the use of health care services amongst incident cancer patients in Denmark one year before and one year after cancer diagnosis. Methods The present study is a national population-based case–control (1:10 registry study. All incident cancer patients (n = 127,210 diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 aged 40 years or older were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry. Data from national health registries were provided for all cancer patients and for 1,272,100 controls. Monthly consultation frequencies, monthly proportions of persons receiving health services and three-month incidence rate ratios for one year before and one year after the cancer diagnosis were calculated. Data were analysed separately for women and men. Results Three months before their diagnosis, cancer patients had twice as many general practitioner (GP consultations, ten to eleven times more diagnostic investigations and five times more hospital contacts than the reference population. The demand for GP services peaked one month before diagnosis, the demand for diagnostic investigations one month after diagnosis and the number of hospital contacts three months after diagnosis. The proportion of cancer patients receiving each of these three types of health services remained more than 10% above that of the reference population from two months before diagnosis until the end of the study period. Conclusions Cancer patients’ health service utilisation rose dramatically three months before their diagnosis. This increase applied to

  8. EUROCOURSE lessons learned from and for population-based cancer registries in Europe and their programme owners: Improving performance by research programming for public health and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coebergh, Jan Willem; van den Hurk, Corina; Rosso, Stefano; Comber, Harry; Storm, Hans; Zanetti, Roberto; Sacchetto, Lidia; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska; Thong, Melissa; Siesling, Sabine; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, Janny

    2015-06-01

    Population-based cancer registries (CRs) in Europe have played a supportive, sometimes guiding, role in describing geographic variation of cancer epidemics and comparisons of oncological practice and preventive interventions since the 1950s for all types of cancer, separate and simultaneously. This paper deals with historical and longitudinal developments of the roughly 160 CRs and their programme owners (POs) that emerged since 1927 and accelerating since the late 70s especially in southern and continental Europe. About 40 million newly diagnosed patients were recorded since the 1950s out of a total of 100 million of whom almost 20 million are still alive and about 10% annually dying from cancer. The perception of unity in diversity and suboptimal comparability in performance and governance of CRs was confirmed in the EUROCOURSE (EUROpe against cancer: Optimisation of the Use of Registries for Scientific Excellence in research) European Research Area (ERA)-net coordination FP7 project of the European Commission (EU) which explored best practices, bottlenecks and future challenges of CRs. Regional oncologic and public health changes but also academic embedding of CRs varied considerably, although Anno 2012 optimal cancer surveillance indeed demanded intensive collaboration with professional and institutional stakeholders in two major areas (public health and clinical research) and five minor overlapping cancer research domains: aetiologic research, mass screening evaluation, quality of care, translational prognostics and survivorship. Each of these domains address specific study questions, mixes of disciplines, methodologies, additional data-sources and funding mechanisms. POs tended to become more and more public health institutes, Health ministries, but also comprehensive cancer centres and cancer societies through more and more funding at project or programme basis. POs were not easy to pin down because of their multiple, sometimes competitive (funding

  9. Clinical and Prognostic Factors for Renal Parenchymal, Pelvis, and Ureter Cancers in SEER Registries: Collaborative Stage Data Collection System, Version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altekruse, Sean F.; Dickie, Lois; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Wu, Manxia; Lee, Richard; Delacroix, Scott

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The American Joint Committee on Cancer’s (AJCC) 7th edition cancer staging manual reflects recent changes in cancer care practices. This report assesses changes from the AJCC 6th to the AJCC 7th edition stage distributions and the quality of site-specific factors (SSFs). METHODS Incidence data for renal parenchyma and pelvis and ureter cancers from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries were examined, including staging trends during 2004–2010, stage distribution changes between the AJCC 6th and 7th editions, and SSF completeness for cases diagnosed in 2010. RESULTS From 2004 to 2010, the percentage of stage I renal parenchyma cancers increased from 50% to 58%, whereas stage IV and unknown stage cases decreased (18% to 15%, and 10% to 6%, respectively). During this period, the percentage of stage 0a renal pelvis and ureter cancers increased from 21% to 25%, and stage IV and unknown stage tumors decreased (20% to 18%, and 7% to 5%, respectively). Stage distributions under the AJCC 6th and 7th editions were about the same. For renal parenchymal cancers, 71%–90% of cases had known values for 6 required SSFs. For renal pelvis and ureter cancers, 74% of cases were coded as known for SSF1 (WHO/ISUP grade) and 47% as known for SSF2 (depth of renal parenchymal invasion). SSF values were known for larger proportions of cases with reported resections. CONCLUSIONS Stage distributions between the AJCC 6th and 7th editions were similar. SSFs were known for more than two-thirds of cases, providing more detail in the SEER database relevant to prognosis. PMID:25412394

  10. Cancer and the healthy immigrant effect: a statistical analysis of cancer diagnosis using a linked Census-cancer registry administrative database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ted McDonald

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large volume of research has been published on both the socio economic and demographic determinants of cancer and on the health of immigrants and minority groups. Yet because of data limitations, little research examines differences in the occurrence of cancer incidence between immigrants and non-immigrants and among immigrants defined by region of birth and time in the host country. In particular it is not known whether a healthy immigrant effect is present for cancer and if so, whether this advantage is lost with additional years of residence in the host country. Methods This paper uses a large data file from Statistics Canada that links Census information on immigrant status, socioeconomic status including educational attainment, and other person-level information with administrative data on cancer and mortality over a continuous 13 year period of observation. It estimates discrete and continuous time duration models to identify differences in cancer diagnosis by immigrant subgroup after controlling for a variety of potential confounders. Differences in historical smoking behavior are not observable at the individual level in the dataset but are accounted for indirectly using various methods. Results Results in general confirm the existence of a healthy immigrant effect for cancer in that, overall, recent immigrants to Canada are significantly less likely than otherwise comparable non-immigrant Canadians to be diagnosed with any cancer and the most common forms of cancer by site. As well, this gap appears to decline with additional years in Canada for immigrant men and women, eventually converging to Canadian-born levels. Differentiating among immigrant subgroups by period of arrival and country of birth reveals significant variation across immigrant subgroups, with immigrant men and women from developing countries typically having a lower likelihood of being diagnosed with cancer than immigrants from the US, UK and

  11. Cancer and the healthy immigrant effect: a statistical analysis of cancer diagnosis using a linked Census-cancer registry administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James Ted; Farnworth, Michael; Liu, Zikuan

    2017-04-05

    A large volume of research has been published on both the socio economic and demographic determinants of cancer and on the health of immigrants and minority groups. Yet because of data limitations, little research examines differences in the occurrence of cancer incidence between immigrants and non-immigrants and among immigrants defined by region of birth and time in the host country. In particular it is not known whether a healthy immigrant effect is present for cancer and if so, whether this advantage is lost with additional years of residence in the host country. This paper uses a large data file from Statistics Canada that links Census information on immigrant status, socioeconomic status including educational attainment, and other person-level information with administrative data on cancer and mortality over a continuous 13 year period of observation. It estimates discrete and continuous time duration models to identify differences in cancer diagnosis by immigrant subgroup after controlling for a variety of potential confounders. Differences in historical smoking behavior are not observable at the individual level in the dataset but are accounted for indirectly using various methods. Results in general confirm the existence of a healthy immigrant effect for cancer in that, overall, recent immigrants to Canada are significantly less likely than otherwise comparable non-immigrant Canadians to be diagnosed with any cancer and the most common forms of cancer by site. As well, this gap appears to decline with additional years in Canada for immigrant men and women, eventually converging to Canadian-born levels. Differentiating among immigrant subgroups by period of arrival and country of birth reveals significant variation across immigrant subgroups, with immigrant men and women from developing countries typically having a lower likelihood of being diagnosed with cancer than immigrants from the US, UK and continental Europe. As well, controlling for immigrant

  12. Correlates of physical activity among colorectal cancer survivors: results from the longitudinal population-based profiles registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, M van; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Luyer, M.D.; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de; Ezendam, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Physical activity can improve health of cancer survivors. To increase physical activity levels among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, we need to understand which factors affect physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal relationship between symptom-related,

  13. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Michel D; van Oort, Inge M; Gerritsen, Winald R; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Coenen, Jules L L M; Bergman, Andries M; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-09-01

    Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of the Dutch CUP, detailing the safety and efficacy of cabazitaxel in a routine clinical practice setting. Safety and efficacy data of all 5 Dutch centers participating in the cabazitaxel CUP were collected. Safety data were collected prospectively using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), time to PSA progression (TTPP), and best clinical response were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-one patients were registered in the CUP; 49 received cabazitaxel. Forty-two of 49 patients [85.7%], 42 patients had ≥ 2 metastatic sites. Patients received on average 6 cabazitaxel cycles (range, 1-21). A dose reduction or dose delay occurred in 13 and 20 patients [26.5% and 40.9%] respectively. Prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was used in 8 patients [16.3%]. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events were observed in 25 patients [51.0%]; 16 patients [32.7%] discontinued treatment because of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). Serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred in 16 (32.7%) patients; the most frequent SAEs were hematuria (4 patients [8.3%]) and urosepsis (3 patients [6.3%]). Febrile neutropenia occurred twice; no patient had grade ≥ 3 neuropathy. No toxicity-related mortality occurred. Median follow-up was 24.1 months. Median OS was 8.7 months (interquartile range [IQR], 6.0-15.9 months); median TTPP was 2.8 months (IQR, 1.7-5.9 months). In the Dutch CUP, patients with advanced mCRPC had delayed tumor progression with acceptable toxicities using cabazitaxel treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Target volume delineation variation in radiotherapy for early stage rectal cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; de Haas-Kock, Danielle F M; Beukema, Jannet C; Neelis, Karen J; Woutersen, Dankert; Ceha, Heleen; Rozema, Tom; Slot, Annerie; Vos-Westerman, Hanneke; Intven, Martijn; Spruit, Patty H; van der Linden, Yvette; Geijsen, Debby; Verschueren, Karijn; van Herk, Marcel B; Marijnen, Corrie A M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and improve the quality of target volume delineation by means of national consensus on target volume definition in early-stage rectal cancer. The CTV's for eight patients were delineated by 11 radiation oncologists in 10 institutes according to local guidelines (phase 1). After observer variation analysis a workshop was organized to establish delineation guidelines and a digital atlas, with which the same observers re-delineated the dataset (phase 2). Variation in volume, most caudal and cranial slice and local surface distance variation were analyzed. The average delineated CTV volume decreased from 620 to 460 cc (p<0.001) in phase 2. Variation in the caudal CTV border was reduced significantly from 1.8 to 1.2 cm SD (p=0.01), while it remained 0.7 cm SD for the cranial border. The local surface distance variation (cm SD) reduced from 1.02 to 0.74 for anterior, 0.63 to 0.54 for lateral, 0.33 to 0.25 for posterior and 1.22 to 0.46 for the sphincter region, respectively. The large variation in target volume delineation could significantly be reduced by use of consensus guidelines and a digital delineation atlas. Despite the significant reduction there is still a need for further improvement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Living with the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy: a study among 1-10-year rectal cancer survivors from the population-based PROFILES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mols, Floortje; Lemmens, Valery; Bosscha, Koop; van den Broek, Wim; Thong, Melissa S Y

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the physical and mental consequences of an ostomy among 1-10-year rectal cancer survivors. Patients with rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000 to 2009, as registered in the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry, received a questionnaire on quality of life (QOL; EORTC QLQ-C30), disease-specific health status (EORTC QLQ-CR38), depression and anxiety (HADS), illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire), and health care utilization; 76% (n = 1019) responded. A total of 408 (43%) rectal cancer survivors had an ostomy at survey and they reported a statistically significant and clinically relevant lower physical, role, and social functioning, and global health status/QOL but fewer problems with constipation and diarrhea compared with those without an ostomy. Also, they had a significantly worse body image, more male sexual problems, and fewer gastrointestinal problems although these differences were not clinically relevant. No differences regarding the prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression were found. Survivors with an ostomy believed that their illness have significantly more serious consequences, will last longer (clinically relevant), and were more concerned about their illness compared with those without an ostomy. Survivors with an ostomy visited their medical specialist, but not their general practitioner, significantly more often. Also, they more often received additional support after cancer treatment. Rectal cancer survivors with an ostomy have a lower QOL, worse illness perceptions, and a higher health care consumption compared with those without an ostomy 1-10 years after diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Application of data mining techniques and data analysis methods to measure cancer morbidity and mortality data in a regional cancer registry: The case of the island of Crete, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamis, Iraklis; Apostolakis, Ioannis; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Dey, Nilanjan; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Lionis, Christos

    2017-07-01

    Micro or macro-level mapping of cancer statistics is a challenging task that requires long-term planning, prospective studies and continuous monitoring of all cancer cases. The objective of the current study is to present how cancer registry data could be processed using data mining techniques in order to improve the statistical analysis outcomes. Data were collected from the Cancer Registry of Crete in Greece (counties of Rethymno and Lasithi) for the period 1998-2004. Data collection was performed on paper forms and manually transcribed to a single data file, thus introducing errors and noise (e.g. missing and erroneous values, duplicate entries etc.). Data were pre-processed and prepared for analysis using data mining tools and algorithms. Feature selection was applied to evaluate the contribution of each collected feature in predicting patients' survival. Several classifiers were trained and evaluated for their ability to predict survival of patients. Finally, statistical analysis of cancer morbidity and mortality rates in the two regions was performed in order to validate the initial findings. Several critical points in the process of data collection, preprocessing and analysis of cancer data were derived from the results, while a road-map for future population data studies was developed. In addition, increased morbidity rates were observed in the counties of Crete (Age Standardized Morbidity/Incidence Rates ASIR= 396.45 ± 2.89 and 274.77 ±2.48 for men and women, respectively) compared to European and world averages (ASIR= 281.6 and 207.3 for men and women in Europe and 203.8 and 165.1 in world level). Significant variation in cancer types between sexes and age groups (the ratio between deaths and reported cases for young patients, less than 34 years old, is at 0.055 when the respective ratio for patients over 75 years old is 0.366) was also observed. This study introduced a methodology for preprocessing and analyzing cancer data, using a

  17. Feasibility test of a UK-scalable electronic system for regular collection of patient-reported outcome measures and linkage with clinical cancer registry data: The electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velikova Galina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer survivors can face significant physical and psychosocial challenges; there is a need to identify and predict which survivors experience what sorts of difficulties. As highlighted in the UK National Cancer Survivorship Initiative, routine post-diagnostic collection of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs is required; to be most informative, PROMs must be linked and analysed with patients' diagnostic and treatment information. We have designed and built a potentially cost-efficient UK-scalable electronic system for collecting PROMs via the internet, at regular post-diagnostic time-points, for linking these data with patients' clinical data in cancer registries, and for electronically managing the associated patient monitoring and communications; the electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS system. This study aims to test the feasibility of the ePOCS system, by running it for 2 years in two Yorkshire NHS Trusts, and using the Northern and Yorkshire Cancer Registry and Information Service. Methods/Design Non-metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer patients (largest survivor groups, within 6 months post-diagnosis, will be recruited from hospitals in the Yorkshire Cancer Network. Participants will be asked to complete PROMS, assessing a range of health-related quality-of-life outcomes, at three time-points up to 15 months post-diagnosis, and subsequently to provide opinion on the ePOCS system via a feedback questionnaire. Feasibility will be examined primarily in terms of patient recruitment and retention rates, the representativeness of participating patients, the quantity and quality of collected PROMs data, patients' feedback, the success and reliability of the underpinning informatics, and the system running costs. If sufficient data are generated during system testing, these will be analysed to assess the health-related quality-of-life outcomes reported by patients, and to explore

  18. Cost-effectiveness of the prophylactic HPV vaccine: an application to the Netherlands taking non-cervical cancers and cross-protection into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttjeboer, J; Westra, T A; Wilschut, J C; Nijman, H W; Daemen, T; Postma, M J

    2013-08-20

    Despite an effective screening programme, 600-700 women are still diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Netherlands each year. In 2009 a prophylactic vaccine against HPV-type 16 and 18 was implemented in the national immunisation programme to decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. There is evidence that infections with several oncogenic HPV types other than the vaccine types 16 and 18 are also prevented by vaccination, also known as cross-protection. Besides cervical cancer, HPV can also cause cancers at other sites such as the oropharynx, vulva, vagina and the anus/anal area. In this study we estimated the maximum health and economic benefits of vaccinating 12-year old girls against infection with HPV, taking cross-protection and non-cervical cancers into account. In the base-case, we found an incremental cost ratio (ICER) of €5815 per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Robustness of this result was examined in sensitivity analysis. The ICER proved to be most sensitive to vaccine price, discounting rates, costs of cervical cancer and to variation in the disutility of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. First report of the United Network for Organ Sharing Transplant Tumor Registry: donors with a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, H M; McBride, M A; Delmonico, F L

    2000-12-27

    Severe organ shortages have led to donor pool expansion to include older individuals, patients with hypertension, diabetes, and a past history of cancer. Transmission of cancer from cadaveric donors is a risk of transplantation and carries a high mortality rate. During a 33 month period, UNOS recorded 14,705 cadaveric donors of which 257 had a past history of cancer (PHC). A total of 650 organs (397 kidneys, 178 livers, and 75 hearts) were transplanted from these 257 donors. Type of cancer, tumor-free interval at organ procurement, and whether any PHC donor transmitted a tumor to the recipient were analyzed. Three PHC donor tumor types (skin, brain, genitourinary) were associated with 549 of the transplanted organs (85%). Twenty-eight recipients of PHC donor organs developed posttransplantation tumors (18 skin, 2 PTLD, 8 solid cancers). During a mean follow-up of 45 months (range 30-61 months), no recipients of organs from PHC donors developed a donor derived cancer. The majority (71.5%) of all non-skin and non-CNS system cancer donors had a cancer-free interval of greater than five years. Risks of cancer transmission from donors with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer and selected cancers of the CNS appear to be small. Risks of tumor transmission with certain other types of cancer may be acceptable, particularly if the donor has a long cancer-free interval prior to organ procurement while certain other cancers pose a high transmission risk. Selective use of PHC donors may permit expansion of the donor pool.

  20. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C.; Lobbezoo, Dorien J.A.; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M. Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J.W.; van de Wouw, Agnès J.; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A.; Peer, Petronella G.M.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. Methods. We included all patients with stage I–III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005–2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Results. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37–1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. PMID:26099745

  1. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2015-08-01

    The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. We included all patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005-2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. ©AlphaMed Press.

  2. Form of presentation, natural history and course of postoperative venous thromboembolism in patients operated on for pelvic and abdominal cancer. Analysis of the RIETE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos Merlo, Ana Belén; Arcelus Martínez, Juan Ignacio; Turiño Luque, Jesús Damián; Valero, Beatriz; Villalobos, Aurora; Aibar, Miguel Ángel; Monreal Bosch, Manuel

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a serious complication after oncologic surgery. Recent studies have shown that the risk of VTE persists several weeks after surgery. This study assesses the form of presentation and time course of VTE after abdominal and pelvic cancer surgery. Prospective, multicenter, observational study that analyzes data from an international registry (RIETE) that includes consecutive patients with symptomatic VTE. Our study assesses the form and time of presentation of postoperative VTE, as well as main outcomes, in patients operated for abdominopelvic cancer 8 weeks prior to VTE diagnosis. Variables related to the presentation of VTE after hospital discharge are identified. Out of the 766 analyzed patients with VTE, 395 (52%) presented pulmonary embolism (PE). Most VTE cases (84%) were detected after the first postoperative week, and 38% after one month. Among patients with VTE in the first postoperative week, 70% presented PE. VTE presented after hospital discharge in 54% of cases. Colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic tumors, the use of radiotherapy, and blood hemoglobin levels were independently associated with VTE diagnosis after hospital discharge. Complications (thrombosis recurrence, bleeding, and death) occurred in 34% of patients with VTE detected before hospital discharge, compared to 24% in VTE after hospital discharge (P<0.01). VTE occurs after hospital discharge in most patients, particularly in those operated for colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic cancer. Pulmonary embolism is more frequent in patients who develop early VTE, who also have worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Ovarian Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients < 41 Years of Age in the Netherlands: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Inge T A; van Zwet, Erik W; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Kuppen, Peter J K; Hilders, Carina G J M; Trimbos, J Baptist

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the primary indications for cryopreservation and subsequent autotransplantation of ovarian tissue. The safety of this fertility preservation method remains questionable, as the presence of disseminated breast tumor cells cannot yet be excluded in the ovarian autografts. We explored the prevalence of ovarian metastases among young breast cancer patients and determined risk factors for the development of ovarian metastases. Using the nationwide database of the Dutch Pathology Registry (PALGA), we identified a cohort of 2648 women with primary invasive breast cancer at age breast cancer diagnosis and oophorectomy was selected. Data were collected on patient characteristics, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Ovarian metastases were found in 63 out of 2648 patients who met the inclusion criteria. The risk of developing ovarian metastases increased with time passed since breast cancer diagnosis. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed significant association between tumor stage and the development of ovarian metastases (p = 0.024). The prevalence of ovarian metastases was 2.4% among young breast cancer patients. Early ovary removal may reduce the risk of developing ovarian metastases. In breast cancer patients with tumors > 5 cm and/or inflammatory carcinoma, we recommend a cautious approach to ovarian tissue autotransplantation.

  4. The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, M.; Clerkx, A.P.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Forest coverage in the Netherlands has expanded from 2% at the beginning of the nineteenth century to 11% nowadays (370,000 ha). Wood production is only one function among many others including recreation and nature protection. Consequently, the harvest level is low relative to the increment (~55%),

  5. Incidence rate of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas among males in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the Saudi Cancer Registry, 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Ahlam A Dohal,4 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy5 1School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK; 2Albaha University, Al Baha city, Saudi Arabia; 3General Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Al Baha, 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHSTrust, Lincoln, UK Background: This study describes epidemiological data of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi men. Materials and methods: Retrospective data from all NHL cancer cases among Saudi men recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR between January 2001 and December 2008 were used. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and simple linear regression were also used. Results: In total, 2,555 new cases of NHL were recorded between January 2001 and December 2008. The region of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia had the highest overall age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR at 7.8, followed by the Eastern region at 6.8, and Makkah at 6.1 per 100,000 men; however, Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest average ASIRs at 2.5, 3.7, and 3.9 per 100,000 men, respectively. The incidence-rate ratio for the number of NHL cases was significantly higher in Riyadh (4.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.11–5.32, followed by Makkah (4.47, 95% CI 3.94–5.07, and the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia (3.27, 95% CI 2.90–3.69 than that in the reference region of Jazan. Jouf had the highest changes in the ASIRs of NHL among Saudi men from 2001 and 2008 (5.0 per 100,000 men. Conclusion: A significant increase in the crude incidence rate and ASIR for NHL in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008 was found. Riyadh, the Eastern region, and Makkah had the highest overall ASIR in Saudi Arabia. Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest rates. Additionally, Riyadh, Makkah, and the Eastern region had the

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer: A veteran administration registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Issam; Yacoub, Abdulraheem; Siegel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. Several studies have suggested a role for diabetes mellitus, but the magnitude of its contribution remains controversial. Utilizing a large administrative database, this retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. Using the Veterans Integrated Services Network 16 database, 322,614 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 110,919 with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 211,695 diabetes-free controls matched by gender, year of birth and healthcare facility. A significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer was observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with an adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 2.17 (1.70-2.77) for type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls (p type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer was statistically significant and may, in part, explain the rising incidence of pancreatic cancer.

  7. MDS classification is improving in an era of the WHO 2016 criteria of MDS: A population-based analysis among 9159 MDS patients diagnosed in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinmohamed, Avinash G; Visser, Otto; Posthuma, Eduardus F M; Huijgens, Peter C; Sonneveld, Pieter; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca

    2017-10-01

    Morphologic and cytogenetic assessments are required to characterize diagnostic and prognostic features of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We assessed whether these assessments were performed among newly diagnosed MDS patients in the Netherlands. MDS cases were retrieved from the nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry (N=9159; period 2001-2014) and the regional PHAROS MDS registry (N=676; period 2008-2011). The proportion of unclassified MDS decreased from 58% in 2001 to 13% in 2014. Data from the more detailed PHAROS registry revealed that the degree of bone marrow dysplasia was only reported in ∼30% of all evaluable bone marrow aspirates. Further, the International Prognostic Scoring System was undetermined in 55% of patients, primarily owing to unperformed cytogenetics in 46% of patients. The classification of MDS is improving in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, particular diagnostic and prognostic procedures that are essential for the diagnosis and subsequent treatment decision-making of MDS were not fully utilized in particular patient subsets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of name recognition software, census data and multiple imputation to predict missing data on ethnicity: application to cancer registry records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ronan; Vernon, Sally; Lawrence, Gill; Wilson, Sue

    2012-01-23

    Information on ethnicity is commonly used by health services and researchers to plan services, ensure equality of access, and for epidemiological studies. In common with other important demographic and clinical data it is often incompletely recorded. This paper presents a method for imputing missing data on the ethnicity of cancer patients, developed for a regional cancer registry in the UK. Routine records from cancer screening services, name recognition software (Nam Pehchan and Onomap), 2001 national Census data, and multiple imputation were used to predict the ethnicity of the 23% of cases that were still missing following linkage with self-reported ethnicity from inpatient hospital records. The name recognition software were good predictors of ethnicity for South Asian cancer cases when compared with data on ethnicity derived from hospital inpatient records, especially when combined (sensitivity 90.5%; specificity 99.9%; PPV 93.3%). Onomap was a poor predictor of ethnicity for other minority ethnic groups (sensitivity 4.4% for Black cases and 0.0% for Chinese/Other ethnic groups). Area-based data derived from the national Census was also a poor predictor non-White ethnicity (sensitivity: South Asian 7.4%; Black 2.3%; Chinese/Other 0.0%; Mixed 0.0%). Currently, neither method for assigning individuals to an ethnic group (name recognition and ethnic distribution of area of residence) performs well across all ethnic groups. We recommend further development of name recognition applications and the identification of additional methods for predicting ethnicity to improve their precision and accuracy for comparisons of health outcomes. However, real improvements can only come from better recording of ethnicity by health services.

  9. Subsequent malignancies among long-term survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a pooled analysis of German cancer registry data (1990-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baras, Nadia; Dahm, Stefan; Haberland, Jörg; Janz, Martin; Emrich, Katharina; Kraywinkel, Klaus; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2017-04-01

    The increased risk of subsequent primary malignancies (SPM) in survivors of adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remains a challenging clinical problem worldwide. The German cancer registry database, pooled from 14 federal states, was used to calculate the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and excess absolute risk (EAR) of SPM in 128 587 patients registered with first primary HL/NHL between 1990 and 2012. Conversely, SIRs were also calculated for a subsequent HL/NHL following other first cancers. The risk of developing SPM was significantly increased over twofold for HL survivors (SIR = 2·14, EAR = 51·87 cases/10 000 person-years) and 1·5-fold for NHL survivors (SIR = 1·48, EAR = 55·23) compared with the general German population. For solid cancers, SIRs were significantly elevated (1·6- and 1·4-fold; respectively) and were highest (threefold) in patients below 30 years of age upon initial diagnosis. Overall, SIRs were consistently elevated for lip/oral cavity, colon/rectum, lung, skin melanoma, breast, kidney and thyroid. Significantly increased SIRs for oesophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, testis, prostate, and brain/central nervous system were observed following NHL only. For certain SPM, SIRs remained significantly elevated more than 10 years following HL/NHL diagnosis. Positive reciprocal associations were demonstrated between HL/NHL and several solid cancers mentioned above; for some, common aetiological mechanisms seem plausible. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A prospective cohort study on intake of retinol, vitamins C and E and carotenoids and prostate cancer risk (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The roles of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids as risk factors for prostate carcinoma are still questionable. We evaluated these in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: The cohort study consisted of 58,279 men ages 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. After 6.3 years of follow-up,

  11. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of head-neck and thyroid cancers : results from the netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    Acrylamide exposure has been related to an increased incidence of oral and thyroid tumors in animal studies. In 1986, 120,852 persons (aged 55-69 years) were included in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Dietary acrylamide intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was based on chemical

  12. Improvement of prognosis in breast cancer in Denmark 1977-2006, based on the nationwide reporting to the DBCG Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, H.T.; Bjerre, K.D.; Christiansen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    were registered in the DBCG Database. Since 1977 the prognosis has improved significantly, thus 5 year survival for the total population of patients with primary breast cancer has increased from 65 to 81%. DISCUSSION: According to the present analysis diagnosis at an earlier stage in the natural course......INTRODUCTION: Since 30 years DBCG (Danish Breast Cancer Coperative Group) has maintained, on a nation-wide basis, a clinical database of diagnostic procedures, therapeutic interventions, and clinical outcome in patients with primary breast cancer. The present analysis was undertaken to evaluate...... the development of the prognosis since 1977, and to analyse factors potentially contributing to the change of the prognosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All cases of invasive breast cancer reported to DBCG during the period 1977-2006 were included in the present analysis. RESULTS: A total of close to 80 000 patients...

  13. Quality assessment and correlation of microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical markers among population- and clinic-based colorectal tumors results from the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicek, Mine S; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Bapat, Bharati; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Young, Joanne; Buchanan, Daniel; Walsh, Michael D; Le Marchand, Loic; Burnett, Terrilea; Newcomb, Polly A; Grady, William M; Haile, Robert W; Casey, Graham; Plummer, Sarah J; Krumroy, Lisa A; Baron, John A; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2011-05-01

    The detection of defective mismatch repair (MMR), as assessed by the presence of tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or loss of MMR protein expression by IHC, has been useful for risk assessment, prognosis, and prediction of treatment in patients with colorectal cancer. We analyzed tumors for the presence of defective MMR from 5927 Colorectal Cancer Family Registry patients recruited at six international consortium sites. We evaluated the appropriate percentage instability cutoff used to distinguish the three MSI phenotypes [ie, stable (MSS), low instability (MSI-L), and high instability (MSI-H)]; the sensitivity, specificity, and performance characteristics of individual markers; and the concordance between MSI and IHC phenotypes. Guided by the results of the IHC testing, our findings indicate that the distinction between an MSI-H phenotype from a low-instability or MSS phenotype can best be accomplished by using a cutoff of 30% or greater of the markers showing instability. The sensitivity and specificity of the mononucleotide markers were higher than those of the dinucleotide markers. Specifically, BAT26 and BAT25 had the highest sensitivity (94%) and specificity (98%), and the use of mononucleotide markers alone identified 97% of the MSI-H cases correctly. As expected, the presence of MSI-H correlated with an older age of diagnosis, the presence of tumor in the proximal colon, and female sex. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identifying specific non-attending groups in breast cancer screening - population-based registry study of participation and socio-demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Line

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A population-based breast cancer screening programme was implemented in the Central Denmark Region in 2008–09. The objective of this registry-based study was to examine the association between socio-demographic characteristics and screening participation and to examine whether the group of non-participants can be regarded as a homogeneous group of women. Method Participation status was obtained from a regional database for all women invited to the first screening round in the Central Denmark Region in 2008–2009 (n=149,234. Participation data was linked to registries containing socio-demographic information. Distance to screening site was calculated using ArcGIS. Participation was divided into ‘participants’ and ‘non-participants’, and non-participants were further stratified into ‘active non-participants’ and ‘passive non-participants’ based on whether the woman called and cancelled her participation or was a ‘no-show’. Results The screening participation rate was 78.9%. In multivariate analyses, non-participation was associated with older age, immigrant status, low OECD-adjusted household income, high and low level education compared with middle level education, unemployment, being unmarried, distance to screening site >20 km, being a tenant and no access to a vehicle. Active and passive non-participants comprised two distinct groups with different socio-demographic characteristics, with passive non-participants being more socially deprived compared with active non-participants. Conclusion Non-participation was associated with low social status e.g. low income, unemployment, no access to vehicle and status as tenant. Non-participants were also more likely than participants to be older, single, and of non-Danish origin. Compared to active non-participants, passive non-participants were characterized by e.g. lower income and lower educational level. Different interventions might be warranted to increase

  15. Identifying specific non-attending groups in breast cancer screening--population-based registry study of participation and socio-demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Line Flytkjær; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Andersen, Berit; Vedsted, Peter

    2012-11-14

    A population-based breast cancer screening programme was implemented in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-09. The objective of this registry-based study was to examine the association between socio-demographic characteristics and screening participation and to examine whether the group of non-participants can be regarded as a homogeneous group of women. Participation status was obtained from a regional database for all women invited to the first screening round in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-2009 (n=149,234). Participation data was linked to registries containing socio-demographic information. Distance to screening site was calculated using ArcGIS. Participation was divided into 'participants' and 'non-participants', and non-participants were further stratified into 'active non-participants' and 'passive non-participants' based on whether the woman called and cancelled her participation or was a 'no-show'. The screening participation rate was 78.9%. In multivariate analyses, non-participation was associated with older age, immigrant status, low OECD-adjusted household income, high and low level education compared with middle level education, unemployment, being unmarried, distance to screening site >20 km, being a tenant and no access to a vehicle. Active and passive non-participants comprised two distinct groups with different socio-demographic characteristics, with passive non-participants being more socially deprived compared with active non-participants. Non-participation was associated with low social status e.g. low income, unemployment, no access to vehicle and status as tenant. Non-participants were also more likely than participants to be older, single, and of non-Danish origin. Compared to active non-participants, passive non-participants were characterized by e.g. lower income and lower educational level. Different interventions might be warranted to increase participation in the two non-participant groups.

  16. Oral cancer trends in a single head-and-neck cancer center in the Netherlands; decline in T-stage at the time of admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, Manon; Leemans, C René; Aartman, Irene H; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; van der Waal, Isaäc

    2011-11-01

    In this study we evaluated the possible epidemiologic changes of oral cancer patients in the Netherlands between the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004. We specifically studied the differences in male-female ratio, age, TNM-stage, site distribution, and alcohol and tobacco use. Patients from the VU University Medical Center with an oral squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity registered in 1980-1984 (n=200), group 1, were compared to patients registered in 2000-2004 (n=184), group 2. Trends in prevalence, site distribution, TNM-stage, alcohol and tobacco use, age and gender were studied. The male-female ratio has decreased from 1.8 to 1.2. There were no differences in age between the two groups of patients. The site distribution was similar in both groups. The most commonly involved sites were the tongue and the floor of mouth. In group 2 more patients were diagnosed with a T1 tumour. There were no differences in tobacco use between the two different groups. There were much more light drinkers (0-2 drinks per day) in group 2 than in group 1, whereas there were more heavy drinkers (>4 per day) in group 1 than in group 2 (p<0.001). This was observed in both male and female patients. In our study there were no significant differences between the patients registered in the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004 regarding the mean age of the patients, site distribution and smoking habits. The male-female ratio has decreased. In the recent group more patients were staged T1N0 and there was a strong decrease of the patients who were heavy drinkers.

  17. EMI Registry Design

    CERN Document Server

    Memon, S

    2011-01-01

    Grid services are the fundamental building blocks of today's Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). The discovery of services in the DCI is a primary function that is a precursor to other tasks such as workload and data management. In this context, a service registry can be used to fulfil such a requirement. Existing service registries, such as the ARC Information Index or UNICORE Registry, are examples that have proven themselves in production environments. Such implementations provide a centralized service registry, however, todays DCIs, such as EGI, are based on a federation model. It is therefore necessary for the service registry to mirror such a model in order for it to seamlessly fit into the operational and management requirements - a DCI built using federated approach. This document presents an architecture for a federated service registry and a prototype based on this architecture, the EMI Registry. Special attention is given to how the federated service registry is robust to environment failu...

  18. The EpiCom Survey-Registries Across Europe, Epidemiological Research and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Langholz, Ebbe

    2017-01-01

    The 2015 EpiCom survey evaluated population, patient, and research registries across Europe. Information was collected from 38 countries. The registries included those falling within the remit of national statistics, hospital databases, twin and multiplex registries, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD......] registries and biobanks, and cancer and surgical registries. The scale and nature of registries were investigated, and where possible a contact detail for each registry was obtained.The survey demonstrated 33 birth and death registers across Europe. It also highlighted ethical and legal challenges in linking......-JCC online] depicts active registries in each of the participating countries....

  19. Association of obesity and sleep problems among breast cancer survivors: results from a registry-based survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Sorkin, John D; Gallicchio, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Sleep-related complaints are common among breast cancer survivors. However, the risk factors underlying sleep disturbances in this population are not completely understood. Some studies have shown that maintaining normal weight can result in a reduced risk of cancer-related symptoms, including sleep problems; however, data from published studies are not consistent. This study examined the associations between body mass index (BMI) and sleep-related complaints in breast cancer survivors. Self-reported survey data from 861 breast cancer survivors at a single institution were analyzed. BMI was calculated based on self-reported weight and height at the time of the survey. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Average sleep duration was calculated based on the reported hours of sleep on a typical weekday and weekend. Associations between BMI and the sleep outcomes were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. In adjusted models, BMI was not significantly associated with either excessive daytime sleepiness or "short" sleep pattern (≤ 6 h) in our sample of breast cancer survivors. Younger age, presence of strong acute pain, and lower level of education were independent risk factors for excessive daytime sleepiness. African American race, presence of strong acute pain, and lower level of education were independent risk factors for being a short sleeper. Findings from this study indicate that BMI is not independently associated with sleep-related outcomes among breast cancer survivors. More research is needed to identify cancer survivors who are at increased risk for sleep disturbances as well as the mechanisms that underlie such disturbances.

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer: A veteran administration registry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issam Makhoul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. Several studies have suggested a role for diabetes mellitus, but the magnitude of its contribution remains controversial. Objectives: Utilizing a large administrative database, this retrospective cohort study was designed to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. Patients and design: Using the Veterans Integrated Services Network 16 database, 322,614 subjects were enrolled in the study, including 110,919 with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 211,695 diabetes-free controls matched by gender, year of birth and healthcare facility. Results: A significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer was observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, with an adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval of 2.17 (1.70–2.77 for type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls (p < 10−9 after controlling for the matching factors. Conclusion: The association between type 2 diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer was statistically significant and may, in part, explain the rising incidence of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Differences in screening history, tumour characteristics and survival between women with screen-detected versus not screen-detected cervical cancer in the east of The Netherlands, 1992–2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; Schutter, Eltjo M.; Looijen-Salamon, Monika; Martens, Jolise E.; Siesling, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Objective In The Netherlands, despite a national screening programme since 1996, invasive cervical cancers have been detected in screened and non-screened women. The aim of this study was to determine differences between Pap-smear history, tumour characteristics and survival of patients with a

  2. Differences in screening history, tumour characteristics and survival between women with screen-detected versus not screen-detected cervical cancer in the east of The Netherlands, 1992-2001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, M.A. van der; Schutter, E.M.; Looijen-Salamon, M.; Martens, J.E.; Siesling, S.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In The Netherlands, despite a national screening programme since 1996, invasive cervical cancers have been detected in screened and non-screened women. The aim of this study was to determine differences between Pap-smear history, tumour characteristics and survival of patients with a

  3. Return-to-work intervention for cancer survivors: budget impact and allocation of costs and returns in the Netherlands and six major EU-countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Janne C; Steuten, Lotte M G; Groeneveld, Iris F; de Boer, Angela G E M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; IJzerman, Maarten J; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-11-12

    Return-to-work (RTW)-interventions support cancer