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Sample records for netb structural gene

  1. Multilocus sequence typing analyses of Clostridium perfringens type A strains harboring tpeL and netB genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, V; Ignacio, A; Llanco, L; Bueris, V; Sircili, M P; Avila-Campos, M J

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic bacterium ubiquitous in various environments, especially in soil and the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. In this study, multilocus sequence typing protocol was used to investigate genotypic relationships among 40 C. perfringens strains isolated from humans and broiler chicken with necrotic enteritis [NE]. The results indicated a few clonal populations, mainly observed in human strains, with 32.5% of all strains associated with one of three clonal complexes and 30 sequences types. The CC-1 cluster showed an interesting and unexpected result because it contained seven strains [six from animals and one of human origin]. Detection assays for toxin genes tpeL and netB were also performed. The netB gene was only observed in 7.5% of the strains from healthy human. The toxin gene tpeL was detected in 22.5% of the C. perfringens strains isolated from three individuals and in six broilers with NE. Our study describes the role of some C. perfringens strains of human origin acting as reservoirs of virulence genes and sources of infection. In addition, the strains of human and animal origin were found to be genetically distinct but phylogenetically close, and the human strains showed more diversity than the animal strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. NetB, a new toxin that is associated with avian necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Keyburn

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years a phospholipase C enzyme called alpha-toxin was thought to be the key virulence factor in necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens. However, using a gene knockout mutant we have recently shown that alpha-toxin is not essential for pathogenesis. We have now discovered a key virulence determinant. A novel toxin (NetB was identified in a C. perfringens strain isolated from a chicken suffering from necrotic enteritis (NE. The toxin displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to several pore forming toxins including beta-toxin from C. perfringens (38% identity and alpha-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus (31% identity. NetB was only identified in C. perfringens type A strains isolated from chickens suffering NE. Both purified native NetB and recombinant NetB displayed cytotoxic activity against the chicken leghorn male hepatoma cell line LMH; inducing cell rounding and lysis. To determine the role of NetB in NE a netB mutant of a virulent C. perfringens chicken isolate was constructed by homologous recombination, and its virulence assessed in a chicken disease model. The netB mutant was unable to cause disease whereas the wild-type parent strain and the netB mutant complemented with a wild-type netB gene caused significant levels of NE. These data show unequivocally that in this isolate a functional NetB toxin is critical for the ability of C. perfringens to cause NE in chickens. This novel toxin is the first definitive virulence factor to be identified in avian C. perfringens strains capable of causing NE. Furthermore, the netB mutant is the first rationally attenuated strain obtained in an NE-causing isolate of C. perfringens; as such it has considerable vaccine potential.

  3. Diffusion of Clostridium perfringens NetB positive strains in healthy and diseased chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Bano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years α toxin was considered the key virulence factor responsible for the appearance of necrotic enteritis (NE in chickens but, recently, a new toxin related to the occurrence of NE, called NetB, has been described. The aim of this work was to evaluate the CP toxin-type and the NetB gene presence in strains collected from chickens affected or not by enteric diseases. 107 strains were tested: 30 isolated from chickens affected by NE, 54 from subjects affected by other enteric pathologies and 22 from healthy animals. All strains resulted toxin-type A and 26.17% of these was positive also for β2 toxin gene. No strains were positive for cpe gene. 27% (29/107 of CP was NetB positive and 93% (27/29 of these was isolated from birds affected by intestinal disorders. 16 NetB positive strains were obtained from chickens affected by NE (16/30, 9 from animals affected by other intestinal disorders (9/54 and 4 from healthy animals (4/22. A significant difference between the number of NetB positive strains isolated from animals affected by NE and healthy chickens has been observed (P=0.014. However, the finding that the 17.4% of strains isolated from healthy chickens was also positive for NetB, confirm that other virulence factors could play an important role on NE appearance.

  4. Low Prevalence of netB and tpeL in Historical Clostridium perfringens Isolates from Broiler Farms in Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, M A; Macklin, K S; Krehling, J T

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of novel Clostridium perfringens toxins NetB and TpeL has initiated questions regarding their role in the pathogenesis of disease. However, data showing the prevalence of these genes in C. perfringens populations are limited to certain geographical areas. If netB and tpeL are important virulence factors for disease worldwide, one would expect to find these genes in isolates from other regions as well. To address this hypothesis, C. perfringens isolates collected from Alabama broiler farms over 15 yr ago were toxin genotyped using PCR. Each isolate was screened for netB and tpeL; the major lethal toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, and ia; and the enterotoxin gene cpe. Results of the assay showed all isolates presumed to be C. perfringens were genotypically type A, cpe negative except for one broiler litter isolate, which was genotypically type C. Only two isolates were positive for netB. Similarly, only two isolates were positive for tpeL, one of which was also netB positive. The low incidence observed for netB and tpeL indicates that these genes are not significant virulence factors for the sampled population.

  5. NetB, a Pore-Forming Toxin from Necrotic Enteritis Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. Keyburn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Clostridium perfringens necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB is a recently discovered member of the β-barrel pore-forming toxin family and is produced by a subset of avian C. perfringens type A strains. NetB is cytotoxic for avian cells and is associated with avian necrotic enteritis. This review examines the current state of knowledge of NetB: its role in pathogenesis, its distribution and expression in C. perfringens and its vaccine potential.

  6. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Primer 5.0 software. To adjust for RNA quality and diffe- rences in cDNA concentration, we amplified actin as an internal control with the following primers: PtActin-F (5′-TG. AAGGAGAAACTTGCGTAT-3′) and PtActin-R (5′-GCA. CAATGTTACCGTACAGAT-3′). These genes were ampli- fied from first-strand cDNA using ...

  7. vaccination using profilin and NetB proteins in Montanide IMS adjuvant increases protective immunity against experimentally-induced necrotic enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Soon Lillehoj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The effects of vaccinating 18-day-old chicken embryos with the combination of recombinant Eimeria profilin plus Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens NetB proteins mixed in the Montanide IMS adjuvant on the chicken immune response to necrotic enteritis (NE were investigated using an Eimeria maxima (E. maxima/C. perfringens co-infection NE disease model that we previously developed. Methods Eighteen-day-old broiler embryos were injected with 100 μL of phosphate-buffered saline, profilin, profilin plus necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB, profilin plus NetB/Montanide adjuvant (IMS 106, and profilin plus Net-B/Montanide adjuvant (IMS 101. After post-hatch birds were challenged with our NE experimental disease model, body weights, intestinal lesions, serum antibody levels to NetB, and proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes were measured. Results Chickens in ovo vaccinated with recombinant profilin plus NetB proteins/IMS106 and recombinant profilin plus NetB proteins/IMS101 showed significantly increased body weight gains and reduced gut damages compared with the profilin-only group, respectively. Greater antibody response to NetB toxin were observed in the profilin plus NetB/IMS 106, and profilin plus NetB/IMS 101 groups compared with the other three vaccine/adjuvant groups. Finally, diminished levels of transcripts encoding for proinflammatory cytokines such as lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor, tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15, and interleukin-8 were observed in the intestinal lymphocytes of chickens in ovo injected with profilin plus NetB toxin in combination with IMS 106, and profilin plus NetB toxin in combination with IMS 101 compared with profilin protein alone bird. Conclusion These results suggest that the Montanide IMS adjuvants potentiate host immunity to experimentally-induced avian NE when administered in ovo in conjunction with the profilin and

  8. Variable protection against experimental broiler necrotic enteritis after immunization with the C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin and a non-toxic NetB variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Mot, Dorien; Geeraerts, Sofie; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W

    2016-06-01

    Necrotic enteritis toxin B (NetB) is a pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and has been shown to play a key role in avian necrotic enteritis, a disease causing significant costs to the poultry production industry worldwide. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunization with a non-toxic variant of NetB (NetB W262A) and the C-terminal fragment of C. perfringens alpha-toxin (CPA247-370) would provide protection against experimental necrotic enteritis. Immunized birds with either antigen or a combination of antigens developed serum antibody levels against NetB and CPA. When CPA247-370 and NetB W262A were used in combination as immunogens, an increased protection was observed after oral challenge by individual dosing, but not after in-feed-challenge.

  9. Maternal immunization with vaccines containing recombinant NetB toxin partially protects progeny chickens from necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyburn, Anthony L; Portela, Ricardo W; Ford, Mark E; Bannam, Trudi L; Yan, Xu X; Rood, Julian I; Moore, Robert J

    2013-11-13

    Avian necrotic enteritis is a major economic and welfare issue throughout the global poultry industry and is caused by isolates of Clostridium perfringens that produce NetB toxin. Previously we have shown that birds directly vaccinated with inactivated C. perfringens type A culture supernatant (toxoid) combined with recombinant NetB (rNetB) protein were significantly protected from homologous and heterologous challenge. In the present study the protective effect of maternal immunization was examined. Broiler breeder hens were injected subcutaneously with genetically toxoided rNetB(S254L) alone, C. perfringens type A toxoid and toxoid combined with rNetB(S254L). Vaccination resulted in a strong serum immunoglobulin Y response to NetB in hens immunized with rNetB(S254L) formulations. Anti-NetB antibodies were transferred to the eggs and on into the hatched progeny. Subclinical necrotic enteritis was induced experimentally in the progeny and the occurrence of specific necrotic enteritis lesions evaluated. Birds derived from hens immunized with rNetB(S254L) combined with toxoid and challenged with a homologous strain (EHE-NE18) at either 14 or 21 days post-hatch had significantly lower levels of disease compared to birds from adjuvant only vaccinated hens. In addition, birds from hens immunized with rNetB(S254L) alone were significantly protected when challenged at 14 days post-hatch. These results demonstrate that maternal immunization with a NetB-enhanced toxoid vaccine is a promising method for the control of necrotic enteritis in young broiler chickens.

  10. Synergistic effect of embryo vaccination with Eimeria profilin and Clostridium perfringens NetB proteins on inducing protective immunity against necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of embryo vaccination with Eimeria profilin plus Clostridium perfringens NetB toxin proteins in combination with the Montanide IMS-OVO adjuvant on the chicken immune response to necrotic enteritis were investigated using an E. maxima/C. perfringens co-infection model. Eighteen-day-old br...

  11. In ovo vaccines based on recombinant NetB toxin and Montanide IMS adjuvants induced protective immunity against Necrotic Enteritis in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of in ovo injection of recombinant clostridium NetB toxin plus Eimeria profilin proteins in combination with Montanide adjuvants in modulating immune system in chickens infected for experimental necrotic enteritis (NE) disease. Broiler eggs ...

  12. Conjugation-mediated horizontal gene transfer of Clostridium perfringens plasmids in the chicken gastrointestinal tract results in the formation of new virulent strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Jake A; Keyburn, Anthony L; Ford, Mark E; Portela, Ricardo W; Johanesen, Priscilla A; Lyras, Dena; Moore, Robert J

    2017-10-13

    Clostridium perfringens is a gastrointestinal pathogen capable of causing disease in a variety of hosts. Necrotic enteritis in chickens is caused by C. perfringens strains that produce the pore-forming toxin NetB, the major virulence factor for this disease. Like many other C. perfringens toxins and antibiotic resistance genes, NetB is encoded on a conjugative plasmid. Conjugative transfer of the netB-containing plasmid pJIR3535 has been demonstrated in vitro with a netB null mutant. This study has investigated the effect of plasmid transfer on disease pathogenesis, with two genetically distinct transconjugants constructed under in vitro conditions, within the intestinal tract of chickens. This study also demonstrates that plasmid transfer can occur naturally in the host gut environment, without the need for antibiotic selective pressure to be applied. The demonstration of plasmid transfer within the chicken host may have implications for disease progression and pathogenesis of C. perfringens-mediated disease. Such horizontal gene transfer events are likely to be common in the clostridia and may be a key factor in strain evolution, both within animals and in the wider environment.ImportanceClostridium perfringens is a major gastrointestinal pathogen of poultry. C. perfringens strains that express the NetB pore-forming toxin, which is encoded on a conjugative plasmid, cause necrotic enteritis. This study demonstrated that the conjugative transfer of the netB containing plasmid to two different non-pathogenic strains converted them into disease causing strains with similar disease-causing capability as the donor strain. Plasmid transfer of netB and antibiotic resistance was also demonstrated to occur within the gastrointestinal tract of chickens, with approximately 14% of isolates recovered comprising of three distinct, in vivo derived, transconjugant types. The demonstration of in vivo plasmid transfer indicates the potential importance of strain plasticity and the

  13. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Giguere; K-I. Isobe; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue

  14. Gene Composer in a structural genomics environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Mixon, Mark; Burgin, Alex; Staker, Bart; Stewart, Lance

    2011-09-01

    The structural genomics effort at the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) requires the manipulation of large numbers of amino-acid sequences and the underlying DNA sequences which are to be cloned into expression vectors. To improve efficiency in high-throughput protein structure determination, a database software package, Gene Composer, has been developed which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their underlying gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bioinformatics steps used in modern structure-guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An example of the structure determination of H1N1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase PB2 subunit is given.

  15. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguére, V; Isobe, K; Grosveld, F

    1985-01-01

    We have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue and developmental stage-specific mRNA of 1850 bp. The 5' end of the gene has multiple initiation sites and a non-TATA box promoter. The 3' end shows a single polyadenylation site after a very long untranslated region. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2866091

  16. Clostridium perfringens delta toxin is sequence related to beta toxin, NetB, and Staphylococcus pore-forming toxins, but shows functional differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manich

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens produces numerous toxins, which are responsible for severe diseases in man and animals. Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysins released by a number of C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. Delta toxin was characterized to be cytotoxic for cells expressing the ganglioside G(M2 in their membrane. Here we report the genetic characterization of Delta toxin and its pore forming activity in lipid bilayers. Delta toxin consists of 318 amino acids, its 28 N-terminal amino acids corresponding to a signal peptide. The secreted Delta toxin (290 amino acids; 32619 Da is a basic protein (pI 9.1 which shows a significant homology with C. perfringens Beta toxin (43% identity, with C. perfringens NetB (40% identity and, to a lesser extent, with Staphylococcus aureus alpha toxin and leukotoxins. Recombinant Delta toxin showed a preference for binding to G(M2, in contrast to Beta toxin, which did not bind to gangliosides. It is hemolytic for sheep red blood cells and cytotoxic for HeLa cells. In artificial diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, Delta and Beta toxin formed channels. Conductance of the channels formed by Delta toxin, with a value of about 100 pS to more than 1 nS in 1 M KCl and a membrane potential of 20 mV, was higher than those formed by Beta toxin and their distribution was broader. The results of zero-current membrane potential measurements and single channel experiments suggest that Delta toxin forms slightly anion-selective channels, whereas the Beta toxin channels showed a preference for cations under the same conditions. C. perfringens Delta toxin shows a significant sequence homolgy with C. perfringens Beta and NetB toxins, as well as with S. aureus alpha hemolysin and leukotoxins, but exhibits different channel properties in lipid bilayers. In contrast to Beta toxin, Delta toxin recognizes G(M2 as receptor and forms anion-selective channels.

  17. The Mycoplasma hominis vaa gene displays a mosaic gene structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Emmersen, Jeppe M. G.; Jensen, Lise T.

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis contains a variable adherence-associated (vaa) gene. To classify variants of the vaa genes, we examined 42 M. hominis isolated by PCR, DNA sequencing and immunoblotting. This uncovered the existence of five gene categories. Comparison of the gene types revealed a modular...

  18. Covariance Structure Models for Gene Expression Microarray Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Bentler, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    Covariance structure models are applied to gene expression data using a factor model, a path model, and their combination. The factor model is based on a few factors that capture most of the expression information. A common factor of a group of genes may represent a common protein factor for the transcript of the co-expressed genes, and hence, it…

  19. Evolutionary and Topological Properties of Genes and Community Structures in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szedlak, Anthony; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Li; Paternostro, Giovanni; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The diverse, specialized genes present in today's lifeforms evolved from a common core of ancient, elementary genes. However, these genes did not evolve individually: gene expression is controlled by a complex network of interactions, and alterations in one gene may drive reciprocal changes in its proteins' binding partners. Like many complex networks, these gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are composed of communities, or clusters of genes with relatively high connectivity. A deep understanding of the relationship between the evolutionary history of single genes and the topological properties of the underlying GRN is integral to evolutionary genetics. Here, we show that the topological properties of an acute myeloid leukemia GRN and a general human GRN are strongly coupled with its genes' evolutionary properties. Slowly evolving ("cold"), old genes tend to interact with each other, as do rapidly evolving ("hot"), young genes. This naturally causes genes to segregate into community structures with relatively homogeneous evolutionary histories. We argue that gene duplication placed old, cold genes and communities at the center of the networks, and young, hot genes and communities at the periphery. We demonstrate this with single-node centrality measures and two new measures of efficiency, the set efficiency and the interset efficiency. We conclude that these methods for studying the relationships between a GRN's community structures and its genes' evolutionary properties provide new perspectives for understanding evolutionary genetics.

  20. Comparative genomics of the relationship between gene structure and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, X.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the structure of genes and their expression is a relatively new aspect of genome organization and regulation. With more genome sequences and expression data becoming available, bioinformatics approaches can help the further elucidation of the relationships between gene

  1. Structure of the human lysyl oxidase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, E.R.; Kemppainen, R.; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Kivirikko, K.I. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland))

    1993-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (EC 1.4.3.13), an extracellular copper enzyme, initiates the crosslinking of collagens and elastin by catalyzing oxidative deamination of the [epsilon]-amino group in certain lysine and hydroxylysine residues. The authors report here that the human lysyl oxidase gene is about 15 kb in size and consists of seven exons. Transcription is initiated at one major site and four minor sites, and the first exon consists of 273 bp of untranslated sequences (calculated to the major site) and 631 bp of translated sequences, which accounts for about half of all the translated sequences of the gene. The seventh exon, on the other hand, codes for only the last codon of amino acid 416 and for amino acid 417, which are followed by the translation termination codon and the 3[prime] untranslated sequences. Exons 2-6 vary in size from 96to157 bp, and the introns from 331 bp to about 3.5 kb. The 5[prime] flanking region contains a TATA-like sequence at -30 relative to the major transcription initiation site and a CCAAT motif at -109. The 5[prime] flanking region and the downstream sequences present in the first exon and first intron contain altogether five possible binding sequences for Sp1, six for AP-2, one for AP-1, three of PEA3, three for MEP-1, and three CCCTCCC motifs, all of which may be involved in the regulation of the expression of the gene. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Modeling Three-Dimensional Chromosome Structures Using Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanghua; Wang, Xinlei; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-03-01

    Recent genomic studies have shown that significant chromosomal spatial correlation exists in gene expression of many organisms. Interestingly, coexpression has been observed among genes separated by a fixed interval in specific regions of a chromosome chain, which is likely caused by three-dimensional (3D) chromosome folding structures. Modeling such spatial correlation explicitly may lead to essential understandings of 3D chromosome structures and their roles in transcriptional regulation. In this paper, we explore chromosomal spatial correlation induced by 3D chromosome structures, and propose a hierarchical Bayesian method based on helical structures to formally model and incorporate the correlation into the analysis of gene expression microarray data. It is the first study to quantify and infer 3D chromosome structures in vivo using expression microarrays. Simulation studies show computing feasibility of the proposed method and that, under the assumption of helical chromosome structures, it can lead to precise estimation of structural parameters and gene expression levels. Real data applications demonstrate an intriguing biological phenomenon that functionally associated genes, which are far apart along the chromosome chain, are brought into physical proximity by chromosomal folding in 3D space to facilitate their coexpression. It leads to important biological insight into relationship between chromosome structure and function.

  3. [Integrons and resistance gene cassettes: structure and role against antimicrobials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gerardo; Mella, Sergio; Zemelman, Raúl; Bello, Helia; Domínguez, Mariana

    2004-05-01

    Bacteria have developed sophisticated and successful genetic mechanisms to evade the action of antimicrobials. Bacterial multiresistance has caused serious problems in the treatment of nosocomial infections. Integrons and gene cassettes are considered the main genetic elements in the evolution of plasmids and transposons that actively participate in the mobilization of genes, codifying different bacterial resistance mechanisms. This article reviews the historical and structural aspects of integrons and resistance gene cassettes and the presence of these structures in gram negative bacteria isolated from Chilean hospitals in the last ten years.

  4. Worldwide genetic structure in 37 genes important in telomere biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabello, L; Yeager, M; Chowdhury, S; Qi, L; Deng, X; Wang, Z; Hutchinson, A; Savage, S A

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres form the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes and are vital in maintaining genetic integrity. Telomere dysfunction is associated with cancer and several chronic diseases. Patterns of genetic variation across individuals can provide keys to further understanding the evolutionary history of genes. We investigated patterns of differentiation and population structure of 37 telomere maintenance genes among 53 worldwide populations. Data from 898 unrelated individuals were obtained from the genome-wide scan of the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP) and from 270 unrelated individuals from the International HapMap Project at 716 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci. We additionally compared this gene set to HGDP data at 1396 SNPs in 174 innate immunity genes. The majority of the telomere biology genes had low to moderate haplotype diversity (45–85%), high ancestral allele frequencies (>60%) and low differentiation (FST HapMap 3. TERT had higher than expected levels of haplotype diversity, likely attributable to a lack of linkage disequilibrium, and a potential cancer-associated SNP in this gene, rs2736100, varied substantially in genotype frequency across major continental regions. It is possible that the genes under selection could influence telomere biology diseases. As a group, there appears to be less diversity and differentiation in telomere biology genes than in genes with different functions, possibly due to their critical role in telomere maintenance and chromosomal stability. PMID:21731055

  5. Structure and regulation of the Asr gene family in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Isabelle M; Carpentier, Sebastien C; Pampurova, Suzana; Van Hoylandt, Anais; Panis, Bart; Swennen, Rony; Remy, Serge

    2011-10-01

    Abscisic acid, stress, ripening proteins (ASR) are a family of plant-specific small hydrophilic proteins. Studies in various plant species have highlighted their role in increased resistance to abiotic stress, including drought, but their specific function remains unknown. As a first step toward their potential use in crop improvement, we investigated the structure and regulation of the Asr gene family in Musa species (bananas and plantains). We determined that the Musa Asr gene family contained at least four members, all of which exhibited the typical two exons, one intron structure of Asr genes and the "ABA/WDS" (abscisic acid/water deficit stress) domain characteristic of Asr genes. Phylogenetic analyses determined that the Musa Asr genes were closely related to each other, probably as the product of recent duplication events. For two of the four members, two versions corresponding to the two sub-genomes of Musa, acuminata and balbisiana were identified. Gene expression and protein analyses were performed and Asr expression could be detected in meristem cultures, root, pseudostem, leaf and cormus. In meristem cultures, mAsr1 and mAsr3 were induced by osmotic stress and wounding, while mAsr3 and mAsr4 were induced by exposure to ABA. mASR3 exhibited the most variation both in terms of amino acid sequence and expression pattern, making it the most promising candidate for further functional study and use in crop improvement.

  6. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-16

    Sep 16, 2015 ... accelerates leaf expansion, reduces seed abortion, and enhances fiber production. Mol. Plant 5, 430–441. Zhang D., Xu B., Yang X., Zhang Z. and Li B. 2011 The sucrose synthase gene family in Populus: structure, expression, and evo- lution. Tree Genet. Genomes 7, 443–456. Zhang J., Arro J., Chen Y.

  7. The Structural Characterization of Tumor Fusion Genes and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Daixi; Qin, Guangrong; Zhang, Wen; Ouyang, Jian; Zhang, Menghuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation, which generates fusion proteins in blood tumor or solid tumor, is considered as one of the major causes leading to cancer. Recent studies suggested that the disordered fragments in a fusion protein might contribute to its carcinogenicity. Here, we investigated the sequence feature near the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes, the structure features of breakpoints in fusion proteins, and the posttranslational modification preference in the fusion proteins. Results show that the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes have both sequence preference and structural preference. At the sequence level, nucleotide combination AG is preferred before the breakpoint and GG is preferred at the breakpoint. At the structural level, the breakpoints in the fusion proteins prefer to be located in the disordered regions. Further analysis suggests the phosphorylation sites at serine, threonine, and the methylation sites at arginine are enriched in disordered regions of the fusion proteins. Using EML4-ALK as an example, we further explained how the fusion protein leads to the protein disorder and contributes to its carcinogenicity. The sequence and structural features of the fusion proteins may help the scientific community to predict novel breakpoints in fusion genes and better understand the structure and function of fusion proteins.

  8. Structure and location of the murine adrenoleukodystrophy gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, M.A. [Christchurch School of Medicine (New Zealand); Rowland, S.A.; Dodd, A. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a degenerative neurological disease characterized by the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in various tissues and demyelination of the central nervous system. The human gene responsible for the disease encodes a membrane-bound ATP-binding transporter protein that is located in peroxisomes. We isolated the mouse adrenoleukodystrophy gene, determined its structure, and mapped it both cytogentically and genetically. The mouse gene is very similar in structure to the human gene, consisting of 10 exons arranged over a 22-kb genomic region. We localized it in band B of the mouse X chromosome by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and, using a new microsatellite repeat polymorphism, determined the map location as 47 cM from the X centromere. We found evidence for other sequences in the mouse genome related to the 3{prime} end of Aldgh. This study paves the way for the construction of gene-targeting plasmids that may be used to develop an animal model of ALD. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Correlations in the population structure of music, genes and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Savage, Patrick E; Ko, Albert Min-Shan; Stoneking, Mark; Ko, Ying-Chin; Loo, Jun-Hun; Trejaut, Jean A

    2014-01-07

    We present, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence that music and genes may have coevolved by demonstrating significant correlations between traditional group-level folk songs and mitochondrial DNA variation among nine indigenous populations of Taiwan. These correlations were of comparable magnitude to those between language and genes for the same populations, although music and language were not significantly correlated with one another. An examination of population structure for genetics showed stronger parallels to music than to language. Overall, the results suggest that music might have a sufficient time-depth to retrace ancient population movements and, additionally, that it might be capturing different aspects of population history than language. Music may therefore have the potential to serve as a novel marker of human migrations to complement genes, language and other markers.

  10. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  11. The Structural Characterization of Tumor Fusion Genes and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dandan; Li, Daixi; Qin, Guangrong; Zhang, Wen; Ouyang, Jian; Zhang, Menghuan; Xie, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation, which generates fusion proteins in blood tumor or solid tumor, is considered as one of the major causes leading to cancer. Recent studies suggested that the disordered fragments in a fusion protein might contribute to its carcinogenicity. Here, we investigated the sequence feature near the breakpoints in the fusion partner genes, the structure features of breakpoints in fusion proteins, and the posttranslational modification preference in the fusion proteins. Result...

  12. Harnessing the complexity of gene expression data from cancer: from single gene to structural pathway methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert-Streib Frank

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-dimensional gene expression data provide a rich source of information because they capture the expression level of genes in dynamic states that reflect the biological functioning of a cell. For this reason, such data are suitable to reveal systems related properties inside a cell, e.g., in order to elucidate molecular mechanisms of complex diseases like breast or prostate cancer. However, this is not only strongly dependent on the sample size and the correlation structure of a data set, but also on the statistical hypotheses tested. Many different approaches have been developed over the years to analyze gene expression data to (I identify changes in single genes, (II identify changes in gene sets or pathways, and (III identify changes in the correlation structure in pathways. In this paper, we review statistical methods for all three types of approaches, including subtypes, in the context of cancer data and provide links to software implementations and tools and address also the general problem of multiple hypotheses testing. Further, we provide recommendations for the selection of such analysis methods. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Byung-Soo Kim and Joel Bader.

  13. The gene structure of the Drosophila melanogaster proto-oncogene, kayak, and its nested gene, fos-intronic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stephanie Gidget; Goldstein, Elliott S

    2008-08-15

    We present herein a new model for the structure of the Drosophila kayak gene as well as preliminary data on the functional differences of its various isoforms. kayak is a homolog of the human proto-oncogene, c-fos. kayak has three different starts of transcription, and therefore promoters (P)kay-alpha, (P)kay-beta and (P)kay-gamma. These three promoters lead to four different transcripts: kay-alpha, kay(sro), kay-beta and kay-gamma. (P)kay-alpha produces two different transcripts: kay-alpha and kay(sro) where the other two promoters, (P)kay-beta and (P)kay-gamma, produce a single transcript each. The transcripts kay-alpha, beta and gamma all splice into the mainbody of the kay gene, which codes for the DNA binding domain and leucine zipper; kay(sro) is not spliced. Also, within this region is a nested gene, fos-intronic gene (fig) which is transcribed in the opposite direction. fig codes for a predicted PP2C phosphatase. fig has two different promoters which produce two different transcripts, both in the same reading frame, fig-alpha and beta. This is an unusual gene structure for Drosophila. Only 13% of Drosophila genes have multiple promoters and only 7% have a nested gene. RT-PCR was performed on each transcript to determine the relative amounts of each RNA produced. All spliced kay transcripts appear to have equal abundance. The unspliced kay(sro) transcript has a lower abundance than kay-alpha. Both fig transcripts are also detected in all stages tested. Lethal phase analysis and complementation testing suggest that the three isoforms of kayak may have different functions.

  14. Phylogeny, gene structures, and expression patterns of the ERF gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gaiyun; Chen, Ming; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Zhaoshi; Guan, Shan; Li, Lian-Cheng; Li, Aili; Guo, Jiaming; Mao, Long; Ma, Youzhi

    2008-01-01

    Members of the ERF transcription factor family play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In soybean (Glycine max L.), however, only a few ERF genes have been studied so far. In this study, 98 unigenes that contained a complete AP2/ERF domain were identified from 63,676 unique sequences in the DFCI Soybean Gene Index database. The phylogeny, gene structures, and putative conserved motifs in soybean ERF proteins were analysed, and compared with those of Arabidopsis and rice. The members of the soybean ERF family were divided into 12 subgroups, similar to the case for Arabidopsis. AP2/ERF domains were conserved among soybean, Arabidopsis, and rice. Outside the AP2/ERF domain, many soybean-specific conserved motifs were detected. Expression analysis showed that nine unigenes belonging to six ERF family subgroups were induced by both biotic/abiotic stresses and hormone treatment, suggesting that they were involved in cross-talk between biotic and abiotic stress-responsive signalling pathways. Overexpression of two full-length genes from two different subgroups enhanced the tolerances to drought, salt stresses, and/or pathogen infection of the tobacco plants. These results will be useful for elucidating ERF gene-associated stress response signalling pathways in soybean.

  15. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  16. Gene Expression Divergence is Coupled to Evolution of DNA Structure in Coding Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiming; Dai, Xianhua

    2011-01-01

    Sequence changes in coding region and regulatory region of the gene itself (cis) determine most of gene expression divergence between closely related species. But gene expression divergence between yeast species is not correlated with evolution of primary nucleotide sequence. This indicates that other factors in cis direct gene expression divergence. Here, we studied the contribution of DNA three-dimensional structural evolution as cis to gene expression divergence. We found that the evolution of DNA structure in coding regions and gene expression divergence are correlated in yeast. Similar result was also observed between Drosophila species. DNA structure is associated with the binding of chromatin remodelers and histone modifiers to DNA sequences in coding regions, which influence RNA polymerase II occupancy that controls gene expression level. We also found that genes with similar DNA structures are involved in the same biological process and function. These results reveal the previously unappreciated roles of DNA structure as cis-effects in gene expression. PMID:22125484

  17. Recognizing genes and other components of genomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Myers, E. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Stormo, G.D. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology)

    1991-01-01

    The Aspen Center for Physics (ACP) sponsored a three-week workshop, with 26 scientists participating, from 28 May to 15 June, 1990. The workshop, entitled Recognizing Genes and Other Components of Genomic Structure, focussed on discussion of current needs and future strategies for developing the ability to identify and predict the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians. No participant stayed for less than one week, and most attended for two or three weeks. Computers, software, and databases were available for use as electronic blackboards'' and as the basis for collaborative exploration of ideas being discussed and developed at the workshop. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  19. Comparative DNA methylation and gene expression analysis identifies novel genes for structural congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Marcel; Dorn, Cornelia; Cui, Huanhuan; Dunkel, Ilona; Schulz, Kerstin; Schoenhals, Sophia; Sun, Wei; Berger, Felix; Chen, Wei; Sperling, Silke R

    2016-10-01

    For the majority of congenital heart diseases (CHDs), the full complexity of the causative molecular network, which is driven by genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors, is yet to be elucidated. Epigenetic alterations are suggested to play a pivotal role in modulating the phenotypic expression of CHDs and their clinical course during life. Candidate approaches implied that DNA methylation might have a developmental role in CHD and contributes to the long-term progress of non-structural cardiac diseases. The aim of the present study is to define the postnatal epigenome of two common cardiac malformations, representing epigenetic memory, and adaption to hemodynamic alterations, which are jointly relevant for the disease course. We present the first analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation data obtained from myocardial biopsies of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and ventricular septal defect patients. We defined stringent sets of differentially methylated regions between patients and controls, which are significantly enriched for genomic features like promoters, exons, and cardiac enhancers. For TOF, we linked DNA methylation with genome-wide expression data and found a significant overlap for hypermethylated promoters and down-regulated genes, and vice versa. We validated and replicated the methylation of selected CpGs and performed functional assays. We identified a hypermethylated novel developmental CpG island in the promoter of SCO2 and demonstrate its functional impact. Moreover, we discovered methylation changes co-localized with novel, differential splicing events among sarcomeric genes as well as transcription factor binding sites. Finally, we demonstrated the interaction of differentially methylated and expressed genes in TOF with mutated CHD genes in a molecular network. By interrogating DNA methylation and gene expression data, we identify two novel mechanism contributing to the phenotypic expression of CHDs: aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands

  20. A study of structural properties of gene network graphs for mathematical modeling of integrated mosaic gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2017-04-01

    Gene network modeling is one of the widely used approaches in systems biology. It allows for the study of complex genetic systems function, including so-called mosaic gene networks, which consist of functionally interacting subnetworks. We conducted a study of a mosaic gene networks modeling method based on integration of models of gene subnetworks by linear control functionals. An automatic modeling of 10,000 synthetic mosaic gene regulatory networks was carried out using computer experiments on gene knockdowns/knockouts. Structural analysis of graphs of generated mosaic gene regulatory networks has revealed that the most important factor for building accurate integrated mathematical models, among those analyzed in the study, is data on expression of genes corresponding to the vertices with high properties of centrality.

  1. Structure and chromosome assignment of the murine p36 (calpactin I heavy chain) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiquel, P; Kristensen, Torsten; D'Eustachio, P

    1990-01-01

    , the complete intron/exon structure of the p36 gene was determined and the 5' and 3' noncoding regions of the gene were analyzed. The coding and 3' untranslated region of the p36 gene contains 12 exons which range in size from 48 to 322 base pairs (bp) with an average size of 107 bp. The repeat structures found...

  2. Human glucose phosphate isomerase: Exon mapping and gene structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiming; Lee, Pauline; Beutler, E. [Scripps Research Inst., La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-10-10

    The structure of the gene for human glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) has been determined. Three GPI clones were isolated from a human genomic library by using a full-length GPI cDNA probe and were characterized. Oligonucleotides based on the known cDNA sequence were used as primers in amplification and sequence analyses. This led to the identification of the exon-intron junctions. By this approach, 18 exons and 17 introns have been identified. The exons range in size from 44 to 431 nucleotides. The intronic sequences surrounding the exons provide useful information for the identification of mutations that give rise to human GPI deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The structure of an unusual leghemoglobin gene from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O

    1983-01-01

    A clone containing an unusual leghemoglobin (Lb) gene was isolated from a soybean DNA library present in Charon 4A phage. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the isolated Lb gene has three intervening sequences (IVS-1, IVS-2 and IVS-3) located in the same positions as those found in other Lb genes....... Due to a large increase of IVS-2 and IVS-3, the isolated Lb gene is about twice the size of a normal Lb gene. The coding sequence derived from the DNA sequence corresponds to no known soybean Lb and attempts to find a corresponding mRNA failed. In addition, the 5'-flanking sequence of the Lb gene...

  4. Chromosomal mapping, gene structure and characterization of the human and murine RAB27B gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huxley Clare

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rab GTPases are regulators of intracellular membrane traffic. The Rab27 subfamily consists of Rab27a and Rab27b. Rab27a has been recently implicated in Griscelli Disease, a disease combining partial albinism with severe immunodeficiency. Rab27a plays a key role in the function of lysosomal-like organelles such as melanosomes in melanocytes and lytic granules in cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Little is known about Rab27b. Results The human RAB27B gene is organised in six exons, spanning about 69 kb in the chromosome 18q21.1 region. Exon 1 is non-coding and is separated from the others by 49 kb of DNA and exon 6 contains a long 3' untranslated sequence (6.4 kb. The mouse Rab27b cDNA shows 95% identity with the human cDNA at the protein level and maps to mouse chromosome 18. The mouse mRNA was detected in stomach, large intestine, spleen and eye by RT-PCR, and in heart, brain, spleen and kidney by Northern blot. Transient over-expression of EGF-Rab27b fusion protein in cultured melanocytes revealed that Rab27b is associated with melanosomes, as observed for EGF-Rab27a. Conclusions Our results indicate that the Rab27 subfamily of Ras-like GTPases is highly conserved in mammals. There is high degree of conservation in sequence and gene structure between RAB27A and RAB27B genes. Exogenous expression of Rab27b in melanocytes results in melanosomal association as observed for Rab27a, suggesting the two Rab27 proteins are functional homologues. As with RAB27A in Griscelli Disease, RAB27B may be also associated with human disease mapping to chromosome 18.

  5. GeneViTo: Visualizing gene-product functional and structural features in genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promponas Vasilis J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of increasing amounts of sequence data from completely sequenced genomes boosts the development of new computational methods for automated genome annotation and comparative genomics. Therefore, there is a need for tools that facilitate the visualization of raw data and results produced by bioinformatics analysis, providing new means for interactive genome exploration. Visual inspection can be used as a basis to assess the quality of various analysis algorithms and to aid in-depth genomic studies. Results GeneViTo is a JAVA-based computer application that serves as a workbench for genome-wide analysis through visual interaction. The application deals with various experimental information concerning both DNA and protein sequences (derived from public sequence databases or proprietary data sources and meta-data obtained by various prediction algorithms, classification schemes or user-defined features. Interaction with a Graphical User Interface (GUI allows easy extraction of genomic and proteomic data referring to the sequence itself, sequence features, or general structural and functional features. Emphasis is laid on the potential comparison between annotation and prediction data in order to offer a supplement to the provided information, especially in cases of "poor" annotation, or an evaluation of available predictions. Moreover, desired information can be output in high quality JPEG image files for further elaboration and scientific use. A compilation of properly formatted GeneViTo input data for demonstration is available to interested readers for two completely sequenced prokaryotes, Chlamydia trachomatis and Methanococcus jannaschii. Conclusions GeneViTo offers an inspectional view of genomic functional elements, concerning data stemming both from database annotation and analysis tools for an overall analysis of existing genomes. The application is compatible with Linux or Windows ME-2000-XP operating

  6. The primary structures of two leghemoglobin genes from soybean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Jensen, E O; Paludan, K

    1982-01-01

    We present the complete nucleotide sequences of two leghemoglobin genes isolated from soybean DNA. Both genes contain three intervening sequences which interrupt the two coding sequences in identical positions. The 5' and 3' flanking sequences in both genes contain conserved sequences similar to ...

  7. MADS-box gene evolution-structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise B; Skipper, Martin

    2002-01-01

    This study presents a phylogenetic analysis of 198 MADS-box genes based on 420 parsimony-informative characters. The analysis includes only MIKC genes; therefore several genes from gymnosperms and pteridophytes are excluded. The strict consensus tree identifies all major monophyletic groups known...

  8. The structure and expression of normal and abnormal globin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Flavell, R.A.; Grosveld, G.C.; Grosveld, F.G.; Kooter, J.M.; Boer, E. de

    1979-01-01

    Most mammalian genes are present as a single copy per haploid genome and hence comprise only about one part in 10⁶ of the total nuclear DNA. This fact impeded work on single-copy genes, but recently recombinant DNA technology and sensitive gene mapping has led to the elucidation of the

  9. Novel antifungal α-hairpinin peptide from Stellaria media seeds: structure, biosynthesis, gene structure and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavokhotova, Anna A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Musolyamov, Alexander K; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Oparin, Peter B; Berkut, Antonina A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Egorov, Tsezi A; Grishin, Eugene V; Odintsova, Tatyana I

    2014-01-01

    Plant defense against disease is a complex multistage system involving initial recognition of the invading pathogen, signal transduction and activation of specialized genes. An important role in pathogen deterrence belongs to so-called plant defense peptides, small polypeptide molecules that present antimicrobial properties. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography, we isolated a novel antifungal peptide named Sm-AMP-X (33 residues) from the common chickweed (Stellaria media) seeds. The peptide sequence shows no homology to any previously described proteins. The peculiar cysteine arrangement (C(1)X3C(2)XnC(3)X3C(4)), however, allocates Sm-AMP-X to the recently acknowledged α-hairpinin family of plant defense peptides that share the helix-loop-helix fold stabilized by two disulfide bridges C(1)-C(4) and C(2)-C(3). Sm-AMP-X exhibits high broad-spectrum activity against fungal phytopathogens. We further showed that the N- and C-terminal "tail" regions of the peptide are important for both its structure and activity. The truncated variants Sm-AMP-X1 with both disulfide bonds preserved and Sm-AMP-X2 with only the internal S-S-bond left were progressively less active against fungi and presented largely disordered structure as opposed to the predominantly helical conformation of the full-length antifungal peptide. cDNA and gene cloning revealed that Sm-AMP-X is processed from a unique multimodular precursor protein that contains as many as 12 tandem repeats of α-hairpinin-like peptides. Structure of the sm-amp-x gene and two related pseudogenes sm-amp-x-ψ1 and sm-amp-x-ψ2 allows tracing the evolutionary scenario that led to generation of such a sophisticated precursor protein. Sm-AMP-X is a new promising candidate for engineering disease resistance in plants.

  10. Modelling and structural characteristics analysis of gene networks for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulin; Wang, Shudong; Meng, Dazhi

    2015-01-01

    Analysing structure of gene networks is an important way to understand regulatory mechanisms of organism at the molecular level. In this work, gene mutual information networks are constructed based on gene expression profiles in prostate tissues with and without cancer. In order to contrast structural difference of normal and diseased networks, curves of four structural parameters are given with the change of thresholds. Then threshold discrimination intervals and discrimination weights are defined. A method of finding structural key genes with significant degree-difference is proposed. The finding of key genes will help the biomedical scientists to further research the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Finally randomisation test is performed to prove that these structural parameters can distinguish normal and prostate cancer in their structures compared with these results in real data.

  11. Spontaneous gene flow and population structure in wild and cultivated chicory, Cichorium intybus L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiaer, L.P.; Felber, F.; Flavell, A.; Guadagnuola, R.; Guiatti, D.; Hauser, T.P.; Olivieri, A.M.; Scotti, I.; Syed, N.; Vischi, M.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Jorgensen, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous gene flow between wild and cultivated chicory, Cichorium intybus L., may have implications for the genetic structure and evolution of populations and varieties. One aspect of this crop-wild gene flow is the dispersal of transgenes from genetically modified varieties, e.g. gene flow from

  12. Structure, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of the prepronociceptin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollereau, C; Simons, M J; Soularue, P; Liners, F; Vassart, G; Meunier, J C; Parmentier, M

    1996-08-06

    Nociceptin (orphanin FQ), the newly discovered natural agonist of opioid receptor-like (ORL1) receptor, is a neuropeptide that is endowed with pronociceptive activity in vivo. Nociceptin is derived from a larger precursor, prepronociceptin (PPNOC), whose human, mouse, and rat genes we have now isolated. The PPNOC gene is highly conserved in the three species and displays organizational features that are strikingly similar to those of the genes of preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, and preproopiomelanocortin, the precursors to endogenous opioid peptides, suggesting the four genes belong to the same family-i.e., have a common evolutionary origin. The PPNOC gene encodes a single copy of nociceptin as well as of other peptides whose sequence is strictly conserved across murine and human species; hence it is likely to be neurophysiologically significant. Northern blot analysis shows that the PPNOC gene is predominantly transcribed in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) and, albeit weakly, in the ovary, the sole peripheral organ expressing the gene. By using a radiation hybrid cell line panel, the PPNOC gene was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 8 (8p21), between sequence-tagged site markers WI-5833 and WI-1172, in close proximity of the locus encoding the neurofilament light chain NEFL. Analysis of yeast artificial chromosome clones belonging to the WC8.4 contig covering the 8p21 region did not allow to detect the presence of the gene on these yeast artificial chromosomes, suggesting a gap in the coverage within this contig.

  13. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding...

  14. Associating transcription factors and conserved RNA structures with gene regulation in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Seemann, Stefan E.; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical subdivisions of the human brain can be associated with different neuronal functions. This functional diversification is reflected by differences in gene expression. By analyzing post-mortem gene expression data from the Allen Brain Atlas, we investigated the impact of transcription...... factors (TF) and RNA secondary structures on the regulation of gene expression in the human brain. First, we modeled the expression of a gene as a linear combination of the expression of TFs. We devised an approach to select robust TF-gene interactions and to determine localized contributions to gene...

  15. Genetic variation and population structure of interleukin genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    morphisms (SNPs: IL-1A 4845, IL-1B 3954, IL-1B 511 and IL-1RA 2018) of the interleukin gene cluster. .... Two genes of the interleukin cluster, IL − 1α .... arate branch. Lingayats as a caste group originated approx- imately 800 years ago, largely from the agricultural class, and over time, this caste has absorbed members ...

  16. The genomic structure of the DMBT1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Holmskov, U; Wiemann, S

    1999-01-01

    , and in gastrointestinal and lung cancers. Based on these properties, DMBT1 has been proposed to be a candidate tumour suppressor gene. We have determined the genomic sequence of DMBT1 to allow analyses of mutations. The gene has at least 54 exons that span a genomic region of about 80 kb. We have identified a putative...

  17. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fupeng; Hao, Chaoyun; Yan, Lin; Wu, Baoduo; Qin, Xiaowei; Lai, Jianxiong; Song, Yinghui

    2015-09-01

    In higher plants, sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely considered as a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism. Although, several paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of Sus have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes, to date detailed information about the Sus genes is lacking for cacao. This study reports the identification of six novel Sus genes from economically important cacao tree. Analyses of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrated evolutionary conservation in the Sus family across cacao and other plant species. The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles in cacao, with TcSus1, TcSus5 and TcSus6, being the predominant genes in the bark with phloem, TcSus2 predominantly expressing in the seed during the stereotype stage. TcSus3 and TcSus4 were significantly detected more in the pod husk and seed coat along the pod development, and showed development dependent expression profiles in the cacao pod. These results provide new insights into the evolution, and basic information that will assist in elucidating the functions of cacao Sus gene family.

  18. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Wang, Danhua; Huang, Qixing; Mo, Yeyong; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae) genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III). Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  19. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zou

    Full Text Available WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III. Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae, comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  20. Evolution, functional divergence and conserved exon-intron structure of bHLH/PAS gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Ma, Zhaowu; Xu, Xiaopeng; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    bHLH/PAS genes encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with bHLH, PAS and PAS_3 domain. bHLH/PAS genes are involved in many essential physiological and developmental processes, such as hypoxic response neural development, the circadian clock, and learning ability. Despite their important functions, the origin and evolution of this bHLH/PAS gene family has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we aim to explore the origin, evolution, gene structure conservation of this gene family and provide a model to analyze the evolution of other gene families. Our results show that genes of the bHLH/PAS family only exist in metazoans. They may have originated from the common ancestor of metazoans and expanded into vertebrates. We identified bHLH/PAS genes in more than ten species representing the main lineages and constructed the phylogenetic trees (Beyasian, ML and NJ) to classify them into three groups. The exon-intron structure analysis revealed that a relatively conserved "1001-0210" eight-exon structure exists in most groups and lineages. In addition, we found the exon fusion pattern in several groups in this conserved eight-exon structure. Further analysis indicated that bHLH/PAS protein paralogs evolved from several gene duplication events followed by functional divergence and purifying selection. We presented a phylogenetic model to describe the evolutionary history of the exon structures of bHLH/PAS genes. Taken together, our study revealed the evolutionary model, functional divergence and gene structure conservation of bHLH/PAS genes. These findings provide clues for the functional and evolutionary mechanism of bHLH/PAS genes.

  1. Structure and expression of the chicken calmodulin I gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Q; Berchtold, M W

    1997-01-01

    The chicken calmodulin I (CaMI) gene has been isolated and characterized on the level of cDNA and genomic DNA. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence is identical to the one of chicken CaMII which consists of 148 aa. The CaMI gene contains six exons. Its intron/exon organization is identical...... to that of the chicken CaMII and the CaMI and CaMIII genes of rat and human. Expression of the CaMI gene was detected in all chicken tissues examined, although at varying levels. The gene is transcribed into four mRNAs of 0.8, 1.4, 1.7 and 4.4 kb as determined by Northern blot analysis. Our results demonstrate...... that the "multigene-one-protein" principle of CaM synthesis is not only applicable to mammals whose CaM is encoded by three different genes, but also to chickens....

  2. FancyGene: dynamic visualization of gene structures and protein domain architectures on genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaldi, Davide; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2009-09-01

    FancyGene is a fast and user-friendly web-based tool for producing images of one or more genes directly on the corresponding genomic locus. Starting from a variety of input formats, FancyGene rebuilds the basic components of a gene (UTRs, intron, exons). Once the initial representation is obtained, the user can superimpose additional features-such as protein domains and/or a variety of biological markers-in specific positions. FancyGene is extremely flexible allowing the user to change the resulting image dynamically, modifying colors and shapes and adding and/or removing objects. The output images are generated either in portable network graphics (PNG) or portable document format (PDF) formats and can be used for scientific presentations as well as for publications. The PDF format preserves editing capabilities, allowing picture modification using any vector graphics editor.

  3. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report III. The black gene: general and molecular characteristics of its radiomutability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, I D; Namolovan, L N; Aleksandrova, M V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the genetic, cytogenetic and molecular analysis of the nature of heritable recessive mutations at the small black (b) gene of Drosophila melanogaster induced by different doses (5-10 Gy) of 60Co gamma-rays and 0.85 MeV fission neutrons in the mature sperms of the wild-type males from the laboratory line D32 are presented. The whole spectrum of the b mutations induced by radiation of different quality is found to be the same and consists of the two main classes such as gene/point and gene/chromosome mutations, the latter of which include the whole-genomic, infra- or inter-chromosomal rearrangements involving the b gene. The induction rate of both mutation classes is found to be increased linearly with a dose of low- and high-LET radiation and the effectiveness of neutrons is 2.7 and 4.6 as large as that of gamma-rays under the gene/point and gene/chromosome mutation induction, respectively. Essentially, the molecular alterations underlying 65 gamma-ray- and neutron-induced gene/point b mutations are found not to be detected by the PCR technique. These and other established features of the b gene radiomutability are drastically different from those of another larger vestigial gene described earlier. The nature of these differences is discussed within the framework of the current notion of different biological organization of the two genes mentioned above and of the track structure theory as well.

  4. The mammalian adult neurogenesis gene ontology (MANGO provides a structural framework for published information on genes regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert W Overall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a 'bottom-up' community effort complementing the already

  5. Phylogenetic and functional gene structure shifts of the oral microbiomes in periodontitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; He, Jinzhi; He, Zhili; Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Mengting; Xu, Xin; Sun, Feifei; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Jiyao; Xie, Wenbo; Deng, Ye; Qin, Yujia; VanNostrand, Joy D; Xiao, Liying; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition and function of subgingival dental plaque is crucial to understanding human periodontal health and disease, but it is challenging because of the complexity of the interactions between human microbiomes and human body. Here, we examined the phylogenetic and functional gene differences between periodontal and healthy individuals using MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and a specific functional gene array (a combination of GeoChip 4.0 for biogeochemical processes and HuMiChip 1.0 for human microbiomes). Our analyses indicated that the phylogenetic and functional gene structure of the oral microbiomes were distinctly different between periodontal and healthy groups. Also, 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis indicated that 39 genera were significantly different between healthy and periodontitis groups, and Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Treponema, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Tannerella, Hallella, Parvimonas, Peptostreptococcus and Catonella showed higher relative abundances in the periodontitis group. In addition, functional gene array data showed that a lower gene number but higher signal intensity of major genes existed in periodontitis, and a variety of genes involved in virulence factors, amino acid metabolism and glycosaminoglycan and pyrimidine degradation were enriched in periodontitis, suggesting their potential importance in periodontal pathogenesis. However, the genes involved in amino acid synthesis and pyrimidine synthesis exhibited a significantly lower relative abundance compared with healthy group. Overall, this study provides new insights into our understanding of phylogenetic and functional gene structure of subgingival microbial communities of periodontal patients and their importance in pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:24671083

  6. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2.3 RNA extraction and Northern blot analysis. Total RNA from cells was isolated by the method of ... After 24 h of recovery, cells were treated with 50 nM moxesterol (NEN life science products, USA) dissolved .... major egg yolk protein genes, vitellogenin (VTG) (Gold- berger and Deeley 1980; Wolffe and Tata 1983) and the.

  7. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. ... Spice and Beverage Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences/Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources Utilization of Spice and Beverage Crops ...

  8. Structure and molecular characterization of barley nudix hydrolase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Kihara, Makoto; Sugimoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Putative nudix hydrolase (NUDX) genes, which encode amino acid sequences showing homology with those of Arabidopsis NUDXs and conserve nudix motif, were identified from barley. The 14 deduced barley NUDXs (HvNUDX1-14) were classified into established subfamilies, except for 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP) pyrophosphohydrolase and mRNA decapping enzyme subfamilies, and three substrate-unknown subfamilies. Drought and UV-C stresses, respectively, up-regulated 7 and 4 HvNUDX genes, but some homologs of Arabidopsis NUDXs showed different responses to abiotic stress. HvNUDX12 gene, belonging to diadenosine tetraphosphates (Ap₄A) pyrophosphohydrolase subfamily gene and up-regulated by UV-C, was expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant protein showed 8-oxo-dGTP, Ap₄A, and guanosine-3',5'-tetraphosphate (ppGpp) pyrophosphohydrolase activities, and the suppression of the lacZ amber mutation in a mutT-deficient E. coli cells caused by the incorporation of 8-oxo-GTP into mRNA was prevented to a significant degree. These results suggest that barley NUDXs have unique constitution and response of NUDX to abiotic stress.

  9. Spontaneous gene flow and population structure in wild and cultivated chicory, Cichorium intybus L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiær, Lars Pødenphant; Felber, F.; Flavell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous gene flow between wild and cultivated chicory, Cichorium intybus L., may have implications for the genetic structure and evolution of populations and varieties. One aspect of this crop-wild gene flow is the dispersal of transgenes from genetically modified varieties, e.g. gene flow from...... GM chicory to natural chicory could have unwanted consequences. With the purpose to identify and quantify crop-wild gene flow in chicory, we analysed introgression in 19 wild chicory populations and 16 accessions of chicory varieties and landraces distributed across Northern, Central...... and Mediterranean Europe. The analysis used 281 AFLP markers and 75 SSAP markers giving a total of 356 polymorphic markers. Results from model based assignments with the program STRUCTURE indicated many incidents of recent gene flow. Gene flow was observed both between cultivars and wild populations, between...

  10. Molecular characterization of structural genes coding for a membrane bound hydrogenase in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, R; Hanczár, T; Bodrossy, L; Murrell, J C; Kovács, K L

    2001-12-18

    The first gene cluster encoding for a membrane bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from a methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), was cloned and sequenced. The cluster consisted of the structural genes hupS and hupL and accessory genes hupE, hupC and hupD. A DeltahupSL deletion mutant of Mc. capsulatus was constructed by marker exchange mutagenesis. Membrane associated hydrogenase activity disappeared. The membrane associated hydrogenase appeared to have a hydrogen uptake function in vivo.

  11. Chromosome structures: reduction of certain problems with unequal gene content and gene paralogs to integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily; Gershgorin, Roman; Gorbunov, Konstantin

    2017-12-06

    Chromosome structure is a very limited model of the genome including the information about its chromosomes such as their linear or circular organization, the order of genes on them, and the DNA strand encoding a gene. Gene lengths, nucleotide composition, and intergenic regions are ignored. Although highly incomplete, such structure can be used in many cases, e.g., to reconstruct phylogeny and evolutionary events, to identify gene synteny, regulatory elements and promoters (considering highly conserved elements), etc. Three problems are considered; all assume unequal gene content and the presence of gene paralogs. The distance problem is to determine the minimum number of operations required to transform one chromosome structure into another and the corresponding transformation itself including the identification of paralogs in two structures. We use the DCJ model which is one of the most studied combinatorial rearrangement models. Double-, sesqui-, and single-operations as well as deletion and insertion of a chromosome region are considered in the model; the single ones comprise cut and join. In the reconstruction problem, a phylogenetic tree with chromosome structures in the leaves is given. It is necessary to assign the structures to inner nodes of the tree to minimize the sum of distances between terminal structures of each edge and to identify the mutual paralogs in a fairly large set of structures. A linear algorithm is known for the distance problem without paralogs, while the presence of paralogs makes it NP-hard. If paralogs are allowed but the insertion and deletion operations are missing (and special constraints are imposed), the reduction of the distance problem to integer linear programming is known. Apparently, the reconstruction problem is NP-hard even in the absence of paralogs. The problem of contigs is to find the optimal arrangements for each given set of contigs, which also includes the mutual identification of paralogs. We proved that these

  12. Structural and gene expression analyses of uptake hydrogenases ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These include the expression of oxygen-scavenging uptake hydrogenases, the formation of hopanoid-rich vesicles, enclosed by multi-layered hopanoid structures, the lignification of hyphal cell walls, and the production of haemoglobins in the symbiotic nodule. In this work, we analysed the expression and structure of the ...

  13. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila genes. Report 2. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristics of chromosome mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Aleksandrov, I D; Korablinova, S V

    2012-01-01

    The results of the PCR-assay of mutation lesions at each of 16 fragments overlapping the entire vestigial (vg) gene of Drosophila melanogaster in 52 gamma-ray-, neutron- and neutron + gamma-ray-induced vg mutants having the inversion or translocation breakpoint within the vg microregion are presented. 4 from 52 mutants studied were found to have large deletions of about 200 kb covering the entire vg gene and adjacent to sca and l(2)C gene-markers as well. 23 mutants from 48 (47.9%) were found to have a wild-type gene structure showing that the exchange breakpoints are located outside of the vg gene. 25 others display the intragenic lesions of different complexity detected by PCR as the absence of(i) either one fragment or (ii) two or more (6-7) adjacent fragments and (iii) simultaneously several (i) or (i) and (ii) types separated by normal gene regions. It is important that 6 from 25 mutants have the breakpoint inside the vg gene and display the (i) or (ii) type of lesions at the gene regions containing the putative break whereas 5 others from 25 with the above lesions have the exchange breakpoint outside the vg gene. Therefore, the breakpoints underlying either inversions or translocations induced by low- and high-LET radiation are likely to be located within and outside the gene under study. Thereby, the formation of exchanges is accompanied by DNA deletions of various sizes at the exchange breakpoints. The molecular model of formation of such exchange-deletion rearrangements is elaborated and presented. Also, conception of the predominately clustered action of both low- and high-LET radiation on the germ cell genome is suggested as the summing-up of the presented results. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce the clusters of genetic alterations in the form of hidden DNA damages as well as gene/chromosome mutations is determined by the track structure and hierarchical organization of the genome. To detect the quality and frequency patterns of all

  14. The structure and expression of globin genes in rabbit and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flavell, R.A.; Bernards, R.A.; Grosveld, G.C.; Hoeijmakers-van Dommelen, H.A.M.; Kooter, J.M.; Boer, E. de; Little, P.F.R.

    1979-01-01

    The rabbit and human β-related globin genes have been analysed using genomic 'Southern blotting' and molecular cloning. The rabbit β-globin gene structure has been worked out in detail and its transcripts have been characterized by S₁ nuclease transcription mapping. The arrangement of

  15. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An open reading frame of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. When this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain req...

  16. Methods and strategies for gene structure curation in WormBase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, G W; Davis, P A; Rogers, A S; Bieri, T; Ozersky, P; Spieth, J

    2011-01-01

    .... In one of its roles as a central repository for nematode biology, WormBase continues to refine the gene structure annotations using sequence similarity and other computational methods, as well...

  17. Gene Structures, Classification, and Expression Models of the DREB Transcription Factor Subfamily in Populus trichocarpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunlin; Zhang, Haizhen; Mao, Xuliang; Li, Chenghao

    2013-01-01

    We identified 75 dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) protein genes in Populus trichocarpa. We analyzed gene structures, phylogenies, domain duplications, genome localizations, and expression profiles. The phylogenic construction suggests that the PtrDREB gene subfamily can be classified broadly into six subtypes (DREB A-1 to A-6) in Populus. The chromosomal localizations of the PtrDREB genes indicated 18 segmental duplication events involving 36 genes and six redundant PtrDREB genes were involved in tandem duplication events. There were fewer introns in the PtrDREB subfamily. The motif composition of PtrDREB was highly conserved in the same subtype. We investigated expression profiles of this gene subfamily from different tissues and/or developmental stages. Sixteen genes present in the digital expression analysis had high levels of transcript accumulation. The microarray results suggest that 18 genes were upregulated. We further examined the stress responsiveness of 15 genes by qRT-PCR. A digital northern analysis showed that the PtrDREB17, 18, and 32 genes were highly induced in leaves under cold stress, and the same expression trends were shown by qRT-PCR. Taken together, these observations may lay the foundation for future functional analyses to unravel the biological roles of Populus' DREB genes. PMID:24324388

  18. Gene Structures, Classification, and Expression Models of the DREB Transcription Factor Subfamily in Populus trichocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified 75 dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB protein genes in Populus trichocarpa. We analyzed gene structures, phylogenies, domain duplications, genome localizations, and expression profiles. The phylogenic construction suggests that the PtrDREB gene subfamily can be classified broadly into six subtypes (DREB A-1 to A-6 in Populus. The chromosomal localizations of the PtrDREB genes indicated 18 segmental duplication events involving 36 genes and six redundant PtrDREB genes were involved in tandem duplication events. There were fewer introns in the PtrDREB subfamily. The motif composition of PtrDREB was highly conserved in the same subtype. We investigated expression profiles of this gene subfamily from different tissues and/or developmental stages. Sixteen genes present in the digital expression analysis had high levels of transcript accumulation. The microarray results suggest that 18 genes were upregulated. We further examined the stress responsiveness of 15 genes by qRT-PCR. A digital northern analysis showed that the PtrDREB17, 18, and 32 genes were highly induced in leaves under cold stress, and the same expression trends were shown by qRT-PCR. Taken together, these observations may lay the foundation for future functional analyses to unravel the biological roles of Populus’ DREB genes.

  19. WebScipio: An online tool for the determination of gene structures using protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waack Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining the gene structure for a given protein encoding gene is an important step in many analyses. A software suited for this task should be readily accessible, accurate, easy to handle and should provide the user with a coherent representation of the most probable gene structure. It should be rigorous enough to optimise features on the level of single bases and at the same time flexible enough to allow for cross-species searches. Results WebScipio, a web interface to the Scipio software, allows a user to obtain the corresponding coding sequence structure of a here given a query protein sequence that belongs to an already assembled eukaryotic genome. The resulting gene structure is presented in various human readable formats like a schematic representation, and a detailed alignment of the query and the target sequence highlighting any discrepancies. WebScipio can also be used to identify and characterise the gene structures of homologs in related organisms. In addition, it offers a web service for integration with other programs. Conclusion WebScipio is a tool that allows users to get a high-quality gene structure prediction from a protein query. It offers more than 250 eukaryotic genomes that can be searched and produces predictions that are close to what can be achieved by manual annotation, for in-species and cross-species searches alike. WebScipio is freely accessible at http://www.webscipio.org.

  20. Gene structure, DNA methylation, and imprinted expression of the human SNRPN gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, T.C.; Filbrandt, M.M. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The human SNRPN (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N) gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the smallest deletion region involved in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) within chromosome 15q11-q13. Paternal only expression of SNRPN has previously been demonstrated by use of cell lines from PWS patients (maternal allele only) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients (paternal allele only). We have characterized two previously unidentified 5{prime} exons of the SNRPN gene and demonstrate that exons -1 and 0 are included in the full-length transcript. This gene is expressed in a wide range of somatic tissues and at high, approximately equal levels in all regions of the brain. Both the first exon of SNRPN (exon -1) and the putative transcription start site are embedded within a CpG island. This CpG island is extensively methylated on the repressed maternal allele and is unmethylated on the expressed paternal allele, in a wide range of fetal and adult somatic cells. This provides a quick and highly reliable diagnostic assay for PWS and AS, which is based on DNA-methylation analysis that has been tested on >100 patients in a variety of tissues. Conversely, several CpG sites {approximately}22 kb downstream of the transcription start site in intron 5 are preferentially methylated on the expressed paternal allele in somatic tissues and male germ cells, whereas these same sites are unmethylated in fetal oocytes. These findings are consistent with a key role for DNA methylation in the imprinted inheritance and subsequent gene expression of the human SNRPN gene. 59 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Huyet

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  2. Toxoplasma gondii gene expression is under the control of regulatory pathways acting through chromatin structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bougdour A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity state of a gene is determined by a complex regulatory network of co-acting factors affecting the structure of the chromatin into which the gene is embedded. While significant changes of the transcriptome occur during cell differentiation in apicomplexan parasites, basic mechanisms controlling gene expression are still unknown. Recent studies support and expand the concept of the chromatin environment being key factor for the control of transcriptional activity in these lower eukaryotes organisms. Here, we review recent advances in the field of epigenetic gene regulation in Toxoplasma gondii, the model apicomplexan.

  3. Structure and expression of the human MDR (P-glycoprotein) gene family.

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, J E; Soffir, R; Noonan, K E; Choi, K.; Roninson, I B

    1989-01-01

    The human MDR (P-glycoprotein) gene family is known to include two members, MDR1 and MDR2. The product of the MDR1 gene, which is responsible for resistance to different cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance), appears to serve as an energy-dependent efflux pump for various lipophilic compounds. The function of the MDR2 gene remains unknown. We have examined the structure of the human MDR gene family by Southern hybridization of DNA from different multidrug-resistant cell lines with subfragmen...

  4. TAR cloning: insights into gene function, long-range haplotypes and genome structure and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Larionov, Vladimir

    2006-10-01

    The structural and functional analysis of mammalian genomes would benefit from the ability to isolate from multiple DNA samples any targeted chromosomal segment that is the size of an average human gene. A cloning technique that is based on transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae satisfies this need. It is a unique tool to selectively recover chromosome segments that are up to 250 kb in length from complex genomes. In addition, TAR cloning can be used to characterize gene function and genome variation, including polymorphic structural rearrangements, mutations and the evolution of gene families, and for long-range haplotyping.

  5. Structural variation of the ribosomal gene cluster within the class Insecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukha, D.V.; Sidorenko, A.P.; Lazebnaya, I.V. [Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    General estimation of ribosomal DNA variation within the class Insecta is presented. It is shown that, using blot-hybridization, one can detect differences in the structure of the ribosomal gene cluster not only between genera within an order, but also between species within a genera, including sibling species. Structure of the ribosomal gene cluster of the Coccinellidae family (ladybirds) is analyzed. It is shown that cloned highly conservative regions of ribosomal DNA of Tetrahymena pyriformis can be used as probes for analyzing ribosomal genes in insects. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Structural relationships between highly conserved elements and genes in vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    Full Text Available Large numbers of sequence elements have been identified to be highly conserved among vertebrate genomes. These highly conserved elements (HCEs are often located in or around genes that are involved in transcription regulation and early development. They have been shown to be involved in cis-regulatory activities through both in vivo and additional computational studies. We have investigated the structural relationships between such elements and genes in six vertebrate genomes human, mouse, rat, chicken, zebrafish and tetraodon and detected several thousand cases of conserved HCE-gene associations, and also cases of HCEs with no common target genes. A few examples underscore the potential significance of our findings about several individual genes. We found that the conserved association between HCE/HCEs and gene/genes are not restricted to elements by their absolute distance on the genome. Notably, long-range associations were identified and the molecular functions of the associated genes do not show any particular overrepresentation of the functional categories previously reported. HCEs in close proximity are found to be linked with different set of gene/genes. The results reflect the highly complex correlation between HCEs and their putative target genes.

  7. The IQD gene family in soybean: structure, phylogeny, evolution and expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Feng

    Full Text Available Members of the plant-specific IQ67-domain (IQD protein family are involved in plant development and the basal defense response. Although systematic characterization of this family has been carried out in Arabidopsis, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, Brachypodium distachyon and rice (Oryza sativa, systematic analysis and expression profiling of this gene family in soybean (Glycine max have not previously been reported. In this study, we identified and structurally characterized IQD genes in the soybean genome. A complete set of 67 soybean IQD genes (GmIQD1-67 was identified using Blast search tools, and the genes were clustered into four subfamilies (IQD I-IV based on phylogeny. These soybean IQD genes are distributed unevenly across all 20 chromosomes, with 30 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplication has played a major role in the expansion of the soybean IQD gene family. Analysis of the Ka/Ks ratios showed that the duplicated genes of the GmIQD family primarily underwent purifying selection. Microsynteny was detected in most pairs: genes in clade 1-3 might be present in genome regions that were inverted, expanded or contracted after the divergence; most gene pairs in clade 4 showed high conservation with little rearrangement among these gene-residing regions. Of the soybean IQD genes examined, six were most highly expressed in young leaves, six in flowers, one in roots and two in nodules. Our qRT-PCR analysis of 24 soybean IQD III genes confirmed that these genes are regulated by MeJA stress. Our findings present a comprehensive overview of the soybean IQD gene family and provide insights into the evolution of this family. In addition, this work lays a solid foundation for further experiments aimed at determining the biological functions of soybean IQD genes in growth and development.

  8. Functional genomics and structural biology in the definition of gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrmova, Maria; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2009-01-01

    By mid-2007, the three-dimensional (3D) structures of some 45,000 proteins have been solved, over a period where the linear structures of millions of genes have been defined. Technical challenges associated with X-ray crystallography are being overcome and high-throughput methods both for crystallization of proteins and for solving their 3D structures are under development. The question arises as to how structural biology can be integrated with and adds value to functional genomics programs. Structural biology will assist in the definition of gene function through the identification of the likely function of the protein products of genes. The 3D information allows protein sequences predicted from DNA sequences to be classified into broad groups, according to the overall 'fold', or 3D shape, of the protein. Structural information can be used to predict the preferred substrate of a protein, and thereby greatly enhance the accurate annotation of the corresponding gene. Furthermore, it will enable the effects of amino acid substitutions in enzymes to be better understood with respect to enzyme function and could thereby provide insights into natural variation in genes. If the molecular basis of transcription factor-DNA interactions were defined through precise 3D knowledge of the protein-DNA binding site, it would be possible to predict the effects of base substitutions within the motif on the specificity and/or kinetics of binding. In this chapter, we present specific examples of how structural biology can provide valuable information for functional genomics programs.

  9. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Methods Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Results Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Conclusions Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene. PMID:24716800

  10. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielska, Elżbieta; Płucienniczak, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Magdalena; Dowierciał, Anna; Rode, Wojciech

    2014-04-09

    Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene.

  11. Bioinformatic screening of autoimmune disease genes and protein structure prediction with FAMS for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Shigeharu; Umeyama, Hideaki; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are often intractable because their causes are unknown. Identifying which genes contribute to these diseases may allow us to understand the pathogenesis, but it is difficult to determine which genes contribute to disease. Recently, epigenetic information has been considered to activate/deactivate disease-related genes. Thus, it may also be useful to study epigenetic information that differs between healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Among several types of epigenetic information, promoter methylation is believed to be one of the most important factors. Here, we propose that principal component analysis is useful to identify specific gene promoters that are differently methylated between the normal healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Full Automatic Modeling System (FAMS) was used to predict the three-dimensional structures of selected proteins and successfully inferred relatively confident structures. Several possibilities of the application to the drug discovery based on obtained structures are discussed.

  12. Genomic structure and nucleotide sequence of the p55 gene of the puffer fish Fugu rubripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgar, G.; Rattray, F.; Greystrong, J.; Brenner, S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-10

    The p55 gene, which codes for a 55-kDa erythrocyte membrane protein, has been cloned and sequenced from the genome of the Japanese puffer fish Fugu rubripes (Fugu). This organism has the smallest recorded vertebrate genome and therefore provides an efficient way to sequence genes at the genomic level. The gene encoding p55 covers 5.5 kb from the beginning to the end of the coding sequence, four to six times smaller than the estimated size of the human gene, and is encoded by 12 exons. The structure of this gene has not been previously elucidated, but from this and other data we would predict a similar or identical structure in mammals. The predicted amino acid sequence of this gene in Fugu, coding for a polypeptide of 467 amino acids, is very similar to that of the human gene with the exception of the first two exons, which differ considerably. The predicted Fugu protein has a molecular weight (52.6 kDa compared with 52.3 kDa) and an isoelectric point very similar to those of human p55. In human, the p55 gene lies in the gene-dense Xq28 region, just 30 kb 3{prime} to the Factor VIII gene, and is estimated to cover 20-30 kb. Its 5{prime} end is associated with a CpG island, although there is no evidence that this is the case in Fugu. The small size of genes in Fugu and the high coding homology that they share with their mammalian equivalents, both in structure and sequence, make this compact vertebrate genome an ideal model for genomic studies. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Population Genetic Structure and Gene Flow Among Nigerian Goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population Genetic structure in 200 indigenous goats sampled across four states from the South-Western and South Southern region of Nigeria was assessed using 7 microsatellite DNA markers. Observed Analysis of molecular genetic variation (AMOVA) was higher within populations (3.47) than among populations (1.84) ...

  14. The vertebrate RCAN gene family: novel insights into evolution, structure and regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Serrano-Candelas

    Full Text Available Recently there has been much interest in the Regulators of Calcineurin (RCAN proteins which are important endogenous modulators of the calcineurin-NFATc signalling pathway. They have been shown to have a crucial role in cellular programmes such as the immune response, muscle fibre remodelling and memory, but also in pathological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy and neurodegenerative diseases. In vertebrates, the RCAN family form a functional subfamily of three members RCAN1, RCAN2 and RCAN3 whereas only one RCAN is present in the rest of Eukarya. In addition, RCAN genes have been shown to collocate with RUNX and CLIC genes in ACD clusters (ACD21, ACD6 and ACD1. How the RCAN genes and their clustering in ACDs evolved is still unknown. After analysing RCAN gene family evolution using bioinformatic tools, we propose that the three RCAN vertebrate genes within the ACD clusters, which evolved from single copy genes present in invertebrates and lower eukaryotes, are the result of two rounds of whole genome duplication, followed by a segmental duplication. This evolutionary scenario involves the loss or gain of some RCAN genes during evolution. In addition, we have analysed RCAN gene structure and identified the existence of several characteristic features that can be involved in RCAN evolution and gene expression regulation. These included: several transposable elements, CpG islands in the 5' region of the genes, the existence of antisense transcripts (NAT associated with the three human genes, and considerable evidence for bidirectional promoters that regulate RCAN gene expression. Furthermore, we show that the CpG island associated with the RCAN3 gene promoter is unmethylated and transcriptionally active. All these results provide timely new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying RCAN function and a more in depth knowledge of this gene family whose members are obvious candidates for the development of future therapies.

  15. Differential accumulation of nif structural gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandii with defined deletions in the nif structural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth.

  16. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 Gu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. [Gene polymorphisms in the dihydrofolate reductase ( dhfr ) and dihydropteroate synthase ( dhps ) genes and structural modelling of the dhps gene in Colombian isolates of Toxoplasma gondii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Liliana Jazmín; Duque, Sofía; López, Miryam Consuelo; Moncada, Diego; Molina, Diego; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique; Gunturiz, María Luz

    2014-01-01

    There are no reports describing polymorphisms in target genes of anti- Toxoplasma drugs in South American isolates. This study sought to perform cloning and sequencing of the dihydrofolate reductase ( dhfr ) and dihydropteroate-synthase ( dhps ) genes of the reference Rh strain and two Colombian isolates of Toxoplasma gondii . Two isolates were obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis. A DNA extraction technique and PCR assay for the dhfr and dhps genes were standardized, and the products of amplification were cloned into Escherichia coli and sequenced. One polymorphism (A « G) was found at position 235 of exon 2 in the dhps gene. In addition, two polymorphisms (G « C) at positions 259 and 260 and one polymorphism (T « G) at position 371 within exon 4 of the dhps gene were detected. In this last exon, a bioinformatic analysis revealed a non-synonymous polymorphism in the coding region that could lead to the substitution of Glu (CAA or CAG) for His (encoded by codons AAU or AAC). A structural model of the T. gondii DHPS protein was calculated, and the results revealed modifications in secondary structure due to mutations. The methods described in this study can be used as a tool to search for polymorphisms in samples from patients with different clinical manifestations of toxoplasmosis and to examine their relationship with the therapeutic response.

  18. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRISM...... modeling and three-state versions of the five model structures. The models are all represented as probabilistic logic programs and evaluated using the PRISM machine learning system in terms of statistical information criteria and gene-finding prediction accuracy, in two bacterial genomes. Neither of our...

  19. Automating gene library synthesis by structure-based combinatorial protein engineering: examples from plant sesquiterpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokarry, Melissa; Laurendon, Caroline; O'Maille, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based combinatorial protein engineering (SCOPE) is a homology-independent recombination method to create multiple crossover gene libraries by assembling defined combinations of structural elements ranging from single mutations to domains of protein structure. SCOPE was originally inspired by DNA shuffling, which mimics recombination during meiosis, where mutations from parental genes are "shuffled" to create novel combinations in the resulting progeny. DNA shuffling utilizes sequence identity between parental genes to mediate template-switching events (the annealing and extension of one parental gene fragment on another) in PCR reassembly reactions to generate crossovers and hence recombination between parental genes. In light of the conservation of protein structure and degeneracy of sequence, SCOPE was developed to enable the "shuffling" of distantly related genes with no requirement for sequence identity. The central principle involves the use of oligonucleotides to encode for crossover regions to choreograph template-switching events during PCR assembly of gene fragments to create chimeric genes. This approach was initially developed to create libraries of hybrid DNA polymerases from distantly related parents, and later developed to create a combinatorial mutant library of sesquiterpene synthases to explore the catalytic landscapes underlying the functional divergence of related enzymes. This chapter presents a simplified protocol of SCOPE that can be integrated with different mutagenesis techniques and is suitable for automation by liquid-handling robots. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of SCOPE to create gene libraries using plant sesquiterpene synthases as the model system. In the first example, we outline how to create an active-site library as a series of complex mixtures of diverse mutants. In the second example, we outline how to create a focused library as an array of individual clones to distil minimal combinations of

  20. The desA gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is the structural gene for delta 12 desaturase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, H; Avelange-Macherel, M H; Murata, N

    1993-09-01

    The desA gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was expressed in Escherichia coli, which does not contain any fatty acid desaturase. The product of the desA gene catalyzed the desaturation of fatty acids at the delta 12 position. This result demonstrates that desA is the structural gene for a delta 12 desaturase.

  1. Cationized bovine serum albumin as gene carrier: Influence of specific secondary structure on DNA complexibility and gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianwei; Li, Bangbang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Youxiang

    2016-07-01

    In this research, BSA, one of the natural rigid globular proteins with ca. 51% of α-helix secondary structure, was utilized to prepare cationized BSA (cBSA) as gene carrier. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) or polyethylenimine (PEI1800) was grafted to BSA with different grafting levels. Based on the circular dichoism (CD) spectra, all cBSA remained α-helical structure to some degree. This was exciting to endow cBSA with quite different DNA complexibility and cellular biology behavior from the random coiled and flexible polycations such as PEI and poly-l-lysine (PLL). Strangely, the DNA condensability decreased with the increment of TEPA or PEI1800 grafting level. Also, the cBSA could condense DNA effectively to form irregular nanoparticles around 50-200nm above N/P ratio of 10. On account of the excellent hydration of BSA, the cBSA/DNA complexes revealed good colloidal stability under physiological salt condition. Cell culture experiments indicated this BSA-based gene carrier possessed good cellular compatibility. Surprisingly, cBSA/DNA complexes could be uptaken excellently by up to 90% cells. This might be owing to the agitation effect of α-helical structure and the positive potential of these complexes. BSA-PEI1800/DNA complexes with quick endosome escape even had transfection efficiency as high as PEI25k/DNA complexes. Overall, this paper provided us the potential of cBSA as gene carrier and might have some instructions in the design of protein-based gene delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromoll, J; Pekel, E.; Nieschlag, E. [Institute of Reproductive Medicine of the Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1996-07-15

    The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene were determined by either screening a phage library of human genomic DNA or applying the long PCR technique to amplify different exon pairs with their corresponding introns. The FSHR gene spans a region of 54 kb and consists of 10 exons and 9 introns. Most of the extracellular domain is encoded by 9 exons, ranging in length between 69 and 251 bp; the C-terminal part of the extracellular domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain are encoded by the large exon 10 (1234 bp). Overall the gene encodes 695 amino acids. The structure of the human FSHR displays a striking similarity to that of the previously characterized rat FSHR gene, with a high degree of conservation in exon sizes and exon/intron junctions. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Comparative Annotation of Viral Genomes with Non-Conserved Gene Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas; Hein, Jotun

    2007-01-01

    allows for coding in unidirectional nested and overlapping reading frames, to annotate two homologous aligned viral genomes. Our method does not insist on conserved gene structure between the two sequences, thus making it applicable for the pairwise comparison of more distantly related sequences. Results...... that conservation of gene structure on top of nucleotide sequence is a valuable source of information, especially in distantly related genomes.......Motivation: Detecting genes in viral genomes is a complex task. Due to the biological necessity of them being constrained in length, RNA viruses in particular tend to code in overlapping reading frames. Since one amino acid is encoded by a triplet of nucleic acids, up to three genes may be coded...

  4. Structure, expression differentiation and evolution of duplicated fiber developmental genes in Gossypium barbadense and G. hirsutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tianzhen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both Gossypium hirsutum and G. barbadense probably originated from a common ancestor, but they have very different agronomic and fiber quality characters. Here we selected 17 fiber development-related genes to study their structures, tree topologies, chromosomal location and expression patterns to better understand the interspecific divergence of fiber development genes in the two cultivated tetraploid species. Results The sequence and structure of 70.59% genes were conserved with the same exon length and numbers in different species, while 29.41% genes showed diversity. There were 15 genes showing independent evolution between the A- and D-subgenomes after polyploid formation, while two evolved via different degrees of colonization. Chromosomal location showed that 22 duplicate genes were located in which at least one fiber quality QTL was detected. The molecular evolutionary rates suggested that the D-subgenome of the allotetraploid underwent rapid evolutionary differentiation, and selection had acted at the tetraploid level. Expression profiles at fiber initiation and early elongation showed that the transcripts levels of most genes were higher in Hai7124 than in TM-1. During the primary-secondary transition period, expression of most genes peaked earlier in TM-1 than in Hai7124. Homeolog expression profile showed that A-subgenome, or the combination of A- and D-subgenomes, played critical roles in fiber quality divergence of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. However, the expression of D-subgenome alone also played an important role. Conclusion Integrating analysis of the structure and expression to fiber development genes, suggests selective breeding for certain desirable fiber qualities played an important role in divergence of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense.

  5. Inference of gene regulatory networks with sparse structural equation models exploiting genetic perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Cai

    Full Text Available Integrating genetic perturbations with gene expression data not only improves accuracy of regulatory network topology inference, but also enables learning of causal regulatory relations between genes. Although a number of methods have been developed to integrate both types of data, the desiderata of efficient and powerful algorithms still remains. In this paper, sparse structural equation models (SEMs are employed to integrate both gene expression data and cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL, for modeling gene regulatory networks in accordance with biological evidence about genes regulating or being regulated by a small number of genes. A systematic inference method named sparsity-aware maximum likelihood (SML is developed for SEM estimation. Using simulated directed acyclic or cyclic networks, the SML performance is compared with that of two state-of-the-art algorithms: the adaptive Lasso (AL based scheme, and the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG method. Computer simulations demonstrate that the novel SML algorithm offers significantly better performance than the AL-based and QDG algorithms across all sample sizes from 100 to 1,000, in terms of detection power and false discovery rate, in all the cases tested that include acyclic or cyclic networks of 10, 30 and 300 genes. The SML method is further applied to infer a network of 39 human genes that are related to the immune function and are chosen to have a reliable eQTL per gene. The resulting network consists of 9 genes and 13 edges. Most of the edges represent interactions reasonably expected from experimental evidence, while the remaining may just indicate the emergence of new interactions. The sparse SEM and efficient SML algorithm provide an effective means of exploiting both gene expression and perturbation data to infer gene regulatory networks. An open-source computer program implementing the SML algorithm is freely available upon request.

  6. The genomic structure of the human Charcot-Leyden crystal protein gene is analogous to those of the galectin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, K.D. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Handen, J.S.; Rosenberg, H.F. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The Charcot-Leyden crystal (CLC) protein, or eosinophil lysophospholipase, is a characteristic protein of human eosinophils and basophils; recent work has demonstrated that the CLC protein is both structurally and functionally related to the galectin family of {beta}-galactoside binding proteins. The galectins as a group share a number of features in common, including a linear ligand binding site encoded on a single exon. In this work, we demonstrate that the intron-exon structure of the gene encoding CLC is analogous to those encoding the galectins. The coding sequence of the CLC gene is divided into four exons, with the entire {beta}-galactoside binding site encoded by exon III. We have isolated CLC {beta}-galactoside binding sites from both orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and murine (Mus musculus) genomic DNAs, both encoded on single exons, and noted conservation of the amino acids shown to interact directly with the {beta}-galactoside ligand. The most likely interpretation of these results suggests the occurrence of one or more exon duplication and insertion events, resulting in the distribution of this lectin domain to CLC as well as to the multiple galectin genes. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  7. A scalable algorithm for structure identification of complex gene regulatory network from temporal expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Shupeng; Rice, Andrew P; Chen, Rui; Wu, Liang; Liu, Ji; Miao, Hongyu

    2017-01-31

    Gene regulatory interactions are of fundamental importance to various biological functions and processes. However, only a few previous computational studies have claimed success in revealing genome-wide regulatory landscapes from temporal gene expression data, especially for complex eukaryotes like human. Moreover, recent work suggests that these methods still suffer from the curse of dimensionality if a network size increases to 100 or higher. Here we present a novel scalable algorithm for identifying genome-wide gene regulatory network (GRN) structures, and we have verified the algorithm performances by extensive simulation studies based on the DREAM challenge benchmark data. The highlight of our method is that its superior performance does not degenerate even for a network size on the order of 10(4), and is thus readily applicable to large-scale complex networks. Such a breakthrough is achieved by considering both prior biological knowledge and multiple topological properties (i.e., sparsity and hub gene structure) of complex networks in the regularized formulation. We also validate and illustrate the application of our algorithm in practice using the time-course gene expression data from a study on human respiratory epithelial cells in response to influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as well as the CHIP-seq data from ENCODE on transcription factor (TF) and target gene interactions. An interesting finding, owing to the proposed algorithm, is that the biggest hub structures (e.g., top ten) in the GRN all center at some transcription factors in the context of epithelial cell infection by IAV. The proposed algorithm is the first scalable method for large complex network structure identification. The GRN structure identified by our algorithm could reveal possible biological links and help researchers to choose which gene functions to investigate in a biological event. The algorithm described in this article is implemented in MATLAB (Ⓡ) , and the source code is

  8. Regulation of genes involved in cell wall synthesis and structure during Ustilago maydis dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Briones, Mariana; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2013-02-01

    The cell wall is the structure that provides the shape to fungal cells and protects them from the difference in osmotic pressure existing between the cytosol and the external medium. Accordingly, changes in structure and composition of the fungal wall must occur during cell differentiation, including the dimorphic transition of fungi. We analyzed, by use of microarrays, the transcriptional regulation of the 639 genes identified to be involved in cell wall synthesis and structure plus the secretome of the Basidiomycota species Ustilago maydis during its dimorphic transition induced by a change in pH. Of these, 189 were differentially expressed during the process, and using as control two monomorphic mutants, one yeast like and the other mycelium constitutive, 66 genes specific of dimorphism were identified. Most of these genes were up-regulated in the mycelial phase. These included CHS genes, genes involved in β-1,6-glucan synthesis, N-glycosylation, and proteins containing a residue of glycosylphosphatidylinositol, and a number of genes from the secretome. The possible significance of these data on cell wall plasticity is discussed. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenomics of the archaeal flagellum: rare horizontal gene transfer in a unique motility structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brochier-Armanet Celine

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As bacteria, motile archaeal species swim by means of rotating flagellum structures driven by a proton gradient force. Interestingly, experimental data have shown that the archaeal flagellum is non-homologous to the bacterial flagellum either in terms of overall structure, components and assembly. The growing number of complete archaeal genomes now permits to investigate the evolution of this unique motility system. Results We report here an exhaustive phylogenomic analysis of the components of the archaeal flagellum. In all complete archaeal genomes, the genes coding for flagellum components are co-localized in one or two well-conserved genomic clusters showing two different types of organizations. Despite their small size, these genes harbor a good phylogenetic signal that allows reconstruction of their evolutionary histories. These support a history of mainly vertical inheritance for the components of this unique motility system, and an interesting possible ancient horizontal gene transfer event (HGT of a whole flagellum-coding gene cluster between Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. Conclusion Our study is one of the few exhaustive phylogenomics analyses of a non-informational cell machinery from the third domain of life. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the evolution of the components of the archaeal flagellum. Moreover, we show that the components of the archaeal flagellar system have not been frequently transferred among archaeal species, indicating that gene fixation following HGT can also be rare for genes encoding components of large macromolecular complexes with a structural role.

  10. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Gene finding with a hidden Markov model of genome structure and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hein, Jotun

    2003-01-01

    the model are linear in alignment length and genome number. The model is applied to the problem of gene finding. The benefit of modelling sequence evolution is demonstrated both in a range of simulations and on a set of orthologous human/mouse gene pairs. AVAILABILITY: Free availability over the Internet...... annotation. The modelling of evolution by the existing comparative gene finders leaves room for improvement. Results: A probabilistic model of both genome structure and evolution is designed. This type of model is called an Evolutionary Hidden Markov Model (EHMM), being composed of an HMM and a set of region...

  12. Genome change in wheat observed through the structure and expression of α/β-gliadin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, K; Wu, J; Matsumoto, T; Kanamori, H; Katagiri, S; Ogihara, Y

    2012-06-01

    To better understand genome structure and the expression of α/β-gliadin multigenes in hexaploid wheat, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones containing α/β-gliadin genes from the three loci, Gli-A2, Gli-B2, and Gli-D2, were screened. Based on their restriction fragment patterns, we selected five BAC clones, namely, two clones for Gli-A2, two clones for Gli-B2, and one clone for Gli-D2, to fully sequence. Approximately 200 kb was sequenced for each locus. In total, twelve α/β-gliadin intact genes and four pseudogenes were found, and retrotransposons or other transposons existed in each BAC clone. Dot-plot analysis revealed the pattern of genome segmental duplication within each BAC. We calculated time since duplication of each set of α/β-gliadin genes and insertion of retrotransposons. Duplication of all adjacent genes within the same BAC clone took place before or after allotetrapolyploidization, but duplication of certain genes occurred before diploid differentiation of wheat species. Retrotransposons were also inserted before and after the segmental duplication events. Furthermore, translocation of α/β-gliadin genes from chromosomes 1 to 6 apparently occurred before the diversification of various wheat genomes. Duplication of genome segments containing α/β-gliadin genes and retrotransposons were brought about through unequal crossing-over or saltatory replication and α/β-gliadin genes per se were duplicated without any recombination events. Out of twelve intact α/β-gliadin genes detected from their sequences, nine were expressed, although their patterns of expression were distinct. Since they have similar cis-elements and promoter structures, the mechanisms underlying their distinct gene expression and possible applications are discussed.

  13. [Cloning and structure analysis of zinc finger protein gene in Populus euphratica Oliv].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Yin, Wei-Lun; Xia, Xin-Li

    2005-03-01

    Zinc finger proteins belong to a family of nuclear transcription factors which function is to regulate gene expression in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. A pair of primers was designed after analyzing the conservation of salt-tolerant zinc protein Alfin-1 in such diverse plants as alfalfa and Arabidopsis. The zinc finger protein gene is isolated from total RNA with RT-PCR in aquaculture leaves of Populus euphratica . Its full cDNA length is 924bp. Analysis of its amino acid sequence showed it has a typical Cys(2)/His(2) zinc finger structure and a G-rich promoter binding site GTGGGG, starting from position 556. Since transcrptional factors which have the same function show conservation in structure and amino acid sequence of DNA binding region, the structure analysis in this paper indicates the cloned zinc finger protein gene may have functional correlation to Alfin-1.

  14. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Fan, Ming; Wang, Suojin; Gao, Xin

    2013-07-01

    Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-21

    Motivation: Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Results: Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. The Author 2013.

  16. A highly conserved gene island of three genes on chromosome 3B of hexaploid wheat: diverse gene function and genomic structure maintained in a tightly linked block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wujun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of the wheat genome has resulted from waves of retrotransposable element insertions. Gene deletions and disruptions generated by the fast replacement of repetitive elements in wheat have resulted in disruption of colinearity at a micro (sub-megabase level among the cereals. In view of genomic changes that are possible within a given time span, conservation of genes between species tends to imply an important functional or regional constraint that does not permit a change in genomic structure. The ctg1034 contig completed in this paper was initially studied because it was assigned to the Sr2 resistance locus region, but detailed mapping studies subsequently assigned it to the long arm of 3B and revealed its unusual features. Results BAC shotgun sequencing of the hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring genome has been used to assemble a group of 15 wheat BACs from the chromosome 3B physical map FPC contig ctg1034 into a 783,553 bp genomic sequence. This ctg1034 sequence was annotated for biological features such as genes and transposable elements. A three-gene island was identified among >80% repetitive DNA sequence. Using bioinformatics analysis there were no observable similarity in their gene functions. The ctg1034 gene island also displayed complete conservation of gene order and orientation with syntenic gene islands found in publicly available genome sequences of Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays, even though the intergenic space and introns were divergent. Conclusion We propose that ctg1034 is located within the heterochromatic C-band region of deletion bin 3BL7 based on the identification of heterochromatic tandem repeats and presence of significant matches to chromodomain-containing gypsy LTR retrotransposable elements. We also speculate that this location, among other highly repetitive sequences, may account for the relative stability in gene order and

  17. Structural analysis of DNA sequence: evidence for lateral gene transfer in Thermotoga maritima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worning, Peder; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Nelson, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    The recently published complete DNA sequence of the bacterium Thermotoga maritima provides evidence, based on protein sequence conservation, for lateral gene transfer between Archaea and Bacteria. We introduce a new method of periodicity analysis of DNA sequences, based on structural parameters......, which brings independent evidence for the lateral gene transfer in the genome of T.maritima, The structural analysis relates the Archaea-like DNA sequences to the genome of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Analysis of 24 complete genomic DNA sequences shows different periodicity patterns for organisms...

  18. Sarco(endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase-2 Gene: Structure and Transcriptional Regulation of the Human Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Zarain-Herzberg

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs belong to a family of active calcium transport enzymes encoded by the SERCA1, 2, and 3 genes. In this study, we describe the complete structure of the human SERCA2 gene and its 5’ -regulatory region. The hSERCA2 gene is located in chromosome 12 position q24.1 in Contig NT_009770.8, spans 70 kb, and is organized in 21 exons intervened by 20 introns. The last two exons of the pre-mRNA produce by alternatively splicing the cardiac/slow-twitch muscle-specific SERCA2a isoform and the ubiquitous SERCA2b isoform. The sequence of the proximal 225-bp regulatory region of the SERCA2 genes is 80% G+C-rich and is conserved among human, rabbit, rat, and mouse species. It contains a TATA-like-box, an E-box/USF sequence, a CAAT-box, four Sp1 binding sites, and a thyroid hormone responsive element (TRE. There are two other conserved regulatory regions located between positions -410 to -661 bp and from -919 to -1410 bp. Among the DNA cis-elements present in these two regulatory regions there are potential binding sites for: GATA-4, -5, -6, Nkx-2.5/Csx, OTF-1, USF, MEF-2, SRF, PPAR/RXR, AP-2, and TREs. Upstream from position -1.5 kb, there is no significant homology among the SERCA2 genes cloned. In addition, the human gene has several repeated sequences mainly of the Alu and L2 type located upstream from position -1.7 kb, spanning in a continuous fashion for more than 40 kb. In this study, we report the cloning of 2.4 kb of 5’-regulatory region and demonstrate that the proximal promoter region is sufficient for expression in cardiac myocytes, and the region from -225 to -1232 bp contains regulatory DNA elements which down-regulate the expression of the SERCA2 gene in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  19. Mathematical and Biological Modelling of RNA Secondary Structure and Its Effects on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary structures within the 5′ untranslated regions of messenger RNAs can have profound effects on the efficiency of translation of their messages and thereby on gene expression. Consequently they can act as important regulatory motifs in both physiological and pathological settings. Current approaches to predicting the secondary structure of these RNA sequences find the structure with the global-minimum free energy. However, since RNA folds progressively from the 5′ end when synthesised or released from the translational machinery, this may not be the most probable structure. We discuss secondary structure prediction based on local-minimisation of free energy with thermodynamic fluctuations as nucleotides are added to the 3′ end and show that these can result in different secondary structures. We also discuss approaches for studying the extent of the translational inhibition specified by structures within the 5′ untranslated region.

  20. Analysis of flavonoids and the flavonoid structural genes in brown fiber of upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hongjie; Tian, Xinhui; Liu, Yongchang; Li, Yanjun; Zhang, Xinyu; Jones, Brian Joseph; Sun, Yuqiang; Sun, Jie

    2013-01-01

    As a result of changing consumer preferences, cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum L.) from varieties with naturally colored fibers is becoming increasingly sought after in the textile industry. The molecular mechanisms leading to colored fiber development are still largely unknown, although it is expected that the color is derived from flavanoids. Firstly, four key genes of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in cotton (GhC4H, GhCHS, GhF3'H, and GhF3'5'H) were cloned and studied their expression profiles during the development of brown- and white cotton fibers by QRT-PCR. And then, the concentrations of four components of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway, naringenin, quercetin, kaempferol and myricetin in brown- and white fibers were analyzed at different developmental stages by HPLC. The predicted proteins of the four flavonoid structural genes corresponding to these genes exhibit strong sequence similarity to their counterparts in various plant species. Transcript levels for all four genes were considerably higher in developing brown fibers than in white fibers from a near isogenic line (NIL). The contents of four flavonoids (naringenin, quercetin, kaempferol and myricetin) were significantly higher in brown than in white fibers and corresponding to the biosynthetic gene expression levels. Flavonoid structural gene expression and flavonoid metabolism are important in the development of pigmentation in brown cotton fibers.

  1. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Claessens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4% yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  2. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  3. Novel Moraxella catarrhalis prophages display hyperconserved non-structural genes despite their genomic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Amir; Wise, Michael J; Kahler, Charlene M; Tay, Chin Yen; Peters, Fanny; Perkins, Timothy T; Chang, Barbara J

    2015-10-24

    Moraxella catarrhalis is an important pathogen that often causes otitis media in children, a disease that is not currently vaccine preventable. Asymptomatic colonisation of the human upper respiratory tract is common and lack of clearance by the immune system is likely due to the emergence of seroresistant genetic lineages. No active bacteriophages or prophages have been described in this species. This study was undertaken to identify and categorise prophages in M. catarrhalis, their genetic diversity and the relationship of such diversity with the host-species phylogeny. This study presents a comparative analysis of 32 putative prophages identified in 95 phylogenetically variable, newly sequenced M. catarrhalis genomes. The prophages were genotypically classified into four diverse clades. The genetic synteny of each clade is similar to the group 1 phage family Siphoviridae, however, they form genotypic clusters that are distinct from other members of this family. No core genetic sequences exist across the 32 prophages despite clades 2, 3, and 4 sharing the most sequence identity. The analysis of non-structural prophage genes (coding the integrase, and terminase), and portal gene showed that the respective genes were identical for clades 2, 3, and 4, but unique for clade 1. Empirical analysis calculated that these genes are unexpectedly hyperconserved, under purifying selection, suggesting a tightly regulated functional role. As such, it is improbable that the prophages are decaying remnants but stable components of a fluctuating, flexible and unpredictable system ultimately maintained by functional constraints on non-structural and packaging genes. Additionally, the plate encoding genes were well conserved across all four prophage clades, and the tail fibre genes, commonly responsible for receptor recognition, were clustered into three major groups distributed across the prophage clades. A pan-genome of 283,622 bp was identified, and the prophages were mapped

  4. Engaging Students in a Bioinformatics Activity to Introduce Gene Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J. May

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioinformatics spans many fields of biological research and plays a vital role in mining and analyzing data. Therefore, there is an ever-increasing need for students to understand not only what can be learned from this data, but also how to use basic bioinformatics tools.  This activity is designed to provide secondary and undergraduate biology students to a hands-on activity meant to explore and understand gene structure with the use of basic bioinformatic tools.  Students are provided an “unknown” sequence from which they are asked to use a free online gene finder program to identify the gene. Students then predict the putative function of this gene with the use of additional online databases.

  5. The global relationship between chromatin physical topology, fractal structure, and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Tiwari, A; Ruhoff, P T

    2017-01-01

    Most of what we know about gene transcription comes from the view of cells as molecular machines: focusing on the role of molecular modifications to the proteins carrying out transcriptional reactions at a loci-by-loci basis. This view ignores a critical reality: biological reactions do not happen...... show that the increased heterogeneity of physical structure of chromatin due to increase in fractal dimension correlates with increased heterogeneity of gene networks. These findings indicate that the higher order folding of chromatin topology may act as a molecular-pathway independent code regulating...... global patterns of gene expression. Since physical organization of chromatin is frequently altered in oncogenesis, this work provides evidence pairing molecular function to physical structure for processes frequently altered during tumorigenesis....

  6. Genetic variation and haplotype structures of innate immunity genes in eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagya, Bijan B.; Bhattacharya, Paramita; Bhattacharya, Sujit K.; Dey, Biplab; Dey, Uposoma; Ghosh, Trina; Maiti, Sujit; Majumder, Partha P.; Mishra, Kankadeb; Mukherjee, Sinchita; Mukherjee, Souvik; Narayanasamy, K.; Poddar, Sonia; Roy, Neeta Sarkar; Sengupta, Priya; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sur, Dipika; Sutradhar, Debabrata; Wagener, Diane K.

    2009-01-01

    This study reports results of an extensive and comprehensive study of genetic diversity in 12 genes of the innate immune system in a population of eastern India. Genomic variation was assayed in 171 individuals by resequencing ~75 kb of DNA comprising these genes in each individual. Almost half of the 548 DNA variants discovered was novel. DNA sequence comparisons with human and chimpanzee reference sequences revealed evolutionary features indicative of natural selection operating among individuals, who are residents of an area with a high load of microbial and other pathogens. Significant differences in allele and haplotype frequencies of the study population were observed with the HapMap populations. Gene and haplotype diversities were observed to be high. The genetic positioning of the study population among the HapMap populations based on data of the innate immunity genes substantially differed from what has been observed for Indian populations based on data of other genes. The reported range of variation in SNP density in the human genome is one SNP per 1.19 kb (chromosome 22) to one SNP per 2.18 kb (chromosome 19). The SNP density in innate immunity genes observed in this study (>3 SNPs kb−1) exceeds the highest density observed for any autosomal chromosome in the human genome. The extensive genomic variation and the distinct haplotype structure of innate immunity genes observed among individuals have possibly resulted from the impact of natural selection. PMID:18396467

  7. Evidence-based gene models for structural and functional annotations of the oil palm genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kuang-Lim; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Rosli, Rozana; Amiruddin, Nadzirah; Azizi, Norazah; Halim, Mohd Amin Ab; Sanusi, Nik Shazana Nik Mohd; Jayanthi, Nagappan; Ponomarenko, Petr; Triska, Martin; Solovyev, Victor; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Murphy, Denis; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie

    2017-09-08

    Oil palm is an important source of edible oil. The importance of the crop, as well as its long breeding cycle (10-12 years) has led to the sequencing of its genome in 2013 to pave the way for genomics-guided breeding. Nevertheless, the first set of gene predictions, although useful, had many fragmented genes. Classification and characterization of genes associated with traits of interest, such as those for fatty acid biosynthesis and disease resistance, were also limited. Lipid-, especially fatty acid (FA)-related genes are of particular interest for the oil palm as they specify oil yields and quality. This paper presents the characterization of the oil palm genome using different gene prediction methods and comparative genomics analysis, identification of FA biosynthesis and disease resistance genes, and the development of an annotation database and bioinformatics tools. Using two independent gene-prediction pipelines, Fgenesh++ and Seqping, 26,059 oil palm genes with transcriptome and RefSeq support were identified from the oil palm genome. These coding regions of the genome have a characteristic broad distribution of GC3 (fraction of cytosine and guanine in the third position of a codon) with over half the GC3-rich genes (GC3 ≥ 0.75286) being intronless. In comparison, only one-seventh of the oil palm genes identified are intronless. Using comparative genomics analysis, characterization of conserved domains and active sites, and expression analysis, 42 key genes involved in FA biosynthesis in oil palm were identified. For three of them, namely EgFABF, EgFABH and EgFAD3, segmental duplication events were detected. Our analysis also identified 210 candidate resistance genes in six classes, grouped by their protein domain structures. We present an accurate and comprehensive annotation of the oil palm genome, focusing on analysis of important categories of genes (GC3-rich and intronless), as well as those associated with important functions, such as FA

  8. Linking cell structure to gene regulation: signaling events and expression controls on the model genes PAI-1 and CTGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarakoon, Rohan; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Higgins, Paul J

    2010-10-01

    The microtubule and microfilament cytoskeletal systems as well as cell-to-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions are critical regulators of cell structure and function. Alterations in cell shape profoundly influence signaling events and gene expression programs that impact a spectrum of biological responses including cell growth, migration and apoptosis. These same pathways also contribute to the progression of several important pathologic conditions (e.g., arteriosclerosis, vascular fibrosis, and endothelial dysfunction). Indeed, hemodynamic forces in the vascular compartment are established modifiers of endothelial and smooth muscle cell cytoarchitecture and orchestrate complex genetic and biological responses in concert with contributions from the extracellular matrix (ECM), growth factors (e.g., EGF, and TGF-beta) and cell adhesion receptors (e.g., integrins, and cadherins). The profibrotic matricellular proteins plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are prominent members of a subset of genes the expression of which is highly responsive to cell shape-altering stimuli (i.e., disruption of the actin-based and microtubule networks, shear strain and cyclic stretch). Since both PAI-1 and CTGF are major mediators of cardiovascular fibrotic disease, understanding cell structure-linked signaling cascades provides potential avenues for focused therapy. It is increasingly evident that growth factor receptors (EGFR) are activated by changes in cytoarchitecture and that the "repressive state" of certain signaling proteins (e.g., SMAD, and Rho-GEFs) is maintained by sequestration on cell structural networks. Functional repression can be relieved by cytoskeletal perturbations (e.g., in response to treatment with network-specific drugs) resulting in activation of signaling cascades (e.g., Rho, and MAPK) with associated changes in gene reprogramming. Recent studies document a complex network of both similar and unique

  9. Correlation between CYP2D6*10 Gene Mutation, and Structure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    heparin-treated blood from each volunteer was extracted with the TIANGEN DNA Mini Kit. Allele specific amplification PCR and Gene sequencing were used to detect the CYP2D6 alleles *10. Bioinformatics and computer modeling methods were used to predict the spatial structure and function of the protein encoded by the ...

  10. The 3D chromatin structure of the mouse β-haemoglobin gene cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); E. de Boer (Ernie); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHere we show a 3D DNA-FISH method to visualizes the 3D structure of the β-globin locus. Geometric size and shape measurements of the 3D rendered signals (128Kb) show that the volume of the β-globin locus decreases almost two fold upon gene activation. A decrease in length and a

  11. The structure and organization of the human carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT1) gene2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacobazzi, V.; Naglieri, M. A.; Stanley, C. A.; Wanders, R. J.; Palmieri, F.

    1998-01-01

    The carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT) transports acylcarnitines into mitochondria in exchange for free carnitine and it is, therefore, essential for the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. We have determined the exon-intron structure of the human CACT gene, which is responsible for a genetic

  12. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the last decade a large number of noncoding RNA genes have been identified, but this may only be the tip of the iceberg. Using comparative genomics a large number of sequences that have signals concordant with conserved RNA secondary structures have been discovered in the human...

  13. Structure-activity relationship of dendrimers engineered with twenty common amino acids in gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Hu, Ke; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-01-01

    Systematic explorations on the structure-activity relationship of surface-engineered dendrimers are essential to design high efficient and safe gene vectors. The chemical diversity of residues in naturally occurring amino acids allows us to generate a library of dendrimers with various surface properties. Here, we synthesized a total number of 40 dendrimers engineered with the twenty common amino acids and investigated their performances in gene delivery. The results show that gene transfection efficacy of the synthesized materials depends on both the type of amino acid and the conjugation ratio. Dendrimers engineered with cationic and hydrophobic amino acids possess relatively higher transfection efficacies. Engineering dendrimers with cationic amino acids such as arginine and lysine facilitates polyplex formation and cellular uptake, with histidine improves endosomal escape of the polyplexes, and with hydrophobic amino acids such as tyrosine and phenylalanine modulates the balance between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity on dendrimer surface, which is beneficial for efficient cellular internalization. Dendrimers engineered with anionic or hydrophilic amino acids show limited transfection efficacy due to poor DNA binding capacity and/or limited cellular uptake. In the aspect of cytotoxicity, dendrimers engineered with arginine, lysine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan show much higher cytotoxicity than other engineered dendrimers. These results are helpful for us to tailor the surface chemistry of dendrimers for efficient gene delivery. Cationic polymers such as dendrimers were widely used as gene vectors but are limited by relatively low delivery efficacy and high toxicity. To achieve efficient and low toxic gene delivery, the polymers were modified with various ligands. However, these ligand-modified polymers in gene delivery are reported by independent researchers using different polymer scaffolds and cell lines. It is hard to provide structure

  14. The 3D chromatin structure of the mouse β-haemoglobin gene cluster

    OpenAIRE

    van de Corput, Mariëtte; Knoch, Tobias; de Boer, Ernie; Cappellen, Gert; Lesnussa, Michael; Eussen, Bert

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHere we show a 3D DNA-FISH method to visualizes the 3D structure of the β-globin locus. Geometric size and shape measurements of the 3D rendered signals (128Kb) show that the volume of the β-globin locus decreases almost two fold upon gene activation. A decrease in length and a distinctive change in shape and surface structure of the locus are also observed. Adding 5’ and 3’end regions to the probe (175Kb) showed a less prominent change in length, shape and structure. It was shown...

  15. Characterization of the Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes in Cucumber: Structure, Phylogeny, and Expression Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Juan Dong

    Full Text Available Fatty acid desaturases (FADs introduce double bonds into the hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids to produce unsaturated fatty acids, and therefore play a critical role in plant development and acclimation to environmental stresses. In this study, 23 full-length FAD genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. were identified through database searches, including three CsFAB2 genes, two CsFAD2 genes, fourteen CsFAD5 genes, and one gene each for CsFAD3, CsFAD4, CsFAD6 and CsFAD7. These cucumber FAD genes were distributed on all seven chromosomes and two additional scaffolds. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the cucumber FAD proteins were clustered into five subfamilies with their counterparts from other plants. Gene structures and protein sequences were considerably conserved in each subfamily. All three CsFAB2 proteins shared conserved structure with the known plant soluble FAD proteins. The other cucumber FADs belonged to the membrane-bound FADs and contained three highly conserved histidine boxes. Additionally, the putative endoplasmic reticulum retention signal was found at the C-termini of the CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 proteins, while the N-termini of CsFAD4, CsFAD5, CsFAD6, CsFAD7 and three CsFAB2s contained a predicted chloroplast signal peptide, which was consistent with their associated metabolic pathways. Furthermore, a gene expression analysis showed that CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 were universally expressed in all tested tissues, whereas the other cucumber FAD genes were preferentially expressed in the cotyledons or leaves. The tissue-specific expression patterns of cucumber FAD genes were correlated well with the differences in the fatty acid compositions ofroots and leaves. Finally, the cucumber FAD genes showed a cold-induced and heat-repressed expression pattern, although with distinct regulatory time courses among the different CsFAD members, which indicates the potential roles of the FADs in temperature stress resistance in cucumber.

  16. Characterization of the Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes in Cucumber: Structure, Phylogeny, and Expression Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Cao, Ning; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) introduce double bonds into the hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids to produce unsaturated fatty acids, and therefore play a critical role in plant development and acclimation to environmental stresses. In this study, 23 full-length FAD genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) were identified through database searches, including three CsFAB2 genes, two CsFAD2 genes, fourteen CsFAD5 genes, and one gene each for CsFAD3, CsFAD4, CsFAD6 and CsFAD7. These cucumber FAD genes were distributed on all seven chromosomes and two additional scaffolds. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the cucumber FAD proteins were clustered into five subfamilies with their counterparts from other plants. Gene structures and protein sequences were considerably conserved in each subfamily. All three CsFAB2 proteins shared conserved structure with the known plant soluble FAD proteins. The other cucumber FADs belonged to the membrane-bound FADs and contained three highly conserved histidine boxes. Additionally, the putative endoplasmic reticulum retention signal was found at the C-termini of the CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 proteins, while the N-termini of CsFAD4, CsFAD5, CsFAD6, CsFAD7 and three CsFAB2s contained a predicted chloroplast signal peptide, which was consistent with their associated metabolic pathways. Furthermore, a gene expression analysis showed that CsFAD2 and CsFAD3 were universally expressed in all tested tissues, whereas the other cucumber FAD genes were preferentially expressed in the cotyledons or leaves. The tissue-specific expression patterns of cucumber FAD genes were correlated well with the differences in the fatty acid compositions ofroots and leaves. Finally, the cucumber FAD genes showed a cold-induced and heat-repressed expression pattern, although with distinct regulatory time courses among the different CsFAD members, which indicates the potential roles of the FADs in temperature stress resistance in cucumber.

  17. From Structural Variation of Gene Molecules to Chromatin Dynamics and Transcriptional Bursting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich Boeger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation of eukaryotic genes is accompanied, in general, by a change in the sensitivity of promoter chromatin to endonucleases. The structural basis of this alteration has remained elusive for decades; but the change has been viewed as a transformation of one structure into another, from “closed” to “open” chromatin. In contradistinction to this static and deterministic view of the problem, a dynamical and probabilistic theory of promoter chromatin has emerged as its solution. This theory, which we review here, explains observed variation in promoter chromatin structure at the level of single gene molecules and provides a molecular basis for random bursting in transcription—the conjecture that promoters stochastically transition between transcriptionally conducive and inconducive states. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be understood only in probabilistic terms.

  18. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Learning a structural and functional representation for gene expressions: To systematically dissect complex cancer phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbo; Liu, Quan; Huang, Shan; Yuan, Bo

    2017-05-08

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, thus one of the central problems is how to dissect the resulting complex phenotypes in terms of their biological building blocks. Computationally, this is to represent and interpret high dimensional observations through a structural and conceptual abstraction into the most influential determinants underlying the problem. The working hypothesis of this report is to consider gene interaction to be largely responsible for the manifestation of complex cancer phenotypes, thus where the representation is to be conceptualized. Here we report a representation learning strategy combined with regularizations, in which gene expressions are described in terms of a regularized product of meta-genes and their expression levels. The meta-genes are constrained by gene interactions thus representing their original topological contexts. The expression levels are supervised by their conditional dependencies among the observations thus providing a cluster-specific constraint. We obtain both of these structural constraints using a node-based graphical model. Our representation allows the selection of more influential modules, thus implicating their possible roles in neoplastic transformations. We validate our representation strategy by its robust recognitions of various cancer phenotypes comparing with various classical methods. The modules discovered are either shared or specify for different types or stages of human cancers, all of which are consistent with literature and biology.

  20. Revised Mimivirus major capsid protein sequence reveals intron-containing gene structure and extra domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan-Monti Marie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus (APM is the largest known dsDNA virus. The viral particle has a nearly icosahedral structure with an internal capsid shell surrounded with a dense layer of fibrils. A Capsid protein sequence, D13L, was deduced from the APM L425 coding gene and was shown to be the most abundant protein found within the viral particle. However this protein remained poorly characterised until now. A revised protein sequence deposited in a database suggested an additional N-terminal stretch of 142 amino acids missing from the original deduced sequence. This result led us to investigate the L425 gene structure and the biochemical properties of the complete APM major Capsid protein. Results This study describes the full length 3430 bp Capsid coding gene and characterises the 593 amino acids long corresponding Capsid protein 1. The recombinant full length protein allowed the production of a specific monoclonal antibody able to detect the Capsid protein 1 within the viral particle. This protein appeared to be post-translationnally modified by glycosylation and phosphorylation. We proposed a secondary structure prediction of APM Capsid protein 1 compared to the Capsid protein structure of Paramecium Bursaria Chlorella Virus 1, another member of the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA virus family. Conclusion The characterisation of the full length L425 Capsid coding gene of Acanthamoebae polyphaga Mimivirus provides new insights into the structure of the main Capsid protein. The production of a full length recombinant protein will be useful for further structural studies.

  1. ParsEval: parallel comparison and analysis of gene structure annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Standage Daniel S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate gene structure annotation is a fundamental but somewhat elusive goal of genome projects, as witnessed by the fact that (model genomes typically undergo several cycles of re-annotation. In many cases, it is not only different versions of annotations that need to be compared but also different sources of annotation of the same genome, derived from distinct gene prediction workflows. Such comparisons are of interest to annotation providers, prediction software developers, and end-users, who all need to assess what is common and what is different among distinct annotation sources. We developed ParsEval, a software application for pairwise comparison of sets of gene structure annotations. ParsEval calculates several statistics that highlight the similarities and differences between the two sets of annotations provided. These statistics are presented in an aggregate summary report, with additional details provided as individual reports specific to non-overlapping, gene-model-centric genomic loci. Genome browser styled graphics embedded in these reports help visualize the genomic context of the annotations. Output from ParsEval is both easily read and parsed, enabling systematic identification of problematic gene models for subsequent focused analysis. Results ParsEval is capable of analyzing annotations for large eukaryotic genomes on typical desktop or laptop hardware. In comparison to existing methods, ParsEval exhibits a considerable performance improvement, both in terms of runtime and memory consumption. Reports from ParsEval can provide relevant biological insights into the gene structure annotations being compared. Conclusions Implemented in C, ParsEval provides the quickest and most feature-rich solution for genome annotation comparison to date. The source code is freely available (under an ISC license at http://parseval.sourceforge.net/.

  2. VizPrimer: a web server for visualized PCR primer design based on known gene structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Qu, Wubin; Lu, Yiming; Zhang, Yanchun; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Chenggang

    2011-12-15

    The visualization of gene structure plays an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design, especially for eukaryotic genes with a number of splice variants that users need to distinguish between via PCR. Here, we describe a visualized web server for primer design named VizPrimer. It utilizes the new information technology (IT) tools, HTML5 to display gene structure and JavaScript to interact with the users. In VizPrimer, the users can focus their attention on the gene structure and primer design strategy, without wasting time calculating the exon positions of splice variants or manually configuring complicated parameters. In addition, VizPrimer is also suitable for the design of PCR primers for amplifying open reading frames and detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). VizPrimer is freely available at http://biocompute.bmi.ac.cn/CZlab/VizPrimer/. The web server supported browsers: Chrome (≥5.0), Firefox (≥3.0), Safari (≥4.0) and Opera (≥10.0). zhangcg@bmi.ac.cn; yangyi528@vip.sina.com.

  3. SNPs in stress-responsive rice genes: validation, genotyping, functional relevance and population structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) validation and large-scale genotyping are required to maximize the use of DNA sequence variation and determine the functional relevance of candidate genes for complex stress tolerance traits through genetic association in rice. We used the bead array platform-based Illumina GoldenGate assay to validate and genotype SNPs in a select set of stress-responsive genes to understand their functional relevance and study the population structure in rice. Results Of the 384 putative SNPs assayed, we successfully validated and genotyped 362 (94.3%). Of these 325 (84.6%) showed polymorphism among the 91 rice genotypes examined. Physical distribution, degree of allele sharing, admixtures and introgression, and amino acid replacement of SNPs in 263 abiotic and 62 biotic stress-responsive genes provided clues for identification and targeted mapping of trait-associated genomic regions. We assessed the functional and adaptive significance of validated SNPs in a set of contrasting drought tolerant upland and sensitive lowland rice genotypes by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence alterations in catalytic domains and three-dimensional secondary protein structure encoded by stress-responsive genes. We found a strong genetic association among SNPs in the nine stress-responsive genes with upland and lowland ecological adaptation. Higher nucleotide diversity was observed in indica accessions compared with other rice sub-populations based on different population genetic parameters. The inferred ancestry of 16% among rice genotypes was derived from admixed populations with the maximum between upland aus and wild Oryza species. Conclusions SNPs validated in biotic and abiotic stress-responsive rice genes can be used in association analyses to identify candidate genes and develop functional markers for stress tolerance in rice. PMID:22921105

  4. SNPs in stress-responsive rice genes: validation, genotyping, functional relevance and population structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parida Swarup K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP validation and large-scale genotyping are required to maximize the use of DNA sequence variation and determine the functional relevance of candidate genes for complex stress tolerance traits through genetic association in rice. We used the bead array platform-based Illumina GoldenGate assay to validate and genotype SNPs in a select set of stress-responsive genes to understand their functional relevance and study the population structure in rice. Results Of the 384 putative SNPs assayed, we successfully validated and genotyped 362 (94.3%. Of these 325 (84.6% showed polymorphism among the 91 rice genotypes examined. Physical distribution, degree of allele sharing, admixtures and introgression, and amino acid replacement of SNPs in 263 abiotic and 62 biotic stress-responsive genes provided clues for identification and targeted mapping of trait-associated genomic regions. We assessed the functional and adaptive significance of validated SNPs in a set of contrasting drought tolerant upland and sensitive lowland rice genotypes by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence alterations in catalytic domains and three-dimensional secondary protein structure encoded by stress-responsive genes. We found a strong genetic association among SNPs in the nine stress-responsive genes with upland and lowland ecological adaptation. Higher nucleotide diversity was observed in indica accessions compared with other rice sub-populations based on different population genetic parameters. The inferred ancestry of 16% among rice genotypes was derived from admixed populations with the maximum between upland aus and wild Oryza species. Conclusions SNPs validated in biotic and abiotic stress-responsive rice genes can be used in association analyses to identify candidate genes and develop functional markers for stress tolerance in rice.

  5. Duplication of the IGFBP-2 gene in teleost fish: protein structure and functionality conservation and gene expression divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2 is a secreted protein that binds and regulates IGF actions in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and aging. Elevated expression of IGFBP-2 is often associated with progression of many types of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the identification and characterization of two IGFBP-2 genes in zebrafish and four other teleost fish. Comparative genomics and structural analyses suggest that they are co-orthologs of the human IGFBP-2 gene. Biochemical assays show that both zebrafish igfbp-2a and -2b encode secreted proteins that bind IGFs. These two genes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. During embryogenesis, IGFBP-2a mRNA is initially detected in the lens, then in the brain boundary vasculature, and subsequently becomes highly expressed in the liver. In the adult stage, liver has the highest levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA, followed by the brain. Low levels of IGFBP-2a mRNA were detected in muscle and in the gonad in male adults only. IGFBP-2b mRNA is detected initially in all tissues at low levels, but later becomes abundant in the liver. In adult males, IGFBP-2b mRNA is only detected in the liver. In adult females, it is also found in the gut, kidney, ovary, and muscle. To gain insights into how the IGFBP-2 genes may have evolved through partitioning of ancestral functions, functional and mechanistic studies were carried out. Expression of zebrafish IGFBP-2a and -2b caused significant decreases in the growth and developmental rates and their effects are comparable to that of human IGFBP-2. IGFBP-2 mutants with altered IGF binding-, RGD-, and heparin-binding sites were generated and their actions examined. While mutating the RGD and heparin binding sites had little effect, altering the IGF binding site abolished its biological activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that IGFBP-2 is a conserved regulatory protein and it inhibits

  6. Gene expression in chicken reveals correlation with structural genomic features and conserved patterns of transcription in the terrestrial vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisheng Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chicken is an important agricultural and avian-model species. A survey of gene expression in a range of different tissues will provide a benchmark for understanding expression levels under normal physiological conditions in birds. With expression data for birds being very scant, this benchmark is of particular interest for comparative expression analysis among various terrestrial vertebrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a gene expression survey in eight major chicken tissues using whole genome microarrays. A global picture of gene expression is presented for the eight tissues, and tissue specific as well as common gene expression were identified. A Gene Ontology (GO term enrichment analysis showed that tissue-specific genes are enriched with GO terms reflecting the physiological functions of the specific tissue, and housekeeping genes are enriched with GO terms related to essential biological functions. Comparisons of structural genomic features between tissue-specific genes and housekeeping genes show that housekeeping genes are more compact. Specifically, coding sequence and particularly introns are shorter than genes that display more variation in expression between tissues, and in addition intergenic space was also shorter. Meanwhile, housekeeping genes are more likely to co-localize with other abundantly or highly expressed genes on the same chromosomal regions. Furthermore, comparisons of gene expression in a panel of five common tissues between birds, mammals and amphibians showed that the expression patterns across tissues are highly similar for orthologous genes compared to random gene pairs within each pair-wise comparison, indicating a high degree of functional conservation in gene expression among terrestrial vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: The housekeeping genes identified in this study have shorter gene length, shorter coding sequence length, shorter introns, and shorter intergenic regions, there seems

  7. [Radiation biology of structurally different Drosophila melanogaster genes. Report I. The vestigial gene: molecular characteristic of "point" mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, I D; Afanas'eva, K P; Aleksandrova, M V; Lapidus, I L

    2012-01-01

    The screening of PCR-detected DNA alterations in 9 spontaneous and 59 gamma-ray-, neutron - or neutron + gamma-ray-induced Drosophila vestigial (vg) gene/"point" mutations was carried out. The detected patterns of existence or absence of either of 16 overlapping fragments into which vg gene (15.1 kb, 8 exons, 7 introns) was divided enable us to subdivide all mutants into 4 classes: (i) PCR+ (40.7%) without the detected changes; (ii) "single-site" (33.9%) with the loss of a single fragment; (iii) partial detections (15.2%) as a loss of 2-9 adjacent fragments and (iv) "cluster" mutants (10.2%) having 2-3 independent changes of(ii) and/or (iii) classes. All spontaneous mutants except one were found to be classified as (ii) whereas radiation-induced mutants are represented by all 4 classes whose interrelation is determined by the dose and radiation quality. In particular, the efficacy of neutrons was found to be nine times as large as that of gamma-rays under the "cluster" mutant induction. Essentially, the distribution of DNA changes along the gene is uneven. CSGE-assay of PCR+-exon 3 revealed DNA heteroduplexes in 5 out of 17 PCR+-mutants studied, 2 of which had small deletions (5 and 11 b) and 3 others made transitions (A --> G) as shown by the sequencing. Therefore, gamma-rays and neutrons seem to be significant environmental agents increasing the SNP risk for the population through their action on the germ cells. The results obtained are also discussed within the framework of the track structure theory and the notion of quite different chromatin organization in somatic and germ cells.

  8. Structure of the human laminin {gamma}2 chain gene (LAMC2): Alternative splicing with different tissue distribution of two transcripts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airenne, T.; Haakana, H.; Kallunki, T. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the exon-intron structure and tissue distribution of the laminin {gamma}2 chain (LAMC2) gene, which is mutated in some cases of junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The article also discusses the transcription and splicing of this gene, which result in alternative uses of the last two exons of the gene. The different tissue distributions of the transcripts indicate different functions for the gene in vivo. 36 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. [Characterization of 5S rRNA gene sequence and secondary structure in gymnosperms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In higher plants the primary and the secondary structures of 5S ribosomal RNA gene are considered highly conservative. Little is known about the 5S rRNA gene structure, organization and variation in gyimnosperms. In this study we analyzed sequence and structure variation of 5S rRNA gene in Pinus through cloning and sequencing multiple copies of 5S rDNA repeats from individual trees of five pines, P. bungeana, P. tabulaeformis, P. yunnanensis, P. massoniana and P. densata. Pinus bungeana is from the subgenus Strobus while the other four are from the subgenus Pinus (diploxylon pines). Our results revealed variations in both primary and secondary structure among copies of 5S rDNA within individual genomes and between species. 5S rRNA gene in Pinus is 120 bp long in most of the 122 clones we sequenced except for one or two deletions in three clones. Among these clones 50 unique sequences were identified and they were shared by different pine species. Our sequences were compared to 13 sequences each representing a different gymnosperm species, and to six sequences representing both angiosperm monocots and dicots. Average sequence similarity was 97.1% among Pinus species and 94.3% between Pinus and other gymnosperms. Between gymnosperms and angiosperms the sequence similarity decreased to 88.1%. Similar to other molecular data, significant sequence divergence was found between the two Pinus subgenera. The 5S gene tree (neighbor-joining tree) grouped the four diploxylon pines together and separated them distinctly from P. bungeana. Comparison of sequence divergence within individuals and between species suggested that concerted evolution has been very weak especially after the divergence of the four diploxylon pines. The phylogenetic information contained in the 5S rRNA gene is limited due to its shorter length and the difficulties in identifying orthologous and paralogous copies of rDNA multigene family further complicate its phylogenetic application. Pinus densata is a

  10. Cloning, structure, and chromosome localization of the mouse glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeller, D.M.; DiGiulio, A.; Frerman, F.E. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    Glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial matrix enzyme. In humans, deficiency of GCDH leads to glutaric acidemia type I, and inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism characterized by a progressive neurodegenerative disease. In this report we describe the cloning and structure of the mouse GCDH (Gcdh) gene and cDNA and its chromosomal localization. The mouse Gcdh cDNA is 1.75 kb long and contains and open reading frame of 438 amino acids. The amino acid sequences of mouse, human, and pig GCDH are highly conserved. The mouse Gcdh gene contains 11 exons and spans 7 kb of genomic DNA. Gcdh was mapped by backcross analysis to mouse chromosome 8 within a region that is homologous to a region of human chromosome 19, where the human gene was previously mapped. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Altered cohesin gene dosage affects Mammalian meiotic chromosome structure and behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Murdoch

    Full Text Available Based on studies in mice and humans, cohesin loss from chromosomes during the period of protracted meiotic arrest appears to play a major role in chromosome segregation errors during female meiosis. In mice, mutations in meiosis-specific cohesin genes cause meiotic disturbances and infertility. However, the more clinically relevant situation, heterozygosity for mutations in these genes, has not been evaluated. We report here evidence from the mouse that partial loss of gene function for either Smc1b or Rec8 causes perturbations in the formation of the synaptonemal complex (SC and affects both synapsis and recombination between homologs during meiotic prophase. Importantly, these defects increase the frequency of chromosomally abnormal eggs in the adult female. These findings have important implications for humans: they suggest that women who carry mutations or variants that affect cohesin function have an elevated risk of aneuploid pregnancies and may even be at increased risk of transmitting structural chromosome abnormalities.

  12. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...... of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF...

  13. The small heat shock proteins from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Daniela A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that has been successfully used in metal bioleaching. In this study, an analysis of the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 genome revealed the presence of three sHSP genes, Afe_1009, Afe_1437 and Afe_2172, that encode proteins from the HSP20 family, a class of intracellular multimers that is especially important in extremophile microorganisms. Results The expression of the sHSP genes was investigated in A. ferrooxidans cells submitted to a heat shock at 40°C for 15, 30 and 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, the gene on locus Afe_1437 was about 20-fold more highly expressed than the gene on locus Afe_2172. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses showed that the sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are possible non-paralogous proteins, and are regulated by the σ32 factor, a common transcription factor of heat shock proteins. Structural studies using homology molecular modeling indicated that the proteins encoded by Afe_1009 and Afe_1437 have a conserved α-crystallin domain and share similar structural features with the sHSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, suggesting that their biological assembly involves 24 molecules and resembles a hollow spherical shell. Conclusion We conclude that the sHSPs encoded by the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes are more likely to act as molecular chaperones in the A. ferrooxidans heat shock response. In addition, the three sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are not recent paralogs, and the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes could be inherited horizontally by A. ferrooxidans.

  14. Effects of Structurally Related Flavonoids on hsp Gene Expression in Human Promyeloid Leukaemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwig O. Gutzeit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin is a known specific inhibitor of hsp70 synthesis and thus might be a potent agent for enhancing the selective cytotoxicity of heat on tumour cells. A comparative analysis of the effects of quercetin and five structurally related flavonoids on hsp90α, hsp70A, hsp60 and hsp27 gene expression was carried out using human myeloid leukaemia cells (HL-60. The cells were preincubated with 50 μM quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, taxifolin, isorhamnetin, methylquercetagetin or 0.1 % DMSO (controls for 24 h at 37 °C before heat shock treatment (43 °C for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated from heat-stressed and unstressed cells and analysed by RT PCR. Hsp27 gene expression was inhibited by flavonoids more strongly than other hsp genes investigated in heat stressed as well as in unstressed cells. Among the hsp genes tested, only hsp60 was expressed above control level under the influence of taxifolin. Members of the hsp70 and hsp27 families are highly expressed in breast and lung cancer and leukaemias and they play a role in the acquired resistance to chemotherapy or radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia. Therefore, hsps present potential targets for cancer diagnosis and treatment. The present structure/activity study indicates that position, number and substitution of hydroxyl groups of the B ring and saturation of the C2-C3 bond are important factors affecting flavonoid activity on hsp gene expression. This study could help provide a basis for further design of specific inhibitors of hsp gene expression.

  15. Understanding the genetic structure of Symplocos laurina Wall. populations using nuclear gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Sofia; Bhagwat, R M; Kadoo, N Y; Lagu, M D; Gupta, V S

    2010-02-01

    To characterize the genetic diversity of present populations of Symplocos laurina, which grow in the montane forests in India, we analyzed the DNA sequences of a nuclear gene. Using the 881 bp sequence of cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, we detected 24 haplotypes among 195 individuals sampled from 14 populations. Two dominant haplotypes were distributed over the entire range of this species in India and several private haplotypes were found. Low genetic diversity within population, high differentiation, number of population specific haplotypes and deviation from neutral evolution characterized the present populations of S. laurina. An analysis of molecular variance indicated the presence of geographic structure within the haplotype distribution. The occurrence of S. laurina preglaciation in India is the most parsimonious explanation for the current geographic structure observed. The populations are presumably ancient and might have spread across its extant distribution range in India through a recent range expansion event.

  16. Pristinamycin I biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis: molecular characterization of the first two structural peptide synthetase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Blanc, V; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Lorenzon, S; Famechon, A; Bamas-Jacques, N; Crouzet, J; Thibaut, D

    1997-01-01

    Two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the depsipeptide antibiotics pristinamycins I (PI) produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis were cloned and sequenced. The 1.7-kb snbA gene encodes a 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase, and the 7.7-kb snbC gene encodes PI synthetase 2, responsible for incorporating L-threonine and L-aminobutyric acid in the PI macrocycle. snbA and snbC, which encode the two first structural enzymes of PI synthesis, are not contiguous. Both genes are located in PI-specific transcriptional units, as disruption of one gene or the other led to PI-deficient strains producing normal levels of the polyunsaturated macrolactone antibiotic pristinamycin II, also produced by S. pristinaespiralis. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the SnbA protein is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily and that the SnbC protein contains two amino acid-incorporating modules and a C-terminal epimerization domain. A model for the initiation of PI synthesis analogous to the established model of initiation of fatty acid synthesis is proposed. PMID:9006024

  17. Organizational structure and the periphery of the gene regulatory network in B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2012-05-14

    The physical periphery of a biological cell is mainly described by signaling pathways which are triggered by transmembrane proteins and receptors that are sentinels to control the whole gene regulatory network of a cell. However, our current knowledge about the gene regulatory mechanisms that are governed by extracellular signals is severely limited. The purpose of this paper is three fold. First, we infer a gene regulatory network from a large-scale B-cell lymphoma expression data set using the C3NET algorithm. Second, we provide a functional and structural analysis of the largest connected component of this network, revealing that this network component corresponds to the peripheral region of a cell. Third, we analyze the hierarchical organization of network components of the whole inferred B-cell gene regulatory network by introducing a new approach which exploits the variability within the data as well as the inferential characteristics of C3NET. As a result, we find a functional bisection of the network corresponding to different cellular components. Overall, our study allows to highlight the peripheral gene regulatory network of B-cells and shows that it is centered around hub transmembrane proteins located at the physical periphery of the cell. In addition, we identify a variety of novel pathological transmembrane proteins such as ion channel complexes and signaling receptors in B-cell lymphoma.

  18. Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmann, S A; Powder, K E; Young, N M; Goodnough, L H; Hahn, S M; James, A W; Helms, J A; Lovett, M

    2010-03-01

    Mammals and birds have common embryological facial structures, and appear to employ the same molecular genetic developmental toolkit. We utilized natural variation found in bird beaks to investigate what genes drive vertebrate facial morphogenesis. We employed cross-species microarrays to describe the molecular genetic signatures, developmental signaling pathways and the spectrum of transcription factor (TF) gene expression changes that differ between cranial neural crest cells in the developing beaks of ducks, quails and chickens. Surprisingly, we observed that the neural crest cells established a species-specific TF gene expression profile that predates morphological differences between the species. A total of 232 genes were differentially expressed between the three species. Twenty-two of these genes, including Fgfr2, Jagged2, Msx2, Satb2 and Tgfb3, have been previously implicated in a variety of mammalian craniofacial defects. Seventy-two of the differentially expressed genes overlap with un-cloned loci for human craniofacial disorders, suggesting that our data will provide a valuable candidate gene resource for human craniofacial genetics. The most dramatic changes between species were in the Wnt signaling pathway, including a 20-fold up-regulation of Dkk2, Fzd1 and Wnt1 in the duck compared with the other two species. We functionally validated these changes by demonstrating that spatial domains of Wnt activity differ in avian beaks, and that Wnt signals regulate Bmp pathway activity and promote regional growth in facial prominences. This study is the first of its kind, extending on previous work in Darwin's finches and provides the first large-scale insights into cross-species facial morphogenesis.

  19. A Subset of Autism-associated Genes Regulate the Structural Stability of Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals’ ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms together regulate the structural stability of neurons and are vulnerable targets in ASD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of those autism risk genes that affect the structural connectivity of neurons. We sub-categorize them into 1 cytoskeletal regulators, e.g. motors and small RhoGTPase regulators; 2 adhesion molecules, e.g. cadherins, NCAM, and neurexin superfamily; 3 cell surface receptors, e.g. glutamatergic receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases; 4 signaling molecules, e.g. protein kinases and phosphatases; and 5 synaptic proteins, e.g. vesicle and scaffolding proteins. Although the roles of some of these genes in maintaining neuronal structural stability are well studied, how mutations contribute to the autism phenotype is still largely unknown. Investigating whether and how the neuronal structure and function are affected when these genes are mutated will provide insights toward developing effective interventions aimed at improving the lives of people with autism and their families.

  20. An empirical comparison of popular structure learning algorithms with a view to gene network inference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Djordjilović, V.; Chiogna, M.; Vomlel, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2017), s. 602-613 ISSN 0888-613X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12010S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Bayesian networks * Structure learning * Reverse engineering * Gene networks Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http:// library .utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/vomlel-0477168.pdf

  1. Explaining natural variability in human memory with genes and brain-structure

    OpenAIRE

    Leann, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of candidate genes and brain structure on memory performance. A foreign word-pair association paradigm was designed to provide several dissociable measures of different memory processes. Subjects deeply encoded foreign word pairs with a picture-word matching task. They were tested at five time points over one week which provided measures of learning and forgetting rates, dissociable between measures. Performance was evaluated with respect...

  2. A Subset of Autism-Associated Genes Regulate the Structural Stability of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Frei, Jeannine A.; Kilander, Michaela B. C.; Shen, Wenjuan; Blatt, Gene J.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals’ ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms together regulate the structural stability of neurons and are vulnerable targets in ASD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of those autism risk genes that affect the structural connectivity of neurons. We sub-categorize them into (1) cytoskeletal regulators, e.g., motors and small RhoGTPase regulators; (2) adhesion molecules, e.g., cadherins, NCAM, and neurexin superfamily; (3) cell surface receptors, e.g., glutamatergic receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases; (4) signaling molecules, e.g., protein kinases and phosphatases; and (5) synaptic proteins, e.g., vesicle and scaffolding proteins. Although the roles of some of these genes in maintaining neuronal structural stability are well studied, how mutations contribute to the autism phenotype is still largely unknown. Investigating whether and how the neuronal structure and function are affected when these genes are mutated will provide insights toward developing effective interventions aimed at improving the lives of people with autism and their families. PMID:27909399

  3. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...... endogenous α-amylase 2 and subtilisin (ASI) on chromosome 2, two chymotrypsin/subtilisin inhibitors (CI-1 and CI-2) on chromosome 5 (long arm) and the major trypsin inhibitor (TI-1) on chromosome 3....

  4. Population Structure and Gene Flow of the Yellow Anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Waller, Tomás; Micucci, Patricio A.; Barros, Mariano; Draque, Juan; Amato, George; Mendez, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Yellow anacondas (Eunectes notaeus) are large, semiaquatic boid snakes found in wetland systems in South America. These snakes are commercially harvested under a sustainable management plan in Argentina, so information regarding population structuring can be helpful for determination of management units. We evaluated genetic structure and migration using partial sequences from the mitochondrial control region and mitochondrial genes cyt-b and ND4 for 183 samples collected within northern Argentina. A group of landscape features and environmental variables including several treatments of temperature and precipitation were explored as potential drivers of observed genetic patterns. We found significant population structure between most putative population comparisons and bidirectional but asymmetric migration in several cases. The configuration of rivers and wetlands was found to be significantly associated with yellow anaconda population structure (IBD), and important for gene flow, although genetic distances were not significantly correlated with the environmental variables used here. More in-depth analyses of environmental data may be needed to fully understand the importance of environmental conditions on population structure and migration. These analyses indicate that our putative populations are demographically distinct and should be treated as such in Argentina's management plan for the harvesting of yellow anacondas. PMID:22675425

  5. Gene order data from a model amphibian (Ambystoma: new perspectives on vertebrate genome structure and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voss S Randal

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because amphibians arise from a branch of the vertebrate evolutionary tree that is juxtaposed between fishes and amniotes, they provide important comparative perspective for reconstructing character changes that have occurred during vertebrate evolution. Here, we report the first comparative study of vertebrate genome structure that includes a representative amphibian. We used 491 transcribed sequences from a salamander (Ambystoma genetic map and whole genome assemblies for human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebrafish, and the freshwater pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis to compare gene orders and rearrangement rates. Results Ambystoma has experienced a rate of genome rearrangement that is substantially lower than mammalian species but similar to that of chicken and fish. Overall, we found greater conservation of genome structure between Ambystoma and tetrapod vertebrates, nevertheless, 57% of Ambystoma-fish orthologs are found in conserved syntenies of four or more genes. Comparisons between Ambystoma and amniotes reveal extensive conservation of segmental homology for 57% of the presumptive Ambystoma-amniote orthologs. Conclusion Our analyses suggest relatively constant interchromosomal rearrangement rates from the euteleost ancestor to the origin of mammals and illustrate the utility of amphibian mapping data in establishing ancestral amniote and tetrapod gene orders. Comparisons between Ambystoma and amniotes reveal some of the key events that have structured the human genome since diversification of the ancestral amniote lineage.

  6. Self-similarities of periodic structures for a discrete model of a two-gene system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, S.L.T. de, E-mail: thomaz@ufsj.edu.br [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Lima, A.A. [Escola de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Medrano-T, R.O. [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Guimarães-Filho, Z.O. [Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS PIIM UMR6633, International Institute for Fusion Science, Marseille (France)

    2012-03-12

    We report self-similar properties of periodic structures remarkably organized in the two-parameter space for a two-gene system, described by two-dimensional symmetric map. The map consists of difference equations derived from the chemical reactions for gene expression and regulation. We characterize the system by using Lyapunov exponents and isoperiodic diagrams identifying periodic windows, denominated Arnold tongues and shrimp-shaped structures. Period-adding sequences are observed for both periodic windows. We also identify Fibonacci-type series and Golden ratio for Arnold tongues, and period multiple-of-three windows for shrimps. -- Highlights: ► The existence of noticeable periodic windows has been reported recently for several nonlinear systems. ► The periodic window distributions appear highly organized in two-parameter space. ► We characterize self-similar properties of Arnold tongues and shrimps for a two-gene model. ► We determine the period of the Arnold tongues recognizing a Fibonacci-type sequence. ► We explore self-similar features of the shrimps identifying multiple period-three structures.

  7. Structural equation modeling of gene-environment interactions in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xiaojuan; Eskridge, Kent M; George, Varghese; Wang, Dong

    2011-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a complex disease, which is influenced not only by genetic and environmental factors but also by gene-environment (GE) interactions in interconnected biological pathways or networks. The classical methods are inadequate for identifying GE interactions due to the complex relationships among risk factors, mediating risk factors (e.g., hypertension, blood lipids, and glucose), and CHD. Our aim was to develop a two-level structural equation model (SEM) to identify genes and GE interactions in the progress of CHD to take into account the causal structure among mediating risk factors and CHD (Level 1), and hierarchical family structure (Level 2). The method was applied to the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) Offspring Cohort data. Our approach has several advantages over classical methods: (1) it provides important insight into how genes and contributing factors affect CHD by investigating the direct, indirect, and total effects; and (2) it aids the development of biological models that more realistically reflect the complex biological pathways or networks. Using our method, we are able to detect GE interaction of SERPINE1 and body mass index (BMI) on CHD, which has not been reported. We conclude that SEM modeling of GE interaction can be applied in the analysis of complex epidemiological data sets. © 2011 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  8. Structural features of DNA are conserved in the promoter region of orthologous genes across different strains of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aditya; Manivelan, Vasumathi; Bansal, Manju

    2016-09-01

    Promoter regions play a key role in the process of transcription initiation and gene expression, hence promoter identification is an inherent component of the genome annotation process. Identification and characterization of promoters in fully sequenced genomes is a challenging and complex task. An analysis of sequence-dependent DNA structural properties in the promoter region of orthologous and non-orthologous genes can help in characterizing promoters and also provide insights into transcription initiation. Various structural properties, such as duplex stability, protein-induced bendability and intrinsic curvature of promoter sequences have been calculated and compared for 10 different strains of Helicobacter pylori genomes, and it is found that promoter regions in orthologous and non-orthologous genes show distinct trends for these properties, with orthologous genes showing sharper low-stability peak, lower bendability and higher curvature. The average GC content of orthologous genes is higher than that of non-orthologous genes, and relative stability-based promoter annotation tool PromPredict performs better for orthologous genes than non-orthologous genes. The characteristic sequence-dependent structural properties of promoters show significant differences between orthologous and non-orthologous genes. Interestingly, these structural properties of promoters are conserved, but the genes themselves vary in their evolutionary selection rate. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Pollution-related changes in the structure and function of photosynthesis genes, trauma response genes and defense genes in plants. Schadstoffbedingte Veraenderungen der Struktur und Funktion von Photosynthese-, Wund- und Abwehrgenen in Pflanzen; Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The project employed molecular genetics methods in order to establish whether car exhaust has an effect on the DNA structure or the expression of vegetable genes. First investigations on Helianthus annuus revealed changes in the DNA structure of genes. To be sure, the individual plant specimens were not identical genetically. Fumigation experiments with cloned tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) failed to confirm the results obtained with Helianthus annuus. As investigations using both species revealed, pollutant exposure may result in changes in gene expression. The following is observed: 1. Both car exhaust and ozone impair the expression of photosynthesis genes (rbcS, cab, ST-LS1 gene). 2. Additional traumatic or pathogen stress further inhibits gene expression. 3. Trauma response and protective genes (CHS, PAL, chitinase and glucanase) are induced and in a high degree expressed upon fumigation with ozone, especially in combination with car exhaust. If car exhaust is used alone, it is clearly only the gene for [beta]-1,3-glucanase that is induced. The expression of the CHS gene, indeed, is reduced. 4. In the event of simultaneous application of car exhaust and/or ozone and trauma or elicitor treatment, the expression of all four trauma response and protective genes is increased. 5. NO[sub 2] fumigation [+-] ozone in combination with trauma enhances the expression of the investigated photosynthesis genes; in combination with elicitor treatment the effect is inhibitory. Trauma response and defence genes are induced. (orig./UWA)

  10. Pseudoscorpion mitochondria show rearranged genes and genome-wide reductions of RNA gene sizes and inferred structures, yet typical nucleotide composition bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudoscorpions are chelicerates and have historically been viewed as being most closely related to solifuges, harvestmen, and scorpions. No mitochondrial genomes of pseudoscorpions have been published, but the mitochondrial genomes of some lineages of Chelicerata possess unusual features, including short rRNA genes and tRNA genes that lack sequence to encode arms of the canonical cloverleaf-shaped tRNA. Additionally, some chelicerates possess an atypical guanine-thymine nucleotide bias on the major coding strand of their mitochondrial genomes. Results We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two divergent taxa from the chelicerate order Pseudoscorpiones. We find that these genomes possess unusually short tRNA genes that do not encode cloverleaf-shaped tRNA structures. Indeed, in one genome, all 22 tRNA genes lack sequence to encode canonical cloverleaf structures. We also find that the large ribosomal RNA genes are substantially shorter than those of most arthropods. We inferred secondary structures of the LSU rRNAs from both pseudoscorpions, and find that they have lost multiple helices. Based on comparisons with the crystal structure of the bacterial ribosome, two of these helices were likely contact points with tRNA T-arms or D-arms as they pass through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The mitochondrial gene arrangements of both pseudoscorpions differ from the ancestral chelicerate gene arrangement. One genome is rearranged with respect to the location of protein-coding genes, the small rRNA gene, and at least 8 tRNA genes. The other genome contains 6 tRNA genes in novel locations. Most chelicerates with rearranged mitochondrial genes show a genome-wide reversal of the CA nucleotide bias typical for arthropods on their major coding strand, and instead possess a GT bias. Yet despite their extensive rearrangement, these pseudoscorpion mitochondrial genomes possess a CA bias on the major coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses of all 13

  11. The role of hydrogel structure and dynamic loading on chondrocyte gene expression and matrix formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemus, G D; Bryant, S J

    2008-01-01

    Crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are attractive scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering because of their ability to mimic the aqueous environment and mechanical properties of native cartilage. In this study, hydrogel crosslinking density was varied to study the influence of gel structure and the application of dynamic loading (continuous, 1 Hz, 15% amplitude strain) on chondrocyte gene expression over approximately 1 week culture. Gene expression was quantified using real-time RT-PCR for collagen II and aggrecan, the major cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components, and collagen I, an indicator of chondrocyte de-differentiation. When chondrocytes were encapsulated in PEG gels with low or high crosslinking, a high collagen II expression compared to collagen I expression (1000 or 100,000:1, respectively) indicated the native chondrocyte phenotype was retained. In the absence of loading, relative gene expression for collagen II and aggrecan was significantly higher (e.g., 2-fold and 4-fold, respectively, day 7) in the low crosslinked gels compared to gels with higher crosslinking. Dynamic loading, however, showed little effect on ECM gene expression in both crosslinked systems. To better understand the cellular environment, ECM production was qualitatively assessed using an in situ immunofluorescent technique and standard histology. A pericellular matrix (PCM) was observed as early as day 3 post-encapsulation and the degree of formation was dependent on gel crosslinking. These results suggest the PCM may protect the cells from sensing the applied loads. This study demonstrates that gel structure has a profound effect on chondrocyte gene expression, while dynamic loading has much less of an effect at early culture times.

  12. Structure of U2 snRNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and their expression in electroporated plant protoplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Vankan, Pierre; Filipowicz, Witold

    1988-01-01

    We have characterized the U2 snRNA gene family in the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. It consists of 10-15 genes which do not appear to be closely clustered. Six of the U2 genes were sequenced and the structure of the Arabidopsis U2 RNA termini was determined in order to define the coding regions. Each of the genes codes for a distinct RNA differing from the others by 2-13 point mutations, localized in the 3' part of the 196 nt-long RNA. The upstream non-coding regions of all genes show st...

  13. Structure and Expression Analyses of SVA Elements in Relation to Functional Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jeong Kwon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA elements are present in hominoid primates and are divided into 6 subfamilies (SVA-A to SVA-F and active in the human population. Using a bioinformatic tool, 22 SVA element-associated genes are identified in the human genome. In an analysis of genomic structure, SVA elements are detected in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of HGSNAT (SVA-B, MRGPRX3 (SVA-D, HYAL1 (SVA-F, TCHH (SVA-F, and ATXN2L (SVA-F genes, while some elements are observed in the 3'UTR of SPICE1 (SVA-B, TDRKH (SVA-C, GOSR1 (SVA-D, BBS5 (SVA-D, NEK5 (SVA-D, ABHD2 (SVA-F, C1QTNF7 (SVA-F, ORC6L (SVA-F, TMEM69 (SVA-F, and CCDC137 (SVA-F genes. They could contribute to exon extension or supplying poly A signals. LEPR (SVA-C, ALOX5 (SVA-D, PDS5B (SVA-D, and ABCA10 (SVA-F genes also showed alternative transcripts by SVA exonization events. Dominant expression of HYAL1_SVA appeared in lung tissues, while HYAL1_noSVA showed ubiquitous expression in various human tissues. Expression of both transcripts (TDRKH_SVA and TDRKH_noSVA of the TDRKH gene appeared to be ubiquitous. Taken together, these data suggest that SVA elements cause transcript isoforms that contribute to modulation of gene regulation in various human tissues.

  14. Structure and Expression Analyses of SVA Elements in Relation to Functional Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yun-Jeong; Choi, Yuri; Eo, Jungwoo; Noh, Yu-Na; Gim, Jeong-An; Jung, Yi-Deun; Lee, Ja-Rang; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2013-09-01

    SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) elements are present in hominoid primates and are divided into 6 subfamilies (SVA-A to SVA-F) and active in the human population. Using a bioinformatic tool, 22 SVA element-associated genes are identified in the human genome. In an analysis of genomic structure, SVA elements are detected in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of HGSNAT (SVA-B), MRGPRX3 (SVA-D), HYAL1 (SVA-F), TCHH (SVA-F), and ATXN2L (SVA-F) genes, while some elements are observed in the 3'UTR of SPICE1 (SVA-B), TDRKH (SVA-C), GOSR1 (SVA-D), BBS5 (SVA-D), NEK5 (SVA-D), ABHD2 (SVA-F), C1QTNF7 (SVA-F), ORC6L (SVA-F), TMEM69 (SVA-F), and CCDC137 (SVA-F) genes. They could contribute to exon extension or supplying poly A signals. LEPR (SVA-C), ALOX5 (SVA-D), PDS5B (SVA-D), and ABCA10 (SVA-F) genes also showed alternative transcripts by SVA exonization events. Dominant expression of HYAL1_SVA appeared in lung tissues, while HYAL1_noSVA showed ubiquitous expression in various human tissues. Expression of both transcripts (TDRKH_SVA and TDRKH_noSVA) of the TDRKH gene appeared to be ubiquitous. Taken together, these data suggest that SVA elements cause transcript isoforms that contribute to modulation of gene regulation in various human tissues.

  15. Natural sesquiterpene lactones as inhibitors of Myb-dependent gene expression: structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Caroline; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Da Costa, Fernando B; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2013-05-01

    c-myb is a proto-oncogene encoding a transcription factor which is highly expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells. It regulates the expression of genes important for lineage determination, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Deregulation of c-myb expression is known to be involved in the development of human tumors, especially certain types of leukemia and breast and colon cancer. The c-Myb protein has thus been identified as an interesting therapeutic target. We recently discovered that some sesquiterpene lactones suppress Myb-dependent gene expression which is a new mechanism for these natural products' potential anti-cancer activity. We developed a test system to screen compounds for inhibitory activity on Myb-inducible reporter gene activation. Using this system we have now investigated 60 sesquiterpene lactones for their capacity to inhibit c-Myb-dependent gene activation. The IC50 values were in a range between 0.7 and >30 μM. The furanoheliangolide goyazensolide and the pseudoguaianolide helenalin acetate (IC50 = 0.6 and 0.7 μM, respectively) represent the most active inhibitors of c-Myb dependent gene expression found up to present. Control measurements for cell viability (MTS assay) proved that the observed activity on c-Myb dependent gene expression is not a function of cytotoxicity/unspecific cell damage. Structure-activity relationships were investigated by a QSAR approach based on flexible alignment of the most active compounds and a common pharmacophore model. These investigations resulted in a QSAR model which indicates that the potency of inhibitory activity on c-Myb-dependent transcription does not only depend on the presence of reactive Michael-acceptor features but also on their optimal spatial arrangement in the molecule. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The Use of Gene Modification and Advanced Molecular Structure Analyses towards Improving Alfalfa Forage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yaogeng; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-29

    Alfalfa is one of the most important legume forage crops in the world. In spite of its agronomic and nutritive advantages, alfalfa has some limitations in the usage of pasture forage and hay supplement. High rapid degradation of protein in alfalfa poses a risk of rumen bloat to ruminants which could cause huge economic losses for farmers. Coupled with the relatively high lignin content, which impedes the degradation of carbohydrate in rumen, alfalfa has unbalanced and asynchronous degradation ratio of nitrogen to carbohydrate (N/CHO) in rumen. Genetic engineering approaches have been used to manipulate the expression of genes involved in important metabolic pathways for the purpose of improving the nutritive value, forage yield, and the ability to resist abiotic stress. Such gene modification could bring molecular structural changes in alfalfa that are detectable by advanced structural analytical techniques. These structural analyses have been employed in assessing alfalfa forage characteristics, allowing for rapid, convenient and cost-effective analysis of alfalfa forage quality. In this article, we review two major obstacles facing alfalfa utilization, namely poor protein utilization and relatively high lignin content, and highlight genetic studies that were performed to overcome these drawbacks, as well as to introduce other improvements to alfalfa quality. We also review the use of advanced molecular structural analysis in the assessment of alfalfa forage for its potential usage in quality selection in alfalfa breeding.

  17. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  18. The Use of Gene Modification and Advanced Molecular Structure Analyses towards Improving Alfalfa Forage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yaogeng; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-01-29

    Alfalfa is one of the most important legume forage crops in the world. In spite of its agronomic and nutritive advantages, alfalfa has some limitations in the usage of pasture forage and hay supplement. High rapid degradation of protein in alfalfa poses a risk of rumen bloat to ruminants which could cause huge economic losses for farmers. Coupled with the relatively high lignin content, which impedes the degradation of carbohydrate in rumen, alfalfa has unbalanced and asynchronous degradation ratio of nitrogen to carbohydrate (N/CHO) in rumen. Genetic engineering approaches have been used to manipulate the expression of genes involved in important metabolic pathways for the purpose of improving the nutritive value, forage yield, and the ability to resist abiotic stress. Such gene modification could bring molecular structural changes in alfalfa that are detectable by advanced structural analytical techniques. These structural analyses have been employed in assessing alfalfa forage characteristics, allowing for rapid, convenient and cost-effective analysis of alfalfa forage quality. In this article, we review two major obstacles facing alfalfa utilization, namely poor protein utilization and relatively high lignin content, and highlight genetic studies that were performed to overcome these drawbacks, as well as to introduce other improvements to alfalfa quality. We also review the use of advanced molecular structural analysis in the assessment of alfalfa forage for its potential usage in quality selection in alfalfa breeding.

  19. Gene transfer properties and structural modeling of human stem cell-derived AAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura J; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Carvaines, Sarah K; Van Vliet, Kim; Yang, Ethel; Wong, Kamehameha K; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Chatterjee, Saswati

    2014-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are proving to be remarkably successful for in vivo gene delivery. Based upon reports of abundant AAV in the human marrow, we tested CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells for the presence of natural AAV. Here, we report for the first time, the presence of novel AAV variants in healthy CD34(+) human peripheral blood stem cells. The majority of healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors were found to harbor AAV in their CD34(+) cells. Every AAV isolated from CD34(+) cells mapped to AAV Clade F. Gene transfer vectors derived from these novel AAVs efficiently underwent entry and postentry processing in human cord blood stem cells and supported stable gene transfer into long-term, in vivo engrafting human HSCs significantly better than other serotypes. AAVHSC-transduced human CD34(+) cells engrafted in vivo and gave rise to differentiated transgene-expressing progeny. Importantly, gene-marked CD34(+) stem cells persisted long term in xenograft recipients, indicating transduction of primitive progenitors. Notably, correlation of structure with function permitted identification of potential capsid components important for HSC transduction. Thus, AAVHSCs represent a new class of genetic vectors for the manipulation of HSC genomes.

  20. Functional and Structural Characterization of FAU Gene/Protein from Marine Sponge Suberites domuncula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin Perina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine sarcoma virus (FBR-MuSV ubiquitously expressed (FAU gene is down-regulated in human prostate, breast and ovarian cancers. Moreover, its dysregulation is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Sponges (Porifera are animals without tissues which branched off first from the common ancestor of all metazoans. A large majority of genes implicated in human cancers have their homologues in the sponge genome. Our study suggests that FAU gene from the sponge Suberites domuncula reflects characteristics of the FAU gene from the metazoan ancestor, which have changed only slightly during the course of animal evolution. We found pro-apoptotic activity of sponge FAU protein. The same as its human homologue, sponge FAU increases apoptosis in human HEK293T cells. This indicates that the biological functions of FAU, usually associated with “higher” metazoans, particularly in cancer etiology, possess a biochemical background established early in metazoan evolution. The ancestor of all animals possibly possessed FAU protein with the structure and function similar to evolutionarily more recent versions of the protein, even before the appearance of true tissues and the origin of tumors and metastasis. It provides an opportunity to use pre-bilaterian animals as a simpler model for studying complex interactions in human cancerogenesis.

  1. Structural analysis of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase genes in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Rahma; Rouault, J-D; Ayadi, Habib; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase is a ubiquitous pump coordinating the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the membrane of cells and its role is fundamental to cellular functions. It is heteromer in eukaryotes including two or three subunits (α, β and γ which is specific to the vertebrates). The catalytic functions of the enzyme have been attributed to the α subunit. Several complete α protein sequences are available, but only few gene structures were characterized. We identified the genomic sequences coding the α-subunit of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, from the whole-genome shotgun contigs (WGS), NCBI Genomes (chromosome), Genomic Survey Sequences (GSS) and High Throughput Genomic Sequences (HTGS) databases across distinct phyla. One copy of the α subunit gene was found in Annelida, Arthropoda, Cnidaria, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Mollusca, Placozoa, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Urochordata, but the nematodes seem to possess 2 to 4 copies. The number of introns varied from 0 (Platyhelminthes) to 26 (Porifera); and their localization and length are also highly variable. Molecular phylogenies (Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony methods) showed some clusters constituted by (Chordata/(Echinodermata/Hemichordata)) or (Plathelminthes/(Annelida/Mollusca)) and a basal position for Porifera. These structural analyses increase our knowledge about the evolutionary events of the α subunit genes in the invertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural organization and chromosomal assignment of the mouse embryonic TEA domain-containing factor (ETF) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Yasunami, M; Matsuda, Y; Maeda, T; Kobayashi, H; Terasaki, H; Ohkubo, H

    1996-09-01

    Embryonic TEA domain-containing factor (ETF) belongs to the family of proteins structurally related to transcriptional enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) and is implicated in neural development. Isolation and characterization of the cosmid clones encoding the mouse ETF gene (Etdf) revealed that Etdf spans approximately 17.9 kb and consists of 12 exons. The exon-intron structure of Etdf closely resembles that of the Drosophila scalloped gene, indicating that these genes may have evolved from a common ancestor. The multiple transcription initiation sites revealed by S1 protection and primer extension analyses are consistent with the absence of the canonical TATA and CAAT boxes in the 5'-flanking region, which contains many potential regulatory sequences, such as the E-box, N-box, Sp1 element, GATA-1 element, TAATGARAT element, and B2 short interspersed element (SINE) as well as several direct and inverted repeat sequences. The Etdf locus was assigned to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 7 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage mapping analyses. These results provide the molecular basis for studying the regulation, in vivo function, and evolution of Etdf.

  3. Improvements to previous algorithms to predict gene structure and isoform concentrations using Affymetrix Exon arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aramburu Ander

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exon arrays provide a way to measure the expression of different isoforms of genes in an organism. Most of the procedures to deal with these arrays are focused on gene expression or on exon expression. Although the only biological analytes that can be properly assigned a concentration are transcripts, there are very few algorithms that focus on them. The reason is that previously developed summarization methods do not work well if applied to transcripts. In addition, gene structure prediction, i.e., the correspondence between probes and novel isoforms, is a field which is still unexplored. Results We have modified and adapted a previous algorithm to take advantage of the special characteristics of the Affymetrix exon arrays. The structure and concentration of transcripts -some of them possibly unknown- in microarray experiments were predicted using this algorithm. Simulations showed that the suggested modifications improved both specificity (SP and sensitivity (ST of the predictions. The algorithm was also applied to different real datasets showing its effectiveness and the concordance with PCR validated results. Conclusions The proposed algorithm shows a substantial improvement in the performance over the previous version. This improvement is mainly due to the exploitation of the redundancy of the Affymetrix exon arrays. An R-Package of SPACE with the updated algorithms have been developed and is freely available.

  4. Structural organization and mutational analysis of the human uncoupling protein-2 (hUCP2) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, N; Chen, H; Winnikes, U; Reinert, I; Marmann, G; Pirke, K M; Lentes, K U

    1999-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are mitochondrial membrane transporters which are involved in dissipating the proton electrochemical gradient thereby releasing stored energy as heat. This implies a major role of UCPs in energy metabolism and thermogenesis which when deregulated are key risk factors for the development of obesity and other eating disorders. From the three different human UCPs identified so far by gene cloning both UCP2 and UCP3 were mapped in close proximity (75-150 kb) to regions of human chromosome 11 (11q13) that have been linked to obesity and hyperinsulinaemia. At the amino acid level hUCP2 has about 55% identity to hUCP1 while hUCP3 is 71% identical to hUCP2. In this study we have deduced the genomic structure of the human UCP2 gene by PCR and direct sequence analysis. The hUCP2 gene spans over 8.7 kb distributed on 8 exons. The localization of the exon/intron boundaries within the coding region matches precisely that of the hUCP1 gene and is almost conserved in the recently discovered hUCP3 gene as well. The high degree of homology at the nucleotide level and the conservation of the exon /intron boundaries among the three UCP genes suggests that they may have evolved from a common ancestor or are the result from gene duplication events. Mutational analysis of the hUCP2 gene in a cohort of 172 children (aged 7 - 13) of Caucasian origin revealed a polymorphism in exon 4 (C to T transition at position 164 of the cDNA resulting in the substitution of an alanine by a valine at codon 55) and an insertion polymorphism in exon 8. The insertion polymorphism consists of a 45 bp repeat located 150 bp downstream of the stop codon in the 3'-UTR. The allele frequencies were 0.63 and 0.37 for the alanine and valine encoded alleles, respectively, and 0.71 versus 0.29 for the insertion polymorphism. The allele frequencies of both polymorphisms were not significantly elevated in a subgroup of 25 children characterized by low Resting Metabolic Rates (RMR). So far a

  5. Gene transfer occurs with enhanced efficiency in biofilms and induces enhanced stabilisation of the biofilm structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2003-01-01

    There has been much interest in bioremediation based on the introduction of bacteria able to catabolise recalcitrant compounds deposited in the environment. In particular, the delivery of catabolic information in the form of conjugative plasmids to bacterial populations in situ has great potential....... As most bacteria in the environment live in surface-associated communities (biofilms), the gene transfer systems within these communities need to be better characterised for bio-enhancement strategies to be developed. Recent findings suggest that gene transfer does take place within biofilms, but studies...... also identified limitations and bottlenecks of the process. The dense population structure in biofilms increases plasmid dispersal by conjugation, and the conjugation mechanism itself may stimulate biofilm development. Moreover, DNA release and transformation seem to be part of a biofilm-related life...

  6. The cryptomonad histone H4-encoding gene: structure and chromosomal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S B; Rensing, S A; Maier, U G

    1994-12-15

    Cryptomonads are unicellular flagellates whose plastids are surrounded by four membranes. A periplastidal compartment, containing eukaryote-type ribosomes, starch grains and a so-called nucleomorph, is located between the inner and outer membrane pairs. The nucleomorph has been shown to be the vestigial nucleus of a eukaryotic endosymbiont. In order to obtain more information about the chromatin structure of the nucleomorph and the host nuclear chromosomes, we studied the distribution of the histone, H4. H4 was not detectable in the nucleomorph by immunolocalization, thus supporting earlier findings by Gibbs [In: Wiesner et al. (Eds.), Experimental Phycology 1, 1990, pp. 145-157]. Likewise, no H4 DNA was demonstrable in the nucleomorph by Southern hybridization. Sequence analysis, and Southern and Northern blot data of a cryptomonad gene, H4, indicate an intermediate position for these genes between animals and plants.

  7. Structure of the gene encoding human alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, M; Umetsu, K; Sato, M; Ohki, T; Yukawa, N; Suzuki, T; Takeichi, S

    1997-09-01

    Alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) is a human plasma glycoprotein and fetuin is the homologue in the calf. In this report, we present the structure and organization of the AHSG gene. Introns and the 5' and 3'-flanking regions were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the inverted PCR, respectively, from genomic DNA using AHSG cDNA-specific oligonucleotide primers. The sequence of the PCR products shows that the coding region spans approximately 8.2 kb and is composed of seven exons interrupted by six introns. The exon-intron splice junctions agree with the consensus sequence, and the positions interrupted by introns are precisely identical to those of the rat insulin receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (fetuin) gene. The 5'-promoter region contains several characteristic sequences such as an A + T-rich sequence of TAAATAA, C/EBP-binding site, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-5 (HNF-5) and serum response factor (SRF) sites.

  8. Expression of IQ-motif genes in human cells and ASPM domain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Allen; Kenguele, Hilaire

    2005-01-01

    Genes encoding multiple IQ-motif proteins have been identified in the human genome and may be regulated by calmodulin (CaM). Three genes of unknown function, abnormal spindle-like primary microcephaly (ASPM), KIAA0036, and KIAA1023, were expressed strongly in nearly all transformed human cell lines and in a panel of 16 adult human tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. However, ASPM gene expression was not detected in adult brain or skeletal muscle. To better understand function, the domain structure of ASPM was examined. Abnormal spindle-like primary (ASP) protein (abnormal spindle) of Drosophila spp, an orthologue of ASPM, is involved in mitosis, and mutations lead to abnormal spindles and inhibition of cytokinesis. Studies of ASP have indicated that a microtubule binding region exists on the N-terminal third of the protein. Reiterative searches of the protein database using PSI-BLAST identified a common putative microtubular binding domain of 240 residues designated as MTASP. This nearly "all alpha" domain occurs in >25 related proteins including ASP and ASPM. The major C-terminal region of MTASP is basic with conserved hydrophobic residues and terminates at a flanking actin binding (CH) domain. This region is somewhat similar to other microtubule binding proteins such as MAP1B, MAP2, and tau. Multiple IQ motifs and often a conserved C-terminal domain occur in the remaining sequence. The multidomain structure of ASPM suggests a role in the coordination of cell cycle events. The extensive expression of multiple IQ-motif genes and the absence of ASPM in nondividing adult brain and skeletal muscle also suggest a role in cell division.

  9. A Cluster of Vitellogenin Genes in the Mediterranean Fruit Fly Ceratitis Capitata: Sequence and Structural Conservation in Dipteran Yolk Proteins and Their Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rina, M.; Savakis, C.

    1991-01-01

    Four genes encoding the major egg yolk polypeptides of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata, vitellogenins 1 and 2 (VG1 and VG2), were cloned, characterized and partially sequenced. The genes are located on the same region of chromosome 5 and are organized in pairs, each encoding the two polypeptides on opposite DNA strands. Restriction and nucleotide sequence analysis indicate that the gene pairs have arisen from an ancestral pair by a relatively recent duplication event. The transcribed part is very similar to that of the Drosophila melanogaster yolk protein genes Yp1, Yp2 and Yp3. The Vg1 genes have two introns at the same positions as those in D. melanogaster Yp3; the Vg2 genes have only one of the introns, as do D. melanogaster Yp1 and Yp2. Comparison of the five polypeptide sequences shows extensive homology, with 27% of the residues being invariable. The sequence similarity of the processed proteins extends in two regions separated by a nonconserved region of varying size. Secondary structure predictions suggest a highly conserved secondary structure pattern in the two regions, which probably correspond to structural and functional domains. The carboxy-end domain of the C. capitata proteins shows the same sequence similarities with triacylglycerol lipases that have been reported previously for the D. melanogaster yolk proteins. Analysis of codon usage shows significant differences between D. melanogaster and C. capitata vitellogenins with the latter exhibiting a less biased representation of synonymous codons. PMID:1903120

  10. Morphological Structure and Genetic Mapping of New Leaf-Color Mutant Gene in Rice (Oryza sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hong LI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-color mutations are a widely-observed class of mutations, playing an important role in the study of chlorophyll biosynthesis and plant chloroplast structure, function, genetics and development. A naturally-occurring leaf-color rice mutant, Baihuaidao 7, was analyzed. Mutant plants typically exhibited a green-white-green leaf-color progression, but this phenotype was only expressed in the presence of a stress signal induced by mechanical scarification such as transplantation. Prior to the appearance of white leaves, mutant plant growth, leaf color, chlorophyll content, and chloroplast ultrastructure appeared to be identical to those of the wild type. After the changeover to white leaf color, an examination of the mutated leaves revealed a decrease in total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoid content, a reduction in the number of chloroplast grana lamella and grana, and a gradual degradation of the thylakoid lamellas. At maturity, the mutant plant was etiolated and dwarfed compared with wild-type plants. Genetic analysis indicated that the leaf mutant character is controlled by a recessive nuclear gene. Genetic mapping of the mutant gene was performed using an F2 population derived from a Baihuaidao 7 × Jiangxi 1587 cross. The mutant gene was mapped to rice chromosome 11, positioned between InDel markers L59.2-7 and L64.8-11, which are separated by approximately 740.5 kb. The mutant gene is believed to be a new leaf-color mutant gene in rice, and is tentatively designated as gwgl.

  11. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  12. Gene expression noise in spatial patterning: hunchback promoter structure affects noise amplitude and distribution in Drosophila segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holloway, David M; Lopes, Francisco J P; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Travençolo, Bruno A N; Golyandina, Nina; Usevich, Konstantin; Spirov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    .... We identify means by which noise is controlled during gene expression by characterizing the dependence of hb mRNA and protein output noise on hb promoter structure and transcriptional dynamics...

  13. Phocid Seal Leptin: Tertiary Structure and Hydrophobic Receptor Binding Site Preservation during Distinct Leptin Gene Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, John A.; Hauton, Chris; Bennett, Kimberley A.; Hall, Ailsa J.

    2012-01-01

    The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids) have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR) binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional surfactant requirement

  14. Phocid seal leptin: tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Hammond

    Full Text Available The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional

  15. Structural, Functional, and Evolutionary Analysis of the Unusually Large Stilbene Synthase Gene Family in Grapevine1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A.B.; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed. PMID:22961129

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dal Santo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA, expansin B (EXPB, expansin-like A (EXLA and expansin-like B (EXLB. There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa. We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. CONCLUSION: Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Santo, Silvia; Vannozzi, Alessandro; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Fasoli, Marianna; Venturini, Luca; Pezzotti, Mario; Zenoni, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP) comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA), expansin B (EXPB), expansin-like A (EXLA) and expansin-like B (EXLB). There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera) genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa), compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the functional characterization of grapevine gene families by combining

  18. Structural and functional studies of a family of Dictyostelium discoideum developmentally regulated, prestalk genes coding for small proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Juan J; Galardi-Castilla, María; Escalante, Ricardo; Sastre, Leandro

    2008-01-03

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum executes a multicellular development program upon starvation. This morphogenetic process requires the differential regulation of a large number of genes and is coordinated by extracellular signals. The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for several stages of development, including slug migration and spore terminal differentiation. Subtractive hybridization allowed the isolation of a gene, sigN (SrfA-induced gene N), that was dependent on the transcription factor SrfA for expression at the slug stage of development. Homology searches detected the existence of a large family of sigN-related genes in the Dictyostelium discoideum genome. The 13 most similar genes are grouped in two regions of chromosome 2 and have been named Group1 and Group2 sigN genes. The putative encoded proteins are 87-89 amino acids long. All these genes have a similar structure, composed of a first exon containing a 13 nucleotides long open reading frame and a second exon comprising the remaining of the putative coding region. The expression of these genes is induced at10 hours of development. Analyses of their promoter regions indicate that these genes are expressed in the prestalk region of developing structures. The addition of antibodies raised against SigN Group 2 proteins induced disintegration of multi-cellular structures at the mound stage of development. A large family of genes coding for small proteins has been identified in D. discoideum. Two groups of very similar genes from this family have been shown to be specifically expressed in prestalk cells during development. Functional studies using antibodies raised against Group 2 SigN proteins indicate that these genes could play a role during multicellular development.

  19. Structural and functional studies of a family of Dictyostelium discoideum developmentally regulated, prestalk genes coding for small proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escalante Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum executes a multicellular development program upon starvation. This morphogenetic process requires the differential regulation of a large number of genes and is coordinated by extracellular signals. The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for several stages of development, including slug migration and spore terminal differentiation. Results Subtractive hybridization allowed the isolation of a gene, sigN (SrfA-induced gene N, that was dependent on the transcription factor SrfA for expression at the slug stage of development. Homology searches detected the existence of a large family of sigN-related genes in the Dictyostelium discoideum genome. The 13 most similar genes are grouped in two regions of chromosome 2 and have been named Group1 and Group2 sigN genes. The putative encoded proteins are 87–89 amino acids long. All these genes have a similar structure, composed of a first exon containing a 13 nucleotides long open reading frame and a second exon comprising the remaining of the putative coding region. The expression of these genes is induced at10 hours of development. Analyses of their promoter regions indicate that these genes are expressed in the prestalk region of developing structures. The addition of antibodies raised against SigN Group 2 proteins induced disintegration of multi-cellular structures at the mound stage of development. Conclusion A large family of genes coding for small proteins has been identified in D. discoideum. Two groups of very similar genes from this family have been shown to be specifically expressed in prestalk cells during development. Functional studies using antibodies raised against Group 2 SigN proteins indicate that these genes could play a role during multicellular development.

  20. Cloning and structural analysis of partial acetylcholine receptor subunit genes from the parasitic nematode Teladorsagia circumcincta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J; Hoekstra, R; Roos, M H; Wiley, L J; Weiss, A S; Sangster, N C; Tait, A

    2001-06-28

    Nematode nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are the sites of action for the anthelmintic drug levamisole. Recent findings indicate that the molecular mechanism of levamisole resistance may involve changes in the number and/or functions of target nAChRs. Accordingly, we have used an RT-PCR approach to isolate and characterise partial cDNA clones (tca-1 and tca-2) encoding putative nAChR subunits from the economically important trichostrongyloid, Teladorsagia circumcincta. The predicted tca-1 gene product is a 248 aa fragment (TCA-1) which contains structural motifs typical of ligand-binding (alpha-) subunits, and which shows very high sequence similarities (98.8 and 97.2% amino acid identities) to the alpha-subunits encoded by tar-1 and hca-1 from Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Haemonchus contortus, respectively. Sequence analyses of partial tca-1 cDNAs from one levamisole-resistant and two susceptible populations of T. circumcincta revealed polymorphism at the predicted amino acid level, but there was no apparent association of any particular tca-1 allele with resistance. tca-2 encodes a 67 aa fragment (TCA-2) containing the TM4 transmembrane domain and carboxyl terminus of a putative nAChR structural (non-alpha) subunit. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCA-2 shows highest similarity (75% amino acid identity) to ACR-2, a structural subunit involved in forming levamisole-gated ion channels in Caenorhabditis elegans, but low similarity (43% identity) to the corresponding regions of TAR-1 and HCA-1. tca-2 is the first nAChR subunit gene of this type to be isolated from parasitic nematodes, and it provides a basis for further characterisation of structural subunits in trichostrongyloids.

  1. Preservation of bone mass and structure in hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus) through elevated expression of anabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Vadim B; Goropashnaya, Anna V; Tøien, Øivind; Stewart, Nathan C; Chang, Celia; Wang, Haifang; Yan, Jun; Showe, Louise C; Showe, Michael K; Donahue, Seth W; Barnes, Brian M

    2012-06-01

    Physical inactivity reduces mechanical load on the skeleton, which leads to losses of bone mass and strength in non-hibernating mammalian species. Although bears are largely inactive during hibernation, they show no loss in bone mass and strength. To obtain insight into molecular mechanisms preventing disuse bone loss, we conducted a large-scale screen of transcriptional changes in trabecular bone comparing winter hibernating and summer non-hibernating black bears using a custom 12,800 probe cDNA microarray. A total of 241 genes were differentially expressed (P 1.4) in the ilium bone of bears between winter and summer. The Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed an elevated proportion in hibernating bears of overexpressed genes in six functional sets of genes involved in anabolic processes of tissue morphogenesis and development including skeletal development, cartilage development, and bone biosynthesis. Apoptosis genes demonstrated a tendency for downregulation during hibernation. No coordinated directional changes were detected for genes involved in bone resorption, although some genes responsible for osteoclast formation and differentiation (Ostf1, Rab9a, and c-Fos) were significantly underexpressed in bone of hibernating bears. Elevated expression of multiple anabolic genes without induction of bone resorption genes, and the down regulation of apoptosis-related genes, likely contribute to the adaptive mechanism that preserves bone mass and structure through prolonged periods of immobility during hibernation.

  2. Landscape genetic structure and evolutionary genetics of insecticide resistance gene mutations in Anopheles sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xuelian; Zhong, Daibin; Lo, Eugenia; Fang, Qiang; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Wang, Xiaoming; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Zhou, Guofa; Zhu, Guoding; Qin, Qian; Chen, Xiaoguang; Cui, Liwang; Yan, Guiyun

    2016-04-23

    Anopheles sinensis is one of the most abundant vectors of malaria and other diseases in Asia. Vector control through the use of insecticides is the front line control method of vector-borne diseases. Pyrethroids are the most commonly used insecticides due to their low toxicity to vertebrates and low repellency. However, the extensive use of insecticides has imposed strong selection pressure on mosquito populations for resistance. High levels of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides and various mutations and haplotypes in the para sodium channel gene that confers knockdown resistance (kdr) have been detected in An. sinensis. Despite the importance of kdr mutations in pyrethroid resistance, the evolutionary origin of the kdr mutations is unknown. This study aims to examine the evolutionary genetics of kdr mutations in relation to spatial population genetic structure of An. sinensis. Adults or larvae of Anopheles sinensis were collected from various geographic locations in China. DNA was extracted from individual mosquitoes. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the para-type sodium channel gene were conducted to analyse kdr allele frequency distribution, kdr codon upstream and downstream intron polymorphism, population genetic diversity and kdr codon evolution. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase COI and COII genes were amplified and sequenced to examine population variations, genetic differentiation, spatial population structure, population expansion and gene flow patterns. Three non-synonymous mutations (L1014F, L1014C, and L1014S) were detected at the kdr codon L1014 of para-type sodium channel gene. A patchy distribution of kdr mutation allele frequencies from southern to central China was found. Near fixation of kdr mutation was detected in populations from central China, but no kdr mutations were found in populations from southwestern China. More than eight independent mutation events were detected in the three kdr alleles, and at least one of them evolved

  3. Influences of the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE Gene on cardiac structure and function of ball game players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Yongwoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Except for the I/D polymorphism in the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE gene, there were few reports about the relationship between other genetic polymorphisms in this gene and the changes in cardiac structure and function of athletes. Thus, we investigated whether the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene is associated with the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players. Total 85 healthy ball game players were recruited in this study, and they were composed of 35 controls and 50 ball game players, respectively. Cardiac structure and function were measured by 2-D echocardiography, and the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene analyzed by the SNaPshot method. Results There were significant differences in left ventricular mass index (LVmassI value among each sporting discipline studied. Especially in the athletes of basketball disciplines, indicated the highest LVmassI value than those of other sporting disciplines studied (p ACE gene in the both controls and ball game players. Conclusions Our data suggests that the G2350A polymorphism in the ACE gene may not significantly contribute to the changes in cardiac structure and function of ball game players, although sporting disciplines of ball game players may influence the changes in LVmassI value of these athletes. Further studies using a larger sample size and other genetic markers in the ACE gene will be needed.

  4. Enhanced QSAR Model Performance by Integrating Structural and Gene Expression Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Fan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of intensive research and a number of demonstrable successes, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR models still fail to yield predictions with reasonable accuracy in some circumstances, especially when the QSAR paradox occurs. In this study, to avoid the QSAR paradox, we proposed a novel integrated approach to improve the model performance through using both structural and biological information from compounds. As a proof-of-concept, the integrated models were built on a toxicological dataset to predict non-genotoxic carcinogenicity of compounds, using not only the conventional molecular descriptors but also expression profiles of significant genes selected from microarray data. For test set data, our results demonstrated that the prediction accuracy of QSAR model was dramatically increased from 0.57 to 0.67 with incorporation of expression data of just one selected signature gene. Our successful integration of biological information into classic QSAR model provided a new insight and methodology for building predictive models especially when QSAR paradox occurred.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Population structure of barley landrace populations and gene-flow with modern varieties.

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    Elisa Bellucci

    Full Text Available Landraces are heterogeneous plant varieties that are reproduced by farmers as populations that are subject to both artificial and natural selection. Landraces are distinguished by farmers due to their specific traits, and different farmers often grow different populations of the same landrace. We used simple sequence repeats (SSRs to analyse 12 barley landrace populations from Sardinia from two collections spanning 10 years. We analysed the population structure, and compared the population diversity of the landraces that were collected at field level (population. We used a representative pool of barley varieties for diversity comparisons and to analyse the effects of gene flow from modern varieties. We found that the Sardinian landraces are a distinct gene pool from those of both two-row and six-row barley varieties. There is also a low, but significant, mean level and population-dependent level of introgression from the modern varieties into the Sardinian landraces. Moreover, we show that the Sardinian landraces have the same level of gene diversity as the representative sample of modern commercial varieties grown in Italy in the last decades, even within population level. Thus, these populations represent crucial sources of germplasm that will be useful for crop improvement and for population genomics studies and association mapping, to identify genes, loci and genome regions responsible for adaptive variations. Our data also suggest that landraces are a source of valuable germplasm for sustainable agriculture in the context of future climate change, and that in-situ conservation strategies based on farmer use can preserve the genetic identity of landraces while allowing adaptation to local environments.

  7. Macronuclear genome structure of the ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis: Single-gene chromosomes and tiny introns

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    Landweber Laura F

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nyctotherus ovalis is a single-celled eukaryote that has hydrogen-producing mitochondria and lives in the hindgut of cockroaches. Like all members of the ciliate taxon, it has two types of nuclei, a micronucleus and a macronucleus. N. ovalis generates its macronuclear chromosomes by forming polytene chromosomes that subsequently develop into macronuclear chromosomes by DNA elimination and rearrangement. Results We examined the structure of these gene-sized macronuclear chromosomes in N. ovalis. We determined the telomeres, subtelomeric regions, UTRs, coding regions and introns by sequencing a large set of macronuclear DNA sequences (4,242 and cDNAs (5,484 and comparing them with each other. The telomeres consist of repeats CCC(AAAACCCCn, similar to those in spirotrichous ciliates such as Euplotes, Sterkiella (Oxytricha and Stylonychia. Per sequenced chromosome we found evidence for either a single protein-coding gene, a single tRNA, or the complete ribosomal RNAs cluster. Hence the chromosomes appear to encode single transcripts. In the short subtelomeric regions we identified a few overrepresented motifs that could be involved in gene regulation, but there is no consensus polyadenylation site. The introns are short (21–29 nucleotides, and a significant fraction (1/3 of the tiny introns is conserved in the distantly related ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. As has been observed in P. tetraurelia, the N. ovalis introns tend to contain in-frame stop codons or have a length that is not dividable by three. This pattern causes premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and potentially degradation of unspliced mRNAs by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Conclusion The combination of short leaders, tiny introns and single genes leads to very minimal macronuclear chromosomes. The smallest we identified contained only 150 nucleotides.

  8. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis.

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    René M Malenfant

    Full Text Available Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago-an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study's main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1 highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2 incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3 misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and-importantly-we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada's expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears' abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing-and increasingly rapid-loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change.

  9. Circumpolar Genetic Structure and Recent Gene Flow of Polar Bears: A Reanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenfant, René M; Davis, Corey S; Cullingham, Catherine I; Coltman, David W

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an extensive study of 2,748 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from across their circumpolar range was published in PLOS ONE, which used microsatellites and mitochondrial haplotypes to apparently show altered population structure and a dramatic change in directional gene flow towards the Canadian Archipelago-an area believed to be a future refugium for polar bears as their southernmost habitats decline under climate change. Although this study represents a major international collaborative effort and promised to be a baseline for future genetics work, methodological shortcomings and errors of interpretation undermine some of the study's main conclusions. Here, we present a reanalysis of this data in which we address some of these issues, including: (1) highly unbalanced sample sizes and large amounts of systematically missing data; (2) incorrect calculation of FST and of significance levels; (3) misleading estimates of recent gene flow resulting from non-convergence of the program BayesAss. In contrast to the original findings, in our reanalysis we find six genetic clusters of polar bears worldwide: the Hudson Bay Complex, the Western and Eastern Canadian Arctic Archipelago, the Western and Eastern Polar Basin, and-importantly-we reconfirm the presence of a unique and possibly endangered cluster of bears in Norwegian Bay near Canada's expected last sea-ice refugium. Although polar bears' abundance, distribution, and population structure will certainly be negatively affected by ongoing-and increasingly rapid-loss of Arctic sea ice, these genetic data provide no evidence of strong directional gene flow in response to recent climate change.

  10. Three-Dimensional Gene Map of Cancer Cell Types: Structural Entropy Minimisation Principle for Defining Tumour Subtypes

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    Li, Angsheng; Yin, Xianchen; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose a method for constructing cell sample networks from gene expression profiles, and a structural entropy minimisation principle for detecting natural structure of networks and for identifying cancer cell subtypes. Our method establishes a three-dimensional gene map of cancer cell types and subtypes. The identified subtypes are defined by a unique gene expression pattern, and a three-dimensional gene map is established by defining the unique gene expression pattern for each identified subtype for cancers, including acute leukaemia, lymphoma, multi-tissue, lung cancer and healthy tissue. Our three-dimensional gene map demonstrates that a true tumour type may be divided into subtypes, each defined by a unique gene expression pattern. Clinical data analyses demonstrate that most cell samples of an identified subtype share similar survival times, survival indicators and International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and indicate that distinct subtypes identified by our algorithms exhibit different overall survival times, survival ratios and IPI scores. Our three-dimensional gene map establishes a high-definition, one-to-one map between the biologically and medically meaningful tumour subtypes and the gene expression patterns, and identifies remarkable cells that form singleton submodules.

  11. Structural and functional analysis of chitinase gene family in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A K; Pandey, Bharati; Tyagi, Chetna; Chakraborty, Ohika; Kumar, Amrender; Jain, A K

    2015-04-01

    Chitinases are the hydrolytic enzymes which protect plants against pathogen attack. However, the precise role of chitinases in disease resistance has not been explored in wheat. In the present study, in silico approach, including secondary structure analysis, detailed signature pattern study, cis-acting regulatory elements survey, evolutionary trends and three-dimensional molecular modeling was used for different chitinase classes of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Homology modeling of class I, II, IV and 3 chitinase proteins was performed using the template crystal structure. The model structures were further refined by molecular mechanics methods using different tools, such as Procheck, ProSA and Verify3D. Secondary structure studies revealed greater percentage of residues forming a helix conformation with specific signature pattern, similar to casein kinase II phosphorylation site, amidation site, N-myristoylation (N-MYR) site and protein kinase C phoshorylation site. The expression profile suggested that wheat chitinase gene was highly expressed in cell culture and callus. We found that wheat chitinases showed more functional similarity with rice and barley. The results provide insight into the evolution of the chitinase family, constituting a diverse array of pathogenesis-related proteins. The study also provides insight into the possible binding sites of chitinase proteins and may further enhance our knowledge of fungal resistance mechanism in plants.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Sucrose Synthase Gene Family in Grape (Vitis vinifera): Structure, Evolution, and Expression Profiles

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    Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Mengqi; Li, Xiaopeng; Jiu, Songtao; Wang, Chen; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SS) is widely considered as the key enzyme involved in the plant sugar metabolism that is critical to plant growth and development, especially quality of the fruit. The members of SS gene family have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes. However, detailed information about this gene family is lacking in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.). In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of the grape (V. vinifera) genome and reported that there are five SS genes (VvSS1–5) in the grape genome. Comparison of the structures of grape SS genes showed high structural conservation of grape SS genes, resulting from the selection pressures during the evolutionary process. The segmental duplication of grape SS genes contributed to this gene family expansion. The syntenic analyses between grape and soybean (Glycine max) demonstrated that these genes located in corresponding syntenic blocks arose before the divergence of grape and soybean. Phylogenetic analysis revealed distinct evolutionary paths for the grape SS genes. VvSS1/VvSS5, VvSS2/VvSS3 and VvSS4 originated from three ancient SS genes, which were generated by duplication events before the split of monocots and eudicots. Bioinformatics analysis of publicly available microarray data, which was validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), revealed distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns of VvSS genes in various tissues, organs and developmental stages, as well as in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Taken together, our results will be beneficial for further investigations into the functions of SS gene in the processes of grape resistance to environmental stresses. PMID:28350372

  13. Characterization of the linkage disequilibrium structure and identification of tagging-SNPs in five DNA repair genes

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    Camp Nicola J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterization of the linkage disequilibrium (LD structure of candidate genes is the basis for an effective association study of complex diseases such as cancer. In this study, we report the LD and haplotype architecture and tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs for five DNA repair genes: ATM, MRE11A, XRCC4, NBS1 and RAD50. Methods The genes ATM, MRE11A, and XRCC4 were characterized using a panel of 94 unrelated female subjects (47 breast cancer cases, 47 controls obtained from high-risk breast cancer families. A similar LD structure and tSNP analysis was performed for NBS1 and RAD50, using publicly available genotyping data. We studied a total of 61 SNPs at an average marker density of 10 kb. Using a matrix decomposition algorithm, based on principal component analysis, we captured >90% of the intragenetic variation for each gene. Results Our results revealed that three of the five genes did not conform to a haplotype block structure (MRE11A, RAD50 and XRCC4. Instead, the data fit a more flexible LD group paradigm, where SNPs in high LD are not required to be contiguous. Traditional haplotype blocks assume recombination is the only dynamic at work. For ATM, MRE11A and XRCC4 we repeated the analysis in cases and controls separately to determine whether LD structure was consistent across breast cancer cases and controls. No substantial difference in LD structures was found. Conclusion This study suggests that appropriate SNP selection for an association study involving candidate genes should allow for both mutation and recombination, which shape the population-level genomic structure. Furthermore, LD structure characterization in either breast cancer cases or controls appears to be sufficient for future cancer studies utilizing these genes.

  14. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

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    Herington Adrian C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS, which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL. Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2. Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis, as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading

  15. Comparing large covariance matrices under weak conditions on the dependence structure and its application to gene clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinyuan; Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Wen-Xin; Wang, Lan

    2017-03-01

    Comparing large covariance matrices has important applications in modern genomics, where scientists are often interested in understanding whether relationships (e.g., dependencies or co-regulations) among a large number of genes vary between different biological states. We propose a computationally fast procedure for testing the equality of two large covariance matrices when the dimensions of the covariance matrices are much larger than the sample sizes. A distinguishing feature of the new procedure is that it imposes no structural assumptions on the unknown covariance matrices. Hence, the test is robust with respect to various complex dependence structures that frequently arise in genomics. We prove that the proposed procedure is asymptotically valid under weak moment conditions. As an interesting application, we derive a new gene clustering algorithm which shares the same nice property of avoiding restrictive structural assumptions for high-dimensional genomics data. Using an asthma gene expression dataset, we illustrate how the new test helps compare the covariance matrices of the genes across different gene sets/pathways between the disease group and the control group, and how the gene clustering algorithm provides new insights on the way gene clustering patterns differ between the two groups. The proposed methods have been implemented in an R-package HDtest and are available on CRAN. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  16. Learning Parsimonious Classification Rules from Gene Expression Data Using Bayesian Networks with Local Structure.

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    Lustgarten, Jonathan Lyle; Balasubramanian, Jeya Balaji; Visweswaran, Shyam; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi

    2017-03-01

    The comprehensibility of good predictive models learned from high-dimensional gene expression data is attractive because it can lead to biomarker discovery. Several good classifiers provide comparable predictive performance but differ in their abilities to summarize the observed data. We extend a Bayesian Rule Learning (BRL-GSS) algorithm, previously shown to be a significantly better predictor than other classical approaches in this domain. It searches a space of Bayesian networks using a decision tree representation of its parameters with global constraints, and infers a set of IF-THEN rules. The number of parameters and therefore the number of rules are combinatorial to the number of predictor variables in the model. We relax these global constraints to a more generalizable local structure (BRL-LSS). BRL-LSS entails more parsimonious set of rules because it does not have to generate all combinatorial rules. The search space of local structures is much richer than the space of global structures. We design the BRL-LSS with the same worst-case time-complexity as BRL-GSS while exploring a richer and more complex model space. We measure predictive performance using Area Under the ROC curve (AUC) and Accuracy. We measure model parsimony performance by noting the average number of rules and variables needed to describe the observed data. We evaluate the predictive and parsimony performance of BRL-GSS, BRL-LSS and the state-of-the-art C4.5 decision tree algorithm, across 10-fold cross-validation using ten microarray gene-expression diagnostic datasets. In these experiments, we observe that BRL-LSS is similar to BRL-GSS in terms of predictive performance, while generating a much more parsimonious set of rules to explain the same observed data. BRL-LSS also needs fewer variables than C4.5 to explain the data with similar predictive performance. We also conduct a feasibility study to demonstrate the general applicability of our BRL methods on the newer RNA sequencing gene

  17. Tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: structure analysis and gene deletion.

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    Robert Schnell

    Full Text Available The diaminopimelic acid pathway of lysine biosynthesis has been suggested to provide attractive targets for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. Here we report the characterization of two enzymes from this pathway in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilizing structural biology, biochemistry and genetics. We show that tetrahydrodipicolinate N-succinyltransferase (DapD from P. aeruginosa is specific for the L-stereoisomer of the amino substrate L-2-aminopimelate, and its D-enantiomer acts as a weak inhibitor. The crystal structures of this enzyme with L-2-aminopimelate and D-2-aminopimelate, respectively, reveal that both compounds bind at the same site of the enzyme. Comparison of the binding interactions of these ligands in the enzyme active site suggests misalignment of the amino group of D-2-aminopimelate for nucleophilic attack on the succinate moiety of the co-substrate succinyl-CoA as the structural basis of specificity and inhibition. P. aeruginosa mutants where the dapA gene had been deleted were viable and able to grow in a mouse lung infection model, suggesting that DapA is not an optimal target for drug development against this organism. Structure-based sequence alignments, based on the DapA crystal structure determined to 1.6 Å resolution revealed the presence of two homologues, PA0223 and PA4188, in P. aeruginosa that could substitute for DapA in the P. aeruginosa PAO1ΔdapA mutant. In vitro experiments using recombinant PA0223 protein could however not detect any DapA activity.

  18. Tillage Management and Seasonal Effects on Denitrifier Community Abundance, Gene Expression and Structure over Winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatti, Enrico; Goyer, Claudia; Burton, David L; Wertz, Sophie; Zebarth, Bernie J; Chantigny, Martin; Filion, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Tillage effects on denitrifier communities and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were mainly studied during the growing season. There is limited information for the non-growing season, especially in northern countries where winter has prolonged periods with sub-zero temperatures. The abundance and structure of the denitrifier community, denitrification gene expression and N2O emissions in fields under long-term tillage regimes [no-tillage (NT) vs conventional tillage (CT)] were assessed during two consecutive winters. NT exerted a positive effect on nirK and nosZ denitrifier abundance in both winters compared to CT. Moreover, the two contrasting managements had an opposite influence on nirK and nirS RNA/DNA ratios. Tillage management resulted in different denitrifier community structures during both winters. Seasonal changes were observed in the abundance and the structure of denitrifiers. Interestingly, the RNA/DNA ratios were greater in the coldest months for nirK, nirS and nosZ. N2O emissions were not influenced by management but changed over time with two orders of magnitude increase in the coldest month of both winters. In winter of 2009-2010, emissions were mainly as N2O, whereas in 2010-2011, when soil temperatures were milder due to persistent snow cover, most emissions were as dinitrogen. Results indicated that tillage management during the growing season induced differences in denitrifier community structure that persisted during winter. However, management did not affect the active cold-adapted community structure.

  19. A Plasmodium falciparum FcB1-schizont-EST collection providing clues to schizont specific gene structure and polymorphism

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    Charneau Sébastien

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium falciparum genome (3D7 strain published in 2002, revealed ~5,400 genes, mostly based on in silico predictions. Experimental data is therefore required for structural and functional assessments of P. falciparum genes and expression, and polymorphic data are further necessary to exploit genomic information to further qualify therapeutic target candidates. Here, we undertook a large scale analysis of a P. falciparum FcB1-schizont-EST library previously constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to study genes expressed during merozoite morphogenesis, with the aim of: 1 obtaining an exhaustive collection of schizont specific ESTs, 2 experimentally validating or correcting P. falciparum gene models and 3 pinpointing genes displaying protein polymorphism between the FcB1 and 3D7 strains. Results A total of 22,125 clones randomly picked from the SSH library were sequenced, yielding 21,805 usable ESTs that were then clustered on the P. falciparum genome. This allowed identification of 243 protein coding genes, including 121 previously annotated as hypothetical. Statistical analysis of GO terms, when available, indicated significant enrichment in genes involved in "entry into host-cells" and "actin cytoskeleton". Although most ESTs do not span full-length gene reading frames, detailed sequence comparison of FcB1-ESTs versus 3D7 genomic sequences allowed the confirmation of exon/intron boundaries in 29 genes, the detection of new boundaries in 14 genes and identification of protein polymorphism for 21 genes. In addition, a large number of non-protein coding ESTs were identified, mainly matching with the two A-type rRNA units (on chromosomes 5 and 7 and to a lower extent, two atypical rRNA loci (on chromosomes 1 and 8, TARE subtelomeric regions (several chromosomes and the recently described telomerase RNA gene (chromosome 9. Conclusion This FcB1-schizont-EST analysis confirmed the actual expression of 243

  20. Effects of the gene carrier polyethyleneimines on structure and function of blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dagen; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Nan; Zuo, Qinhua; Wang, Qian; Xue, Wei; Liu, Zonghua

    2013-01-01

    As a synthetic polycation, polyethylenimine (PEI) is currently one of the most effective non-viral gene carriers. For in vivo applications, PEI will enter systemic circulation and interact with various blood components and then affect their individual bio-functions. Up to now, overall and systematic investigation on the interaction of PEI with multiple blood components at cellular, membrane, and molecular levels is lacking, even though it is critically important for the in vivo safety of PEI. To learn a structure-activity relationship, we investigated the effects of PEI with different molecular weight (MW) and shape (branched or linear) on key blood components and function, specifically, on RBC aggregation and morphological change, platelet activation, conformation change of albumin (as a representative of plasma proteins), and blood coagulation process. Additionally, more proteins from plasma were screened and identified to have associations with PEI by a proteomic analysis. It was found that, the PEIs have severe impact on RBC membrane structure, albumin conformation, and blood coagulation process, but do not significantly activate platelets at low concentrations. Furthermore, 41 plasma proteins were identified to have some interaction with PEI. This indicates that, besides albumin, PEI does interact with a variety of blood plasma proteins, and could have unexplored effects on their structures and bio-functions. The results provide good insight into the molecular design and blood safety of PEI and other polycations for in vivo applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

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    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  2. Allelic Diversity and Population Structure in Oenococcus oeni as Determined from Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Marcobal, Ángela; Muñoz, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the organism of choice for promoting malolactic fermentation in wine. The population biology of O. oeni is poorly understood and remains unclear. For a better understanding of the mode of genetic variation within this species, we investigated by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) with the gyrB, pgm, ddl, recP, and mleA genes the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 18 O. oeni strains isolated in various years from wines of the United States, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. These strains have also been characterized by ribotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region (ISR). Ribotyping grouped the strains into two groups; however, the RFLP analysis of the ISRs showed no differences in the strains analyzed. In contrast, MLST in oenococci had a good discriminatory ability, and we have found a higher genetic diversity than indicated by ribotyping analysis. All sequence types were represented by a single strain, and all the strains could be distinguished from each other because they had unique combinations of alleles. Strains assumed to be identical showed the same sequence type. Phylogenetic analyses indicated a panmictic population structure in O. oeni. Sequences were analyzed for evidence of recombination by split decomposition analysis and analysis of clustered polymorphisms. All results indicated that recombination plays a major role in creating the genetic heterogeneity of O. oeni. A low standardized index of association value indicated that the O. oeni genes analyzed are close to linkage equilibrium. This study constitutes the first step in the development of an MLST method for O. oeni and the first example of the application of MLST to a nonpathogenic food production bacteria. PMID:15574919

  3. The puh structural gene coding for the H subunit of the Rhodospirillum rubrum photoreaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérard, J; Gingras, G

    1991-01-01

    The Rhodospirillum rubrum structural gene puh, coding for the photoreaction center H polypeptide, and three other putative genes that surround puh were cloned and sequenced. The deduced 257 amino acid H polypeptide has a molecular weight of 27,909, in close agreement with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis determination. Hydropathy plots predict a single hydrophobic alpha helix. The H polypeptide of Rhodospirillum rubrum shares only 23% of its residues with all three of the H polypeptides from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Despite this apparent low degree of similarity, statistical analysis leaves no doubt about their close relatedness. Interspecies evolutionary distance, assessed by this analysis, confirms the closeness of the two Rhodobacter species, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas viridis being approximately equidistant from them. Three regions of the H polypeptide are highly conserved in all four species. They correspond to known contact points of H with the complex of the other two (L and M) subunits on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. A glutamic acid residue (H polypeptide residue 177), conserved in the other bacteria and suggested to be involved in the binding of secondary quinone QB, is replaced by serine in Rhodospirillum rubrum. The open reading frames G115, I2372, and I3087 are predicted to, respectively, encode polypeptides of 480, 224, and 155 residues coiled in 10, 2, and 1 transmembrane helices. Open reading frame G115 shares 56% identical residues with F1696, a sequence arranged in the genome of Rhodobacter capsulatus. The gene product of ORF I3087 is predicted to share highly similar sequences with nitrogenase reductase (encoded by nifH) of 11 different bacterial species and is suggested to have a regulatory function.

  4. Identification of putative methanol dehydrogenase (moxF) structural genes in methylotrophs and cloning of moxF genes from Methylococcus capsulatus bath and Methylomonas albus BG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, R L; Haygood, M G; Lidstrom, M E

    1988-01-01

    An open-reading-frame fragment of a Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 gene (moxF) encoding a portion of the methanol dehydrogenase structural protein has been used as a hybridization probe to detect similar sequences in a variety of methylotrophic bacteria. This hybridization was used to isolate clones containing putative moxF genes from two obligate methanotrophic bacteria, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath and Methylomonas albus BG8. The identity of these genes was confirmed in two ways. A T7 expression vector was used to produce methanol dehydrogenase protein in Escherichia coli from the cloned genes, and in each case the protein was identified by immunoblotting with antiserum against the Methylomonas albus methanol dehydrogenase. In addition, a moxF mutant of Methylobacterium strain AM1 was complemented to a methanol-positive phenotype that partially restored methanol dehydrogenase activity, using broad-host-range plasmids containing the moxF genes from each methanotroph. The partial complementation of a moxF mutant in a facultative serine pathway methanol utilizer by moxF genes from type I and type X obligate methane utilizers suggests broad functional conservation of the methanol oxidation system among gram-negative methylotrophs. Images PMID:3129400

  5. Structural defect linked to nonrandom mutations in the matrix gene of Biden strain subacute sclerosing panencephalitis virus defined by cDNA cloning and expression of chimeric genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayata, M.; Hirano, A.; Wong, T.C.

    1989-03-01

    Biken strain, a nonproductive measles viruslike agent isolated from a subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) patient, contains a posttranscriptional defect affecting matrix (M) protein. A putative M protein was translated in vitro with RNA from Biken strain-infected cells. A similar protein was detected in vivo by an antiserum against a peptide synthesized from the cloned M gene of Edmonston strain measles virus. By using a novel method, full-length cDNAs of the Biken M gene were selectively cloned. The cloned Biken M gene contained an open reading frame which encoded 8 extra carboxy-terminal amino acid residues and 20 amino acid substitutions predicted to affect both the hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the gene product. The cloned gene was expressed in vitro and in vivo into a 37,500 M/sub r/ protein electrophoretically and antigenically distinct from the M protein of Edmonston strain but identical to the M protein in Biken strain-infected cells. Chimeric M proteins synthesized in vitro and in vivo showed that the mutations in the carboxy-proximal region altered the local antigenicity and those in the amino region affected the overall protein conformation. The protein expressed from the Biken M gene was unstable in vivo. Instability was attributed to multiple mutations. These results offer insights into the basis of the defect in Biken strain and pose intriguing questions about the evolutionary origins of SSPE viruses in general.

  6. iHAP – integrated haplotype analysis pipeline for characterizing the haplotype structure of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Yun Ping

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of genotype data from large-scale efforts that catalog the genetic variants of different populations have given rise to new avenues for multifactorial disease association studies. Recent work shows that genotype data from the International HapMap Project have a high degree of transferability to the wider population. This implies that the design of genotyping studies on local populations may be facilitated through inferences drawn from information contained in HapMap populations. Results To facilitate analysis of HapMap data for characterizing the haplotype structure of genes or any chromosomal regions, we have developed an integrated web-based resource, iHAP. In addition to incorporating genotype and haplotype data from the International HapMap Project and gene information from the UCSC Genome Browser Database, iHAP also provides capabilities for inferring haplotype blocks and selecting tag SNPs that are representative of haplotype patterns. These include block partitioning algorithms, block definitions, tag SNP definitions, as well as SNPs to be "force included" as tags. Based on the parameters defined at the input stage, iHAP performs on-the-fly analysis and displays the result graphically as a webpage. To facilitate analysis, intermediate and final result files can be downloaded. Conclusion The iHAP resource, available at http://ihap.bii.a-star.edu.sg, provides a convenient yet flexible approach for the user community to analyze HapMap data and identify candidate targets for genotyping studies.

  7. Structure of 5' region of human tenascin-R gene and characterization of its promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherzi, R; Leprini, A; Siri, A; Zardi, L

    1998-03-01

    The tenascin-R (TN-R) gene encodes a multidomain extracellular matrix protein belonging to the tenascin family, previously detected only in the central nervous system. In this report, we describe the structure of the 5' region of the human TN-R gene and characterize the activity of its promoter. We cloned two previously unreported nontranslated exons (exons 1 and 2, 539 and 101 bp in length, respectively) separated by a large (> or = 40-kb) intron. The intron between exons 2 and 3 (containing the ATG codon) is 122 kb in length. Tenascin-R transcripts in fetal, adult, and neoplastic human brain contain both exons 1 and 2, as demonstrated by S1 nuclease analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The human TN-R promoter displays relatively unusual features in terms of sequence in that it lacks any TATA box, CAAT box, GC-rich regions, or initiator element. The promoter displays its activity only in cultured cells of neural and glial origin, not in transformed epithelial cells and melanoma cells. All the elements required for the full and cell-specific activity of the promoter are contained in the 57-bp sequence closest to the transcription startpoint.

  8. Hydrogel scaffolds promote neural gene expression and structural reorganization in human astrocyte cultures

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    V. Bleu Knight

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial scaffolds have the potential to enhance neuronal development and regeneration. Understanding the genetic responses of astrocytes and neurons to biomaterials could facilitate the development of synthetic environments that enable the specification of neural tissue organization with engineered scaffolds. In this study, we used high throughput transcriptomic and imaging methods to determine the impact of a hydrogel, PuraMatrix™, on human glial cells in vitro. Parallel studies were undertaken with cells grown in a monolayer environment on tissue culture polystyrene. When the Normal Human Astrocyte (NHA cell line is grown in a hydrogel matrix environment, the glial cells adopt a structural organization that resembles that of neuronal-glial cocultures, where neurons form clusters that are distinct from the surrounding glia. Statistical analysis of next generation RNA sequencing data uncovered a set of genes that are differentially expressed in the monolayer and matrix hydrogel environments. Functional analysis demonstrated that hydrogel-upregulated genes can be grouped into three broad categories: neuronal differentiation and/or neural plasticity, response to neural insult, and sensory perception. Our results demonstrate that hydrogel biomaterials have the potential to transform human glial cell identity, and may have applications in the repair of damaged brain tissue.

  9. Aspects of gene structure and functional regulation of the isozymes of Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    Gaps in our understanding of the complex regulated expression of isozymes of Na,K-ATPase and the diverse systems for posttranslational modification and short term regulation of active Na,K-transport in animals and humans are the main problems in comprehensive Na,K-pump physiology. In mammalian...... genomes, the genes of four alpha-subunit and at least three beta-subunit isoforms of Na,K-ATPase are identified and two gamma-subunits are expressed in kidney. The isoforms combine in a number of Na,K-ATPase isozymes that are expressed in a tissue and cell specific manner. Models of the molecular...... mechanism of regulation of these isozymes have become more reliable due to progress in understanding the three-dimensional protein structure and conformational transitions mediating transfer of energy from the P-domain to intramembrane Na+ and K+ binding sites....

  10. Uncovering Gene Regulatory Networks from Time-Series Microarray Data with Variational Bayesian Structural Expectation Maximization

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    Huang Yufei

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in this paper reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks from time-series microarray data. We apply dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs for modeling cell cycle regulations. In developing a network inference algorithm, we focus on soft solutions that can provide a posteriori probability (APP of network topology. In particular, we propose a variational Bayesian structural expectation maximization algorithm that can learn the posterior distribution of the network model parameters and topology jointly. We also show how the obtained APPs of the network topology can be used in a Bayesian data integration strategy to integrate two different microarray data sets. The proposed VBSEM algorithm has been tested on yeast cell cycle data sets. To evaluate the confidence of the inferred networks, we apply a moving block bootstrap method. The inferred network is validated by comparing it to the KEGG pathway map.

  11. Using co-occurrence network structure to extract synonymous gene and protein names from MEDLINE abstracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spackman K

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Text-mining can assist biomedical researchers in reducing information overload by extracting useful knowledge from large collections of text. We developed a novel text-mining method based on analyzing the network structure created by symbol co-occurrences as a way to extend the capabilities of knowledge extraction. The method was applied to the task of automatic gene and protein name synonym extraction. Results Performance was measured on a test set consisting of about 50,000 abstracts from one year of MEDLINE. Synonyms retrieved from curated genomics databases were used as a gold standard. The system obtained a maximum F-score of 22.21% (23.18% precision and 21.36% recall, with high efficiency in the use of seed pairs. Conclusion The method performs comparably with other studied methods, does not rely on sophisticated named-entity recognition, and requires little initial seed knowledge.

  12. Bioinformatics resources for cancer research with an emphasis on gene function and structure prediction tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kihara

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The immensely popular fields of cancer research and bioinformatics overlap in many different areas, e.g. large data repositories that allow for users to analyze data from many experiments (data handling, databases, pattern mining, microarray data analysis, and interpretation of proteomics data. There are many newly available resources in these areas that may be unfamiliar to most cancer researchers wanting to incorporate bioinformatics tools and analyses into their work, and also to bioinformaticians looking for real data to develop and test algorithms. This review reveals the interdependence of cancer research and bioinformatics, and highlight the most appropriate and useful resources available to cancer researchers. These include not only public databases, but general and specific bioinformatics tools which can be useful to the cancer researcher. The primary foci are function and structure prediction tools of protein genes. The result is a useful reference to cancer researchers and bioinformaticians studying cancer alike.

  13. Gene flow and population structure in the Mexican blind cavefish complex (Astyanax mexicanus

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    Bradic Martina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cave animals converge evolutionarily on a suite of troglomorphic traits, the best known of which are eyelessness and depigmentation. We studied 11 cave and 10 surface populations of Astyanax mexicanus in order to better understand the evolutionary origins of the cave forms, the basic genetic structuring of both cave and surface populations, and the degree to which present day migration among them affects their genetic divergence. Results To assess the genetic structure within populations and the relationships among them we genotyped individuals at 26 microsatellite loci. We found that surface populations are similar to one another, despite their relatively large geographic separation, whereas the cave populations are better differentiated. The cave populations we studied span the full range of the cave forms in three separate geographic regions and have at least five separate evolutionary origins. Cave populations had lower genetic diversity than surface populations, correlated with their smaller effective population sizes, probably the result of food and space limitations. Some of the cave populations receive migrants from the surface and exchange migrants with one another, especially when geographically close. This admixture results in significant heterozygote deficiencies at numerous loci due to Wahlund effects. Cave populations receiving migrants from the surface contain small numbers of individuals that are intermediate in both phenotype and genotype, affirming at least limited gene flow from the surface. Conclusions Cave populations of this species are derived from two different surface stocks denoted "old" and "new." The old stock colonized caves at least three times independently while the new stock colonized caves at least twice independently. Thus, the similar cave phenotypes found in these caves are the result of repeated convergences. These phenotypic convergences have occurred in spite of gene flow from surface

  14. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

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    Diana Chernikova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important.

  15. Analysis of genetic structure in Slovak Pinzgau cattle using five candidate genes related to milk production traits

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    Miluchova Martina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper was to identify genetic structure of five candidate genes for milk production in Slovak Pinzgau breed. A total of 86 mothers of bulls of Slovak Pinzgau cattle were use in this study. To genotype of cows for candidate genes we used PCR methods (PCR-RFLP, ARMS-PCR, multiplex PCR-RFLP. On the basis of PCR analyses we established genotype structure of cattle population and calculated allelic frequencies. Effectiveness of allele incidence and genetic diversity was evaluated with following parameters: theoretical heterozygosity (He exp, experimental heterozygosity (He obs, polymorphism information content (PIC, expected homozygosity (E, effective number of alleles (ENA, level of possible variability realization (V%. Slovak Pinzgau cattle exhibit the high values of heterozygosity, polymorphism information content, effective number of alleles and level of possible variability realization for genes CSN2, CSN3 and LALBA. In opposite, for genes CSN1S1 and LGB show high values of homozygosity.

  16. Reverse engineering model structures for soil and ecosystem respiration: the potential of gene expression programming

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    I. Ilie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate model representation of land–atmosphere carbon fluxes is essential for climate projections. However, the exact responses of carbon cycle processes to climatic drivers often remain uncertain. Presently, knowledge derived from experiments, complemented by a steadily evolving body of mechanistic theory, provides the main basis for developing such models. The strongly increasing availability of measurements may facilitate new ways of identifying suitable model structures using machine learning. Here, we explore the potential of gene expression programming (GEP to derive relevant model formulations based solely on the signals present in data by automatically applying various mathematical transformations to potential predictors and repeatedly evolving the resulting model structures. In contrast to most other machine learning regression techniques, the GEP approach generates readable models that allow for prediction and possibly for interpretation. Our study is based on two cases: artificially generated data and real observations. Simulations based on artificial data show that GEP is successful in identifying prescribed functions, with the prediction capacity of the models comparable to four state-of-the-art machine learning methods (random forests, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and kernel ridge regressions. Based on real observations we explore the responses of the different components of terrestrial respiration at an oak forest in south-eastern England. We find that the GEP-retrieved models are often better in prediction than some established respiration models. Based on their structures, we find previously unconsidered exponential dependencies of respiration on seasonal ecosystem carbon assimilation and water dynamics. We noticed that the GEP models are only partly portable across respiration components, the identification of a general terrestrial respiration model possibly prevented by equifinality issues. Overall

  17. Reverse engineering model structures for soil and ecosystem respiration: the potential of gene expression programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Iulia; Dittrich, Peter; Carvalhais, Nuno; Jung, Martin; Heinemeyer, Andreas; Migliavacca, Mirco; Morison, James I. L.; Sippel, Sebastian; Subke, Jens-Arne; Wilkinson, Matthew; Mahecha, Miguel D.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate model representation of land-atmosphere carbon fluxes is essential for climate projections. However, the exact responses of carbon cycle processes to climatic drivers often remain uncertain. Presently, knowledge derived from experiments, complemented by a steadily evolving body of mechanistic theory, provides the main basis for developing such models. The strongly increasing availability of measurements may facilitate new ways of identifying suitable model structures using machine learning. Here, we explore the potential of gene expression programming (GEP) to derive relevant model formulations based solely on the signals present in data by automatically applying various mathematical transformations to potential predictors and repeatedly evolving the resulting model structures. In contrast to most other machine learning regression techniques, the GEP approach generates readable models that allow for prediction and possibly for interpretation. Our study is based on two cases: artificially generated data and real observations. Simulations based on artificial data show that GEP is successful in identifying prescribed functions, with the prediction capacity of the models comparable to four state-of-the-art machine learning methods (random forests, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and kernel ridge regressions). Based on real observations we explore the responses of the different components of terrestrial respiration at an oak forest in south-eastern England. We find that the GEP-retrieved models are often better in prediction than some established respiration models. Based on their structures, we find previously unconsidered exponential dependencies of respiration on seasonal ecosystem carbon assimilation and water dynamics. We noticed that the GEP models are only partly portable across respiration components, the identification of a general terrestrial respiration model possibly prevented by equifinality issues. Overall, GEP is a promising

  18. Structure and role of neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... The neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene consists of 11 exons and is found in two forms; one is wild type gene and the other is pseudogene. It has more than 98% homology. Both genes occupy the same chromosome region. The mutation in this gene leads to various types of diseases such as chronic.

  19. Netter: re-ranking gene network inference predictions using structural network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyssinck, Joeri; Demeester, Piet; Dhaene, Tom; Saeys, Yvan

    2016-02-09

    Many algorithms have been developed to infer the topology of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data. These methods typically produce a ranking of links between genes with associated confidence scores, after which a certain threshold is chosen to produce the inferred topology. However, the structural properties of the predicted network do not resemble those typical for a gene regulatory network, as most algorithms only take into account connections found in the data and do not include known graph properties in their inference process. This lowers the prediction accuracy of these methods, limiting their usability in practice. We propose a post-processing algorithm which is applicable to any confidence ranking of regulatory interactions obtained from a network inference method which can use, inter alia, graphlets and several graph-invariant properties to re-rank the links into a more accurate prediction. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, we re-rank predictions of six different state-of-the-art algorithms using three simple network properties as optimization criteria and show that Netter can improve the predictions made on both artificially generated data as well as the DREAM4 and DREAM5 benchmarks. Additionally, the DREAM5 E.coli. community prediction inferred from real expression data is further improved. Furthermore, Netter compares favorably to other post-processing algorithms and is not restricted to correlation-like predictions. Lastly, we demonstrate that the performance increase is robust for a wide range of parameter settings. Netter is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be. Network inference from high-throughput data is a long-standing challenge. In this work, we present Netter, which can further refine network predictions based on a set of user-defined graph properties. Netter is a flexible system which can be applied in unison with any method producing a ranking from omics data. It can be tailored to specific prior

  20. Elongation Factor-Tu (EF-Tu) proteins structural stability and bioinformatics in ancestral gene reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Tremberger, G.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Holden, T.; Cheung, T.

    2013-09-01

    A paleo-experimental evolution report on elongation factor EF-Tu structural stability results has provided an opportunity to rewind the tape of life using the ancestral protein sequence reconstruction modeling approach; consistent with the book of life dogma in current biology and being an important component in the astrobiology community. Fractal dimension via the Higuchi fractal method and Shannon entropy of the DNA sequence classification could be used in a diagram that serves as a simple summary. Results from biomedical gene research provide examples on the diagram methodology. Comparisons between biomedical genes such as EEF2 (elongation factor 2 human, mouse, etc), WDR85 in epigenetics, HAR1 in human specificity, DLG1 in cognitive skill, and HLA-C in mosquito bite immunology with EF Tu DNA sequences have accounted for the reported circular dichroism thermo-stability data systematically; the results also infer a relatively less volatility geologic time period from 2 to 3 Gyr from adaptation viewpoint. Comparison to Thermotoga maritima MSB8 and Psychrobacter shows that Thermus thermophilus HB8 EF-Tu calibration sequence could be an outlier, consistent with free energy calculation by NUPACK. Diagram methodology allows computer simulation studies and HAR1 shows about 0.5% probability from chimp to human in terms of diagram location, and SNP simulation results such as amoebic meningoencephalitis NAF1 suggest correlation. Extensions to the studies of the translation and transcription elongation factor sequences in Megavirus Chiliensis, Megavirus Lba and Pandoravirus show that the studied Pandoravirus sequence could be an outlier with the highest fractal dimension and lowest entropy, as compared to chicken as a deviant in the DNMT3A DNA methylation gene sequences from zebrafish to human and to the less than one percent probability in computer simulation using the HAR1 0.5% probability as reference. The diagram methodology would be useful in ancestral gene

  1. The UDP-glucuronate decarboxylase gene family in Populus: structure, expression, and association genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhang Du

    Full Text Available In woody crop plants, the oligosaccharide components of the cell wall are essential for important traits such as bioenergy content, growth, and structural wood properties. UDP-glucuronate decarboxylase (UXS is a key enzyme in the synthesis of UDP-xylose for the formation of xylans during cell wall biosynthesis. Here, we isolated a multigene family of seven members (PtUXS1-7 encoding UXS from Populus tomentosa, the first investigation of UXSs in a tree species. Analysis of gene structure and phylogeny showed that the PtUXS family could be divided into three groups (PtUXS1/4, PtUXS2/5, and PtUXS3/6/7, consistent with the tissue-specific expression patterns of each PtUXS. We further evaluated the functional consequences of nucleotide polymorphisms in PtUXS1. In total, 243 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified, with a high frequency of SNPs (1/18 bp and nucleotide diversity (πT = 0.01033, θw = 0.01280. Linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis showed that LD did not extend over the entire gene (r (2<0.1, P<0.001, within 700 bp. SNP- and haplotype-based association analysis showed that nine SNPs (Q <0.10 and 12 haplotypes (P<0.05 were significantly associated with growth and wood property traits in the association population (426 individuals, with 2.70% to 12.37% of the phenotypic variation explained. Four significant single-marker associations (Q <0.10 were validated in a linkage mapping population of 1200 individuals. Also, RNA transcript accumulation varies among genotypic classes of SNP10 was further confirmed in the association population. This is the first comprehensive study of the UXS gene family in woody plants, and lays the foundation for genetic improvements of wood properties and growth in trees using genetic engineering or marker-assisted breeding.

  2. Ultra high-resolution gene centric genomic structural analysis of a non-syndromic congenital heart defect, Tetralogy of Fallot.

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    Douglas C Bittel

    Full Text Available Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is one of the most common severe congenital heart malformations. Great progress has been made in identifying key genes that regulate heart development, yet approximately 70% of TOF cases are sporadic and nonsyndromic with no known genetic cause. We created an ultra high-resolution gene centric comparative genomic hybridization (gcCGH microarray based on 591 genes with a validated association with cardiovascular development or function. We used our gcCGH array to analyze the genomic structure of 34 infants with sporadic TOF without a deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 (n male = 20; n female = 14; age range of 2 to 10 months. Using our custom-made gcCGH microarray platform, we identified a total of 613 copy number variations (CNVs ranging in size from 78 base pairs to 19.5 Mb. We identified 16 subjects with 33 CNVs that contained 13 different genes which are known to be directly associated with heart development. Additionally, there were 79 genes from the broader list of genes that were partially or completely contained in a CNV. All 34 individuals examined had at least one CNV involving these 79 genes. Furthermore, we had available whole genome exon arrays from right ventricular tissue in 13 of our subjects. We analyzed these for correlations between copy number and gene expression level. Surprisingly, we could detect only one clear association between CNVs and expression (GSTT1 for any of the 591 focal genes on the gcCGH array. The expression levels of GSTT1 were correlated with copy number in all cases examined (r = 0.95, p = 0.001. We identified a large number of small CNVs in genes with varying associations with heart development. Our results illustrate the complexity of human genome structural variation and underscore the need for multifactorial assessment of potential genetic/genomic factors that contribute to congenital heart defects.

  3. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

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    Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez Madalena

    Full Text Available Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA, allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  4. Identification of the first deletion-insertion involving the complete structure of GAA gene and part of CCDC40 gene mediated by an Alu element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiñoso, Cinthia; Vallespin, Elena; Fernández, Luís; Arrabal, Luisa F; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belen; Santos, Fernando; Solera, Jesús

    2013-04-25

    Pompe disease is an uncommon autosomal recessive glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of acid α-glucosidase. Classic infantile form triggers severe cardiomyopathy, hypotonia, and respiratory failure, leading to death within the first two years of life. The majority of patients with Pompe disease have been reported to have point mutations in the GAA gene. We report the first complex deletion-insertion encompassing the complete structure of GAA gene and a large fragment of the gene CCDC40 in a patient with very severe form of Pompe disease. Sequencing analysis of breakpoints allowed us to determine the potential implication of an Alu repeat in the pathogenic mechanism. We suggest that molecular strategy of Pompe disease should include systematic analysis of large rearrangements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  6. Genetic structure of the endogenous proviruses and expression of the gag gene in Brown Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, A V; Korec, E; Chernov, M V; Tikhonenko, A T; Obukh, I B; Hlozánek, I

    1986-01-01

    Seven loci of endogenous proviruses were detected in the genome of Brown Leghorn chickens. Sets of endogenous proviruses in DNA of the chicken embryos examined were identified by blot hybridization with 32P-labelled DNA of RSV and EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestion. Comparison of the results showed that only one locus (A) of endogeneous provirus was associated with a gs+ phenotype as determined by the immunoperoxidase reaction and antibodies against gag gene products of RSV. Restriction endonuclease analysis with HindIII, BamHI and SacI revealed that proviruses A and F in Brown Leghorn chickens correspond to loci ev-3 and ev-6, respectively, in White Leghorn chickens. Other loci (B, C, D, E, and X) were designated ev-22, ev-23, ev-24, ev-25, ev-26, respectively. None of these loci expressed infectious virions. The structure of most of the endogenous proviruses examined is considerably different from the genome of the endogenous chicken virus RAV-O. The difference in structure may be one possible cause of the absence of endogenous provirus expression.

  7. Structure-based predictions broadly link transcription factor mutations to gene expression changes in cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Justin; Bernard, Brady; Reynolds, Sheila; Plaisier, Christopher L.; Shmulevich, Ilya; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of unique mutations in transcription factors (TFs) arise in cancers, and the functional and biological roles of relatively few of these have been characterized. Here, we used structure-based methods developed specifically for DNA-binding proteins to systematically predict the consequences of mutations in several TFs that are frequently mutated in cancers. The explicit consideration of protein–DNA interactions was crucial to explain the roles and prevalence of mutations in TP53 and RUNX1 in cancers, and resulted in a higher specificity of detection for known p53-regulated genes among genetic associations between TP53 genotypes and genome-wide expression in The Cancer Genome Atlas, compared to existing methods of mutation assessment. Biophysical predictions also indicated that the relative prevalence of TP53 missense mutations in cancer is proportional to their thermodynamic impacts on protein stability and DNA binding, which is consistent with the selection for the loss of p53 transcriptional function in cancers. Structure and thermodynamics-based predictions of the impacts of missense mutations that focus on specific molecular functions may be increasingly useful for the precise and large-scale inference of aberrant molecular phenotypes in cancer and other complex diseases. PMID:25378323

  8. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  9. Structural organization of the human type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), composed of more exons than any previously characterized gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiano, A.M.; Chung-Honet, L.C.; Greenspan, D.S.; Hoffman, G.G.; Lee, S.; Cheng, W. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)); Uitto, J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1994-05-01

    The human type VII collagen (COL7A1) gene is the locus for mutations in at least some cases of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here the authors describe the entire intron/exon organization of COL7A1, which is shown to have 118 exons, more than any previously described gene. Despite this complexity, COL7A1 is compact. Consisting of 31,132 bp from transcription start site to polyadenylation site, it is only about three times the size of type VII collagen mRNA. Thus, COL7A1 introns are small. A 71-nucleotide COL7A1 intron is the smallest intron yet reported in a collagen gene, and only one COL7A1 intron is greater than 1 kb in length. All exons in the COL7A1 triple helix coding region that do not begin with sequences corresponding to imperfections of the triple helix begin with intact codons for Gly residues of Gly-X-Y repeats. This is reminiscent of the structure of fibrillar rather than other nonfibrillar collagen genes. In addition, the COL7A1 triple helix coding region contains many exons of recurring sizes (e.g., 25 exons are 36 bp, 12 exons are 45 bp, 8 exons are 63 bp), suggesting an evolutionary origin distinct from those of other nonfibrillar collagen genes. Sequences from the 5[prime] portion of COL7A1 are presented along with the 3766-bp intergenic sequence, which separated COL7A1 from the upstream gene encoding the core I protein of the cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex. The COL7A1 promoter region is found to lack extensive homologies with promoter regions of other genes expressed primarily in skin. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  11. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees

    OpenAIRE

    C?t?, Caroline L; Boileau, Francis; Roy, Vicky; Ouellet, Mario; Levasseur, Caroline; Morency, Marie-Jos?e; Cooke, Janice EK; S?guin, Armand; MacKay, John J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip III) proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cambium identity, as well as primary and secondary vascular differentiation and patterning in herbaceous plants. They have been proposed to regulate wood formation but relatively little evidence is available to validate such a role. We characterised and compared HD-Zip III gene family in an angiosperm tree, Populus spp. (poplar), and the gymnosperm Picea glauca (white spruc...

  12. Comparative mapping, genomic structure, and expression analysis of eight pseudo-response regulator genes in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin A; Kim, Jung Sun; Hong, Joon Ki; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Choi, Beom-Soon; Seol, Young-Joo; Jeon, Chang Hoo

    2012-05-01

    Circadian clocks regulate plant growth and development in response to environmental factors. In this function, clocks influence the adaptation of species to changes in location or climate. Circadian-clock genes have been subject of intense study in models such as Arabidopsis thaliana but the results may not necessarily reflect clock functions in species with polyploid genomes, such as Brassica species, that include multiple copies of clock-related genes. The triplicate genome of Brassica rapa retains high sequence-level co-linearity with Arabidopsis genomes. In B. rapa we had previously identified five orthologs of the five known Arabidopsis pseudo-response regulator (PRR) genes that are key regulators of the circadian clock in this species. Three of these B. rapa genes, BrPRR1, BrPPR5, and BrPPR7, are present in two copies each in the B. rapa genome, for a total of eight B. rapa PRR (BrPRR) orthologs. We have now determined sequences and expression characteristics of the eight BrPRR genes and mapped their positions in the B. rapa genome. Although both members of each paralogous pair exhibited the same expression pattern, some variation in their gene structures was apparent. The BrPRR genes are tightly linked to several flowering genes. The knowledge about genome location, copy number variation and structural diversity of these B. rapa clock genes will improve our understanding of clock-related functions in this important crop. This will facilitate the development of Brassica crops for optimal growth in new environments and under changing conditions.

  13. Cloning and characterization of nif structural and regulatory genes in the purple sulfur bacterium, Halorhodospira halophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuihiji, Hisayoshi; Yamazaki, Yoichi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Imamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2006-03-01

    Halorhodospira halophila is a halophilic photosynthetic bacterium classified as a purple sulfur bacterium. We found that H. halophila generates hydrogen gas during photoautotrophic growth as a byproduct of a nitrogenase reaction. In order to consider the applied possibilities of this photobiological hydrogen generation, we cloned and characterized the structural and regulatory genes encoding the nitrogenase, nifH, nifD and nifA, from H. halophila. This is the first description of the nif genes for a purple sulfur bacterium. The amino-acid sequences of NifH and NifD indicated that these proteins are an Fe protein and a part of a MoFe protein, respectively. The important residues are conserved completely. The sequence upstream from the nifH region and sequence similarities of nifH and nifD with those of the other organisms suggest that the regulatory system might be a NifL-NifA system; however, H. halophila lacks nifL. The amino-acid sequence of H. halophila NifA is closer to that of the NifA of the NifL-NifA system than to that of NifA without NifL. H. halophila NifA does not conserve either the residue that interacts with NifL or the important residues involved in NifL-independent regulation. These results suggest the existence of yet another regulatory system, and that the development of functional systems and their molecular counterparts are not necessarily correlated throughout evolution. All of these Nif proteins of H. halophila possess an excess of acidic residues, which acts as a salt-resistant mechanism.

  14. Structure, expression and regulation of the cannabinoid receptor gene (CB1) in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaw, Elizabeth A; Hu, Haibei; Gomez, Geraldine T; Hebb, Andrea L O; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2004-12-01

    Loss of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) occurs prior to neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD). The levels and distribution of CB1 RNA were equivalent in 3-week-old mice regardless of genotype demonstrating that the specific factors and appropriate chromatin structure that lead to the transcription of CB1 were present in the striatum of young R6/2 and R6/1 transgenic HD mice. The expression of the mutant HD transgene led progressively to decreased steady-state levels of CB1 mRNA in neurons of the lateral striatum, which was dependent on the size of the CAG repeat and relative expression of the gene encoding mutant huntingtin (HD). Although it is known that the coding region of CB1 is contained within a single exon in mice, rats and humans, the 5'-untranslated region of the mouse gene remained to be defined. CB1 mRNA is encoded by two exons separated by an 18.4-kb intron. Transcription of CB1 occurred at multiple sites within a GC-rich promoter region upstream of exon 1 encoding the 5'-UTR of CB1. There was no difference in the selection of specific transcription initiation sites associated with higher levels of CB1 expression in the striatum compared to the cortex or between the striata of wild-type and HD transgenic mice. The progressive decline in CB1 mRNA levels in R6 compared to wild-type mice was due to decreased transcription, which is consistent with the hypothesis that mutant huntingtin exerts its effects by altering transcription factor activity. The cell-specific conditions that allow for increased transcription of CB1 in the lateral striatum compared to other forebrain regions from all transcription start sites were affected by the expression of mutant huntingtin in a time-dependent manner.

  15. Spatial genetic structure and asymmetrical gene flow within the Pacific walrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Jay, Chadwick V.; Fischbach, Anthony S.; Sage, George K.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) occupying shelf waters of Pacific Arctic seas migrate during spring and summer from 3 breeding areas in the Bering Sea to form sexually segregated nonbreeding aggregations. We assessed genetic relationships among 2 putative breeding populations and 6 nonbreeding aggregations. Analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequence data suggest that males are distinct among breeding populations (ΦST=0.051), and between the eastern Chukchi and other nonbreeding aggregations (ΦST=0.336–0.449). Nonbreeding female aggregations were genetically distinct across marker types (microsatellite FST=0.019; mtDNA ΦST=0.313), as was eastern Chukchi and all other nonbreeding aggregations (microsatellite FST=0.019–0.035; mtDNA ΦST=0.386–0.389). Gene flow estimates are asymmetrical from St. Lawrence Island into the southeastern Bering breeding population for both sexes. Partitioning of haplotype frequencies among breeding populations suggests that individuals exhibit some degree of philopatry, although weak. High levels of genetic differentiation among eastern Chukchi and all other nonbreeding aggregations, but considerably lower genetic differentiation between breeding populations, suggest that at least 1 genetically distinct breeding population remained unsampled. Limited genetic structure at microsatellite loci between assayed breeding areas can emerge from several processes, including male-mediated gene flow, or population admixture following a decrease in census size (i.e., due to commercial harvest during 1880–1950s) and subsequent recovery. Nevertheless, high levels of genetic diversity in the Pacific walrus, which withstood prolonged decreases in census numbers with little impact on neutral genetic diversity, may reflect resiliency in the face of past environmental challenges.

  16. DIGEP-Pred: web service for in silico prediction of drug-induced gene expression profiles based on structural formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunin, Alexey; Ivanov, Sergey; Rudik, Anastasia; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2013-08-15

    Experimentally found gene expression profiles are used to solve different problems in pharmaceutical studies, such as drug repositioning, resistance, toxicity and drug-drug interactions. A special web service, DIGEP-Pred, for prediction of drug-induced changes of gene expression profiles based on structural formulae of chemicals has been developed. Structure-activity relationships for prediction of drug-induced gene expression profiles were determined by Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances (PASS) software. Comparative Toxicogenomics Database with data on the known drug-induced gene expression profiles of chemicals was used to create mRNA- and protein-based training sets. An average prediction accuracy for the training sets (ROC AUC) calculated by leave-one-out cross-validation on the basis of mRNA data (1385 compounds, 952 genes, 500 up- and 475 down-regulations) and protein data (1451 compounds, 139 genes, 93 up- and 55 down-regulations) exceeded 0.85. Freely available on the web at http://www.way2drug.com/GE.

  17. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Background Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromat...

  18. The human beta 2-microglobulin gene. Primary structure and definition of the transcriptional unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güssow, D.; REIN, R.; GINJAAR, I.; Hochstenbach, F.; SEEMANN, G.; KOTTMAN, A.; Ploegh, H. L.

    1987-01-01

    The human genomic clone pb2m13 contains a functional beta 2-microglobulin (B2m) gene, which upon transfection is readily expressed in murine fibroblasts. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of the human beta 2m gene and of a nearly full length cDNA clone. A comparison with the murine beta 2m gene

  19. The structure of two distinct pancreatic amylase genes in mouse strain YBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, BM; Clark, ME; Christiansen, Gunna

    1985-01-01

    ; another of 41 kb with a complete but different gene, PAN-I beta, plus a truncated gene, PAN-psi 1; and finally, one of 23 kb with another truncated gene, PAN-psi 2. Parts of the amino acid sequence of A beta and B beta have previously been determined, and we report here the sequencing of a 4-kb DNA...

  20. Structure and role of neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mutation in this gene leads to various types of diseases such as chronic granulomatous disease, multiple sclerosis, arthritis and parasitic infection. The common mutation of this gene in most diseases is GT deletion at the start of exon 2. The NCF1 gene interact with other subunits of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ...

  1. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes.

  2. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Caroline L; Boileau, Francis; Roy, Vicky; Ouellet, Mario; Levasseur, Caroline; Morency, Marie-Josée; Cooke, Janice E K; Séguin, Armand; MacKay, John J

    2010-12-11

    Class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip III) proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cambium identity, as well as primary and secondary vascular differentiation and patterning in herbaceous plants. They have been proposed to regulate wood formation but relatively little evidence is available to validate such a role. We characterised and compared HD-Zip III gene family in an angiosperm tree, Populus spp. (poplar), and the gymnosperm Picea glauca (white spruce), representing two highly evolutionarily divergent groups. Full-length cDNA sequences were isolated from poplar and white spruce. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that some of the gymnosperm sequences were derived from lineages that diverged earlier than angiosperm sequences, and seem to have been lost in angiosperm lineages. Transcript accumulation profiles were assessed by RT-qPCR on tissue panels from both species and in poplar trees in response to an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. The overall transcript profiles HD-Zip III complexes in white spruce and poplar exhibited substantial differences, reflecting their evolutionary history. Furthermore, two poplar sequences homologous to HD-Zip III genes involved in xylem development in Arabidopsis and Zinnia were over-expressed in poplar plants. PtaHB1 over-expression produced noticeable effects on petiole and primary shoot fibre development, suggesting that PtaHB1 is involved in primary xylem development. We also obtained evidence indicating that expression of PtaHB1 affected the transcriptome by altering the accumulation of 48 distinct transcripts, many of which are predicted to be involved in growth and cell wall synthesis. Most of them were down-regulated, as was the case for several of the poplar HD-Zip III sequences. No visible physiological effect of over-expression was observed on PtaHB7 transgenic trees, suggesting that PtaHB1 and PtaHB7 likely have distinct roles in tree development, which is in agreement with the functions that

  3. Gene family structure, expression and functional analysis of HD-Zip III genes in angiosperm and gymnosperm forest trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooke Janice EK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (HD-Zip III proteins have been implicated in the regulation of cambium identity, as well as primary and secondary vascular differentiation and patterning in herbaceous plants. They have been proposed to regulate wood formation but relatively little evidence is available to validate such a role. We characterised and compared HD-Zip III gene family in an angiosperm tree, Populus spp. (poplar, and the gymnosperm Picea glauca (white spruce, representing two highly evolutionarily divergent groups. Results Full-length cDNA sequences were isolated from poplar and white spruce. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that some of the gymnosperm sequences were derived from lineages that diverged earlier than angiosperm sequences, and seem to have been lost in angiosperm lineages. Transcript accumulation profiles were assessed by RT-qPCR on tissue panels from both species and in poplar trees in response to an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. The overall transcript profiles HD-Zip III complexes in white spruce and poplar exhibited substantial differences, reflecting their evolutionary history. Furthermore, two poplar sequences homologous to HD-Zip III genes involved in xylem development in Arabidopsis and Zinnia were over-expressed in poplar plants. PtaHB1 over-expression produced noticeable effects on petiole and primary shoot fibre development, suggesting that PtaHB1 is involved in primary xylem development. We also obtained evidence indicating that expression of PtaHB1 affected the transcriptome by altering the accumulation of 48 distinct transcripts, many of which are predicted to be involved in growth and cell wall synthesis. Most of them were down-regulated, as was the case for several of the poplar HD-Zip III sequences. No visible physiological effect of over-expression was observed on PtaHB7 transgenic trees, suggesting that PtaHB1 and PtaHB7 likely have distinct roles in tree development

  4. Effects of using coding potential, sequence conservation and mRNA structure conservation for predicting pyrroly-sine containing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Zambach, Sine; Christiansen, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Background Pyrrolysine (the 22nd amino acid) is in certain organisms and under certain circumstances encoded by the amber stop codon, UAG. The circumstances driving pyrrolysine translation are not well understood. The involvement of a predicted mRNA structure in the region downstream UAG has been...... these clusters according to several features that may influence pyrrolysine translation. The ranking effects of different features are assessed and we propose a weighted combination of these features which best explains the currently known pyrrolysine incorporating genes. We devote special attention...... for prediction of pyrrolysine incorporating genes in genomes of bacteria and archaea leading to insights about the factors driving pyrrolysine translation and identification of new gene candidates. The method predicts known conserved genes with high recall and predicts several other promising candidates...

  5. Two potential hookworm DAF-16 target genes, SNR-3 and LPP-1: gene structure, expression profile, and implications of a cis-regulatory element in the regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Goggin, Kevin; Dowling, Camille; Qian, Jason; Hawdon, John M

    2015-01-08

    Hookworms infect nearly 700 million people, causing anemia and developmental stunting in heavy infections. Little is known about the genomic structure or gene regulation in hookworms, although recent publication of draft genome assemblies has allowed the first investigations of these topics to be undertaken. The transcription factor DAF-16 mediates multiple developmental pathways in the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and is involved in the recovery from the developmentally arrested L3 in hookworms. Identification of downstream targets of DAF-16 will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of hookworm infection. Genomic Fragment 2.23 containing a DAF-16 binding element (DBE) was used to identify overlapping complementary expressed sequence tags (ESTs). These sequences were used to search a draft assembly of the Ancylostoma caninum genome, and identified two neighboring genes, snr-3 and lpp-1, in a tail-to-tail orientation. Expression patterns of both genes during parasitic development were determined by qRT-PCR. DAF-16 dependent cis-regulatory activity of fragment 2.23 was investigated using an in vitro reporter system. The snr-3 gene spans approximately 5.6 kb in the genome and contains 3 exons and 2 introns, and contains the DBE in its 3' untranslated region. Downstream from snr-3 in a tail-to-tail arrangement is the gene lpp-1. The lpp-1 gene spans more than 6 kb and contains 10 exons and 9 introns. The A. caninum genome contains 2 apparent splice variants, but there are 7 splice variants in the A. ceylanicum genome. While the gene order is similar, the gene structures of the hookworm genes differ from their C. elegans orthologs. Both genes show peak expression in the late L4 stage. Using a cell culture based expression system, fragment 2.23 was found to have both DAF-16-dependent promoter and enhancer activity that required an intact DBE. Two putative DAF-16 targets were identified by genome wide screening for DAF-16 binding

  6. Structure of pyrR (Rv1379) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A persistence gene and protein drug target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantardjieff, K A; Vasquez, C; Castro, P; Warfel, N M; Rho, B; Lekin, T; Kim, C; Segelke, B W; Terwilliger, T C; Rupp, B

    2004-09-24

    The 1.9 {angstrom} native structure of pyrimidine biosynthesis regulatory protein encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrR gene (Rv1379) is reported. Because pyrimidine biosynthesis is an essential step in the progression of TB, pyrR is an attractive antitubercular drug target. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis pyrR gene (Rv1379) encodes a protein that regulates expression of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (pyr) genes in a UMP-dependent manner. Because pyrimidine biosynthesis is an essential step in the progression of TB, the gene product pyrR is an attractive antitubercular drug target. We report the 1.9 {angstrom} native structure of Mtb pyrR determined by the TB Structural Genomics Consortium facilities (PDB entry 1W30) in trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with cell dimensions at 120K of a = 66.64 {angstrom}, c = 154.72 {angstrom}, and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The 3D structure and residual uracil phosphoribosyltransferase activity point to a common PRTase ancestor for pyrR. However, while PRPP and UMP binding sites have been retained in Mtb pyrR, a novel dimer interaction among subunits creates a deep, positively charged cleft capable of binding pyr mRNA. In silico screening of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs has revealed a number of potential leads compounds that, if bound to Mtb pyrR, could facilitate transcriptional attenuation, particularly cyclopentenyl nucleosides.

  7. The histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is a repressor of Vibrio cholerae exopolysaccharide biosynthesis (vps) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxia; Ayala, Julio C; Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2012-04-01

    The capacity of Vibrio cholerae to form biofilms has been shown to enhance its survival in the aquatic environment and play important roles in pathogenesis and disease transmission. In this study, we demonstrated that the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein is a repressor of exopolysaccharide (vps) biosynthesis genes and biofilm formation.

  8. Pseudomonas community structure and antagonistic potential in the rhizosphere : insights gained by combining phylogenetic and functional gene-based analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Rodrigo; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Kroegerrecklenfort, Ellen; Opelt, Katja; Berg, Gabriele; Smalla, Kornelia

    The Pseudomonas community structure and antagonistic potential in the rhizospheres of strawberry and oilseed rape (host plants of the fungal phytopathogen Verticillium dahliae) were assessed. The use of a new PCR-DGGE system, designed to target Pseudomonas-specific gacA gene fragments in

  9. Genetic structure of a rural region in Spain: distribution of surnames and gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Díaz, Roberto; Blanco Villegas, María José

    2010-06-01

    The biodemography of isolated populations with a subsistence economy is of special interest because the conditions to which the populations have been subjected are similar to those present over a large part of the history of our species, and hence the conclusions drawn can be extrapolated to other similar populations. In the present work, we used two recently employed techniques (self-organizing maps and Monmonier's algorithm) to study the genetic structure of a small rural region: Fuentes Carrionas (province of Palencia, Spain). The study was based on information contained in marriage registers and family reconstructions for the period 1880-1979. We calculated the coefficients of relationships (Hedrick) among the parishes (by isonymy and parent-offspring matrix) and studied their relationship with geographic distances (Mantel). Then, using Monmonier's algorithm, we examined the genetic barriers. Finally, by applying self-organizing maps, we studied the distribution of surnames. The correlation between genetic distance matrices estimated through surnames and gene flow was high (p flow (p < 0.01); geographic distance therefore seems to be the main factor of isolation. However, the genetic barriers revealed a region divided in two, and the surname distribution displayed an identical division: 29.56% of the surnames appeared almost exclusively in the northeastern half and 21.91% appeared only in the southwest. Both techniques afforded coherent and complementary results. Their combined use allows a detailed study to be made. Although geographic distance was the strongest determining factor, we detected others factors (orographic and socioeconomic) that seem to have left their mark on the genetic structure of Fuentes Carrionas.

  10. Genetic structure and gene flow of the flea Xenopsylla cheopis in Madagascar and Mayotte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harimalala, Mireille; Telfer, Sandra; Delatte, Hélène; Watts, Phillip C; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Ramihangihajason, Tojo Rindra; Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Rajerison, Minoarisoa; Boyer, Sébastien

    2017-07-20

    The flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) is a vector of plague. Despite this insect's medical importance, especially in Madagascar where plague is endemic, little is known about the organization of its natural populations. We undertook population genetic analyses (i) to determine the spatial genetic structure of X. cheopis in Madagascar and (ii) to determine the potential risk of plague introduction in the neighboring island of Mayotte. We genotyped 205 fleas from 12 sites using nine microsatellite markers. Madagascan populations of X. cheopis differed, with the mean number of alleles per locus per population ranging from 1.78 to 4.44 and with moderate to high levels of genetic differentiation between populations. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified, with different geographical distributions but with some apparent gene flow between both islands and within Malagasy regions. The approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) used to test the predominant direction of flea dispersal implied a recent population introduction from Mayotte to Madagascar, which was estimated to have occurred between 1993 and 2012. The impact of this flea introduction in terms of plague transmission in Madagascar is unclear, but the low level of flea exchange between the two islands seems to keep Mayotte free of plague for now. This study highlights the occurrence of genetic structure among populations of the flea vector of plague, X. cheopis, in Madagascar and suggests that a flea population from Mayotte has been introduced to Madagascar recently. As plague has not been reported in Mayotte, this introduction is unlikely to present a major concern for plague transmission. Nonetheless, evidence of connectivity among flea populations in the two islands indicates a possibility for dispersal by fleas in the opposite direction and thus a risk of plague introduction to Mayotte.

  11. Sulfamethoxazole and COD increase abundance of sulfonamide resistance genes and change bacterial community structures within sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xueping; Pang, Weihai; Dou, Chunling; Yin, Daqiang

    2017-05-01

    The abundant microbial community in biological treatment processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may potentially enhance the horizontal gene transfer of antibiotic resistance genes with the presence of antibiotics. A lab-scale sequencing batch reactor was designed to investigate response of sulfonamide resistance genes (sulI, sulII) and bacterial communities to various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of wastewater. The SMX concentrations (0.001 mg/L, 0.1 mg/L and 10 mg/L) decreased with treatment time and higher SMX level was more difficult to remove. The presence of SMX also significantly reduced the removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen, affecting the normal function of WWTPs. All three concentrations of SMX raised both sulI and sulII genes with higher concentrations exhibiting greater increases. The abundance of sul genes was positive correlated with treatment time and followed the second-order reaction kinetic model. Interestingly, these two genes have rather similar activity. SulI and sulII gene abundance also performed similar response to COD. Simpson index and Shannon-Weiner index did not show changes in the microbial community diversity. However, the 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing results showed the bacterial community structures varied during different stages. The results demonstrated that influent antibiotics into WWTPs may facilitate selection of ARGs and affect the wastewater conventional treatment as well as the bacteria community structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intercontinental genetic structure and gene flow in Dunlin (Calidris alpina), a potential vector of avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Ruan, Luzhang; Casler, Bruce; Dondua, Alexei; Gates, River H.; Johnson, J. Matthew; Kendall, Steven J.; Tomkovich, Pavel S.; Tracy, Diane; Valchuk, Olga P.; Lanctot, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Waterfowl (Anseriformes) and shorebirds (Charadriiformes) are the most common wild vectors of influenza A viruses. Due to their migratory behavior, some may transmit disease over long distances. Migratory connectivity studies can link breeding and nonbreeding grounds while illustrating potential interactions among populations that may spread diseases. We investigated Dunlin (Calidris alpina), a shorebird with a subspecies (C. a. arcticola) that migrates from nonbreeding areas endemic to avian influenza in eastern Asia to breeding grounds in northern Alaska. Using microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA, we illustrate genetic structure among six subspecies: C. a. arcticola, C. a. pacifica, C. a. hudsonia, C. a. sakhalina, C. a. kistchinski, and C. a. actites. We demonstrate that mitochondrial DNA can help distinguish C. a. arcticola on the Asian nonbreeding grounds with >70% accuracy depending on their relative abundance, indicating that genetics can help determine whether C. a. arcticola occurs where they may be exposed to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) during outbreaks. Our data reveal asymmetric intercontinental gene flow, with some C. a. arcticola short-stopping migration to breed with C. a. pacifica in western Alaska. Because C. a. pacifica migrates along the Pacific Coast of North America, interactions between these subspecies and other taxa provide route for transmission of HPAI into other parts of North America.

  13. alpha-Globin genes: thalassemic and structural alterations in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R.S.C. Wenning

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven unrelated patients with hemoglobin (Hb H disease and 27 individuals with alpha-chain structural alterations were studied to identify the alpha-globin gene mutations present in the population of Southeast Brazil. The -alpha3.7, --MED and -(alpha20.5 deletions were investigated by PCR, whereas non-deletional alpha-thalassemia (alphaHphalpha, alphaNcoIalpha, aaNcoI, alphaIcalpha and alphaTSaudialpha was screened with restriction enzymes and by nested PCR. Structural alterations were identified by direct DNA sequencing. Of the seven patients with Hb H disease, all of Italian descent, two had the -(alpha20.5/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/-alpha3.7 genotype, one had the --MED/alphaHphalpha genotype and three showed interaction of the -alpha3.7 deletion with an unusual, unidentified form of non-deletional alpha-thalassemia [-alpha3.7/(aaT]. Among the 27 patients with structural alterations, 15 (of Italian descent had Hb Hasharon (alpha47Asp->His associated with the -alpha3.7 deletion, 4 (of Italian descent were heterozygous for Hb J-Rovigo (alpha53Ala->Asp, 4 (3 Blacks and 1 Caucasian were heterozygous for Hb Stanleyville-II (alpha78Asn->Lys associated with the alpha+-thalassemia, 1 (Black was heterozygous for Hb G-Pest (alpha74Asp->Asn, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Kurosaki (alpha7Lys->Glu, 1 (Caucasian was heterozygous for Hb Westmead (alpha122His->Gln, and 1 (Caucasian was the carrier of a novel silent variant (Hb Campinas, alpha26Ala->Val. Most of the mutations found reflected the Mediterranean and African origins of the population. Hbs G-Pest and Kurosaki, very rare, and Hb Westmead, common in southern China, were initially described in individuals of ethnic origin differing from those of the carriers reported in the present study and are the first cases to be reported in the Brazilian population.

  14. Distribution, structure and diversity of “bacterial” genes encoding two-component proteins in the Euryarchaeota

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    Mark K. Ashby

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The publicly available annotated archaeal genome sequences (23 complete and three partial annotations, October 2005 were searched for the presence of potential two-component open reading frames (ORFs using gene category lists and BLASTP. A total of 489 potential two-component genes were identified from the gene category lists and BLASTP. Two-component genes were found in 14 of the 21 Euryarchaeal sequences (October 2005 and in neither the Crenarchaeota nor the Nanoarchaeota. A total of 20 predicted protein domains were identified in the putative two-component ORFs that, in addition to the histidine kinase and receiver domains, also includes sensor and signalling domains. The detailed structure of these putative proteins is shown, as is the distribution of each class of two-component genes in each species. Potential members of orthologous groups have been identified, as have any potential operons containing two or more two-component genes. The number of two-component genes in those Euryarchaeal species which have them seems to be linked more to lifestyle and habitat than to genome complexity, with most examples being found in Methanospirillum hungatei, Haloarcula marismortui, Methanococcoides burtonii and the mesophilic Methanosarcinales group. The large numbers of two-component genes in these species may reflect a greater requirement for internal regulation. Phylogenetic analysis of orthologous groups of five different protein classes, three probably involved in regulating taxis, suggests that most of these ORFs have been inherited vertically from an ancestral Euryarchaeal species and point to a limited number of key horizontal gene transfer events.

  15. The NCAM1 gene set is linked to depressive symptoms and their brain structural correlates in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovska, Jana; Coynel, David; Fastenrath, Matthias; Milnik, Annette; Auschra, Bianca; Egli, Tobias; Gschwind, Leo; Hartmann, Francina; Loos, Eva; Sifalakis, Klara; Vogler, Christian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Heck, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Depressive symptoms exist on a continuum, the far end of which is found in depressive disorders. Utilizing the continuous spectrum of depressive symptoms may therefore contribute to the understanding of the biological underpinnings of depression. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) is an important tool for the identification of gene groups linked to complex traits, and was applied in the present study on genome-wide association study (GWAS) data of depression scores and their brain-level structural correlates in healthy young individuals. On symptom level (i.e. depression scores), robust enrichment was identified for two gene sets: NCAM1 Interactions and Collagen Formation. Depression scores were also associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) - a brain white matter property - within the forceps minor and the left superior temporal longitudinal fasciculus. Within each of these tracts, mean FA value of depression score-associated voxels was used as a phenotype in a subsequent GSEA. The NCAM1 Interactions gene set was significantly enriched in these tracts. By linking the NCAM1 Interactions gene set to depression scores and their structural brain correlates in healthy participants, the current study contributes to the understanding of the molecular underpinnings of depressive symptomatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning and structural characterization of the genes coding for adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, E N; McKie, N; Davis, N K; Leadlay, P F

    1989-06-01

    The structural genes coding for both subunits of adenosylcobalamin-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from the Gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium shermanii have been cloned, with the use of synthetic oligonucleotides as primary hybridization probes. The genes are closely linked and are transcribed in the same direction. Nucleotide sequence analysis of 4.5 kb of DNA encompassing both genes allowed us to infer the complete amino acid sequence of the two subunits: the beta-subunit is the product of the upstream gene, and consists of 638 amino acid residues (Mr 69465) and the alpha-subunit consists of 728 amino acid residues (Mr 80,147). There is a very close structural homology between the two subunits, reflecting the probable duplication of a common ancestral gene. A sequence present only in the alpha-subunit is significantly homologous to a portion of the sequence of the methylmalonyl-CoA-binding subunit of transcarboxylase from P. shermanii [Samols, Thornton, Murtif, Kumar, Haase & Wood (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 6461-6464], and this homologous region may form part of the CoA ester-binding site in both enzymes.

  17. The effect of Endurance Exercise on myh6 Gene Expression and Structural and Functional Changes of Left Ventricular

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    Mohammad Fathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Endurance exercise induces cardiac remodeling. Also, myh6 gene is affected by cardiac remodeling. This study was performed with the objective of determining the effect of endurance activity on cardiac myh6 gene expression.   Methods: In this study, 14 rats (weight, 231±24g, after familiarization with endurance trainings, were randomly divided into two groups of control and experimental (7 animals each. The experimental group performed a training program (30m/min, 50min/session, and 6 session/week, for 14 weeks on treadmill. Forty-eight hours after the end of the last session, the animals of the experimental and control groups were anesthetized and anatomized, then, the heart and subsequently the left ventricle, were removed. Real time PCR and sonography methods were, respectively, used to assess the expression levels of myh6 gene and structural changes in left ventricle. Data were analyzed using t-test.   Results: In this study, endurance exercise significantly increased heart weight to body surface area ratio (p=0.002, also final diastolic diameter increased (p=0.008 in experimental group compared to control group. The results showed 124 fold and significant (p=0.011 increase in myh6 gene expression in the experimental group compared to control group.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, endurance exercise along with structural and functional changes in the left ventricle, induces changes at the gene level and thereby increases heart contractility power.

  18. Deregulation of gluconeogenic structural genes by variants of the transcriptional activator Cat8p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, A; Hiesinger, M; Schüller, H J

    1999-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growth with a non-fermentable carbon source requires co-ordinate transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic structural genes by an upstream activation site (UAS) element, designated CSRE (carbon source-responsive element). The zinc cluster protein encoded by CAT8 is necessary for transcriptional derepression mediated by a CSRE. Expression of CAT8 as well as transcriptional activation by Cat8p is regulated by the carbon source, requiring a functional Cat1p (= Snf1p) protein kinase. The importance of both regulatory levels was investigated by construction of CAT8 variants with a constitutive transcriptional activation domain (INO2TAD) and/or a carbon source-independent promoter (MET25 ). Whereas a reporter gene driven by a CSRE-dependent synthetic minimal promoter showed a 40-fold derepression with wild-type CAT8, an almost constitutive expression was found with a MET25-CAT8-INO2TAD fusion construct due to a dramatically increased gene activation under conditions of glucose repression. Similar results were obtained with the mRNA of the isocitrate lyase gene ICL1 and at the level of ICL enzyme activity. Taking advantage of a Cat8p size variant, we demonstrate its binding to the CSRE. Our data show that carbon source-dependent transcriptional activation by Cat8p is the most important mechanism affecting the regulated expression of gluconeogenic structural genes.

  19. Comparative analyses of microbial structures and gene copy numbers in the anaerobic digestion of various types of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Taira; Tsushima, Ikuo; Tsumori, Jun

    2018-01-06

    Anaerobic co-digestion of various sewage sludges is a promising approach for greater recovery of energy, but the process is more complicated than mono-digestion of sewage sludge. The applicability of microbial structure analyses and gene quantification to understand microbial conditions was evaluated. The results show that information from gene analyses is useful in managing anaerobic co-digestion and damaged microbes in addition to conventional parameters like total solids, pH and biogas production. Total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy numbers are the most useful tools for evaluating unstable anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge, rather than mcrA and total archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers, and high-throughput sequencing. First order decay rates of gene copy numbers during pH failure were higher than typical decay rates of microbes in stable operation. The sequencing analyses, including multidimensional scaling, showed very different microbial structure shifts, but the results were not consistent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural, evolutionary and functional analysis of the class III peroxidase gene family in Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Peng Cao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases (PRXs are widely existed in various organisms and could be divided into different types according to their structures and functions. Specifically, the Class III Peroxidase, a plant-specific multi-gene family, involves in many physiological processes, such as the metabolism of auxin, the extension and thickening of cell wall, as well as the formation of lignin. By searching the pear genome database, 94 non-redundant PRXs from Pyrus bretschneideri (PbPRXs were identified. Subsequently, analysis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, conserved motifs, and microsynteny was performed. These PbPRXs were unevenly distributed among 17 chromosomes of pear. In addition, 26 segmental duplication events but only one tandem duplication were occurred in these PbPRXs, implying segmental duplication was the main contributor to the expansion of the PbPRX family. By the Ka/Ks analysis, 26 out of 27 duplicated PbPRXs has experienced purifying selection. Twenty motifs were identified in PbPRXs based on the MEME analysis, eleven of which were enriched in pear. A total of 41 expressed genes were identified from ESTs of pear fruit. According to qRT-PCR, the expression trends of five PbPRXs in subgroup C were consistent with the change of lignin content during pear fruit development. So we inferred that the five PbPRXs were candidate genes involved in the lignin synthesis pathway. These results provided useful information for further researches of PRX genes in pear.

  1. Core histone genes of Giardia intestinalis: genomic organization, promoter structure, and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Rodney D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giardia intestinalis is a protist found in freshwaters worldwide, and is the most common cause of parasitic diarrhea in humans. The phylogenetic position of this parasite is still much debated. Histones are small, highly conserved proteins that associate tightly with DNA to form chromatin within the nucleus. There are two classes of core histone genes in higher eukaryotes: DNA replication-independent histones and DNA replication-dependent ones. Results We identified two copies each of the core histone H2a, H2b and H3 genes, and three copies of the H4 gene, at separate locations on chromosomes 3, 4 and 5 within the genome of Giardia intestinalis, but no gene encoding a H1 linker histone could be recognized. The copies of each gene share extensive DNA sequence identities throughout their coding and 5' noncoding regions, which suggests these copies have arisen from relatively recent gene duplications or gene conversions. The transcription start sites are at triplet A sequences 1–27 nucleotides upstream of the translation start codon for each gene. We determined that a 50 bp region upstream from the start of the histone H4 coding region is the minimal promoter, and a highly conserved 15 bp sequence called the histone motif (him is essential for its activity. The Giardia core histone genes are constitutively expressed at approximately equivalent levels and their mRNAs are polyadenylated. Competition gel-shift experiments suggest that a factor within the protein complex that binds him may also be a part of the protein complexes that bind other promoter elements described previously in Giardia. Conclusion In contrast to other eukaryotes, the Giardia genome has only a single class of core histone genes that encode replication-independent histones. Our inability to locate a gene encoding the linker histone H1 leads us to speculate that the H1 protein may not be required for the compaction of Giardia's small and gene-rich genome.

  2. Surface epitope localization and gene structure of a Babesia bovis 44-kilodalton variable merozoite surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Reduker, D W; Hines, S A; Perryman, L E; McGuire, T C

    1992-10-01

    Variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigens occurs among geographic strains of the parasite. In this and a concurrent report, we investigate this variation at the gene and protein level. Using a monoclonal antibody (mAb 23/70.174), B. bovis gene sequences were identified that encoded a surface epitope of a 44-kDa merozoite surface antigen (MSA-2). This epitope is variably expressed among geographic isolates of B. bovis. Here, we describe the MSA-2 protein gene sequence, localize this surface epitope to a repeated amino acid sequence, and investigate the genomic organization of the gene in B. bovis strains from Mexico and Australia. The predicted protein sequence had hydrophobic regions at its amino and carboxy termini consistent with a signal peptide and a membrane anchor via glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, respectively. The surface epitope recognized by mAb 23/70.174 was localized within a 24-amino acid sequence which is repeated twice in tandem. Six different EcoRI bands hybridized to the MSA-2 gene sequence with varying intensities in genomic Southern blots of the homologous strain. Two of these appear to be alleles of the MSA-2 gene. Whereas 5' and 3' sequences of the MSA-2 gene sequence were detected in an Australia strain of B. bovis, internal gene sequences encoding the surface epitope were not. The 3' sequences of the MSA-2 gene also had significant sequence similarity with the MSA-1 gene of the Mexico strain B. bovis and a gene from the previously described BabR locus. These data indicate that the MSA-2 protein gene belongs to the BabR locus which encodes variable merozoite surface antigens.

  3. Functional gene array-based analysis of microbial community structure in groundwaters with a gradient of contaminant levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, P.J.; Wu, L.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Schadt, C.W.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Palumbo, A.V.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-06-15

    To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity but greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.

  4. Epigenomic modifications predict active promoters and gene structure in Toxoplasma gondii.

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    Mathieu Gissot

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of gene regulation are poorly understood in Apicomplexa, a phylum that encompasses deadly human pathogens like Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Initial studies suggest that epigenetic phenomena, including histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, have a profound effect upon gene expression and expression of virulence traits. Using the model organism Toxoplasma gondii, we characterized the epigenetic organization and transcription patterns of a contiguous 1% of the T. gondii genome using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. We show that methylation and acetylation of histones H3 and H4 are landmarks of active promoters in T. gondii that allow us to deduce the position and directionality of gene promoters with >95% accuracy. These histone methylation and acetylation "activation" marks are strongly associated with gene expression. We also demonstrate that the pattern of histone H3 arginine methylation distinguishes certain promoters, illustrating the complexity of the histone modification machinery in Toxoplasma. By integrating epigenetic data, gene prediction analysis, and gene expression data from the tachyzoite stage, we illustrate feasibility of creating an epigenomic map of T. gondii tachyzoite gene expression. Further, we illustrate the utility of the epigenomic map to empirically and biologically annotate the genome and show that this approach enables identification of previously unknown genes. Thus, our epigenomics approach provides novel insights into regulation of gene expression in the Apicomplexa. In addition, with its compact genome, genetic tractability, and discrete life cycle stages, T. gondii provides an important new model to study the evolutionarily conserved components of the histone code.

  5. DNA microarrays: from structural genomics to functional genomics. The applications of gene chips in dermatology and dermatopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellheyer, Klaus; Belbin, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    The human genome project was successful in sequencing the entire human genome and ended earlier than expected. The vast genetic information now available will have far-reaching consequences for medicine in the twenty-first century. The knowledge gained from the mapping and sequencing of human genes on a genome-wide scale--commonly referred to as structural genomics--is prerequisite for studies that focus on the functional aspects of genes. A recently invented technique, known as gene chip, or DNA microarray, technology, allows the study of the function of thousands of genes at once, thereby opening the door to the new field of functional genomics. At its core, the DNA microarray utilizes a unique feature of DNA known as complementary hybridization. As such, it is not different from Southern (DNA) blot or northern (RNA) blot hybridizations, or the polymerase chain reaction, with the exception that it allows expression profiling of the entire human genome in a single hybridization experiment. The article highlights the principles, technology, and applications of DNA microarrays as they pertain to the field of dermatology and dermatopathology. The most important applications are the gene expression profiling of skin cancer, especially of melanoma. Other potential applications include gene expression profiling of inflammatory skin diseases, the mutational analysis of genodermatoses, and polymorphism screening, as well as drug development and chemosensitivity prediction. cDNA microarrays will shape the diagnostic approach of the dermatology and the dermatopathology of the future and may lead to new therapeutic options.

  6. Determination of flower structure in Elaeis guineensis: do palms use the same homeotic genes as other species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Helene; Jouannic, Stefan; Morcillo, Fabienne; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Duval, Yves; Tregear, James W

    2007-07-01

    In this article a review is made of data recently obtained on the structural diversity and possible functions of MADS box genes in the determination of flower structure in the African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis). MADS box genes play a dominant role in the ABC model established to explain how floral organ identity is determined in model dicotyledon species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Antirrhinum majus. In the monocotyledons, although there appears to be a broad general conservation of ABC gene functions, the model itself needs to be adapted in some cases, notably for certain species which produce flowers with sepals and petals of similar appearance. For the moment, ABC genes remain unstudied in a number of key monocot clades, so only a partial picture is available for the Liliopsida as a whole. The aim of this article is to summarize data recently obtained for the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, a member of the family Arecaceae (Arecales), and to discuss their significance with respect to knowledge gained from other Angiosperm groups, particularly within the monocotyledons. The essential details of reproductive development in oil palm are discussed and an overview is provided of the structural and functional characterization of MADS box genes likely to play a homeotic role in flower development in this species. The structural and functional data provide evidence for a general conservation of the generic 'ABC' model in oil palm, rather than the 'modified ABC model' proposed for some other monocot species which produce homochlamydeous flowers (i.e. with morphologically similar organs in both perianth whorls), such as members of the Liliales. Our oil palm data therefore follow a similar pattern to those obtained for other Commelinid species in the orders Commelinales and Poales. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  7. Family structure and phylogenetic analysis of odorant receptor genes in the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea

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    Zhu Peng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory receptors, which are all G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, come in four types: odorant receptors (ORs, vomeronasal receptors, trace-amine associated receptors and formyl peptide receptor-like proteins. The ORs are the most important receptors for detecting a wide range of environmental chemicals in daily life. Most fish OR genes have been identified from genome databases following the completion of the genome sequencing projects of many fishes. However, it remains unclear whether these OR genes from the genome databases are actually expressed in the fish olfactory epithelium. Thus, it is necessary to clone the OR mRNAs directly from the olfactory epithelium and to examine their expression status. Results Eighty-nine full-length and 22 partial OR cDNA sequences were isolated from the olfactory epithelium of the large yellow croaker, Larimichthys crocea. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis classified the vertebrate OR genes into two types, with several clades within each type, and showed that the L. crocea OR genes of each type are more closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback than they are to those of medaka, zebrafish and frog. The reconciled tree showed 178 duplications and 129 losses. The evolutionary relationships among OR genes in these fishes accords with their evolutionary history. The fish OR genes have experienced functional divergence, and the different clades of OR genes have evolved different functions. The result of real-time PCR shows that different clades of ORs have distinct expression levels. Conclusion We have shown about 100 OR genes to be expressed in the olfactory epithelial tissues of L. crocea. The OR genes of modern fishes duplicated from their common ancestor, and were expanded over evolutionary time. The OR genes of L. crocea are closely related to those of fugu, pufferfish and stickleback, which is consistent with its evolutionary position. The different expression

  8. Fungal community structure in disease suppressive soils assessed by 28S LSU gene sequencing.

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    C Ryan Penton

    Full Text Available Natural biological suppression of soil-borne diseases is a function of the activity and composition of soil microbial communities. Soil microbe and phytopathogen interactions can occur prior to crop sowing and/or in the rhizosphere, subsequently influencing both plant growth and productivity. Research on suppressive microbial communities has concentrated on bacteria although fungi can also influence soil-borne disease. Fungi were analyzed in co-located soils 'suppressive' or 'non-suppressive' for disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 8 at two sites in South Australia using 454 pyrosequencing targeting the fungal 28S LSU rRNA gene. DNA was extracted from a minimum of 125 g of soil per replicate to reduce the micro-scale community variability, and from soil samples taken at sowing and from the rhizosphere at 7 weeks to cover the peak Rhizoctonia infection period. A total of ∼ 994,000 reads were classified into 917 genera covering 54% of the RDP Fungal Classifier database, a high diversity for an alkaline, low organic matter soil. Statistical analyses and community ordinations revealed significant differences in fungal community composition between suppressive and non-suppressive soil and between soil type/location. The majority of differences associated with suppressive soils were attributed to less than 40 genera including a number of endophytic species with plant pathogen suppression potentials and mycoparasites such as Xylaria spp. Non-suppressive soils were dominated by Alternaria, Gibberella and Penicillum. Pyrosequencing generated a detailed description of fungal community structure and identified candidate taxa that may influence pathogen-plant interactions in stable disease suppression.

  9. Fungal community structure in disease suppressive soils assessed by 28S LSU gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penton, C Ryan; Gupta, V V S R; Tiedje, James M; Neate, Stephen M; Ophel-Keller, Kathy; Gillings, Michael; Harvey, Paul; Pham, Amanda; Roget, David K

    2014-01-01

    Natural biological suppression of soil-borne diseases is a function of the activity and composition of soil microbial communities. Soil microbe and phytopathogen interactions can occur prior to crop sowing and/or in the rhizosphere, subsequently influencing both plant growth and productivity. Research on suppressive microbial communities has concentrated on bacteria although fungi can also influence soil-borne disease. Fungi were analyzed in co-located soils 'suppressive' or 'non-suppressive' for disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 8 at two sites in South Australia using 454 pyrosequencing targeting the fungal 28S LSU rRNA gene. DNA was extracted from a minimum of 125 g of soil per replicate to reduce the micro-scale community variability, and from soil samples taken at sowing and from the rhizosphere at 7 weeks to cover the peak Rhizoctonia infection period. A total of ∼ 994,000 reads were classified into 917 genera covering 54% of the RDP Fungal Classifier database, a high diversity for an alkaline, low organic matter soil. Statistical analyses and community ordinations revealed significant differences in fungal community composition between suppressive and non-suppressive soil and between soil type/location. The majority of differences associated with suppressive soils were attributed to less than 40 genera including a number of endophytic species with plant pathogen suppression potentials and mycoparasites such as Xylaria spp. Non-suppressive soils were dominated by Alternaria, Gibberella and Penicillum. Pyrosequencing generated a detailed description of fungal community structure and identified candidate taxa that may influence pathogen-plant interactions in stable disease suppression.

  10. Associations of POU1F1 gene polymorphisms and protein structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sheep POU1F1 gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains six exons and five introns. In various mammalian species, certain mutations in different exons are associated with different production traits. The aim of this study was to investigate the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 3 exon of POU1F1 gene ...

  11. Changes in global gene expression in response to chemical and genetic perturbation of chromatin structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation are important for controlling gene expression in all eukaryotes. Microarray analysis revealed an altered gene expression profile after treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2’ deoxyctidine (5-AC), which included the upregulation of many transposab...

  12. Lignin peroxidase from the wood-degrading basidiomycete Trametes versicolor. Studies of enzymic properties and gene structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Leif

    1994-01-01

    This study is a contribution to the identification and characterization, at a molecular level, of the enzymic machinery utilized by Trametes versicolor to effect ligninolysis. Emphasis has been given to lignin peroxidase and the genes encoding this enzyme. The characterization of genes contributes to the knowledge of the primary structure of fungal peroxidases. Although much has been gained from studies of complex systems, such as fungal cultures or crude enzyme preparations, a final characterization cannot be reached without the use of defined reaction components. Enzyme purification, studies of the action of pure enzyme preparations on well defined substrates, and characterization of enzyme structure have therefore been given attention. Since ligninolytic peroxidases appear to be produced by T.versicolor during secondary metabolism, the time required for enzyme production tends to be rather long. Adequate supply of enzyme, preferably in the form of pure isozymes, would be helpful for further studies of the structure, action, and mechanism of ligninolytic peroxidases. Molecular genetic approaches, such as heterologous expression of overproduction of isolated genes, are usually valuable tools in this regard, especially for detailed studies of structure and function by use of site-directed mutagenesis

  13. Gene flow and population structure of a common agricultural wild species (Microtus agrestis) under different land management regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, C; Andersen, L W; Damgaard, C; Olsen, K; Jensen, T S; Loeschcke, V

    2013-12-01

    The impact of landscape structure and land management on dispersal of populations of wild species inhabiting the agricultural landscape was investigated focusing on the field vole (Microtus agrestis) in three different areas in Denmark using molecular genetic markers. The main hypotheses were the following: (i) organic farms act as genetic sources and diversity reservoirs for species living in agricultural areas and (ii) gene flow and genetic structure in the agricultural landscape are influenced by the degree of landscape complexity and connectivity. A total of 443 individual voles were sampled within 2 consecutive years from two agricultural areas and one relatively undisturbed grassland area. As genetic markers, 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci (nuclear markers) and the central part of the cytochrome-b (mitochondrial sequence) were analysed for all samples. The results indicate that management (that is, organic or conventional management) was important for genetic population structure across the landscape, but that landscape structure was the main factor shaping gene flow and genetic diversity. More importantly, the presence of organically managed areas did not act as a genetic reservoir for conventional areas, instead the most important predictor of effective population size was the amount of unmanaged available habitat (core area). The relatively undisturbed natural area showed a lower level of genetic structuring and genetic diversity compared with the two agricultural areas. These findings altogether suggest that political decisions for supporting wildlife friendly land management should take into account both management and landscape structure factors.

  14. Structural analysis of the genome of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-30 identifies twelve expressed fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ina; Batty, Elizabeth M; Pole, Jessica C M; Blood, Katherine A; Mo, Steven; Cooke, Susanna L; Ng, Charlotte; Howe, Kevin L; Chin, Suet-Feung; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Howarth, Karen D; Edwards, Paul A W

    2012-12-22

    It has recently emerged that common epithelial cancers such as breast cancers have fusion genes like those in leukaemias. In a representative breast cancer cell line, ZR-75-30, we searched for fusion genes, by analysing genome rearrangements. We first analysed rearrangements of the ZR-75-30 genome, to around 10kb resolution, by molecular cytogenetic approaches, combining array painting and array CGH. We then compared this map with genomic junctions determined by paired-end sequencing. Most of the breakpoints found by array painting and array CGH were identified in the paired end sequencing-55% of the unamplified breakpoints and 97% of the amplified breakpoints (as these are represented by more sequence reads). From this analysis we identified 9 expressed fusion genes: APPBP2-PHF20L1, BCAS3-HOXB9, COL14A1-SKAP1, TAOK1-PCGF2, TIAM1-NRIP1, TIMM23-ARHGAP32, TRPS1-LASP1, USP32-CCDC49 and ZMYM4-OPRD1. We also determined the genomic junctions of a further three expressed fusion genes that had been described by others, BCAS3-ERBB2, DDX5-DEPDC6/DEPTOR and PLEC1-ENPP2. Of this total of 12 expressed fusion genes, 9 were in the coamplification. Due to the sensitivity of the technologies used, we estimate these 12 fusion genes to be around two-thirds of the true total. Many of the fusions seem likely to be driver mutations. For example, PHF20L1, BCAS3, TAOK1, PCGF2, and TRPS1 are fused in other breast cancers. HOXB9 and PHF20L1 are members of gene families that are fused in other neoplasms. Several of the other genes are relevant to cancer-in addition to ERBB2, SKAP1 is an adaptor for Src, DEPTOR regulates the mTOR pathway and NRIP1 is an estrogen-receptor coregulator. This is the first structural analysis of a breast cancer genome that combines classical molecular cytogenetic approaches with sequencing. Paired-end sequencing was able to detect almost all breakpoints, where there was adequate read depth. It supports the view that gene breakage and gene fusion are important

  15. Habitat fragmentation influences gene structure and gene differentiation among the Loxoblemmus aomoriensis populations in the Thousand Island Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kun; Zhou, Jing; Gu, Jian-Qiang; Zhou, Guo-Xing; Wang, Wei; Xu, Zhi-Hong

    2017-02-16

    Thousand Island Lake (TIL) is a fragmented landscape consisting of more than 1000 land-bridge islands isolated during reservoir formation. To evaluate the effects of fragmentation and island attributes on insect populations, we examined the genetic structure of Loxoblemmus aomoriensis, a species of cricket widely distributed in TIL, and compared genetic diversity between islands samples. Population genetic analyses was conducted based on mitochondrial DNA haplotype frequencies of 10 sample islands. By comparing three island attributes with population genetic diversity reveals that island area influenced population genetic diversity (r(2 )=( )0.5094, p = 0.00204). Using Pairwise Fst values, we also found that long-distance isolation increased the genetic differentiation, while short-distance isolation can be offset by dispersal. These results indicate that fragmentation can impact populations on a genetic level.

  16. Evolutionary conservation and network structure characterize genes of phenotypic relevance for mitosis in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Ostaszewski

    Full Text Available The impact of gene silencing on cellular phenotypes is difficult to establish due to the complexity of interactions in the associated biological processes and pathways. A recent genome-wide RNA knock-down study both identified and phenotypically characterized a set of important genes for the cell cycle in HeLa cells. Here, we combine a molecular interaction network analysis, based on physical and functional protein interactions, in conjunction with evolutionary information, to elucidate the common biological and topological properties of these key genes. Our results show that these genes tend to be conserved with their corresponding protein interactions across several species and are key constituents of the evolutionary conserved molecular interaction network. Moreover, a group of bistable network motifs is found to be conserved within this network, which are likely to influence the network stability and therefore the robustness of cellular functioning. They form a cluster, which displays functional homogeneity and is significantly enriched in genes phenotypically relevant for mitosis. Additional results reveal a relationship between specific cellular processes and the phenotypic outcomes induced by gene silencing. This study introduces new ideas regarding the relationship between genotype and phenotype in the context of the cell cycle. We show that the analysis of molecular interaction networks can result in the identification of genes relevant to cellular processes, which is a promising avenue for future research.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus identifies variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youyuan; Xu, Miao; Liang, Liming; Zhang, Haojiong; Xu, Ruihua; Feng, Qisheng; Feng, Lin; Luo, Bing; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2017-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a ubiquitous virus and is associated with several human malignances, including the significant subset of gastric carcinoma, Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma. Some Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases are uniquely prevalent in populations with different geographic origins. However, the features of the disease and geographically associated Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation as well as the roles that the variation plays in carcinogenesis and evolution remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we sequenced 95 geographically distinct Epstein-Barr virus isolates from Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma biopsies and saliva of healthy donors to detect variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure from a genome-wide spectrum. We demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus revealed the population structure between North China and South China. In addition, we observed population stratification between Epstein-Barr virus strains from gastric carcinoma and healthy controls, indicating that certain Epstein-Barr virus subtypes are associated with different gastric carcinoma risks. We identified that the BRLF1, BBRF3, and BBLF2/BBLF3 genes had significant associations with gastric carcinoma. LMP1 and BNLF2a genes were strongly geographically associated genes in Epstein-Barr virus. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus for gastric carcinoma, and the genetic variants associated with gastric carcinoma can serve as biomarkers for oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus.

  18. Similarity of bacterial community structure between Asian dust and its sources determined by rRNA gene-targeted approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshinori; Kenzaka, Takehiko; Sueyoshi, Akio; Li, Pinfang; Fujiyama, Hideyasu; Baba, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2010-01-01

    The atmospheric movement of arid soil can play an important role in the movement of microorganisms attached to soil microparticles. Bacterial community structures in Asian dust collected at Beijing were investigated using the 16S rRNA gene sequence and compared to those in arid soil, a possible source of the dust. Asian dust samples contained 2.5×10(7) to 3.5×10(9) copies of the 16S rRNA gene gram(-1). Therefore, more than 10(13) bacterial cells (km)(-2) per month were estimated to arrive in Beijing via Asian dust. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed that the bacterial community structures in Asian dust samples differed greatly according to the scale of the dust event. The bacterial communities from major dust events were similar to those from an arid region of China.

  19. Population genetic structure of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Palaemonidae) from Indian waters using mitochondrial ATPase 6/8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Gopalakrishnan, A; Divya, P R; Basheer, V S; Singh, Rajeev K; Mohindra, Vindya; Lal, Kuldeep K; Jena, J K

    2017-07-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii, giant freshwater prawn, is one of the most commercially important crustaceans. In the present study, primers for ATPase 6/8 region of mt-DNA were designed and successfully amplified (827 bp) in the species. The nucleotide variation in ATPase 6/8 gene revealed the population structuring in natural populations of M. rosenbergii in Indian waters. A total of 35 haplotypes were observed in 93 individuals collected from different locations. Low nucleotide diversity and high haplotype diversity were noticed for the ATPase 6/8 gene. Significant pairwise FST and, haplotype network indicated occurrence of distinct populations. Observed mismatch distribution and Tajima's D test suggested demographical stability of giant freshwater prawn. The genetic stock structure revealed in this study will be helpful for conservation and management of stocks of M. rosenbergii in Indian waters.

  20. Expression and chromatin structures of cellulolytic enzyme gene regulated by heterochromatin protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiujun; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, homologue HepA in Penicillium oxalicum) binding is associated with a highly compact chromatin state accompanied by gene silencing or repression. HP1 loss leads to the derepression of gene expression. We investigated HepA roles in regulating cellulolytic enzyme gene expression, as an increasingly number of studies have suggested that cellulolytic enzyme gene expression is not only regulated by transcription factors, but is also affected by the chromatin status. Among the genes that exhibited significant differences between the hepA deletion strain (ΔhepA) and the wild type (WT), most (95.0 %) were upregulated in ΔhepA compared with WT. The expression of the key transcription factor for cellulolytic enzyme gene (e.g., repressor CreA and activator ClrB) increased significantly. However, the deletion of hepA led to downregulation of prominent extracellular cellulolytic enzyme genes. Among the top 10 extracellular glycoside hydrolases (Amy15A, Amy13A, Cel7A/CBHI, Cel61A, Chi18A, Cel3A/BGLI, Xyn10A, Cel7B/EGI, Cel5B/EGII, and Cel6A/CBHII), in which secretion amount is from the highest to the tenth in P. oxalicum secretome, eight genes, including two amylase genes (amy15A and amy13A), all five cellulase genes (cel7A/cbh1, cel6A/cbh2, cel7B/eg1, cel5B/eg2, and cel3A/bgl1), and the cellulose-active LPMO gene (cel61A) expression were downregulated. Results of chromatin accessibility real-time PCR (CHART-PCR) showed that the chromatin of all three tested upstream regions opened specifically because of the deletion of hepA in the case of two prominent cellulase genes cel7A/cbh1 and cel7B/eg1. However, the open chromatin status did not occur along with the activation of cellulolytic enzyme gene expression. The overexpression of hepA upregulated the cellulolytic enzyme gene expression without chromatin modification. The overexpression of hepA remarkably activated the cellulolytic enzyme synthesis, not only in WT (~150 % filter paper activity

  1. The early nutritional environment of mice determines the capacity for adipose tissue expansion by modulating genes of caveolae structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie P Kozak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available While the phenomenon linking the early nutritional environment to disease susceptibility exists in many mammalian species, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that nutritional programming is a variable quantitative state of gene expression, fixed by the state of energy balance in the neonate, that waxes and wanes in the adult animal in response to changes in energy balance. We tested this hypothesis with an experiment, based upon global gene expression, to identify networks of genes in which expression patterns in inguinal fat of mice have been altered by the nutritional environment during early post-natal development. The effects of over- and under-nutrition on adiposity and gene expression phenotypes were assessed at 5, 10, 21 days of age and in adult C57Bl/6J mice fed chow followed by high fat diet for 8 weeks. Under-nutrition severely suppressed plasma insulin and leptin during lactation and diet-induced obesity in adult mice, whereas over-nourished mice were phenotypically indistinguishable from those on a control diet. Food intake was not affected by under- or over-nutrition. Microarray gene expression data revealed a major class of genes encoding proteins of the caveolae and cytoskeleton, including Cav1, Cav2, Ptrf (Cavin1, Ldlr, Vldlr and Mest, that were highly associated with adipose tissue expansion in 10 day-old mice during the dynamic phase of inguinal fat development and in adult animals exposed to an obesogenic environment. In conclusion gene expression profiles, fat mass and adipocyte size in 10 day old mice predicted similar phenotypes in adult mice with variable diet-induced obesity. These results are supported by phenotypes of KO mice and suggest that when an animal enters a state of positive energy balance adipose tissue expansion is initiated by coordinate changes in mRNA levels for proteins required for modulating the structure of the caveolae to maximize the capacity of the adipocyte for lipid storage.

  2. Structure of U2 snRNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and their expression in electroporated plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankan, P; Filipowicz, W

    1988-03-01

    We have characterized the U2 snRNA gene family in the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. It consists of 10-15 genes which do not appear to be closely clustered. Six of the U2 genes were sequenced and the structure of the Arabidopsis U2 RNA termini was determined in order to define the coding regions. Each of the genes codes for a distinct RNA differing from the others by 2-13 point mutations, localized in the 3' part of the 196 nt-long RNA. The upstream non-coding regions of all genes show strong sequence similarity in positions -81 to -1 and contain three highly conserved sequence elements: GTCCCACATCG (positions -78 to -68; 100% conservation), GTAGTATAAATA (-37 to -26) and CAANTC (-6 to -1). The coding regions are followed by the sequence CAN(7-9)AGTNNAA, a putative termination signal. The expression of three of the genes was studied in electroporated Orychophragmus violaceus and Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts. The genes, one of which contains a T --> C change in the Sm antigen binding site, were actively transcribed and processed into U2 RNAs of the expected size and containing trimethylguanosine caps. Deletion analysis indicates that sequences upstream of the conserved -80 to -1 region are not important for transcription in protoplasts. The 5'-terminal parts of U2 RNAs from several monocot and dicot plants were sequenced. This region, containing the sequence implicated in base-pairing with the branch point in pre-mRNA introns, is identical in all U2 RNAs examined.

  3. Cyclodextrin- and calixarene-based polycationic amphiphiles as gene delivery systems: A structure-activity relationship study

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego-Yerga, Laura; Lomazzi, Michela; Franceschi, Valentina; Sansone, Francesco; Ortiz-Mellet, Carmen; Donofrio, Gaetano; Canasti, Alessandro; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Multi-head/multi-tail facial amphiphiles built on cyclodextrin (CD) and calixarene (CA) scaffolds are paradigmatic examples of monodisperse gene delivery systems. The possibility to precisely control the architectural features at the molecular level offers unprecedented opportunities for conducting structure-activity relationship studies. A major requirement for those channels is the design of a sufficiently diverse ensemble of compounds for parallel evaluation of their capabilities to conden...

  4. An extracellular disulfide bond forming protein (DsbF) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Structural, biochemical and gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chim, Nicholas; Riley, Robert; The, Juliana; Im, Soyeon; Segelke, Brent; Lekin, Tim; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li Wei; Terwilliger, Tom; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2010-01-01

    Disulfide bond forming (Dsb) proteins ensure correct folding and disulfide bond formation of secreted proteins. Previously, we showed that Mycobacterium tuberculosis DsbE (Mtb DsbE, Rv2878c) aids in vitro oxidative folding of proteins. Here we present structural, biochemical and gene expression analyses of another putative Mtb secreted disulfide bond isomerase protein homologous to Mtb DsbE, Mtb DsbF (Rv1677). The X-ray crystal structure of Mtb DsbF reveals a conserved thioredoxin fold althou...

  5. [Research progress in the structure and fuction of Orthopoxvirus host range genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yi-Ming

    2013-06-01

    Orthopoxvirus vector has a broad prospect in recombinant vaccine research, but the rarely severe side-effect impedes its development. Vaccinia virus and Cowpox virus of Orthopoxvirus have broad host range, and they have typical host range genes as K1L, CP77 and C7L. These three genes affect host range of Vaccinia virus, disturb the cell signaling pathways, suppress immune response and are related to virulence.

  6. Structure and function of a cellulase gene in redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Allison C; Kricker, Jennifer A; Anderson, Alex J; Richardson, Neil R; Mather, Peter B

    2004-10-13

    The most abundant organic compound produced by plants is cellulose; however, it has long been accepted that most animals do not produce endogenous enzymes required for its degradation, but rely instead on symbiotic relationships with microbes that produce the necessary enzymes. Here, we present the genomic organisation of an endogenous glycosyl hydrolase family (GHF) 9 gene in redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus), consolidated from a cDNA sequence determined by Byrne et al. [Gene 239 (1999) 317-324.]. Comparison with several other invertebrate GHF9 genes reveals the conservation of both intron position/phase and splice sequence, which adds support to an argument for an ancestral animal cellulase gene. Furthermore, two introns in plant GHF9 genes are also identical in position, implying a more ancient origin for this class of animal cellulase. Protein purification from redclaw gastric fluid via fast performance liquid chromatography (FPLC) indicated the presence of two endoglucanase enzymes. The molecular weights of these components were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) to be 47,887 Da (Cel1) and 50,295 Da (Cel2). Cel1 is possibly the functional product of the described cellulase gene, with N-terminal amino acid residues identical to the translated amino acid sequence from the corresponding gene region. Cel2 was identical to Cel1 for 7 of 11 N-terminal residues and likely to be the product of a paralogous endoglucanase gene. These results suggest that redclaw crayfish possess at least one and possibly two functional, endoglucanase enzymes, although further work is required to confirm their origin and attributes.

  7. Gene flow and genetic structure in the Galician population (NW Spain) according to Alu insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Tito A; Fariña, José; Diéguez, Lois Pérez; Lodeiro, Rosa

    2008-12-02

    The most recent Alu insertions reveal different degrees of polymorphism in human populations, and a series of characteristics that make them particularly suitable genetic markers for Human Biology studies. This has led these polymorphisms to be used to analyse the origin and phylogenetic relationships between contemporary human groups. This study analyses twelve Alu sequences in a sample of 216 individuals from the autochthonous population of Galicia (NW Spain), with the aim of studying their genetic structure and phylogenetic position with respect to the populations of Western and Central Europe and North Africa, research that is of special interest in revealing European population dynamics, given the peculiarities of the Galician population due to its geographical situation in western Europe, and its historical vicissitudes. The insertion frequencies of eleven of the Alu elements analysed were within the variability range of European populations, while Yb8NBC125 proved to be the lowest so far recorded to date in Europe. Taking the twelve polymorphisms into account, the GD value for the Galician population was 0.268. The comparative analyses carried out using the MDS, NJ and AMOVA methods reveal the existence of spatial heterogeneity, and identify three population groups that correspond to the geographic areas of Western-Central Europe, Eastern Mediterranean Europe and North Africa. Galicia is shown to be included in the Western-Central European cluster, together with other Spanish populations. When only considering populations from Mediterranean Europe, the Galician population revealed a degree of genetic flow similar to that of the majority of the populations from this geographic area. The results of this study reveal that the Galician population, despite its geographic situation in the western edge of the European continent, occupies an intermediate position in relation to other European populations in general, and Iberian populations in particular. This

  8. Analysis of population genetic structure from Bucaramanga (Colombia) based on gene polymorphisms associated with the regulation of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Francisco Javier; Rondón, Fernando; Vargas, Clara Inés; Oróstegui, Myriam; Bautista, Leonelo; Serrano, Norma Cecilia; Páez, María C; Castillo, Adriana

    2012-04-01

    In spite of nearly 40% of variability in blood pressure being explained by genetic factors, the identification of genes associated with essential high blood pressure is difficult to determine in populations where individuals have different genetic backgrounds. In these circumstances it is necessary to determinate whether the population is sub-structured because this can bias studies associated with this disease. TO DETERMINE THE GENETIC STRUCTURE OF THE POPULATION IN BUCARAMANGA FROM GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE REGULATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE: 448G>T, 679C>T y 1711C>T from the gene kinase 4 of the dopaminergic receptor linked to the protein G and Glu298Asp, -786T>C and the VNTR of the intron 4 of the gene of endothelial nitric oxide. A sample of 552 unrelated individuals was studied through analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism. The allelic, haplotypic and genotypic frequencies were calculated, the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was determined and a molecular analysis of variance was performed to determine the genetic structure. Thirty-eight (38) Haplotypes were identified with GCCTG4b being the most frequent (21.2%). The most diverse polymorphism was 448G>T with a frequency of 49.9% for heterozygous. The six polymorphisms were found in genetic equilibrium and a genetic structure of populations was not evidenced (FST= 0.0038). The population studied does not present a genetic sub-structure and the polymorphisms analyzed were found in genetic equilibrium. This indicates that the population mixes randomly and there are no sub-groups capable of affecting the results of the association studies.

  9. 214 Fractal Structure in Volumetric Contrast Enhancement of Malignant Gliomas Correlates With Oxidative Metabolic Pathway Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kai; Berendsen, Sharon; Seute, Tatjana; Yeom, Kristen; Hayden, Melanie Gephart; Grant, Gerald A; Robe, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Fractal structure is found throughout many processes in nature, and often arises from sets of simple rules. We examined the contrast enhancement pattern in glioblastoma brain tumor MRIs for evidence of fractal structure, which might then be compared with expression of specific gene sets obtained from surgical specimens of each tumor. Volumetric T1 postcontrast imaging was obtained in 39 patients prior to surgical resection of pathology-confirmed glioblastoma lesions. For each tumor, we calculated the fractal dimension (Minkowski Bouligand dimension) using a box-counting (cubic scaling) approach. RNA expression microarray data from resected tissue were explored by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We found robust evidence for fractal structure in the contrast enhancement pattern, with an average fractal dimension of 2.17 ± 0.10, with a visually apparent split at 2.10. GSEA analysis showed a definitive association between this split in fractal dimension and 6 gene sets (of 4080), all 6 of which are linked to mitochondrial respiration/ATP production pathways. There is fractal structure in the volumetric enhancement pattern of glioblastoma tumors, with dimension approximately 2.15. Variation in this fractal dimension, and therefore the complexity of contrast enhancement it reflects, is specifically associated with genetic correlates of a shift to glycolytic metabolism in tumor cells. Drugs that shift glioblastoma to oxidative metabolism have recently been identified as independent therapeutic agents as well as sensitizing agents for irradiation. Therefore, a radiogenomic marker of glucose metabolism, such as this fractal structure in enhancement, might help to guide individualized therapy.

  10. [Radiation biology of structurally different drosophila genes. Report IV. The black gene: sequencing of the "point" mutations and recombination mechanisms of their processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davkova, L N; Aleksandrova, M V; Aleksandrov, I D

    2013-01-01

    As it has been ascertained in our large-scale experiments with Drosophila specific five-loci test [1], the radio- mutability of the black gene is unusual at lest in two respects: 1) fission neutrons are strangely more efficient than γ-rays in the gene/point mutation induction and 2) a lot of gene/point black mutations have the DNA alterations not detected by PCR (so-called PCR(+)-mutants). To verify the hypothesis that neutrons induce more efficiently than γ-rays the small structural DNA changes which fail to notice the PCR, sequence ana- lysis of 8 neutron-, 8 γ-ray-induced and 3 spontaneous (from instable D32 line) black gene/point PCR(+)-mutations was performed. As controls, sequences of the test-allele black1, as well as irradiated black(+32) and black(+18) alleles were analyzed. In black1 the replacement of four bases (ATCC) by an insertion (TACCTACC) at position +530 (exon 1) results in a frameshift. There were also 27 single base pair substitutions compared to the control black(+32) or black(+18) sequence. Further, 6 γ-ray- and one neutron-induced black mutants displayed the small deletions/insertions and transversion (G --> T) which led to the stop-codon in one case. These nucleotide changes thought to be the result of γ-ray-induced processing by the NHEJ, SSA or MMR repair pathways which act in the early zygote ahead of the first (gonomeric) nuclear division. Remarkably, 3 spontaneous, 2 γ-ray- and 7 neutron-induced black mutants were found to have the sequence alterations intrinsic to the black allele showing that interallelic recombination (gene conversion) seems to be a major pathway of processing of the gross DNA lesions by acting of the HR, SDSA or BIR repair systems in zygote after the gonomeric division. Substantially, the frequency of conversion events for the neutron-induced DNA lesions was found to be 3.5 time as high as for γ-ray-induced ones. The genetic impact of the radiation-induced conversion events in zygotic nucleus leading to the

  11. The Eucalyptus Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein (TIP gene subfamily: genomic organization, structural features and expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Iara Rodrigues

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant aquaporins are water channels implicated in various physiological processes, including growth, development and adaptation to stress. In this study, the Tonoplast Intrinsic Protein (TIP gene subfamily of Eucalyptus, an economically important woody species, was investigated and characterized. A genome-wide survey of the Eucalyptus grandis genome revealed the presence of eleven putative TIP genes (referred as EgTIP, which were individually assigned by phylogeny to each of the classical TIP1–5 groups. Homology modelling confirmed the presence of the two highly conserved NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala motifs in the identified EgTIPs. Residue variations in the corresponding selectivity filters, that might reflect differences in EgTIP substrate specificity, were observed. All EgTIP genes, except EgTIP5.1, were transcribed and the majority of them showed organ/tissue-enriched expression. Inspection of the EgTIP promoters revealed the presence of common cis-regulatory elements implicated in abiotic stress and hormone responses pointing to an involvement of the identified genes in abiotic stress responses. In line with these observations, additional gene expression profiling demonstrated increased expression under polyethylene glycol-imposed osmotic stress. Overall, the results obtained suggest that these novel EgTIPs might be functionally implicated in eucalyptus adaptation to stress.

  12. Rat tenascin-R gene: structure, chromosome location and transcriptional activity of promoter and exon 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprini, A; Gherzi, R; Vecchi, E; Borsi, L; Zardi, L; Siri, A

    1998-01-01

    Tenascin-R is an extracellular matrix protein expressed exclusively in the central nervous system where it is thought to play a relevant role in regulating neurite outgrowth. We have i) cloned the cDNA of the rat tenascin-R 5' region; ii) defined its genomic organization, obtaining the sequence of two novel untranslated exons; iii) mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13q23 and suggested a previously unreported synteny between rat chromosome 13q23, human chromosome 1q24, and mouse chromosome 4E; and iv) sequenced and characterized the elements responsible for its neural cell-restricted transcription. We found that two discrete regions of the rat gene (the first in the proximal promoter, the second in the first exon) are independently able to activate to a high degree the transcription of a reporter gene in either human or rat neuroblastoma cell lines but not in other cell lines. Based on this observation, we re-evaluated the arrangement of transcriptionally active regions in the human tenascin-R gene we recently cloned and found that the human gene also contains an exon sequence able to initiate and sustain transcription independently of promoter sequences.

  13. The murine alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor gene family: polymorphism, chromosomal location, and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Karen W; Wei, FuSheng; Brannan, Camilynn; Flotte, Terence R; Baumann, Heinz; Berger, Franklin G

    2002-11-01

    alpha(1)-Proteinase inhibitor (alpha(1)-PI) is a member of the serpin superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors, which function in maintaining homeostasis through regulation of numerous proteolytic processes. In laboratory mice (Mus musculus domesticus), alpha(1)-PI occurs in multiple isoforms encoded by a family of three to five genes that are polymorphic among inbred strains and that are located at the Serpina1 locus on chromosome 12. In the present study, we have characterized the alpha(1)-PI gene family of inbred mice in more detail. We show that mice express seven isoforms, all of which are encoded by genes that map to the Serpina1 locus. In addition, polymorphism at the locus is defined by three haplotypes (Serpina1(b), Serpina1(c), and Serpina1(l)) that differ with regard to both the number and identity of alpha(1)-PI genes. Finally, we present the complete sequence of an 84-kb region of Serpina1 containing a tandem repeat of two alpha(1)-PI genes.

  14. Two human homeobox genes, c1 and c8: structure analysis and expression in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, A; Mavilio, F; Acampora, D; Giampaolo, A; Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; D'Esposito, M; Pannese, M; Russo, G; Boncinelli, E

    1987-07-01

    Two human cDNA clones (HHO.c1.95 and HHO.c8.5111) containing a homeobox region have been characterized, and the respective genomic regions have been partially analyzed. Expression of the corresponding genes, termed c1 and c8, was evaluated in different organs and body parts during human embryonic/fetal development. HHO.c1.95 apparently encodes a 217-amino acid protein containing a class I homeodomain that shares 60 out of 61 amino acid residues with the Antennapedia homeodomain of Drosophila melanogaster. HHO.c8.5111 encodes a 153-amino acid protein containing a homeodomain identical to that of the frog AC1 gene. Clones HHO.c1 and HHO.c8 detect by blot-hydridization one and two specific polyadenylylated transcripts, respectively. These are differentially expressed in spinal cord, backbone rudiments, limb buds (or limbs), heart, and skin of human embryos and early fetuses in the 5- to 9-week postfertilization period, thus suggesting that the c1 and c8 genes play a key role in a variety of developmental processes. Together, the results of the embryonic/fetal expression of c1 and c8 and those of two previously analyzed genes (c10 and c13) indicate a coherent pattern of expression of these genes in early human ontogeny.

  15. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an endemic monotypic genus Hagenia (Rosaceae: structural comparative analysis, gene content and microsatellite detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Gichira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hagenia is an endangered monotypic genus endemic to the topical mountains of Africa. The only species, Hagenia abyssinica (Bruce J.F. Gmel, is an important medicinal plant producing bioactive compounds that have been traditionally used by African communities as a remedy for gastrointestinal ailments in both humans and animals. Complete chloroplast genomes have been applied in resolving phylogenetic relationships within plant families. We employed high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine the complete chloroplast genome sequence of H. abyssinica. The genome is a circular molecule of 154,961 base pairs (bp, with a pair of Inverted Repeats (IR 25,971 bp each, separated by two single copies; a large (LSC, 84,320 bp and a small single copy (SSC, 18,696. H. abyssinica’s chloroplast genome has a 37.1% GC content and encodes 112 unique genes, 78 of which code for proteins, 30 are tRNA genes and four are rRNA genes. A comparative analysis with twenty other species, sequenced to-date from the family Rosaceae, revealed similarities in structural organization, gene content and arrangement. The observed size differences are attributed to the contraction/expansion of the inverted repeats. The translational initiation factor gene (infA which had been previously reported in other chloroplast genomes was conspicuously missing in H. abyssinica. A total of 172 microsatellites and 49 large repeat sequences were detected in the chloroplast genome. A Maximum Likelihood analyses of 71 protein-coding genes placed Hagenia in Rosoideae. The availability of a complete chloroplast genome, the first in the Sanguisorbeae tribe, is beneficial for further molecular studies on taxonomic and phylogenomic resolution within the Rosaceae family.

  17. Genomic structure and marker-derived gene networks for growth and meat quality traits of Brazilian Nelore beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudadu, Maurício A; Porto-Neto, Laercio R; Mokry, Fabiana B; Tizioto, Polyana C; Oliveira, Priscila S N; Tullio, Rymer R; Nassu, Renata T; Niciura, Simone C M; Tholon, Patrícia; Alencar, Maurício M; Higa, Roberto H; Rosa, Antônio N; Feijó, Gélson L D; Ferraz, André L J; Silva, Luiz O C; Medeiros, Sérgio R; Lanna, Dante P; Nascimento, Michele L; Chaves, Amália S; Souza, Andrea R D L; Packer, Irineu U; Torres, Roberto A A; Siqueira, Fabiane; Mourão, Gerson B; Coutinho, Luiz L; Reverter, Antonio; Regitano, Luciana C A

    2016-03-15

    Nelore is the major beef cattle breed in Brazil with more than 130 million heads. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are often used to associate markers and genomic regions to growth and meat quality traits that can be used to assist selection programs. An alternative methodology to traditional GWAS that involves the construction of gene network interactions, derived from results of several GWAS is the AWM (Association Weight Matrices)/PCIT (Partial Correlation and Information Theory). With the aim of evaluating the genetic architecture of Brazilian Nelore cattle, we used high-density SNP genotyping data (~770,000 SNP) from 780 Nelore animals comprising 34 half-sibling families derived from highly disseminated and unrelated sires from across Brazil. The AWM/PCIT methodology was employed to evaluate the genes that participate in a series of eight phenotypes related to growth and meat quality obtained from this Nelore sample. Our results indicate a lack of structuring between the individuals studied since principal component analyses were not able to differentiate families by its sires or by its ancestral lineages. The application of the AWM/PCIT methodology revealed a trio of transcription factors (comprising VDR, LHX9 and ZEB1) which in combination connected 66 genes through 359 edges and whose biological functions were inspected, some revealing to participate in biological growth processes in literature searches. The diversity of the Nelore sample studied is not high enough to differentiate among families neither by sires nor by using the available ancestral lineage information. The gene networks constructed from the AWM/PCIT methodology were a useful alternative in characterizing genes and gene networks that were allegedly influential in growth and meat quality traits in Nelore cattle.

  18. Genetic characterization of the non-structural protein-3 gene of bluetongue virus serotype-2 isolate from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Sumanth Pudupakam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sequence analysis and phylogenetic studies based on non-structural protein-3 (NS3 gene are important in understanding the evolution and epidemiology of bluetongue virus (BTV. This study was aimed at characterizing the NS3 gene sequence of Indian BTV serotype-2 (BTV2 to elucidate its genetic relationship to global BTV isolates. Materials and Methods: The NS3 gene of BTV2 was amplified from infected BHK-21 cell cultures, cloned and subjected to sequence analysis. The generated NS3 gene sequence was compared with the corresponding sequences of different BTV serotypes across the world, and a phylogenetic relationship was established. Results: The NS3 gene of BTV2 showed moderate levels of variability in comparison to different BTV serotypes, with nucleotide sequence identities ranging from 81% to 98%. The region showed high sequence homology of 93-99% at amino acid level with various BTV serotypes. The PPXY/PTAP late domain motifs, glycosylation sites, hydrophobic domains, and the amino acid residues critical for virus-host interactions were conserved in NS3 protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BTV isolates segregate into four topotypes and that the Indian BTV2 in subclade IA is closely related to Asian and Australian origin strains. Conclusion: Analysis of the NS3 gene indicated that Indian BTV2 isolate is closely related to strains from Asia and Australia, suggesting a common origin of infection. Although the pattern of evolution of BTV2 isolate is different from other global isolates, the deduced amino acid sequence of NS3 protein demonstrated high molecular stability.

  19. The Choline Acetyltransferase (CHAT) Gene is Associated with Parahippocampal and Hippocampal Structure and Short-term Memory Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Moyzis, Robert K; Dong, Qi; Lin, Chongde

    2018-01-15

    The CHAT gene encodes choline acetyltransferase, which is an enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brain. This study collected structural MRI, genetic, and behavioral data from 324 healthy Chinese adults, and examined the associations between CHAT genetic variants, parahippocampal and hippocampal structure, and short-term memory span. After controlling for intracranial volume, sex, and age, CHAT SNP rs12246528 had the strongest association with parahippocampal structure, with the A allele being linked to smaller volume, surface area, and thickness. SNP rs1917814 had the strongest association with hippocampal volume, with the T allele being linked to larger hippocampal volume. After controlling for sex and age, CHAT rs3729496 had the strongest association with memory span, with the T allele being associated with a greater memory span. Finally, the left parahippocampal gyrus surface area was positively associated with memory span. This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of the CHAT gene in parahippocampal and hippocampal structures and memory span in healthy Chinese adults. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chromatin fine structure profiles for a developmentally regulated gene: reorganization of the lysozyme locus before trans-activator binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaraki, J; Chen, H H; Riggs, A; Bonifer, C

    2000-08-15

    The chicken lysozyme locus is activated in a stepwise fashion during myeloid differentiation. We have used this locus as a model to study at high resolution changes in chromatin structure both in chicken cell lines representing various stages of macrophage differentiation and in primary cells from transgenic mice. In this study we have addressed the question of whether chromatin rearrangements can be detected in myeloid precursor cells at a stage well before overt transcription of the lysozyme gene begins. In addition to restriction enzyme accessibility assays and DMS footprinting, we have applied new, very sensitive techniques to assay for chromatin changes. Particularly informative was UV photofootprinting, using terminal transferase-dependent PCR and nonradioactive detection. We find that the basic chromatin structure in lysozyme nonexpressing hematopoietic precursor cells is highly similar to the pattern found in fully differentiated lysozyme-expressing cells. In addition, we find that only in nonexpressing cells are dimethylsulfate footprints and UV photofootprints affected by trichostatin, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. These results are interpreted to mean that most chromatin pattern formation is complete before the binding of end-stage trans-activators, supporting the notion that heritable chromatin structure is central to the stable epigenetic programs that guide development.

  1. Integrative structural annotation of de novo RNA-Seq provides an accurate reference gene set of the enormous genome of the onion (Allium cepa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungill; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kim, Yong-Min; Yeom, Seon-In; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Kim, Sunggil; Kim, Do-Sun; Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2015-02-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetable crops in the world. Although a considerable amount of onion transcriptome data has been deposited into public databases, the sequences of the protein-coding genes are not accurate enough to be used, owing to non-coding sequences intermixed with the coding sequences. We generated a high-quality, annotated onion transcriptome from de novo sequence assembly and intensive structural annotation using the integrated structural gene annotation pipeline (ISGAP), which identified 54,165 protein-coding genes among 165,179 assembled transcripts totalling 203.0 Mb by eliminating the intron sequences. ISGAP performed reliable annotation, recognizing accurate gene structures based on reference proteins, and ab initio gene models of the assembled transcripts. Integrative functional annotation and gene-based SNP analysis revealed a whole biological repertoire of genes and transcriptomic variation in the onion. The method developed in this study provides a powerful tool for the construction of reference gene sets for organisms based solely on de novo transcriptome data. Furthermore, the reference genes and their variation described here for the onion represent essential tools for molecular breeding and gene cloning in Allium spp. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  2. Structure and expression of a pyrimidine gene cluster from the extreme thermophile Thermus strain ZO5.

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Casteele, M; Chen, P.; Roovers, M.; Legrain, C.; Glansdorff, N

    1997-01-01

    On a 4.7-kbp HindIII clone of Thermus strain ZO5 DNA, complementing an aspartate carbamoyltransferase mutation in Escherichia coli, we identified a cluster of four potential open reading frames corresponding to genes pyrR, and pyrB, an unidentified open reading frame named bbc, and gene pyrC. The transcription initiation site was mapped at about 115 nucleotides upstream of the pyrR translation start codon. The cognate Thermus pyr promoter also functions in heterologous expression of Thermus p...

  3. Global analysis of saliva as a source of bacterial genes for insights into human population structure and migration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Karsten; Li, Jing; Stoneking, Mark; Kessler, Olga; Schilling, Hildegard; Sonanini, Anne; Conrads, Georg; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2014-08-22

    The genetic diversity of the human microbiome holds great potential for shedding light on the history of our ancestors. Helicobacter pylori is the most prominent example as its analysis allowed a fine-scale resolution of past migration patterns including some that could not be distinguished using human genetic markers. However studies of H. pylori require stomach biopsies, which severely limits the number of samples that can be analysed. By focussing on the house-keeping gene gdh (coding for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), on the virulence gene gtf (coding for the glucosyltransferase) of mitis-streptococci and on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum-group we here tested the hypothesis that bacterial genes from human saliva have the potential for distinguishing human populations. Analysis of 10 individuals from each of seven geographic regions, encompassing Africa, Asia and Europe, revealed that the genes gdh and ITS exhibited the highest number of polymorphic sites (59% and 79%, respectively) and most OTUs (defined at 99% identity) were unique to a given country. In contrast, the gene gtf had the lowest number of polymorphic sites (21%), and most OTUs were shared among countries. Most of the variation in the gdh and ITS genes was explained by the high clonal diversity within individuals (around 80%) followed by inter-individual variation of around 20%, leaving the geographic region as providing virtually no source of sequence variation. Conversely, for gtf the variation within individuals accounted for 32%, between individuals for 57% and among geographic regions for 11%. This geographic signature persisted upon extension of the analysis to four additional locations from the American continent. Pearson correlation analysis, pairwise Fst-cluster analysis as well as UniFrac analyses consistently supported a tree structure in which the European countries clustered tightly together and branched

  4. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Goettel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to

  5. A Computational Approach From Gene to Structure Analysis of the Human ABCA4 Transporter Involved in Genetic Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Alfonso; Bernini, Andrea; Langella, Andrea; Ascher, David B; Pires, Douglas E V; Sodi, Andrea; Passerini, Ilaria; Pelo, Elisabetta; Rizzo, Stanislao; Niccolai, Neri; Spiga, Ottavia

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this article is to report the investigation of the structural features of ABCA4, a protein associated with a genetic retinal disease. A new database collecting knowledge of ABCA4 structure may facilitate predictions about the possible functional consequences of gene mutations observed in clinical practice. In order to correlate structural and functional effects of the observed mutations, the structure of mouse P-glycoprotein was used as a template for homology modeling. The obtained structural information and genetic data are the basis of our relational database (ABCA4Database). Sequence variability among all ABCA4-deposited entries was calculated and reported as Shannon entropy score at the residue level. The three-dimensional model of ABCA4 structure was used to locate the spatial distribution of the observed variable regions. Our predictions from structural in silico tools were able to accurately link the functional effects of mutations to phenotype. The development of the ABCA4Database gathers all the available genetic and structural information, yielding a global view of the molecular basis of some retinal diseases. ABCA4 modeled structure provides a molecular basis on which to analyze protein sequence mutations related to genetic retinal disease in order to predict the risk of retinal disease across all possible ABCA4 mutations. Additionally, our ABCA4 predicted structure is a good starting point for the creation of a new data analysis model, appropriate for precision medicine, in order to develop a deeper knowledge network of the disease and to improve the management of patients.

  6. New structures simultaneously harboring class 1 integron and ISCR1-linked resistance genes in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cancan; Sun, Jingjing; Zheng, Fen; Lu, Wenting; Yang, Qiu; Rui, Yongyu

    2016-04-21

    The connection structure of class 1 integron and insertion sequence common region 1 (ISCR1) is called "complex class 1 integrons" or "complex sul1-type integrons", which is also known to be associated with many resistance genes. This structure is a powerful gene-capturing tool kit that can mobilize antibiotic resistance genes. In order to look for and study the structure among clinical multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative isolates, 63 isolates simultaneously harbored class 1 integron and ISCR1-linked resistance genes were isolated from 2309 clinical non-redundant MDR Gram-negative isolates in Nanfang Hospital in 2008-2013. The connecting regions between the class 1 integrons and ISCR1 were examined using PCR and DNA sequencing to determine the structures in these isolates. The two elements (the variable regions of the class 1 integron structures and the ISCR1-linked resistance genes) are connected in series among 63 isolates according to long-extension PCR and DNA sequencing. According to the kinds and permutations of resistance genes in the structure, 12 distinct types were identified, including 8 types that have never been described in any species. Several types of these structures are similar with the structures of other reports, but not entirely same. This study is the first to determine the structure simultaneously harboring class 1 integron and ISCR1-linked resistance genes by detecting the region connecting class 1 integrons and ISCR1 in a large number of MDR bacteria. These structures carrying various resistance genes were closely associated with multidrug resistance bacteria in Southern China.

  7. Methods for Analyzing the Role of DNA Methylation and Chromatin Structure in Regulating T Lymphocyte Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Qianjin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure, determined in part by DNA methylation, is established during differentiation and prevents expression of genes unnecessary for the function of a given cell type. We reported that DNA methylation and chromatin structure contributes to lymphoid-specific ITGAL (CD11a and PRF1 (perforin expression. We used bisulfite sequencing to compare methylation patterns in the ITGAL promoter and 5' flanking region of T cells and fibroblasts, and in the PRF1 promoter and upstream enhancer of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with fibroblasts. The effects of methylation on promoter function were tested using regional methylation of reporter constructs, and confirmed by DNA methyltransferase inhibition. The relationship between DNA methylation and chromatin structure was analyzed by DNaseI hypersensitivity. Herein we described the methods and results in greater detail.

  8. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-23

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  9. The protocadherin 17 gene affects cognition, personality, amygdala structure and function, synapse development and risk of major mood disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H; Hoshina, N; Zhang, C; Ma, Y; Cao, H; Wang, Y; Wu, D-d; Bergen, S E; Landén, M; Hultman, C M; Preisig, M; Kutalik, Z; Castelao, E; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, M; Forstner, A J; Strohmaier, J; Hecker, J; Schulze, T G; Müller-Myhsok, B; Reif, A; Mitchell, P B; Martin, N G; Schofield, P R; Cichon, S; Nöthen, M M; Backlund, Lena; Frisén, Louise; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schalling, Martin; Ösby, Urban; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Leber, Markus; Degenhardt, Franziska; Treutlein, Jens; Mattheisen, Manuel; Maaser, Anna; Meier, Sandra; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Lacour, André; Witt, Stephanie H; Streit, Fabian; Lucae, Susanne; Maier, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Markus; Vedder, Helmut; Kammerer-Ciernioch, Jutta; Pfennig, Andrea; Bauer, Michael; Hautzinger, Martin; Wright, Adam; Fullerton, Janice M; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Gordon, Scott D; Becker, Tim; Schumacher, Johannes; Propping, Peter; Walter, H; Erk, S; Heinz, A; Amin, N; van Duijn, C M; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Tost, H; Xiao, X; Yamamoto, T; Rietschel, M; Li, M

    2018-01-01

    Major mood disorders, which primarily include bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, are the leading cause of disability worldwide and pose a major challenge in identifying robust risk genes. Here, we present data from independent large-scale clinical data sets (including 29 557 cases and 32 056 controls) revealing brain expressed protocadherin 17 (PCDH17) as a susceptibility gene for major mood disorders. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the PCDH17 region are significantly associated with major mood disorders; subjects carrying the risk allele showed impaired cognitive abilities, increased vulnerable personality features, decreased amygdala volume and altered amygdala function as compared with non-carriers. The risk allele predicted higher transcriptional levels of PCDH17 mRNA in postmortem brain samples, which is consistent with increased gene expression in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy subjects. Further, overexpression of PCDH17 in primary cortical neurons revealed significantly decreased spine density and abnormal dendritic morphology compared with control groups, which again is consistent with the clinical observations of reduced numbers of dendritic spines in the brains of patients with major mood disorders. Given that synaptic spines are dynamic structures which regulate neuronal plasticity and have crucial roles in myriad brain functions, this study reveals a potential underlying biological mechanism of a novel risk gene for major mood disorders involved in synaptic function and related intermediate phenotypes. PMID:28070120

  10. Structural and functional characterization of the Colletotrichum lindemuthianum nit1 gene, which encodes a nitrate eductase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, G B; Queiroz, M V; Ribeiro, R A; Araújo, E F

    2013-02-08

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is the causal agent of plant bean anthracnose, one of the most important diseases affecting the common bean. We investigated the structure and expression of the nit1 gene (nitrate reductase) of C. lindemuthianum. The nit1 gene open reading frame contains 2787 bp, interrupted by a single 69-bp intron. The predicted protein has 905 amino acids; it shows high identity with the nitrate reductase of C. higginsianum (79%) and C. graminicola (73%). Expression of nit1 in C. lindemuthianum was evaluated in mycelia grown on different nitrogen sources under conditions of activation and repression. The gene was expressed after 15 min of induction with nitrate, reaching maximum expression at 360 min. The transcription was repressed in mycelia grown in media enriched with ammonia, urea or glutamine. Twenty nit1⁻ mutants were obtained in a medium treated with chlorate. Ten of these mutants were characterized by DNA hybridization, which identified point mutations, a deletion and an insertion. These rearrangements in the nit1 gene in the different mutants may have occurred through activity of transposable elements.

  11. Morphological characteristics, anatomical structure, and gene expression: novel insights into gibberellin biosynthesis and perception during carrot growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Long; Xiong, Fei; Que, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are considered potentially important regulators of cell elongation and expansion in plants. Carrot undergoes significant alteration in organ size during its growth and development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying gibberellin accumulation and perception during carrot growth and development remain unclear. In this study, five stages of carrot growth and development were investigated using morphological and anatomical structural techniques. Gibberellin levels in leaf, petiole, and taproot tissues were also investigated for all five stages. Gibberellin levels in the roots initially increased and then decreased, but these levels were lower than those in the petioles and leaves. Genes involved in gibberellin biosynthesis and signaling were identified from the carrotDB, and their expression was analyzed. All of the genes were evidently responsive to carrot growth and development, and some of them showed tissue-specific expression. The results suggested that gibberellin level may play a vital role in carrot elongation and expansion. The relative transcription levels of gibberellin pathway-related genes may be the main cause of the different bioactive GAs levels, thus exerting influences on gibberellin perception and signals. Carrot growth and development may be regulated by modification of the genes involved in gibberellin biosynthesis, catabolism, and perception.

  12. Fungal endophytes of Catharanthus roseus enhance vindoline content by modulating structural and regulatory genes related to terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shiv S; Singh, Sucheta; Babu, C S Vivek; Shanker, Karuna; Srivastava, N K; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Kalra, Alok

    2016-05-25

    Not much is known about the mechanism of endophyte-mediated induction of secondary metabolite production in Catharanthus roseus. In the present study two fungal endophytes, Curvularia sp. CATDLF5 and Choanephora infundibulifera CATDLF6 were isolated from the leaves of the plant that were found to enhance vindoline content by 229-403%. The isolated endophytes did not affect the primary metabolism of the plant as the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, net CO2 assimilation, plant biomass and starch content of endophyte-inoculated plants was similar to endophyte-free control plants. Expression of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway genes, geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), strictosidine synthase (STR), 16-hydoxytabersonine-O-methyltransferase (16OMT), desacetoxyvindoline-4-hydroxylase (D4H), deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) were upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. Endophyte inoculation upregulated the expression of the gene for transcriptional activator octadecanoid-responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein (ORCA3) and downregulated the expression of Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein family transcriptional repressors (ZCTs). The gene for the vacuolar class III peroxidase (PRX1), responsible for coupling vindoline and catharanthine, was upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. These endophytes may enhance vindoline production by modulating the expression of key structural and regulatory genes of vindoline biosynthesis without affecting the primary metabolism of the host plant.

  13. Fungal endophytes of Catharanthus roseus enhance vindoline content by modulating structural and regulatory genes related to terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shiv S.; Singh, Sucheta; Babu, C. S. Vivek; Shanker, Karuna; Srivastava, N. K.; Shukla, Ashutosh K.; Kalra, Alok

    2016-01-01

    Not much is known about the mechanism of endophyte-mediated induction of secondary metabolite production in Catharanthus roseus. In the present study two fungal endophytes, Curvularia sp. CATDLF5 and Choanephora infundibulifera CATDLF6 were isolated from the leaves of the plant that were found to enhance vindoline content by 229–403%. The isolated endophytes did not affect the primary metabolism of the plant as the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, net CO2 assimilation, plant biomass and starch content of endophyte-inoculated plants was similar to endophyte-free control plants. Expression of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) pathway genes, geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), strictosidine synthase (STR), 16-hydoxytabersonine-O-methyltransferase (16OMT), desacetoxyvindoline-4-hydroxylase (D4H), deacetylvindoline-4-O-acetyltransferase (DAT) were upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. Endophyte inoculation upregulated the expression of the gene for transcriptional activator octadecanoid-responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein (ORCA3) and downregulated the expression of Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein family transcriptional repressors (ZCTs). The gene for the vacuolar class III peroxidase (PRX1), responsible for coupling vindoline and catharanthine, was upregulated in endophyte-inoculated plants. These endophytes may enhance vindoline production by modulating the expression of key structural and regulatory genes of vindoline biosynthesis without affecting the primary metabolism of the host plant. PMID:27220774

  14. Sequence and Structure Analysis of Distantly-Related Viruses Reveals Extensive Gene Transfer between Viruses and Hosts and among Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprari, Silvia; Metzler, Saskia; Lengauer, Thomas; Kalinina, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    The origin and evolution of viruses is a subject of ongoing debate. In this study, we provide a full account of the evolutionary relationships between proteins of significant sequence and structural similarity found in viruses that belong to different classes according to the Baltimore classification. We show that such proteins can be found in viruses from all Baltimore classes. For protein families that include these proteins, we observe two patterns of the taxonomic spread. In the first pattern, they can be found in a large number of viruses from all implicated Baltimore classes. In the other pattern, the instances of the corresponding protein in species from each Baltimore class are restricted to a few compact clades. Proteins with the first pattern of distribution are products of so-called viral hallmark genes reported previously. Additionally, this pattern is displayed by the envelope glycoproteins from Flaviviridae and Bunyaviridae and helicases of superfamilies 1 and 2 that have homologs in cellular organisms. The second pattern can often be explained by horizontal gene transfer from the host or between viruses, an example being Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae hemagglutinin esterases. Another facet of horizontal gene transfer comprises multiple independent introduction events of genes from cellular organisms into otherwise unrelated viruses. PMID:26492264

  15. Elevation in tropical sky islands as the common driver in structuring genes and communities of freshwater organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueuning, Morgan; Suchan, Tomasz; Rutschmann, Sereina; Gattolliat, Jean-Luc; Jamsari, Jamsari; Kamil, Al Ihsan; Pitteloud, Camille; Buerki, Sven; Balke, Michael; Sartori, Michel; Alvarez, Nadir

    2017-11-23

    Tropical mountains are usually characterized by a vertically-arranged sequence of ecological belts, which, in contrast to temperate habitats, have remained relatively stable in space across the Quaternary. Such long-lasting patterning of habitats makes them ideal to test the role of environmental pressure in driving ecological and evolutionary processes. Using Sumatran freshwater mayfly communities, we test whether elevation, rather than other spatial factors (i.e. volcanoes, watersheds) structures both species within communities and genes within species. Based on the analysis of 31 mayfly (Ephemeroptera) communities and restriction-site-associated-DNA sequencing in the four most ubiquitous species, we found elevation as the major spatial component structuring both species and genes in the landscape. In other words, similar elevations across different mountains or watersheds harbor more similar species and genes than different elevations within the same mountain or watershed. Tropical elevation gradients characterized by environmental conditions that are both steep and relatively stable seasonally and over geological time scales, are thus responsible for both ecological and genetic differentiation. Our results demonstrate how in situ ecological diversification at the micro-evolutionary level might fuel alpha- and beta- components of diversity in tropical sky islands.

  16. A Deconvolution Protocol for ChIP-Seq Reveals Analogous Enhancer Structures on the Mouse and Human Ribosomal RNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Clement Mars

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and Massively Parallel Sequencing, or ChIP-Seq, has greatly advanced our genome-wide understanding of chromatin and enhancer structures. However, its resolution at any given genetic locus is limited by several factors. In applying ChIP-Seq to the study of the ribosomal RNA genes, we found that a major limitation to resolution was imposed by the underlying variability in sequence coverage that very often dominates the protein–DNA interaction profiles. Here, we describe a simple numerical deconvolution approach that, in large part, corrects for this variability, and significantly improves both the resolution and quantitation of protein–DNA interaction maps deduced from ChIP-Seq data. This approach has allowed us to determine the in vivo organization of the RNA polymerase I preinitiation complexes that form at the promoters and enhancers of the mouse (Mus musculus and human (Homo sapiens ribosomal RNA genes, and to reveal a phased binding of the HMG-box factor UBF across the rDNA. The data identify and map a “Spacer Promoter” and associated stalled polymerase in the intergenic spacer of the human ribosomal RNA genes, and reveal a very similar enhancer structure to that found in rodents and lower vertebrates.

  17. Novel missense mutations in the human lysosomal sialidase gene in sialidosis patients and prediction of structural alterations of mutant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kohji; Naganawa, Yasunori; Matsuzawa, Fumiko; Aikawa, Seiichi; Doi, Hirofumi; Sasagasako, Naokazu; Yamada, Takeshi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Takuro; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    Three novel missense mutations in the human lysosomal sialidase gene causing amino acid substitutions (P80L, W240R. and P316S) in the coding region were identified in two Japanese sialidosis patients. One patient with a severe, congenital form of type 2 sialidosis was a compound heterozygote for 239C-to-T (P80L) and 718T-to-C (W240R). The other patient with a mild juvenile-onset phenotype (type 1) was a homozygote for the base substitution of 946C-to-T (P316S). None of these mutant cDNA products showed enzymatic activity toward an artificial substrate when coexpressed in galactosialidosis fibroblastic cells together with protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). All mutants showed a reticular immunofluorescence distribution when coexpressed with the PPCA gene in COS-1 cells, suggesting that the gene products were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi area or rapidly degraded in the lysosomes. Homology modeling of the structural changes introduced by the mutations predicted that the P80L and P316S transversions cause large conformational changes including the active site residues responsible for binding the sialic acid carboxylate group. The W240R substitution was deduced to influence the molecular surface structure of a limited region of the constructed models, which was also influenced by previously identified V217M and G243R transversions.

  18. Loop structures in the 5' untranslated region and antisense RNA mediate pilE gene expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Thao L; Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A

    2016-11-01

    Regulation of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilE gene is ill-defined. In this study, post-transcriptional effects on expression were assessed. In silico analysis predicts the formation of three putative stable stem-loop structures with favourable free energies within the 5' untranslated region of the pilE message. Using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analyses, we show that each loop structure forms, with introduced destabilizing stem-loop mutations diminishing loop stability. Utilizing a series of pilE translational fusions, deletion of either loop 1 or loop 2 caused a significant reduction of pilE mRNA resulting in reduced expression of the reporter gene. Consequently, the formation of the loops apparently protects the pilE transcript from degradation. Putative loop 3 contains the pilE ribosomal binding site. Consequently, its formation may influence translation. Analysis of a small RNA transcriptome revealed an antisense RNA being produced upstream of the pilE promoter that is predicted to hybridize across the 5' untranslated region loops. Insertional mutants were created where the antisense RNA is not transcribed. In these mutants, pilE transcript levels are greatly diminished, with any residual message apparently not being translated. Complementation of these insertion mutants in trans with the antisense RNA gene facilitates pilE translation yielding a pilus + phenotype. Overall, this study demonstrates a complex relationship between loop-dependent transcript protection and antisense RNA in modulating pilE expression levels.

  19. Delineation of genetic relatedness and population structure of oral and enteric Campylobacter concisus strains by analysis of housekeeping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Vikneswari; Octavia, Sophie; Demirbas, Omer Faruk; Sabrina, Sheryl; Ma, Rena; Lan, Ruiting; Riordan, Stephen M; Grimm, Michael C; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Campylobacter concisus is an oral bacterium that has been shown to be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study we examined clusters of oral C. concisus strains isolated from patients with IBD and healthy controls by analysing six housekeeping genes. In addition, we investigated the population structure of C. concisus strains. Whether oral and enteric strains form distinct clusters based on the sequences of these housekeeping genes was also investigated. The oral C. concisus strains were found to contain two genomospecies, which belong to the two genomospecies previously found in enteric C. concisus strains. C. concisus clusters formed based on the sequences of a single aspA gene were the same as that formed by using previously reported MLST schemes. The analysis of combined oral and enteric C. concisus strains found that enteric C. concisus strains did not form distinct clusters. Genetic structure analysis identified five subpopulations of C. concisus and showed that genetic recombination between C. concisus strains was common. However, genetic recombination was significantly less in oral strains isolated from patients with IBD than from healthy individuals. Previously reported oral and enteric intestinal epithelial invasive C. concisus strains were in cluster II and subpopulation III. Furthermore, this study shows that there are no distinct enteric C. concisus strain clusters or subpopulations.

  20. A Deconvolution Protocol for ChIP-Seq Reveals Analogous Enhancer Structures on the Mouse and Human Ribosomal RNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Jean-Clement; Sabourin-Felix, Marianne; Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2018-01-04

    The combination of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and Massively Parallel Sequencing, or ChIP-Seq, has greatly advanced our genome-wide understanding of chromatin and enhancer structures. However, its resolution at any given genetic locus is limited by several factors. In applying ChIP-Seq to the study of the ribosomal RNA genes, we found that a major limitation to resolution was imposed by the underlying variability in sequence coverage that very often dominates the protein-DNA interaction profiles. Here, we describe a simple numerical deconvolution approach that, in large part, corrects for this variability, and significantly improves both the resolution and quantitation of protein-DNA interaction maps deduced from ChIP-Seq data. This approach has allowed us to determine the in vivo organization of the RNA polymerase I preinitiation complexes that form at the promoters and enhancers of the mouse ( Mus musculus ) and human ( Homo sapiens ) ribosomal RNA genes, and to reveal a phased binding of the HMG-box factor UBF across the rDNA. The data identify and map a "Spacer Promoter" and associated stalled polymerase in the intergenic spacer of the human ribosomal RNA genes, and reveal a very similar enhancer structure to that found in rodents and lower vertebrates. Copyright © 2018 Mars et al.

  1. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: genome structure, evolutionary aspects, gene content and SSR detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila do Nascimento Vieira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR. It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU, which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara. Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. CONCLUSION: The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of

  2. Structure and role of neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-12-27

    Dec 27, 2010 ... in innate immunity and produce reactive oxygen species and reduce the severity and duration of parasitic infection and autoimmune disease. NCF1 also has a role in T cell activation. Key words: Neutrophil cytosol factor 1 (NCF1) gene, exons, T cell activation. INTRODUCTION. An immune system is a ...

  3. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE CYTOCHROME P450 LANOSTEROL 14A-DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the nucleotide sequence of the gene and flanking DNA for the cytochrome P450 lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from the yeast Candida tropicalis ATCC750. An open reading frame (ORF) of 528 codons encoding a 60.9-kD protein is identified. This ORF includes a charact...

  4. Partial duplication of the APBA2 gene in chromosome 15q13 corresponds to duplicon structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesterson Robert A

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosomal abnormalities affecting human chromosome 15q11-q13 underlie multiple genomic disorders caused by deletion, duplication and triplication of intervals in this region. These events are mediated by highly homologous segments of DNA, or duplicons, that facilitate mispairing and unequal cross-over in meiosis. The gene encoding an amyloid precursor protein-binding protein (APBA2 was previously mapped to the distal portion of the interval commonly deleted in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and duplicated in cases of autism. Results We show that this gene actually maps to a more telomeric location and is partially duplicated within the broader region. Two highly homologous copies of an interval containing a large 5' exon and downstream sequence are located ~5 Mb distal to the intact locus. The duplicated copies, containing the first coding exon of APBA2, can be distinguished by single nucleotide sequence differences and are transcriptionally inactive. Adjacent to APBA2 maps a gene termed KIAA0574. The protein encoded by this gene is weakly homologous to a protein termed X123 that in turn maps adjacent to APBA1 on 9q21.12; APBA1 is highly homologous to APBA2 in the C-terminal region and is distinguished from APBA2 by the N-terminal region encoded by this duplicated exon. Conclusion The duplication of APBA2 sequences in this region adds to a complex picture of different low copy repeats present across this region and elsewhere on the chromosome.

  5. DISC1 gene and affective psychopathology : A combined structural and functional MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opmeer, Esther M.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Veltman, Dick J.; Aleman, Andre

    The gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISCI) has been indicated as a determinant of psychopathology, including affective disorders, and shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus functioning, regions of major interest for affective disorders. We aimed to investigate whether DISCI

  6. Structure and expression of the murine retinoblastoma gene and characterization of its encoded protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Schackleford, G.M.; Gerber, M.R.; Horowitz, J.M.; Friend, S.H.; Schartl, M.; Bogenmann, E.; Rapaport, J.M.; McGee, T.; Dryja, T.; Weinberg, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone of the murine homologue of the human retinoblastoma (Rb) susceptibility gene. DNA sequence analysis reveals a high degree of conservation with the human Rb sequence, both in the coding and in the noncoding regions. The predicted amino acid sequence of the mouse Rb

  7. Structure of the gene encoding the murine protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    II restriction endonuclease, and several blocks of sequence in the 5' flanking region are conserved between mouse and human. Despite all of these common features, one of the most striking differences found concerns the human CK2 alpha subunit binding domain at position -170 to -239 of the human gene. This domain...

  8. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human anti-mullerian hormone type II receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Visser (Jenny); A. McLuskey; T. van Beers (T.); D.O. Weghuis (D. Olde); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractUsing the rat anti-müllerian hormone type II receptor (AMHRII) cDNA as a probe, two overlapping lambda phage clones containing the AMHRII gene were isolated from a human genomic library. Sequence analysis of the exons was performed and the exon/intron boundaries were determined. The

  9. Structure, chromosomal assignment, and expression of the gene for proteinase-3. The Wegener's granulomatosis autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, A B; Franklin, K F; Rao, G; Marshall, B C; Rebentisch, M B; Lemons, R S; Hoidal, J R

    1992-10-15

    Proteinase-3 (PR-3) is a neutral serine proteinase present in the azurophil granules of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It degrades a variety of extracellular matrix proteins including elastin in vitro and causes emphysema when administered by tracheal insufflation to hamsters. It is identical to the target autoantigen (c-ANCA) associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and to myeloblastin, a serine proteinase first identified in HL-60 leukemia cells. In this study, the gene encoding PR-3 was cloned and sequenced. The gene spans approximately 6.5 kilobase pairs and consists of five exons and four introns. The genomic organization of PR-3 is similar to that of the other serine proteinases expressed in hemopoietic cells. Each residue of the catalytic triad of PR-3 is located on a separate exon, and the positions of the residues within the exons are similar to those in human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. The phase and placement of the introns in the PR-3 gene are also similar to those in human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. The 400-base pair (bp) 5'-flanking sequence of the PR-3 gene contains a TATA box at position 379. There is no CAAT box promoter element. The 3'-untranslated region is 200 bp, extending from a TGA stop codon to the site of polyadenylation 10 bp after the canonical AATAAA signal. Amplification of PR-3 from a human/hamster hybrid cell line localizes the gene to human chromosome 19. Evidence from Northern analysis suggests that PR-3 expression is primarily confined to the promyelocytic/myelocytic stage of bone marrow development.

  10. Evolutionary diversification of SPANX-N sperm protein gene structure and expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalay Kouprina

    Full Text Available The sperm protein associated with nucleus in the X chromosome (SPANX genes cluster at Xq27 in two subfamilies, SPANX-A/D and SPANX-N. SPANX-A/D is specific for hominoids and is fairly well characterized. The SPANX-N gave rise to SPANX-A/D in the hominoid lineage approximately 7 MYA. Given the proposed role of SPANX genes in spermatogenesis, we have extended studies to SPANX-N gene evolution, variation, regulation of expression, and intra-sperm localization. By immunofluorescence analysis, SPANX-N proteins are localized in post-meiotic spermatids exclusively, like SPANX-A/D. But in contrast to SPANX-A/D, SPANX-N are found in all ejaculated spermatozoa rather than only in a subpopulation, are localized in the acrosome rather than in the nuclear envelope, and are expressed at a low level in several nongametogenic adult tissues as well as many cancers. Presence of a binding site for CTCF and its testis-specific paralogue BORIS in the SPANX promoters suggests, by analogy to MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1, that their activation in spermatogenesis is mediated by the programmed replacement of CTCF by BORIS. Based on the relative density of CpG, the more extended expression of SPANX-N compared to SPANX-A/D in nongametogenic tissues is likely attributed to differences in promoter methylation. Our findings suggest that the recent duplication of SPANX genes in hominoids was accompanied by different localization of SPANX-N proteins in post-meiotic sperm and additional expression in several nongonadal tissues. This suggests a corresponding functional diversification of SPANX gene families in hominoids. SPANX proteins thus provide unique targets to investigate their roles in the function of spermatozoa, selected malignancies, and for SPANX-N, in other tissues as well.

  11. Toward a suitable structural analysis of gene delivery carrier based on polycationic carbohydrates by electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybylski, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.przybylski@upmc.fr [Université d’Evry-Val-d’Essonne, Laboratoire Analyse et Modélisation pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, CNRS UMR 8587, Bâtiment Maupertuis, Bld F. Mitterrand, F-91025 Evry (France); Benito, Juan M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas (IIQ), CSIC−Universidad de Sevilla, Américo Vespucio 49, Isla de la Cartuja, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Bonnet, Véronique [Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Glycochimie, des Antimicrobiens et des Agroressources, CNRS UMR 7378, 80039 Amiens (France); Mellet, Carmen Ortiz [Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41012 Sevilla (Spain); García Fernández, José M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas (IIQ), CSIC−Universidad de Sevilla, Américo Vespucio 49, Isla de la Cartuja, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    Polycationic carbohydrates represent an attractive class of biomolecules for several applications and particularly as non viral gene delivery vectors. In this case, the establishment of structure-biological activity relationship requires sensitive and accurate characterization tools to both control and achieve fine structural deciphering. Electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) appears as a suitable approach to address these questions. In the study herein, we have investigated the usefulness of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to get structural data about five polycationic carbohydrates demonstrated as promising gene delivery agents. A particular attention was paid to determine the influence of charge states as well as both fluoranthene reaction time and supplementary activation (SA) on production of charge reduced species, fragmentation yield, varying from 2 to 62%, as well as to obtain the most higher both diversity and intensity of fragments, according to charge states and targeted compounds. ETD fragmentation appeared to be mainly directed toward pending group rather than carbohydrate cyclic scaffold leading to a partial sequencing for building blocks when amino groups are close to carbohydrate core, but allowing to complete structural deciphering of some of them, such as those including dithioureidocysteaminyl group which was not possible with CID only. Such findings clearly highlight the potential to help the rational choice of the suitable analytical conditions, according to the nature of the gene delivery molecules exhibiting polycationic features. Moreover, our ETD-MS/MS approach open the way to a fine sequencing/identification of grafted groups carried on various sets of oligo-/polysaccharides in various fields such as glycobiology or nanomaterials, even with unknown or questionable extraction, synthesis or modification steps. - Highlights: • The first ETD-MS/MS characterization of polycationic carbohydrate based non-viral gene delivery

  12. The structure of the human sterol carrier protein X/sterol carrier protein 2 gene (SCP2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohba, Takashi; Rennert, H.; Pfeifer, S.M. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Phildelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-15

    Sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) is a 58-kDa protein that is localized to peroxisomes. The amino acid sequence of the protein suggests that SCPx may function as a thiolase. The gene encoding SCPx also codes for a 15.3-kDa protein called sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). Here the authors report the structure of this gene (SCP2), which spans approximately 80 kb and consists of 16 exons and 15 introns. Multiple transcription start sites were identified. The 5{prime} flanking region has characteristics of other peroxisomal protein promoters, which include the absence of a TATA box and G+C-enriched region containing several reverse GC boxes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Structures and comparative characterization of biosynthetic gene clusters for cyanosporasides, enediyne-derived natural products from marine actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amy L; Nam, Sang-Jip; Fukuda, Takashi; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Kauffman, Christopher A; Jensen, Paul R; Fenical, William; Moore, Bradley S

    2013-03-20

    Cyanosporasides are marine bacterial natural products containing a chlorinated cyclopenta[a]indene core of suspected enediyne polyketide biosynthetic origin. Herein, we report the isolation and characterization of novel cyanosporasides C-F (3-6) from the marine actinomycetes Salinispora pacifica CNS-143 and Streptomyces sp. CNT-179, highlighted by the unprecedented C-2' N-acetylcysteamine functionalized hexose group of 6. Cloning, sequencing, and mutagenesis of homologous ~50 kb cyanosporaside biosynthetic gene clusters from both bacteria afforded the first genetic evidence supporting cyanosporaside's enediyne, and thereby p-benzyne biradical, biosynthetic origin and revealed the molecular basis for nitrile and glycosyl functionalization. This study provides new opportunities for bioengineering of enediyne derivatives and expands the structural diversity afforded by enediyne gene clusters.

  14. Usher Syndrome Type III: Revised Genomic Structure of the USH3 Gene and Identification of Novel Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Randall R.; Zhou, Guimei; Huang, Dali; Davis, Jack R.; Möller, Claes; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Kimberling, William J.; Sumegi, Janos

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disease gene was localized to 3q25 and recently was identified by positional cloning. In the present study, we have revised the structure of the USH3 gene, including a new translation start site, 5′ untranslated region, and a transcript encoding a 232–amino acid protein. The mature form of the protein is predicted to contain three transmembrane domains and 204 residues. We have found four new disease-causing mutations, including one that appears to be relatively common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. We have also identified mouse (chromosome 3) and rat (chromosome 2) orthologues, as well as two human paralogues on chromosomes 4 and 10. PMID:12145752

  15. Cloning and characterization of a pectin lyase gene from Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and comparative phylogenetic/structural analyses with genes from phytopathogenic and saprophytic/opportunistic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Microorganisms produce cell-wall-degrading enzymes as part of their strategies for plant invasion/nutrition. Among these, pectin lyases (PNLs) catalyze the depolymerization of esterified pectin by a β-elimination mechanism. PNLs are grouped together with pectate lyases (PL) in Family 1 of the polysaccharide lyases, as they share a conserved structure in a parallel β-helix. The best-characterized fungal pectin lyases are obtained from saprophytic/opportunistic fungi in the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium and from some pathogens such as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. The organism used in the present study, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is a phytopathogenic fungus that can be subdivided into different physiological races with different capacities to infect its host, Phaseolus vulgaris. These include the non-pathogenic and pathogenic strains known as races 0 and 1472, respectively. Results Here we report the isolation and sequence analysis of the Clpnl2 gene, which encodes the pectin lyase 2 of C. lindemuthianum, and its expression in pathogenic and non-pathogenic races of C. lindemuthianum grown on different carbon sources. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of Clpnl2 based on reported sequences of PNLs from other sources and compared the three-dimensional structure of Clpnl2, as predicted by homology modeling, with those of other organisms. Both analyses revealed an early separation of bacterial pectin lyases from those found in fungi and oomycetes. Furthermore, two groups could be distinguished among the enzymes from fungi and oomycetes: one comprising enzymes from mostly saprophytic/opportunistic fungi and the other formed mainly by enzymes from pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Clpnl2 was found in the latter group and was grouped together with the pectin lyase from C. gloeosporioides. Conclusions The Clpnl2 gene of C. lindemuthianum shares the characteristic elements of genes coding for pectin

  16. Gene expression noise in spatial patterning: hunchback promoter structure affects noise amplitude and distribution in Drosophila segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Holloway

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Positional information in developing embryos is specified by spatial gradients of transcriptional regulators. One of the classic systems for studying this is the activation of the hunchback (hb gene in early fruit fly (Drosophila segmentation by the maternally-derived gradient of the Bicoid (Bcd protein. Gene regulation is subject to intrinsic noise which can produce variable expression. This variability must be constrained in the highly reproducible and coordinated events of development. We identify means by which noise is controlled during gene expression by characterizing the dependence of hb mRNA and protein output noise on hb promoter structure and transcriptional dynamics. We use a stochastic model of the hb promoter in which the number and strength of Bcd and Hb (self-regulatory binding sites can be varied. Model parameters are fit to data from WT embryos, the self-regulation mutant hb(14F, and lacZ reporter constructs using different portions of the hb promoter. We have corroborated model noise predictions experimentally. The results indicate that WT (self-regulatory Hb output noise is predominantly dependent on the transcription and translation dynamics of its own expression, rather than on Bcd fluctuations. The constructs and mutant, which lack self-regulation, indicate that the multiple Bcd binding sites in the hb promoter (and their strengths also play a role in buffering noise. The model is robust to the variation in Bcd binding site number across a number of fly species. This study identifies particular ways in which promoter structure and regulatory dynamics reduce hb output noise. Insofar as many of these are common features of genes (e.g. multiple regulatory sites, cooperativity, self-feedback, the current results contribute to the general understanding of the reproducibility and determinacy of spatial patterning in early development.

  17. Different impacts of manure and chemical fertilizers on bacterial community structure and antibiotic resistance genes in arable soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Jia, Shuyu; He, Xiwei; Zhang, Xuxiang; Ye, Lin

    2017-12-01

    Both manure and chemical fertilizers are widely used in modern agriculture. However, the impacts of different fertilizers on bacterial community structure and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in arable soils still remain unclear. In this study, high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR were employed to investigate the bacterial community structure, ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) influenced by the application of different fertilizers, including chemical fertilizers, piggery manure and straw ash. The results showed that the application of fertilizers could significantly change the soil bacterial community and the abundance of Gaiella under phylum Actinobacteria was significantly reduced from 12.9% in unfertilized soil to 4.1%-7.4% in fertilized soil (P bacterial community structure but exerted little effect on soil resistome. Overall, the results of this study illustrated the different effects of different fertilizers on the soil resistome and revealed that the changes of soil resistome induced by manure application mainly resulted from alteration of bacteria community rather than the horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Landscape barriers reduce gene flow in an invasive carnivore: geographical and local genetic structure of American mink in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Andrzej; Piertney, Stuart B; Zalewska, Hanna; Lambin, Xavier

    2009-04-01

    To be effective, management programmes geared towards halting or reversing the spread of invasive species must focus on defined and defensible areas. This requires knowledge of the dispersal of non-native species targeted for control to better understand invasion and recolonisation scenarios. We investigated the genetic structure of invasive American mink (Neovison vison) in Scotland, and incorporated landscape genetic approaches to examine resultant patterns in relation to geographical features that may influence dispersal. Populations of mink sampled from 10 sites in two regions (Argyll and Northeast Scotland) show a distinct genetic structure. First, the majority of pairwise population comparisons yielded F(ST) values that were significantly greater than zero. Second, AMOVA revealed that most of the genetic variance was attributable to differences among regions. Assignment tests placed 89 or more of individuals into their sampled region. Bayesian clustering methods grouped samples into two clusters according to their region of origin. Wombling approach identified the Cairngorms Mountains as a major impediment to gene flow between the regions. Mantel pairwise correlations between genetic and geographical distances estimated as least-cost distance assuming a linear increase in the cost of movement with increasing elevation were higher than Euclidean distances or distance along waterways. Spatial autocorrelation analyses revealed stronger spatial structuring for females than for males. These results suggest that gene flow by American mink is restricted by landscape features (mountain ranges) and that eradication attempt should in the first instance break down the connectivity between management units separated by mountains.

  19. Structure and Mechanism of the Siderophore-Interacting Protein from the Fuscachelin Gene Cluster of Thermobifida fusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Chen, Wei-Hung; Bruner, Steven D

    2015-06-30

    Microbial iron acquisition is a complex process and frequently a key and necessary step for survival. Among the several paths for iron assimilation, small molecule siderophore-mediated transport is a commonly employed strategy of many microorganisms. The chemistry and biology of the extraordinary tight and specific binding of siderophores to metal is also exploited in therapeutic treatments for microbial virulence and metal toxicity. The intracellular fate of iron acquired via the siderophore pathway is one of the least understood steps in the complex process at the molecular level. A common route to cellular incorporation is the single-electron reduction of ferric to ferrous iron catalyzed by specific and/or nonspecific reducing agents. The biosynthetic gene clusters for siderophores often contain representatives of one or two families of redox-active enzymes: the flavin-containing "siderophore-interacting protein" and iron-sulfur ferric siderophore reductases. Here we present the structure and characterization of the siderophore-interacting protein, FscN, from the fuscachelin siderophore gene cluster of Thermobifida fusca. The structure shows a flavoreductase fold with a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor along with an unexpected metal bound adjacent to the flavin site. We demonstrated that FscN is redox-active and measured the binding and reduction of ferric fuscachelin. This work provides a structural basis for the activity of a siderophore-interacting protein and further insight into the complex and important process of iron acquisition and utilization.

  20. Revised genomic structure of the human ghrelin gene and identification of novel exons, alternative splice variants and natural antisense transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herington Adrian C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide hormone expressed in a range of normal tissues and pathologies. It has been reported that the human ghrelin gene consists of five exons which span 5 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3 and includes a 20 bp non-coding first exon (20 bp exon 0. The availability of bioinformatic tools enabling comparative analysis and the finalisation of the human genome prompted us to re-examine the genomic structure of the ghrelin locus. Results We have demonstrated the presence of an additional novel exon (exon -1 and 5' extensions to exon 0 and 1 using comparative in silico analysis and have demonstrated their existence experimentally using RT-PCR and 5' RACE. A revised exon-intron structure demonstrates that the human ghrelin gene spans 7.2 kb and consists of six rather than five exons. Several ghrelin gene-derived splice forms were detected in a range of human tissues and cell lines. We have demonstrated ghrelin gene-derived mRNA transcripts that do not code for ghrelin, but instead may encode the C-terminal region of full-length preproghrelin (C-ghrelin, which contains the coding region for obestatin and a transcript encoding obestatin-only. Splice variants that differed in their 5' untranslated regions were also found, suggesting a role of these regions in the post-transcriptional regulation of preproghrelin translation. Finally, several natural antisense transcripts, termed ghrelinOS (ghrelin opposite strand transcripts, were demonstrated via orientation-specific RT-PCR, 5' RACE and in silico analysis of ESTs and cloned amplicons. Conclusion The sense and antisense alternative transcripts demonstrated in this study may function as non-coding regulatory RNA, or code for novel protein isoforms. This is the first demonstration of putative obestatin and C-ghrelin specific transcripts and these findings suggest that these ghrelin gene-derived peptides may also be produced independently of preproghrelin

  1. Inferred vs realized patterns of gene flow: an analysis of population structure in the Andros Island Rock Iguana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Colosimo

    Full Text Available Ecological data, the primary source of information on patterns and rates of migration, can be integrated with genetic data to more accurately describe the realized connectivity between geographically isolated demes. In this paper we implement this approach and discuss its implications for managing populations of the endangered Andros Island Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura cychlura. This iguana is endemic to Andros, a highly fragmented landmass of large islands and smaller cays. Field observations suggest that geographically isolated demes were panmictic due to high, inferred rates of gene flow. We expand on these observations using 16 polymorphic microsatellites to investigate the genetic structure and rates of gene flow from 188 Andros Iguanas collected across 23 island sites. Bayesian clustering of specimens assigned individuals to three distinct genotypic clusters. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicates that allele frequency differences are responsible for a significant portion of the genetic variance across the three defined clusters (Fst =  0.117, p<<0.01. These clusters are associated with larger islands and satellite cays isolated by broad water channels with strong currents. These findings imply that broad water channels present greater obstacles to gene flow than was inferred from field observation alone. Additionally, rates of gene flow were indirectly estimated using BAYESASS 3.0. The proportion of individuals originating from within each identified cluster varied from 94.5 to 98.7%, providing further support for local isolation. Our assessment reveals a major disparity between inferred and realized gene flow. We discuss our results in a conservation perspective for species inhabiting highly fragmented landscapes.

  2. GENETIC POPULATION STRUCTURE AND LEVELS OF GENE FLOW IN THE STREAM DWELLING WATERSTRIDER, AQUARIUS (=GERRIS) REMIGIS (HEMIPTERA: GERRIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, Richard F; Fairbairn, Daphne J

    1992-04-01

    Gene flow, in combination with selection and drift, determines levels of differentiation among local populations. In this study we estimate gene flow in a stream dwelling, flightless waterstrider, Aquarius remigis. Twenty-eight Aquarius remigis populations from Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick, Iowa, North Carolina, and California were genetically characterized at 15 loci using starch gel electrophoresis. Sampling over two years was designed for a hierarchical analysis of population structure incorporating variation among sites within streams, streams within watersheds, watersheds within regions, and regions within North America. Hierarchical F statistics indicated that only sites within streams maintained enough gene flow to prevent differentiation through drift (Nm = 27.5). Above the level of sites within streams gene flow is highly restricted (Nm ≤ 0.5) and no correlation is found between genetic and geographic distances. This agrees well with direct estimates of gene flow based on mark and recapture data, yielding an N e of approximately 170 individuals. Previous assignment of subspecific status to Californian A. remigis is not supported by genetic distances between those populations and other populations in North America. Previous suggestion of specific status for south-eastern A. remigis is supported by genetic distances between North Carolina populations and other populations in North America, and a high proportion of region specific alleles in the North Carolina populations. However, because of the high degree of morphological and genetic variability throughout the range of this species, the assignment of specific or subspecific status to parts of the range may be premature. © 1992 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Systematic review, structural analysis, and new theoretical perspectives on the role of serotonin and associated genes in the etiology of psychopathy and sociopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yildirim, B.O.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Since its theoretical inception, psychopathy has been considered by philosophers, clinicians, theorists, and empirical researchers to be substantially and critically explained by genetic factors. In this systematic review and structural analysis, new hypotheses will be introduced regarding gene–gene

  4. Relationship between mRNA secondary structure and sequence variability in Chloroplast genes: possible life history implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seligmann Hervé

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synonymous sites are freer to vary because of redundancy in genetic code. Messenger RNA secondary structure restricts this freedom, as revealed by previous findings in mitochondrial genes that mutations at third codon position nucleotides in helices are more selected against than those in loops. This motivated us to explore the constraints imposed by mRNA secondary structure on evolutionary variability at all codon positions in general, in chloroplast systems. Results We found that the evolutionary variability and intrinsic secondary structure stability of these sequences share an inverse relationship. Simulations of most likely single nucleotide evolution in Psilotum nudum and Nephroselmis olivacea mRNAs, indicate that helix-forming propensities of mutated mRNAs are greater than those of the natural mRNAs for short sequences and vice-versa for long sequences. Moreover, helix-forming propensity estimated by the percentage of total mRNA in helices increases gradually with mRNA length, saturating beyond 1000 nucleotides. Protection levels of functionally important sites vary across plants and proteins: r-strategists minimize mutation costs in large genes; K-strategists do the opposite. Conclusion Mrna length presumably predisposes shorter mRNAs to evolve under different constraints than longer mRNAs. The positive correlation between secondary structure protection and functional importance of sites suggests that some sites might be conserved due to packing-protection constraints at the nucleic acid level in addition to protein level constraints. Consequently, nucleic acid secondary structure a priori biases mutations. The converse (exposure of conserved sites apparently occurs in a smaller number of cases, indicating a different evolutionary adaptive strategy in these plants. The differences between the protection levels of functionally important sites for r- and K-strategists reflect their respective molecular adaptive

  5. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2014-01-01

    -wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum...... falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  6. Structural organization of the human short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corydon, M J; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    1997-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) is a homotetrameric mitochondrial flavoenzyme that catalyzes the initial reaction in short-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation. Defects in the SCAD enzyme are associated with failure to thrive, often with neuromuscular dysfunction and elevated urinary excreti....... The evolutionary relationship between SCAD and five other members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family was investigated by two independent approaches that gave similar phylogenetic trees....... shown to be associated with ethylmalonic aciduria. From analysis of 18 unrelated Danish families, we show that the four SCAD gene polymorphisms constitute five allelic variants of the SCAD gene, and that the 625A variant together with the less frequent variant form of the three other polymorphisms (321C...

  7. Structure of genetic diversity in the two major gene pools of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Myounghai; Gepts, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Domesticated materials with well-known wild relatives provide an experimental system to reveal how human selection during cultivation affects genetic composition and adaptation to novel environments. In this paper, our goal was to elucidate how two geographically distinct domestication events modified the structure and level of genetic diversity in common bean. Specifically, we analyzed the genome-wide genetic composition at 26, mostly unlinked microsatellite loci in 349 accessions of wild and domesticated common bean from the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. Using a model-based approach, implemented in the software STRUCTURE, we identified nine wild or domesticated populations in common bean, including four of Andean and four of Mesoamerican origins. The ninth population was the putative wild ancestor of the species, which was classified as a Mesoamerican population. A neighbor-joining analysis and a principal coordinate analysis confirmed genetic relationships among accessions and populations observed with the STRUCTURE analysis. Geographic and genetic distances in wild populations were congruent with the exception of a few putative hybrids identified in this study, suggesting a predominant effect of isolation by distance. Domesticated common bean populations possessed lower genetic diversity, higher F(ST), and generally higher linkage disequilibrium (LD) than wild populations in both gene pools; their geographic distributions were less correlated with genetic distance, probably reflecting seed-based gene flow after domestication. The LD was reduced when analyzed in separate Andean and Mesoamerican germplasm samples. The Andean domesticated race Nueva Granada had the highest F(ST) value and widest geographic distribution compared to other domesticated races, suggesting a very recent origin or a selection event, presumably associated with a determinate growth habit, which predominates in this race.

  8. Genetic diversity and structure of the zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) gene pool based on SSR marker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachapak, Sujinna; Somta, Prakit; Poonchaivilaisak, Supalak; Yimram, Tarika; Srinives, Peerasak

    2017-04-01

    Zombi pea (Vigna vexillata (L.) A. Rich) is an underutilized legume species and a useful gene source for resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, although there is little understanding on its genetic diversity and structure. In this study, 422 (408 wild and 14 cultivated) accessions of zombi pea from diverse origins (201 from Africa, 126 from America, 85 from Australia, 5 from Asia and 5 from unknown origin) were analyzed with 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to determine its genetic diversity and genetic structure. The SSR markers detected 273 alleles in total with a mean of 13.6 alleles per locus. Polymorphism information content values of the markers varied from 0.58 to 0.90 with an average of 0.76. Overall gene diversity was 0.715. Gene diversity and average allelic richness was highest in Africa (0.749 and 8.08, respectively) and lowest in America (0.435 and 4.10, respectively). Nei's genetic distance analysis revealed that the highest distance was between wild Australia and cultivated Africa (0.559), followed by wild West Africa and wild Australia (0.415). STRUCTURE, neighbor-joining (NJ), and principal coordinate analyses consistently showed that these zombi pea accessions were clustered into three major groups, viz. America, Africa and Asia, and Australia. NJ tree also suggested that American and Australian accessions are originated from East African zombi peas, and that the cultivated accessions from Africa and Asia were genetically distinct, while those from America were clustered with some cultivated accessions from Africa. These results suggest that Africa is the center of origin and diversity of zombi pea, and that domestication of this pea took place more than once in different regions.

  9. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genes and Structural Proteins of the Phage Syn5 of the Marine Cyanobacteria Synechococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    similar to genes found in the cyanophages P-SSP7, P60, and S-PM2 include those that encode ribonucleotide reductase, thymidylate synthase , and...P-SSM4, P60 0.054, 0-21 59 ...... 60 DNA maturase P-SSP7, P60, Pseudomonas putida, T3, phiYeO3-12, T7 00 61 Thymidylate synthase Prochlorococcus

  11. Genetic Variation and Population Structure in Jamunapari Goats Using Microsatellites, Mitochondrial DNA, and Milk Protein Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, P. K.; Thangraj, K.; Mandal, A.; Roy, R.

    2012-01-01

    Jamunapari, a dairy goat breed of India, has been gradually declining in numbers in its home tract over the years. We have analysed genetic variation and population history in Jamunapari goats based on 17 microsatellite loci, 2 milk protein loci, mitochondrial hypervariable region I (HVRI) sequencing, and three Y-chromosomal gene sequencing. We used the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mismatch distribution, microsatellite data, and bottleneck tests to infer the population history and demography. The mean number of alleles per locus was 9.0 indicating that the allelic variation was high in all the loci and the mean heterozygosity was 0.769 at nuclear loci. Although the population size is smaller than 8,000 individuals, the amount of variability both in terms of allelic richness and gene diversity was high in all the microsatellite loci except ILST 005. The gene diversity and effective number of alleles at milk protein loci were higher than the 10 other Indian goat breeds that they were compared to. Mismatch analysis was carried out and the analysis revealed that the population curve was unimodal indicating the expansion of population. The genetic diversity of Y-chromosome genes was low in the present study. The observed mean M ratio in the population was above the critical significance value (Mc) and close to one indicating that it has maintained a slowly changing population size. The mode-shift test did not detect any distortion of allele frequency and the heterozygosity excess method showed that there was no significant departure from mutation-drift equilibrium detected in the population. However, the effects of genetic bottlenecks were observed in some loci due to decreased heterozygosity and lower level of M ratio. There were two observed genetic subdivisions in the population supporting the observations of farmers in different areas. This base line information on genetic diversity, bottleneck analysis, and mismatch analysis was obtained to assist the conservation

  12. Gene Expression and Structural Skeletal Responses to Long-Duration Simulated Microgravity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Rael, Victoria E.; Torres, Samantha; Steczina, Sonette; Bryant, Sheenah; Tahimic, Candice; Globus, Ruth K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aim to examine skeletal responses to simulated long-duration spaceflight (90 days) and weight-bearing recovery on bone loss using the ground-based hindlimb unloading (HU) model in adolescent (3-month old) male rats. We hypothesized that simulated microgravity leads to the temporal regulation of oxidative defense genes and pro-bone resorption factors, where there is a progression and eventual plateau; furthermore, early transient changes in these pathways precede skeletal adaptations.

  13. Structure and expression of human B cell stimulatory factor-2 (BSF-2/IL-6) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, K; Hirano, T; Watanabe, Y; Muratani, K; Matsuda, T; Nakai, S; Kishimoto, T

    1987-01-01

    The chromosomal DNA segment of human B cell stimulatory factor-2 (BSF-2/IL-6) was isolated and characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis. The human BSF-2/IL-6 gene consists of five exons and four introns and its organization shows a distinctive similarity to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene. The two genes have the same number of exons and introns and the size of each exon is strikingly similar. The BSF-2/IL-6 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in a human T cell leukemia virus-1 transformed T cell line, TCL-Na1, a bladder cell carcinoma line, T24, and an amnion derived cell line, FL. The BSF-2/IL-6 mRNA was also found to be inducible with interleukin-1 beta in an astrocytoma line, U373 and a glioblastoma line, SK-MG-4. S1 mapping and primer extension analyses showed the presence of multiple initiation sites and the preferential utilization of a different initiation site for each individual tissue tested. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3500852

  14. Training ANFIS structure using genetic algorithm for liver cancer classification based on microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Haznedar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Classification is an important data mining technique, which is used in many fields mostly exemplified as medicine, genetics and biomedical engineering. The number of studies about classification of the datum on DNA microarray gene expression is specifically increased in recent years. However, because of the reasons as the abundance of gene numbers in the datum as microarray gene expressions and the nonlinear relations mostly across those datum, the success of conventional classification algorithms can be limited. Because of these reasons, the interest on classification methods which are based on artificial intelligence to solve the problem on classification has been gradually increased in recent times. In this study, a hybrid approach which is based on Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS and Genetic Algorithm (GA are suggested in order to classify liver microarray cancer data set. Simulation results are compared with the results of other methods. According to the results obtained, it is seen that the recommended method is better than the other methods.

  15. Microbial community structure of Arctic multiyear sea ice and surface seawater by 454 sequencing of the 16S RNA gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowman, Jeff S.; Rasmussen, Simon; Blom, Nikolaj

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic decreases in the extent of Arctic multiyear ice (MYI) suggest this environment may disappear as early as 2100, replaced by ecologically different first-year ice. To better understand the implications of this loss on microbial biodiversity, we undertook a detailed census of the microbial...... community in MYI at two sites near the geographic North Pole using parallel tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Although the composition of the MYI microbial community has been characterized by previous studies, microbial community structure has not been. Although richness was lower in MYI than...

  16. Evidence against the structural gene encoding type II collagen (COL2A1) as the mutant locus in achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, D; Wordsworth, P; Thompson, E; Sykes, B

    1986-01-01

    The structure of the locus encoding the major cartilage collagen gene (COL2A1) was studied in a total of 19 cases of achondroplasia. No gross rearrangements were seen. The segregation of COL2A1 was examined in three affected kindreds using restriction site and length variants as genetic markers. In two kindreds discordant segregation between the achondroplasia and COL2A1 loci was demonstrated. Paternity/maternity was confirmed using a 'minisatellite' core sequence probe which reveals cross hybridising polymorphic loci. Images PMID:3005580

  17. Structural and segregation analysis of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in some heritable chondrodysplasias.

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, P.; Ogilvie, D; Priestley, L; Smith, R.; Wynne-Davies, R; Sykes, B

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-seven persons with a variety of heritable chondrodysplasias were screened for gross rearrangements of the structural gene encoding the major cartilage collagen, collagen II. None was found. Segregation of the locus (COL2A1) was studied in 19 pedigrees using three restriction site dimorphisms (shown by PvuII, HindIII, and BamHI) and a length polymorphism as linkage markers. Discordant segregation between COL2A1 and the mutant locus was seen in pedigrees with multiple epiphyseal dysplas...

  18. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Marie-Lou; Perron, Gabriel G.; Arsenault, Julie; Letellier, Ann; Boulianne, Martine; Quessy, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is key to a sustainable and cost-effective production in the absence of AGPs. Using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we evaluated how the C. perfringens population evolved in drug-free commercial broiler chicken farms, either healthy or affected with recurring clinical necrotic enteritis outbreaks, over a 14-month period. We show that a high genotypic richness was associated with an increased risk of clinical necrotic enteritis. Also, necrotic enteritis-affected farms had a significant reduction of C. perfringens genotypic richness over time, an increase in the proportion of C. perfringens strains harboring the cpb2 gene, the netB gene, or both. Thus, necrotic enteritis occurrence is correlated with the presence of an initial highly diverse C. perfringens population, increasing the opportunity for the selective sweep of particularly virulent genotypes. Disease outbreaks also appear to largely influence the evolution of this bacterial species in poultry farms over time. PMID:28567032

  19. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Lou Gaucher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is key to a sustainable and cost-effective production in the absence of AGPs. Using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we evaluated how the C. perfringens population evolved in drug-free commercial broiler chicken farms, either healthy or affected with recurring clinical necrotic enteritis outbreaks, over a 14-month period. We show that a high genotypic richness was associated with an increased risk of clinical necrotic enteritis. Also, necrotic enteritis-affected farms had a significant reduction of C. perfringens genotypic richness over time, an increase in the proportion of C. perfringens strains harboring the cpb2 gene, the netB gene, or both. Thus, necrotic enteritis occurrence is correlated with the presence of an initial highly diverse C. perfringens population, increasing the opportunity for the selective sweep of particularly virulent genotypes. Disease outbreaks also appear to largely influence the evolution of this bacterial species in poultry farms over time.

  20. Recurring Necrotic Enteritis Outbreaks in Commercial Broiler Chicken Flocks Strongly Influence Toxin Gene Carriage and Species Richness in the Resident Clostridium perfringens Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Marie-Lou; Perron, Gabriel G; Arsenault, Julie; Letellier, Ann; Boulianne, Martine; Quessy, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in food animals has been questioned due to the globally increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. For the poultry industry, digestive health management following AGP withdrawal in Europe has been a challenge, especially the control of necrotic enteritis. Much research work has focused on gut health in commercial broiler chicken husbandry. Understanding the behavior of Clostridium perfringens in its ecological niche, the poultry barn, is key to a sustainable and cost-effective production in the absence of AGPs. Using polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we evaluated how the C. perfringens population evolved in drug-free commercial broiler chicken farms, either healthy or affected with recurring clinical necrotic enteritis outbreaks, over a 14-month period. We show that a high genotypic richness was associated with an increased risk of clinical necrotic enteritis. Also, necrotic enteritis-affected farms had a significant reduction of C. perfringens genotypic richness over time, an increase in the proportion of C. perfringens strains harboring the cpb2 gene, the netB gene, or both. Thus, necrotic enteritis occurrence is correlated with the presence of an initial highly diverse C. perfringens population, increasing the opportunity for the selective sweep of particularly virulent genotypes. Disease outbreaks also appear to largely influence the evolution of this bacterial species in poultry farms over time.

  1. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  2. Structural biologists capture detailed image of gene regulator’s fleeting form | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using an ultrafast, high-intensity radiation source called an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), scientists have captured an atomic-level picture of an RNA structure called a riboswitch as it reorganizes itself to regulate protein production. The structure they visualized has never before been seen, and likely exists for only milliseconds after the riboswitch first encounters its activating molecule.  Read more...  

  3. Hierarchical structure of genetic distances: Effects of matrix size, spatial distribution and correlation structure among gene frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Flávia Melo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Geographic structure of genetic distances among local populations within species, based on allozyme data, has usually been evaluated by estimating genetic distances clustered with hierarchical algorithms, such as the unweighted pair-group method by arithmetic averages (UPGMA. The distortion produced in the clustering process is estimated by the cophenetic correlation coefficient. This hierarchical approach, however, can fail to produce an accurate representation of genetic distances among populations in a low dimensional space, especially when continuous (clinal or reticulate patterns of variation exist. In the present study, we analyzed 50 genetic distance matrices from the literature, for animal taxa ranging from Platyhelminthes to Mammalia, in order to determine in which situations the UPGMA is useful to understand patterns of genetic variation among populations. The cophenetic correlation coefficients, derived from UPGMA based on three types of genetic distance coefficients, were correlated with other parameters of each matrix, including number of populations, loci, alleles, maximum geographic distance among populations, relative magnitude of the first eigenvalue of covariance matrix among alleles and logarithm of body size. Most cophenetic correlations were higher than 0.80, and the highest values appeared for Nei's and Rogers' genetic distances. The relationship between cophenetic correlation coefficients and the other parameters analyzed was defined by an "envelope space", forming triangles in which higher values of cophenetic correlations are found for higher values in the parameters, though low values do not necessarily correspond to high cophenetic correlations. We concluded that UPGMA is useful to describe genetic distances based on large distance matrices (both in terms of elevated number of populations or alleles, when dimensionality of the system is low (matrices with large first eigenvalues or when local populations are separated

  4. Identification, structural characterisation and expression analysis of a defensin gene from the tiger beetle Calomera littoralis (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-García, María Juliana; García-Reina, Andrés; Machado, Vilmar; Galián, José

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a defensin gene (Clit-Def) has been characterised in the tiger beetle Calomera littoralis for the first time. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the gene has an open reading frame of 246bp that contains a 46 amino acid mature peptide. The phylogenetic analysis showed a high variability in the coleopteran defensins analysed. The Clit-Def mature peptide has the features to be involved in the antimicrobial function: a predicted cationic isoelectric point of 8.94, six cysteine residues that form three disulfide bonds, and the typical cysteine-stabilized α-helix β-sheet (CSαβ) structural fold. Real time quantitative PCR analysis showed that Clit-Def was upregulated in the different body parts analysed after infection with lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli, and also indicated that has an expression peak at 12h post infection. The expression patterns of Clit-Def suggest that this gene plays important roles in the humoral system in the adephagan beetle Calomera littoralis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic structure, mating system, and long-distance gene flow in heart of palm (Euterpe edulis Mart.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiotto, F A; Grattapaglia, D; Vencovsky, R

    2003-01-01

    We report a detailed analysis of the population genetic structure, mating system, and gene flow of heart of palm (Euterpe edulis Mart.-Arecaceae) in central Brazil. This palm is considered a keystone species because it supplies fruits for birds and rodents all year and is intensively harvested for culinary purposes. Two populations of this palm tree were examined, using 18 microsatellite loci. The species displays a predominantly outcrossed mating system (tm = 0.94), with a probability of full sibship greater than 70% within open-pollinated families. The following estimates of interpopulation genetic variation were calculated and found significant: FIT = 0.17, FIS = 0.12, FST = 0.06, and RST = 0.07. This low but significant level of interpopulation genetic variation indicates high levels of gene flow. Two adult trees were identified as likely seed parents (P > 99.9%) of juveniles located at a distance of 22 km. Gene flow over such distances has not been reported before for tropical tree species. The establishment and management of in situ genetic reserves or ex situ conservation and breeding populations for E. edulis should contemplate the collection of several hundreds open-pollinated maternal families from relatively few distant populations to maximize the genetic sampling of a larger number of pollen parents.

  6. Physical factors correlate to microbial community structure and nitrogen cycling gene abundance in a nitrate fed eutrophic lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Paul Highton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenous run-off from farmed pastures contributes to the eutrophication of Lake Ellesmere, a large shallow lagoon/lake on the east coast of New Zealand. Tributaries periodically deliver high loads of nitrate to the lake which likely affect microbial communities therein. We hypothesized that a nutrient gradient would form from the potential sources (tributaries creating a disturbance resulting in changes in microbial community structure. To test this we first determined the existence of such a gradient but found only a weak nitrogen (TN and phosphorous gradient (DRP. Changes in microbial communities were determined by measuring functional potential (quantification of nitrogen cycling genes via nifH, nirS, nosZI and nosZII using qPCR, potential activity (via denitrification enzyme activity, as well as using changes in total community (via 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Our results demonstrated that changes in microbial communities at a phylogenetic (relative abundance and functional level (proportion of the microbial community carrying nifH and nosZI genes were most strongly associated with physical gradients (e.g. lake depth, sediment grain size, sediment porosity and not nutrient concentrations. Low nitrate influx at the time of sampling is proposed as a factor contributing to the observed patterns.

  7. Mouse Social Network Dynamics and Community Structure are Associated with Plasticity-Related Brain Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Cait M; Franks, Becca; Curley, James P

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory studies of social behavior have typically focused on dyadic interactions occurring within a limited spatiotemporal context. However, this strategy prevents analyses of the dynamics of group social behavior and constrains identification of the biological pathways mediating individual differences in behavior. In the current study, we aimed to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics and hierarchical organization of a large social network of male mice. We also sought to determine if standard assays of social and exploratory behavior are predictive of social behavior in this social network and whether individual network position was associated with the mRNA expression of two plasticity-related genes, DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3a. Mice were observed to form a hierarchically organized social network and self-organized into two separate social network communities. Members of both communities exhibited distinct patterns of socio-spatial organization within the vivaria that was not limited to only agonistic interactions. We further established that exploratory and social behaviors in standard behavioral assays conducted prior to placing the mice into the large group was predictive of initial network position and behavior but were not associated with final social network position. Finally, we determined that social network position is associated with variation in mRNA levels of two neural plasticity genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, in the hippocampus but not the mPOA. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the role of social context and complex social dynamics in determining the relationship between individual differences in social behavior and brain gene expression.

  8. Demographic history and population structure of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis in Argentina based on the mitochondrial COI gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantur Juri, María J; Moreno, Marta; Prado Izaguirre, Mónica J; Navarro, Juan C; Zaidenberg, Mario O; Almirón, Walter R; Claps, Guillermo L; Conn, Jan E

    2014-09-04

    Anopheles pseudopunctipennis is an important malaria vector in the Neotropical region and the only species involved in Plasmodium transmission in the Andean foothills. Its wide geographical distribution in America, high preference for biting humans and capacity to rest inside dwellings after feeding, are attributes contributing to its vector status. Previous reports have tried to elucidate its taxonomic status, distinguishing populations from North, Central and South America. In the present study we used a mitochondrial marker to examine the demographic history of An. pseudopunctipennis in northwestern Argentina. Twelve localities were selected across 550 km of the distribution of this species in Argentina, including two near the Bolivian border and several in South Tucumán, for sampling. A fragment of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene was sequenced and haplotype relationships were analyzed by a statistical parsimony network and a Neighbor-Joining (NJ) tree. Genetic differentiation was estimated with FST. Historical demographic processes were evaluated using diversity measures, neutrality tests and mismatch distribution. Forty-one haplotypes were identified, of which haplotype A was the most common and widely distributed. Neither the network nor the NJ tree showed any geographic differentiation between northern and southern populations. Haplotype diversities, Tajima's DT and Fu & Li's F and D neutrality tests and mismatch distribution supported a scenario of Holocene demographic expansion. The demographic pattern suggests that An. pseudopunctipennis has undergone a single colonization process, and the ancestral haplotype is shared by specimens from all localities, indicating mitochondrial gene flow. Genetic differentiation was minimal, observed only between one northern and one southern locality. The estimated time of the population expansion of this species was during the Holocene. These data suggest that regional vector control measures would be equally

  9. Mouse Social Network Dynamics and Community Structure are Associated with Plasticity-Related Brain Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cait M Williamson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory studies of social behavior have typically focused on dyadic interactions occurring within a limited spatiotemporal context. However, this strategy prevents analyses of the dynamics of group social behavior and constrains identification of the biological pathways mediating individual differences in behavior. In the current study, we aimed to identify the spatiotemporal dynamics and hierarchical organization of a large social network of male mice. We also sought to determine if standard assays of social and exploratory behavior are predictive of social behavior in this social network and whether individual network position was associated with the mRNA expression of two plasticity-related genes, DNA methyltransferase 1 and 3a. Mice were observed to form a hierarchically organized social network and self-organized into two separate social network communities. Members of both communities exhibited distinct patterns of socio-spatial organization within the vivaria that was not limited to only agonistic interactions. We further established that exploratory and social behaviors in standard behavioral assays conducted prior to placing the mice into the large group was predictive of initial network position and behavior but were not associated with final social network position. Finally, we determined that social network position is associated with variation in mRNA levels of two neural plasticity genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3a, in the hippocampus but not the mPOA. This work demonstrates the importance of understanding the role of social context and complex social dynamics in determining the relationship between individual differences in social behavior and brain gene expression.

  10. Nested PCR Biases in Interpreting Microbial Community Structure in 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqin Yu

    Full Text Available Sequencing of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene has become a common approach to microbial community investigations in the fields of human health and environmental sciences. This approach, however, is difficult when the amount of DNA is too low to be amplified by standard PCR. Nested PCR can be employed as it can amplify samples with DNA concentration several-fold lower than standard PCR. However, potential biases with nested PCRs that could affect measurement of community structure have received little attention.In this study, we used 17 DNAs extracted from vaginal swabs and 12 DNAs extracted from stool samples to study the influence of nested PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene on the estimation of microbial community structure using Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Nested and standard PCR methods were compared on alpha- and beta-diversity metrics and relative abundances of bacterial genera. The effects of number of cycles in the first round of PCR (10 vs. 20 and microbial diversity (relatively low in vagina vs. high in stool were also investigated. Vaginal swab samples showed no significant difference in alpha diversity or community structure between nested PCR and standard PCR (one round of 40 cycles. Stool samples showed significant differences in alpha diversity (except Shannon's index and relative abundance of 13 genera between nested PCR with 20 cycles in the first round and standard PCR (P27% of total OTUs in stool.Nested PCR introduced bias in estimated diversity and community structure. The bias was more significant for communities with relatively higher diversity and when more cycles were applied in the first round of PCR. We conclude that nested PCR could be used when standard PCR does not work. However, rare taxa detected by nested PCR should be validated by other technologies.

  11. The horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is enhanced by ionic liquid with different structure of varying alkyl chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Lu, Qian; Mao, Daqing; Cui, Yuxiao; Luo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have become a global health concern. In our previous study, an ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6]) had been proven to facilitate the dissemination of ARGs in the environment. However, enhanced alkyl group chain length or the substitution of alkyl groups with the cation ring corresponded with increased antimicrobial effects. In this study, we investigated how different structures of ILs with 4, 6, and 8 C atoms in the longer alkyl chain on the imidazolium cations facilitated the dissemination of ARGs. The promotion of plasmid RP4 transfer frequency decreased with [CnMIM][BF4] increasing the alkyl chain length from 4 carbon atoms to 8 carbon atoms on the imidazolium cations, which is observed with [BMIM][BF4] (n = 4, 5.9 fold) > HMIM][BF4] (n = 6, 2.2 fold) > [OMIM][BF4] (n = 8, 1.7 fold). This illustrates that [CnMIM][BF4] with increasing the alkyl chain length exert decreasing ability in facilitating plasmid RP4 horizontal transfer, which is possibly related to IL-structure dependent toxicity. The IL-structure dependent plasmid RP4 transfer frequency was attributable to bacterial cell membrane permeability weaken with increasing alkyl chain length of [CnMIM][PF4], which was evidenced by flow cytometry. In freshwater microcosm, [CnMIm][BF4] promoted the relative abundance of the sulI and intI genes for 4.6 folds, aphA and traF for 5.2 folds higher than the untreated groups, promoting the propagation of ARGs in the aquatic environment. This is the first report that ILs with different structure of varying alkyl chain length facilitate horizontal transfer of plasmid RP4 which is widely distributed in the environment, and thus add the adverse effects of the environmental risk of ILs.

  12. Parthenocarpic potential in Capsicum annuum L. is enhanced by carpelloid structures and controlled by a single recessive gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Lin B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parthenocarpy is a desirable trait in Capsicum annuum production because it improves fruit quality and results in a more regular fruit set. Previously, we identified several C. annuum genotypes that already show a certain level of parthenocarpy, and the seedless fruits obtained from these genotypes often contain carpel-like structures. In the Arabidopsis bel1 mutant ovule integuments are transformed into carpels, and we therefore carefully studied ovule development in C. annuum and correlated aberrant ovule development and carpelloid transformation with parthenocarpic fruit set. Results We identified several additional C. annuum genotypes with a certain level of parthenocarpy, and confirmed a positive correlation between parthenocarpic potential and the development of carpelloid structures. Investigations into the source of these carpel-like structures showed that while the majority of the ovules in C. annuum gynoecia are unitegmic and anatropous, several abnormal ovules were observed, abundant at the top and base of the placenta, with altered integument growth. Abnormal ovule primordia arose from the placenta and most likely transformed into carpelloid structures in analogy to the Arabidopsis bel1 mutant. When pollination was present fruit weight was positively correlated with seed number, but in the absence of seeds, fruit weight proportionally increased with the carpelloid mass and number. Capsicum genotypes with high parthenocarpic potential always showed stronger carpelloid development. The parthenocarpic potential appeared to be controlled by a single recessive gene, but no variation in coding sequence was observed in a candidate gene CaARF8. Conclusions Our results suggest that in the absence of fertilization most C. annuum genotypes, have parthenocarpic potential and carpelloid growth, which can substitute developing seeds in promoting fruit development.

  13. Gene order for rubella virus structural proteins is NH/sub 2/-C-E2-E1-COOH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oker-Blom, C.

    1984-08-01

    The order of translation in vivo of the genes coding for rubella virus structural proteins was studied in infected B-Vero cells. The proteins were sequentially pulse-chase labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine after synchronization of translation initiation with hypertonic salt treatment. A sequential labeling procedure (window-labeling) to specifically label defined segments of the structural proteins was also used. The labeled proteins were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis after immunoprecipitation with specific antisera directed against the two virion glycoproteins (E1 and E2a/E2b) and the nucleocapsid (C) protein. The order of translation was found to be NH/sub 2/-C-E2-E1-COOH. We have previously shown that the structural proteins are synthesized in vitro from a cytoplasmic 24S subgenomic mRNA as a 110,000-dalton (p110) precursor. Here, it is shown that p110 is precipitated with anti-C, anti-E2, and anti-E1 sera, indicating that p110 is the precursor of all three structural proteins. Two major in vitro translation products (M/sub r/s, 66,000 and 62,000) that could represent preterminated polypeptide chains or proteolytic cleavage products were precipitated with anti-C and anti-Es sera, but not with anti-E1 serum, indicating, in conformity with the in vivo results, that the genes for the C and E2 proteins are adjacent to each other. Using these specific antisera, we have also confirmed the identity of the unglycosylated forms of E1 (M/sub r/, 53,000) and E2 (M/sub r/ 30,000) immunoprecipitated from tunicamycin-treated infected cells. 18 references, 6 figures.

  14. The horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is enhanced by ionic liquid with different structure of varying alkyl chain length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs have become a global health concern. In our previous study, an ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6] had been proven to facilitate the dissemination of ARGs in the environment. However, enhanced alkyl group chain length or the substitution of alkyl groups with the cation ring corresponded with increased antimicrobial effects. In this study, we investigated how different structures of ILs with 4, 6 and 8 C atoms in the longer alkyl chain on the imidazolium cations facilitated the dissemination of ARGs. The promotion of plasmid RP4 transfer frequency decreased with [CnMIM][BF4] increasing the alkyl chain length from 4 carbon atoms to 8 carbon atoms on the imidazolium cations, which is observed with [BMIM][BF4] (n=4, 5.9 fold> HMIM][BF4] (n=6, 2.2 fold> [OMIM][BF4] (n=8, 1.7 fold. This illustrates that [CnMIM][BF4] with increasing the alkyl chain length exert decreasing ability in facilitating plasmid RP4 horizontal transfer, which is possibly related to IL-structure dependent toxicity. The IL-structure dependent plasmid RP4 transfer frequency was attributable to bacterial cell membrane permeability weaken with increasing alkyl chain length of [CnMIM][PF4], which was evidenced by flow cytometry (FCM. In freshwater microcosm, [CnMIm][BF4] promoted the relative abundance of the sulI and intI genes for 4.6 folds, aphA and traF for 5.2 folds higher than the untreated groups, promoting the propagation of ARGs in the aquatic environment. This is the first report that ILs with different structure of varying alkyl chain length facilitate horizontal transfer of plasmid RP4 which is widely distributed in the environment, and thus add the adverse effects of the environmental risk of ILs.

  15. Parthenocarpic potential in Capsicum annuum L. is enhanced by carpelloid structures and controlled by a single recessive gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aparna; Vivian-Smith, Adam; Voorrips, Roeland E; Habets, Myckel E J; Xue, Lin B; Offringa, Remko; Heuvelink, E P

    2011-10-21

    Parthenocarpy is a desirable trait in Capsicum annuum production because it improves fruit quality and results in a more regular fruit set. Previously, we identified several C. annuum genotypes that already show a certain level of parthenocarpy, and the seedless fruits obtained from these genotypes often contain carpel-like structures. In the Arabidopsis bel1 mutant ovule integuments are transformed into carpels, and we therefore carefully studied ovule development in C. annuum and correlated aberrant ovule development and carpelloid transformation with parthenocarpic fruit set. We identified several additional C. annuum genotypes with a certain level of parthenocarpy, and confirmed a positive correlation between parthenocarpic potential and the development of carpelloid structures. Investigations into the source of these carpel-like structures showed that while the majority of the ovules in C. annuum gynoecia are unitegmic and anatropous, several abnormal ovules were observed, abundant at the top and base of the placenta, with altered integument growth. Abnormal ovule primordia arose from the placenta and most likely transformed into carpelloid structures in analogy to the Arabidopsis bel1 mutant. When pollination was present fruit weight was positively correlated with seed number, but in the absence of seeds, fruit weight proportionally increased with the carpelloid mass and number. Capsicum genotypes with high parthenocarpic potential always showed stronger carpelloid development. The parthenocarpic potential appeared to be controlled by a single recessive gene, but no variation in coding sequence was observed in a candidate gene CaARF8. Our results suggest that in the absence of fertilization most C. annuum genotypes, have parthenocarpic potential and carpelloid growth, which can substitute developing seeds in promoting fruit development.

  16. Population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae) in China: two gene pools inferred by microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yajun; Yang, Manni; Fan, Yong; Wu, Jing; Ma, Ying; Xu, Jiannong

    2011-01-01

    Anopheles sinensis is a competent malaria vector in China. An understanding of vector population structure is important to the vector-based malaria control programs. However, there is no adequate data of A. sinensis population genetics available yet. This study used 5 microsatellite loci to estimate population genetic diversity, genetic differentiation and demographic history of A. sinensis from 14 representative localities in China. All 5 microsatellite loci were highly polymorphic across populations, with high allelic richness and heterozygosity. Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium was found in 12 populations associated with heterozygote deficits, which was likely caused by the presence of null allele and the Wahlund effect. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed two gene pools, grouping samples into two population clusters; one includes six and the other includes eight populations. Out of 14 samples, six samples were mixed with individuals from both gene pools, indicating the coexistence of two genetic units in the areas sampled. The overall differentiation between two genetic pools was moderate (F(ST) = 0.156). Pairwise differentiation between populations were lower within clusters (F(ST) = 0.008-0.028 in cluster I and F(ST) = 0.004-0.048 in cluster II) than between clusters (F(ST) = 0.120-0.201). A reduced gene flow (Nm = 1-1.7) was detected between clusters. No evidence of isolation by distance was detected among populations neither within nor between the two clusters. There are differences in effective population size (Ne = 14.3-infinite) across sampled populations. Two genetic pools with moderate genetic differentiation were identified in the A. sinensis populations in China. The population divergence was not correlated with geographic distance or barrier in the range. Variable effective population size and other demographic effects of historical population perturbations could be the factors affecting the population differentiation. The

  17. Population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae in China: two gene pools inferred by microsatellites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajun Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anopheles sinensis is a competent malaria vector in China. An understanding of vector population structure is important to the vector-based malaria control programs. However, there is no adequate data of A. sinensis population genetics available yet. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used 5 microsatellite loci to estimate population genetic diversity, genetic differentiation and demographic history of A. sinensis from 14 representative localities in China. All 5 microsatellite loci were highly polymorphic across populations, with high allelic richness and heterozygosity. Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium was found in 12 populations associated with heterozygote deficits, which was likely caused by the presence of null allele and the Wahlund effect. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed two gene pools, grouping samples into two population clusters; one includes six and the other includes eight populations. Out of 14 samples, six samples were mixed with individuals from both gene pools, indicating the coexistence of two genetic units in the areas sampled. The overall differentiation between two genetic pools was moderate (F(ST = 0.156. Pairwise differentiation between populations were lower within clusters (F(ST = 0.008-0.028 in cluster I and F(ST = 0.004-0.048 in cluster II than between clusters (F(ST = 0.120-0.201. A reduced gene flow (Nm = 1-1.7 was detected between clusters. No evidence of isolation by distance was detected among populations neither within nor between the two clusters. There are differences in effective population size (Ne = 14.3-infinite across sampled populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Two genetic pools with moderate genetic differentiation were identified in the A. sinensis populations in China. The population divergence was not correlated with geographic distance or barrier in the range. Variable effective population size and other demographic effects of historical population

  18. Structural organization of the human and mouse laminin beta2 chain genes, and alternative splicing at the 5' end of the human transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Gautam, M; Loechel, F

    1996-01-01

    We have determined the structural organization of the human and mouse genes that encode the laminin beta2 chain (s-laminin), an essential component of the basement membranes of the neuromuscular synapse and the kidney glomerulus. The human and mouse genes have a nearly identical exon......-intron organization and are the smallest laminin chain genes characterized to date, due to the unusually small size of their introns. The laminin beta2 chain genes of both species consist of 33 exons that span...

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis vast BspA-like gene family: evidence for functional diversity from structural organisation and transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Petrus

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common non-viral human sexually transmitted pathogen and importantly, contributes to facilitating the spread of HIV. Yet very little is known about its surface and secreted proteins mediating interactions with, and permitting the invasion and colonisation of, the host mucosa. Initial annotations of T. vaginalis genome identified a plethora of candidate extracellular proteins. Results Data mining of the T. vaginalis genome identified 911 BspA-like entries (TvBspA sharing TpLRR-like leucine-rich repeats, which represent the largest gene family encoding potential extracellular proteins for the pathogen. A broad range of microorganisms encoding BspA-like proteins was identified and these are mainly known to live on mucosal surfaces, among these T. vaginalis is endowed with the largest gene family. Over 190 TvBspA proteins with inferred transmembrane domains were characterised by a considerable structural diversity between their TpLRR and other types of repetitive sequences and two subfamilies possessed distinct classic sorting signal motifs for endocytosis. One TvBspA subfamily also shared a glycine-rich protein domain with proteins from Clostridium difficile pathogenic strains and C. difficile phages. Consistent with the hypothesis that TvBspA protein structural diversity implies diverse roles, we demonstrated for several TvBspA genes differential expression at the transcript level in different growth conditions. Identified variants of repetitive segments between several TvBspA paralogues and orthologues from two clinical isolates were also consistent with TpLRR and other repetitive sequences to be functionally important. For one TvBspA protein cell surface expression and antibody responses by both female and male T. vaginalis infected patients were also demonstrated. Conclusions The biased mucosal habitat for microbial species encoding BspA-like proteins, the characterisation of a vast

  20. Intrapopulation genomics in a model mutualist: Population structure and candidate symbiosis genes under selection in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Michael A; De Mita, Stephane; Burke, Patricia V; Solórzano-Lowell, Kathryn L S; Heath, Katy D

    2016-12-01

    Bottom-up evolutionary approaches, including geographically explicit population genomic analyses, have the power to reveal the mechanistic basis of adaptation. Here, we conduct a population genomic analysis in the model legume, Medicago truncatula, to characterize population genetic structure and identify symbiosis-related genes showing evidence of spatially variable selection. Using RAD-seq, we generated over 26,000 SNPs from 191 accessions from within three regions of the native range in Europe. Results from STRUCTURE analysis identify five distinct genetic clusters with divisions that separate east and west regions in the Mediterranean basin. Much of the genetic variation is maintained within sampling sites, and there is evidence for isolation by distance. Extensive linkage disequilibrium was identified, particularly within populations. We conducted genetic outlier analysis with FST -based genome scans and a Bayesian modeling approach (PCAdapt). There were 70 core outlier loci shared between these distinct methods with one clear candidate symbiosis related gene, DMI1. This work sets that stage for functional experiments to determine the important phenotypes that selection has acted upon and complementary efforts in rhizobium populations. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Signalign: An Ontology of DNA as Signal for Comparative Gene Structure Prediction Using Information-Coding-and-Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ning; Guo, Xuan; Gu, Feng; Pan, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Conventional character-analysis-based techniques in genome analysis manifest three main shortcomings-inefficiency, inflexibility, and incompatibility. In our previous research, a general framework, called DNA As X was proposed for character-analysis-free techniques to overcome these shortcomings, where X is the intermediates, such as digit, code, signal, vector, tree, graph network, and so on. In this paper, we further implement an ontology of DNA As Signal, by designing a tool named Signalign for comparative gene structure analysis, in which DNA sequences are converted into signal series, processed by modified method of dynamic time warping and measured by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The ontology of DNA As Signal integrates the principles and concepts of other disciplines including information coding theory and signal processing into sequence analysis and processing. Comparing with conventional character-analysis-based methods, Signalign can not only have the equivalent or superior performance, but also enrich the tools and the knowledge library of computational biology by extending the domain from character/string to diverse areas. The evaluation results validate the success of the character-analysis-free technique for improved performances in comparative gene structure prediction.

  2. Distinct genetic structure in populations of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae shown by genetic markers ISSR and COI gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara C. C. P. Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Distinct genetic structure in populations of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen (Neuroptera, Chrysopidae shown by genetic markers ISSR and COI gene. Green lacewings are generalist predators, and the species Chrysoperla externa presents a great potential for use in biological control of agricultural pests due to its high predation and reproduction capacities, as well as its easy mass rearing in the laboratory. The adaptive success of a species is related to genetic variability, so that population genetic studies are extremely important in order to maximize success of the biological control. Thus, the present study used nuclear (Inter Simple Sequence Repeat - ISSR and mitochondrial (Cytochrome Oxidase I - COI molecular markers to estimate the genetic variability of 12 populations in the São Paulo State, Brazil, as well as the genetic relationships between populations. High levels of genetic diversity were observed for both markers, and the highest values of genetic diversity appear associated with municipalities that have the greatest areas of native vegetation. There was high haplotype sharing, and there was no correlation between the markers and the geographic distribution of the populations. The AMOVA indicated absence of genetic structure for the COI gene, suggesting that the sampled areas formed a single population unit. However, the great genetic differentiation among populations showed by ISSR demonstrates that these have been under differentiation after their expansion or may also reflect distinct dispersal behavior between males and females.

  3. Genetic structure and gene flow in the endangered aquatic economic crop Brasenia schreberi J. F. Gmel. (Nymphaeaceae) in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuan-Huo; Wahiti Gituru, Robert

    Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to measure the levels of genetic variation and patterns of population structure within and among five extant populations of Brasenia schreberi, an endangered aquatic plant in China. Six primers selected from sixty ISSR primers were used in the study which amplified 49 reproducible bands with 22 (44.9%) being polymorphic, indicating low levels of genetic diversity at the species level. AMOVA analysis revealed that most genetic variation (85.64%) is present among populations. The low level of gene flow (Nm = 0.1) is estimated among five remaining populations. A Mantel test show significant relationship between genetic distance and geographic distance (r = 0.91). Several factors including clonal growth, habitat fragment, population isolation, restricted gene flow among populations and agricultural practices, might have played an important role in maintaining the genetic structure of B. schreberi populations in China. In view of the limited genetic information currently available for B. schreberi, we recommend in situ preservation of the remaining population.

  4. Personality in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Exploring the Hierarchical Structure and Associations with the Vasopressin V1A Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D.; Hopkins, William D.; Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Young, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major contributions of recent personality psychology is the finding that traits are related to each other in an organized hierarchy. To date, however, researchers have yet to investigate this hierarchy in nonhuman primates. Such investigations are critical in confirming the cross-species nature of trait personality helping to illuminate personality as neurobiologically-based and evolutionarily-derived dimensions of primate disposition. Investigations of potential genetic polymorphisms associated with hierarchical models of personality among nonhuman primates represent a critical first step. The current study examined the hierarchical structure of chimpanzee personality as well as sex-specific associations with a polymorphism in the promoter region of the vasopressin V1a receptor gene (AVPR1A), a gene associated with dispositional traits, among 174 chimpanzees. Results confirmed a hierarchical structure of personality across species and, despite differences in early rearing experiences, suggest a sexually dimorphic role of AVPR1A polymorphisms on hierarchical personality profiles at a higher-order level. PMID:24752497

  5. Multilocus sequence typing using mitochondrial genes (mtMLST) reveals geographic population structure of Ixodes ricinus ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnis, Ruth E; Seelig, Frederik; Bormane, Antra; Donaghy, Michael; Vollmer, Stephanie A; Feil, Edward J; Kurtenbach, Klaus; Margos, Gabriele

    2014-03-01

    The hard tick Ixodes ricinus is the principal vector of Lyme borreliosis (LB) group spirochaetes in Europe, but it also transmits a large number of other microbial pathogens that are of importance to animal and human health. Here, we characterise geographically distinct populations of this important ectoparasite based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of multiple mitochondrial (mt) genes (mtMLST). Internal fragments of approximately 500 bp were amplified and sequenced for 6 protein-encoding and ribosomal genes (atp6, coi, coii, coiii, cytB, and 12s). The samples analysed consisted of 506 questing nymphs collected in Britain and Latvia in 2006-2008 and in Latvia in 2002. Although little genetic structure has previously been observed in I. ricinus ticks among Europe, our data could clearly differentiate these 2 populations. Here, we argue that this novel scheme provides additional phylogenetic resolution which is important for understanding the genetic and geographic structure of I. ricinus populations. This in turn will benefit monitoring and management of tick-borne diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Form and function in gene regulatory networks: the structure of network motifs determines fundamental properties of their dynamical state space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, S E; Fink, T M A

    2016-07-01

    Network motifs have been studied extensively over the past decade, and certain motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, play an important role in regulatory networks. Recent studies have used Boolean network motifs to explore the link between form and function in gene regulatory networks and have found that the structure of a motif does not strongly determine its function, if this is defined in terms of the gene expression patterns the motif can produce. Here, we offer a different, higher-level definition of the 'function' of a motif, in terms of two fundamental properties of its dynamical state space as a Boolean network. One is the basin entropy, which is a complexity measure of the dynamics of Boolean networks. The other is the diversity of cyclic attractor lengths that a given motif can produce. Using these two measures, we examine all 104 topologically distinct three-node motifs and show that the structural properties of a motif, such as the presence of feedback loops and feed-forward loops, predict fundamental characteristics of its dynamical state space, which in turn determine aspects of its functional versatility. We also show that these higher-level properties have a direct bearing on real regulatory networks, as both basin entropy and cycle length diversity show a close correspondence with the prevalence, in neural and genetic regulatory networks, of the 13 connected motifs without self-interactions that have been studied extensively in the literature. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Fruit specific variability in capsaicinoid accumulation and transcription of structural and regulatory genes in Capsicum fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyhaninejad, Neda; Curry, Jeanne; Romero, Joslynn; O’Connell, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissue of ripening chile (Capsicum spp.) fruit follows the coordinated expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes producing the substrates for capsaicin synthase. Transcription factors are likely agents to regulate expression of these biosynthetic genes. Placental RNAs from habanero fruit (C. chinense) were screened for expression of candidate transcription factors; with two candidate genes identified, both in the ERF family of transcription factors. Characterization of these transcription factors, Erf and Jerf, in nine chile cultivars with distinct capsaicinoid contents demonstrated a correlation of expression with pungency. Amino acid variants were observed in both ERF and JERF from different chile cultivars; none of these changes involved the DNA binding domains. Little to no transcription of Erf was detected in non-pungent C. annuum or C. chinense mutants. This correlation was characterized at an individual fruit level in a set of jalapeño (C. annuum) lines again with distinct and variable capsaicinoid contents. Both Erf and Jerf are expressed early in fruit development, 16–20 days post-anthesis, at times prior to the accumulation of capsaicinoids in the placental tissues. These data support the hypothesis that these two members of the complex ERF family participate in regulation of the pungency phenotype in chile. PMID:24388515

  8. Identification of Genes that Maintain Behavioral and Structural Plasticity during Sleep Loss

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    Laurent Seugnet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although patients with primary insomnia experience sleep disruption, they are able to maintain normal performance on a variety of cognitive tasks. This observation suggests that insomnia may be a condition where predisposing factors simultaneously increase the risk for insomnia and also mitigate against the deleterious consequences of waking. To gain insight into processes that might regulate sleep and buffer neuronal circuits during sleep loss, we manipulated three genes, fat facet (faf, highwire (hiw and the GABA receptor Resistance to dieldrin (Rdl, that were differentially modulated in a Drosophila model of insomnia. Our results indicate that increasing faf and decreasing hiw or Rdl within wake-promoting large ventral lateral clock neurons (lLNvs induces sleep loss. As expected, sleep loss induced by decreasing hiw in the lLNvs results in deficits in short-term memory and increases of synaptic growth. However, sleep loss induced by knocking down Rdl in the lLNvs protects flies from sleep-loss induced deficits in short-term memory and increases in synaptic markers. Surprisingly, decreasing hiw and Rdl within the Mushroom Bodies (MBs protects against the negative effects of sleep deprivation (SD as indicated by the absence of a subsequent homeostatic response, or deficits in short-term memory. Together these results indicate that specific genes are able to disrupt sleep and protect against the negative consequences of waking in a circuit dependent manner.

  9. Cuticular lipid composition, surface structure, and gene expression in Arabidopsis stem epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mi Chung; Samuels, A Lacey; Jetter, Reinhard; Kunst, Ljerka; Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John; Beisson, Fred

    2005-12-01

    All vascular plants are protected from the environment by a cuticle, a lipophilic layer synthesized by epidermal cells and composed of a cutin polymer matrix and waxes. The mechanism by which epidermal cells accumulate and assemble cuticle components in rapidly expanding organs is largely unknown. We have begun to address this question by analyzing the lipid compositional variance, the surface micromorphology, and the transcriptome of epidermal cells in elongating Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stems. The rate of cell elongation is maximal near the apical meristem and decreases steeply toward the middle of the stem, where it is 10 times slower. During and after this elongation, the cuticular wax load and composition remain remarkably constant (32 microg/cm2), indicating that the biosynthetic flux into waxes is closely matched to surface area expansion. By contrast, the load of polyester monomers per unit surface area decreases more than 2-fold from the upper (8 microg/cm2) to the lower (3 microg/cm2) portion of the stem, although the compositional variance is minor. To aid identification of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of waxes and cutin, we have isolated epidermal peels from Arabidopsis stems and determined transcript profiles in both rapidly expanding and nonexpanding cells. This transcriptome analysis was validated by the correct classification of known epidermis-specific genes. The 15% transcripts preferentially expressed in the epidermis were enriched in genes encoding proteins predicted to be membrane associated and involved in lipid metabolism. An analysis of the lipid-related subset is presented.

  10. Structural, expression and evolutionary analysis of the non-specific phospholipase C gene family in Gossypium hirsutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiuling; Zhou, Yonghe; Zhang, Juren; Zhang, Kewei

    2017-12-19

    Nonspecific phospholipase C (NPC), which belongs to a phospholipase C subtype, is a class of phospholipases that hydrolyzes the primary membrane phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine, to yield sn-1, 2-diacylglycerol and a phosphorylated head-group. NPC plays multiple physiological roles in lipid metabolism and signaling in plants. To fully understand the putative roles of NPC genes in upland cotton, we cloned NPC genes from Gossypium hirsutum and carried out structural, expression and evolutionary analysis. Eleven NPC genes were cloned from G. hirsutum, which were found on chromosomes scaffold269.1, D03, A07, D07, A08, D11, and scaffold3511_A13. All GhNPCs had typical phosphoesterase domains and have hydrolase activity that acts on ester bonds. GhNPCs were annotated as phospholipase C, which was involved in glycerophospholipid metabolism, ether lipid metabolism, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. These GhNPCs showed differential expression patterns in distinct plant tissues and in response to various types of stress (low-phosphate, salt, drought, and abscisic acid). They also had different types and numbers of cis-element. GhNPCs could be classified into four subfamilies. Four pairs of GhNPCs were generated by whole-genome duplication and they underwent purifying selection. Our results suggested that GhNPCs are involved in regulating key abiotic stress responses and ABA signaling transduction, and they may have various functional roles for different members under complex abiotic stress conditions. Functional divergence may be the evolutionary driving force for the retention of four pairs of duplicate NPCs. Our analysis provides a solid foundation for the further functional characterization of the GhNPC gene family, and leads to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cotton cultivars.

  11. Cell-bound lipases from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002: gene sequence analysis, expression, enzymatic characterization, and 3D structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhengyu; Lin, Hong; Shi, Shaolei; Mu, Xiangduo; Liu, Yanru; Huang, Jianzhong

    2016-05-03

    The whole-cell lipase from Burkholderia cepacia has been used as a biocatalyst in organic synthesis. However, there is no report in the literature on the component or the gene sequence of the cell-bound lipase from this species. Qualitative analysis of the cell-bound lipase would help to illuminate the regulation mechanism of gene expression and further improve the yield of the cell-bound lipase by gene engineering. Three predictive cell-bound lipases, lipA, lipC21 and lipC24, from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 were cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both LipA and LipC24 displayed the lipase activity. LipC24 was a novel mesophilic enzyme and displayed preference for medium-chain-length acyl groups (C10-C14). The 3D structural model of LipC24 revealed the open Y-type active site. LipA displayed 96 % amino acid sequence identity with the known extracellular lipase. lipA-inactivation and lipC24-inactivation decreased the total cell-bound lipase activity of Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 by 42 % and 14 %, respectively. The cell-bound lipase activity from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 originated from a multi-enzyme mixture with LipA as the main component. LipC24 was a novel lipase and displayed different enzymatic characteristics and structural model with LipA. Besides LipA and LipC24, other type of the cell-bound lipases (or esterases) should exist.

  12. Structure and functional analysis of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein from the fuscachelin gene cluster of Thermobifida fusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Iron acquisition is a complex, multicomponent process critical for most organisms' survival and virulence. Small iron chelating molecules, siderophores, mediate transport as key components of common pathways for iron assimilation in many microorganisms. The chemistry and biology of the extraordinary tight and specific metal binding siderophores is of general interest in terms of host/guest chemistry and is a potential target toward the development of therapeutic treatments for microbial virulence. The siderophore pathway of the moderate thermophile, Thermobifida fusca, is an excellent model system to study the process in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we describe the structure and characterization of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein, FscJ from the fuscachelin gene cluster of T. fusca. The structure shows a di-domain arrangement connected with a long α-helix hinge. Several X-ray structures detail ligand-free conformational changes at different pH values, illustrating complex interdomain flexibility of the siderophore receptors. We demonstrated that FscJ has a unique recognition mechanism and details the binding interaction with ferric-fuscachelin A through ITC and docking analysis. The presented work provides a structural basis for the complex molecular mechanisms of siderophore recognition and transportation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Genetic structure of Octopus vulgaris (Cephalopoda, Octopodidae) in the central Mediterranean Sea inferred from the mitochondrial COIII gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhlaoui-Zid, Karima; Knittweis, Leyla; Aurelle, Didier; Nafkha, Chaala; Ezzeddine, Soufia; Fiorentino, Fabio; Ghmati, Hisham; Ceriola, Luca; Jarboui, Othman; Maltagliati, Ferruccio

    2012-01-01

    The polymorphism of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase III was studied in the Mediterranean octopus, Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1797. A total of 202 specimens from seven sampling sites were analysed with the aim of elucidating patterns of genetic structure in the central Mediterranean Sea and to give an insight into the phylogeny of the Octopus genus. Phylogenetic analyses showed that individuals from the central Mediterranean belong to the O. vulgaris species whose limits should nevertheless be clarified. Concerning genetic structure, two high-frequency haplotypes were present in all locations. The overall genetic divergence (Φ(ST)=0.05, P<0.05) indicated a significant genetic structuring in the study area and an AMOVA highlighted a significant break between western and eastern Mediterranean basins (Φ(CT)=0.094, P<0.05). Possible explanations for the observed patterns of genetic structuring are discussed with reference to their relevance for fisheries management. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Structure and transcriptional impact of divergent repetitive elements inserted within Phanerochaete chrysosporium strain RP-78 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis F. Larrondo; Paulo Canessa; Rafael Vicuna; Philip Stewart; Amber Vanden Wymelenberg; Dan Cullen

    2007-01-01

    We describe the structure, organization, and transcriptional impact of repetitive elements within the lignin-degrading basidiomycete, Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Searches of the P. chrysosporium genome revealed five copies of pce1, a 1,750-nt non-autonomous, class II element. Alleles encoding a putative glucosyltransferase and a cytochrome P450 harbor pce insertions...

  15. Amelotin Gene Structure and Expression during Enamel Formation in the Opossum Monodelphis domestica.

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    Barbara Gasse

    Full Text Available Amelotin (AMTN is an ameloblast-secreted protein that belongs to the secretory calcium-binding phosphoprotein family, which also includes the enamel matrix proteins amelogenin, ameloblastin and enamelin. Although AMTN is supposed to play an important role in enamel formation, data were long limited to the rodents, in which it is expressed during the maturation stage. Recent comparative studies in sauropsids and amphibians revealed that (i AMTN was expressed earlier, i.e. as soon as ameloblasts are depositing the enamel matrix, and (ii AMTN structure was different, a change which mostly resulted from an intraexonic splicing in the large exon 8 of an ancestral mammal. The present study was performed to know whether the differences in AMTN structure and expression in rodents compared to non-mammalian tetrapods dated back to an early ancestral mammal or were acquired later in mammalian evolution. We sequenced, assembled and screened the jaw transcriptome of a neonate opossum Monodelphis domestica, a marsupial. We found two AMTN transcripts. Variant 1, representing 70.8% of AMTN transcripts, displayed the structure known in rodents, whereas variant 2 (29.2% exhibited the nonmammalian tetrapod structure. Then, we studied AMTN expression during amelogenesis in a neonate specimen. We obtained similar data as those reported in rodents. These findings indicate that more than 180 million years ago, before the divergence of marsupials and placentals, changes occurred in AMTN function and structure. The spatiotemporal expression was delayed to the maturation stage of amelogenesis and the intraexonic splicing gave rise to isoform 1, encoded by variant 1 and lacking the RGD motif. The ancestral isoform 2, housing the RGD, was initially conserved, as demonstrated here in a marsupial, then secondarily lost in the placental lineages. These findings bring new elements towards our understanding of the non-prismatic to prismatic enamel transition that occurred at

  16. Promoter Structure of the RNA Polymerase II Large Subunit Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D M; Kaloshian, I; Molinari, S

    1997-06-01

    The 5'-end of the Caenorhabditis elegans ama-1 gene transcript, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was cloned. Sequencing revealed that the message is trans-spliced. To characterize the Ce-ama-1 promoter, DNA sequence spanning 3 kb upstream from the initiation codon was determined. Typical elements, such as TATA and Spl sites, were absent. The homologue of ama-1 in C. briggsae, Cb-ama-1, was isolated and its 5' flanking sequence compared with that of Ce-ama-1, revealing only limited similarity, although both sequences included a potential initiator-class transcriptional regulator and phased repeats of an ATC motif. The latter elements are postulated to facilitate DNA bending and may play a role in transcription regulation.

  17. Streptomyces lavendulae Protease Inhibitor: Purification, Gene Overexpression, and 3-Dimensional Structure

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    D. E. El-Hadedy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitors trypsin (STI1, Streptomyces trypsin inhibitor 1 has been identified, purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. SDS-PAGE of protease inhibitor showed molecular weight of approximately 10 KDa. PCR product (~1615 bp of sti1 gene was cloned in expression vector pACYC177/ET3d and transformed in Escherichia coli JM109. Protease inhibitors trypsin was purified and used as antivirus against Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3. CVB3 is one of the major causative agents of chronic, subacute, acute, and fulminant myocarditis as well as pancreatitis and aseptic meningitis. It has been reported that more than 50% of human myocarditis is associated with CVB3 infection.

  18. The structural complexity of the human BORIS gene in gametogenesis and cancer.

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    Elena M Pugacheva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BORIS/CTCFL is a paralogue of CTCF, the major epigenetic regulator of vertebrate genomes. BORIS is normally expressed only in germ cells but is aberrantly activated in numerous cancers. While recent studies demonstrated that BORIS is a transcriptional activator of testis-specific genes, little is generally known about its biological and molecular functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that BORIS is expressed as 23 isoforms in germline and cancer cells. The isoforms are comprised of alternative N- and C-termini combined with varying numbers of zinc fingers (ZF in the DNA binding domain. The patterns of BORIS isoform expression are distinct in germ and cancer cells. Isoform expression is activated by downregulation of CTCF, upregulated by reduction in CpG methylation caused by inactivation of DNMT1 or DNMT3b, and repressed by activation of p53. Studies of ectopically expressed isoforms showed that all are translated and localized to the nucleus. Using the testis-specific cerebroside sulfotransferase (CST promoter and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR, it was shown that binding of BORIS isoforms to DNA targets in vitro is methylation-sensitive and depends on the number and specific composition of ZF. The ability to bind target DNA and the presence of a specific long amino terminus (N258 in different isoforms are necessary and sufficient to activate CST transcription. Comparative sequence analyses revealed an evolutionary burst in mammals with strong conservation of BORIS isoproteins among primates. CONCLUSIONS: The extensive repertoire of spliced BORIS variants in humans that confer distinct DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties, and their differential patterns of expression among germ cells and neoplastic cells suggest that the gene is involved in a range of functionally important aspects of both normal gametogenesis and cancer development. In addition, a burst in isoform diversification may

  19. The structural complexity of the human BORIS gene in gametogenesis and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Elena M; Suzuki, Teruhiko; Pack, Svetlana D; Kosaka-Suzuki, Natsuki; Yoon, Jeongheon; Vostrov, Alexander A; Barsov, Eugene; Strunnikov, Alexander V; Morse, Herbert C; Loukinov, Dmitri; Lobanenkov, Victor

    2010-11-08

    BORIS/CTCFL is a paralogue of CTCF, the major epigenetic regulator of vertebrate genomes. BORIS is normally expressed only in germ cells but is aberrantly activated in numerous cancers. While recent studies demonstrated that BORIS is a transcriptional activator of testis-specific genes, little is generally known about its biological and molecular functions. Here we show that BORIS is expressed as 23 isoforms in germline and cancer cells. The isoforms are comprised of alternative N- and C-termini combined with varying numbers of zinc fingers (ZF) in the DNA binding domain. The patterns of BORIS isoform expression are distinct in germ and cancer cells. Isoform expression is activated by downregulation of CTCF, upregulated by reduction in CpG methylation caused by inactivation of DNMT1 or DNMT3b, and repressed by activation of p53. Studies of ectopically expressed isoforms showed that all are translated and localized to the nucleus. Using the testis-specific cerebroside sulfotransferase (CST) promoter and the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR), it was shown that binding of BORIS isoforms to DNA targets in vitro is methylation-sensitive and depends on the number and specific composition of ZF. The ability to bind target DNA and the presence of a specific long amino terminus (N258) in different isoforms are necessary and sufficient to activate CST transcription. Comparative sequence analyses revealed an evolutionary burst in mammals with strong conservation of BORIS isoproteins among primates. The extensive repertoire of spliced BORIS variants in humans that confer distinct DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties, and their differential patterns of expression among germ cells and neoplastic cells suggest that the gene is involved in a range of functionally important aspects of both normal gametogenesis and cancer development. In addition, a burst in isoform diversification may be evolutionarily tied to unique aspects of primate speciation.

  20. Enrichment of HP1a on Drosophila chromosome 4 genes creates an alternate chromatin structure critical for regulation in this heterochromatic domain.

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    Nicole C Riddle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin environments differ greatly within a eukaryotic genome, depending on expression state, chromosomal location, and nuclear position. In genomic regions characterized by high repeat content and high gene density, chromatin structure must silence transposable elements but permit expression of embedded genes. We have investigated one such region, chromosome 4 of Drosophila melanogaster. Using chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by microarray (ChIP-chip analysis, we examined enrichment patterns of 20 histone modifications and 25 chromosomal proteins in S2 and BG3 cells, as well as the changes in several marks resulting from mutations in key proteins. Active genes on chromosome 4 are distinct from those in euchromatin or pericentric heterochromatin: while there is a depletion of silencing marks at the transcription start sites (TSSs, HP1a and H3K9me3, but not H3K9me2, are enriched strongly over gene bodies. Intriguingly, genes on chromosome 4 are less frequently associated with paused polymerase. However, when the chromatin is altered by depleting HP1a or POF, the RNA pol II enrichment patterns of many chromosome 4 genes shift, showing a significant decrease over gene bodies but not at TSSs, accompanied by lower expression of those genes. Chromosome 4 genes have a low incidence of TRL/GAGA factor binding sites and a low T(m downstream of the TSS, characteristics that could contribute to a low incidence of RNA polymerase pausing. Our data also indicate that EGG and POF jointly regulate H3K9 methylation and promote HP1a binding over gene bodies, while HP1a targeting and H3K9 methylation are maintained at the repeats by an independent mechanism. The HP1a-enriched, POF-associated chromatin structure over the gene bodies may represent one type of adaptation for genes embedded in repetitive DNA.

  1. An investigation into pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and mutant male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, M H; Charlton, H M; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2013-10-01

    To investigate brain-pituitary-gonadal inter-relationships, we have compared the effects of mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male mice. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, and gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β knockout (FSHβKO), FSH receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone (LH) receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg), testicular feminised (tfm) and gonadectomised mice were compared with control wild-type mice or heterozygotes. Serum levels of LH were similar in FSHβKO, FSHRKO and heterozygote males despite decreased androgen production in KO males. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the common α and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO males. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from controls, except that the subpopulation of granules consisting of an electron-dense core and electron-lucent 'halo' was not observed in FSHβKO gonadotrophs and the granules were smaller in diameter. In the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and hormone levels were significantly lower compared to control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller, with less abundant endoplasmic reticulum and reduced secretory granules. In LuRKO, tfm and gonadectomised mice, hyperstimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA and serum protein concentrations was reflected by subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and more secretory granules distributed adjacent to the plasma membrane. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH have been found between normal and mutant male mice. These changes are

  2. Insight into higher-level phylogeny of Neuropterida: Evidence from secondary structures of mitochondrial rRNA genes and mitogenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Lin, Aili; Zhao, Xincheng

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that the rRNA structure information is important to assist phylogenetic analysis through identifying homologous positions to improve alignment accuracy. In addition, the secondary structure of some conserved motifs is highly stable among distantly related taxa, which can provide potentially informative characters for estimating phylogeny. In this paper, we applied the high-throughput pooled sequencing approach to the determination of neuropteran mitogenomes. Four complete mitogenome sequences were obtained: Micromus angulatus (Hemerobiidae), Chrysoperla nipponensis (Chrysopidae), Rapisma sp. (Ithonidae), and Thaumatosmylus sp. (Osmylidae). This allowed us to sample more complete mitochondrial RNA gene sequences. Secondary structure diagrams for the complete mitochondrial small and large ribosomal subunit RNA genes of eleven neuropterid species were predicted. Comparative analysis of the secondary structures indicated a closer relationship of Megaloptera and Neuroptera. This result was congruent with the resulting phylogeny inferred from sequence alignments of all 37 mitochondrial genes, namely the hypothesis of (Raphidioptera + (Megaloptera + Neuroptera)).

  3. Molecular markers for genetic diversity, gene flow and genetic population structure of freshwater mussel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choupina, A B; Martins, I M

    2014-08-01

    Freshwater mussel species are in global decline. Anthropogenic changes of river channels and the decrease of autochthonous fish population, the natural hosts of mussels larval stages (glochidia), are the main causes. Therefore, the conservation of mussel species depends not only on habitat conservation, but also on the availability of the fish host. In Portugal, information concerning most of the mussel species is remarkably scarce. One of the most known species, Unio pictorum is also in decline however, in the basins of the rivers Tua and Sabor (Northeast of Portugal), there is some indication of relatively large populations. The aforementioned rivers can be extremely important for this species conservation not only in Portugal, but also in the remaining Iberian Peninsula. Thus, it is important to obtain data concerning Unio pictorum bioecology (distribution, habitat requirements, population structure, genetic variability, reproductive cycle and recruitment rates), as well as the genetic variability and structure of the population. Concomitantly, information concerning fish population structure, the importance of the different fish species as "glochidia" hosts and their appropriate density to allow effective mussel recruitment, will also be assessed. The achieved data is crucial to obtain information to develop effective management measures in order to promote the conservation of this bivalve species, the conservation of autochthonous fish populations, and consequently the integrity of the river habitats.

  4. Structural Basis for a Human Glycosylation Disorder Caused by Mutation of the COG4 Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, B.; Smith, R; Ungar, D; Nakamura, A; Jeffrey, P; Lupashin, V; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    The proper glycosylation of proteins trafficking through the Golgi apparatus depends upon the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex. Defects in COG can cause fatal congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) in humans. The recent discovery of a form of CDG, caused in part by a COG4 missense mutation changing Arg 729 to Trp, prompted us to determine the 1.9 A crystal structure of a Cog4 C-terminal fragment. Arg 729 is found to occupy a key position at the center of a salt bridge network, thereby stabilizing Cog4's small C-terminal domain. Studies in HeLa cells reveal that this C-terminal domain, while not needed for the incorporation of Cog4 into COG complexes, is essential for the proper glycosylation of cell surface proteins. We also find that Cog4 bears a strong structural resemblance to exocyst and Dsl1p complex subunits. These complexes and others have been proposed to function by mediating the initial tethering between transport vesicles and their membrane targets; the emerging structural similarities provide strong evidence of a common evolutionary origin and may reflect shared mechanisms of action.

  5. Vat, an amazing gene conferring resistance to aphids and viruses they carry: from molecular structure to field effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Boissot

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We review half a century of research on Cucumis melo resistance to Aphis gossypii from molecular to field levels. The Vat gene is unique in conferring resistance to both A. gossypii and the viruses it transmits. This double phenotype is aphid clone-dependent and has been observed in 25 melon accessions, mostly from Asia. It is controlled by a cluster of genes including CC-NLR, which has been characterized in detail. Copy-number polymorphisms (for the whole gene and for a domain that stands out in the LLR region and single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified in the Vat cluster. The role of these polymorphisms in plant aphid/interactions remains unclear. The Vat gene structure suggests a functioning with separate recognition and response phases. During the recognition phase, the VAT protein is thought to interact (likely indirectly with an aphid effector introduced during cell puncture by the aphid. A few hours later, several miRNAs are upregulated in Vat plants. Peroxidase activity increases, and callose and lignin are deposited in the walls of the cells adjacent to the stylet path, disturbing aphid behavior. In aphids feeding on Vat plants, Piwi-interacting RNA-like sequences are abundant and the levels of other miRNAs are modified. At the plant level, resistance to aphids is quantitative (aphids escape the plant and display low rates of reproduction. Resistance to viruses is qualitative and local.Durability of NLR genes is highly variable. A. gossypii clones are adapted to Vat resistance, either by introducing a new effector that interferes with the deployment of plant defenses, or by adapting to the defenses it triggered. Viruses transmitted in a non-persistent manner cannot adapt to Vat resistance. At population level, Vat reduces aphid density and genetic diversity. The durability of Vat resistance to A. gossypii populations depends strongly on the agro-ecosystem, including, in particular, the presence of other cucurbit crops

  6. Structure of the human acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT-2) gene and its relation to dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuren, K; Tamura, T; Arashiro, R; Takata, K; Matsuura, T; Niikawa, N; Ohta, T

    2001-04-30

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes cholesterol esterification in mammalian cells. Two isoforms of ACAT have been reported to date (ACAT-1 and ACAT-2). ACAT-1 is ubiquitously expressed in tissues except the intestine. In contrast, ACAT-2 is expressed mainly in the intestine in humans. To investigate the relationship between ACAT-2 and dyslipidemia, we determined the structure of the human ACAT-2 gene and then studied the relationship between mutations of the ACAT-2 gene and dyslipidemia. To isolate human ACAT-2 genomic DNA, we designed primers based on the human ACAT-2 cDNA sequence: forward primer 5'-ACACCTCGATCTTGGTCCTGCCATA-3' and reverse primer 5'-GGAATGCAGACAGGGAGTCCT-3'. Using these primers, a human P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) library was screened by PCR-based procedures. Isolated PAC clones were completely digested with BamHI and subcloned into plasmid vector. Subclones that contained exons were screened by dot-blot hybridization using partial ACAT-2 cDNA fragments. The coding region of the ACAT-2 gene was encoded in 15 exons from 51 to 265 base pairs on a 21 kilobase span of genomic DNA. The exonic sequences coincided completely with that of ACAT-2 cDNA, and each exon-intron junction conserved splicing consensus sequences. Next, 187 (91 dyslipidemic and 96 normolipidemic) subjects were screened by PCR single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of the ACAT-2 gene. Three mutations were identified by DNA sequencing: two missense mutations (E14G in exon 1 and T254I in exon 7) and a point mutation in intron 7 (-35G-->A). Mutations in exon 1 and intron 7 were not associated with plasma concentrations of lipids and apolipoproteins (apo). However, plasma apoC-III levels in T254I heterozygotes were significantly higher than those in subjects without mutation. Plasma triglyceride (TG) levels in T254I heterozygotes were similar to those in subjects without mutation. Although further studies are needed, our data suggest that ACAT-2

  7. Sponge non-metastatic Group I Nme gene/protein - structure and function is conserved from sponges to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćetković Helena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleoside diphosphate kinases NDPK are evolutionarily conserved enzymes present in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, with human Nme1 the most studied representative of the family and the first identified metastasis suppressor. Sponges (Porifera are simple metazoans without tissues, closest to the common ancestor of all animals. They changed little during evolution and probably provide the best insight into the metazoan ancestor's genomic features. Recent studies show that sponges have a wide repertoire of genes many of which are involved in diseases in more complex metazoans. The original function of those genes and the way it has evolved in the animal lineage is largely unknown. Here we report new results on the metastasis suppressor gene/protein homolog from the marine sponge Suberites domuncula, NmeGp1Sd. The purpose of this study was to investigate the properties of the sponge Group I Nme gene and protein, and compare it to its human homolog in order to elucidate the evolution of the structure and function of Nme. Results We found that sponge genes coding for Group I Nme protein are intron-rich. Furthermore, we discovered that the sponge NmeGp1Sd protein has a similar level of kinase activity as its human homolog Nme1, does not cleave negatively supercoiled DNA and shows nonspecific DNA-binding activity. The sponge NmeGp1Sd forms a hexamer, like human Nme1, and all other eukaryotic Nme proteins. NmeGp1Sd interacts with human Nme1 in human cells and exhibits the same subcellular localization. Stable clones expressing sponge NmeGp1Sd inhibited the migratory potential of CAL 27 cells, as already reported for human Nme1, which suggests that Nme's function in migratory processes was engaged long before the composition of true tissues. Conclusions This study suggests that the ancestor of all animals possessed a NmeGp1 protein with properties and functions similar to evolutionarily recent versions of the protein, even before the

  8. Sponge non-metastatic Group I Nme gene/protein - structure and function is conserved from sponges to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Nucleoside diphosphate kinases NDPK are evolutionarily conserved enzymes present in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, with human Nme1 the most studied representative of the family and the first identified metastasis suppressor. Sponges (Porifera) are simple metazoans without tissues, closest to the common ancestor of all animals. They changed little during evolution and probably provide the best insight into the metazoan ancestor's genomic features. Recent studies show that sponges have a wide repertoire of genes many of which are involved in diseases in more complex metazoans. The original function of those genes and the way it has evolved in the animal lineage is largely unknown. Here we report new results on the metastasis suppressor gene/protein homolog from the marine sponge Suberites domuncula, NmeGp1Sd. The purpose of this study was to investigate the properties of the sponge Group I Nme gene and protein, and compare it to its human homolog in order to elucidate the evolution of the structure and function of Nme. Results We found that sponge genes coding for Group I Nme protein are intron-rich. Furthermore, we discovered that the sponge NmeGp1Sd protein has a similar level of kinase activity as its human homolog Nme1, does not cleave negatively supercoiled DNA and shows nonspecific DNA-binding activity. The sponge NmeGp1Sd forms a hexamer, like human Nme1, and all other eukaryotic Nme proteins. NmeGp1Sd interacts with human Nme1 in human cells and exhibits the same subcellular localization. Stable clones expressing sponge NmeGp1Sd inhibited the migratory potential of CAL 27 cells, as already reported for human Nme1, which suggests that Nme's function in migratory processes was engaged long before the composition of true tissues. Conclusions This study suggests that the ancestor of all animals possessed a NmeGp1 protein with properties and functions similar to evolutionarily recent versions of the protein, even before the appearance of true tissues

  9. Delta zero-thalassemia in cis of beta Knossos-globin gene. Normal structure transient expression of the delta-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouazana, R; Bozon, D; Baklouti, F; Gonnet, C; Delaunay, J; Godet, J

    1989-07-31

    We have previously described the first homozygous cases of Hb Knossos in an Algerian family. The Hb A2 was completely absent, ascertaining the presence of a delta zero-thalassemia determinant in cis of the beta Knossos S gene. Here, we investigate the affected delta-globin gene. The complete DNA sequence of the gene and its 5' and 3' flanking regions was determined. Only two nucleotide changes were recorded: a C----T substitution at -199 and an AT insertion at -448 upstream from the cap site. To examine the involvement of these changes in gene function, the delta-gene was subcloned in an expression vector and introduced into COS cells. Analysis of RNA derived from these cells, using an S1 protection assay and dot-blot hybridization, revealed qualitatively and quantitatively normal transcription. The loss of delta-globin gene activity in vivo may be due to the alteration of a tissue-specific control.

  10. Structure of AAV-DJ, a Retargeted Gene Therapy Vector: Cryo-Electron Microscopy at 4.5Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas F.; O’Donnell, Jason K.; Meyer, Nancy L.; Xie, Qing; Taylor, Kenneth A.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary AAV-DJ, a leading candidate vector for liver gene therapy, was created through random homologous recombination followed by directed evolution, selecting for in vivo liver tropism and resistance to in vitro immune neutralization. Here, the 4.5Å resolution cryo-EM structure is determined, the first for an engineered AAV vector, revealing structural features that underscore its unique phenotype. The heparan sulfate receptor-binding site in AAV-DJ is little changed from AAV-2, binding measurements revealing similar heparin affinity. A loop that is antigenic in other serotypes has a unique conformation in AAV-DJ that would conflict with the binding of an AAV-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody. This is consistent with increased resistance to neutralization by human polyclonal sera, suggesting that the selected changed tropism may be a secondary effect of altered immune interactions. The reconstruction exemplifies analysis of fine structural changes and the potential of cryo-EM, in favorable cases, to characterize mutant or ligand-bound complexes. PMID:22727812

  11. Structure of AAV-DJ, a retargeted gene therapy vector: cryo-electron microscopy at 4.5 Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Thomas F; O'Donnell, Jason K; Meyer, Nancy L; Xie, Qing; Taylor, Kenneth A; Stagg, Scott M; Chapman, Michael S

    2012-08-08

    AAV-DJ, a leading candidate vector for liver gene therapy, was created through random homologous recombination followed by directed evolution, selecting for in vivo liver tropism and resistance to in vitro immune neutralization. Here, the 4.5 Å resolution cryo-EM structure is determined for the engineered AAV vector, revealing structural features that illuminate its phenotype. The heparan sulfate receptor-binding site is little changed from AAV-2, and heparin-binding affinity is similar. A loop that is antigenic in other serotypes has a unique conformation in AAV-DJ that would conflict with the binding of an AAV-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody. This is consistent with increased resistance to neutralization by human polyclonal sera, raising the possibility that changed tropism may be a secondary effect of altered immune interactions. The reconstruction exemplifies analysis of fine structural changes and the potential of cryo-EM, in favorable cases, to characterize mutant or ligand-bound complexes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of gene-activated human acid-beta-glucosidase: crystal structure, glycan composition, and internalization into macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshtein, Boris; Salinas, Paul; Peterson, Brian; Chan, Victor; Silman, Israel; Sussman, Joel L; Savickas, Philip J; Robinson, Gregory S; Futerman, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disease, can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), in which defective acid-beta-glucosidase (GlcCerase) is supplemented by a recombinant, active enzyme. The X-ray structures of recombinant GlcCerase produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells (imiglucerase, Cerezyme) and in transgenic carrot cells (prGCD) have been previously solved. We now describe the structure and characteristics of a novel form of GlcCerase under investigation for the treatment of Gaucher disease, Gene-Activated human GlcCerase (velaglucerase alfa). In contrast to imiglucerase and prGCD, velaglucerase alfa contains the native human enzyme sequence. All three GlcCerases consist of three domains, with the active site located in domain III. The distances between the carboxylic oxygens of the catalytic residues, E340 and E235, are consistent with distances proposed for acid-base hydrolysis. Kinetic parameters (K(m) and V(max)) of velaglucerase alfa and imiglucerase, as well as their specific activities, are similar. However, analysis of glycosylation patterns shows that velaglucerase alfa displays distinctly different structures from imiglucerase and prGCD. The predominant glycan on velaglucerase alfa is a high-mannose type, with nine mannose units, while imiglucerase contains a chitobiose tri-mannosyl core glycan with fucosylation. These differences in glycosylation affect cellular internalization; the rate of velaglucerase alfa internalization into human macrophages is at least 2-fold greater than that of imiglucerase.

  13. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase: From biochemistry and gene structure to clinical implications of NOS3 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-01-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator with a well-established role in cardiovascular homeostasis. While mediator is synthesized from L-arginine by neuronal, endothelial, and inducible nitric oxide synthases (NOS1,NOS3 and NOS2 respectively), NOS3 is the most important isoform for NO formation in the cardiovascular system. NOS3 is a dimeric enzyme whose expression and activity are regulated at transcriptional, posttranscriptional,and posttranslational levels. The NOS3 gene, which encodes NOS3, exhibits a number of polymorphic sites including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), microsatellites, and insertions/deletions. Some NOS3 polymorphisms show functional effects on NOS3 expression or activity, thereby affecting NO formation. Interestingly, many studies have evaluated the effects of functional NOS3 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and drug responses. Moreover, some studies have investigated how NOS3 haplotypes may impact endogenous NO formation and disease susceptibility. In this article,we carried out a comprehensive review to provide a basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in NOS3 regulation and how genetic variations in NOS3 may translate into relevant clinical and pharmacogenetic implications.

  14. Dissecting the structure and mechanism of a complex duplication-triplication rearrangement in the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Chen, Jian-Min; Bernard, Rafaëlle; de Massy, Bernard; Baudat, Frédéric; Boyer, Amandine; Méchin, Déborah; Thorel, Delphine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2013-08-01

    Pathogenic complex genomic rearrangements are being increasingly characterized at the nucleotide level, providing unprecedented opportunities to evaluate the complexities of mutational mechanisms. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a complex duplication-triplication rearrangement involving exons 45-60 of the DMD gene. Inverted repeats facilitated this complex rearrangement, which shares common genomic organization with the recently described duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) events; specifically, a 690-kb region comprising DMD exons from 45 to 60 was duplicated in tandem, and another 46-kb segment containing exon 51 was inserted inversely in between them. Taking into consideration (1) the presence of a predicted PRDM9 binding site in the near vicinity of the junction involving two inverted L1 elements and (2) the inherent properties of X-Y chromosome recombination during male meiosis, we proposed an alternative two-step model for the generation of this X-linked DMD DUP-TRP/INV-DUP event. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. Plasmodium falciparum K76T pfcrt Gene Mutations and Parasite Population Structure, Haiti, 2006–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Macarthur; Das, Sanchita; Daniels, Rachel; Kirkman, Laura; Delva, Glavdia G.; Destine, Rodney; Escalante, Ananias; Villegas, Leopoldo; Daniels, Noah M.; Shigyo, Kristi; Volkman, Sarah K.; Pape, Jean W.

    2016-01-01

    Hispaniola is the only Caribbean island to which Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains endemic. Resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine has rarely been reported in Haiti, which is located on Hispaniola, but the K76T pfcrt (P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter) gene mutation that confers chloroquine resistance has been detected intermittently. We analyzed 901 patient samples collected during 2006–2009 and found 2 samples showed possible mixed parasite infections of genetically chloroquine-resistant and -sensitive parasites. Direct sequencing of the pfcrt resistance locus and single-nucleotide polymorphism barcoding did not definitively identify a resistant population, suggesting that sustained propagation of chloroquine-resistant parasites was not occurring in Haiti during the study period. Comparison of parasites from Haiti with those from Colombia, Panama, and Venezuela reveals a geographically distinct population with highly related parasites. Our findings indicate low genetic diversity in the parasite population and low levels of chloroquine resistance in Haiti, raising the possibility that reported cases may be of exogenous origin. PMID:27089479

  16. Reprogramming fibroblasts to neural-precursor-like cells by structured overexpression of pallial patterning genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti, Marilena; Granzotto, Marilena; Duc, Minh Do; Fimiani, Cristina; Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we assayed the capability of four genes implicated in embryonic specification of the cortico-cerebral field, Foxg1, Pax6, Emx2 and Lhx2, to reprogramme mouse embryonic fibroblasts towards neural identities. Lentivirus-mediated, TetON-dependent overexpression of Pax6 and Foxg1 transgenes specifically activated the neural stem cell (NSC) reporter Sox1-EGFP in a substantial fraction of engineered cells. The efficiency of this process was enhanced up to ten times by simultaneous inactivation of Trp53 and co-administration of a specific drug mix inhibiting HDACs, H3K27-HMTase and H3K4m2-demethylase. Remarkably, a fraction of the reprogrammed population expressed other NSC markers and retained its new identity, even after switching off the reprogramming transgenes. When transferred into a pro-differentiative environment, Pax6/Foxg1-overexpressing cells activated the neuronal marker Tau-EGFP. Frequency of Tau-EGFP positive cells was almost doubled upon delayed delivery of Emx2 and Lhx2 transgenes. A further improvement of the neuron-like cell output was achieved by inhibition of the BMP and TGFβ pathways. Tau-EGFP positive cells were able to generate action potentials upon injection of depolarizing current pulses, further indicating their neuron-like phenotype. © 2013.

  17. Mutational analysis of two structural genes of the remperate lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 involved in tail length determination and baseplate assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Margit; Østergaard, Solvej; Bresciani, José

    2000-01-01

    phages to the indicator strain L. lactic ssp. cremoris 3107 were determined and electron micrographs were obtained. Specific mutations in orf tmp resulted in the production of mostly phage head structures without tails and a few wild-type looking phages. Furthermore, construction of an inframe deletion...... of the TP901-1 tail and baseplate structure is presented. Author Keywords: Lactococcus bacteriophage; TP901-1; mutagenesis; structural genes; adsorption; tail protein; tape measure protein; baseplate protein...

  18. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone structural gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskam, W G; Rougeon, F

    1979-01-01

    An almost complete cDNA copy of human growth hormone has been cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence confirms the known protein sequence and predicts the sequence of a precursor region of 26 amino acids. We have compared the nucleotide sequence to that for the homolgous proteins, rat growth hormone and human chorionic somatomammotropin (Seeburg et al. and Shine et al., Nature 270, 486 (1977)). There appears to be evolutionary conservation of mRNA sequence features not related to protein structure. Images PMID:386281

  19. Analysis of the structural genes encoding M-factor in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: identification of a third gene, mfm3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O

    1994-01-01

    We previously identified two genes, mfm1 and mfm2, with the potential to encode the M-factor mating pheromone of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (J. Davey, EMBO J. 11:951-960, 1992), but further analysis revealed that a mutant strain lacking both genes still produced active M-factor. ......We previously identified two genes, mfm1 and mfm2, with the potential to encode the M-factor mating pheromone of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (J. Davey, EMBO J. 11:951-960, 1992), but further analysis revealed that a mutant strain lacking both genes still produced active M...

  20. Association of kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR gene polymorphism/ haplotypes with recurrent spontaneous abortion and genetic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Shahsavari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent spontaneous abortion is one of the diseases that can lead to physical, psychological, and, economical problems for both individuals and society. Recently a few numbers of genetic polymorphisms in kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR gene are examined that can endanger the life of the fetus in pregnant women. Objective: The risk of KDR gene polymorphisms was investigated in Iranian women with idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Materials and Methods: A case controlled study was performed. One hundred idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients with at least two consecutive pregnancy losses before 20 weeks of gestational age with normal karyotypes were included in the study. Also, 100 healthy women with at least one natural pregnancy were studied as control group. Two functional SNPs located in KDR gene; rs1870377 (Q472H, and rs2305948 (V297I as well as one tag SNP in the intron region (rs6838752 were genotyped by using PCR based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Haplotype frequency was determined for these three SNPs’ genotypes. Analysis of genetic STRUCTURE and K means clustering were performed to study genetic variation. Results: Functional SNP (rs1870377 was highly linked to tag SNP (rs6838752 (D´ value=0. 214; χ2 = 16.44, p<0. 001. K means clustering showed that k = 8 as the best fit for the optimal number of genetic subgroups in our studied materials. This result was in agreement with Neighbor Joining cluster analysis. Conclusion: In our study, the allele and genotype frequencies were not associated with RSA between patient and control individuals. Inconsistent results in different populations with different allele frequencies among RSA patients and controls may be due to ethnic variation and used sample size.

  1. Structure-function evolution of the Transforming acidic coiled coil genes revealed by analysis of phylogenetically diverse organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiMatteo Anthony

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Examination of ancient gene families can provide an insight into how the evolution of gene structure can relate to function. Functional homologs of the evolutionarily conserved transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC gene family are present in organisms from yeast to man. However, correlations between functional interactions and the evolution of these proteins have yet to be determined. Results We have performed an extensive database analysis to determine the genomic and cDNA sequences of the TACCs from phylogenetically diverse organisms. This analysis has determined the phylogenetic relationship of the TACC proteins to other coiled coil proteins, the resolution of the placement of the rabbit TACC4 as the orthologue of human TACC3, and RHAMM as a distinct family of coiled coil proteins. We have also extended the analysis of the TACCs to the interaction databases of C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify potentially novel TACC interactions. The validity of this modeling was confirmed independently by the demonstration of direct binding of human TACC2 to the nuclear hormone receptor RXRβ. Conclusion The data so far suggest that the ancestral TACC protein played a role in centrosomal/mitotic spindle dynamics. TACC proteins were then recruited to complexes involved in protein translation, RNA processing and transcription by interactions with specific bridging proteins. However, during evolution, the TACC proteins have now acquired the ability to directly interact with components of these complexes (such as the LSm proteins, nuclear hormone receptors, GAS41, and transcription factors. This suggests that the function of the TACC proteins may have evolved from performing assembly or coordination functions in the centrosome to include a more intimate role in the functional evolution of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranscriptional complexes in the cell.

  2. Hopping into a hot seat: Role of DNA structural features on IS5-mediated gene activation and inactivation under stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zafri Humayun

    Full Text Available Insertion sequence elements (IS elements are proposed to play major roles in shaping the genetic and phenotypic landscapes of prokaryotic cells. Recent evidence has raised the possibility that environmental stress conditions increase IS hopping into new sites, and often such hopping has the phenotypic effect of relieving the stress. Although stress-induced targeted mutations have been reported for a number of E. coli genes, the glpFK (glycerol utilization and the cryptic bglGFB (β-glucoside utilization systems are among the best characterized where the effects of IS insertion-mediated gene activation are well-characterized at the molecular level. In the glpFK system, starvation of cells incapable of utilizing glycerol leads to an IS5 insertion event that activates the glpFK operon, and enables glycerol utilization. In the case of the cryptic bglGFB operon, insertion of IS5 (and other IS elements into a specific region in the bglG upstream sequence has the effect of activating the operon in both growing cells, and in starving cells. However, a major unanswered question in the glpFK system, the bgl system, as well as other examples, has been why the insertion events are promoted at specific locations, and how the specific stress condition (glycerol starvation for example can be mechanistically linked to enhanced insertion at a specific locus. In this paper, we show that a specific DNA structural feature (superhelical stress-induced duplex destabilization, SIDD is associated with "stress-induced" IS5 insertion in the glpFK, bglGFB, flhDC, fucAO and nfsB systems. We propose a speculative mechanistic model that links specific environmental conditions to the unmasking of an insertional hotspot in the glpFK system. We demonstrate that experimentally altering the predicted stability of a SIDD element in the nfsB gene significantly impacts IS5 insertion at its hotspot.

  3. Activation of the alpha-globin gene expression correlates with dramatic upregulation of nearby non-globin genes and changes in local and large-scale chromatin spatial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Galitsyna, Aleksandra A; Flyamer, Ilya M; Golov, Arkadiy K; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Imakaev, Maxim V; Abdennur, Nezar A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-07-11

    In homeotherms, the alpha-globin gene clusters are located within permanently open genome regions enriched in housekeeping genes. Terminal erythroid differentiation results in dramatic upregulation of alpha-globin genes making their expression comparable to the rRNA transcriptional output. Little is known about the influence of the erythroid-specific alpha-globin gene transcription outburst on adjacent, widely expressed genes and large-scale chromatin organization. Here, we have analyzed the total transcription output, the overall chromatin contact profile, and CTCF binding within the 2.7 Mb segment of chicken chromosome 14 harboring the alpha-globin gene cluster in cultured lymphoid cells and cultured erythroid cells before and after induction of terminal erythroid differentiation. We found that, similarly to mammalian genome, the chicken genomes is organized in TADs and compartments. Full activation of the alpha-globin gene transcription in differentiated erythroid cells is correlated with upregulation of several adjacent housekeeping genes and the emergence of abundant intergenic transcription. An extended chromosome region encompassing the alpha-globin cluster becomes significantly decompacted in differentiated erythroid cells, and depleted in CTCF binding and CTCF-anchored chromatin loops, while the sub-TAD harboring alpha-globin gene cluster and the upstream major regulatory element (MRE) becomes highly enriched with chromatin interactions as compared to lymphoid and proliferating erythroid cells. The alpha-globin gene domain and the neighboring loci reside within the A-like chromatin compartment in both lymphoid and erythroid cells and become further segregated from the upstream gene desert upon terminal erythroid differentiation. Our findings demonstrate that the effects of tissue-specific transcription activation are not restricted to the host genomic locus but affect the overall chromatin structure and transcriptional output of the encompassing

  4. Selective upregulation of a single distinctly structured var gene in chondroitin sulphate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum involved in pregnancy-associated malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Staalsoe, Trine; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    after selection for adhesion to CSA in vitro. The gene belongs to a highly conserved and common var gene subfamily (var2csa). The var2csa genes are structurally distinct from all other var genes in the parasite genome in lacking both CIDR and DBL-gamma domains. These domains have previously been...

  5. Structural brain abnormalities in a single gene disorder associated with epilepsy, language impairment and intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Bathelt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood speech and language deficits are highly prevalent and are a common feature of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it is difficult to investigate the underlying causal pathways because many diagnostic groups have a heterogeneous aetiology. Studying disorders with a shared genetic cause and shared cognitive deficits can provide crucial insight into the cellular mechanisms and neural systems that give rise to those impairments. The current study investigated structural brain differences of individuals with mutations in ZDHHC9, which is associated with a specific neurodevelopmental phenotype including prominent speech and language impairments and intellectual disability. We used multiple structural neuroimaging methods to characterise neuroanatomy in this group, and observed bilateral reductions in cortical thickness in areas surrounding the temporo-parietal junction, parietal lobule, and inferior frontal lobe, and decreased microstructural integrity of cortical, subcortical-cortical, and interhemispheric white matter projections. These findings are compared to reports for other genetic groups and genetically heterogeneous disorders with a similar presentation. Overlap in the neuroanatomical phenotype suggests a common pathway that particularly affects the development of temporo-parietal and inferior frontal areas, and their connections.

  6. Patterns of genetic structure and evidence of gene flow among Tunisian Citrus species based on informative nSSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Romdhane, Meriam; Riahi, Leila; Selmi, Ayet; Zoghlami, Nejia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the extent of genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships and the amount of gene flow among Tunisian Citrus species based on a set of 15 informative nuclear SSR molecular markers. Genotyping data highlighted an allelic richness among Tunisian Citrus species and has allowed the detection of 168 alleles among them 104.19 were effective. The partition of the total genetic diversity (HT=0.832) showed that the highest amount of variation within the Citrus species is HS=0.550, while the relative amount of the between-species genetic diversity GST does not exceed 0.338. This pattern of genetic structure was supported by low-to-moderate FST pairwise values and the presence of a gene flow (Nm) among the eight Citrus species. The lowest genetic differentiation was revealed between the species C. sinensis and C. insitorum (FST=0.111, Nm=1.99), while the highest genetic differentiation was recorded between the species C. aurantifolia and C. paradisi (FST=0.367, Nm=0.43). The established Neighbor Joining analysis showed that all genotypes were widely discriminated and clearly pooled according to their species of origin, with minor exceptions. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Unique structure and regulation of the nematode detoxification gene regulator SKN-1: implications to understanding and controlling drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Keith P.; Leung, Chi K.; Miyamoto, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Nematodes parasitize an alarming number of people and agricultural animals globally and cause debilitating morbidity and mortality. Anthelmintics have been the primary tools used to control parasitic nematodes for the past several decades, but drug resistance is becoming a major obstacle. Xenobiotic detoxification pathways defend against drugs and other foreign chemicals in diverse organisms, and evidence is accumulating that they play a role in mediating resistance to anthelmintics in nematodes. Related anti-oxidation pathways may also provide filarial parasites protection against host free radical-mediated immune responses. Upstream regulatory pathways have received almost no attention in nematode parasites despite their potential to co-regulate multiple detoxification and anti-oxidation genes. The NRF2 transcription factor mediates inducible detoxification and anti-oxidation defenses in mammals and recent studies have demonstrated that it promotes multidrug resistance in some human tumors. Recent studies in the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have defined the homologous transcription factor SKN-1 as a master regulator of detoxification and anti-oxidation genes. Despite similar functions, SKN-1 and NRF2 have important differences in structure and regulatory pathways. Protein alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these differences are shared among many nematodes making SKN-1 a candidate for specifically targeting nematode detoxification and anti-oxidation. PMID:22656429

  8. Genome-wide analysis reveals novel genes influencing temporal lobe structure with relevance to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jason L; Hua, Xue; Morra, Jonathan H; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P; Ho, April J; Leow, Alex D; Toga, Arthur W; Sul, Jae Hoon; Kang, Hyun Min; Eskin, Eleazar; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Gerber, Jill D; Allen, April N; Corneveaux, Jason J; Stephan, Dietrich A; Webster, Jennifer; DeChairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2010-06-01

    In a genome-wide association study of structural brain degeneration, we mapped the 3D profile of temporal lobe volume differences in 742 brain MRI scans of Alzheimer's disease patients, mildly impaired, and healthy elderly subjects. After searching 546,314 genomic markers, 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with bilateral temporal lobe volume (Pmental state exam scores (MMSE; t=-2.114; P=0.035) demonstrating a negative effect on global cognitive function. Voxelwise maps of genetic association of this SNP with regional brain volumes, revealed intense temporal lobe effects (FDR correction at q=0.05; critical P=0.0257). This study uses large-scale brain mapping for gene discovery with implications for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ToxT reveals a mechanism for fatty acid regulation of virulence genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Michael J.; Skorupski, Karen; Pellegrini, Maria; Chiorazzo, Michael G.; Taylor, Ronald K.; Kull, F. Jon (Dartmouth)

    2010-03-04

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. In order for V. cholerae to cause disease, it must produce two virulence factors, the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT), whose expression is controlled by a transcriptional cascade culminating with the expression of the AraC-family regulator, ToxT. We have solved the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of ToxT, which reveals folds in the N- and C-terminal domains that share a number of features in common with AraC, MarA, and Rob as well as the unexpected presence of a buried 16-carbon fatty acid, cis-palmitoleate. The finding that cis-palmitoleic acid reduces TCP and CT expression in V. cholerae and prevents ToxT from binding to DNA in vitro provides a direct link between the host environment of V. cholerae and regulation of virulence gene expression.

  10. High frequency of rare copy number variants affecting functionally related genes in patients with structural brain malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kariminejad, Roxana; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Tümer, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    During the past years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the development of the human brain, and much of this knowledge comes from genetic studies of disorders associated with abnormal brain development. We employed array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH...... that genes involved in "axonal transport," "cation transmembrane transporter activity," and the "c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade" play a significant role in the etiology of brain malformations. This is to the best of our knowledge the first systematic study of CNVs in patients with structural brain...... malformations and our data show that CNVs play an important role in the etiology of these malformations, either as direct causes or as genetic risk factors....

  11. Altered physiology, cell structure, and gene expression of Theobroma cacao seedlings subjected to Cu toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Vânia L; de Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Souza, Jadiel de S; Mangabeira, Pedro A O; de Jesus, Raildo M; Pirovani, Carlos P; Ahnert, Dário; Baligar, Virupax C; Loguercio, Leandro L

    2014-01-01

    Seedlings of Theobroma cacao CCN 51 genotype were grown under greenhouse conditions and exposed to increasing concentrations of Cu (0.005, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 mg Cu L(-1)) in nutrient solution. When doses were equal or higher than 8 mg Cu L(-1), after 24 h of treatment application, leaf gas exchange was highly affected and changes in chloroplasts thylakoids of leaf mesophyll cells and plasmolysis of cells from the root cortical region were observed. In addition, cell membranes of roots and leaves were damaged. In leaves, 96 h after treatments started, increases in the percentage of electrolyte leakage through membranes were observed with increases of Cu in the nutrient solution. Moreover, there was an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in roots due to lipid peroxidation of membranes. Chemical analysis showed that increases in Cu concentrations in vegetative organs of T. cacao increased with the increase of the metal in the nutrient solution, but there was a greater accumulation of Cu in roots than in shoots. The excess of Cu interfered in the levels of Mn, Zn, Fe, Mg, K, and Ca in different organs of T. cacao. Analysis of gene expression via RTq-PCR showed increased levels of MT2b, SODCyt, and PER-1 expression in roots and of MT2b, PSBA, PSBO, SODCyt, and SODChI in leaves. Hence, it was concluded that Cu in nutrient solution at doses equal or above 8 mg L(-1) significantly affected leaf gas exchange, cell ultrastructure, and transport of mineral nutrients in seedlings of this T. cacao genotype.

  12. Brain white matter structure and COMT gene are linked to second-language learning in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Ping C; Richards, Todd L; Coe, Bradley P; Eichler, Evan E; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-06-28

    Adult human brains retain the capacity to undergo tissue reorganization during second-language learning. Brain-imaging studies show a relationship between neuroanatomical properties and learning for adults exposed to a second language. However, the role of genetic factors in this relationship has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was twofold: (i) to characterize the relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and second-language immersion using diffusion tensor imaging, and (ii) to determine whether polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene affect the relationship. We recruited incoming Chinese students enrolled in the University of Washington and scanned their brains one time. We measured the diffusion properties of the white matter fiber tracts and correlated them with the number of days each student had been in the immersion program at the time of the brain scan. We found that higher numbers of days in the English immersion program correlated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. We show that fractional anisotropy declined once the subjects finished the immersion program. The relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and immersion varied in subjects with different COMT genotypes. Subjects with the Methionine (Met)/Valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes showed higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity during immersion, which reversed immediately after immersion ended, whereas those with the Met/Met genotype did not show these relationships. Statistical modeling revealed that subjects' grades in the language immersion program were best predicted by fractional anisotropy and COMT genotype.

  13. Demographic history, genetic structure and gene flow in a steppe-associated raptor species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Jesus T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental preferences and past climatic changes may determine the length of time during which a species range has contracted or expanded from refugia, thereby influencing levels of genetic diversification. Connectivity among populations of steppe-associated taxa might have been maximal during the long glacial periods, and interrupted only during the shorter interglacial phases, potentially resulting in low levels of genetic differentiation among populations. We investigated this hypothesis by exploring patterns of genetic diversity, past demography and gene flow in a raptor species characteristic of steppes, the Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus, using mitochondrial DNA data from 13 breeding populations and two wintering populations. Results Consistent with our hypothesis, Montagu's harrier has relatively low genetic variation at the mitochondrial DNA. The highest levels of genetic diversity were found in coastal Spain, France and central Asia. These areas, which were open landscapes during the Holocene, may have acted as refugia when most of the European continent was covered by forests. We found significant genetic differentiation between two population groups, at the SW and NE parts of the species' range. Two events of past population growth were detected, and occurred ca. 7500-5500 and ca. 3500-1000 years BP in the SW and NE part of the range respectively. These events were likely associated with vegetation shifts caused by climate and human-induced changes during the Holocene. Conclusions The relative genetic homogeneity observed across populations of this steppe raptor may be explained by a short isolation time, relatively recent population expansions and a relaxed philopatry. We highlight the importance of considering the consequence of isolation and colonization processes in order to better understand the evolutionary history of steppe species.

  14. Demographic history, genetic structure and gene flow in a steppe-associated raptor species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jesus T; Alda, Fernando; Terraube, Julien; Mougeot, François; Sternalski, Audrey; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Arroyo, Beatriz

    2011-11-17

    Environmental preferences and past climatic changes may determine the length of time during which a species range has contracted or expanded from refugia, thereby influencing levels of genetic diversification. Connectivity among populations of steppe-associated taxa might have been maximal during the long glacial periods, and interrupted only during the shorter interglacial phases, potentially resulting in low levels of genetic differentiation among populations. We investigated this hypothesis by exploring patterns of genetic diversity, past demography and gene flow in a raptor species characteristic of steppes, the Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus), using mitochondrial DNA data from 13 breeding populations and two wintering populations. Consistent with our hypothesis, Montagu's harrier has relatively low genetic variation at the mitochondrial DNA. The highest levels of genetic diversity were found in coastal Spain, France and central Asia. These areas, which were open landscapes during the Holocene, may have acted as refugia when most of the European continent was covered by forests. We found significant genetic differentiation between two population groups, at the SW and NE parts of the species' range. Two events of past population growth were detected, and occurred ca. 7500-5500 and ca. 3500-1000 years BP in the SW and NE part of the range respectively. These events were likely associated with vegetation shifts caused by climate and human-induced changes during the Holocene. The relative genetic homogeneity observed across populations of this steppe raptor may be explained by a short isolation time, relatively recent population expansions and a relaxed philopatry. We highlight the importance of considering the consequence of isolation and colonization processes in order to better understand the evolutionary history of steppe species.

  15. Demographic history, genetic structure and gene flow in a steppe-associated raptor species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental preferences and past climatic changes may determine the length of time during which a species range has contracted or expanded from refugia, thereby influencing levels of genetic diversification. Connectivity among populations of steppe-associated taxa might have been maximal during the long glacial periods, and interrupted only during the shorter interglacial phases, potentially resulting in low levels of genetic differentiation among populations. We investigated this hypothesis by exploring patterns of genetic diversity, past demography and gene flow in a raptor species characteristic of steppes, the Montagu's harrier (Circus pygargus), using mitochondrial DNA data from 13 breeding populations and two wintering populations. Results Consistent with our hypothesis, Montagu's harrier has relatively low genetic variation at the mitochondrial DNA. The highest levels of genetic diversity were found in coastal Spain, France and central Asia. These areas, which were open landscapes during the Holocene, may have acted as refugia when most of the European continent was covered by forests. We found significant genetic differentiation between two population groups, at the SW and NE parts of the species' range. Two events of past population growth were detected, and occurred ca. 7500-5500 and ca. 3500-1000 years BP in the SW and NE part of the range respectively. These events were likely associated with vegetation shifts caused by climate and human-induced changes during the Holocene. Conclusions The relative genetic homogeneity observed across populations of this steppe raptor may be explained by a short isolation time, relatively recent population expansions and a relaxed philopatry. We highlight the importance of considering the consequence of isolation and colonization processes in order to better understand the evolutionary history of steppe species. PMID:22093489

  16. Characterization of an AGAMOUS gene expressed throughout development of the fleshy fruit-like structure produced by Ginkgo biloba around its seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovisetto, Alessandro; Baldan, Barbara; Pavanello, Anna; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2015-07-16

    The involvement of MADS-box genes of the AGAMOUS lineage in the formation of both flowers and fruits has been studied in detail in Angiosperms. AGAMOUS genes are expressed also in the reproductive structures of Gymnosperms, yet the demonstration of their role has been problematic because Gymnosperms are woody plants difficult to manipulate for physiological and genetic studies. Recently, it was shown that in the gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba an AGAMOUS gene was expressed throughout development and ripening of the fleshy fruit-like structures produced by this species around its seeds. Such fleshy structures are evolutionarily very important because they favor the dispersal of seeds through endozoochory. In this work a characterization of the Ginkgo gene was carried out by over-expressing it in tomato. In tomato plants ectopically expressing the Ginkgo AGAMOUS gene a macroscopic anomaly was observed only in the flower sepals. While the wild type sepals had a leaf-like appearance, the transgenic ones appeared connately adjoined at their proximal extremity and, concomitant with the development and ripening of the fruit, they became thicker and acquired a yellowish-orange color, thus indicating that they had undergone a homeotic transformation into