WorldWideScience

Sample records for net surface heat

  1. Surface Oxide Net Charge of a Titanium Alloy; Comparison Between Effects of Treatment With Heat or Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Daniel E.; Rapuano, Bruce E.; Schniepp, Hannes C.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we have compared the effects of heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) treatment of a Ti6Al4V alloy on the physico-chemical properties of the alloy’s surface oxide. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were passivated alone, heated to 600 °C, or RFGD plasma treated in pure oxygen. RFGD treatment did not alter the roughness, topography, elemental composition or thickness of the alloy’s surface oxide layer. In contrast, heat treatment altered oxide topography by creating a pattern of oxide elevations approximately 50–100 nm in diameter. These nanostructures exhibited a three-fold increase in roughness compared to untreated surfaces when RMS roughness was calculated after applying a spatial high-pass filter with a 200 nm cutoff wavelength. Heat treatment also produced a surface enrichment in aluminum and vanadium oxides. Both RFGD and heat treatment produced similar increases in oxide wettability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of metal surface oxide net charge signified by a long range force of attraction to or repulsion from a (negatively charged) silicon nitride AFM probe were also obtained for all three experimental groups. Force measurements showed that the RFGD-treated Ti6Al4V samples demonstrated a higher net positive surface charge at pH values below 6 and a higher net negative surface charge at physiological pH (pH values between 7 and 8) compared to control and heat-treated samples These findings suggest that RFGD treatment of metallic implant materials can be used to study the role of negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in protein bioactivity, osteogenic cell behavior and osseointegration independently of oxide topography. PMID:20880672

  2. Downward Heat Penetration below Seasonal Thermocline and its Impact on Sea Surface Temperature Variation Affected by Net Heat Flux during Summer Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, S.; Nonaka, M.; Tomita, T.; Taguchi, B.; Tomita, H.; Iwasaka, N.

    2016-02-01

    Oceanic heat capacity of the upper layer is a key of the change in the sea surface temperature (SST) affecting air-sea heat exchange and of the temporal scale of SST variability. In the past, studies of SST variability associated with the air-sea heat exchange have mainly focused on the conditions during the winter, because wintertime deep mixed layer (ML) accumulates a huge amount of heat to the atmosphere. On the contrary, ML during the warming season is thinner than it is during the cooling season, being only a few tens of meters deep at mid- and high- latitudes, bounded by a shallow and sharp seasonal thermocline. Since the ML that directly communicates with the atmosphere is thin, the ocean has been considered to play a passive role in air-sea interactions during the warming season. In this study, we clarified that subsurface ocean plays an important role to seasonal changes of SST and heat capacity during the warming season using observational data of Argo and J-OFURO2, which is net heat flux (Qnet) data from satellites. To clarify the role of upper ocean to the Qnet during summer, we introduce a concept of heat penetration depth (HPD), defined as the depth to which Qnet distinctly penetrates below the seasonal thermocline. Then we assume vertical one dimensional process between Qnet and temporal heat content (HC) change integrating temperature from surface to HPD. The vertical one dimensional process can be assumed in almost mid- and high-latitude NP, and we successfully characterize the heat capacity in terms of the HC above the HPD. The downward heat penetration below the shallow seasonal thermocline is widely found throughout the NP. On the basis of a simple estimation that the amount of heat accumulated by summer Qnet in the NP, about two-thirds of Qnet penetrates below the shallow seasonal thermocline. The effect of heat penetration also makes a magnitude of seasonal change in SST to be smaller, at least a half of that the magnitude under the assumption

  3. Using the Synergy Between GERB/SEVIRI and Micrometeorological Data to Study the Relationship Between Surface Net Radiation and Soil Heat Flux at Local and Regional Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, A. G.; Velázquez Blázquez, A.; Soria, E.; Lopez-Baeza, E.

    2009-04-01

    The surface energy exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere can be described by the energy balance equation Rn - H - LE - G = 0, where Rn represents net radiation, H the sensible heat flux, LE, the latent heat flux and G the soil heat flux. In this work the relationship between Rn and G is studied over vineyard crops, a relative sparse vegetation cover crop where, according to the literature, it is expected that G consumes a significant proportion of Rn. In order to study this relationship at local and regional scales, micrometeorological observations and METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) satellite data have been used. MSG through the GERB (Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget) and the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensors can provide estimates of net radiation and required land surface temperature (LST) information with a frequency of 15 min intervals. The necessary micrometeorological parameters, to compare with satellite data, were collected during the full vine growing season of 2007 (May to September) in a field experiment carried out at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) site area. The VAS is a robust reference meteorological station which is successfully used preferentially for validation of low spatial resolution satellite data and products. It is located on the natural region of the Utiel-Requena Plateau, at about 80 km west from the city of Valencia, Spain, and represents a reasonable homogeneous area of about 50 km x 50 km dedicated primarily to growing vines. The methodology utilized to study the relationship between Rn and G at local and regional scales, was that proposed by Santanello and Friedel (2002), where surface temperature can be obtained from SEVIRI that provides estimates of LST with unprecedented frequency of 15 min intervals with a spatial resolution of 3.1 km, thus totally covering its diurnal course. The preliminary results show that: 1- the correlation between the ground measurements and SEVIRI LST is

  4. Relationships Between the Bulk-Skin Sea Surface Temperature Difference, Wind, and Net Air-Sea Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Baldwin in the preparation of their publication "Accuracy of in situ sea surface temperatures used to calibrate infrared satellite measurements". The remainder of this report is drawn from these publications and presentations.

  5. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  6. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  7. Surface renewal method for estimating sensible heat flux | Mengistu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For short canopies, latent energy flux may be estimated using a shortened surface energy balance from measurements of sensible and soil heat flux and the net irradiance at the surface. The surface renewal (SR) method for estimating sensible heat, latent energy, and other scalar fluxes has the advantage over other ...

  8. Temporal and spatial changes in mixed layer properties and atmospheric net heat flux in the Nordic Seas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A; Alekseev, G [SI ' Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Korablev, A; Esau, I, E-mail: avsmir@aari.nw.r [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    The Nordic Seas are an important area of the World Ocean where warm Atlantic waters penetrate far north forming the mild climate of Northern Europe. These waters represent the northern rim of the global thermohaline circulation. Estimates of the relationships between the net heat flux and mixed layer properties in the Nordic Seas are examined. Oceanographic data are derived from the Oceanographic Data Base (ODB) compiled in the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute. Ocean weather ship 'Mike' (OWS) data are used to calculate radiative and turbulent components of the net heat flux. The net shortwave flux was calculated using a satellite albedo dataset and the EPA model. The net longwave flux was estimated by Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) method. Turbulent fluxes at the air-sea interface were calculated using the COARE 3.0 algorithm. The net heat flux was calculated by using oceanographic and meteorological data of the OWS 'Mike'. The mixed layer depth was estimated for the period since 2002 until 2009 by the 'Mike' data as well. A good correlation between these two parameters has been found. Sensible and latent heat fluxes controlled by surface air temperature/sea surface temperature gradient are the main contributors into net heat flux. Significant correlation was found between heat fluxes variations at the OWS 'Mike' location and sea ice export from the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Study on Surface Heat Budget of Various Pavements for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Takebayashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface heat budgets of various pavement surfaces are studied with the aim of mitigating the urban heat island effect. In this study, the thermal characteristics of pavements are examined using data from observations. The net radiation, surface temperature, temperature under the surface, conduction heat flux, and core weight for each experimental surface are recorded, together with the weather conditions at the time of observation. The latent heat flux is estimated from the observed weight of the cores. The surface heat budget under the same weather conditions is examined, and the sensible heat flux from each target surface is calculated. The parameters that influence the surface heat budget, for example, solar reflectance (albedo, evaporative efficiency, heat conductivity, and heat capacity, are examined. On a typical summer day, the maximum reduction in the sensible heat flux from that on a normal asphalt surface is about 150 W/m2 for an asphalt surface with water-retaining material and about 100 W/m2 for a cement concrete surface with water-retaining material, depending on the albedo of each surface.

  10. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis-based global net surface energy flux and uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    The net surface energy flux is central to the climate system yet observational limitations lead to substantial uncertainty (Trenberth and Fasullo, 2013; Roberts et al., 2016). A combination of satellite-derived radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) adjusted using the latest estimation of the net heat uptake of the Earth system, and the atmospheric energy tendencies and transports from the ERA-Interim reanalysis are used to estimate surface energy flux globally (Liu et al., 2015). Land surface fluxes are adjusted through a simple energy balance approach using relations at each grid point with the consideration of snowmelt to improve regional realism. The energy adjustment is redistributed over the oceans using a weighting function to avoid meridional discontinuities. Uncertainties in surface fluxes are investigated using a variety of approaches including comparison with a range of atmospheric reanalysis input data and products. Zonal multiannual mean surface flux uncertainty is estimated to be less than 5 Wm-2 but much larger uncertainty is likely for regional monthly values. The meridional energy transport is calculated using the net surface heat fluxes estimated in this study and the result shows better agreement with observations in Atlantic than before. The derived turbulent fluxes (difference between the net heat flux and the CERES EBAF radiative flux at surface) also have good agreement with those from OAFLUX dataset and buoy observations. Decadal changes in the global energy budget and the hemisphere energy imbalances are quantified and present day cross-equator heat transports is re-evaluated as 0.22±0.15 PW southward by the atmosphere and 0.32±0.16 PW northward by the ocean considering the observed ocean heat sinks (Roemmich et al., 2006) . Liu et al. (2015) Combining satellite observations and reanalysis energy transports to estimate global net surface energy fluxes 1985-2012. J. Geophys. Res., Atmospheres. ISSN 2169-8996 doi: 10.1002/2015JD

  11. System and method for determining the net output torque from a waste heat recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricaud, Christophe; Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2016-12-13

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system with a system and method for calculation of the net output torque from the waste heat recovery system. The calculation uses inputs from existing pressure and speed sensors to create a virtual pump torque sensor and a virtual expander torque sensor, and uses these sensors to provide an accurate net torque output from the WHR system.

  12. Global Surface Net-Radiation at 5 km from MODIS Terra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Verma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reliable and fine resolution estimates of surface net-radiation are required for estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. However, currently, fine resolution estimates of net-radiation are not available and consequently it is challenging to develop multi-year estimates of evapotranspiration at scales that can capture land surface heterogeneity and are relevant for policy and decision-making. We developed and evaluated a global net-radiation product at 5 km and 8-day resolution by combining mutually consistent atmosphere and land data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board Terra. Comparison with net-radiation measurements from 154 globally distributed sites (414 site-years from the FLUXNET and Surface Radiation budget network (SURFRAD showed that the net-radiation product agreed well with measurements across seasons and climate types in the extratropics (Wilmott’s index ranged from 0.74 for boreal to 0.63 for Mediterranean sites. Mean absolute deviation between the MODIS and measured net-radiation ranged from 38.0 ± 1.8 W∙m−2 in boreal to 72.0 ± 4.1 W∙m−2 in the tropical climates. The mean bias was small and constituted only 11%, 0.7%, 8.4%, 4.2%, 13.3%, and 5.4% of the mean absolute error in daytime net-radiation in boreal, Mediterranean, temperate-continental, temperate, semi-arid, and tropical climate, respectively. To assess the accuracy of the broader spatiotemporal patterns, we upscaled error-quantified MODIS net-radiation and compared it with the net-radiation estimates from the coarse spatial (1° × 1° but high temporal resolution gridded net-radiation product from the Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES. Our estimates agreed closely with the net-radiation estimates from the CERES. Difference between the two was less than 10 W·m−2 in 94% of the total land area. MODIS net-radiation product will be a valuable resource for the

  13. Heat Mismatch of future Net Zero Energy Buildings within district heating areas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen; Möller, Bernd

    . NZEBs are characterized by having a greatly reduced energy demand that on an annual basis can be balanced out by an equivalent generation of energy from RES. Most buildings in Denmark are connected electricity grids and around half to district heating (DH) systems. Connecting buildings to larger energy...... instead of wasting the energy. The objective in this paper is find how large an area of NZEBs is to be built within DH areas and how the heat mismatch of NZEBs influence different types of Danish DH systems. In the analyses nine different scenarios are analyzed. The examination is from a technical......The long-term goal for Denmark is to develop an energy system solely based on renewable energy sources (RES) in 2050. To reach this goal energy savings in buildings are essential. Therefore, a focus on energy efficient measures in buildings and net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) have increased...

  14. Heat transfer research on enhanced heating surfaces in pool boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawa, Wojciech; Wójcik, Tadeusz M.; Piasecka, Magdalena

    The paper focuses on the analysis of the enhanced surfaces in such applications as boiling heat transfer. The testing measurement module with enhanced heating surfaces was used for pool boiling research. Pool boiling experiments were conducted with distilled water at atmospheric pressure in the vessel using an enhanced sample as the bottom heating surface. The samples are soldered to a copper heating block of the round cross-section .They were placed: in the fluid (saturation temperature measurement), under the sample for temperature determination. A vessel made of four flat glass panes was used for visualization. The heated surfaces in contact with the fluid differed in roughness were smooth or enhanced. This paper analyzes the effects of the microstructured heated surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the heat flux and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported for the enhanced surfaces.

  15. Consumer Unit for Low Energy District Heating Net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Otto; Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    heat load on a daily basis, having a flow temperature control based on outdoor climate. The unit is designed for a near constant district heating water flow. The paper describes two concepts. The analyses are based on TRNSYS (Klein et al., 2006) simulation, supplied with laboratory verification...

  16. The surface heat budget of Hudson Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danielson, E.W

    1969-01-01

    ... which information the heat budget calculations are based. These data include surface air and sea temperatures, ice concentration, cloudiness, wind, atmospheric moisture, ice and water movement, and heat storage amounts within Hudson Bay waters...

  17. Evaluation of Advanced Stirling Convertor Net Heat Input Correlation Methods Using a Thermal Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. In an effort to improve net heat input predictions, numerous tasks have been performed which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs, including testing validation hardware, known as the Thermal Standard, to provide a direct comparison to numerical and empirical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This validation hardware provided a comparison for scrutinizing and improving empirical correlations and numerical models of ASC-E2 net heat input. This hardware simulated the characteristics of an ASC-E2 convertor in both an operating and non-operating mode. This paper describes the Thermal Standard testing and the conclusions of the validation effort applied to the empirical correlation methods used by the Radioisotope Power System (RPS) team at NASA Glenn.

  18. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  19. Passive heating of the ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburczyk, Anna

    2016-03-01

    The phenomenon of phase change is one of the most important contemporary issues of thermal engineering. In particular, this applies to all kinds of heat exchanger systems, which should achieve the highest possible efficiency while reducing investment and operating costs. Some of these systems are heat pipes or thermosyphons, which, among others, are used for the heat transfer, temperature stabilization and the regulation of heat flux density. Additionally, they are passive systems, and therefore do not require an external power supply. Heat pipes can be used to stabilize the surface temperature of roads and driveways. Large heat tubes can be applied for heating the surface of bridges and overpasses, which become icy in unfavorable climatic conditions. The paper presents research on the test facility, whose main component is a long vertical copper fin. The temperature at the base of the fin was kept constant for a given series of measurements. Heat receiving fluid was ethanol at atmospheric pressure. The measurement methodology and the results of investigations were discussed. The surface temperature distribution was measured with the infrared camera, and on this basis the local values of heat flow and the heat transfer coefficient were determined. The results were presented as boiling curves for both the fin with the smooth surface and the one covered with a metal capillary-porous structure. The results obtained are useful in the design of heat exchangers, including passive heating of the ground.

  20. The Influence of Rain Sensible Heat and Subsurface Energy Transport on the Energy Balance at the Land Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollet, S.J.; Cvijanovic, I.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Maxwell, R.M.; Moene, A.F.; Bayer, P.

    2009-01-01

    In land surface models, which account for the energy balance at the land surface, subsurface heat transport is an important component that reciprocally influences ground, sensible, and latent heat fluxes and net radiation. In most models, subsurface heat transport parameterizations are commonly

  1. Heat diffusion in fractal geometry cooling surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramšak Matjaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the numerical simulation of heat diffusion in the fractal geometry of Koch snowflake is presented using multidomain mixed Boundary Element Method. The idea and motivation of work is to improve the cooling of small electronic devices using fractal geometry of surface similar to cooling ribs. The heat diffusion is assumed as the only principle of heat transfer. The results are compared to the heat flux of a flat surface. The limiting case of infinite small fractal element is computed using Richardson extrapolation.

  2. Microscale surface modifications for heat transfer enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, Huseyin; Singh, Virendra; Kizito, John P; Rini, Daniel P; Seal, Sudipta; Chow, Louis C

    2013-10-09

    In this experimental study, two surface modification techniques were investigated for their effect on heat transfer enhancement. One of the methods employed the particle (grit) blasting to create microscale indentations, while the other used plasma spray coating to create microscale protrusions on Al 6061 (aluminum alloy 6061) samples. The test surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy. Because of the surface modifications, the actual surface area was increased up to 2.8× compared to the projected base area, and the arithmetic mean roughness value (Ra) was determined to vary from 0.3 μm for the reference smooth surface to 19.5 μm for the modified surfaces. Selected samples with modified surfaces along with the reference smooth surface were then evaluated for their heat transfer performance in spray cooling tests. The cooling system had vapor-atomizing nozzles and used anhydrous ammonia as the coolant in order to achieve heat fluxes up to 500 W/cm(2) representing a thermal management setting for high power systems. Experimental results showed that the microscale surface modifications enhanced heat transfer coefficients up to 76% at 500 W/cm(2) compared to the smooth surface and demonstrated the benefits of these practical surface modification techniques to enhance two-phase heat transfer process.

  3. Spatial patterns and cell surface clusters in perineuronal nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnst, Nikita; Kuznetsova, Svetlana; Lipachev, Nikita; Shaikhutdinov, Nurislam; Melnikova, Anastasiya; Mavlikeev, Mikhail; Uvarov, Pavel; Baltina, Tatyana V; Rauvala, Heikki; Osin, Yuriy N; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Paveliev, Mikhail

    2016-10-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNN) ensheath GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses on neuronal cell surface in the central nervous system (CNS), have neuroprotective effect in animal models of Alzheimer disease and regulate synaptic plasticity during development and regeneration. Crucial insights were obtained recently concerning molecular composition and physiological importance of PNN but the microstructure of the network remains largely unstudied. Here we used histochemistry, fluorescent microscopy and quantitative image analysis to study the PNN structure in adult mouse and rat neurons from layers IV and VI of the somatosensory cortex. Vast majority of meshes have quadrangle, pentagon or hexagon shape with mean mesh area of 1.29µm(2) in mouse and 1.44µm(2) in rat neurons. We demonstrate two distinct patterns of chondroitin sulfate distribution within a single mesh - with uniform (nonpolar) and node-enriched (polar) distribution of the Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive signal. Vertices of the node-enriched pattern match better with local maxima of chondroitin sulfate density as compared to the uniform pattern. PNN is organized into clusters of meshes with distinct morphologies on the neuronal cell surface. Our findings suggest the role for the PNN microstructure in the synaptic transduction and plasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Heat transfer with freezing in a scraped surface heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhdar, M.B. [LGL France Refrigerating Division, Genas (France); Cerecero, R.; Alvarez, G.; Guilpart, J. [Cemagref, Antony cedex (France). Food Process Engineering; Flick, D. [Institut National Agronomique, Paris (France); Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon (France). Centre de Thermique

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out on a scraped surface heat exchanger used for freezing of water-ethanol mixture and aqueous sucrose solution. The influence of various parameters on heat transfer intensity was established: product type and composition, flow rate, blade rotation speed, distance between blades and wall. During starting (transient period) the solution is first supercooled, then ice crystals appear on the scraped surface (heterogeneous nucleation) and no more supercooling is observed. It seems that, when blades are 3 mm far from the surface, a constant ice layer is formed having this thickness and acting as a thermal resistance. But when the blades rotate at 1 mm from the surface, periodically all the ice layer is removed despite the surface is not really scraped. This could simplify ice generator technology. An internal heat transfer coefficient was defined; it depends mainly on rotation speed. Correlations were proposed for its prediction, which could be applied, at least as a first approach, for the most common freezing applications of scraped surface heat exchanger i.e. ice creams (which are derived from sucrose solutions) and two-phase secondary refrigerants (which are principally ethanol solutions). (author)

  5. Numerical Computation of Net Radiative Heat Transfer within a Non Absorbing Furnace Enclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaibu Ndache MOHAMMED

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The numerical evaluation of the net radiative heat transfer rate in a single zone, non absorbing furnace enclosure is reported. In this analysis, simplified mathematical furnace model namely, the long furnace model is used to determine furnace performance. The formulation assumes some known temperature values. Thus, heat transfer equations were set up and solved numerically. A FORTRAN computer program was developed and debugged. Results obtained from this study compare favourably well with the results from the traditional graphical method. Also, the computer program developed can handle variations in furnace operating conditions, temperatures, thermal properties and dimensions.

  6. Excess heat production of future net zero energy buildings within district heating areas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen; Möller, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    buildings in Denmark are connected to electricity grids and around half are connected to districtheating (DH) systems. Connecting buildings to larger energy systems enables them to send and receive energy from these systems. This paper’s objective is to examine how excess heat production from NZEBs...... excess heat production from solar thermal collectors. The main findings are that the excess heat from NZEBs can benefit DH systems by decreasing the production from production units utilizing combustible fuels. In DH areas where the heat demand in summer months is already covered by renewable energy......Denmark’s long-term energy goal is to develop an energy system solely based on renewable energy sources by 2050. To reach this goal, energy savings in buildings is essential. Therefore, the focus on energy efficient measures in buildings and netzeroenergybuildings (NZEBs) has increased. Most...

  7. Tidal and atmospheric forcing of the upper ocean in the Gulf of California. 2: Surface heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, Cynthia A.; Winant, Clinton D.; Abbott, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite infrared imagery and coastal meteorological data for March 1984 through February 1985 are used to estimate the net annual surface heat flux for the northern Gulf of California. The average annual surface heat flux for the area north of Guaymas and Santa Rosalia is estimated to be +74 W/sq m for the 1984-1985 time period. This is comparable to the +20-50 W/sq m previously obtained from heat and freshwater transport estimates made with hydrographic surveys from different years and months. The spatial distribution of the net surface heat flux shows a net gain of heat over the whole northern gulf. Except for a local maximum near San Esteban Island, the largest heat gain (+110-120 W/sq m) occurs in the Ballenas and Salsipuedes channels, where strong tidal mixing produces anomalously cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over much of the year. The lowest heat gain occurs in the Guayamas Basin (+40-50 W/sq m), where SSTs are consistently warmer. In the relatively shallow northern basin the net surface heat flux is farily uniform, with a net annual gain of approxmately +70 W/sq m. A local minimum in heat gain (approximately +60 W/sq m) is observed over the shelf in the northwest, where spring and summer surface temperatures are particularly high. A similar minimum in heat gain over the shelf was observed in a separate study in which historical SSTs and 7 years (1979-1986) of meteorological data from Puerto Penasco were used to estimate the net surface heat flux for the northern basin. In that study, however, the heat fluxes were higher, with a gain of +100 W/sq m over the shelf and +114 W/sq m in the northern basin. These larger values are directly attributable to the higher humidities in the 1979-1986 study compared to the 1984-1985 satellite study. High humidities reduce evaporation and the associated latent heat loss, promoting a net annual heat gain. In the norther Gulf of California, however, tidal mixing appears to play a key role in the observed gain of

  8. Elevated CO2 maintains grassland net carbon uptake under a future heat and drought extreme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jacques; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Augusti, Angela; Benot, Marie-Lise; Thiery, Lionel; Darsonville, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Devidal, Sébastien; Escape, Christophe; Ravel, Olivier; Fromin, Nathalie; Volaire, Florence; Milcu, Alexandru; Bahn, Michael; Soussana, Jean-François

    2016-05-31

    Extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as droughts and heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and frequency and impact the terrestrial carbon balance. However, we lack direct experimental evidence of how the net carbon uptake of ecosystems is affected by ECEs under future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2). Taking advantage of an advanced controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron), we simulated eCO2 and extreme cooccurring heat and drought events as projected for the 2050s and analyzed their effects on the ecosystem-level carbon and water fluxes in a C3 grassland. Our results indicate that eCO2 not only slows down the decline of ecosystem carbon uptake during the ECE but also enhances its recovery after the ECE, as mediated by increases of root growth and plant nitrogen uptake induced by the ECE. These findings indicate that, in the predicted near future climate, eCO2 could mitigate the effects of extreme droughts and heat waves on ecosystem net carbon uptake.

  9. Annual and Seasonal Variability of Net Heat Budget in the Northern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Bentamy, Abderrahim; Chen, Wen; Kumar, M. R. Ramesh; Mathew, Simi; Venkatesan, Ramasamy

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal features of the net heat budget over the Northern Indian Ocean (focusing on the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal), using satellite and numerical model estimates. The main objective is to characterize the annual, seasonal, and inter-annual patterns over this basin of climatic significance. To assess the temporal variability, several turbulent and radiative fluxes are used The turbulent fluxes are based on information from the Institut Français pout la Recherche et l'Exploitation de la MER (IFREMER V3), the Hamburg Ocean-Atmosphere Parameters from Satellite (HOAPS V3), the SEAFLUX V1, the Japanese Ocean Flux Data sets with Use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO V2), the Objective Analysis Fluxes (OAFlux V2), the European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), the ERA Interim, the National centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis, CFSR, and the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA). The radiative fluxes, both shortwave and longwave, include those produced at the University of Maryland (UMD) as well as those derived from several of the above mentioned numerical models. An attempt will be made to evaluate the various fluxes against buoy observations such as those from the RAMA array. The National Institute of Ocean Technology, Chennai, India under its Ocean Observation Program has deployed a series of OMNI Buoys both in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal. These buoys are equipped with sensors to measure the radiation as well as other parameters. Comparison has been done with the OMNI observations and good agreement has been found with the current set-up of the instrument at a 3 m level. We found significant differences between the various products at specific locations. The ultimate objective is to investigates the sources of the differences in terms of atmospheric variables (surface

  10. Influence of snow cover changes on surface radiation and heat balance based on the WRF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingxue; Liu, Tingxiang; Bu, Kun; Yang, Jiuchun; Chang, Liping; Zhang, Shuwen

    2017-10-01

    The snow cover extent in mid-high latitude areas of the Northern Hemisphere has significantly declined corresponding to the global warming, especially since the 1970s. Snow-climate feedbacks play a critical role in regulating the global radiation balance and influencing surface heat flux exchange. However, the degree to which snow cover changes affect the radiation budget and energy balance on a regional scale and the difference between snow-climate and land use/cover change (LUCC)-climate feedbacks have been rarely studied. In this paper, we selected Heilongjiang Basin, where the snow cover has changed obviously, as our study area and used the WRF model to simulate the influences of snow cover changes on the surface radiation budget and heat balance. In the scenario simulation, the localized surface parameter data improved the accuracy by 10 % compared with the control group. The spatial and temporal analysis of the surface variables showed that the net surface radiation, sensible heat flux, Bowen ratio, temperature and percentage of snow cover were negatively correlated and that the ground heat flux and latent heat flux were positively correlated with the percentage of snow cover. The spatial analysis also showed that a significant relationship existed between the surface variables and land cover types, which was not obviously as that for snow cover changes. Finally, six typical study areas were selected to quantitatively analyse the influence of land cover types beneath the snow cover on heat absorption and transfer, which showed that when the land was snow covered, the conversion of forest to farmland can dramatically influence the net radiation and other surface variables, whereas the snow-free land showed significantly reduced influence. Furthermore, compared with typical land cover changes, e.g., the conversion of forest into farmland, the influence of snow cover changes on net radiation and sensible heat flux were 60 % higher than that of land cover changes

  11. UV sensitivity of planktonic net community production in ocean surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaudie-de-Gioux, Aurore; Agustí, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-05-01

    The net plankton community metabolism of oceanic surface waters is particularly important as it more directly affects the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters and thus the air-sea fluxes of CO2. Plankton communities in surface waters are exposed to high irradiance that includes significant ultraviolet blue (UVB, 280-315 nm) radiation. UVB radiation affects both photosynthetic and respiration rates, increase plankton mortality rates, and other metabolic and chemical processes. Here we test the sensitivity of net community production (NCP) to UVB of planktonic communities in surface waters across contrasting regions of the ocean. We observed here that UVB radiation affects net plankton community production at the ocean surface, imposing a shift in NCP by, on average, 50% relative to the values measured when excluding partly UVB. Our results show that under full solar radiation, the metabolic balance shows the prevalence of net heterotrophic community production. The demonstration of an important effect of UVB radiation on NCP in surface waters presented here is of particular relevance in relation to the increased UVB radiation derived from the erosion of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our results encourage design future research to further our understanding of UVB effects on the metabolic balance of plankton communities.

  12. UV sensitivity of planktonic net community production in ocean surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    Regaudie de Gioux, Aurore; Agustí, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    The net plankton community metabolism of oceanic surface waters is particularly important as it more directly affects the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters and thus the air-sea fluxes of CO2. Plankton communities in surface waters are exposed to high irradiance that includes significant ultraviolet blue (UVB, 280-315 nm) radiation. UVB radiation affects both photosynthetic and respiration rates, increase plankton mortality rates, and other metabolic and chemical processes. Here we tes...

  13. Surface layer scintillometry for estimating the sensible heat flux component of the surface energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Savage

    2010-01-01

    energy balance, measurements of net irradiance and soil heat as well as SLS estimates of sensible heat allows path-weighted evaporation from the surface to be estimated. Research applications involving the use of the SLS method, as well as the theory on which the method is based, are presented.

  14. Surface Oxide Net Charge of a Titanium Alloy ; Modulation of Fibronectin-Activated Attachment and Spreading of Osteogenic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapuano, Bruce E.; MacDonald, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we have altered the surface oxide properties of a Ti6Al4V alloy using heat treatment or radiofrequency glow discharge (RFGD) in order to evaluate the relationship between the physico-chemical and biological properties of the alloy's surface oxide. The effects of surface pretreatments on the attachment of cells from two osteogenic cell lines (MG63 and MC3T3) and a mesenchymal stem cell line (C3H10T1/2) to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy were measured. Both heat and RFGD pretreatments produced a several-fold increase in the number of cells that attached to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy (0.001 and 10 nM FN) for each cell line tested. An antibody (HFN7.1) directed against the central integrin binding domain of fibronectin produced a 65-70% inhibition of cell attachment to fibronectin-coated disks, incdicating that cell attachment to the metal discs was dependent on fibronectin binding to cell integrin receptors. Both treatments also accelerated the cell spreading response manifested by extensive flattening and an increase in mean cellular area. The treatment-induced increases in the cell attachment activity of adsorbed fibronectin were correlated with previously demonstrated increases in Ti6Al4V oxide negative net surface charge at physiological pH produced by both heat and RFGD pretreatments. Since neither treatment increased the adsorption mass of fibronectin, these findings suggest that negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in Ti6Al4V can modulate fibronectin's integrin receptor activity by altering the adsorbed protein's conformation. Our results further suggest that negatively charged functional groups in the surface oxide can play a prominent role in the osseointegration of metallic implant materials. PMID:20884181

  15. Sensors measure surface ablation rate of reentry vehicle heat shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, J. M., III

    1966-01-01

    Sensors measure surface erosion rate of ablating material in reentry vehicle heat shield. Each sensor, which is placed at precise depths in the heat shield is activated when the ablator surface erodes to the location of a sensing point. Sensor depth and activation time determine ablator surface erosion rate.

  16. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  17. Achievement of Sustained Net Plasma Heating in a Fusion Experiment with the Optometrist Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, E A; Trask, E; Binderbauer, M; Dikovsky, M; Gota, H; Mendoza, R; Platt, J C; Riley, P F

    2017-07-25

    Many fields of basic and applied science require efficiently exploring complex systems with high dimensionality. An example of such a challenge is optimising the performance of plasma fusion experiments. The highly-nonlinear and temporally-varying interaction between the plasma, its environment and external controls presents a considerable complexity in these experiments. A further difficulty arises from the fact that there is no single objective metric that fully captures both plasma quality and equipment constraints. To efficiently optimise the system, we develop the Optometrist Algorithm, a stochastic perturbation method combined with human choice. Analogous to getting an eyeglass prescription, the Optometrist Algorithm confronts a human operator with two alternative experimental settings and associated outcomes. A human operator then chooses which experiment produces subjectively better results. This innovative technique led to the discovery of an unexpected record confinement regime with positive net heating power in a field-reversed configuration plasma, characterised by a >50% reduction in the energy loss rate and concomitant increase in ion temperature and total plasma energy.

  18. Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation, which is presumably due to the predominance of different cloud types throughout the day. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged by using the temporally averaged column water vapor amount and the temporally averaged cosine of the solar zenith angle. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  19. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  20. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using Surface-Mounted One-Dimensional Flat Gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the measurement of the net heat flux normal to a surface using flat gages mounted onto the surface. Conduction heat flux is not the focus of this standard. Conduction applications related to insulation materials are covered by Test Method C 518 and Practices C 1041 and C 1046. The sensors covered by this test method all use a measurement of the temperature difference between two parallel planes normal to the surface to determine the heat that is exchanged to or from the surface in keeping with Fourier’s Law. The gages operate by the same principles for heat transfer in either direction. 1.2 This test method is quite broad in its field of application, size and construction. Different sensor types are described in detail in later sections as examples of the general method for measuring heat flux from the temperature gradient normal to a surface (1). Applications include both radiation and convection heat transfer. The gages have broad application from aerospace to biomedical en...

  1. Liquid-Infused Smooth Surface for Improved Condensation Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hirotaka; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Moriya, Takeo; Yoshikawa, Ryohei; Sasaki, Kaichi; Togasawa, Ryo; Yamazaki, Taku; Manabe, Kengo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2017-09-12

    Control of vapor condensation properties is a promising approach to manage a crucial part of energy infrastructure conditions. Heat transfer by vapor condensation on superhydrophobic coatings has garnered attention, because dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with rough structures leads to favorable heat-transfer performance. However, pinned condensed water droplets within the rough structure and a high thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation of superhydrophobic surfaces limit their heat-transfer increase. Recently, slippery liquid-infused surfaces (SLIPS) have been investigated, because of their high water sliding ability and surface smoothness originating from the liquid layer. However, even on SLIPS, condensed water droplets are eventually pinned to degrade their heat-transfer properties after extended use, because the rough base layer is exposed as infused liquid is lost. Herein, we report a liquid-infused smooth surface named "SPLASH" (surface with π electron interaction liquid adsorption, smoothness, and hydrophobicity) to overcome the problems derived from the rough structures in previous approaches to obtain stable, high heat-transfer performance. The SPLASH displayed a maximum condensation heat-transfer coefficient that was 175% higher than that of an uncoated substrate. The SPLASH also showed higher heat-transfer performance and more stable dropwise condensation than superhydrophobic surfaces and SLIPS from the viewpoints of condensed water droplet mobility and the thermodynamic energy barrier for nucleation. The effects of liquid-infused surface roughness and liquid viscosity on condensation heat transfer were investigated to compare heat-transfer performance. This research will aid industrial applications using vapor condensation.

  2. Automated Hybrid Microwave Heating for Lunar Surface Solidification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project addresses the need for a system that will provide automated lunar surface stabilization via hybrid microwave heating. Surface stabilization is...

  3. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation and optimization of the depth of flue gas heat recovery in surface heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, V. V.; Bespalov, V. I.; Melnikov, D. V.

    2017-09-01

    Economic issues associated with designing deep flue gas heat recovery units for natural gas-fired boilers are examined. The governing parameter affecting the performance and cost of surface-type condensing heat recovery heat exchangers is the heat transfer surface area. When firing natural gas, the heat recovery depth depends on the flue gas temperature at the condenser outlet and determines the amount of condensed water vapor. The effect of the outlet flue gas temperature in a heat recovery heat exchanger on the additionally recovered heat power is studied. A correlation has been derived enabling one to determine the best heat recovery depth (or the final cooling temperature) maximizing the anticipated reduced annual profit of a power enterprise from implementation of energy-saving measures. Results of optimization are presented for a surface-type condensing gas-air plate heat recovery heat exchanger for the climatic conditions and the economic situation in Tomsk. The predictions demonstrate that it is economically feasible to design similar heat recovery heat exchangers for a flue gas outlet temperature of 10°C. In this case, the payback period for the investment in the heat recovery heat exchanger will be 1.5 years. The effect of various factors on the optimal outlet flue gas temperature was analyzed. Most climatic, economical, or technological factors have a minor effect on the best outlet temperature, which remains between 5 and 20°C when varying the affecting factors. The derived correlation enables us to preliminary estimate the outlet (final) flue gas temperature that should be used in designing the heat transfer surface of a heat recovery heat exchanger for a gas-fired boiler as applied to the specific climatic conditions.

  5. Link between Surface and Subsurface Urban Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne; Bayer, Peter; Olesen, Folke; Goettsche, Frank; Blum, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Urban heat islands exist in all diverse layers of modern cities, such as surface and subsurface. While both layers are typically investigated separately, the coupling of surface and subsurface urban heat islands is insufficiently understood. Hence, this study focuses on the interrelation of both zones and the influence of additional underground heat sources, such as heated basements, on this interaction. Using satellite derived land surface temperatures and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements the spatial properties of both heat islands are compared. Significant correlations of 0.5 up to more than 0.8 are found between surface and subsurface urban heat islands. If groundwater flow is considered this correlation increases by approximately 10%. Next we analyzed the dissimilarities between both heat islands in order to understand the interaction between the urban surface and subsurface. We find that local groundwater hotspots under the city center and industrial areas are not revealed in satellite derived land surface temperatures. Overall groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures in 95% of the analyzed area due to the influence of below ground anthropogenic heat sources such as sewage systems, district heating systems, and especially elevated basement temperatures. Thus, an estimation method is proposed that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method regional groundwater temperatures can be accurately estimated with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K. Since land surface temperatures and building densities are available from remote sensing, this method has the potential for a large scale estimations of urban groundwater temperatures. Thus, it is feasible to detect subsurface urban heat islands on a global level and to investigate sustainable geothermal potentials using satellite derived data.

  6. NetOglyc: prediction of mucin type O-glycosylation sites based on sequence context and surface accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Erik; Lund, Ole; Tolstrup, Niels

    1998-01-01

    . A jury of artifical neural networks was trained to recognize the sequence context and surface accessibility of 299 known and verified mucin type O-glycosylation sites extracted from O-GLYCBASE. The cross-validated NetOglyc network system correctly found 83% of the glycosylated and 90% of the non...... on the amino acid sequence. The server addresses are http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetOGlyc/ and netOglyc@cbs.dtu.dk...

  7. Analytical solution to laser short-pulse heating of microsized metal wire: volumetric and surface heat source considerations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yilbas, B.S; Al-Dweik, A.Y

    2012-01-01

    .... The volumetric heat source resembles absorption by irradiated field according to Lambert’s Beer law while a surface heat source represents short pulse heating through high intensity thermal contact at the surface...

  8. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  9. Estimation of surface heat flux and surface temperature during inverse heat conduction under varying spray parameters and sample initial temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong; Zubair, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m(2) was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  10. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck’s sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa.

  11. Estimation of Surface Heat Flux and Surface Temperature during Inverse Heat Conduction under Varying Spray Parameters and Sample Initial Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Aqeel-ur-Rehman; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the effects of inlet pressure, sample thickness, initial sample temperature, and temperature sensor location on the surface heat flux, surface temperature, and surface ultrafast cooling rate using stainless steel samples of diameter 27 mm and thickness (mm) 8.5, 13, 17.5, and 22, respectively. Inlet pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 1.8 MPa, while sample initial temperature varied from 600°C to 900°C. Beck's sequential function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Inlet pressure has a positive effect on surface heat flux (SHF) within a critical value of pressure. Thickness of the sample affects the maximum achieved SHF negatively. Surface heat flux as high as 0.4024 MW/m2 was estimated for a thickness of 8.5 mm. Insulation effects of vapor film become apparent in the sample initial temperature range of 900°C causing reduction in surface heat flux and cooling rate of the sample. A sensor location near to quenched surface is found to be a better choice to visualize the effects of spray parameters on surface heat flux and surface temperature. Cooling rate showed a profound increase for an inlet pressure of 0.8 MPa. PMID:24977219

  12. Surface Heat Balance Analysis of Tainan City on March 6, 2001 Using ASTER and Formosat-2 Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yi Sun

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island phenomenon occurs as a mixed result of anthropogenic heat discharge, decreased vegetation, and increased artificial impervious surfaces. To clarify the contribution of each factor to the urban heat island, it is necessary to evaluate the surface heat balance. Satellite remote sensing data of Tainan City, Taiwan, obtained from Terra ASTER and Formosat-2 were used to estimate surface heat balance in this study. ASTER data is suitable for analyzing heat balance because of the wide spectral range. We used Formosat-2 multispectral data to classify the land surface, which was used to interpolate some surface parameters for estimating heat fluxes. Because of the high spatial resolution of the Formosat-2 image, more roads, open spaces and small vegetation areas could be distinguished from buildings in urban areas; however, misclassifications of land cover in such areas using ASTER data would overestimate the sensible heat flux. On the other hand, the small vegetated areas detected from the Formosat-2 image slightly increased the estimation of latent heat flux. As a result, the storage heat flux derived from Formosat-2 is higher than that derived from ASTER data in most areas. From these results, we can conclude that the higher resolution land coverage map increases accuracy of the heat balance analysis. Storage heat flux occupies about 60 to 80% of the net radiation in most of the artificial surface areas in spite of their usages. Because of the homogeneity of the building roof materials, there is no contrast between the storage heat flux in business and residential areas. In sparsely vegetated urban areas, more heat is stored and latent heat is smaller than that in the forested suburbs. This result implies that density of vegetation has a significant influence in decreasing temperatures.

  13. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  14. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation for Heat Transfer Enhancement by Dimpled Surface Heat Exchanger in Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiping; Li, Shuai; Yang, Xue; Deng, Yadong; Su, Chuqi

    2016-03-01

    For vehicle thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery, the temperature difference between the heat exchanger and the coolant has a strong influence on the electric power generation, and ribs are often employed to enhance the heat transfer of the heat exchanger. However, the introduction of ribs will result in a large unwanted pressure drop in the exhaust system which is unfavorable for the engine's efficiency. Therefore, how to enhance the heat transfer and control the pressure drop in the exhaust system is quite important for thermoelectric generators (TEG). In the current study, a symmetrical arrangement of dimpled surfaces staggered in the upper and lower surfaces of the heat exchanger was proposed to augment heat transfer rates with minimal pressure drop penalties. The turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer performance of turbulent flow over the dimpled surface in a flat heat exchanger was investigated by numerical simulation and temperature measurements. The heat transfer capacity in terms of Nusselt number and the pressure loss in terms of Fanning friction factors of the exchanger were compared with those of the flat plate. The pressure loss and heat transfer characteristics of dimples with a depth-to-diameter ratio ( h/D) at 0.2 were investigated. Finally, a quite good heat transfer performance with minimal pressure drop heat exchanger in a vehicle TEG was obtained. And based on the area-averaged surface temperature of the heat exchanger and the Seeback effect, the power generation can be improved by about 15% at Re = 25,000 compared to a heat exchanger with a flat surface.

  16. Revised Estimate of Earth's Surface Heat Flow: 47 +- 2 TW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. H.; Davies, D. R.

    2012-04-01

    Earth's surface heat flow provides a fundamental constraint on solid Earth dynamics. However, deriving an estimate of the total surface heat flux is complex, due to the inhomogeneous distribution of heat flow measurements and difficulties in measuring heat flux in young oceanic crust, arising due to hydrothermal circulation. A database of 38347 measurements (provided by G. Laske & G. Masters), representing a 55% increase on the number of measurements used previously, and the methods of Geographical Information Science (GIS), is used to derive a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux (Davies & Davies, 2010). To account for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust, we use a model estimate of the heat flux, following the work of Jaupart et al., 2007; while for the rest of the globe, in an attempt to overcome the inhomogeneous distribution of measurements, we develop an average for different geological units. Two digital geology data sets are used to define the global geology: (i) continental geology - Hearn et al., 2003; and (ii) the global data-set of CCGM - Commission de la Carte Géologique du Monde, 2000. This leads to > 93,000 polygons defining Earth's geology. The influence of clustering is limited by intersecting the geology polygons with a 1 by 1 degree (at the equator) equal area grid. The average heat flow is evaluated for each geology class. The contribution of each geology class to the global surface heat flow is derived by multiplying this estimated average surface heat flux with the area of that geology class. The surface heat flow contributions of all the geology classes are summed. For Antarctica we use an estimate based on depth to Curie temperature and include a 1TW contribution from hot-spots in young ocean age. Geology classes with less than 50 readings are excluded. The raw data suggests that this method of correlating heat flux with geology has some power. Our revised estimate for Earth's global surface heat flux is 47 ± 2 TW

  17. Comparative Assessment of Satellite-Retrieved Surface Net Radiation: An Examination on CERES and SRB Datasets in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface net radiation plays an important role in land–atmosphere interactions. The net radiation can be retrieved from satellite radiative products, yet its accuracy needs comprehensive assessment. This study evaluates monthly surface net radiation generated from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES and the Surface Radiation Budget project (SRB products, respectively, with quality-controlled radiation data from 50 meteorological stations in China for the period from March 2000 to December 2007. Our results show that surface net radiation is generally overestimated for CERES (SRB, with a bias of 26.52 W/m2 (18.57 W/m2 and a root mean square error of 34.58 W/m2 (29.49 W/m2. Spatially, the satellite-retrieved monthly mean of surface net radiation has relatively small errors for both CERES and SRB at inland sites in south China. Substantial errors are found at northeastern sites for two datasets, in addition to coastal sites for CERES. Temporally, multi-year averaged monthly mean errors are large at sites in western China in spring and summer, and in northeastern China in spring and winter. The annual mean error fluctuates for SRB, but decreases for CERES between 2000 and 2007. For CERES, 56% of net radiation errors come from net shortwave (NSW radiation and 44% from net longwave (NLW radiation. The errors are attributable to environmental parameters including surface albedo, surface water vapor pressure, land surface temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI of land surface proxy, and visibility for CERES. For SRB, 65% of the errors come from NSW and 35% from NLW radiation. The major influencing factors in a descending order are surface water vapor pressure, surface albedo, land surface temperature, NDVI, and visibility. Our findings offer an insight into error patterns in satellite-retrieved surface net radiation and should be valuable to improving retrieval accuracy of surface net radiation. Moreover, our

  18. Influence of Ear Surface Area on Heat Tolerance of Composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relative importance of ear surface area on heat tolerance of composite rabbit population was evaluated. The study was conducted during the dry and rainy seasons, climatic data were recorded to obtain categorical heat stress index. Physiological parameters, growth performance, ear length and ear width of the rabbits ...

  19. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  20. Atmostpheric simulations of extreme surface heating episodes on simple hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.E. Heilman

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonhydrostatic atmospheric model was used to simulate the circulation patterns (wind and vorticity) and turbulence energy fields associated with lines of extreme surface heating on simple two-dimensional hills. Heating-line locations and ambient crossflow conditions were varied to qualitatively determine the impact of terrain geometry on the...

  1. ENSO related SST anomalies and relation with surface heat fluxes over south Pacific and Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Nuncio, M.; Satheesan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes in Southern Pacific and Atlantic Ocean SST anomalies associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is studied using observation and ocean reanalysis products. A prominent dipole structure in SST anomaly is found with a positive (negative) anomaly center over south Pacific (65S-45S, 120W-70W) and negative (positive) one over south Atlantic (50S-30S, 30W-0E) during austral summer (DJF) of El Nino (LaNina). During late austral spring-early summer (OND) of El Nino (LaNina), anomalous northerly (southerly) meridional moisture transport and a positive (negative) sea level pressure anomaly induces a suppressed (enhanced) latent heat flux from the ocean surface over south Pacific. This in turn results in a shallower than normal mixed layer depth which further helps in development of the SST anomaly. Mixed layer thins further due to anomalous shortwave radiation during summer and a well developed SST anomaly evolves. The south Atlantic pole exhibits exactly opposite characteristics at the same time. The contribution from the surface heat fluxes to mixed layer temperature change is found to be dominant over the advective processes over both the basins. Net surface heat fluxes anomaly is also found to be maximum during late austral spring-early summer period, with latent heat flux having a major contribution to it. The anomalous latent heat fluxes between atmosphere and ocean surface play important role in the growth of observed summertime SST anomaly. Sea-surface height also shows similar out-of-phase signatures over the two basins and are well correlated with the ENSO related SST anomalies. It is also observed that the magnitude of ENSO related anomalies over the southern ocean are weaker in LaNina years than in El Nino years, suggesting an intensified tropics-high latitude tele-connection during warm phases of ENSO.

  2. Grain surface heating in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Muratov, M. M.

    2017-05-01

    The surface temperature of the dust particle in cryogenic complex plasmas at gas pressure 0.6-10 Pa is considered. It is shown that at low pressure the dust particle surface temperature is significantly higher than that of the background gas, as a result of which the atom drag force is comparable with the screened Coulomb interaction and even exceeds it for the large-size dust particles. As the gas temperature near the grain surface is a slowly decreasing function of distance with asymptotic ˜1/r behavior, for correct description of the cryogenic complex plasma at low gas pressure, it is important to include effects related to the dust particle surface temperature.

  3. Heat Rejection Concepts for Lunar Fission Surface Power Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamidis, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for lunar surface Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for surface power applications. Surface reactors may be used for the moon to power human outposts enabling extended stays and closed loop life support. The Brayton Heat Rejection System (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Space Brayton conversion system designs tend to optimize at efficiencies of about 20 to 25 percent with radiator temperatures in the 400 K to 600 K range. A notional HRS was developed for a 100 kWe-class Brayton power system that uses a pumped water heat transport loop coupled to a water heat pipe radiator. The radiator panels employ a tube and fin construction consisting of regularly-spaced circular heat pipes contained within two composite facesheets. The water heat pipes interface to the coolant through curved sections partially contained within the cooling loop. The paper evaluates various design parameters including radiator panel orientation, coolant flow path, and facesheet thickness. Parameters were varied to compare design options on the basis of H2O pump pressure rise and required power, heat pipe unit power and radial flux, radiator area, radiator panel areal mass, and overall HRS mass.

  4. Lunar Dust on Heat Rejection System Surfaces: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Heat rejection from power systems will be necessary for human and robotic activity on the lunar surface. Functional operation of such heat rejection systems is at risk of degradation as a consequence of dust accumulation. The Apollo astronauts encountered marked degradation of performance in heat rejection systems for the lunar roving vehicle, science packages, and other components. Although ground testing of dust mitigation concepts in support of the Apollo mission identified mitigation tools, the brush concept adopted by the Apollo astronauts proved essentially ineffective. A better understanding of the issues associated with the impact of lunar dust on the functional performance of heat rejection systems and its removal is needed as planning gets underway for human and robotic missions to the Moon. Renewed emphasis must also be placed on ground testing of pristine and dust-covered heat rejection system surfaces to quantify degradation and address mitigation concepts. This paper presents a review of the degradation in performance of heat rejection systems encountered on the lunar surface to-date, and will discuss current activities underway to evaluate the durability of candidate heat rejection system surfaces and current dust mitigation concepts.

  5. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Shea Rose, Leanna

    2007-06-14

    Data on materials and surface types that comprise a city, i.e. urban fabric, are needed in order to estimate the effects of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on the meteorology and air quality of a city. We discuss the results of a semi-automatic statistical approach used to develop data on surface-type distribution and urban-fabric makeup using aerial color orthophotography, for four metropolitan areas of Chicago, IL, Houston, TX, Sacramento, CA, and Salt Lake City, UT. The digital high resolution (0.3 to 0.5-m) aerial photographs for each of these metropolitan areas covers representative urban areas ranging from 30 km{sup 2} to 52 km{sup 2}. Major land-use types examined included: commercial, residential, industrial, educational, and transportation. On average, for the metropolitan areas studied, vegetation covers about 29-41% of the area, roofs 19-25%, and paved surfaces 29-39%. For the most part, trees shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. At ground level, i.e., view from below the tree canopies, vegetation covers about 20-37% of the area, roofs 20-25%, and paved surfaces 29-36%.

  6. Copper in the sediment and sea surface microlayer near a fallowed, open-net fish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, Clyde V; Fisher, E Brian

    2012-09-01

    Sediment and sea surface microlayer samples near an open-net salmon farm in Nova Scotia, were analysed for copper. Copper is a constituent of the feed and is an active ingredient of anti-foulants. The salmon farm was placed in fallow after 15 years of production. Sampling was pursued over 27 months. Elevated copper concentrations in the sediments indicated the farm site as a source. Bubble flotation due to gas-emitting sediments from eutrophication is a likely process for accumulating copper in the sea surface microlayer at enriched concentrations. Elevated and enriched concentrations in the sea surface microlayer over distance from the farm site led, as a result of wind-drift, to an enlarged farm footprint. The levels of copper in both sediments and sea surface microlayer exceeded guidelines for protection of marine life. Over the 27 months period, copper levels persisted in the sediments and decreased gradually in the sea surface microlayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling heat efficiency, flow and scale-up in the corotating disc scraped surface heat exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Alan; Szabo, Peter; Karlson, Torben

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of two different scale corotating disc scraped surface heat exchangers (CDHE) was performed experimentally. The findings were compared to predictions from a finite element model. We find that the model predicts well the flow pattern of the two CDHE's investigated. The heat transfer...... performance predicted by the model agrees well with experimental observations for the laboratory scale CDHE whereas the overall heat transfer in the scaled-up version was not in equally good agreement. The lack of the model to predict the heat transfer performance in scale-up leads us to identify the key...

  8. Numerical study on condensation heat transfer of trapezoid grooved surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojin Qi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a numerical analysis and experimental study on condensation heat transfer and fluid flow for filmwise condensation on trapezoid grooved surfaces. First, a physical model was properly simplified based on some reasonable assumptions. Then, the coupled non-linear governing equations for the mass transfer, fluid flow, and two-dimensional thermal conduction were developed. The relationship between z-coordinate and heat transfer was obtained by solving the equations numerically. The influences of groove length and basic angle were discussed. The calculation results showed that the heat flux decreased with increase in groove length, and the decline range also decreased gradually. The calculation results also suggested that the heat flux through groove with α = 60° was lower than the groove with α = 75° at the top of the groove, while the opposite conclusion was obtained at the low parts. The distributions of wall temperature and heat flux on trapezoid groove were also studied systematically. The distribution of surface temperature and heat flux presents obvious lateral inhomogeneity, and the maximum wall temperature and heat flux were both obtained in region II. The thermal resistance of groove with α = 60° was lower but the liquid-discharged ability was better than that of groove with α = 75°. In order to validate the feasibility and reliability of the present analyses and to further investigate the heat transfer performance of trapezoid grooved surfaces, experiments were carried out with three condensing plates including two trapezoid grooved surfaces in different physical dimensions and one smooth surface. The experimental data obtained under various schooling were compared with the calculations, and the experimental results for different condensing plates are all in good agreement with the numerical model, with a maximum deviation less than 15%. Moreover, the trapezoid grooves can enhance the

  9. High performance heat sink for surface mount applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Stephen A.; Levasseur, Robert D.

    Surface-mounted electronic module configurations are sensitive to thermal cycling because the reduced compliance between the component and module increases the thermally induced strain in the solder joint. Providing a thermal match between the component and the module reduces this strain, reduces low-cycle fatigue damage, and increases solder joint life. One way of achieving this thermal match is through the use of a thermally matched heat sink. In addition to having the required coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), heat sinks for surface-mount avionic configurations require low weight and high thermal conductivity. A heat sink has been developed that has thermal conductivity close to aluminum, a CTE close to ceramic, and a weight density only 8 percent higher than aluminum. The flexural modulus of this heat sink is 40 percent higher than aluminum, which results in improved vibration performance.

  10. Research of characteristics slot-hole heat exchanger with the developed surface of heat exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkin E. C.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal characteristics of multichannel slot-hole heat exchanger with the developed surface of heat exchange inside the opened-cycle water cooling system are experimentally investigated. Graphic dependences of average value of temperature of the simulator of a heat current and temperatures of the heat exchanger base are presented on tapped-off power. Dependences of tapped-off power and hydraulic losses on the of water consumption are given. It is shown, that use of developed slot-hole heat exchanger provides higher values of tapped-off power as compared to well-known two-channel slot-hole heat exchanger: at the temperature of heat-generating component simulator of +60°С the tapped-off power increases with 307 up to 750 W. Recommendations on increase of adaptability of slot-hole heat exchanger manufacturing are given. Heat exchanger is suitable for application in microprocessors and others heat-generating components and electronic equipment units cooling.

  11. Surface heat budget at the Nordic Seas in Lagrangian observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Lama, Marta S.; Isachsen, Pål E.; Koszalka, Inga; Lacasce, Joseph H.

    2014-05-01

    In the Nordic Seas, the warm, inflowing Atlantic Water is cooled until it is dense enough to sink. Thereafter it circulates at depth, eventually feeding the North Atlantic Deep Water. The air-sea interaction which facilitates this cooling is a complex process involving diverse phenomena, from surface heating to turbulent entrainment at the base of the ocean surface mixed layer. In the present study, we use 486 freely-drifting surface buoys to observe temperature changes on water parcels and the response to air-sea heat fluxes. Such Lagrangian observations advantageously 'filter out' horizontal heat fluxes, since the buoys are advected by the flow, allowing one to focus on the vertical exchanges. We examine the temporal evolution of temperature on the drifters and the correlations with surface heat fluxes, obtained from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses. The frequency spectra indicate a clear ω-2 dependence at frequencies higher than roughly 1/40 days-1. The temperature fluctuations on the other hand are correlated with surface fluxes only at the longer time scales. We then show how the Lagrangian temperature can be represented as a stochastic process, with a deterministic portion determined by the low frequency atmospheric forcing and a white noise perturbation. This is in line with previous studies of the ocean surface response to stochastic wind forcing. What distinguishes the present model is the deterministic part, which must account for the gradual cooling of the water parcels.

  12. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  13. Hybrid Heat Pipes for Lunar and Martian Surface and High Heat Flux Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Mohammed T.; Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Alvarez-Hernandez, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Novel hybrid wick heat pipes are developed to operate against gravity on planetary surfaces, operate in space carrying power over long distances and act as thermosyphons on the planetary surface for Lunar and Martian landers and rovers. These hybrid heat pipes will be capable of operating at the higher heat flux requirements expected in NASA's future spacecraft and on the next generation of polar rovers and equatorial landers. In addition, the sintered evaporator wicks mitigate the start-up problems in vertical gravity aided heat pipes because of large number of nucleation sites in wicks which will allow easy boiling initiation. ACT, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Johnson Space Center, are working together on the Advanced Passive Thermal experiment (APTx) to test and validate the operation of a hybrid wick VCHP with warm reservoir and HiK"TM" plates in microgravity environment on the ISS.

  14. A Novel Heat Treatment Process for Surface Hardening of Steel: Metal Melt Surface Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-sheng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei; Li, Jiehua; Li, Jun; Xia, Mingxu; Li, Jianguo

    2017-09-01

    A novel heat treatment process for surface hardening of steel has been demonstrated and named as "metal melt surface hardening (MMSH)." A surface layer with a thickness of about 400 μm and a hardness of about 700 HV has been achieved by ejecting AISI 304 stainless steel melt at a temperature of about 1783 K (1510 °C) onto the 40Cr steel surface. This proposed MMSH provides a very promising application for surface hardening of steel.

  15. Prototyping Energy Efficient Thermo-Magnetic & Induction Hardening for Heat Treat & Net Shape Forming Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquil Ahmad

    2012-08-03

    Within this project, Eaton undertook the task of bringing about significant impact with respect to sustainability. One of the major goals for the Department of Energy is to achieve energy savings with a corresponding reduction in carbon foot print. The use of a coupled induction heat treatment with high magnetic field heat treatment makes possible not only improved performance alloys, but with faster processing times and lower processing energy, as well. With this technology, substitution of lower cost alloys for more exotic alloys became a possibility; microstructure could be tailored for improved magnetic properties or wear resistance or mechanical performance, as needed. A prototype commercial unit has been developed to conduct processing of materials. Testing of this equipment has been conducted and results demonstrate the feasibility for industrial commercialization.

  16. The surface heat island of Rotterdam and its relationship with urban surface characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, L.; Zwart, S.; Verhagen, H.; Mauri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal infrared high resolution satellite images from Landsat sensors were used to spatially quantify the surface heat island (SHI) of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Based on surface temperature maps retrieved on 15 summer days since 1984, the average surface temperature of each district and

  17. Find surface heat loss and flue gas density quickly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanapathy, V.

    1985-04-01

    Tables and charts are presented for quick estimates of heat loss from insulated surfaces and flue gas density for various fossil fuels. Two types of problems faced by thermal engineers are presented. Both types of problems can be handled. An advantage of the chart is that for a wide range of surface and ambient temperatures ..gamma.. may be determined. This situation is common in industrial practice where wind velocity and ambient temperatures vary significantly over a period of time.

  18. Mitigating the surface urban heat island: Mechanism study and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2017-08-01

    In a surface urban heat island (SUHI), the urban land surface temperature (LST) is usually higher than the temperature of the surrounding rural areas due to human activities and surface characteristics. Because a SUHI has many adverse impacts on urban environment and human health, SUHI mitigation strategies are very important. This paper investigates the mechanism of a SUHI based on the basic physical laws that control the formation of a SUHI; five mitigation strategies are proposed, namely: sprinkling and watering; paving a pervious surface; reducing the anthropogenic heat (AH) release; using a "white roof"; increasing the fractional vegetation cover or leaf area index (LAI). To quantify the effect of these mitigation strategies, 26 sets of experiments are designed and implemented by running the integrated urban land model (IUM). The results of the sensitivity analysis indicate that sprinkling and watering is an effective measure for mitigating a SUHI for an entire day. Decreasing the AH release is also useful for both night- and daytime SUHI mitigation; however, the cooling extent is proportional to the diurnal cycle of AH. Increasing the albedo can reduce the LST in the daytime, especially when the solar radiation is significant; the cooling extent is approximately proportional to the diurnal cycle of the net radiation. Increasing the pervious surface percentage can mitigate the SUHI especially in the daytime. Increasing the fractional vegetation cover can mitigate the SUHI in the daytime but may aggravate the SUHI at night.

  19. Revisiting a Hydrological Analysis Framework with International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Initiative 2 Rainfall, Net Radiation, and Runoff Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Fekete, Balazs M.; Huffman, George J.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Initiative 2 (ISLSCP-2) data set provides the data needed to characterize the surface water budget across much of the globe in terms of energy availability (net radiation) and water availability (precipitation) controls. The data, on average, are shown to be consistent with Budyko s decades-old framework, thereby demonstrating the continuing relevance of Budyko s semiempirical relationships. This consistency, however, appears only when a small subset of the data with hydrologically suspicious behavior is removed from the analysis. In general, the precipitation, net radiation, and runoff data also appear consistent in their interannual variability and in the phasing of their seasonal cycles.

  20. Net Surface Shortwave Radiation from GOES Imagery—Product Evaluation Using Ground-Based Measurements from SURFRAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand K. Inamdar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s surface net radiation controls the energy and water exchanges between the Earth’s surface and the atmosphere, and can be derived from satellite observations. The ability to monitor the net surface radiation over large areas at high spatial and temporal resolution is essential for many applications, such as weather forecasting, short-term climate prediction or water resources management. The objective of this paper is to derive the net surface radiation in the shortwave domain at high temporal (half-hourly and spatial resolution (~1 km using visible imagery from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES. The retrieval algorithm represents an adaptation to GOES data of a standard algorithm initially developed for the NASA-operated Clouds and Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES scanner. The methodology relies on: (1 the estimation of top of atmosphere shortwave radiation from GOES spectral measurements; and (2 the calculation of net surface shortwave (SW radiation accounting for atmospheric effects. Comparison of GOES-retrieved net surface shortwave radiation with ground-measurements at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA Surface Radiation (SURFRAD stations yields very good agreement with average bias lower than 5 W·m−2 and root mean square difference around 70 W·m−2. The algorithm performance is usually higher over areas characterized by low spatial variability in term of land cover type and surface biophysical properties. The technique does not involve retrieval and assessment of cloud properties and can be easily adapted to other meteorological satellites around the globe.

  1. Linking Surface Urban Heat Islands with Groundwater Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Susanne A; Bayer, Peter; Goettsche, Frank M; Olesen, Folke S; Blum, Philipp

    2016-01-05

    Urban temperatures are typically, but not necessarily, elevated compared to their rural surroundings. This phenomenon of urban heat islands (UHI) exists both above and below the ground. These zones are coupled through conductive heat transport. However, the precise process is not sufficiently understood. Using satellite-derived land surface temperature and interpolated groundwater temperature measurements, we compare the spatial properties of both kinds of heat islands in four German cities and find correlations of up to 80%. The best correlation is found in older, mature cities such as Cologne and Berlin. However, in 95% of the analyzed areas, groundwater temperatures are higher than land surface temperatures due to additional subsurface heat sources such as buildings and their basements. Local groundwater hot spots under city centers and under industrial areas are not revealed by satellite-derived land surface temperatures. Hence, we propose an estimation method that relates groundwater temperatures to mean annual land-surface temperatures, building density, and elevated basement temperatures. Using this method, we are able to accurately estimate regional groundwater temperatures with a mean absolute error of 0.9 K.

  2. Heat and mass transfer over slippery, superhydrophobic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, A. Sander; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2016-01-01

    The classical Graetz-Nusselt problem is extended to describe heat and mass transfer over heterogeneously slippery, superhydrophobic surfaces. The cylindrical wall consists of segments with a constant temperature/concentration and areas that are insulating/impermeable. Only in the case of mass

  3. Solar Sustainable Heating, Cooling and Ventilation of a Net Zero Energy House

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Skrupskelis, Martynas; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    Present work addresses the heating, cooling and ventilation concerns of the Technical University of Denmark’s house, Fold, for Solar Decathlon Europe 2012. Various innovative approaches are investigated, namely, utilization of ground, photo-voltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels and phase change materials...... by the embedded pipes which are coupled with the ground. Ventilation is mainly used to control the humidity and to remove sensory and chemical pollution. PV/T panels enable the house to be a “plus” energy house. PV/T also yields to a solar fraction of 63% and 31% for Madrid and Copenhagen, respectively...

  4. Cutaneous and mucosal human papillomaviruses differ in net surface charge, potential impact on tropism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibom Carl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Papillomaviruses can roughly be divided into two tropism groups, those infecting the skin, including the genus beta PVs, and those infecting the mucosa, predominantly genus alpha PVs. The L1 capsid protein determines the phylogenetic separation between beta types and alpha types and the L1 protein is most probably responsible for the first interaction with the cell surface. Virus entry is a known determinant for tissue tropism and to study if interactions of the viral capsid with the cell surface could affect HPV tropism, the net surface charge of the HPV L1 capsid proteins was analyzed and HPV-16 (alpha and HPV-5 (beta with a mucosal and cutaneous tropism respectively were used to study heparin inhibition of uptake. The negatively charged L1 proteins were all found among HPVs with cutaneous tropism from the beta- and gamma-PV genus, while all alpha HPVs were positively charged at pH 7.4. The linear sequence of the HPV-5 L1 capsid protein had a predicted isoelectric point (pI of 6.59 and a charge of -2.74 at pH 7.4, while HPV-16 had a pI of 7.95 with a charge of +2.98, suggesting no interaction between HPV-5 and the highly negative charged heparin. Furthermore, 3D-modelling indicated that HPV-5 L1 exposed more negatively charged amino acids than HPV-16. Uptake of HPV-5 (beta and HPV-16 (alpha was studied in vitro by using a pseudovirus (PsV assay. Uptake of HPV-5 PsV was not inhibited by heparin in C33A cells and only minor inhibition was detected in HaCaT cells. HPV-16 PsV uptake was significantly more inhibited by heparin in both cells and completely blocked in C33A cells.

  5. Towards closure of regional heat budgets in the North Atlantic using Argo floats and surface flux datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Wells

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The upper ocean heat budget (0–300 m of the North Atlantic from 20°–60° N is investigated using data from Argo profiling floats for 1999–2005 and the NCEP/NCAR and NOC surface flux datasets. Estimates of the different terms in the budget (heat storage, advection, diffusion and surface exchange are obtained using the methodology developed by Hadfield et al. (2007a, b. The method includes optimal interpolation of the individual profiles to produce gridded fields with error estimates at a 10°×10° grid box resolution. Closure of the heat budget is obtained within the error estimates for some regions – particularly the eastern subtropical Atlantic – but not for those boxes that include the Gulf Stream. Over the whole range considered, closure is obtained for 13 (9 out of 20 boxes with the NOC (NCEP/NCAR surface fluxes. The seasonal heat budget at 20–30° N, 35–25° W is considered in detail. Here, the NCEP based budget has an annual mean residual of −55±35 Wm−2 compared with a NOC based value of −4±35 Wm−2. For this box, the net heat divergence of 36 Wm−2 (Ekman=−4 Wm−2, geostrophic=11 Wm−2, diffusion=29 Wm−2 offsets the net heating of 32 Wm−2 from the NOC surface heat fluxes. The results in this box are consistent with an earlier evaluation of the fluxes using measurements from research buoys in the subduction array which revealed biases in NCEP but good agreement of the buoy values with the NOC fields.

  6. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2017-09-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  7. Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.; Lindemuth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    The principal objective of this Phase 2 SBIR program was to develop and demonstrate a practically insoluble coating for nickel-based superalloys for Stirling engine heat pipe applications. Specific technical objectives of the program were: (1) Determine the solubility corrosion rates for Nickel 200, Inconel 718, and Udimet 72OLI in a simulated Stirling engine heat pipe environment, (2) Develop coating processes and techniques for capillary groove and screen wick structures, (3) Evaluate the durability and solubility corrosion rates for capillary groove and screen wick structures coated with an insoluble coating in cylindrical heat pipes operating under Stirling engine conditions, and (4) Design and fabricate a coated full-scale, partial segment of the current Stirling engine heat pipe for the Stirling Space Power Convertor program. The work effort successfully demonstrated a two-step nickel aluminide coating process for groove wick structures and interior wall surfaces in contact with liquid metals; demonstrated a one-step nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures; and developed and demonstrated a two-step aluminum-to-nickel aluminide coating process for nickel screen wick structures. In addition, the full-scale, partial segment was fabricated and the interior surfaces and wick structures were coated. The heat pipe was charged with sodium, processed, and scheduled to be life tested for up to ten years as a Phase 3 effort.

  8. Net radiation, sensible and latent heat flux densities on slopes computed by the energy balance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschen, Leo; Qian, Ping

    1990-01-01

    Energy balance components obtained over five grass-covered sloping surfaces near Manhattan, KS, using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique with the instruments mounted horizontally were compared with calculated values when the instruments were mounted parallel to the surfaces. Hourly values of the components changed when the instruments were parallel to the surfaces. The changes were larger at low solar angles (spring and fall) and on steeper slopes. An area average of daylight totals, assuming that all aspects were equally represented, changed only 0.1 percent on June 6 and 2.3 percent on October 11. The calculations, extended to steeper slopes, indicated small changes in the daylight totals for slopes of less than 10 deg.

  9. Ultrasonic Heat Transfer Enhancement with Obstacle in Front of Heating Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Nakagawa, Masafumi; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi; Murakami, Koichi; Kobayashi, Ryousuke

    2005-06-01

    Heat transfer enhancement using a horn-type transducer was carried out in the natural convection region while a flat plate was used as a wall-like obstacle in front of the heating surface. Three types of plate were used as obstacles: acrylic, aluminum, and Styrofoam. A horn tip of 6 mm diameter and 60.7 kHz was used as the ultrasonic transducer. The acoustic cavitation jet induced by the ultrasonic vibration exhibited the same tendency as the axisymmetric free jet. The acoustic jet from the horn tip was shut out by the flat plate; however, the ultrasound passed through the flat plate and transferred the flow effect and agitation effect to the area behind the plate. By applying ultrasonic vibration, the heat transfer coefficient of the heating surface behind the flat plate was increased by up to threefold. The heat transfer coefficient decreased as the thickness of the flat plate increased. The heat transfer coefficient was the highest for the acrylic plate, then the aluminum plate, and lowest for the Styrofoam plate.

  10. Effect of carbon nanofiber surface morphology on convective heat transfer from cylindrical surface: Synthesis, characterization and heat transfer measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification is made by layers of carbon nanofiber (CNF) on a 50 μm nickel wire using Thermal chemical vapor deposition process (TCVD). Three different CNF layer morphologies are made, at 500 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C, to investigate the influence of morphology on

  11. Analysis of selected surface characteristics and latent heat storage for passive solar space heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fthenakis, V.; Leigh, R.

    1981-12-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the value of various technical improvements in the solar collector and thermal storage subsystems of passive solar residential, agricultural, and industrial systems for two regions of the country. The evaluated improvements are: decreased emissivity and increased absorptivity of absorbing surfaces, decreased reflectivity, and decreased emissivity of glazing surface, and the substitution of sensible heat storage media with phase change materials. The value of each improvement is estimated by the additional energy savings resulting from the improvement.

  12. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Tayfun Kilic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys. To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage.

  13. Critical heat flux variations on CANDU calandria tube surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdadi, A.; Luxat, J.C., E-mail: behdada@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Engineering Physics Dept., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Heavy water moderator surrounding each fuel channel is one of the important safety features in CANDU reactors since it provides an in-situ passive heat sink for the fuel in situations where other engineered means of heat removal from fuel channels have failed. In a critical break LOCA scenario, fuel cooling becomes severely degraded due to rapid flow reduction in the affected flow pass of the heat transport system. This can result in pressure tubes experiencing significant heat-up during early stages of the accident when coolant pressure is still high, thereby causing uniform thermal creep strain (ballooning) of the pressure tube (PT) into contact with its calandria tube (CT). The contact of the hot PT with the CT causes rapid redistribution of stored heat from the PT to CT and a large heat flux spike from the CT to the moderator fluid. For conditions where subcooling of the moderator fluid is low, this heat flux spike can cause dryout of the CT. This can detrimentally affect channel integrity if the CT post-dryout temperature becomes sufficiently high to result in continued thermal creep strain deformation of both the PT and the CT. The focus of this work is to develop a mechanistic model to predict Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on the CT surface following a contact with its pressure tube. A mechanistic CHF model is applied based on a concept of wall dry patch formation, prevention of rewetting and subsequent dry patch spreading. Results have been compared to an empirical correlation and a good agreement has been obtained. The model has been used to predict the spatial variation of CHF over a cylinder with dimensions of CANDU CT. (author)

  14. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  15. Insoluble coatings for Stirling engine heat pipe condenser surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-09-01

    The work done by Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for the Phase 1, 1992 SBIR National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contract, 'Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces' is described. The work was performed between January 1992 and July 1992. Stirling heat engines are being developed for electrical power generation use on manned and unmanned earth orbital and planetary missions. Dish Stirling solar systems and nuclear reactor Stirling systems are two of the most promising applications of the Stirling engine electrical power generation technology. The sources of thermal energy used to drive the Stirling engine typically are non-uniform in temperature and heat flux. Liquid metal heat pipe receivers are used as thermal transformers and isothermalizers to deliver the thermal energy at a uniform high temperature to the heat input section of the Stirling engine. The use of a heat pipe receiver greatly enhances system efficiency and potential life span. One issue that is raised during the design phase of heat pipe receivers is the potential solubility corrosion of the Stirling engine heat input section by the liquid metal working fluid. This Phase 1 effort initiated a program to evaluate and demonstrate coatings, applied to nickel based Stirling engine heater head materials, that are practically 'insoluble' in sodium, potassium, and NaK. This program initiated a study of nickel aluminide as a coating and developed and demonstrated a heat pipe test vehicle that can be used to test candidate materials and coatings. Nickel 200 and nickel aluminide coated Nickel 200 were tested for 1000 hours at 800 C at a condensation heat flux of 25 W/sq cm. Subsequent analyses of the samples showed no visible sign of solubility corrosion of either coated or uncoated samples. The analysis technique, photomicrographs at 200X, has a resolution of better than 2.5 microns (.0001 in). The results indicate that the heat pipe environment is not directly

  16. Water heating solar system using collector with polycarbonate absorber surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luiz Guilherme Meira de; Sodre, Dilton; Cavalcanti, Eduardo Jose Cidade; Souza, Luiz Guilherme Vieira Meira de; Mendes, Jose Ubiragi de Lima [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)], e-mails: lguilherme@dem.ufrn.br, diltonsodre@ifba.edu.br, ubiragi@ct.ufrn.br

    2010-07-01

    It is presented s solar collector to be used in a heating water for bath system, whose main characteristics are low cost and easy fabrication and assembly processes. The collector absorber surface consists of a polycarbonate plate with an area of 1.5 m{sup 2}. The water inlet and outlet are made of PVC 50mm, and were coupled to a 6mm thick polycarbonate plate using fiberglass resin. A 200 liters thermal reservoir will be used. This reservoir is also alternative. The absorber heating system works under thermo-siphon regimen. Thermal parameters will be evaluated to prove the feasibility of the studied solar heating system to obtain bath water for a four people family. (author)

  17. Measurement of a surface heat flux and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. M.; Antoine, G. J.; Diller, T. E.; Wicks, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Heat Flux Microsensor is a new sensor which was recently patented by Virginia Tech and is just starting to be marketed by Vatell Corp. The sensor is made using the thin-film microfabrication techniques directly on the material that is to be measured. It consists of several thin-film layers forming a differential thermopile across a thermal resistance layer. The measured heat flux q is proportional to the temperature difference across the resistance layer q= k(sub g)/delta(sub g) x (t(sub 1) - T(sub 2)), where k(sub g) is the thermal conductivity and delta (sub g) is the thickness of the thermal resistance layer. Because the gages are sputter coated directly onto the surface, their total thickness is less than 2 micrometers, which is two orders of magnitude thinner than previous gages. The resulting temperature difference across the thermal resistance layer (delta is less than 1 micrometer) is very small even at high heat fluxes. To generate a measurable signal many thermocouple pairs are put in series to form a differential thermopile. The combination of series thermocouple junctions and thin-film design creates a gage with very attractive characteristics. It is not only physically non-intrusive to the flow, but also causes minimal disruption of the surface temperature. Because it is so thin, the response time is less than 20 microsec. Consequently, the frequency response is flat from 0 to over 50 kHz. Moreover, the signal of the Heat Flux Microsensor is directly proportional to the heat flux. Therefore, it can easily be used in both steady and transient flows, and it measures both the steady and unsteady components of the surface heat flux. A version of the Heat Flux Microsensor has been developed to meet the harsh demands of combustion environments. These gages use platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium as the thermoelectric materials. The thermal resistance layer is silicon monoxide and a protective coating of Al2O3 is deposited on top of the sensor. The

  18. Two Improvements of an Operational Two-Layer Model for Terrestrial Surface Heat Flux Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to make the prediction of land surface heat fluxes more robust, two improvements were made to an operational two-layer model proposed previously by Zhang. These improvements are: 1 a surface energy balance method is used to determine the theoretical boundary lines (namely ‘true wet/cool edge’ and ‘true dry/warm edge’ in the trapezoid in the scatter plot for the surface temperature versus the fractional vegetation cover in mixed pixels; 2 a new assumption that the slope of the Tm – f curves is mainly controlled by soil water content is introduced. The variables required by the improved method include near surface vapor pressure, air temperature, surface resistance, aerodynamic resistance, fractional vegetation cover, surface temperature and net radiation. The model predictions from the improved model were assessed in this study by in situ measurements, which show that the total latent heat flux from the soil and vegetation are in close agreement with the in situ measurement with an RMSE (Root Mean Square Error ranging from 30 w/m2~50 w/m2,which is consistent with the site scale measurement of latent heat flux. Because soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration are not measured separately from the field site, in situ measured CO2 flux is used to examine the modeled λEveg. Similar trends of seasonal variations of vegetation were found for the canopy transpiration retrievals and in situ CO2 flux measurements. The above differences are mainly caused by 1 the scale disparity between the field measurement and the MODIS observation; 2 the non-closure problem of the surface energy balance from the surface fluxes observations themselves. The improved method was successfully used to predict the component surface heat fluxes from the soil and vegetation and it provides a promising approach to study the canopy transpiration and the soil evaporation quantitatively during the

  19. Infrared Low Temperature Turbine Vane Rough Surface Heat Transfer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. J.; Spuckler, C. M.; Lucci, B. L.; Camperchioli, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer distributions obtained using an infrared camera technique are described. Infrared thermography was used because noncontact surface temperature measurements were desired. Surface temperatures were 80 C or less. Tests were conducted in a three vane linear cascade, with inlet pressures between 0.14 and 1.02 atm., and exit Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, and 0.9, for turbulence intensities of approximately 1 and 10%. Measurements were taken on the vane suction side, and on the pressure side leading edge region. The designs for both the vane and test facility are discussed. The approach used to account for conduction within the vane is described. Midspan heat transfer distributions are given for the range of test conditions.

  20. Experimental studies of surface modified oscillating heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng; Wu, Cheng-Han

    2017-04-01

    Oscillating heat pipe (OHP) is a two-phase heat transfer device which has the characteristics of simple construction, high heat flux capability and no need of wicking structures for liquid transport. There are many studies in finding the ways how to improve the system performance OHP. In this paper, studies of the effects of contact angle (θ c ) on the inner wall of OHP system have been conducted first. Glass OHP systems with unmodified (θ c = 26.74°), superhydrophobic (θ c = 156.2°), superhydrophilic (θ c evaporator region and superhydrophobic within condensation region) surfaces, are studied. The research results indicated that thermal resistance of these four OHP systems can be significantly affected by different surface modification approaches. Although superhydrophobic OHP system can still work, the thermal resistance (R th ) is the highest one of the four OHP systems, R th = 0.36 °C/W at 200 W. Unmodified pure glass and superhydrophilic OHP systems have similar performance. Thermal resistances are 0.28 and 0.27 °C/W at 200 W respectively. The hybrid OHP achieves the lowest thermal resistance, R th = 0.23 °C/W at 200 W in this study. The exact mechanism and effects of contact angle on OHP systems are investigated with the help of flow visualization. By comparing the flow visualization results of OHP systems before and after surface modification, one tries to find the mechanism how the surface modified inner wall surface affects the OHP system performance. In additional to the reason that the superhydrophobic dropwise condensation surface inside the hybrid OHP system, hybrid OHP system shows more stable and energetic circulation flow. It is found that instead of stratified flow, vapor slug flows are identified within the evaporator section of the hybrid OHP system that can effectively generate higher pressure force for two phase interfacial flow. This effect is attributed to be the main mechanism for better performance of the hybrid OHP system.

  1. NOy production, ozone loss and changes in net radiative heating due to energetic particle precipitation in 2002–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sinnhuber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the impact of energetic particle precipitation on the stratospheric nitrogen budget, ozone abundances and net radiative heating using results from three global chemistry-climate models considering solar protons and geomagnetic forcing due to auroral or radiation belt electrons. Two of the models cover the atmosphere up to the lower thermosphere, the source region of auroral NO production. Geomagnetic forcing in these models is included by prescribed ionization rates. One model reaches up to about 80 km, and geomagnetic forcing is included by applying an upper boundary condition of auroral NO mixing ratios parameterized as a function of geomagnetic activity. Despite the differences in the implementation of the particle effect, the resulting modeled NOy in the upper mesosphere agrees well between all three models, demonstrating that geomagnetic forcing is represented in a consistent way either by prescribing ionization rates or by prescribing NOy at the model top.Compared with observations of stratospheric and mesospheric NOy from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS instrument for the years 2002–2010, the model simulations reproduce the spatial pattern and temporal evolution well. However, after strong sudden stratospheric warmings, particle-induced NOy is underestimated by both high-top models, and after the solar proton event in October 2003, NOy is overestimated by all three models. Model results indicate that the large solar proton event in October 2003 contributed about 1–2 Gmol (109 mol NOy per hemisphere to the stratospheric NOy budget, while downwelling of auroral NOx from the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere contributes up to 4 Gmol NOy. Accumulation over time leads to a constant particle-induced background of about 0.5–1 Gmol per hemisphere during solar minimum, and up to 2 Gmol per hemisphere during solar maximum. Related negative anomalies of ozone are predicted by

  2. Evaluation of scale formation in waterwall heated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylasheva Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibility of forecasting assessments of the speed and the time of formation of depositions in the evaporator-tube elements of double-drum boilers. The values of thermal flow in the wall region of tank screens of boiler furnace are obtained, besides the velocity values of scaling metal corrosion products are obtained. Conclusions about the ability of forecasting unnominal situations and emergency risks dependent with damage to the screen surface heating pipes are made.

  3. Diesel particulate filter regeneration via resistive surface heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

    2013-10-08

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine; and a grid of electrically resistive material that is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and that selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF.

  4. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  5. Thermal and Physical Properties and Deposit Structure of Power Equipment Heating Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nerezko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows influence of heating surface material, design peculiarities, operational conditions of heat exchangers and water-chemical regime on chemical and structural composition of deposits, their heat conduction and porosity.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF HEATED STREAM ABOVE THE HORIZONTAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Diachek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of thermal contaminated air stream formed above the surface of lengthy heated plate is investigated on the basis of the mathematical model of heat and mass transfer processes. The numerical simulation results performed for the purpose of finding a way to prevent the contaminants outflow from the hood in the presence of external influence are given. Three variants of the hood side panels lengthening are considered: on either side; on the side of the fresh air supply; on the side opposite to the location of air distributors. Comparison of the effects of using these variants of hood design allowed determining that the hood panel located on the side of the coming air flow gives the greatest leakage reduction. It is found out that lengthening of the hood side panels does not ensure full localization of the contaminated convective stream.Several variants of using the screen located on the side of the lateral air flow were investigated in the course of work. Best result is observed under conditions of application of the screen symmetrically located relative to spacing between the hood and the plate. The analysis of local values of temperature and velocity fields in this case shows that losses of heated contaminated air to the workshop space are practically absent. It is found out that the convective stream can be most efficiently localized under the condition of hood-symmetric distribution of supply air. Influence of the open gate on convective stream formation in the workshop space with heat emission is considered. The shift of upward flow to the opposite side relative to the gate is observed. The radiant heat release from the board is of great importance in the temperature field formation of closely located areas of floor and walls surfaces

  7. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, X.; Ju, W.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs) for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP) estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI) is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE) in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m-2 yr-1 to 4.8 g C m-2 yr-1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m-2 yr-1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI) and elevation have small and additive effects on improving the spatial scaling

  8. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m−2 yr−1 to 4.8 g C m−2 yr−1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m−2 yr−1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI and elevation have small and additive effects on improving

  9. Tissue responses to fractional transient heating with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Magdy A; El-Bary, Alaa A; Al-Sowayan, Noorah S

    2016-10-01

    A fractional model of Bioheat equation for describing quantitatively the thermal responses of skin tissue under sinusoidal heat flux conditions on skin surface is given. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain the solution in a closed form. The resulting formulation is applied to one-dimensional application to investigate the temperature distribution in skin with instantaneous surface heating for different cases. According to the numerical results and its graphs, conclusion about the fractional bioheat transfer equation has been constructed. Sensitivity analysis is performed to explore the thermal effects of various control parameters on tissue temperature. The comparisons are made with the results obtained in the case of the absence of time-fractional order. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  10. Analysis of parameter sensitivity on surface heat exchange in the Noah land surface model at a temperate desert steppe site in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Zhou, Guangsheng; Chen, Fei

    2017-12-01

    The dominant parameters in the Noah land surface model (LSM) are identified, and the effects of parameter optimization on the surface heat exchange are investigated at a temperate desert steppe site during growing season in Inner Mongolia, China. The relative impacts of parameters on surface heat flux are examined by the distributed evaluation of local sensitivity analysis (DELSA), and the Noah LSM is calibrated by the global shuffled complex evolution (SCE) against the corresponding observations during May-September of 2008 and 2009. The differences in flux simulations are assessed between the Noah LSM calibrated by the SCE with 27 parameters and 12 dominant parameters. The systematic error, unsystematic error, root mean squared error, and mean squared error decompositions are used to evaluate the model performance. Compared to the control experiment, parameter optimization by the SCE using net radiation, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, and ground heat flux as the objective criterion, respectively, can obviously reduce the errors of the Noah LSM. The calibrated Noah LSM is further validated against flux observations of growing season in 2010, and it is found that the calibrated Noah LSM can be applied in the longer term at this site. The Noah LSM with 12 dominant parameters calibrated performs similar to that with 27 parameters calibrated.

  11. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  12. Tropical Warm Pool Surface Heat Budgets and Temperature: Contrasts Between 1997-98 El Nino and 1998-99 La Nina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Lin, Po-Hsiung; Wang, Kung-Hwa

    2003-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual variations of the net surface heating F(sub NET) and sea surface temperature tendency (T(sub s)/dt) in the tropical eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans are studied. The surface heat fluxes are derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager and Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite radiance measurements for the period October 1997-September 2000. It is found that the magnitude of solar heating is lager than that of evaporative cooling, but the spatial variation of the latter is significantly large than the former. As a result, the spatial variations of seasonal and interannual variability of F(sub NET), follow closely that of evaporative cooling. Seasonal variations of F(sub NET) and T(sub s)/dt are significantly correlated, except for the equatorial western Pacific. The high correlation is primarily attributable to high correlation between seasonal cycles of solar heating and T(sub s)/dt. The change of F(sub NET) between 1997-98 El Nino and 1998-99 La Nina is significantly larger in the tropical eastern Indian Ocean than tropical western Pacific. For the former region, the reduced evaporative cooling arising from weakened winds during the El Nino is generally associated with enhanced solar heating due to decreased cloudiness, and thus increases the interannual variability of F(sub NET). For the latter region, the reduced evaporative cooling due to weakened winds is generally associated with but exceeds the reduced solar heating arising from increased cloudiness, and vise versa. Thus the interannual variability of F(sub NET) is reduced due to this offsetting effect. Interannual variations of F(sub NET) and T(sub s)/dt have very low correlation. This is most likely related to interannual variability of ocean dynamics, which includes the variations of solar radiation penetrating through oceanic mixed layer, upwelling of cold thermocline water, Indonesian throughflow for transporting heat from the Pacific to Indian Ocean, and

  13. Heat affected zone in surfacing chromium ledeburitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tonkovič Prijanovič

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tools get failured during work; wear is a major factor that contributes to failures. Damaged tools are replaced or filed. This paper describes typical changes that occur in the heat affected zone of tool (HAZ, which was repaired by surfacing with a TIG and with micro-plasma procedure. Microstructure of the steel on the repaired tool was analysed by an optical and scanning electron microscope. The tool was made of chromium ledeburitic steel type W.N. 1.2379 and it was repaired by surfacing steel type W.N. 1.4718. Changes in the HAZ also depend on the type of surfacing. Besides microstructural changes, dissolution of carbides, especially primary carbides. This way the concentration of the carbide-forming elements and carbon is increased in the base around the primary carbides in the HAZ so the result is so-called secondary eutectic or secondary ledeburite.

  14. Lunar Surface Stirling Power Systems Using Isotope Heat Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, NASA has used the decay of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) (in the form of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS)) as a heat source for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), which have provided electrical power for many NASA missions. While RTGs have an impressive reliability record for the missions in which they have been used, their relatively low thermal to electric conversion efficiency and the scarcity of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) has led NASA to consider other power conversion technologies. NASA is considering returning both robotic and human missions to the lunar surface and, because of the long lunar nights (14.75 Earth days), isotope power systems are an attractive candidate to generate electrical power. NASA is currently developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) as a candidate higher efficiency power system that produces greater than 160 W with two GPHS modules at the beginning of life (BOL) (32% efficiency). The ASRG uses the same Pu-238 GPHS modules, which are used in RTG, but by coupling them to a Stirling convertor provides a four-fold reduction in the number of GPHS modules. This study considers the use of americium-241 (Am-241) as a substitute for the Pu-238 in Stirling- convertor-based Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for power levels from tens of watts to 5 kWe. The Am-241 is used as a substitute for the Pu-238 in GPHS modules. Depending on power level, different Stirling heat input and removal systems are modeled. It was found that substituting Am-241 GPHS modules into the ASRG reduces power output by about one-fifth while maintaining approximately the same system mass. In order to obtain the nominal 160 W of electrical output of the Pu-238 ASRG requires 10 Am-241 GPHS modules. Higher power systems require changing from conductive coupling heat input and removal from the Stirling convertor to either pumped loops or heat pipes. Liquid metal pumped loops are considered as the primary heat transportation on the hot

  15. A hybrid surface modification method on copper wire braids for enhancing thermal performance of ultra-thin heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, W. K.; Lin, H. T.; Wu, C. H.; Kuo, L. S.; Chen, P. H.

    2017-02-01

    Copper is the most widely used material in heat pipe manufacturing. Since the capability of wick structures inside a heat pipe will dominate its thermal performance, in this study, we introduce a hybrid surface modification method on the copper wire braids being inserted as wick structure into an ultra-thin heat pipe. The hybrid method is the combination of a chemical-oxidation-based method and a sol-gel method with nanoparticles being dip-coated onto the braid. The experimental data show that braids under hybrid treatment perform higher water rising speed than the oxidized braids while owning higher water net weight than those braids being only dip-coated with nanoparticle.

  16. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  17. Regionalization of land surface heat fluxes and evapotranspiration over heterogeneous landscape: from Tibetan Plateau to Third Pole region and Pan-Third Pole region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaoming

    2017-04-01

    The exchange of heat and water vapor between land surface and atmosphere over the Third Pole region (Tibetan Plateau and surrounding region) and Pan-Third Pole region (Third Pole region and surrounding region) play an important role in the Asian monsoon, westerlies and the northern hemisphere weather systems. Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and some international organizations, a Third Pole Environment (TPE) Research Platform (TPEP) and Pan-TPE Research Platform (PTPEP) are now implementing over the Third Pole region and Pan-Third Pole region. The background of the establishment of the TPEP and PTPEP, the establishing and monitoring plan of long-term scale (5-10 years) of the TPEP and PTPEP will be shown firstly. Then the preliminary observational analysis results, such as the characteristics of land surface heat fluxes partitioning, the characteristics of atmospheric and soil variables, the structure of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the turbulent characteristics have also been shown in this study. The parameterization method based on satellite data and the ABL observations has been proposed and tested for deriving regional distribution of surface reflectance, surface temperature, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux and evapotranspiration (ET) over heterogeneous landscape. As cases study, the method was applied to the whole Tibetan Plateau area and Nepal area. To validate the proposed method, the ground-measured surface reflectance, surface temperature, net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux in the TPEP are compared to the derived values. The results show that the derived surface variables, land surface heat fluxes and ET over the study area are in good accordance with the land surface status. These parameters show a wide range due to the strong contrast of surface features. And the estimated land surface variables and land surface heat fluxes are in good agreement

  18. Heat loss through the glabrous skin surfaces of heavily insulated, heat-stressed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, D A; Dillon, J L; Heller, H C

    2009-07-01

    Insulation reduces heat exchange between a body and the environment. Glabrous (nonhairy) skin surfaces (palms of the hands, soles of the feet, face, and ears) constitute a small percentage of total body surface area but contain specialized vascular structures that facilitate heat loss. We have previously reported that cooling the glabrous skin surfaces is effective in alleviating heat stress and that the application of local subatmospheric pressure enhances the effect. In this paper, we compare the effects of cooling multiple glabrous skin surfaces with and without vacuum on thermal recovery in heavily insulated heat-stressed individuals. Esophageal temperatures (T(es)) and heart rates were monitored throughout the trials. Water loss was determined from pre- and post-trial nude weights. Treadmill exercise (5.6 km/h, 9-16% slope, and 25-45 min duration) in a hot environment (41.5 degrees C, 20-30% relative humidity) while wearing insulating pants and jackets was used to induce heat stress (T(es)>or=39 degrees C). For postexercise recovery, the subjects donned additional insulation (a balaclava, winter gloves, and impermeable boot covers) and rested in the hot environment for 60 min. Postexercise cooling treatments included control (no cooling) or the application of a 10 degrees C closed water circulating system to (a) the hand(s) with or without application of a local subatmospheric pressure, (b) the face, (c) the feet, or (d) multiple glabrous skin regions. Following exercise induction of heat stress in heavily insulated subjects, the rate of recovery of T(es) was 0.4+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12), but with application of cooling to one hand, the rate was 0.8+/-0.3 degrees C/h(n=12), and with one hand cooling with subatmospheric pressure, the rate was 1.0+/-0.2 degrees C/h(n=12). Cooling alone yielded two responses, one resembling that of cooling with subatmospheric pressure (n=8) and one resembling that of no cooling (n=4). The effect of treating multiple surfaces was

  19. Observational & modeling analysis of surface heat and moisture fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An observational and modeling study was conducted to help assess how well current GCMs are predicting surface fluxes under the highly variable cloudiness and flow conditions characteristic of the real atmosphere. The observational data base for the study was obtained from a network of surface flux stations operated during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The study included examination of a surface-driven secondary circulation in the boundary layer resulting from a persistent cross-site gradient in soil moisture, to demonstrate the sensitivity of boundary layer dynamics to heterogeneous surface fluxes, The performance of a biosphere model in reproducing the measured surface fluxes was evaluated with and without the use of satellite retrieval of three key canopy variables with RMS uncertainties commensurate with those of the measurements themselves. Four sensible heat flux closure schemes currently being used in GCMs were then evaluated against the FIFE observations. Results indicate that the methods by which closure models are calibrated lead to exceedingly large errors when the schemes are applied to variable boundary layer conditions. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Satellite Based Analysis of Surface Urban Heat Island Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gémes Orsolya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The most obvious characteristics of urban climate are higher air and surface temperatures compared to rural areas and large spatial variation of meteorological parameters within the city. This research examines the long term and seasonal development of urban surface temperature using satellite data during a period of 30 years and within a year. The medium resolution Landsat data were (preprocessed using open source tools. Besides the analysis of the long term and seasonal changes in land surface temperature within a city, also its relationship with changes in the vegetation cover was investigated. Different urban districts and local climate zones showed varying strength of correlation. The temperature difference between urban surfaces and surroundings is defined as surface urban heat island (SUHI. Its development shows remarkable seasonal and spatial anomalies. The satellite images can be applied to visualize and analyze the SUHI, although they were not collected at midday and early afternoon, when the phenomenon is normally at its maximum. The applied methodology is based on free data and software and requires minimal user interaction. Using the results new urban developments (new built up and green areas can be planned, that help mitigate the negative effects of urban climate.

  1. Satellite-Based Surface Heat Budgets and Sea Surface Temperature Tendency in the Tropical Eastern Indian and Western Pacific Oceans for the 1997/98 El Nino and 1998/99 La Nina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Lin, Po-Hsiung

    2002-01-01

    The 1997/98 is a strong El Nino warm event, while the 1998/99 is a moderate La Nina cold event. We have investigated surface heat budgets and sea surface temperature (SST) tendency for these two events in the tropical western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans using satellite-retrieved surface radiative and turbulent fluxes. The radiative fluxes are taken from the Goddard Satellite-retrieved Surface Radiation Budget (GSSRB), derived from radiance measurements of the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The GSSRB covers the domain 40 deg S - 4 deg N, 90 deg E-17 deg W and a period from October 1997 to December 2000. The spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg lat-long and the temporal resolution is 1 day. The turbulent fluxes are taken from Version 2 of the Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF-2). The GSSTF-2 has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long over global Oceans and a temporal resolution of 1 day covering the period July 1987-December 2000. Daily turbulent fluxes are derived from the S S M (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) surface wind and surface air humidity, and the SST and 2-m air temperature of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a stability-dependent bulk flux algorithm. The changes of surface heat budgets, SST and tendency, cloudiness, wind speed, and zonal wind stress of the 1997/98 El Nino relative to the1998/99 La Nina for the northern winter and spring seasons are analyzed. The relative changes of surface heat budgets and SST tendency of the two events are quite different between the tropical eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans. For the tropical western Pacific, reduced solar heating (more clouds) is generally associated with decreased evaporative cooling (weaker winds), and vise versa. The changes in evaporative cooling over-compensate that of solar heating and dominate the spatial variability of the changes in net surface heating. Both solar heating and evaporative cooling offset each other to reduce

  2. Investigation of the third heat transfer crisis on a vertical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avksentyuk, B. P.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    The process of development of the third heat transfer crisis for vertical orientation of the heating surface was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out with acetone under the conditions of saturation for the pressures in the working volume from 20 to 28 kPa. In all experiments, the third heat transfer crisis was preceded by propagation of evaporation front along the heating surface. The threshold values of heat flux densities, above which a stable vapor film is formed on the whole heating surface, are lower for vertical orientation of this heating surface than for the horizontal one. Data on the threshold heat flux densities and overheating before boiling-up were obtained. Above these values, formation of evaporation fronts was observed. The range of operation parameters corresponding to formation of the sites of unstable film boiling on the heating surface after boiling-up was determined.

  3. Estimating land surface heat flux using radiometric surface temperature without the need for an extra resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Yang, Y.; Liu, S.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely-sensed land surface temperature (LST) is a key variable in energy balance and is widely used for estimating regional heat flux. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero) poses a great challenge for regional heat flux estimation in one -source energy balance models. In this study, a one-source model for land (OSML) was proposed to estimate regional surface heat flux without a need for an empirical extra resistance. The proposed OSML employs both a conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analogue formula of sensible heat flux (H) to estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae) by using a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX), using a remotely-sensed data set at a regional scale. Validated against tower observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) of H and latent heat flux (LE) from OSML was 47 W/m2 and 51 W/m2, which is comparable to other published studies. OSML and SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) compared under the same available energy indicated that LE estimated by OSML is comparable to that derived from the SEBS model. In conducting further inter-comparisons of rae, the aerodynamic resistance derived from SEBS (ra_SEBS), and aerodynamic resistance (ra) derived from Brutsaert et al. (2005) in corn and soybean fields, we found that rae and ra_SEBS are comparable. Most importantly, our study indicates that the OSML method is applicable without having to acquire wind speed or to specify aerodynamic surface characteristics and that it is applicable to heterogeneous areas.

  4. Radiant heat evaluation of concrete: a study of the erosion of concrete due to surface heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the erosion of concrete under high surface heat flux in connection with the core-melt/concrete interaction studies. The dominate erosion mechanism was found to be melting at the surface accompanied by chemical decomposition of the concrete beneath the melt-solid interface. The erosion process reaches a steady state after an initial transient. The steady state is characterized by an essentially constant erosion rate at the surface and a nonvarying (with respect to the moving melt interface) temperature distribution within the concrete. For the range of incident heat flux 64 W/cm/sup 2/ to 118 W/cm/sup 2/, the corresponding steady state erosion rate varies from approximately 8 cm/hr to 23 cm/hr. A simple ablation/melting model is proposed for the erosion process. The model was found to be able to correlate all temperature responses at various depths from all tests at large times and for temperatures above approximately 250/sup 0/C.

  5. Heat and mass transfer at a free surface with diabatic boundaries in a single-species system under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael E.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the heat and mass transfer at a free surface under microgravity conditions. The SOURCE-II (Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment) experiment was performed on a suborbital flight in February 2012 from Esrange in North Sweden. It provided representative data with respect to solid, liquid, and vapor temperatures as well as the visible surface position. The objectives were to quantify the deformation of the free liquid surface and to correlate the apparent contact angle to a characteristic temperature difference between subcooled liquid and superheated wall. Furthermore, the influence of evaporation and condensation at the liquid/vapor interface and at the superheated wall must be taken into account to analyze heat and mass fluxes due to a characteristic temperature difference. In the following, we show evidently that the magnitude of the apparent contact angle depends on the exerted specific pressurizations of the vapor phase during the experiment and hence on the change in the saturation temperature at the free surface. The characteristic temperature difference is defined with respect to the wall temperature in the vicinity of the contact line and the saturation temperature. Therefore, apparent contact angle and temperature difference can be correlated and indicate a specific characteristic. Concerning the heat and mass transfer at the free liquid surface and the contact line, two different methods are presented to evaluate the net mass due to phase change within a certain time interval. In the first approach, the mass flow rate is calculated by means of the ideal gas law and its derivatives with respect to temperature and pressure. The second approach calculates the heat flux as well as the mass flux at the wall and in the region of the free liquid surface. In these cases, a specific heat transfer coefficient and a thermal boundary layer thickness are used.

  6. Vaporization heat transfer of dielectric liquids on enhanced surfaces covered with screen wicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C. B.; Chow, L. C.; Pais, M. R.; Baker, K.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the vaporization heat transfer characteristics for the dielectric liquid FC-72 on several wicking surfaces which may be used in flat-plate heat pipes. The wicking materials studied included microstructure enhanced surfaces and coarse surfaces covered with screen meshes. Experimental data for q versus deltaT curves and critical heat fluxes were obtained for the two different operating conditions of a heat pipe, evaporation, and shallow pool boiling. When the liquid level was above the heated surface, the height of the liquid level above the surface was varied from 0 to 10 mm. When the liquid level was below the heated surface, the distance from the liquid level to the edge of the surface was adjusted from 0 to 15 mm. Experimental results revealed that for shallow pool boiling when the heated surface was covered with a wire screen mesh, the heat transfer coefficient increased at lower heat fluxes but the critical heat flux (CHF) decreased for all the surfaces tested. In the case of evaporation, both CHF and the heat transfer coefficient increased as the microstructure surfaces were covered with screen meshes.

  7. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-12-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  8. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-07-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  9. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Thakur, D.B.; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon

  10. Attenuating the surface Urban Heat Island within the Local Thermal Zones through land surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiong; Ouyang, Wanlu

    2017-02-01

    Inefficient mitigation of excessive heat is attributed to the discrepancy between the scope of climate research and conventional planning practice. This study approaches this problem at both domains. Generally, the study, on one hand, claims that the climate research of the temperature phenomenon should be at local scale, where implementation of planning and design strategies can be more feasible. On the other hand, the study suggests that the land surface factors should be organized into zones or patches, which conforms to the urban planning and design manner. Thus in each zone, the land surface composition of those excessively hot places can be compared to the zonal standard. The comparison gives guidance to the modification of the land surface factors at the target places. Specifically, this study concerns the Land Surface Temperature (LST) in Wuhan, China. The land surface is classified into Local Thermal Zones (LTZ). The specifications of temperature sensitive land surface factors are relative homogeneous in each zone and so is the variation of the LST. By extending the city scale analysis of Urban Heat Island into local scale, the Local Surface Urban Heat Islands (LSUHIs) are extracted. Those places in each zone that constantly maintain as LSUHI and exceed the homogenous LST variation are considered as target places or hotspots with higher mitigation or adaptation priority. The operation is equivalent to attenuate the abnormal LST variation in each zone. The framework is practical in the form of prioritization and zoning, and mitigation strategies are essentially operated locally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vaporization heat transfer of dielectric liquids on a wick-covered surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C. B.; Chow, L. C.; Baker, K.

    1993-01-01

    Vaporization heat transfer characteristics were measured for the dielectric liquid FC-72 on a horizontal heated surface covered with wire screen wicks with the mesh number for the screens varying from 24 to 100. In such a situation the liquid level can be either higher or lower than the heated surface. When the liquid level was above the heated surface (shallow pool boiling), the height of the liquid level above the surface, h, was varied from 0 to 10 mm. When the liquid level was below the heated surface (evaporation through capillary pumping), the distance from the liquid level to the edge of the surface, L, was adjusted from 0 to 15 mm. Experimental data revealed that the critical heat flux (CHF) decreases as the mesh number is increased from 24 to 100 for both vaporation and shallow pool boiling, showing that the vapor-escaping limit is more important than the capillary limit in flat plate heat pipe application.

  12. Enhancement of heat transfer at pool boiling on surfaces with silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnov, E. A.; Shatskiy, E. N.; Khmel, S. Ya; Baranov, E. A.; Zamchiy, A. O.; Semionov, V. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    The boiling heat transfer on the local heaters with microstructured and nanomodified surfaces was studied. As nanomodified surfaces we used copper ones where the microropes of silicon oxide nanowires were grown. The aging of the nanomodified surface was observed after first series of experiments. It was shown that both finning and nanostructuring of the surface result in increase of heat transfer. The heat flux density of 1400 W/cm2 was reached.

  13. Impact of Fe powder sintering and soldering in production of porous heating surface on flow boiling heat transfer in minichannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depczyński Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on identification of the impact of porous heated surface on flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel. The heated element for Fluorinert FC-72 was a thin plate made of Haynes-230. Infrared thermography was used to determine changes in the temperature on its outer smooth side. The porous surface in contact with the fluid in the minichannel was produced in two processes: sintering or soldering of Fe powder to the plate. The results were presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance from the minichannel inlet and as boiling curves. Results obtained for using a smooth heated plate at the saturated boiling region were also presented to compare. In the subcooled boiling region, at a higher heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient was slightly higher for the surface prepared via soldering. In the saturated boiling region, the local heat transfer coefficients obtained for the smooth plate surface were slightly higher than those achieved from the sintered plate surface. The porous structures formed have low thermal conductivity. This may induce noticeable thermal resistance at the diffusion bridges of the sintered structures, in particular within the saturated boiling region.

  14. Impact of Fe powder sintering and soldering in production of porous heating surface on flow boiling heat transfer in minichannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depczyński, Wojciech; Piasecki, Artur; Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on identification of the impact of porous heated surface on flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel. The heated element for Fluorinert FC-72 was a thin plate made of Haynes-230. Infrared thermography was used to determine changes in the temperature on its outer smooth side. The porous surface in contact with the fluid in the minichannel was produced in two processes: sintering or soldering of Fe powder to the plate. The results were presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance from the minichannel inlet and as boiling curves. Results obtained for using a smooth heated plate at the saturated boiling region were also presented to compare. In the subcooled boiling region, at a higher heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient was slightly higher for the surface prepared via soldering. In the saturated boiling region, the local heat transfer coefficients obtained for the smooth plate surface were slightly higher than those achieved from the sintered plate surface. The porous structures formed have low thermal conductivity. This may induce noticeable thermal resistance at the diffusion bridges of the sintered structures, in particular within the saturated boiling region.

  15. Experimental study of heat transfer enhancement due to the surface vibrations in a flexible double pipe heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinian, A.; Meghdadi Isfahani, A. H.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the heat transfer enhancement due to the surface vibration for a double pipe heat exchanger, made of PVDF, is investigated. In order to create forced vibrations (3-9 m/s2, 100 Hz) on the outer surface of the heat exchanger electro-dynamic vibrators are used. Experiments were performed at inner Reynolds numbers ranging from 2533 to 9960. The effects of volume flow rate and temperature on heat transfer performance are evaluated. Results demonstrated that heat transfer coefficient increases by increasing vibration level and mass flow rate. The most increase in heat transfer coefficient is 97% which is obtained for the highest vibration level (9 m/s2) in the experiment range.

  16. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  17. The NET effect of dispersants : A critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marieke Zeinstra-Helfrich; Wierd Koops; Albertinka J. Murk

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  18. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  19. The impact of heat waves on surface urban heat island and local economy in Cluj-Napoca city, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Ioana; Croitoru, Adina-Eliza; Rus, Adina Viorica; Roşca, Cristina Florina; Harpa, Gabriela Victoria; Ciupertea, Antoniu-Flavius; Rus, Ionuţ

    2017-07-01

    The association between heat waves and the urban heat island effect can increase the impact on environment and society inducing biophysical hazards. Heat stress and their associated public health problems are among the most frequent. This paper explores the heat waves impact on surface urban heat island and on the local economy loss during three heat periods in Cluj-Napoca city in the summer of 2015. The heat wave events were identified based on daily maximum temperature, and they were divided into three classes considering the intensity threshold: moderate heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 90th percentile), severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature over the 95th percentile), and extremely severe heat waves (daily maximum temperature exceeding the 98th percentile). The minimum length of an event was of minimum three consecutive days. The surface urban heat island was detected based on land surface temperature derived from Landsat 8 thermal infrared data, while the economic impact was estimated based on data on work force structure and work productivity in Cluj-Napoca derived from the data released by Eurostat, National Bank of Romania, and National Institute of Statistics. The results indicate that the intensity and spatial extension of surface urban heat island could be governed by the magnitude of the heat wave event, but due to the low number of satellite images available, we should consider this information only as preliminary results. Thermal infrared remote sensing has proven to be a very efficient method to study surface urban heat island, due to the fact that the synoptic conditions associated with heat wave events usually favor cloud free image. The resolution of the OLI_TIRS sensor provided good results for a mid-extension city, but the low revisiting time is still a drawback. The potential economic loss was calculated for the working days during heat waves and the estimated loss reached more than 2.5 mil. EUR for each heat wave day

  20. The Use of Solar Heating and Heat Cured Polymers for Lunar Surface Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul; Curran, Jerry; Back, Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Dust ejecta can affect visibility during a lunar landing, erode nearby coated surfaces and get into mechanical assemblies of in-place infrastructure. Regolith erosion was observed at many of the Apollo landing sites. This problem needs to be addressed at the beginning of the lunar base missions, as the amount of infrastructure susceptible to problems will increase with each landing. Protecting infrastructure from dust and debris is a crucial step in its long term functionality. A proposed way to mitigate these hazards is to build a lunar launch pad. Other areas of a lunar habitat will also need surface stabilization methods to help mitigate dust hazards. Roads would prevent dust from being lifted during movement and dust free zones might be required for certain areas critical to crew safety or to critical science missions. Work at NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is investigating methods of stabilizing the lunar regolith including: sintering the regolith into a solid and using heat or UV cured polymers to stabilize the surface. Sintering, a method in which powders are heated until fusing into solids, has been proposed as one way of building a Lunar launch/landing pad. A solar concentrator has been built and used in the field to sinter JSC-1 Lunar stimulant. Polymer palliatives are used by the military to build helicopter landing pads and roads in dusty and sandy areas. Those polymers are dispersed in a solvent (water), making them unsuitable for lunar use. Commercially available, solvent free, polymer powders are being investigated to determine their viability to work in the same way as the solvent borne terrestrial analog. This presentation will describe the ongoing work at KSC in this field. Results from field testing will be presented. Physical testing results, including compression and abrasion, of field and laboratory prepared samples will be presented.

  1. On the Heat Transfer through a Solid Slab Heated Uniformly and Continuously on One of Its Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, E.; Lara-Bernal, A.; Calderon, A.; Delgado-Vasallo, O.

    2011-01-01

    Some peculiarities of the heat transfer through a sample that is heated by the superficial absorption of light energy under continuous uniform illumination are discussed. We explain, using a different approach to that presented in a recent article published in this journal (Salazar "et al" 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 1053-9), that the front surface of…

  2. Enhanced boiling performance of a nanoporous copper surface by electrodeposition and heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiao; Lu, Long-Sheng; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Tang, Biao

    2017-03-01

    A nanoporous structure was fabricated on the surface of a copper block by electrodeposition and heat treatment compound technology. The influence of the heat treatment parameters on the binding force of a structure was analyzed, and a platform was set up to test the pool boiling heat transfer performance. By observing the SEM morphology, the effect of electrodeposition parameters on the formation of nanoporous structure was determined, and the heat transfer coefficient and wall superheat between different surfaces were compared. At the same time, by means of visualization, the bubble behavior of a smooth surface and a nanoporous surface under different heat fluxes was studied. The results show that the surface structure of nanoporous copper prepared by electrodeposition and heat treatment can improve the bonding strength by 77 %, decrease the wall superheat by 45 %, and increase the heat transfer coefficient by 80 %.

  3. Tingkat Insidensi Malaria di Wilayah Pemanasan Kelambu Berinsektisida Tahan Lama dan Wilayah Kontrol (MALARIA INCIDENCE RATE OF HEAT ASSISTED REGENERATION LONG LASTING INSECTICIDAL NETS AREA AND CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etih Sudarnika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Long lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN is one effective way to prevent malaria. Permethrin treatedLLIN is one type of LLIN which is recommended by WHO. Several studies have shown that these types ofLLIN requiring heat assisted regeneration after washing to enhance the biological activity of insecticidethat contained in the LLIN fibers. This study aimed to compare the incidence rates of malaria in childrenunder five years old who live in the intervention area (where the heat assisted regeneration on LLIN afterwashing was applied and control area (where the heat assisted regeneration on LLIN after washing wasnot applied. Data of malaria cases was collected from laboratory log book at all health centers in BangkaDistrict, in the period of June June 2007 until July 2008. Data were analyzed with Poisson regressionmodels. The results showed that the incidence rate of malaria in children under five years old was notsignificantly different between the treatment and control areas.

  4. Surface Heat Balance and Spatially Distributed Ablation Modelling at Koryto Glacier, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Konya, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takane; Naruse,Renji

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of ablation at Koryto Glacier, a mountain glacier under maritime climate in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, we made field observations from August to early September 2000. At a site near the equilibrium line, the 31-day average net radiation, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux were 43, 59 and 31 W-2, respectively. We developed a new distributed ablation model, which only needs measurements of air temperature and global radiation at one site. Hourly ablati...

  5. A modified force-restore approach to modeling snow-surface heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Luce; David G. Tarboton

    2001-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the energy balance of a snowpack requires good estimates of the snow surface temperature. The snow surface temperature allows a balance between atmospheric heat fluxes and the conductive flux into the snowpack. While the dependency of atmospheric fluxes on surface temperature is reasonably well understood and parameterized, conduction of heat from...

  6. Aram Chaos and its constraints on the surface heat flux of Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, S.; Zegers, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The surface heat flux of a planet is an important parameter to characterize its internal activity and to determine its thermal evolution. Here we report on a new method to constrain the surface heat flux of Mars during the Hesperian. For this, we explore the consequences for the martian surface

  7. Performance analyses of helical coil heat exchangers. The effect of external coil surface modification on heat exchanger effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Muszyński, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    The shell and coil heat exchangers are commonly used in heating, ventilation, nuclear industry, process plant, heat recovery and air conditioning systems. This type of recuperators benefits from simple construction, the low value of pressure drops and high heat transfer. In helical coil, centrifugal force is acting on the moving fluid due to the curvature of the tube results in the development. It has been long recognized that the heat transfer in the helical tube is much better than in the straight ones because of the occurrence of secondary flow in planes normal to the main flow inside the helical structure. Helical tubes show good performance in heat transfer enhancement, while the uniform curvature of spiral structure is inconvenient in pipe installation in heat exchangers. Authors have presented their own construction of shell and tube heat exchanger with intensified heat transfer. The purpose of this article is to assess the influence of the surface modification over the performance coefficient and effectiveness. The experiments have been performed for the steady-state heat transfer. Experimental data points were gathered for both laminar and turbulent flow, both for co current- and countercurrent flow arrangement. To find optimal heat transfer intensification on the shell-side authors applied the number of transfer units analysis.

  8. Low temperature heating and high temperature cooling embedded water based surface heating and cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Babiak, Jan; Petras, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    This Guidebook describes the systems that use water as heat-carrier and when the heat exchange within the conditioned space is more than 50% radiant. Embedded systems insulated from the main building structure (floor, wall and ceiling) are used in all types of buildings and work with heat carriers at low temperatures for heating and relatively high temperature for cooling.

  9. Quantification of surface urban heat island intensity using impervious surface area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huidong; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2017-04-01

    Accurate quantification of urban heat island could contribute to efficiently evaluate potential heat risk. This paper come up with a new approach to calculate urban heat island intensity (UHII) using remote sensing data based on the linear regression slope between temperature and urban indicators. Urban fraction and sealing degree were used here as the urban indicators. Meanwhile, given the footprint of temperature measurement over each pixels, a new urban indicator, Urban Index, was calculated using sealing degree and Kernel Density Estimation. The results showed that the MODIS land surface temperature presents a strong linear correlation with the Urban Index, with R2 of 0.92 during the day and 0.94 at night compared to urban fraction and original sealing degree data. Further, the linear regression function between LST and Urban Index was used to analyze the SUHII characteristic. The daily SUHII show larger values in summer and during the day than in winter and at night with maximum values of 8.86, 9.22, 5.47 and 5.54 K at 11 am, 12:30am, 10 pm and 2 am, respectively. The new SUHII presents good correlation with the UHII calculated from the approach using in-situ measurements data, in particular at night. Given the good relationship between temperature and Urban Index, the potential heat stress risk is divided into five grades. The risk map is generated based on the spatial distribution of Urban Index.

  10. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... HAM conditions. The paper focuses on the influence of the interior surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients, and investigates its effect on the hygrothermal performance. The parameter study showed that the magnitude of the convective surface transfer coefficients have a relatively large...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  11. Low-Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer on Vertical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe Andersen, J. G.; Dix, G. E.; Leonard, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The phenomenon of film boiling heat transfer for high wall temperatures has been investigated. Based on the assumption of laminar flow for the film, the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for the vapor film are solved and a Bromley-type analytical expression for the heat transfer...... length, an average film boiling heat transfer coefficient is obtained....

  12. Piston surface heat transfer during combustion in large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    In the design process of large marine diesel engines information on the maximum heat load on the piston surface experienced during the engine cycle is an important parameter. The peak heat load occurs during combustion when hot combustion products impinge on the piston surface. Although the maximum...... heat load is only present for a short time of the total engine cycle, it is a severe thermal load on the piston surface. At the same time, cooling of the piston crown is generally more complicated than cooling of the other components of the combustion chamber. This can occasionally cause problems...... with burning off piston surface material. In this work the peak heat load on the piston surface of large marine diesel engines during combustion was investigated. Measurements of the instantaneous surface temperature and surface heat flux on pistons in large marine engines are difficult due to expensive...

  13. Annual Performance of a Two-Speed, Dedicated Dehumidification Heat Pump in the NIST Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, W Vance

    2016-01-01

    A 2715 ft2 (252 m2), two story, residential home of the style typical of the Gaithersburg, Maryland area was constructed in 2012 to demonstrate technologies for net-zero energy (NZE) homes (or ZEH). The NIST Net-Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF) functions as a laboratory to support the development and adoption of cost-effective NZE designs, technologies, construction methods, and building codes. The primary design goal was to meet the comfort and functional needs of the simulated occupants. The first annual test period began on July 1, 2013 and ended June 30, 2014. During the first year of operation, the home's annual energy consumption was 13039 kWh (4.8 kWh ft-2, 51.7 kWh m-2), and the 10.2 kW solar photovoltaic system generated an excess of 484 kWh. During this period the heating and air conditioning of the home was performed by a novel air-source heat pump that utilized a reheat heat exchanger to allow hot compressor discharge gas to reheat the supply air during a dedicated dehumidification mode. During dedicated dehumidification, room temperature air was supplied to the living space until the relative humidity setpoint of 50% was satisfied. The heat pump consumed a total of 6225 kWh (2.3 kWh ft-2, 24.7 kWh m-2) of electrical energy for cooling, heating, and dehumidification. Annual cooling efficiency was 10.1 Btu W-1h-1 (2.95 W W-1), relative to the rated SEER of the heat pump of 15.8 Btu W-1h-1 (4.63 W W-1). Annual heating efficiency was 7.10 Btu W-1h-1 (2.09 W W-1), compared with the unit's rated HSPF of 9.05 Btu W-1h-1 (2.65 W W-1). These field measured efficiency numbers include dedicated dehumidification operation and standby energy use for the year. Annual sensible heat ratio was approximately 70%. Standby energy consumption was 5.2 % and 3.5 % of the total electrical energy used for cooling and heating, respectively.

  14. Reduction of trapped ion anomalous heating by in situ surface plasma cleaning

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous motional heating is a major obstacle to scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. While the source of this heating is not yet understood, several previous studies suggest that surface contaminants may be largely responsible. We demonstrate an improvement by a factor of four in the room-temperature heating rate of a niobium surface electrode trap by in situ plasma cleaning of the trap surface. This surface treatment was performed with a simple homebuilt coil assembly and commercially-available matching network and is considerably gentler than other treatments, such as ion milling or laser cleaning, that have previously been shown to improve ion heating rates. We do not see an improvement in the heating rate when the trap is operated at cryogenic temperatures, pointing to a role of thermally-activated surface contaminants in motional heating whose activity may freeze out at low temperatures.

  15. An optimization methodology for the design of renewable energy systems for residential net zero energy buildings with on-site heat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Christian; Bojesen, Carsten; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2011-01-01

    energy supply systems for residential NZEB involving on-site production of heat and electricity in combination with electricity exchanged with the public grid. The model is based on linear programming and determines the optimal capacities for each relevant supply technology in terms of the overall system......The concept of net zero energy buildings (NZEB) has received increased attention throughout the last years. A well adapted and optimized design of the energy supply system is crucial for the performance of such buildings. This paper aims at developing a method for the optimal sizing of renewable...

  16. Characterization methods of nano-patterned surfaces generated by induction heating assisted injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Ravn, Christian; Menotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    An induction heating-assisted injection molding (IHAIM) process developed by the authors is used to replicate surfaces containing random nano-patterns. The injection molding setup is developed so that an induction heating system rapidly heats the cavity wall at rates of up to 10◦C/s. In order...

  17. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter ...

  18. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, ...

  19. SolNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Vajen, Klaus; Bales, Chris

    2014-01-01

    SolNet, founded in 2006, is the first coordinated International PhD education program on Solar Thermal Engineering. The SolNet network is coordinated by the Institute of Thermal Engineering at Kassel University, Germany. The network offers PhD courses on solar heating and cooling, conference...

  20. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wen

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol. However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite. Keywords: Microwave-assisted heating, Chalcopyrite, Leaching kinetics, Interface temperature, Surface energy

  1. Estimation of Surface Temperature and Heat Flux by Inverse Heat Transfer Methods Using Internal Temperatures Measured While Radiantly Heating a Carbon/Carbon Specimen up to 1920 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Michelle; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Glass, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve the heat conduction equation is needed when designing materials to be used on vehicles exposed to extremely high temperatures; e.g. vehicles used for atmospheric entry or hypersonic flight. When using test and flight data, computational methods such as finite difference schemes may be used to solve for both the direct heat conduction problem, i.e., solving between internal temperature measurements, and the inverse heat conduction problem, i.e., using the direct solution to march forward in space to the surface of the material to estimate both surface temperature and heat flux. The completed research first discusses the methods used in developing a computational code to solve both the direct and inverse heat transfer problems using one dimensional, centered, implicit finite volume schemes and one dimensional, centered, explicit space marching techniques. The developed code assumed the boundary conditions to be specified time varying temperatures and also considered temperature dependent thermal properties. The completed research then discusses the results of analyzing temperature data measured while radiantly heating a carbon/carbon specimen up to 1920 F. The temperature was measured using thermocouple (TC) plugs (small carbon/carbon material specimens) with four embedded TC plugs inserted into the larger carbon/carbon specimen. The purpose of analyzing the test data was to estimate the surface heat flux and temperature values from the internal temperature measurements using direct and inverse heat transfer methods, thus aiding in the thermal and structural design and analysis of high temperature vehicles.

  2. Characterisation of a grooved heat pipe with an anodised surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A. Brusly; Ram Kumar, A. M.; Ramachandran, K.; Pillai, B. C.; Senthil Kumar, C.; Sharifpur, Mohsen; Meyer, Josua P.

    2017-03-01

    A grooved heat pipe (GHP) is an important device for managing heat in space applications such as satellites and space stations, as it works efficiently in the absence of gravity. Apart from the above application, axial GHPs are used in many applications, such as electronic cooling units for temperature control and permafrost cooling. Improving the performance of GHPs is essential for better cooling and thermal management. In the present study, the effect of anodization on the heat transfer characteristics of a GHP is studied with R600a as a working fluid. In addition, the effects of fill ratio, inclination angle and heat inputs on the heat transfer performance of a GHP are studied. Furthermore, the effect of heat flux on dimensional numbers, such as the Webber, Bond, Kutateladze and condensation numbers, are studied. The inclination angle, heat input and fill ratio of GHPs are varied in the range of 0°-90°, 25-250 W and 10-70 % respectively. It is found that the above parameters have a significant effect on the performance of a GHP. Due to the anodisation, the maximum enhancement in heat transfer coefficient at the evaporator is 39 % for a 90° inclination at a heat flux of 11 kW/m2. The reported performance enhancement of a GHP may be due to the large numbers of nucleation sites created by the anodisation process and enhancement in the capillary force due to the coating.

  3. Experimental investigation of turbulent transport of momentum and heat in the atmospheric surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guowen; Zheng, X. J.; Bo, Tianli

    2017-11-01

    In our study, turbulent transport of momentum and heat is investigated in the neutral and unstable atmospheric surface layer (ASL) over the edge of a desert. Our results reveal that with the increase of wind speed the transport efficiencies for momentum and heat increased, furthermore, transport efficiency of momentum increases faster than that of heat. In addition, the method of quadrant analysis and turbulent events were used to analyze the moment flux and heat flux. Experimental results show that the influence of wind speed on moment flux and heat flux can be quite different, which maybe has a great impact on the turbulent transport of momentum and heat in ASL.

  4. Instantaneous heat flux flowing into ceramic combustion chamber wall surface of low heat rejection engine; Shanetsu engine no ceramic nenshoshitsu hekimen eno shunji netsuryusoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Y.; Hagihara, Y. [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, S. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Adachi, K. [Daido Hoxan Inc., Sapporo (Japan); Nagano, H. [Riso Kagaku Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, A. [Mitani Sangyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-25

    To evaluate the effectiveness of low heat rejection engine under heat loss condition, instantaneous heat fluxes flowing into ceramic piston surface and aluminum alloy (Loex) piston surface using thin film thermocouple were measured, and both were compared. As a result, in the working stroke, the instantaneous heat flux flowing into ceramic piston surface was larger than the instantaneous heat flux flowing into Loex piston surface. Accordingly, it became clear that reduction of heat loss was not effected when ceramics that thermal conductivity is small was used for combustion chamber wall. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  5. A One-Source Approach for Estimating Land Surface Heat Fluxes Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of available energy between sensible heat and latent heat is important for precise water resources planning and management in the context of global climate change. Land surface temperature (LST is a key variable in energy balance process and remotely sensed LST is widely used for estimating surface heat fluxes at regional scale. However, the inequality between LST and aerodynamic surface temperature (Taero poses a great challenge for regional heat fluxes estimation in one-source energy balance models. To address this issue, we proposed a One-Source Model for Land (OSML to estimate regional surface heat fluxes without requirements for empirical extra resistance, roughness parameterization and wind velocity. The proposed OSML employs both conceptual VFC/LST trapezoid model and the electrical analog formula of sensible heat flux (H to analytically estimate the radiometric-convective resistance (rae via a quartic equation. To evaluate the performance of OSML, the model was applied to the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX in United States and the Multi-Scale Observation Experiment on Evapotranspiration (MUSOEXE in China, using remotely sensed retrievals as auxiliary data sets at regional scale. Validated against tower-based surface fluxes observations, the root mean square deviation (RMSD of H and latent heat flux (LE from OSML are 34.5 W/m2 and 46.5 W/m2 at SMACEX site and 50.1 W/m2 and 67.0 W/m2 at MUSOEXE site. The performance of OSML is very comparable to other published studies. In addition, the proposed OSML model demonstrates similar skills of predicting surface heat fluxes in comparison to SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System. Since OSML does not require specification of aerodynamic surface characteristics, roughness parameterization and meteorological conditions with high spatial variation such as wind speed, this proposed method shows high potential for routinely acquisition of latent heat flux estimation

  6. Investigation of Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger Designs for Fission Surface Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Penswick, Barry; Robbie, Malcolm; Geng, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Fission surface power is an option for future Moon and Mars surface missions. High power nuclear reactor heated Stirling convertors are an option to provide reliable power for long duration outpost operations. This report investigates various design approaches for the liquid metal to acceptor heat exchange and clarifies the details used in the analysis.

  7. Selecting the induction heating for normalization of deposited surfaces of cylindrical parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Валеріївна Бережна

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The machine parts recovered by electric contact surfacing with metal strip are characterized by high loading of the surface layer, which has a significant impact on their performance. Therefore, the improvement of the operational stability of fast-wearing machine parts through the use of combined treatment technologies is required. Not all the work-piece but just the worn zones are subjected to recovery with electric contact surfacing; the tape thickness and depth of the heat affected zone being not more than a few millimeters. Therefore, the most optimal in this case is the use of a local surface heating method of high frequency currents. This method has economical benefits because there is no need to heat the entire work-piece. The induction heating mode at a constant power density has been proposed and analytically investigated. The ratios that make it possible to determine the main heating parameters ensuring calculation of the inductor for the normalization of the reconstructed surface of cylindrical parts have been given. These parameters are: specific power, frequency and warm-up time. The proposed induction heating mode is intermediate between the quenching and cross-cutting heating and makes it possible to simultaneously obtain the required temperatures at the surface and at the predetermined depth of the heated layer of cylindrical parts with the normalization of their surfaces restored with electric contact surfacing

  8. An inverse method to estimate stem surface heat flux in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Bova; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2009-01-01

    Models of wildland fire-induced stem heating and tissue necrosis require accurate estimates of inward heat flux at the bark surface. Thermocouple probes or heat flux sensors placed at a stem surface do not mimic the thermal response of tree bark to flames.We show that data from thin thermocouple probes inserted just below the bark can be used, by means of a one-...

  9. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  10. Comprehensive study of flow and heat transfer at the surface of circular cooling fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityakov, V. Yu; Grekov, M. A.; Gusakov, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, S. Z.; Seroshtanov, V. V.; Bashkatov, A. V.; Dymkin, A. N.; Pavlov, A. V.; Milto, O. A.; Kalmykov, K. S.

    2017-11-01

    For the first time is proposed to combine heat flux measurements with thermal imaging and PIV (particle image velocimetry) for a comprehensive study of flow and heat transfer at the surface of the circular cooling fin. The investigated hollow fin is heated from within with saturated water steam; meanwhile the isothermal external surface simulates one of the perfect fin. Flow and heat transfer at the surface of the solid fin of the same size and shape, made of titanium alloy is investigated in the same regimes. Gradient Heat Flux Sensors (GHFS) were installed at different places of the fin surface. Velocity field around a cylinder, temperature field at the surface of the fin and heat flux for each rated time were obtained. Comprehensive method including heat flux measurement, PIV and thermal imaging allow to study flow and heat transfer at the surface of the fin in real time regime. The possibility to study flow and heat transfer for non-isothermal fins is shown; it is allow to improve traditional calculation of the cooling fins.

  11. The TX-model - a quantitative heat loss analysis of district heating pipes by means of IR surface temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinki, Heimo [ZW Energiteknik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of analysing the temperature profile at the ground surface above buried district heating pipes in such a way that would enable the quantitative determination of heat loss from the pair of pipes. In practical applications, it is supposed that this temperature profile is generated by means of advanced IR-thermography. For this purpose, the principle of the TX - model has been developed, based on the fact that the heat losses from pipes buried in the ground have a temperature signature on the ground surface. Qualitative analysis of this temperature signature is very well known and in practical use for detecting leaks from pipes. These techniques primarily make use of relative changes of the temperature pattern along the pipe. In the quantitative heat loss analysis, however, it is presumed that the temperature profile across the pipes is related to the pipe heat loss per unit length. The basic idea is that the integral of the temperature profile perpendicular to the pipe, called TX, is a function of the heat loss, but is also affected by other parameters such as burial depth, heat diffusivity, wind, precipitation and so on. In order to analyse the parameters influencing the TX- factor, a simulation model for the energy balance at the ground surface has been developed. This model includes the heat flow from the pipe to the surface and the heat exchange at the surface with the environment due to convection, latent heat change, solar and long wave radiation. The simulation gives the surprising result that the TX factor is by and large unaffected during the course of a day even when the sun is shining, as long as other climate conditions are relatively stable (low wind, no rain, no shadows). The results from the simulations were verified at different sites in Denmark, Finland, Sweden and USA through a co-operative research program organised and partially financed by the IEA District Heating Programme, Task III, and

  12. Estimation of surface Latent Heat Fluxes from IRS-P4/MSMR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    latent heat flux from satellite data. Liu and Niiler. (1984) and Liu (1986) applied the bulk formula to retrieve the surface LHF using near surface para- meters derived from satellite data. This method, hereafter referred to as the LN method, uses geo- physical parameters such as winds, sea surface tem- perature and surface ...

  13. The effect of heating rate on the surface chemistry of NiTi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undisz, Andreas; Hanke, Robert; Freiberg, Katharina E; Hoffmann, Volker; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the heating rate on the Ni content at the surface of the oxide layer of biomedical NiTi is explored. Heat treatment emulating common shape-setting procedures was performed by means of conventional and inductive heating for similar annealing time and temperature, applying various heating rates from ~0.25 K s(-1) to 250 K s(-1). A glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy method was established and employed to evaluate concentration profiles of Ni, Ti and O in the near-surface region at high resolution. The Ni content at the surface of the differently treated samples varies significantly, with maximum surface Ni concentrations of ~20 at.% at the lowest and ~1.5 at.% at the highest heating rate, i.e. the total amount of Ni contained in the surface region of the oxide layer decreases by >15 times. Consequently, the heating rate is a determinant for the biomedical characteristics of NiTi, especially since Ni available at the surface of the oxide layer may affect the hemocompatibility and be released promptly after surgical application of a respective implant. Furthermore, apparently contradictory results presented in the literature reporting surface Ni concentrations of ~3 at.% to >20 at.% after heat treatment are consistently explained considering the ascertained effect of the heating rate. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF SOLAR ABSORPTANCE OF BUILDING EXTERNAL SURFACES FROM HEAT FLUX POINT OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral ÖZEL

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, solar absorptance of external surfaces of buildings has been numerically investigated from the heat gain and losses point of view. For this purpose, external surface solar absorptance was icreased from 0 to 1with an ratio of 0.1 and, for the summer and winter conditions, heat fluxs was calculated by considering orientations of the wall and its roof for brick and concrete structure materials. Besides, external surface absorptance was assumed as 0.2, 0.5 and 0.9, respectively. Than, heat gain and losses were calculated to insulation thickness increasing on the outdoor surface of wall. Results obtained were presented as graphics

  15. Effect of size sprinkled heat exchange surface on developing boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kracík

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents research of sprinkled heat exchangers. This type of research has become rather topical in relation to sea water desalination. This process uses sprinkling of exchangers which rapidly separates vapour phase from a liquid phase. Applications help better utilize low-potential heat which is commonly wasted in utility systems. Low-potential heat may increase utilization of primary materials. Our ambition is to analyse and describe the whole sprinkled exchanger. Two heat exchangers were tested with a similar tube pitch: heat exchanger no. 1 had a four-tube bundle and heat exchanger no. 2 had eight-tube bundle. Efforts were made to maintain similar physical characteristics. They were tested at two flow rates (ca 0.07 and 0.11 kg s−1 m−1 and progress of boiling on the bundle was observed. Initial pressure was ca 10 kPa (abs at which no liquid was boiling at any part of the exchanger; the pressure was then lowered. Other input parameters were roughly similar for both flow rates. Temperature of heating water was ca 50°C at a constant flow rate of ca 7.2 L min−1. Results of our experiments provide optimum parameters for the given conditions for both tube bundles.

  16. Sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a plain heating surface during pool boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen-hua; Liao, Liang [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200030 Shanghai (China)

    2008-05-15

    The pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments of water (H{sub 2}O) based and alcohol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) based nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions on the plain heated copper surface were carried out. The study was focused on the sorption and agglutination phenomenon of nanofluids on a heated surface. The nanofluids consisted of the base liquid, the nanoparticles and the surfactant. The nanoparticles-suspensions consisted of the base liquid and nanoparticles. The both liquids of water and alcohol and both nanoparticles of CuO and SiO{sub 2} were used. The surfactant was sodium dodecyl benzene sulphate (SDBS). The experimental results show that for nanofluids, the agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heated surface when the wall temperature was over 112{sup o}C and steady nucleated boiling experiment could not be carried out. The reason was that an unsteady porous agglutination layer was formed on the heated surface. However, for nanoparticles-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and the steady boiling could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region. For the both of alcohol based nanofluids and nano-suspensions, no agglutination phenomenon occurred on the heating surface and steady nucleate boiling experiment could be carried out in the whole nucleate boiling region whose wall temperature did not exceed 112{sup o}C. The boiling heat transfer characteristics of the nanofluids and nanoparticles-suspensions are somewhat poor compared with that of the base fluids, since the decrease of the active nucleate cavities on the heating surface with a very thin nanoparticles sorption layer. The very thin nanoparticles sorption layer also caused a decrease in the solid-liquid contact angle on the heating surface which leaded to an increase of the critical heat flux (CHF). (author)

  17. Surface Approximation using Growing Self-Organizing Nets and Gradient Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Rivera-Rovelo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show how to improve the performance of two self-organizing neural networks used to approximate the shape of a 2D or 3D object by incorporating gradient information in the adaptation stage. The methods are based on the growing versions of the Kohonen's map and the neural gas network. Also, we show that in the adaptation stage the network utilizes efficient transformations, expressed as versors in the conformal geometric algebra framework, which build the shape of the object independent of its position in space (coordinate free. Our algorithms were tested with several images, including medical images (CT and MR images. We include also some examples for the case of 3D surface estimation.

  18. Near-surface heat flow in Saline Valley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, C.W.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.; Munroe, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    With the exception of values from one borehole drilled at Palm Spring and three boreholes drilled around Saline Valley dry lake, eight new heatflow values in Saline Valley, California, are within or somewhat below the range one would expect for this region of the Basin and Range heat-flow province. The lack of recent volcanism in the area and the apparently normal Basin and Range heat flow suggest that geothermal systems within the valley are stable stationary phases supported by high regional heat flow and forced convection.

  19. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, N.; Narayanan, S.; Möller, S. A.; Clark, R.; Lee, T. E.; Leek, P. J.; Wallraff, A.; Schulz, St.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Häffner, H.

    2011-01-01

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with a trapping height of approximately 240 μm. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation, the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion-loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and the possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed onto metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

  20. Immersion Condensation on Oil-Infused Heterogeneous Surfaces for Enhanced Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rong; Miljkovic, Nenad; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing condensation heat transfer is important for broad applications from power generation to water harvesting systems. Significant efforts have focused on easy removal of the condensate, yet the other desired properties of low contact angles and high nucleation densities for high heat transfer performance have been typically neglected. In this work, we demonstrate immersion condensation on oil-infused micro and nanostructured surfaces with heterogeneous coatings, where water droplets nucleate immersed within the oil. The combination of surface energy heterogeneity, reduced oil-water interfacial energy, and surface structuring enabled drastically increased nucleation densities while maintaining easy condensate removal and low contact angles. Accordingly, on oil-infused heterogeneous nanostructured copper oxide surfaces, we demonstrated approximately 100% increase in heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art dropwise condensation surfaces in the presence of non-condensable gases. This work offers a distinct approach utilizing surface chemistry and structuring together with liquid-infusion for enhanced condensation heat transfer. PMID:23759735

  1. Discussion on the Heat and Mass Transfer Model on the Pool Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon-Joon; Choo, Yeon-Jun [FNC Tech., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Heat transfer on the pool surface involves the evaporation and condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gas. It is a kind of inter-phase heat transfer. This phenomenon has been regarded as less important on the thermal hydraulic behaviors such as pressure, temperature, hydrogen distribution, and so on in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a matter of fact, several RAIs (requests for additional information) during the licensing review of the developed CAP have been presented. And early in 2000s the steam condensation on the water surface of IRWST was a concern of APR1400 design. Such an increased concern is believed because it is a newly adopted system. This study discusses the pool surface heat transfer by reviewing the models of several well-known containment analysis codes, and conducting the sensitivities. This study discussed the pool surface heat transfer. The related models of CAP, GOTHIC, CONTEMPT-LT, and CONTEMPT4 were compared. The sensitivity of heat transfer coefficient for SKN3 and 4 using conventional code CONTEMPT-LT/028-A showed little effect. And the sensitivity of relative humidity and heat transfer area for latent heat transfer shows that CAP locates between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT4/MOD. The sensitivity for sensible heat transfer also shows similar trend. Conclusively, current CAP model of pool surface heat transfer has no fatal defect.

  2. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (99% of the original CO 2

  3. Smolt Responses to Hydrodynamic Conditions in Forebay Flow Nets of Surface Flow Outlets, 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Hedgepeth, J. B.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Anderson, Michael G.; Deng, Zhiqun; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Serkowski, John A.; Steinbeck, John R.

    2009-04-01

    This study provides information on juvenile salmonid behaviors at McNary and The Dalles dams that can be used by the USACE, fisheries resource managers, and others to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance fish passage. We researched smolt movements and ambient hydrodynamic conditions using a new approach combining simultaneous acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and acoustic imaging device (AID) measurements at surface flow outlets (SFO) at McNary and The Dalles dams on the Columbia River during spring and summer 2007. Because swimming effort vectors could be computed from the simultaneous fish and flow data, fish behavior could be categorized as passive, swimming against the flow (positively rheotactic), and swimming with the flow (negatively rheotactic). We present bivariate relationships to provide insight into fish responses to particular hydraulic variables that engineers might consider during SFO design. The data indicate potential for this empirical approach of simultaneous water/fish measurements to lead to SFO design guidelines in the future.

  4. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of "good modeling practice" to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level.

  5. Applying Artificial Neural Networks to Estimate Net Radiation at Surface Using the Synergy between GERB-SEVIRI and Ground Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo Ferreira, A.; Soria, Emilio; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Vila, Joan; Serrano, Antonio J.; Martinez, Marcelino; Velazquez Blazquez, Almudena; Clerbaux, Nicolas

    This paper describes the results obtained using Artificial Neural Networks (AAN) models to estimate the diurnal cycle of net radiation (Rn) at surface. The data used as input parameter in the AAN model were that measured by Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB-1) instrument, on board Meteosat 9 satellite. The data concerning Rn at the surface were collected at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS), a ground reference meteorological station for the validation of low spatial resolution sensors situated near de city of Valencia, Spain. This data refers to the periods July 31st -August 6th 2006 and June 19th -August 18th 2007. Both, GERB-1 and VAS data are used to train and validate the AAN model. The same data set is also used to develop and validate a Multivariate Linear Regression (MLR) model. A comparison between the estimates provided by the AAN and the MLR models has been carried out; the results obtained with the neural model outperform the linear model. Moreover, the low values of the error indexes show that neural models can be used as an alternative methodology to make atmospheric corrections.

  6. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  7. An inverse hyperbolic heat conduction problem in estimating surface heat flux by the conjugate gradient method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.-H.; Wu, H.-H. [Department of Systems and Naval Mechatronic Engineering National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China)

    2006-09-21

    In the present study an inverse hyperbolic heat conduction problem is solved by the conjugate gradient method (CGM) in estimating the unknown boundary heat flux based on the boundary temperature measurements. Results obtained in this inverse problem will be justified based on the numerical experiments where three different heat flux distributions are to be determined. Results show that the inverse solutions can always be obtained with any arbitrary initial guesses of the boundary heat flux. Moreover, the drawbacks of the previous study for this similar inverse problem, such as (1) the inverse solution has phase error and (2) the inverse solution is sensitive to measurement error, can be avoided in the present algorithm. Finally, it is concluded that accurate boundary heat flux can be estimated in this study.

  8. A new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Jianing; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new simplified model to calculate surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor heating and cooling system was proposed and established using the conduction shape factor. Measured data from references were used to validate the proposed model. The results showed...... that the maximum differences between the calculated surface temperature and heat transfer using the proposed model and the measured data were 0.8 ºC and 8.1 W/m2 for radiant floor heating system when average water temperature between 40 ºC and 60 ºC. For the corresponding values were 0.3 ºC and 2.0 W/m2...... for radiant floor cooling systems when average water temperature between 10 ºC and 20 ºC. Numerically simulated data in this study were also used to validate the proposed model. The results showed that the surface temperature and heat transfer of radiant floor calculated by the proposed model agreed very well...

  9. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution

  10. The modeling of heat affected zone (HAZ in submerged arc welding (SAW surfacing steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Winczek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work the bimodal heat source model in the description of the temperature field is presented. The electric arc was treated physically as one heat source, whose heat was divided: part of the heat is transferred by the direct impact of the electric arc, but another part of the heat is transferred to the weld by the melted material of the electrode. Computations of the temperature field during SAW surfacing of S355 steel element are carried out. The macrographic and metallographic analysis of the weld confirmed the depth and shapes of the fusion line and HAZ defined by the numerical simulation.

  11. CFD simulation of simultaneous monotonic cooling and surface heat transfer coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihálka, Peter, E-mail: usarmipe@savba.sk; Matiašovský, Peter, E-mail: usarmat@savba.sk [Institute of Construction and Architecture, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 03 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-07-07

    The monotonic heating regime method for determination of thermal diffusivity is based on the analysis of an unsteady-state (stabilised) thermal process characterised by an independence of the space-time temperature distribution on initial conditions. At the first kind of the monotonic regime a sample of simple geometry is heated / cooled at constant ambient temperature. The determination of thermal diffusivity requires the determination rate of a temperature change and simultaneous determination of the first eigenvalue. According to a characteristic equation the first eigenvalue is a function of the Biot number defined by a surface heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity of an analysed material. Knowing the surface heat transfer coefficient and the first eigenvalue the thermal conductivity can be determined. The surface heat transport coefficient during the monotonic regime can be determined by the continuous measurement of long-wave radiation heat flow and the photoelectric measurement of the air refractive index gradient in a boundary layer. CFD simulation of the cooling process was carried out to analyse local convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients more in detail. Influence of ambient air flow was analysed. The obtained eigenvalues and corresponding surface heat transfer coefficient values enable to determine thermal conductivity of the analysed specimen together with its thermal diffusivity during a monotonic heating regime.

  12. Full Scale Investigation of the Dynamic Heat Storage of Concrete Decks with PCM and Enhanced Heat Transfer Surface Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the full-scale experimental investigation of the dynamic heat storage potential of the prefabricated hollow core deck elements with and without phase change material (PCM) and with and without increased bottom surface area of the decks. In the presented investigation five types...... can result in the increased heat amount that can be transferred and stored in the heavy construction element during the diurnal indoor temperature fluctuations.......The paper presents the full-scale experimental investigation of the dynamic heat storage potential of the prefabricated hollow core deck elements with and without phase change material (PCM) and with and without increased bottom surface area of the decks. In the presented investigation five types...

  13. Numerical Simulation of Frosting on Wavy Fin-and-tube Heat Exchanger Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Wu, X. M.; Chu, F.; Zhu, B.

    2017-11-01

    Frost on fin surfaces of the heat exchanger increases thermal resistance and blocks air flow passage, which reduces the system energy efficiency. In this paper, a frosting model based on Euler multi-phase flow proposed before is used to simulate the frost layer growth process on wavy fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces. The model predicts the frost layer and temperature distributions on the heat exchanger surfaces. The air flow pressure drops before and after frosting have been obtained. The results show that the frost layer is unevenly distributed and no frost appears on the fin surfaces in the tube wake region. Frost on the wavy fin-and-tube heat exchanger surfaces restricts the airflow and the pressure drop increases about 140% after 45 min frosting. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Carbon cycling in the epilimnion of Lake Kivu (East Africa): surface net autotrophy and emission of CO2 to the atmosphere sustained by geogenic inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Bouillon, Steven; Morana, Cédric D. T.; Servais, Pierre; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Darchambeau, François

    2013-04-01

    Lake Kivu [2.50°S 1.59°S 29.37°E 28.83°E] is one of the East African great lakes (2370 km2 surface area, 550 km3 volume). It is a deep (maximum depth of 485 m) meromictic lake, with an oxic mixolimnion down to 70 m maximum, and a deep monolimnion rich in dissolved gases and nutrients. Lake Kivu is permanently stratified (meromictic) and deep layers receive heat, salts, and CO2 from deep geothermal springs. Seasonality of the physical and chemical vertical structure and biological activity in surface waters of Lake Kivu is driven by the oscillation between the dry season (June-September) and the rainy season (October-May), the former characterized by a deepening of the mixolimnion. This seasonal mixing favours the input of dissolved nutrients and the development of diatoms, while, during the rest of the year, the phytoplankton assemblage is dominated by cyanobacteria, chrysophytes and cryptophytes. Huge amounts of CO2 and methane (CH4) (300 km3 and 60 km3, respectively, at 0°C and 1 atm] are dissolved in the deep layers of Lake Kivu. The CO2 is mainly geogenic. Large scale industrial extraction of CH4 from the deep layers of Lake Kivu is planned which could affect the ecology and biogeochemical cycling of C of the lake and change for instance the emission of greenhouse gases such as CH4 and CO2. Here, we report a data set covering the seasonality of CO2 dynamics and fluxes, in conjunction with mass balances of C, and process rate measurements (primary production and bacterial production). In order to capture the seasonal variations of the studied quantities, four cruises were carried out in Lake Kivu on 15/03-29/03/2007 (mid rainy season), 28/08-10/09/2007 (late dry season), 21/06-03/07/2008 (early dry season) and 21/04-05/05/2009 (late rainy season). We show that the lake is a modest source of CO2 to the atmosphere but which is sustained by geogenic inputs from depth rather than net heterotrophy as reported in lakes in general. Indeed we provide several lines

  15. Estimation of surface heat flux for ablation and charring of thermal protection material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei-qi; He, Kai-feng; Zhou, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ablation of the thermal protection material of the reentry hypersonic flight vehicle is a complex physical and chemical process. To estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperature measurement is much more complex than the conventional inverse heat conduction problem case. In the paper, by utilizing a two-layer pyrogeneration-plane ablation model to model the ablation and charring of the material, modifying the finite control volume method to suit for the numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with variable-geometry, the CGM along with the associated adjoint problem is developed to estimate the surface heat flux. This estimation method is verified with a numerical example at first, the results show that the estimation method is feasible and robust. The larger is the measurement noise, the greater is the deviation of the estimated result from the exact value, and the measurement noise of ablated surface position has a significant and more direct influence on the estimated result of surface heat flux. Furthermore, the estimation method is used to analyze the experimental data of ablation of blunt Carbon-phenolic material Narmco4028 in an arc-heater. It is shown that the estimated surface heat flux agrees with the heating power value of the arc-heater, and the estimation method is basically effective and potential to treat the engineering heat conduction problem with ablation.

  16. Methodology for estimation of time-dependent surface heat flux due to cryogen spray cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, James W; Torres, Jorge H; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective technique to protect the epidermis during cutaneous laser therapies. Spraying a cryogen onto the skin surface creates a time-varying heat flux, effectively cooling the skin during and following the cryogen spurt. In previous studies mathematical models were developed to predict the human skin temperature profiles during the cryogen spraying time. However, no studies have accounted for the additional cooling due to residual cryogen left on the skin surface following the spurt termination. We formulate and solve an inverse heat conduction (IHC) problem to predict the time-varying surface heat flux both during and following a cryogen spurt. The IHC formulation uses measured temperature profiles from within a medium to estimate the surface heat flux. We implement a one-dimensional sequential function specification method (SFSM) to estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperatures measured within an in vitro model in response to a cryogen spurt. Solution accuracy and experimental errors are examined using simulated temperature data. Heat flux following spurt termination appears substantial; however, it is less than that during the spraying time. The estimated time-varying heat flux can subsequently be used in forward heat conduction models to estimate temperature profiles in skin during and following a cryogen spurt and predict appropriate timing for onset of the laser pulse.

  17. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k- ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  18. FLOW VELOCITY AND SURFACE TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT FROM URBAN CANOPY SURFACES BY NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraja Subramania Pillai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC from urban building surfaces by numerical simulation. The thermal effects produced by geometrical and physical properties of urban areas generate a relatively differential heating and uncomfortable environment compared to rural regions called as Urban Heat Island (UHI phenomena. The urban thermal comfort is directly related to the CHTC from the urban canopy surfaces. This CHTC from urban canopy surfaces expected to depend upon the wind velocity flowing over the urban canopy surfaces, urban canopy configurations, building surface temperature etc. But the most influential parameter on CHTC has not been clarified yet. Urban canopy type experiments in thermally stratified wind tunnel have normally been used to study the heat transfer issues. But, it is not an easy task in wind tunnel experiments to evaluate local CHTC, which vary on individual canyon surfaces such as building roof, walls and ground. Numerical simulation validated by wind tunnel experiments can be an alternative for the prediction of CHTC from building surfaces in an urban area. In our study, wind tunnel experiments were conducted to validate the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model which was used for the evaluation of CHTC from surfaces. The calculated CFD results showed good agreement with experimental results. After this validation, the effects of flow velocity and building surface temperature effects on CHTC from urban building surfaces were investigated. It has been found that the change in velocity remarkably affects the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces and change in surface temperature has almost no effect over the CHTC from urban canopy surfaces.

  19. Modelling of boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the flue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for the relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verification is planned...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  20. Effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interface temperature and surface energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Tong; Zhao, Yunliang; Xiao, Qihang; Ma, Qiulin; Kang, Shichang; Li, Hongqiang; Song, Shaoxian

    The microwave-assisted leaching was a new approach to intensify the copper recovery from chalcopyrite by hydrometallurgy. In this work, the effect of microwave-assisted heating on chalcopyrite leaching of kinetics, interfacial reaction temperature and surface energy were investigated. The activation energy of chalcopyrite leaching was affected indistinctively by the microwave-assisted heating (39.1 kJ/mol) compared with the conventional heating (43.9 kJ/mol). However, the boiling point of the leaching system increased through microwave-assisted heating. Because of the improved boiling point and the selective heating of microwave, the interfacial reaction temperature increased significantly, which gave rise to the increase of the leaching recovery of copper. Moreover, the surface energy of the chalcopyrite through microwave-assisted heating was also enhanced, which was beneficial to strengthen the leaching of chalcopyrite.

  1. Thermal Advantages for Solar Heating Systems with a Glass Cover with Antireflection Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2003-01-01

    Investigations elucidate how a glass cover with antireflection surfaces can improve the efficiency of a solar collector and the thermal performance of solar heating systems. The transmittances for two glass covers for a flat-plate solar collector were measured for different incidence angles...... was determined for different solar heating systems. Three systems were investigated: solar domestic hot water systems, solar heating systems for combined space heating demand and domestic hot water supply, and large solar heating plants. The yearly thermal performance of the systems was calculated by detailed...... simulation models with collectors with a normal glass cover and with a glass cover with antireflection surfaces. The calculations were carried out for different solar fractions and temperature levels of the solar heating systems. These parameters influence greatly the thermal performance associated...

  2. Measuring heat balance residual at lake surface using distributed temperature sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Rimmer, A.; Lechinsky, Y.; Wenker, K.J.R.; Nussboim, S.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2013-01-01

    This research presents a new method to verify the measurements of surface fluxes and the heat balance at a lake surface, by means of Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) measurements from 0.5 m above to 1.5 m below the surface. Using a polyvinyl chloride hyperboloid construction, a floating

  3. Martian surface heat production and crustal heat flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma‐Ray spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, B. C; McLennan, S. M; Klein, E. C

    2011-01-01

    .... As previous studies have suggested that the crust is a repository for approximately 50% of the radiogenic elements on Mars, these models provide important, directly measurable constraints on Martian heat generation...

  4. A Revised Estimate of Earth's Surface Heat Flux: 47TW ± 2TW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.; Davies, R.

    2011-12-01

    Earth's surface heat flux provides a fundamental constraint on solid Earth dynamics. However, deriving an estimate of the total surface heat flux is complex, due to the inhomogeneous distribution of heat flow measurements and difficulties in measuring heat flux in young oceanic crust, arising due to hydrothermal circulation. We derive a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux using a database of 38347 measurements (provided by G. Laske and G. Masters), representing a 55% increase on the number of measurements used previously, and the methods of Geographical Information Science (GIS) (Davies & Davies, 2010). To account for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust, we use a model estimate of the heat flux, following the work of Jaupart et al., 2007; while for the rest of the globe, in an attempt to overcome the inhomogeneous distribution of measurements, we develop an average for different geological units. Two digital geology data sets are used to define the global geology: (i) continental geology - Hearn et al., 2003; and (ii) the global data-set of CCGM - Commission de la Carte Géologique du Monde, 2000. This leads to > 93,000 polygons defining Earth's geology. To limit the influence of clustering, we intersect the geology polygons with a 1 by 1 degree (at the equator) equal area grid. For each geology class the average heat flow in the resulting polygons is evaluated. The contribution of that geology class to the global surface heat flow is derived by multiplying the estimated surface heat flux with the area of that geology class. The total surface heat flow contributions of all the geology classes are summed. For Antarctica we use an estimate based on depth to Curie temperature and include a 1TW contribution from hot-spots in young ocean age. Geology classes with less than 50 readings are excluded. The raw data suggests that this method of correlating heat flux with geology has some power. Our revised estimate for Earth's global surface heat flux

  5. Linking surface-fire behavior, stem heating, and tissue necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.S. Bova; M.B. Dickinson; M.B. Dickinson

    2005-01-01

    Data from 69 experimental, small-plot fires are used to describe relationships among fire intensity, barksurface heat flux, and depth of necrosis in stem tissue for red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.j. A tetrazolium staining technique was used to determine the depth of necrosis in tree boles subjected to fires with intensities of 20 to 2000...

  6. Thermal and Fluid Dynamic Performance of Pin Fin Heat Transfer Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sahiti, Naser

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is organized into nine Chapters. Chapter 2 gives an overview of some highly effec-tive heat transfer surfaces used basically for the enhancement of single-phase convective heat transfer in the air conditioning, refrigeration, unit air heater and automobile industries. It follows the analysis of basic parameters that influence the performance of the fins and at the end a rela-tively simple analytical method for the assessment of the order of the magnitude of heat transfer enhanceme...

  7. Control of wave-driven turbulence and surface heating on the mixing of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, T.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Proskurowski, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    Buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD) is a pollutant in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) that is submerged by turbulent transport processes. Langmuir circulation (LC) is a turbulent process driven by wind and surface waves that enhances mixing in the OSBL. Sea surface cooling also contributes to OSBL turbulence by driving convection. On the other hand, sea surface heating stratifies and stabilizes the water column to reduce turbulent motion. We analyze observed MPMD surface concentrations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to reveal a significant increase in MPMD concentrations during surface heating and a decrease during surface cooling. Turbulence resolving large eddy simulations of the OSBL for an idealized diurnal heating cycle suggest that turbulent downward fluxes of buoyant tracers are enhanced at night, facilitating deep submergence of plastics, and suppressed in heating conditions, resulting in surface trapped MPMD. Simulations agree with observations if enhanced mixing due to LC is included. Our results demonstrate the controlling influence of surface heat fluxes and LC on turbulent transport in the OSBL and on vertical distributions of buoyant marine particles.

  8. Heat Transfer Enhancement During Water and Hydrocarbon Condensation on Lubricant Infused Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel J; Lu, Zhengmao; Song, Youngsup; Zhao, Yajing; Wilke, Kyle L; Antao, Dion S; Louis, Marcel; Wang, Evelyn N

    2018-01-11

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat or separating fluids. Dropwise condensation, where discrete droplets form on the condenser surface, offers a potential improvement in heat transfer of up to an order of magnitude compared to filmwise condensation, where a liquid film covers the surface. Low surface tension fluid condensates such as hydrocarbons pose a unique challenge since typical hydrophobic condenser coatings used to promote dropwise condensation of water often do not repel fluids with lower surface tensions. Recent work has shown that lubricant infused surfaces (LIS) can promote droplet formation of hydrocarbons. In this work, we confirm the effectiveness of LIS in promoting dropwise condensation by providing experimental measurements of heat transfer performance during hydrocarbon condensation on a LIS, which enhances heat transfer by ≈450% compared to an uncoated surface. We also explored improvement through removal of noncondensable gases and highlighted a failure mechanism whereby shedding droplets depleted the lubricant over time. Enhanced condensation heat transfer for low surface tension fluids on LIS presents the opportunity for significant energy savings in natural gas processing as well as improvements in thermal management, heating and cooling, and power generation.

  9. Future projections of the surface heat and water budgets of the Mediterranean Sea in an ensemble of coupled atmosphere-ocean regional climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, C.; Somot, S.; Deque, M.; Sevault, F. [CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Calmanti, S.; Carillo, A.; Dell' Aquilla, A.; Sannino, G. [ENEA, Rome (Italy); Elizalde, A.; Jacob, D. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Gualdi, S.; Oddo, P.; Scoccimarro, E. [INGV, Bologna (Italy); L' Heveder, B.; Li, L. [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris (France)

    2012-10-15

    Within the CIRCE project ''Climate change and Impact Research: the Mediterranean Environment'', an ensemble of high resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean regional climate models (AORCMs) are used to simulate the Mediterranean climate for the period 1950-2050. For the first time, realistic net surface air-sea fluxes are obtained. The sea surface temperature (SST) variability is consistent with the atmospheric forcing above it and oceanic constraints. The surface fluxes respond to external forcing under a warming climate and show an equivalent trend in all models. This study focuses on the present day and on the evolution of the heat and water budget over the Mediterranean Sea under the SRES-A1B scenario. On the contrary to previous studies, the net total heat budget is negative over the present period in all AORCMs and satisfies the heat closure budget controlled by a net positive heat gain at the strait of Gibraltar in the present climate. Under climate change scenario, some models predict a warming of the Mediterranean Sea from the ocean surface (positive net heat flux) in addition to the positive flux at the strait of Gibraltar for the 2021-2050 period. The shortwave and latent flux are increasing and the longwave and sensible fluxes are decreasing compared to the 1961-1990 period due to a reduction of the cloud cover and an increase in greenhouse gases (GHGs) and SSTs over the 2021-2050 period. The AORCMs provide a good estimates of the water budget with a drying of the region during the twenty-first century. For the ensemble mean, he decrease in precipitation and runoff is about 10 and 15% respectively and the increase in evaporation is much weaker, about 2% compared to the 1961-1990 period which confirm results obtained in recent studies. Despite a clear consistency in the trends and results between the models, this study also underlines important differences in the model set-ups, methodology and choices of some physical parameters inducing

  10. Heat transfer in a stagnation point flow of a second grade fluid over a stretching surface with heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Ali Attia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer in a steady planar stagnation point flow of an incompressible non-Newtonian second grade fluid impinging on a permeable stretching surface with heat generation or absorption is examined. The governing nonlinear momentum and energy equations are solved numerically using finite differences. The influence of the characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid, the surface stretching velocity, the heat generation/ absorption coefficient, and Prandtl number on both the flow and heat transfer is reported.

  11. Heat transfer and vascular cambium necrosis in the boles of trees during surface fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. B. Dickinson

    2002-01-01

    Heat-transfer and cell-survival models are used to link surface fire behavior with vascular cambium necrosis from heating by flames. Vascular cambium cell survival was predicted with a numerical model based on the kinetics of protein denaturation and parameterized with data from the literature. Cell survival was predicted for vascular cambium temperature regimes...

  12. Color and surface chemistry changes of extracted wood flour after heating at 120 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Nicole M. Stark

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of heat on color and surface chemistry of wood flour (WF), unextracted, extracted and delignified samples of commercial WF were heated at 120 °C for 24 h and analyzed by colorimetry, diffuse reflectance visible (DRV), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopies....

  13. Heat waves measured with MODIS land surface temperature data predict changes in avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2011-01-01

    Heat waves are expected to become more frequent and severe as climate changes, with unknown consequences for biodiversity. We sought to identify ecologically-relevant broad-scale indicators of heat waves based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and interpolated air temperature data and assess their associations with avian community structure. Specifically, we...

  14. Differential efficiencies of dip-net sampling versus sampling surface-floating pupal exuviae in a biodiversity survey of Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Charles Ferrington Jr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Relative efficiencies of standard dip-net sampling (SDN versus collections of surface-floating pupal exuviae (SFPE were determined for detecting Chironomidae at catchment and site scales and at subfamily/tribe-, genus- and species-levels based on simultaneous, equal-effort sampling on a monthly basis for one year during a biodiversity assessment of Bear Run Nature Reserve. Results showed SFPE was more efficient than SDN at catchment scales for detecting both genera and species. At site scales, SDN sampling was more efficient for assessment of a first-order site. No consistent pattern, except for better efficiency of SFPE to detect Orthocladiinae genera, was observed at genus-level for two second-order sites. However, SFPE was consistently more efficient at detecting species of Orthocladiinae, Chironomini and Tanytarsini at the second order sites. SFPE was more efficient at detecting both genera and species at two third-order sites. The differential efficiencies of the two methods are concluded to be related to stream order and size, substrate size, flow and water velocity, depth and habitat heterogeneity, and differential ability to discriminate species among pupal exuviae specimens versus larval specimens. Although both approaches are considered necessary for comprehensive biodiversity assessments of Chironomidae, our results suggest that there is an optimal, but different, allocation of sampling effort for detecting Chironomidae across stream orders and at differing spatial and taxonomic scales.Article submitted 13. August 2014, accepted 31. October 2014, published 22. December 2014.

  15. Estimating Trends and Variation of Net Biome Productivity in India for 1980-2012 Using a Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlot, Shilpa; Shu, Shijie; Jain, Atul K.; Baidya Roy, Somnath

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we explore the trend in net biome productivity (NBP) over India for the period 1980-2012 and quantify the impact of different environmental factors, including atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]), land use and land cover change, climate, and nitrogen deposition on carbon fluxes using a land surface model, Integrated Science Assessment Model. Results show that terrestrial ecosystems of India have been a carbon sink for this period. Driven by a strong CO2 fertilization effect, magnitude of NBP increased from 27.17 TgC/yr in the 1980s to 34.39 TgC/yr in the 1990s but decreased to 23.70 TgC/yr in the 2000s due to change in climate. Adoption of forest conservation, management, and reforestation policies in the past decade has promoted carbon sequestration in the ecosystems, but this effect has been offset by loss of carbon from ecosystems due to rising temperatures and decrease in precipitation.

  16. Experimental study of curvature effects on jet impingement heat transfer on concave surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the local and average heat transfer characteristics of a single round jet impinging on the concave surfaces was conducted in this work to gain in-depth knowledge of the curvature effects. The experiments were conducted by employing a piccolo tube with one single jet hole over a wide range of parameters: jet Reynolds number from 27000 to 130000, relative nozzle to surface distance from 3.3 to 30, and relative surface curvature from 0.005 to 0.030. Experimental results indicate that the surface curvature has opposite effects on heat transfer characteristics. On one hand, an increase of relative nozzle to surface distance (increasing jet diameter in fact enhances the average heat transfer around the surface for the same curved surface. On the other hand, the average Nusselt number decreases as relative nozzle to surface distance increases for a fixed jet diameter. Finally, experimental data-based correlations of the average Nusselt number over the curved surface were obtained with consideration of surface curvature effect. This work contributes to a better understanding of the curvature effects on heat transfer of a round jet impingement on concave surfaces, which is of high importance to the design of the aircraft anti-icing system.

  17. Heat pipe and surface mass transfer cooling of hypersonic vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Gene T.; Modlin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of determining the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heating using heat pipe and mass transfer cooling techniques is addressed. A description is presented of a numerical finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model incorporating poststartup liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling to predict the transient structural temperature distributions and maximum surface temperatures of hypersonic vehicle leading edge. An application of this model to the transient cooling of a typical aerospace plane wing leading-edge section. The results of this application indicated that liquid metal heat pipe cooling alone is insufficient to maintain surface temperatures below an assumed maximum level of 1800 K for about one-third of a typical aerospace plane ascent trajectory through the earth's atmosphere.

  18. Linking potential heat source and sink to urban heat island: Heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on land surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Cao, Qiwen; Lang, Kun; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-05-15

    Rapid urbanization has significantly contributed to the development of urban heat island (UHI). Regulating landscape composition and configuration would help mitigate the UHI in megacities. Taking Shenzhen, China, as a case study area, we defined heat source and heat sink and identified strong and weak sources as well as strong and weak sinks according to the natural and socioeconomic factors influencing land surface temperature (LST). Thus, the potential thermal contributions of heat source and heat sink patches were differentiated. Then, the heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on LST were examined by using semiparametric geographically weighted regression (SGWR) models. The results showed that landscape composition has more significant effects on thermal environment than configuration. For a strong source, the percentage of patches has a positive impact on LST. Additionally, when mosaicked with some heat sink, even a small improvement in the degree of dispersion of a strong source helps to alleviate UHI. For a weak source, the percentage and density of patches have positive impacts on LST. For a strong sink, the percentage, density, and degree of aggregation of patches have negative impacts on LST. The effects of edge density and patch shape complexity vary spatially with the fragmentation of a strong sink. Similarly, the impacts of a weak sink are mainly exerted via the characteristics of percent, density, and shape complexity of patches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling of Boiler Heating Surfaces and Evaporator Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the ue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equation systems (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for these relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verication is planned...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  20. Heat transfer at evaporation of falling films of Freon mixture on the smooth and structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecherkin, N. I.; Pavlenko, A. N.; Volodin, O. A.

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental investigation of heat transfer and hydrodynamics of falling films of binary mixtures of R21 and R114 freons on the surfaces with complex configuration. The vertical tubes of 50-mm diameter with the smooth and structured surfaces, made of D16T alloy, were used as the working sections. The range of film Reynolds number at the inlet to the working section was Re =10÷155. The image of wave surface of the falling liquid film was visualized and recorded by a high-speed digital video camera. At evaporation the heat transfer coefficients on the smooth and structured surfaces are determined by the liquid flow rate and weakly depend on the heat flux. At low liquid flows, the heat transfer coefficients on the structured surface decrease in comparison with the smooth surface because of liquid accumulation and enlargement of efficient thickness in microtexture channels. At high liquid flows, a change in the structure of the wave film surface leads to an increase in heat transfer coefficients in comparison with the smooth surface.

  1. Evaporation Heat Transfer of HCFC 22 on the Grooved Surfaces Inside a Horizontal Rectangular Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Osao; Uehara, Haruo

    The evaporation heat transfer performance on six kinds of grooved surface with 0.15 mm to 0.34 mm of the groove pitch was obtained using a rectangular channel. The upper and lower surfaces inside a horizontal rectangular channel, 10 mm in width, 5 mm in height, and 500 mm in length, were heated electrically by Nichrome heaters. HCFC 22 was used as a working fluid. Evaporating pressure was 0.49 MPa, heat flux was 4.65 kW/m2, vapor quality was varied from 0.1 to 0.9, and mass velocity was varied from 86 to 345 kg/(m2s). The empirical correlations to predict the heat transfer coefficients on upper and lower surfaces were proposed. The maximum heat transfer coefficient on upper surface is obtained on the grooved surface with 2 × 10-8 of the modified bond number. Heat transfer coefficient on lower surface isn't influenced by the groove geometries except for lead angle.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus dry-surface biofilms are more resistant to heat treatment than traditional hydrated biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, A; Tahir, S; Hu, H; Chowdhury, D; Gosbell, I B; Jensen, S O; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Glasbey, T; Vickery, K

    2018-02-01

    The importance of biofilms to clinical practice is being increasingly realized. Biofilm tolerance to antibiotics is well described but limited work has been conducted on the efficacy of heat disinfection and sterilization against biofilms. To test the susceptibility of planktonic, hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm forms of Staphylococcus aureus, to dry-heat and wet-heat treatments. S. aureus was grown as both hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm in the CDC biofilm generator. Biofilm was subjected to a range of temperatures in a hot-air oven (dry heat), water bath or autoclave (wet heat). Dry-surface biofilms remained culture positive even when treated with the harshest dry-heat condition of 100°C for 60min. Following autoclaving samples were culture negative but 62-74% of bacteria in dry-surface biofilms remained alive as demonstrated by live/dead staining and confocal microscopy. Dry-surface biofilms subjected to autoclaving at 121°C for up to 30min recovered and released planktonic cells. Recovery did not occur following autoclaving for longer or at 134°C, at least during the time-period tested. Hydrated biofilm recovered following dry-heat treatment up to 100°C for 10min but failed to recover following autoclaving despite the presence of 43-60% live cells as demonstrated by live/dead staining. S. aureus dry-surface biofilms are less susceptible to killing by dry heat and steam autoclaving than hydrated biofilms, which are less susceptible to heat treatment than planktonic suspensions. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimation of annual heat flux balance at the sea surface from sst (NOAA-satellite and ships drift data off southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimine Ikeda

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to study the possibility of estimating the heat flux balance at the sea surface from GOSSTCOMP (Global Ocean Sea Surface Temperature Computation developed by NOAA/NESS, USA, and sea surface current data based from ships drift information obtained from Pilot Charts, published by the Diretoria de Hidrografia e Navegação (DHN, Brazilian Navy. The annual mean value of the heat flux balance at the sea surface off southeast Brazil for 1977, is estimated from data on the balance between the heat transported by the currents and that transported by eddy diffusion for each volume defined as 2º x 2º (Lat. x Long. square with a constant depth equivalent to an oceanic mixed layer, 100 m thick. Results show several oceanic areas where there are net flows of heat from atmosphere towards the sea surface. In front of Rio de Janeiro the heat flow was downward and up to 70 ly day-1 and is probably related to the upwellirug phenomenon normally occurring in that area. Another coastal area between Lat. 25ºS to 28ºS indicated an downward flow up to 50 ly day-1; and for an area south of Lat. 27ºS, Long. 040ºW - 048ºW an downward flow up to 200 ly day-1, where the transfer was probably due to the cold water of a nortward flux from the Falkland (Malvinas Current. Results also show several oceanic areas where net flows of heat (of about -100 ly day-1 were toward the atmosphere. In the oceanic areas Lat. 19ºS - 23ºS and Lat. 24ºS - 30ºS, the flows were probably due to the warm water of a southward flux of the Brazil Current. The resulting fluxes from the warm waters of the Brazil Current when compared with those from warm waters of the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio, indicate that the Gulf Stream carries about 3.3 times and the Kuroshio 1.7 times more heat than the Brazil Current. These values agree with those of data available on the heat fluxes of the above mentioned Currents calculated by different methods (Budyko, 1974.

  4. Progress in remote sensing of global land surface heat fluxes and evaporations with a turbulent heat exchange parameterization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuelong; Su, Bob

    2017-04-01

    Remote sensing has provided us an opportunity to observe Earth land surface with a much higher resolution than any of GCM simulation. Due to scarcity of information for land surface physical parameters, up-to-date GCMs still have large uncertainties in the coupled land surface process modeling. One critical issue is a large amount of parameters used in their land surface models. Thus remote sensing of land surface spectral information can be used to provide information on these parameters or assimilated to decrease the model uncertainties. Satellite imager could observe the Earth land surface with optical, thermal and microwave bands. Some basic Earth land surface status (land surface temperature, canopy height, canopy leaf area index, soil moisture etc.) has been produced with remote sensing technique, which already help scientists understanding Earth land and atmosphere interaction more precisely. However, there are some challenges when applying remote sensing variables to calculate global land-air heat and water exchange fluxes. Firstly, a global turbulent exchange parameterization scheme needs to be developed and verified, especially for global momentum and heat roughness length calculation with remote sensing information. Secondly, a compromise needs to be innovated to overcome the spatial-temporal gaps in remote sensing variables to make the remote sensing based land surface fluxes applicable for GCM model verification or comparison. A flux network data library (more 200 flux towers) was collected to verify the designed method. Important progress in remote sensing of global land flux and evaporation will be presented and its benefits for GCM models will also be discussed. Some in-situ studies on the Tibetan Plateau and problems of land surface process simulation will also be discussed.

  5. FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF PEARLITIC S.G. CAST IRONS AFTER LASER SURFACE HEAT TREATMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Pantelis, D.; Chambolle, D.; Parent-Simonin, S.; Poupeau, Ph.

    1991-01-01

    The laser transformation hardening does not improve the fatigue resistance of two pearlitic S.G. cast irons, using as surface preparation BN coating, sandblasting or phosphatation. On the treated surface, the initial pearlite is transformed into martensite. In the treated layer, further under the treated surface, a martensitic microstructure with traces of incompletely dissolved cementite can be observed. A bidimensional numerical heat transfer model has been developed for surface transformat...

  6. Sensible and Latent Heat Exchange at the Soil Surface Beneath a Maize Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Thomas John

    Soil heat and vapor exchange at the soil surface beneath a plant canopy was measured using heat and vapor source plates. Data from field and laboratory experiments were used to derive equations predicting interfacial heat and vapor transfer coefficients for inclusion in an existing, comprehensive soil-plant-atmosphere model, Cupid. Heat and vapor source plates constructed of anodized aluminum (305 by 864 mm by 13 mm thick) were installed level with the soil surface within a maize (Zea mays, L.) field to provide an area of known and controllable temperature and/or vapor pressure and sensible and/or latent heat flux. Sensible heat flux density was determined from an energy budget analysis while evaporation from wetted felt fabric on one plate's surface was used to determine the latent heat flux density. Flux measurements were combined with measured temperature and vapor pressure differences to determine the interfacial transfer coefficients. Field measurements were made during all stages of canopy development and were supplemented by extensive measurements of the local microclimate. Controlled forced convection experiments were also conducted in a wind tunnel using three levels of turbulence intensity and two arrays of aluminum roughness elements to assess the effects of turbulence and surface roughness on heat and mass transfer. Measured interfacial transfer coefficients during the field experiments ranged from 2 to 30 mm s ^{-1} over wind speeds of 5 to 280 cm s^{-1} measured 3 cm above the plate surface. Equations based on dimensionless parameters were developed and fit to the wind tunnel data, compared with the field data, and incorporated into the computer model. The new transfer coefficient relationships had less scatter and were more closely correlated to within -canopy wind speed than the previous formulations. Predictions of canopy microclimate characteristics were significantly improved as compared to those predictions obtained using transfer coefficients

  7. Effect of surface catalytic activity on stagnation heat-transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was made to determine the effect heterogeneous catalytic surface reactions have on heat-transfer rates in highly frozen low-density stagnation-point boundary layers. Data were obtained in arc-heated facilities that were capable of producing large percentages of chemical energy frozen in a supersonic freestream. The heat-transfer rate to a silicon-dioxide surface was reduced to a minimum value of only one-third of the value obtained on relatively active nickel and platinum surfaces. This is the result of its low catalytic efficiency. Ionization energy was recovered on both the active and the inactive surfaces, indicating that this energy either was released many times faster than the recombination energy or was not controlled by the surface composition.

  8. Experimental measurements of heat transfer from an iced surface during artificial and natural cloud icing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M. S.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The heat transfer behavior of accreting ice surfaces in natural (flight test) and simulated (wind tunnel) cloud icing conditions have been studied. Observations of wet and dry ice growth regimes as measured by ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques were made. Observed wet and dry ice growth regimes at the stagnation point of a cylinder were compared with those predicted using a quasi steady-state heat balance model. A series of heat transfer coefficients were employed by the model to infer the local heat transfer behavior of the actual ice surfaces. The heat transfer in the stagnation region was generally inferred to be higher in wind tunnel icing tests than in natural, flight, icing conditions.

  9. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  10. Embedded water-based surface heating part 2: experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    : hybrid 3D numerical model. Journal of Building Physics 33: 357-391). The thermal response of the system is tested in both long (16 h) and short (30 min) cycle experiments where the water flow alters between on and off. Temperature distribution, within the floor construction, and the heat exchange process...... at the core of the concrete slab are underestimated by up to 1.5 degrees C. Amplitudes, phase shifts, rise, and delay times at different measurement points are simulated with good precision. A sensitivity analysis is performed where material parameters and boundary conditions are analyzed. None of the tested...

  11. Turbulence Control Through Selective Surface Heating Using Microwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    air channel of wind tunnel ,(facility) , ,S S sc S tsP P P . Calibration has been performed for five positions of reference pressure probe across... big project. Here it is simply supposed that the bottom part of model (it is not shown in Fig.4.5b) is made of a radiotransparent dielectric...before the model burnout that enable only a limited number of test runs. The main drawback of the MW heating resultd from the non-uniformity of energy

  12. Viscous flow and heat transfer over an unsteady stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ene Remus-Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have studied the flow and heat transfer of a horizontal sheet in a viscous fluid. The stretching rate and temperature of the sheet vary with time. The governing equations for momentum and thermal energy are reduced to ordinary differential equations by means of similarity transformation. These equations are solved approximately by means of the Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM which provides us with a convenient way to control the convergence of approximation solutions and adjust convergence rigorously when necessary. Some examples are given and the results obtained reveal that the proposed method is effective and easy to use.

  13. Thermal Characteristics of a Primary Surface Heat Exchanger with Corrugated Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Won Seo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of a primary surface heat exchanger (PSHE with corrugated surfaces. The PSHE was experimentally investigated for a Reynolds number range of 156–921 under various flow conditions on the hot and cold sides. The inlet temperature of the hot side was maintained at 40 °C, while that of the cold side was maintained at 20 °C. A counterflow was used as it has a higher temperature proximity in comparison with a parallel flow. The heat transfer rate and pressure drop were measured for various Reynolds numbers on both the hot and cold sides of the PSHE, with the heat transfer coefficients for both sides computed using a modified Wilson plot method. Based on the results of the experiment, both Nusselt number and friction factor correlations were suggested for a PSHE with corrugated surfaces.

  14. Heat transfer at boiling of R114/R21 refrigerants mixture film on microstructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, O. A.; Pecherkin, N. I.; Pavlenko, A. N.; Zubkov, N. N.; Bityutskaya, Yu L.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental study of heat transfer in the film flow of R114/R21 refrigerant mixture on the vertical thin-wall copper cylinders with microstructured outer surfaces. Microstructuring is made by the method of deforming cutting with subsequent rolling by a straight knurl roller along the fin tops. The pitch of micro-finning was 100 or 200 μm and height was 220 or 440 μm, respectively. The knurling pitch in both cases was 318 μm. The film Reynolds number was varied in the range of 300-1500. The heat flux density was step-by-step increased from zero to the values corresponding to the boiling crisis. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficients at nucleate boiling on the studied surfaces with microstructuring exceed the corresponding values for a smooth surface more than by 3 times, the critical heat flux increases more than twice.

  15. Heat Transfer in Bubble Columns with High Viscous and Low Surface Tension Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wan Tae; Lim, Dae Ho; Kang, Yong [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Axial and overall heat transfer coefficients were investigated in a bubble column with relatively high viscous and low surface tension media. Effects of superficial gas velocity (0.02-0.1 m/s), liquid viscosity (0.1-3 Pa·s) and surface tension (66.1-72.9x10{sup -3} N/m) on the local and overall heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer field was composed of the immersed heater and the bubble column; a vertical heater was installed at the center of the column coaxially. The heat transfer coefficient was determined by measuring the temperature differences continuously between the heater surface and the column which was bubbling in a given operating condition, with the knowledge of heat supply to the heater. The local heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing superficial gas velocity but decreased with increasing axial distance from the gas distributor and liquid surface tension. The overall heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing superficial gas velocity but decreased with increasing liquid viscosity or surface tension. The overall heat transfer coefficient was well correlated in terms of operating variables such as superficial gas velocity, liquid surface tension and liquid viscosity with a correlation coefficient of 0.91, and in terms of dimensionless groups such as Nusselt, Reynolds, Prandtl and Weber numbers with a correlation of 0.92; h=2502U{sub G}{sup 0.236}{sub L}{sup -0.250}{sub L}{sup -}0{sup .028} Nu=3.25Re{sup 0.180}Pr{sup -0.067}We{sup 0.028}.

  16. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology and Net Primary Production of the Appalachian Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-12-15

    The gradients of the Appalachian Mountains in elevations and latitudes provide a unique regional perspective of landscape variations in the eastern United States and a section of the southeastern Canada. This study reveals patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) and AVHRR Global Production Efficiency Model (GloPEM) datasets. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS) and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compared the results out of the Appalachian Mountains regions in different spatial contexts including the North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations we analyzed data and compared the results between 30°N-40°N and 40°N-50°N latitudes. The result revealed significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years between 1982 and 2006. The LOS had prolonged 0.3 day yr-1 during 25 years over the Appalachian Mountains regions. The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ecosystem compositions of the Appalachian Mountains. The comparison with the Appalachian Trail corridor area provides a regional mega-transect view of the measured variables.

  17. Mapping soil moisture and surface heat fluxes by assimilating GOES land surface temperature and SMAP soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating soil moisture and sensible/latent heat fluxes by assimilating remotely-sensed land surface temperature (LST) and soil moisture data. Surface heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere, and play a crucial role in the water and energy cycles. However, they cannot be directly measured using remote sensing. It has been demonstrated that LST time series contain information about the surface energy balance, and that assimilating soil moisture further improves the estimation by putting more constraints on the energy partitioning. In previous studies, two controlling factors were estimated: (1) a monthly constant bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) that scales the sum of surface heat fluxes, and (2) an evaporative fraction (EF) which governs the energy partitioning and stays quasi-constant during the near-peak hours. Considering the fact that CHN is not constant especially in the growing season, here CHN is assumed a function of leaf area index (LAI). LST data from GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites) and soil moisture data from SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) are both assimilated into a simply heat and water transfer model to update LST, soil moisture, CHN and EF , and to map surface heat fluxes over a study area in central US. A hybrid data assimilation strategy is necessary because SMAP data are available every 2-3 days, while GOES LST data are provided every hour. In this study, LST data are assimilated using an adaptive particle batch smoother (APBS) and soil moisture is periodically updated using a particle filter (PF). Results show that soil moisture is greatly improved, and that EF estimates are restored very well after assimilation. As forcing data are provided by remote sensing or reanalysis products to minimize the dependence on ground measurements, this methodology can be easily applied in other regions with limited data.

  18. Sensible and latent heat loss from the body surface of Holstein cows in a tropical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, A. S. C.; Dasilva, R. G.; Battiston Loureiro, C. M.

    2005-09-01

    The general principles of the mechanisms of heat transfer are well known, but knowledge of the transition between evaporative and non-evaporative heat loss by Holstein cows in field conditions must be improved, especially for low-latitude environments. With this aim 15 Holstein cows managed in open pasture were observed in a tropical region. The latent heat loss from the body surface of the animals was measured by means of a ventilated capsule, while convective heat transfer was estimated by the theory of convection from a horizontal cylinder and by the long-wave radiation exchange based on the Stefan-Boltzmann law. When the air temperature was between 10 and 36°C the sensible heat transfer varied from 160 to -30 W m-2, while the latent heat loss by cutaneous evaporation increased from 30 to 350 W m-2. Heat loss by cutaneous evaporation accounted for 20-30% of the total heat loss when air temperatures ranged from 10 to 20°C. At air temperatures >30°C cutaneous evaporation becomes the main avenue of heat loss, accounting for approximately 85% of the total heat loss, while the rest is lost by respiratory evaporation.

  19. Surface energy balance closure in an arid region: role of soil and heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Berkowicz, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The large soil heat fluxes in hot desert regions are very important in energy balance studies. Surface energy balance (SEB) observations, however, reveal that there is an imbalance in Surface flux measurements and that it is difficult to isolate those flux measurements causing the imbalance errors.

  20. Investigation of the influence of a step change in surface roughness on turbulent heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Taylor, J. Keith; Hosni, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    The use is studied of smooth heat flux gages on the otherwise very rough SSME fuel pump turbine blades. To gain insights into behavior of such installations, fluid mechanics and heat transfer data were collected and are reported for a turbulent boundary layer over a surface with a step change from a rough surface to a smooth surface. The first 0.9 m length of the flat plate test surface was roughened with 1.27 mm hemispheres in a staggered, uniform array spaced 2 base diameters apart. The remaining 1.5 m length was smooth. The effect of the alignment of the smooth surface with respect to the rough surface was also studied by conducting experiments with the smooth surface aligned with the bases or alternatively with the crests of the roughness elements. Stanton number distributions, skin friction distributions, and boundary layer profiles of temperature and velocity are reported and are compared to previous data for both all rough and all smooth wall cases. The experiments show that the step change from rough to smooth has a dramatic effect on the convective heat transfer. It is concluded that use of smooth heat flux gages on otherwise rough surfaces could cause large errors.

  1. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for the optimization a dynamic model for the boiler is applied. Furthermore a function for the value of the dynamic performance is included in the model. The dynamic models for simulating boiler performance consists of a model for the ue gas side, a model for the evaporator circuit and a model for the drum....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level uctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...... transfer, circulation in the evaporator circuit and water level uctuations in the drum....

  2. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for the optimization a dynamic model for the boiler is applied. Furthermore a function for the value of the dynamic performance is included in the model. The dynamic models for simulating boiler performance consists of a model for the flue gas side, a model for the evaporator circuit and a model for the drum....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level fluctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...... transfer, circulation in the evaporator circuit and water level fluctuations in the drum....

  3. Inferring CO2 Fluxes from OCO-2 for Assimilation into Land Surface Models to Calculate Net Ecosystem Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, R.; Radov, A.; Halem, M.; Nearing, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of mid to high latitude atmospheric CO2 show a growing seasonal amplitude. Land surface models poorly predict net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and are unable to substantiate these sporadic observations. An investigation of how the biosphere has reacted to changes in atmospheric CO2 is essential to our understanding of potential climate-vegetation feedbacks. A global, seasonal investigation of CO2-flux is then necessary in order to assimilate into land surface models for improving the prediction of annual NEE. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) of DOE collects CO2-flux measurements (in addition to CO2 concentration and various other meteorological quantities) at several towers located around the globe at half hour temporal frequencies. CO2-fluxes are calculated via the eddy covariance technique, which utilizes CO2-densities and wind velocities to calculate CO2-fluxes. The global coverage of CO2 concentrations as provided by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) provide satellite-derived CO2 concentrations all over the globe. A framework relating the satellite-inferred CO2 concentrations collocated with the ground-based ARM as well as Ameriflux stations would enable calculations of CO2-fluxes far from the station sites around the entire globe. Regression techniques utilizing deep-learning neural networks may provide such a framework. Additionally, meteorological reanalysis allows for the replacement of the ARM multivariable meteorological variables needed to infer the CO2-fluxes. We present the results of inferring CO2-fluxes from OCO-2 CO2 concentrations for a two year period, Sept. 2014- Sept. 2016 at the ARM station located near Oklahoma City. A feed-forward neural network (FFNN) is used to infer relationships between the following data sets: F([ARM CO2-density], [ARM Meteorological Data]) = [ARM CO2-Flux] F([OCO-2 CO2-density],[ARM Meteorological Data]) = [ARM CO2-Flux] F([ARM CO2-density],[Meteorological Reanalysis]) = [ARM CO2-Flux

  4. Relationship between Secondary Structure and Surface Hydrophobicity of Soybean Protein Isolate Subjected to Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated relationship between secondary structure and surface hydrophobicity of soy protein isolate (SPI subjected to a thermal treatment at 70~90°C. Heat denaturation increased the surface hydrophobicity and surface hydrophobicity decreased as aggregate formed. Heat caused an increase in the relative amount of α-helix structures and an overall decrease in the amount of β-sheet structures when compared with nontreated SPI. The relative amounts of secondary structures varied with time, temperature, and intensity of heat treatment applied. The β-sheet structure was most important for its significant role in denaturation of 7S globulin and following formed aggregates and even in denaturation of 11S globulin. The amount of β-sheet structure in SPI had an inverse correlation with the surface hydrophobicity when the temperature was kept below 90°C. Besides, β-turn structure increased as β-7S/B-11S aggregate formated.

  5. Surface development of a brazing alloy during heat treatment–a comparison between UHV and APXPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullik, L.; Johansson, N.; Bertram, F.; Evertsson, J.; Stenqvist, T.; Lundgren, E.

    2018-01-01

    In an attempt to bridge the pressure gap, APXPS was used to follow the surface development of an aluminum brazing sheet during heating in an ambient oxygen-pressure mimicking the environment of an industrial brazing furnace. The studied aluminum alloy brazing sheet is a composite material consisting of two aluminum alloy standards whose surface is covered with a native aluminum oxide film. To emphasize the necessity of studies of this system in ambient sample environments it is compared to measurements in UHV. Changes in thickness and composition of the surface oxide were followed after heating to 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C. The two sets presented in this paper show that the surface development strongly depends on the environment the sample is heated in.

  6. Experimental Study on Boiling Heat Transfer of Liquid Film Flow on a Structural Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Koichi; Mizuno, Itsuo; Nakata, Daisuke; Ouchi, Masaki

    An experimental study on the boiling heat transfer characteristics of liquid films flowing downward along vertically positioned plane and constant curvature surface (CCS) with isolated fine cavities was conducted. The effects of structural surfaces were examined, comparing with the case of smooth plane. The main results of these experiments are summarized as follows; (1) In the case of structual plane surface, there are remarkable enhancements of heat transfer rate in the nucleate boiling region. (2) In the case of CCS, it takes large values of heatflux in the region which strongly governed by the surface evaporation. (3)CCS avoids effectively the occurrence of splitting of the liquid film into rivulets. This study aims to put practical use of the heat transfer enhancement for the evaporator of a two-phase closed thermosiphon.

  7. Surface development of a brazing alloy during heat treatment-a comparison between UHV and APXPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullik, L; Johansson, N; Bertram, F; Evertsson, J; Stenqvist, T; Lundgren, E

    2018-01-17

    In an attempt to bridge the pressure gap, APXPS was used to follow the surface development of an aluminum brazing sheet during heating in an ambient oxygen-pressure mimicking the environment of an industrial brazing furnace. The studied aluminum alloy brazing sheet is a composite material consisting of two aluminum alloy standards whose surface is covered with a native aluminum oxide film. To emphasize the necessity of studies of this system in ambient sample environments it is compared to measurements in UHV. Changes in thickness and composition of the surface oxide were followed after heating to 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C. The two sets presented in this paper show that the surface development strongly depends on the environment the sample is heated in.

  8. Transition process leading to microbubble emission boiling on horizontal circular heated surface in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Ando, Jun; Horiuchi, Kazuna; Saiki, Takahito; Kaneko, Toshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) produces a higher heat flux than critical heat flux (CHF) and therefore has been investigated in terms of its heat transfer characteristics as well as the conditions under which MEB occurs. Its physical mechanism, however, is not yet clearly understood. We carried out a series of experiments to examine boiling on horizontal circular heated surfaces of 5 mm and of 10 mm in diameter, in a subcooled pool, paying close attention to the transition process to MEB. High-speed observation results show that, in the MEB regime, the growth, condensation, and collapse of the vapor bubbles occur within a very short time. In addition, a number of fine bubbles are emitted from the collapse of the vapor bubbles. By tracking these tiny bubbles, we clearly visualize that the collapse of the vapor bubbles drives the liquid near the bubbles towards the heated surface, such that the convection field around the vapor bubbles under MEB significantly differs from that under nucleate boiling. Moreover, the axial temperature gradient in a heated block (quasi-heat flux) indicates a clear difference between nucleate boiling and MEB. A combination of quasi-heat flux and the measurement of the behavior of the vapor bubbles allows us to discuss the transition to MEB. This work was financially supported by the 45th Research Grant in Natural Sciences from The Mitsubishi Foundation (2014 - 2015), and by Research Grant for Boiler and Pressurized Vessels from The Japan Boiler Association (2016).

  9. The simultaneous retrieval of surface evaporative fraction and heat transfer coefficients using variational data assimilation and surface radiometric temperature observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, W. T.; Kustas, W. P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent advances in land data assimilation have yielded data assimilation techniques designed to solve the surface energy balance based on remote observations of surface radiometric temperature and a simple prognostic equation for surface temperature. These approaches have a number of potential advantages over existing diagnostic models, including the ability to make energy flux predictions between satellite overpass times, more physically realistic representations of ground heat flux, and reduced requirements for ancillary parameter estimation. Of particular interest is the variational approach presented by Caparrini et al. (Journal of Hydrometeorology, 2003) which uses a force-restore equation for surface temperature as a constraint for the simultaneous estimation of both evaporative fraction and bulk heat transfer coefficients from sequences of surface radiometric temperature observations. Using eddy correlation flux tower data and analogous energy balance results obtained from the diagnostic Two-Source Model (TSM), this presentation will examine the performance of the Caparrini et al. algorithm over a range of vegetative and hydrologic conditions in the southern United States. Results identify circumstances under which the simultaneous - and unambiguous - retrieval of both surface evaporation fraction and heat transfer coefficients is possible and clarify parameter interpretation issues associated with the single-source geometry of the variational approach. Inter-comparison with the TSM model illustrates circumstances under which the increased parameter complexity of the TSM model is justified by its more accurate two-source representation of thermal emission from partial vegetation canopies. Potential improvements to current variational data assimilation techniques will also be discussed.

  10. High Heat Flux Surface Coke Deposition and Removal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    obtained under these conditions. Another study was directed at hypersonic vehicles and was done with Inconel tubes, which eliminated complications...Release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Technical paper presented at the AIAA Propulsion and Energy Forum and Exposition (Joint... Propulsion Conference)in Orlando, FL; 27-29 July, 2015 14. ABSTRACT The internal surfaces of liquid hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine thrust chambers

  11. Impact of Cubic Pin Finned Surface Structure Geometry upon Spray Cooling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Eric A.; Kim, Jungho; Kiger, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of enhanced surface structures on heat flux using spray cooling. The surface enhancements consisted of cubic pin fins machined on the top surface of copper heater blocks. The structure height, pitch, and width were parametrically vaned. Each copper block had a projected cross-sectional area of 2.0 sq cm. Measurements were also obtained on a heater block with a flat surface for baseline comparison purposes. A 2 x 2 nozzle array was used with PF-5060 as the working fluid. Thermal performance data were obtained under nominally degassed (chamber pressure of 41.4 kPa) and gassy conditions (chamber with N2 gas at 100.7 kPa) with a bulk fluid temperature of 20.5 C. Results for both the degassed and gassy cases show that structure width and separation distance have a dominant effect upon the heat transfer for the size ranges used. Cubic pin fin height had little impact upon heat flux. The maximum critical heat flux (CHF) attained for any of the surfaces was 121 W/sq cm, giving an enhancement of 51% relative to the flat surface case under nominally degassed conditions. The gassy case had a maximum CHF of 149 W/sq cm, giving an enhancement of 38% relative to the flat surface case.

  12. Mean surface temperature prediction models for broiler chickens—a study of sensible heat flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; da Silva, Iran José Oliveira; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Castro, Ariane Cristina; Vieira, Frederico Marcio Corrêa

    2014-03-01

    Body surface temperature can be used to evaluate thermal equilibrium in animals. The bodies of broiler chickens, like those of all birds, are partially covered by feathers. Thus, the heat flow at the boundary layer between broilers' bodies and the environment differs between feathered and featherless areas. The aim of this investigation was to use linear regression models incorporating environmental parameters and age to predict the surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas of broiler chickens. The trial was conducted in a climate chamber, and 576 broilers were distributed in two groups. In the first trial, 288 broilers were monitored after exposure to comfortable or stressful conditions during a 6-week rearing period. Another 288 broilers were measured under the same conditions to test the predictive power of the models. Sensible heat flow was calculated, and for the regions covered by feathers, sensible heat flow was predicted based on the estimated surface temperatures. The surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas can be predicted based on air, black globe or operative temperatures. According to the sensible heat flow model, the broilers' ability to maintain thermal equilibrium by convection and radiation decreased during the rearing period. Sensible heat flow estimated based on estimated surface temperatures can be used to predict animal responses to comfortable and stressful conditions.

  13. A study of the flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel for a heated wall with surface texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Strąk, Kinga; Maciejewska, Beata; Grabas, Bogusław

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results concerning flow boiling heat transfer in a vertical minichannel with a depth of 1.7 mm and a width of 16 mm. The element responsible for heating FC-72, which flowed laminarly in the minichannel, was a plate with an enhanced surface. Two types of surface textures were considered. Both were produced by vibration-assisted laser machining. Infrared thermography was used to record changes in the temperature on the outer smooth side of the plate. Two-phase flow patterns were observed through a glass pane. The main aim of the study was to analyze how the two types of surface textures affect the heat transfer coefficient. A two-dimensional heat transfer approach was proposed to determine the local values of the heat transfer coefficient. The inverse problem for the heated wall was solved using a semi-analytical method based on the Trefftz functions. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance along the minichannel length and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported in the saturated boiling region for the plate with the type 1 texture produced by vibration-assisted laser machining.

  14. Effects of heat stress on the level of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of hepatocellular carcinoma Hep G2 cells: implications for the treatment of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Naizhong; Xu, Yongping; Cao, Zhenhui; Xu, Fanxing; Zhang, Peng; Jin, Liji

    2013-04-01

    The ability to distinguish tumor cells from normal cells is vital to allow the immune system to selectively destroy tumor cells. In order to find an effective marker, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry to investigate the effects of heat stress on the amount of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of tumor cells (Hep G2 cells). Heat shock protein 70 is the major stress-induced heat shock protein found on the surface of tumor cells. Our results indicate that the percentage of Hep G2 cells with a detectable level of heat shock protein 70 on their cell surface increased significantly (P heat stress at 42 °C for 2 h (up to 1.92 times the level before heat treatment). The detectable level of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of Hep G2 cells reached its peak 12 h after treatment. However, the fluorescent intensity of stressed and unstressed Hep G2 cells was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The increase in the level of heat shock protein 70 on the surface of tumor cells following heat stress could provide a basis for finding novel immunotoxins as targets for drug action and may have application to be used in conjunction with hyperthermia in the treatment of tumors.

  15. Development of energy efficient smart module with variable direction of heat flow, heat capacity and surface absorptivity(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, W.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Lee, H.J. [Jeju University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    This work has been carried out to develop thermal diode modules with variable direction of heat flow, heat capacity and surface absorptivity. The module can be used for space heating in winter and reduce the cooling load of buildings in summer. this concept could be also utilized for domestic hot water heating. The modules are categorized as follows; (1) Loop Type Smart Module, (2) Bayonet Type Smart Module, (3) Roller Type Smart Module, (4) Plane Tubeless Solar Collector and Storage System Utilizing the Bayonet Concept. Each system generally features either or both of the passive or active schemes. The Loop Type, in particular, is designed with the photo diode and microprocessor to harness the solar energy more aggressively. It is essential to contrive a totally new design concept apart from conventional ones to fully appreciate the availability of the sun`s energy. In this regard, the solar modules under investigation in the present study is of great significance. (author) 29 refs., 65 figs., 5 photos.

  16. Injection molding of nanopatterned surfaces in the sub-micrometer range with induction heating aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2014-01-01

    Replication of sub-micrometer structures by injection molding leads to special requirements for the mold in order to ensure proper replica and acceptable cycle time. This paper investigates the applicability of induction heating embedded into the mold for the improvement of nanopattern replication....... A tool insert having a surface containing functional geometries in the sub-micrometer range was produced using aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. In order to provide elevated mold temperatures necessary for the complete replica of the pattern, a new mold setup was developed, which allows...... rapid heating of the cavity wall using an induction heating system. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple placed in the mold insert. The system was used to heat up the cavity wall with heating rates of up to 10 K/s. Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC) were used...

  17. A comparative study of the local heat transfer distributions around various surface mounted obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyssmann, Robert; Ullmer, Dirk; Terzis, Alexandros; Ott, Peter

    2014-04-01

    In many engineering applications, heat transfer enhancement techniques are of vital importance in order to ensure reliable thermal designs of convective heat transfer applications. This study examines experimentally the heat transfer characteristics on the base plate around various surface mounted obstacles. Local convection coefficients are evaluated in the vicinity of each individual protruding body with great spatial resolution using the transient liquid crystal technique. Five different obstacles of constant height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio (˜1.3) are considered. These include: a cylinder, a square, a triangle, a diamond and a vortex generator of delta wing shape design. The experiments were carried out over a range of freestream Reynolds numbers, based on the hydraulic diameter of each obstacle, varying from 4,000 to 13,000. The results indicate a negligible effect of the flow speed on the heat transfer topological structure and a considerable effect of the obstacle geometry on the level and distribution of heat transfer enhancement.

  18. Comments on the dissipation of hydromagnetic surface waves. [applicable to solar coronal plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A recent paper by Wentzel, which claims to calculate a plasma heating rate due to dissipation of surface waves in an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid, is found to be in error in interpretation. A well-established general theorem pertaining to the conservative ideal MHD fluid requires that the normal mode calculated by Wentzel be oscillatory in time. Within ideal MHD, dissipation and plasma heating are therefore impossible.

  19. Similarity Solutions for Flow and Heat Transfer of Non-Newtonian Fluid over a Stretching Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Atta Sojoudi; Ali Mazloomi; Saha, Suvash C.; Gu, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    Similarity solutions are carried out for flow of power law non-Newtonian fluid film on unsteady stretching surface subjected to constant heat flux. Free convection heat transfer induces thermal boundary layer within a semi-infinite layer of Boussinesq fluid. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations (PDE) governing the flow and the boundary conditions are converted to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) using two-parameter groups. This technique reduces the number of ...

  20. Vibration-Assisted Laser Surface Texturing and Electromachining for the Intensification of Boiling Heat Transfer in a Minichannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecka M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes applications of the vibration-assisted laser surface texturing and spark erosion process as methods of modifying properties and structures of metal surfaces. Practical aspects of the use of produced surfaces in the heat exchanger with a minichannel have been described. Compared with smooth surfaces, developed metal surfaces obtained by vibration-assisted laser surface texturing and electromachining show more effective heat transfer. The local heat transfer coefficient for the saturated boiling region obtained for developed surfaces had the values significantly higher than those obtained for the smooth plate at the same heat flux. The experimental results are presented as the heated plate temperature (obtained from infrared thermography and relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the distance along the length of the minichannel for the saturated boiling region.

  1. Land surface and atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves in the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungul; Bieda, Rahama; Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Richter, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to extreme heat was reconstructed based on regional land-atmosphere processes from 1979 to 2010 in the South Central U.S. The study region surrounds the Chickasaw Nation (CN), a predominantly Native American population with a highly prevalent burden of climate-sensitive chronic diseases. Land surface and atmospheric conditions for summer heat waves were analyzed during spring (March-April-May, MAM) and summer (June-July-August, JJA) based on the Climate and Ocean: Variability, Predictability, and Change maximum temperature definition for heat wave frequency (HWF). The spatial-temporal pattern of HWF was determined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and the corresponding principle component time series of the first EOF of HWF. Statistically significant analyses of observed conditions indicated that sensible heat increased and latent heat fluxes decreased with high HWF in the South Central U.S. The largest positive correlations of sensible heat flux to HWF and the largest negative correlations of latent heat flux to HWF were specifically observed over the CN. This is a significantly different energy transfer regime due to less available soil moisture during the antecedent MAM and JJA. The higher sensible heat from dry soil could cause significant warming from the near surface (> 2.0°C) to the lower troposphere (> 1.5°C), and accumulated boundary layer heat could induce the significant patterns of higher geopotential height and enhance anticyclonic circulations (negative vorticity anomaly) at the midtroposphere. Results suggested a positive land-atmosphere feedback associated with heat waves and called attention to the need for region-specific climate adaptation planning.

  2. The effects of heat treatment on the physical properties and surface roughness of Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna L.) wood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korkut, Derya Sevim; Korkut, Süleyman; Bekar, Ilter; Budakçi, Mehmet; Dilik, Tuncer; Cakicier, Nevzat

    2008-01-01

    Heat treatment is often used to improve the dimensional stability of wood. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the physical properties and surface roughness of Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna L.) wood were examined...

  3. Condensation on Highly Superheated Surfaces: Unstable Thin Films in a Wickless Heat Pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Akshay; Nguyen, Thao T T; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C; Chao, David F; Sicker, Ronald J

    2017-03-03

    A wickless heat pipe was operated on the International Space Station to provide a better understanding of how the microgravity environment might alter the physical and interfacial forces driving evaporation and condensation. Traditional heat pipes are divided into three zones: evaporation at the heated end, condensation at the cooled end, and intermediate or adiabatic in between. The microgravity experiments reported herein show that the situation may be dramatically more complicated. Beyond a threshold heat input, there was a transition from evaporation at the heated end to large-scale condensation, even as surface temperatures exceeded the boiling point by 160 K. The hotter the surface, the more vapor was condensed onto it. The condensation process at the heated end is initiated by thickness and temperature disturbances in the thin liquid film that wet the solid surface. Those disturbances effectively leave the vapor "superheated" in that region. Condensation is amplified and sustained by the high Marangoni stresses that exist near the heater and that drive liquid to cooler regions of the device.

  4. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The evaluation of energy efficiency of convective heat transfer surfaces in tube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, B. A.; Pronin, V. A.; Salohin, V. I.; Sidenkov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    When evaluating the effectiveness of the heat exchange surfaces in the main considered characteristics such as heat flow (Q, Watt), the power required for pumps (N, Watt), and surface area of heat transfer (F, m2). The most correct comparison provides a comparison “ceteris paribus”. Carried out performance comparison “ceteris paribus” in-line and staggered configurations of bundles with a circular pipes can serve as a basis for the development of physical models of flow and heat transfer in tube bundles with tubes of other geometric shapes, considering intertubular stream with attached eddies. The effect of longitudinal and transverse steps of the pipes on the energy efficiency of different configurations would take into account by mean of physical relations between the structure of shell side flow with attached eddies and intensity of transfer processes of heat and momentum. With the aim of energy-efficient placement of tubes, such an approach opens up great opportunities for the synthesis of a plurality of tubular heat exchange surfaces, in particular, the layout of the twisted and in-line-diffuser type with a drop-shaped pipes.

  6. Change in cell surface properties of Lactobacillus casei under heat shock treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaji, Najla; Mahdhi, Abdel Karim; Krifi, Boubaker; Ismail, Manel Ben; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2015-05-01

    We undertake this study in the aim to give new insight about the change in cellular physiological state under heat shock treatment and probiotic strain screening procedure. Different cell properties have been studied like adhesive ability to biotic and abiotic surfaces, the cell surface hydrophobicity and the fatty acids profiles. Compared to the normal cells, the heated cells increased their adhesive ability to biotic surface. However, the adhesion to abiotic surface was decreased. The cell surface hydrophobicity of the heated strains showed a significant decrease (P Lactobacillus casei cells was significantly higher than that of the control cells (P < 0.05). The present finding could firstly add new insight about the response of probiotic to stressful conditions, such us the important role of cell membrane, considered as the first main structure to be damaged by physicochemical stress, in stress resistance because of their composition that can change in adaptation to harsh conditions. Secondly, there is no relationship between changes in membrane composition and fluidity induced by heat shock treatment and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surface. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Nanofluids for power engineering: Emergency cooling of overheated heat transfer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, B. I.; Moraru, V. N.; Sidorenko, S. V.; Komysh, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of emergency cooling of an overheated heat transfer surface using nanofluids in the case of a boiling crisis is explored by means of synchronous recording of changes of main heat transfer parameters of boiling water over time. Two nanofluids are tested, which are derived from a mixture of natural aluminosilicates (AlSi-7) and titanium dioxide (NF-8). It is found that the introduction of a small portions of nanofluid into a boiling coolant (distilled water) in a state of film boiling ( t heater > 500°C) can dramatically decrease the heat transfer surface temperature to 130-150°C, which corresponds to a transition to a safe nucleate boiling regime without affecting the specific heat flux. The fact that this regime is kept for a long time at a specific heat load exceeding the critical heat flux for water and t heater = 125-130°C is particularly important. This makes it possible to prevent a potential accident emergency (heater burnout and failure of the heat exchanger) and to ensure the smooth operation of the equipment.

  8. A review of surface heat-flow data of the northern Middle Atlas (Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiozzi, Paolo; Barkaoui, Alae-Eddine; Rimi, Abdelkrim; Verdoya, Massimo; Zarhloule, Yassine

    2017-12-01

    We revised thermal data available from water and oil wells in the northern sector of the Middle Atlas region. To avoid biased estimation of surface heat flow caused by advection likely occurring in shallow aquifers, temperature measurements in water boreholes were carefully inspected and selected. The heat flow in the oil wells was inferred by taking into account the porosity variation with depth, the temperature effect on thermal conductivity of the matrix and the pore fluid, together with the contribution of the radiogenic heat production. Moreover, the possible bias in heat flow caused by convection occurring in confined carbonate aquifers was evaluated. The results of heat flow slightly modify the picture reported in previous investigations. The heat flow value over the investigated region is rather uniform (about 80 mW m-2) and is similar in oil wells and in water boreholes. Geothermal calculations indicate that such a surface heat flow is compatible with a ∼70 km thick thermal lithosphere and normal thermal conditions in the asthenospheric mantle.

  9. Heat Transfer through a Condensate Droplet on Hydrophobic and Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Shreyas; Cha, Hyeongyun; Orejon, Daniel; Nawaz, Kashif; Singla, Nitish; Yeung, Yip Fun; Park, Deokgeun; Kang, Dong Hoon; Chang, Yujin; Takata, Yasuyuki; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-08-09

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms governing vapor condensation on nonwetting surfaces is crucial to a wide range of energy and water applications. In this paper, we reconcile classical droplet growth modeling barriers by utilizing two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations to study individual droplet heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces (90° condensation. To verify our simulation results, we study condensed water droplet growth using optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy on biphilic samples consisting of hydrophobic and nanostructured superhydrophobic regions, showing excellent agreement with the simulations for both constant base area and constant contact angle growth regimes. Our results demonstrate the importance of resolving local heat transfer effects for the fundamental understanding and high fidelity modeling of phase change heat transfer on nonwetting surfaces.

  10. Stagnation point flow over a stretching/shrinking cylinder with prescribed surface heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md.

    2014-06-01

    The steady stagnation-point flow towards a horizontal linearly stretching/shrinking cylinder immersed in an incompressible viscous fluid with prescribed surface heat flux is investigated. The governing partial differential equations in cylindrical form are transformed into ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations. The transformed equations are solved numerically by using the shooting method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity profiles and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. Effects of the curvature parameter, stretching/shrinking parameter and Prandtl number on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The study indicate that the solutions for a shrinking cylinder are non-unique. It is observed that the surface shear stress and heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases.

  11. Derivation of Surface Net Radiation at the Valencia Anchor Station from Top of the Atmosphere Gerb Fluxes by Means of Linear Models and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo Ferreira, A.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Velazquez Blazquez, Almudena; Soria-Olivas, Emilio; Serrano Lopez, Antonio J.; Gomez Chova, Juan

    2012-07-01

    In this work, Linear Models (LM) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) have been developed to estimate net radiation (RN) at the surface. The models have been developed and evaluated by using the synergy between Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB-1) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data, both instruments onboard METEOSAT-9, and ``in situ'' measurements. The data used in this work, corresponding to August 2006 and June to August 2007, proceed from Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) broadband fluxes from GERB-1, every 15 min, and from net radiation at the surface measured, every 10 min, at the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) area, having measured independently the shortwave and the longwave radiation components (downwelling and upwelling) for different land uses and land cover. The adjustment of both temporal resolutions for the satellite and in situ data was achieved by linear interpolation that showed less standard deviation than the cubic one. The LMs were developed and validated by using satellite TOA RN and ground station surface RN measurements, only considering cloudy free days selected from the ground data. The ANN model was developed both for cloudy and cloudy-free conditions using seven input variables selected for the training/validation sets, namely, hour, day, month, surface RN, solar zenith angle and TOA shortwave and longwave fluxes. Both, LMs and ANNs show remarkably good agreement when compared to surface RN measurements. Therefore, this methodology can be successfully applied to estimate RN at surface from GERB/SEVIRI data.

  12. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  13. Correlation between platinum nanoparticle surface rearrangement induced by heat treatment and activity for an oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Chung, Young-Hoon; Jung, Namgee; Choi, Kwang-Hyun; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-08-28

    Heat treatment of nanoparticles could induce the surface rearrangement for more stable facet exposure induced by thermodynamics. By changing the heat treatment environment, we confirmed the correlation between the oxygen reduction activity and the effect of surface oxide and the degree of surface rearrangement of Pt nanoparticles. Native surface oxide was not a critical factor for oxygen reduction activity. However, the degree of surface rearrangement could affect the activity, which was confirmed by the surface sensitive techniques such as CO(ad) oxidation and potential of zero total charge. Analysis indicated that the driving force for nanoparticle surface rearrangement was affected by the heat treatment environment such as gas, in our case.

  14. Numerical investigation of heat transfer performance of synthetic jet impingement onto dimpled/protrusioned surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Di

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic mesh methods and user defined functions are adopted and the shear stress transport k-ω turbulent model has been used in the numerical investigation of heat transfer performance of synthetic jet impingement onto dimple/protrusioned surface. The results show that the local time-averaged Nusselt number of the dimpled/protrusioned target surface tends to be much closer with that of flat cases with increasing of frequency. The heat transfer performance gets better when frequency increases. The area-averaged time-averaged Nusselt number of protrusioned target surface is the most close to that of flat cases when f = 320 Hz while it is the smallest among the synthetic jet cases in dimpled target surface. The heat transfer enhancement performance of synthetic jet is 30 times better than that of natural convection. The time-averaged Nusselt number of stagnation point in the protrusioned target surface is higher than that of flat target surface while it is lower in the dimpled surface than that of flat surface no matter in the synthetic jet, steady jet or natural convection cases. Meanwhile, the timeaveraged Nusselt number of stagnation point in the synthetic jet cases increases with the increasing of frequency. It is worth pointing out that the time-averaged Nusselt number of stagnation point is lower than that of steady cases when the frequency is low. However, it shows a bit higher than that of steady cases when f = 320 Hz.

  15. Spray Cooling Trajectory Angle Impact Upon Heat Flux Using a Straight Finned Enhanced Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Eric A.; Kim, Jungho; Kiger, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of spray trajectory angles upon heat flux for flat and enhanced surface spray cooling. The surface enhancement consisted of straight fins machined on the top surface of a copper heater block. Spray cooling curves were obtained with the straight fin surface aligned both parallel (axial) and perpendicular (transverse) to the spray axis. Measurements were also obtained on a flat surface heater block for comparison purposes. Each copper block had a cross-sectional area of 2.0 sq cm. A 2x2 nozzle array was used with PF-5060 as the working fluid. Thermal performance data was obtained under nominally degassed (chamber pressure of 41.4 kPa) conditions. Results show that the maximum CHF in all cases was attained for a trajectory angle of 30' from the surface normal. Furthermore, trajectory angles applied to straight finned surfaces can have a critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement as much as 75% (heat flux value of 140 W/sq cm) relative to the vertical spray orientation for the analogous flat surface case under nominally degassed conditions.

  16. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Reddy, G.V.; Araligidad, N.

    super (-1). The role of net surface heat flux in generating the observed inversions are examined from the climatological monthly estimates of the same derived from ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program), SRB (Surface Radiation Budget...

  17. Estimating regional distribution of surface heat fluxes by combining satellite data and a heat budget model over the Kherlen River Basin, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Dai

    2007-01-01

    SummaryThe regional distribution of surface heat fluxes and related parameters over a semi-arid region was estimated using a technique that incorporates the thermal-infrared brightness temperature from a satellite into a heat budget model of land surface including vegetation canopy. We studied the western part of the Kherlen River Basin in Mongolia, where typical steppe dominates, including forest-steppe in the northern part and dry-steppe in the southern part of the basin. Our goal was to estimate the temporal change of surface heat fluxes at a location in the typical steppe over a growing season, and to estimate the spatial distribution of surface heat fluxes over the study area. Seven parameters, including the bulk transfer coefficients, the evaporation efficiency, and the subsurface thermal inertia, which are relevant to the surface heat fluxes, were optimized employing the simplex method. To compensate for insufficient satellite data samples to reproduce the diurnal change of surface heat fluxes, the spatial distribution of the surface brightness temperature was used in the optimization rather than using diurnal change, which is referred to as spatial optimization. Diurnal changes in the surface heat fluxes estimated by spatial optimization were validated by observation. The surface heat fluxes were reasonably accurately reproduced on a daily basis, with the root-mean-squares error of the sensible and the latent heat within 15 W m -2 over the growing season. The evaporation efficiency of canopy and the subsurface thermal inertia optimized in this study correlated well with the volumetric soil water content in a shallow layer on a daily basis, which suggests that thermal inertia can be an indicator of water conditions in a shallow subsurface layer. Spatial distribution of estimated sensible and latent heat after rainfall on successive summer days is discussed.

  18. MOURA magnetometer for Mars MetNet Precursor Mission. Its potential for an in situ magnetic environment and surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Michelena, M.; Sanz, R.; Fernandez, A.B.; Manuel, V. de; Cerdan, M.F.; Apestigue, V.; Arruego, I.; Azcue, J.; Dominguez, J.A.; Gonzalez, M.; Guerrero, H.; Sabau, M.; Kilian, R.; Baeza, O.; Ros, F.; Vazquez, M.; Tordesillas, J.M.; Covisa, P.; Aguado, J.

    2016-07-01

    MOURA magnetometer and gradiometer is part of the scientific instrumentation for Mars MetNet Precursor mission. This work describes the objective of the investigation, summarizes the work done in the design and development of the sensor as well as its calibration, and shows the demonstration campaigns to show the potential of such instrument for planetary landers and rovers. (Author)

  19. Assessment of land surface temperature and heat fluxes over Delhi using remote sensing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Surya Deb; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, Debashis

    2015-01-15

    Surface energy processes has an essential role in urban weather, climate and hydrosphere cycles, as well in urban heat redistribution. The research was undertaken to analyze the potential of Landsat and MODIS data in retrieving biophysical parameters in estimating land surface temperature & heat fluxes diurnally in summer and winter seasons of years 2000 and 2010 and understanding its effect on anthropogenic heat disturbance over Delhi and surrounding region. Results show that during years 2000-2010, settlement and industrial area increased from 5.66 to 11.74% and 4.92 to 11.87% respectively which in turn has direct effect on land surface temperature (LST) and heat fluxes including anthropogenic heat flux. Based on the energy balance model for land surface, a method to estimate the increase in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) has been proposed. The settlement and industrial areas has higher amounts of energy consumed and has high values of Has in all seasons. The comparison of satellite derived LST with that of field measured values show that Landsat estimated values are in close agreement within error of ±2 °C than MODIS with an error of ±3 °C. It was observed that, during 2000 and 2010, the average change in surface temperature using Landsat over settlement & industrial areas of both seasons is 1.4 °C & for MODIS data is 3.7 °C. The seasonal average change in anthropogenic heat flux (Has) estimated using Landsat & MODIS is up by around 38 W/m(2) and 62 W/m(2) respectively while higher change is observed over settlement and concrete structures. The study reveals that the dynamic range of Has values has increased in the 10 year period due to the strong anthropogenic influence over the area. The study showed that anthropogenic heat flux is an indicator of the strength of urban heat island effect, and can be used to quantify the magnitude of the urban heat island effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational prediction of heat transfer to gas turbine nozzle guide vanes with roughened surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, S.M.; Jones, T.V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering Science; Lock, G.D. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Dancer, S.N. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    The local Mach number and heat transfer coefficient over the aerofoil surfaces and endwalls of a transonic gas turbine nozzle guide vane have been calculated. the computations were performed by solving the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using a fully three-dimensional computational code (CFDS), which is well established at Rolls-Royce. A model to predict the effects of roughness has been incorporated into CFDS and heat transfer levels have been calculated for both hydraulically smooth and transitionally rough surfaces. The roughness influences the calculations in two ways; first the mixing length at a certain height above the surface is increased; second the wall function used to reconcile the wall condition with the first grid point above the wall is also altered. The first involves a relatively straightforward shift of the origin in the van Driest damping function description, the second requires an integration of the momentum equation across the wall layer. A similar treatment applies to the energy equation. The calculations are compared with experimental contours of heat transfer coefficient obtained using both thin-film gages and the transient liquid crystal technique. Measurements were performed using both hydraulically smooth and roughened surfaces, and at engine-representative Mach and Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer results are discussed and interpreted in terms of surface-shear flow visualization using oil and dye techniques.

  1. Effects of Surface Wettability and Roughness on the Heat Transfer Performance of Fluid Flowing through Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface characteristics, such as wettability and roughness, play an important role in heat transfer performance in the field of microfluidic flow. In this paper, the process of a hot liquid flowing through a microchannel with cold walls, which possesses different surface wettabilities and microstructures, is simulated by a transient double-distribution function (DDF two-phase thermal lattice Boltzmann BGK (LBGK model. The Shan-Chen multiphase LBGK model is used to describe the flow field and the independent distribution function is introduced to solve the temperature field. The simulation results show that the roughness of the channel wall improves the heat transfer, no matter what the surface wettability is. These simulations reveal that the heat exchange characteristics are directly related to the flow behavior. For the smooth-superhydrophobic-surface flow, a gas film forms that acts as an insulating layer since the thermal conductivity of the gas is relatively small in comparison to that of a liquid. In case of the rough-superhydrophobic-surface flow, the vortex motion of the gas within the grooves significantly enhances the heat exchange between the fluid and wall.

  2. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  3. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  4. Wavelet and Fractal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Surface Temperature with Applications to Estimation of Surface Sensible Heat Flux Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieldge, John

    2000-01-01

    Wavelet and fractal analyses have been used successfully to analyze one-dimensional data sets such as time series of financial, physical, and biological parameters. These techniques have been applied to two-dimensional problems in some instances, including the analysis of remote sensing imagery. In this respect, these techniques have not been widely used by the remote sensing community, and their overall capabilities as analytical tools for use on satellite and aircraft data sets is not well known. Wavelet and fractal analyses have the potential to provide fresh insight into the characterization of surface properties such as temperature and emissivity distributions, and surface processes such as the heat and water vapor exchange between the surface and the lower atmosphere. In particular, the variation of sensible heat flux density as a function of the change In scale of surface properties Is difficult to estimate, but - in general - wavelets and fractals have proved useful in determining the way a parameter varies with changes in scale. We present the results of a limited study on the relationship between spatial variations in surface temperature distribution and sensible heat flux distribution as determined by separate wavelet and fractal analyses. We analyzed aircraft imagery obtained in the thermal infrared (IR) bands from the multispectral TIMS and hyperspectral MASTER airborne sensors. The thermal IR data allows us to estimate the surface kinetic temperature distribution for a number of sites in the Midwestern and Southwestern United States (viz., San Pedro River Basin, Arizona; El Reno, Oklahoma; Jornada, New Mexico). The ground spatial resolution of the aircraft data varied from 5 to 15 meters. All sites were instrumented with meteorological and hydrological equipment including surface layer flux measuring stations such as Bowen Ratio systems and sonic anemometers. The ground and aircraft data sets provided the inputs for the wavelet and fractal analyses

  5. Urban heat mitigation by roof surface materials during the East Asian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjoon; Ryu, Youngryel; Jiang, Chongya

    2017-04-01

    Roof surface materials, such as green and white roofs, have attracted attention in their role in urban heat mitigation, and various studies have assessed the cooling performance of roof surface materials during hot and sunny summer seasons. However, summers in the East Asian monsoon climate region are characterized by significant fluctuations in weather events, such as dry periods, heatwaves, and rainy and cloudy days. This study investigated the efficacy of different roof surface materials for heat mitigation, considering the temperatures both at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials during a summer monsoon in Seoul, Korea. We performed continuous observations of temperature at and beneath the surface of the roof covering materials, and manual observation of albedo and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for a white roof, two green roofs (grass [Poa pratensis] and sedum [Sedum sarmentosum]), and a reference surface. Overall, the surface temperature of the white roof was significantly lower than that of the grass and sedum roofs (1.1 and 1.3°C), whereas the temperature beneath the surface of the white roof did not differ significantly from that of the grass and sedum roofs during the summer. The degree of cloudiness significantly modified the surface temperature of the white roof compared with that of the grass and sedum roofs, which depended on plant metabolisms. It was difficult for the grass to maintain its cooling ability without adequate watering management. After considering the cooling performance and maintenance efforts for different environmental conditions, we concluded that white roof performed better in urban heat mitigation than grass and sedum during the East Asian summer monsoon. Our findings will be useful in urban heat mitigation in the region.

  6. Effect of variable surface catalysis on heating near the stagnation point of a blunt body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.; Kolodziej, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes arc-jet data obtained on the performance of glass coated thermal protection systems in a convectively heated environment. These data confirm earlier flight and arc-jet data that show an increased surface catalysis with salt contamination and a decreased surface catalysis near the softening point temperature of the glass. In addition, surface temperature distributions along sphere-cones with abruptly changing surface catalysis were measured near the stagnation point and compared well with computations using a reacting boundary layer code.

  7. Advantages of analytically computing the ground heat flux in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the ground heat flux accounts for a significant fraction of the surface energy balance. In land surface models, the ground heat flux is typically estimated through a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation. Recent research has shown that this approach introduces errors in the estimation of the energy balance. In this paper, we calibrate a land surface model using a numerical solution of the heat conduction equation with four different vertical spatial resolutions. It is found that the thermal conductivity is the most sensitive parameter to the spatial resolution. More importantly, the thermal conductivity values are directly related to the spatial resolution, thus rendering any physical interpretation of this value irrelevant. The numerical solution is then replaced by an analytical solution. The results of the numerical and analytical solutions are identical when fine spatial and temporal resolutions are used. However, when using resolutions that are typical of land surface models, significant differences are found. When using the analytical solution, the ground heat flux is directly calculated without calculating the soil temperature profile. The calculation of the temperature at each node in the soil profile is thus no longer required, unless the model contains parameters that depend on the soil temperature, which in this study is not the case. The calibration is repeated, and thermal conductivity values independent of the vertical spatial resolution are obtained. The main conclusion of this study is that care must be taken when interpreting land surface model results that have been obtained using numerical ground heat flux estimates. The use of exact analytical solutions, when available, is recommended.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Liquid Film Moving Over a Heated Horizontal Surface Under the Action of a Gas Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartashevich Maria V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer during desorption on a horizontal film of lithium bromide water solution flowing on a heated wall under the action of shear stress is numerically investigated in this paper. The shear stress on the film surface is set by the motion of surrounding saturated water vapor. It is shown that at low values of heat flux the film temperature and vapor concentration in the solution downstream decreases due to desorption. However, with an increase in heat flux, general film heating and desorption slowing down are observed.

  9. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  10. Air-side performance of a micro-channel heat exchanger in wet surface conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisomba Raviwat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of operating conditions on the air-side heat transfer, and pressure drop of a micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions were studied experimentally. The test section was an aluminum micro-channel heat exchanger, consisting of a multi-louvered fin and multi-port mini-channels. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of inlet relative humidity, air frontal velocity, air inlet temperature, and refrigerant temperature on air-side performance. The experimental data were analyzed using the mean enthalpy difference method. The test run was performed at relative air humidities ranging between 45% and 80%; air inlet temperature ranges of 27, 30, and 33°C; refrigerant-saturated temperatures ranging from 18 to 22°C; and Reynolds numbers between 128 and 166. The results show that the inlet relative humidity, air inlet temperature, and the refrigerant temperature had significant effects on heat transfer performance and air-side pressure drop. The heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop for the micro-channel heat exchanger under wet surface conditions are proposed in terms of the Colburn j factor and Fanning f factor.

  11. On ultrahigh-vacuum preparation of monocrystalline transition metal surfaces by heat treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Krakhmalev, V A; Nimatov, S J; Garafutdinova, I A; Boltaev, N N

    2002-01-01

    The composition and substructure changes in monocrystalline singular W, Mo, Nb surfaces under heat treatment have been studied in the range 30-1900 sup d egC and vacuum approx 5 centre dot 10 sup - sup 8 Pa by electronic Auger spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and X-ray methods. Under multiple thermal-cycled treatment the large carbide inclusions have been found to become the places of local surface polygonization with block disordering >=3 sup d eg. In the case of Nb annealing the carbide in the O sub 2 atmosphere has led to solving O sub 2 in sample volume. In what follows, the solute O sub 2 is found to diffuse to on the surface under heating up to maximal temperatures of the above range. Under 30 min annealing of Nb(110) at approx 550 sup d egC, sulphur (S sub 1 sub 5 sub 2) segregation on surface appears that increases with temperature. (author)

  12. An Efficient Surface Algorithm for Random-Particle Simulation of Vorticity and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. A.; Stansby, P. K.

    1989-04-01

    A new surface algorithm has been incorporated into the random-vortex method for the simulation of 2-dimensional laminar flow, in which vortex particles are deleted rather than reflected as they cross a solid surface. This involves a modification to the strength and random walk of newly created vortex particles. Computations of the early stages of symmetric, impulsively started flow around a circular cylinder for a wide range of Reynolds numbers demonstrate that the number of vortices required for convergence is substantially reduced. The method has been further extended to accommodate forced convective heat transfer where temperature particles are created at a surface to satisfy the condition of constant surface temperature. Vortex and temperature particles are handled together throughout each time step. For long runs, in which a steady state is reached, comparison is made with some time-averaged experimental heat transfer data for Reynolds numbers up to a few hundred. A Karman vortex street occurs at the higher Reynolds numbers.

  13. The Impact of Trends in the Large Scale Atmospheric Circulation on Mediterranean Surface Turbulent Heat Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanski, Joy; Hameed, Sultan

    2015-01-01

    Interannual variations of latent heat fluxes (LHF) and sensible heat fluxes (SHF) over the Mediterranean for the boreal winter season (DJF) show positive trends during 1958-2011. Comparison of correlations between the heat fluxes and the intensity and location of the Azores High (AH), and the NAO and East Atlantic-West Russia (EAWR) teleconnections, along with analysis of composites of surface temperature, humidity and wind fields for different teleconnection states, demonstrates that variations of the AH are found to explain the heat flux changes more successfully than the NAO and the EAWR. Trends in sea level pressure and longitude of the Azores High during DJF show a strengthening, and an eastward shift. DJF Azores High pressure and longitude are shown to co-vary such that variability of the Azores High occurs along an axis defined by lower pressure and westward location at one extreme, and higher pressure and eastward location at the other extreme. The shift of the Azores High from predominance of the low/west state to the high/east state induces trends in Mediterranean Sea surface winds, temperature and moisture. These, combined with sea surface warming trends, produce trends in wintertime Mediterranean Sea sensible and latent heat fluxes.

  14. Effect of Favorable Pressure Gradients on Turbine Blade Pressure Surface Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Giel, P. W.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements on a turbine rotor showed significant relaminarization effects. These effects were evident on the pressure surface heat transfer measurements. The character of the heat transfer varied with Reynolds number. Data were obtained for exit Reynolds numbers between 500,000 and 880,000. Tests were done with a high level of inlet turbulence, 7.5%. At lower Reynolds numbers the heat transfer was similar to that for laminar flow, but at a level higher than for laminar flow. At higher Reynolds numbers the heat transfer was similar to turbulent flow, when the acceleration parameter, K, was sufficiently small. The proposed paper discusses the experimental results, and also discusses approaches to calculating the surface heat transfer for the blade surface. Calculations were done using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD analysis. The results of these tests, when compared with previous blade tests in the same facility, illustrate modeling difficulties that were encountered in CFD predictions. The two blades were in many ways similar. However, the degree of agreement between the same analysis and the experimental data was significantly different. These differences are highlighted to illustrate where improvements in modeling approaches are needed for transitional flows.

  15. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  16. CONVECTIVE HEAT EXCHANGE ON THE LATERAL SURFACE OF A RELATIVELY LONG CYCLONE CHAMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Saburov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-turbulent swirling flows of heat carrier that are created by a cyclone chamber are used in industry. They make it possible to intensify processes of heat and mass exchange. The results of an experimental study of convective heat transfer on the lateral surface of the active volume of a relatively long cyclone chamber considerably exceeding the length of the chambers that were used in previously performed studies are presented and analyzed in the article. Air supply in the swirler of the chamber was performed tangentially from diametrically opposite sides of the two input channels. The gas outlet was implemented from the opposite end. The heat transfer by convection to the swirling air flow was studied by the method of changing the state of aggregation of a heating agent – condensation of slightly superheated steam. Collecting condensate from the working section was made through a water seal for maintaining a constant pressure calorimeter. The amount of heat transferred during experiment was determined by weight of the collected condensate. The specific features of influence of geometrical characteristics of cyclone chamber on intensity of heat exchange are considered. In the experiments we varied the relative diameter of the outlet port of the chamber dвых and the relative area of the input channels fвх. Segmental construction of the chamber made it possible to move a calorimeter on its length. The local heat transfer coefficient was determined for various values of the dimensionless longitudinal coordinate z coinciding with the axis of the chamber, and counted from the back end of the swirler. The estimated equations of heat transfer obtained during the research are presented and recommended for use in practice of engineering. The considered problem is of an interest from the point of view of further research of aerodynamics and of convective heat transfer in a highly swirling flow cyclone devices, in order to improve the

  17. A Quantitative Assessment of Surface Urban Heat Islands Using Satellite Multitemporal Data over Abeokuta, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Ishola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast urban expansion has led to the transformation of the natural landscape into anthropogenic surfaces. The city of Abeokuta, for instance, is located in a region experiencing rapid urbanization, which has produced a remarkable effect on the surface thermal response. This effect significantly influences urban internal microclimatology on a regional scale. In this study, the surface temperatures and land cover types retrieved from Landsat TM and ETM+ images of Abeokuta city for 1984, 2003, and 2014 were analyzed. A quantitative approach was used to assess surface urban heat islands through the relationships among surface temperature and land cover types. Results showed that impervious surface areas were found to be correlated positively with high temperatures. Conversely, vegetated areas and bare surfaces correlated positively with mid temperature zones. This study found that areas with increasing impervious surfaces will accelerate LST rise and consequently lead to increasing effect of surface urban heat islands. These findings pose a major challenge to urban planners. However, the study would help to quantify the impacts of different scenarios (e.g., vegetation loss to accommodate urban growth on LST and consequently to devise appropriate policy measures.

  18. Urban surface temperature behaviour and heat island effect in a tropical planned city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeb Qaid; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Jamei, Elmira; Manaf, Norhashima Abd; Said, Ismail; Ahmad, Mohd Hamdan

    2015-02-01

    Putrajaya is a model city planned with concepts of a "city in the garden" and an "intelligent city" in the tropics. This study presents the behaviour of the surface temperature and the heat island effect of Putrajaya. Findings show that heat island intensity is 2 °C on average at nighttime and negligible at daytime. But high surface temperature values were recorded at the main boulevard due to direct solar radiation incident, street orientation in the direction of northeast and southwest and low building height-to-street width ratio. Buildings facing each other had cooling effect on surfaces during the morning and evening hours; conversely, they had a warming effect at noon. Clustered trees along the street are effective in reducing the surface temperature compared to scattered and isolated trees. Surface temperature of built up areas was highest at noon, while walls and sidewalks facing northwest were hottest later in the day. Walls and sidewalks that face northwest were warmer than those that face southeast. The surface temperatures of the horizontal street surfaces and of vertical façades are at acceptable levels relative to the surface temperature of similar surfaces in mature cities in subtropical, temperate and Mediterranean climates.

  19. Transient mass transfer caused by local surface heating in close binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modisette, J. J.; Kondo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The surge of mass from one component of a binary system resulting from local surface heating is analyzed. The impact of such surges on the companion can produce transient phenomena such as those seen in X-ray binaries, RS CVn objects, and cataclysmic variables. The heating may be caused by nonlinear g-mode oscillations or by X-ray heating by the companion in X-ray binaries, among other possible mechanisms. As an example, model calculations have been performed for a surge, triggered by a relatively moderate local heating, in a hypothetical X-ray binary; the results show that such a surge can account for X-ray turn-ons.

  20. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of heat wave using Kalpana-1 VHRR land surface temperature product over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhiraj; Pandya, Mehul R.; Pathak, Vishal N.; Darji, Nikunj P.; Trivedi, Himanshu J.

    2016-05-01

    Heat Waves can have notable impacts on human mortality, ecosystem, economics and energy supply. The effect of heat wave is much more intense during summer than the other seasons. During the period of April to June, spells of very hot weather occur over certain regions of India and global warming scenario may result in further increases of such temperature anomalies and corresponding heat waves conditions. In this paper, satellite observations have been used to detect the heat wave conditions prevailing over India for the period of May-June 2015. The Kalpana-1 VHRR derived land surface temperature (LST) products have been used in the analysis to detect the heat wave affected regions over India. Results from the analysis shows the detection of heat wave affected pixels over Indian land mass. It can be seen that during the study period the parts of the west India, Indo-gangetic plane, Telangana and part of Vidarbh was under severe heat wave conditions which is also confirmed with Automatic Weather Station (AWS) air temperature observations.

  2. Desorption of SVOCs from Heated Surfaces in the Form of Ultrafine Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace, Lance A.; Ott, Wayne R.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) produced by electric heating of stoves and metal cooking pans, absent food, have been hypothesized to be created from a surface film of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) sorbed from the surrounding air. This study tests that hypothesis by size-resolved measurements...... extending the lower range of the UFP studied from 10 to 2.3 nm, and including other surfaces (glass, aluminum, and porcelain). Heating glass Petri dishes or squares of aluminum foil to about 350-400 degrees C for 4-6 min removed all sorbed organic substances completely. Subsequent exposure of these "clean......" Petri dishes and foil squares to indoor air in two different residences for successively longer periods (1 h to 281 days), followed by heating the materials for 4-6 min, indicated a strong relationship of the number, size distribution, and mass of the UFP to the time exposed. Estimates...

  3. Effect of radiant heat and ultrasound on fluoride release and surface hardness of glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolidis, Kosmas; Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Gerasimou, Paris; Sfeikos, Thrasyvoulos

    2016-11-02

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the influence of radiant heat and ultrasound on fluoride release and surface hardness of 3 glass ionomer cements (GICs). There were 3 experimental groups for each GIC; in group 1, the specimens were left to set without any treatment; in group 2, the specimens were irradiated for 2 minutes using a LED unit; and in group 3, ultrasound was applied using a scaler for 55 seconds on the specimen surface. Fluoride release measurements were performed daily for 7 days and at days 14 and 28. Surface hardness of the tested GICs was determined using Vickers method. The measurements were performed 24 hours and 7 days after mixing. Statistical analysis of the data was made using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey's and Bonferroni post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Radiant heat during setting reduced the fluoride release and increased the surface hardness of GICs (p<0.05). Ultrasonic treatment also reduced the fluoride release and increased the surface hardness (p<0.05) of GICs but in lower extent. Among the GICs there were differences in fluoride release and surface hardness properties depending on their composition (p<0.05). Radiant heat and ultrasonic treatments may be useful methods for GIC restorations in order to achieve faster adequate initial mechanical properties.

  4. Neutralized wettability effect of superhydrophilic Cr-layered surface on pool boiling critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hong Hyun; Jeong, Ui Ju; Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Kim, Sung Joong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The former method is deemed challenging due to longer development period and license issue. In this regard, FeCrAl, Cr, and SiC have been received positive attention as ATF coating materials because they are highly resistant to high temperature steam reaction causing massive hydrogen generation. In this study, Cr was selected as a target deposition material on the metal substrate because we found that Cr-layered surface becomes superhydrophilic, favorable to delaying the triggering of the critical heat flux (CHF). Thus in order to investigate the effect of Cr-layered superhydrophilic surfaces (under explored coating conditions) on pool boiling heat transfer, pool boiling experiment was conducted in the saturated deionized water under atmospheric pressure. As a physical vapor deposition (PVD) method, the DC magnetron sputtering technique was introduced to develop Cr-layered nanostructure. As a control variable of DC sputtering, substrate temperature was selected. Surface wettability and nanostructure were analyzed as major surface parameters on the CHF. We believe that highly dense micro/nano structure without nucleation cavities and inner pores neutralized the wettability effect on the CHF. Moreover, superhydrophilic surface with deficient cavity density rather hinders active nucleation. This emphasizes the importance of micro/nano structure surface for enhanced boiling heat transfer.

  5. Surface energy equation for heat transfer process in a pebble fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Área de Ingeniería en Recursos Energéticos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, México, DF 09340 (Mexico); Castillo-Jiménez, V. [Área de Ingeniería en Recursos Energéticos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, México, DF 09340 (Mexico); Herranz-Puebla, L.E. [División de Fisión Nuclear, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vázquez-Rodríguez, R. [Área de Ingeniería en Recursos Energéticos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, México, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Steady and transient behaviors of the interfacial heat transfer in a fuel element. • Non-local averaging volume method for deriving the surface energy equation. • The method captures significant physical phenomena of the interfacial heat transfer. • Closure relationships are proposed in order to obtain the temperatures distribution. • The derived average equation represents an upscaling regarding the local description. - Abstract: In this paper the surface energy equation for the heat transfer process (HT) between the mixture of fuel (TRISO particles and graphite matrix) and coating in a fuel pebble is derived. The fuel pebble can be treated as a heterogeneous region (mixture of microspheres and graphite) interacting thermally with the homogeneous region (the coating or cladding). These two regions are separated by a boundary region where the properties and behavior differ from those of the adjoining regions. The methodology applied for deriving the surface energy equation is based on the classical theory on interfacial transport phenomena. The surface energy equation derived in this work is an average equation that represents an upscaling respect to the local description. The regions around the surface where changes in the physical phenomena are important are of the order of microns, in contrast with interfacial mass transfer between phases that may be several molecular diameters. The numerical analysis regarding the application of surface energy equation is presented in this work.

  6. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, J. D.; Culling, J. R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  7. The effect of heat acclimation on sweat microminerals: Artifact of surface contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat acclimation (HA) reportedly conveys conservation in sweat micromineral concentrations when sampled from arm sweat, but time course is unknown. The observation that comprehensive cleaning of the skin surface negates sweat micromineral reductions during prolonged sweating raises the question of w...

  8. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau : surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Yaoming; Jia, Li; Wen, Jun

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  9. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau: surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Y.; Jia, L.; Wen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  10. Surface phenomena in a precipitation-hardenable nickel–chromium alloy during multiple heating/cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamiak, Stanislaw [Center of Innovation & Knowledge Transfer, Lab. 1, University of Rzeszow, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszow (Poland); Berchenko, Nicolas, E-mail: nberchen@gmail.com [Center for Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, University of Rzeszow, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszow (Poland); Bochnowski, Wojciech; Dziedzic, Andrzej [Center of Innovation & Knowledge Transfer, Lab. 1, University of Rzeszow, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszow (Poland); Trzyna, Malgorzata [Center for Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, University of Rzeszow, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszow (Poland); Fadeyev, Sergey [Lviv Polytechnic State University, Bandera St., 12, Lviv 79646 (Ukraine); Cebulski, Josef [Center of Innovation & Knowledge Transfer, Lab. 1, University of Rzeszow, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszow (Poland)

    2015-09-30

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray mapping were used to investigate physical and chemical processes on the surface of a precipitation-hardenable nickel–chromium alloy associated with single or multiple heating/cooling cycles that simulate typical service conditions of aircraft products made of such alloys. Research findings show the growth of oxide, increase of surface roughness, and microstructural changes. The depth distribution of main metal oxides is discussed. It was determined that aluminum diffusing along the alloy grain boundaries forms an oxide on the surface and intergranular Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The Ti and Nb nitride inclusions were found to appear after the first oxidation cycle. - Highlights: • Multiple heating/cooling cycles increase oxide thickness and surface roughness. • The microstructure changes under multiple heating/cooling. • Metal distribution in the oxide is formed mainly after the first heating/cooling. • Ti and Nb nitride inclusions were found in the oxide layer.

  11. Investigation of operational temperature conditions of steam generating surfaces with critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remizov, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of reliable once-through steam generators requires a knowledge of temperature conditions along the entire length of the steam generating surface including regions affected by deteriorated heat transfer and dryout. Experimental and calculated data on temperatures in these regions are presented and compared. (LCL)

  12. Heat and Mass Transfer in a Pipe with Moving Surface: Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appropriate to simulate wind tunnel tests on lubrication phenomenon in engineering systems. Mathematics Subject Classification (1991): 76Z05, 76E25 Keywords: pipe flow, moving surface, viscosity variation;, heat and material flux, energy dissipation, physiological flows, magnetohydrodynamic and electrohydrodynamic ...

  13. Simulations of horizontal roll vortex development above lines of extreme surface heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.E. Heilman; J.D. Fast

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, coupled, earth/atmospheric model has been used to simulate mean and turbulent atmospheric characteristics near lines of extreme surface heating. Prognostic equations are used to solve for the horizontal and vertical wind components, potential temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The model computes nonhydrostatic pressure...

  14. Brain Surface Heating After Exposure to Ultrasound: An Analysis Using Thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michal E; Lombardo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice to monitor brain pathologies in neonates after complicated deliveries. Animal studies have indicated that ultrasound may cause heating of brain tissues. To date, no study has explored brain surface heating by ultrasound during clinically relevant exposure. Hence, we investigated heating effects of B-mode and pulsed Doppler (PD) mode on ex vivo lamb brains using thermography. Five brains were scanned for 5 min in B-mode or for 3 min, 1 min, 30 s or 15 s in PD mode. Brain surface temperature was measured pre- and post-exposure using thermography. The highest mean temperature increase was recorded by B-mode (3.82 ± 0.43°C). All five PD exposure protocols were associated with surface temperature increases of 2.1-2.7°C. These outcomes highlight for the first time that B-mode ultrasound can contribute to brain surface heating during a routine cranial scan. Scan duration should be minimised whenever possible. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of surface thermal properties of HfB2 nanoparticles on heat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hafnium diboride nanoparticles; multi-walled carbon nanotube; phenolic composites; thermal management. ... heatthroughout the sample, thereby reducing thermal gradients, reducing the intensity of heating at the surface exposed to flame,and insulating the carbonaceous char with the network of HfO 2 /MWCNT/char.

  16. Estimation of sensible heat flux using the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) and ATSR measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, L.; Su, Z.; Hurk, van den B.; Menenti, M.; Moene, A.F.; Bruin, de H.A.R.; Baselga Yrisarry, J.J.; Ibanez, M.; Cuesta, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a modified version of the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) as regards the use of radiometric data from space and presents the results of a large area validation study on estimated sensible heat flux, extended over several months. The improvements were made possible by the

  17. The effect of different wood varnishes on surface color properties of heat treated wood materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Pelit

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of different wood varnishes on the surface color properties of heat treated wood. Samples prepared from Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L. and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. are subjected to heat treatment at 190, 200, and 210 ° C for 2 h. Sample surfaces are then covered with cellulosic (SZ, synthetic (ST, polyurethane (PU, and water-based (SB wood varnishes, and the color properties of samples are determined according to the three-dimensional CIEL*a*b* color space. Results show a decrease in the L* and b* values of samples by 64% and 70%, respectively, depending on the process temperature after heat treatment. The a* value increases by up to 96% for Scots pine samples and up to 56% for beech samples. Color values of heat treated samples change significantly after varnish is applied; L* values of all samples are reduced compared to unvarnished samples and samples are seen to darken. However, the a* value of heat treated Scots pine samples increases significantly after varnishing, while that of heat-treated beech samples at high temperatures (200 and 210 °C generally decreases. Nevertheless, the b* value decreases significantly in both wood species subjected to application of PU and ST varnishes, and the total color change (ΔE* of varnished specimens is generally higher for samples heat-treated at 200 °C. Results show that ST varnish has the largest effect on color change and SB varnish has the smallest effect. The use of SB varnishes is thus preferable when it is necessary to preserve the color of samples from either species following heat treatment.

  18. The Response of the Ocean Thermal Skin Layer to Air-Sea Surface Heat Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elizabeth Wing-See

    There is much evidence that the ocean is heating as a result of an increase in concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere from human activities. GHGs absorb infrared radiation and re-emit infrared radiation back to the ocean's surface which is subsequently absorbed. However, the incoming infrared radiation is absorbed within the top micrometers of the ocean's surface which is where the thermal skin layer exists. Thus the incident infrared radiation does not directly heat the upper few meters of the ocean. We are therefore motivated to investigate the physical mechanism between the absorption of infrared radiation and its effect on heat transfer at the air-sea boundary. The hypothesis is that since heat lost through the air-sea interface is controlled by the thermal skin layer, which is directly influenced by the absorption and emission of infrared radiation, the heat flow through the thermal skin layer adjusts to maintain the surface heat loss, assuming the surface heat loss does not vary, and thus modulates the upper ocean heat content. This hypothesis is investigated through utilizing clouds to represent an increase in incoming longwave radiation and analyzing retrieved thermal skin layer vertical temperature profiles from a shipboard infrared spectrometer from two research cruises. The data are limited to night-time, no precipitation and low winds of less than 2 m/s to remove effects of solar radiation, wind-driven shear and possibilities of thermal skin layer disruption. The results show independence of the turbulent fluxes and emitted radiation on the incident radiative fluxes which rules out the immediate release of heat from the absorption of the cloud infrared irradiance back into the atmosphere through processes such as evaporation and increase infrared emission. Furthermore, independence was confirmed between the incoming and outgoing radiative flux which implies the heat sink for upward flowing heat at the air-sea interface is more

  19. The resistance of surfaces treated with oils and waxes to the action of dry heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface treatment of wood can be done with different coatings, and the choice of the appropriate system of processing depends on several factors, such as technological, aesthetic, economic and ecological. Raising awareness of the need to preserve the living and working environment has had a crucial impact on the increase in the use of natural materials for surface treatment of wood - oil and wax. The application of oils and waxes allows surface treated wood to keep the natural look, while protecting it from different influences, which can cause degradation and deterioration of the final product. The paper presents the results of testing the resistance of beech surface (Fagus silvatica L. processed with linseed oil and beeswax to the action of dry heat. In order to compare the quality of surface treated with oil and/or wax, beech wood treated with 2K-polyurethane coating is taken as a reference of surface treatment of wood. Surfaces treated with beeswax are less resistant to dry heat than those treated with linseed oil, and both showed significantly less resistance than surface treated with 2K-polyurethane coating.

  20. Dynamic surface tension of heat transfer additives suitable for use in steam condensers and absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Yong-Du [Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Kongju National University, Kongju, Chungnam, 314-701 (Korea); Kim, Kwang J.; Kennedy, John M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada-Reno, MS 312, Reno, NV 89557 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Additives are often effectively used in enhancing heat transfer by creating a surface tension gradient on the surface of a condensate film to induce Marangoni driven ''dropwise-like'' condensation. The objective of the current study is to use the Maximum Bubble Pressure Method (MBPM) to evaluate dynamic behavior of the surface tension of solutions of three different additives (2-ethoxy ethanol, isobutylamine, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol) of varying concentrations with water. It was shown that the effects of 2-ethoxy ethanol on surface tension was primarily dependent on solute concentration and showed little dependence on time (i.e. surface age of bubble). While both isobutylamine and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol showed strong dependence on both concentration and time, the effects of the later were far more dramatic. The results for all solutions are presented as functions of concentration and time (i.e. surface age of bubble). (author)

  1. Surface Resistance of Jute Fibre/Polylactic Acid Biocomposite to Wet Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Clio; Bandyopadhyay, N. R.; Ray, Dipa

    2016-04-01

    Jute fibre/polylactic acid (PLA) composite is of special interest because both resin and reinforcement come from renewable resources. Thus, it could be a more eco-friendly alternative to glass fibre composite [1] and to conventional wood-based panels made with phenol-formaldehyde resin which present many drawbacks for the workers and the environment [2]. Yet the water affinity of the natural fibres, the susceptibility of PLA towards hydrolysis and the low glass transition of the PLA raise a question about the surface resistance of such composites to wet heat in service condition for a furniture application [3]. In this work, the surface resistance of PLA/jute composite alone and with two different varnishes are investigated in regard to an interior application following the standard test method in accordance to BS EN 18721:2009: "Furniture: assessment of surface resistance to wet heat". It is compared to two common wood based panels, plywood and hardboard. After test, the composite material surface is found to be more affected than plywood and hardboard, but it becomes resistant to wet heat when a layer of biosourced varnish or petrol-based polyurethane varnish are applied on the surface.

  2. The Effect of Heat and Free Chlorine Treatments on the Surface Properties of Murine Norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brié, Adrien; Razafimahefa, Ravo; Loutreul, Julie; Robert, Aurélie; Gantzer, Christophe; Boudaud, Nicolas; Bertrand, Isabelle

    2017-06-01

    Heat and free chlorine are among the most efficient and commonly used treatments to inactivate enteric viruses, but their global inactivation mechanisms have not been elucidated yet. These treatments have been shown to affect at least the capsid proteins of viruses and thus may affect the surface properties (i.e. electrostatic charge and hydrophobicity) of such particles. Our aim was to study the effects of heat and free chlorine on surface properties for a murine norovirus chosen as surrogate for human norovirus. No changes in the surface properties were observed with our methods for murine norovirus exposed to free chlorine. Only the heat treatment led to major changes in the surface properties of the virus with the expression of hydrophobic domains at the surface of the particles after exposure to a temperature of 55 °C. No modification of the expression of hydrophobic domains occurred after exposure to 60 °C, and the low hydrophobic state exhibited by infectious and inactivated particles after exposure to 60 °C appeared to be irreversible for inactivated particles only, which may provide a means to discriminate infectious from inactivated murine noroviruses. When exposed to a temperature of 72 °C or to free chlorine at a concentration of 50 mg/L, the genome became available for RNases.

  3. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health....... temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a midsized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11...

  4. Equation for differential heat of adsorption (DHA) on a surface with discrete nonuniformity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyachko, A.L.

    1978-09-01

    An equation for differential heat of adsorption (DHA) on a surface with discrete nonuniformity, as a function of the amount of adsorbed compound, was derived from an analysis of adsorption equilibria on surfaces having any number of different types of active sites. The equation can be used in calculating the DHA as a function of surface coverage from the known energy spectrum of the active sites and vice versa. Good agreement between calculated and published experimental data was achieved when applying this equation to adsorption of ammonia on NaA, NaX, and NaY zeolites.

  5. Heat Transfer Measurement and Modeling in Rigid High-Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Cunnington, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Heat transfer in rigid reusable surface insulations was investigated. Steady-state thermal conductivity measurements in a vacuum were used to determine the combined contribution of radiation and solid conduction components of heat transfer. Thermal conductivity measurements at higher pressures were then used to estimate the effective insulation characteristic length for gas conduction modeling. The thermal conductivity of the insulation can then be estimated at any temperature and pressure in any gaseous media. The methodology was validated by comparing estimated thermal conductivities with published data on a rigid high-temperature silica reusable surface insulation tile. The methodology was also applied to the alumina enhanced thermal barrier tiles. Thermal contact resistance for thermal conductivity measurements on rigid tiles was also investigated. A technique was developed to effectively eliminate thermal contact resistance on the rigid tile s cold-side surface for the thermal conductivity measurements.

  6. Seed set, pollen morphology and pollen surface composition response to heat stress in field pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunfei; Lahlali, Rachid; Karunakaran, Chithra; Kumar, Saroj; Davis, Arthur R; Bueckert, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is a major legume crop grown in a semi-arid climate in Western Canada, where heat stress affects pollination, seed set and yield. Seed set and pod growth characteristics, along with in vitro percentage pollen germination, pollen tube growth and pollen surface composition, were measured in two pea cultivars (CDC Golden and CDC Sage) subjected to five maximum temperature regimes ranging from 24 to 36 °C. Heat stress reduced percentage pollen germination, pollen tube length, pod length, seed number per pod, and the seed-ovule ratio. Percentage pollen germination of CDC Sage was greater than CDC Golden at 36 °C. No visible morphological differences in pollen grains or the pollen surface were observed between the heat and control-treated pea. However, pollen wall (intine) thickness increased due to heat stress. Mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) spectra revealed that the chemical composition (lipid, proteins and carbohydrates) of each cultivar's pollen grains responded differently to heat stress. The lipid region of the pollen coat and exine of CDC Sage was more stable compared with CDC Golden at 36 °C. Secondary derivatives of ATR spectra indicated the presence of two lipid types, with different amounts present in pollen grains from each cultivar. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Three Methods for Microwave Heating of Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2012-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization will be Ground Breaking technology for sustained exploration of space. Volatiles are present in planetary regolith, but water by far has the most potential for effective utilization. The presence of water at the lunar poles and Mars opens the possibility of using the hydrogen for propellant on missions beyond Earth orbit. Likewise, the oxygen could be used for in-space propulsion for lunar ascent/descent and for space tugs from low lunar orbit to low Earth orbit. Water is also an effective radiation shielding material as well as a valuable expendable (water and oxygen) required for habitation in space. Because of the strong function of water vapor pressure with temperature, heating regolith effectively liberates water vapor by sublimation. Microwave energy will penetrate soil and heat from within, much more efficiently than heating from the surface with radiant heat. This is especially true under vacuum conditions since the heat transfer rate is very low. The depth of microwave penetration is a strong function of the microwave frequency and to a lesser extent on regolith dielectric properties. New methods for delivery of microwaves into lunar and planetary surfaces is being prototyped with laboratory experiments and modeled with COMSOL MultiPhysics. Recent results are discussed.

  8. Surface aerodynamic temperature modeling over rainfed cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evapotranspiration (ET) or latent heat flux (LE) can be spatially estimated as an energy balance (EB) residual for land surfaces using remote sensing inputs. The EB equation requires the estimation of net radiation (Rn), soil heat flux (G), and sensible heat flux (H). Rn and G can be estimated with ...

  9. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Surface Structure of 6082 Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, N.; Carlberg, T.

    2017-10-01

    The β-Al5FeSi intermetallic phase and coarse Mg2Si particles have negative effects on extrudability and workability of 6xxx Al alloys billets. To achieve extruded products with a high surface quality, the as-cast billets are heat-treated before extrusion. During heat treatment, the undesired intermetallic particles, i.e., β-AlFeSi platelets are transformed to rounded α-Al(FeMn)Si intermetallic phases. Although the heat treatment of the bulk areas of the 6xxx Al alloys has been the focus of many previous studies, the process of phase transformation at the very surface has not been paid the same attention. In this study, microstructures of a homogenized billet of a 6082 alloy at the area very close to the surface were investigated. By comparing the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) of heat-treated samples as a function of different holding times, the gradual phase transformations could be followed, and using GDOES and map analysis by EDX, the alloying elemental redistribution was analyzed. Partial remelting and porosity growth was detected, and transformation rates were faster than in bulk material and from what is known from industrial processes.

  10. Performing multiobjective optimization on perforated plate matrix heat exchanger surfaces using genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Anish K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Heat Exchanger is having wide spread applications in cryogenics and aerospace, where high effectiveness and compactness is essential. This can be achieved by providing high thermal conductive plates and low thermal conductive spacers alternately. These perforated plate matrix heat exchangers have near to 100% efficiency due to low longitudinal heat transfer. The heat transfer and flow friction characteristics of a perforated plate matrix heat exchanger can be represented using Colburn factor and friction factor. In this paper, dimensionless parameters like Reynolds number (Re, porosity (p, perforation perimeter factor (P f, plate thickness to pore diameter ratio (l/d and spacer thickness to plate thickness ratio (s/l have been optimized for maximum Colburn factor and minimum friction factor using genetic algorithm. Two algorithms, one for single objective and the other for multi-objective problems, which are believed to be more efficient, are described. The algorithms coded with MATLAB, is used to perform multi-objective optimization on perforated plate matrix heat exchanger surfaces. The results show promising results.

  11. Evaluation of Heat Losses Behind the Front of the Detonation Moving Along the Metallic Porous Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Golovastov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a computational technique of the heat flow from the hot products of detonation combustion into the porous coating and estimates the efficiency of the coating layer that results in slowing the flame front down with disregard the transverse displacement of the combustion products weight of a hydrogen-air mixture.Initial thermodynamic parameters of combustion products on the porous coating surface have been estimated. A drag (stagnation temperature of flow was determined.The statement of task was to calculate the heat flow into the long cylindrical metal fiber with radius of 15 μm. The reference values of heat capacity and heat diffusivity were used to estimate a thermal diffusivity in a wide range of temperatures. An approximation of the parameters is given for a wide range of temperatures.The calculation algorithm using an explicit four-point scheme is presented. The convergence and accuracy of the results were confirmed. The theoretical estimation using cylindrical Bessel functions was made to prove the accuracy of the results.Total heat loss was estimated using the photos of moving detonation front and hot combustion gases.Comparison of the total heat loss and the amount of energy absorbed by a single fiber allowed us to find that the porous coating thickness, resulting in attenuation of detonation wave, is efficient.

  12. Comparison of Predicted and Measured Turbine Vane Rough Surface Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. J.; Spuckler, C. M.; Lucci, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    The proposed paper compares predicted turbine vane heat transfer for a rough surface over a wide range of test conditions with experimental data. Predictions were made for the entire vane surface. However, measurements were made only over the suction surface of the vane, and the leading edge region of the pressure surface. Comparisons are shown for a wide range of test conditions. Inlet pressures varied between 3 and 15 psia, and exit Mach numbers ranged between 0.3 and 0.9. Thus, while a single roughened vane was used for the tests, the effective rougness,(k(sup +)), varied by more than a factor of ten. Results were obtained for freestream turbulence levels of 1 and 10%. Heat transfer predictions were obtained using the Navier-Stokes computer code RVCQ3D. Two turbulence models, suitable for rough surface analysis, are incorporated in this code. The Cebeci-Chang roughness model is part of the algebraic turbulence model. The k-omega turbulence model accounts for the effect of roughness in the application of the boundary condition. Roughness causes turbulent flow over the vane surface. Even after accounting for transition, surface roughness significantly increased heat transfer compared to a smooth surface. The k-omega results agreed better with the data than the Cebeci-Chang model. However, the low Reynolds number k-omega model did not accurately account for roughness when the freestream turbulence level was low. The high Reynolds number version of this model was more suitable when the freestream turbulence was low.

  13. Specific heats of lunar surface materials from 90 to 350 degrees Kelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, R.A.; Hemingway, B.S.; Wilson, W.H.

    1970-01-01

    The specific heats of lunar samples 10057 and 10084 returned by the Apollo 11 mission have been measured between 90 and 350 degrees Kelvin by use of an adiabatic calorimeter. The samples are representative of type A vesicular basalt-like rocks and of finely divided lunar soil. The specific heat of these materials changes smoothly from about 0.06 calorie per gram per degree at 90 degrees Kelvin to about 0.2 calorie per gram per degree at 350 degrees Kelvin. The thermal parameter ??=(k??C)-1/2 for the lunar surface will accordingly vary by a factor of about 2 between lunar noon and midnight.

  14. Thermophysical properties of lunar media. II - Heat transfer within the lunar surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Heat transfer within the lunar surface layer depends on several thermophysical properties of the lunar regolith, including the thermal conductivity, the specific heat, the thermal diffusivity, and the thermal parameter. Results of property measurements on simulated lunar materials are presented where appropriate as well as measurements made on the actual samples themselves. The variation of temperature on the moon with depth is considered, taking into account various times of the lunar day. The daily variation in temperature drops to about 1 deg at a depth of only 0.172 meters. The steady temperature on the moon below this depth is 225 K.

  15. Design of Phosphor Thermometry System for Transient High Heat Flux Surface Thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Frankel, Jay I [ORNL; Beshears, David L [EMCO

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: A transformative calibration methodology is presented for predicting transient surface temperatures in a thermally conducting medium from in-depth, time-varying temperature measurements. The surface temperature is resolved using two experimental runs and a newly devised first-kind Volterra integral equation. The first experimental run involves calibration with known surface temperature while the second run involves resolving the surface temperature of interest through the ill-posed integral equation. This paper presents the concept genesis and numerically demonstrates the concept for feasibility, robustness, stability and accuracy. From this demonstration, we propose to implement surface placed thermographic phosphors in the calibration stage of the inverse method for estimating the required surface temperature. As a preliminary study, we consider transient, constant property, onedimensional heat conduction in a semi-infinite medium. It is mathematically demonstrated that a Volterra integral equation of the first kind is developed for estimating the surface temperature using a calibrated system (host material and sensor). Sensor characterization, explicit sensor positioning and thermophysical properties are implicitly contained in the new calibration integral equation. The calibration integral equation displays only four terms; namely, the measured front surface temperature and corresponding measured in-depth temperature response associated with the calibration run; and, the unknown surface temperature and its measured in-depth temperature response associated with the second run. Preliminary numerical results indicate the merit of the concept. This paper suggests using thermographic phosphors for estimating the surface temperature in the calibration portion of the process owing to their rapid thermal response, good surface thermal contact characteristics and lack of capacitance for assuring minimal delay. Though the present paper describes the theoretical

  16. Modeling the surface heat flux response to long-lived SST anomalies in the North Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, S.B.; Kleeman, R.; Colman, R.A. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne (Australia)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), a simplified atmospheric model (SAM) of surface heat flux, and various idealized analytic models have been used to investigate the atmospheric response over the North Atlantic to SST anomalies, including a general cooling associated with a weakened thermohaline circulation. Latent heating dominates the surface heat flux response, while sensible heating plays an important secondary role. The total heat flux response is weaker than presumed in recent studies using ocean models under highly idealized surface boundary conditions. This implies that stability of the thermohaline circulation to high-latitude freshening in more sophisticated coupled systems (that incorporate either AGCMs or models like SAM) will be increased. All three kinds of atmospheric models exhibit nonrestorative behavior away from the anomaly peak that is primarily associated with the advection of cooled air eastward. This simple picture is complicated in the AGCM by the fact that the winds weaken over the SST anomaly, which helps to moderate the response. Analytic models for atmospheric temperature forced using imposed surface temperature anomalies highlight conditions under which a nonrestorative response can arise. Previous work has shown that the length scale of spatially periodic anomalies partially determines the magnitude of the response in a diffusive atmosphere. Here the authors show that this scale dependence has much wider applicability by considering more localized anomalies and by the inclusion of advective transport processes. The modification of the response by sea ice changes and the absence of any statistically significant change in the basin-averaged hydrological cycle are also discussed. 62 refs., 19 figs.

  17. Biofouling on polymeric heat exchanger surfaces with E. coli and native biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, S; Madzgalla, M; Manz, W; Bart, H J

    2015-01-01

    The biofouling affinity of different polymeric surfaces (polypropylene, polysulfone, polyethylene terephthalate, and polyether ether ketone) in comparison to stainless steel (SS) was studied for the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12 DSM 498 and native biofilms originating from Rhine water. The biofilm mass deposited on the polymer surfaces was minimized by several magnitudes compared to SS. The cell count and the accumulated biomass of E. coli on the polymer surfaces showed an opposing linear trend. The promising low biofilm formation on the polymers is attributed to the combination of inherent surface properties (roughness, surface energy and hydrophobicity) when compared to SS. The fouling characteristics of E. coli biofilms show good conformity with the more complex native biofilms investigated. The results can be utilized for the development of new polymer heat exchangers when using untreated river water as coolant or for other processes needing antifouling materials.

  18. Rapid heat treatment for anatase conversion of titania nanotube orthopedic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosle, Sachin M.; Friedrich, Craig R.

    2017-10-01

    The amorphous to anatase transformation of anodized nanotubular titania surfaces has been studied by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A more rapid heat treatment for conversion of amorphous to crystalline anatase favorable for orthopedic implant applications was demonstrated. Nanotube titania surfaces were fabricated by electrochemical anodization of Ti6Al4V in an electrolyte containing 0.2 wt% NH4F, 60% ethylene glycol and 40% deionized water. The resulting surfaces were systematically heat treated in air with isochronal and isothermal experiments to study the temperature and time dependent transformation respectively. Energy dispersive spectroscopy shows that the anatase phase transformation of TiO2 in the as-anodized amorphous nanotube layer can be achieved in as little as 5 min at 350 °C in contrast to reports of higher temperature and much longer time. Crystallinity analysis at different temperatures and times yield transformation rate coefficients and activation energy for crystalline anatase coalescence. TEM confirms the (101) TiO2 presence within the nanotubes. These results confirm that for applications where amorphous titania nanotube surfaces are converted to crystalline anatase, a 5 min production flow-through heating process could be used instead of a 3 h batch process, reducing time, cost, and complexity.

  19. The Effect of Surface Charge Saturation on Heat-induced Aggregation of Firefly Luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharanlar, Jamileh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H; Yaghmaei, Parichehr

    2015-01-01

    We present here the effect of firefly luciferase surface charge saturation and the presence of some additives on its thermal-induced aggregation. Three mutants of firefly luciferase prepared by introduction of surface Arg residues named as 2R, 3R and 5R have two, three and five additional arginine residues substituted at their surface compared to native luciferase; respectively. Turbidimetric study of heat-induced aggregation indicates that all three mutants were reproducibly aggregated at higher rates relative to wild type in spite of their higher thermostability. Among them, 2R had most evaluated propensity to heat-induced aggregation. Therefore, the hydrophilization followed by appearing of more substituted arginine residues with positive charge on the firefly luciferase surface was not reduced its thermal aggregation. Nevertheless, at the same condition in the presence of charged amino acids, e.g. Arg, Lys and Glu, as well as a hydrophobic amino acid, e.g. Val, the heat-induced aggregation of wild type and mutants of firefly luciferases was markedly decelerated than those in the absence of additives. On the basis of obtained results it seems, relinquishment of variety in charge of amino acid side chains, they via local interactions with proteins cause to decrease rate and extent of their thermal aggregation. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. Coupled interactions between tungsten surfaces and transient high-heat-flux deuterium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, S.; Uesugi, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental studies on the interactions between transient deuterium-plasma heat pulses and tungsten surfaces were carried out in terms of electrical, mechanical and thermal response in a compact plasma device AIT-PID (Aichi Institute of Technology-Plasma Irradiation Device). Firstly, electron-emission-induced surface-temperature increase is discussed in the surface-temperature range near tungsten's melting point, which is accomplished by controlling the sheath voltage and power transmission factor. Secondly, anomalous penetration of tungsten atomic efflux into the surrounding plasma was observed in addition to a normal layered population; it is discussed in terms of the effect of substantial tungsten influx into the deuterium plasma, which causes dissipation of plasma electron energy. Thirdly, a momentum input from pulsed plasma onto a tungsten target was observed visually. The force is estimated numerically by the accelerated ion flow to the target as well as the reaction of tungsten-vapour efflux. Finally, a discussion follows on the effects of the plasma heat pulses on the morphology of tungsten surface (originally a helium-induced ‘fuzzy’ nanostructure). A kind of bifurcated effect is obtained: melting and annealing. Open questions remain for all the phenomena observed, although sheath-voltage-dependent plasma-heat input may be a key parameter. Discussions on all these phenomena are provided by considering their implications to tokamak fusion devices.

  1. Slip effect on stagnation point flow past a stretching surface with the presence of heat generation/absorption and Newtonian heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Muhammad Khairul Anuar; Noar, Nor Aida Zuraimi Md; Ismail, Zulkhibri; Kasim, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Sarif, Norhafizah Md; Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Ishak, Anuar

    2017-08-01

    Present study solved numerically the velocity slip effect on stagnation point flow past a stretching surface with the presence of heat generation/absorption and Newtonian heating. The governing equations which in the form of partial differential equations are transformed to ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method in MAPLE. The numerical solution is obtained for the surface temperature, heat transfer coefficient, reduced skin friction coefficient as well as the temperature and velocity profiles. The flow features and the heat transfer characteristic for the pertinent parameter such as Prandtl number, stretching parameter, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity slip parameter and conjugate parameter are analyzed and discussed.

  2. Dynamics of explosive boiling and third heat transfer crisis at subcooling on a vertical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avksentyuk, B. P.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.

    2017-07-01

    Results of experimental studies on dynamics of explosive boiling and third heat transfer crisis under the conditions of liquid subcooling are presented for the vertical arrangement of the heat-transfer surface. Acetone was used in experiments at the pressure in the working volume from 20 to 46 kPa and subcooling from 0 to 20 K. The studied processes were recorded. Data on the velocity of evaporation front propagation at liquid subcooling were obtained. These data are compared with the results of calculations according to the models available in the literature. The effect of liquid subcooling on the regions of regime parameters corresponding to explosive boiling and third heat transfer crisis is studied.

  3. Heat and mass transfer in magnetohydrodynamic Casson fluid over an exponentially permeable stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S.K. Raju

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the flow, heat and mass transfer behavior of Casson fluid past an exponentially permeable stretching surface in presence of thermal radiation, magneticfield, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction. We presented dual solutions by comparing the results of the Casson fluid with the Newtonian fluid. The governing partial nonlinear differential equations of the flow, heat and mass transfer are transformed into ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and solved numerically by using Matlab bvp4c package. The effects of various non-dimensional governing parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are discussed and presented graphically. Also, the friction factor, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are analyzed and presented in tabular form for both Casson and Newtonian fluids separately. Under some special conditions the results of the present study have an excellent agreement with existing studies for both Casson and Newtonian fluid cases.

  4. Recent Advances in Power Conversion and Heat Rejection Technology for Fission Surface Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are jointly developing Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology for possible use in human missions to the Moon and Mars. A preliminary reference concept was generated to guide FSP technology development. The concept consists of a liquid-metal-cooled reactor, Stirling power conversion, and water heat rejection, with Brayton power conversion as a backup option. The FSP project has begun risk reduction activities on some key components with the eventual goal of conducting an end-to-end, non-nuclear, integrated system test. Several power conversion and heat rejection hardware prototypes have been built and tested. These include multi-kilowatt Stirling and Brayton power conversion units, titanium-water heat pipes, and composite radiator panels.

  5. Non-uniformity of surface temperatures after microwave heating of poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksoy, E O; James, C; James, S J

    1999-01-01

    Microwave energy has the potential to raise the surface temperatures of meat rapidly for a short period of time sufficient to reduce bacterial numbers significantly without causing physical changes to the meat. Studies have investigated the ability of a standard domestic microwave oven (2450 MHz; IEC 1191 W), an experimental repeatable microwave cavity (2450 MHz; IEC 1139 W) and a number of shielding techniques to achieve uniform surface temperature distributions on pieces of poultry meat. In the domestic oven temperature differences of up to 60 and 80 degrees C were found between different points on the surface of the same sample after 30 s and 3 minutes of heating respectively. The use of a standard cavity and shielding resulted in a difference of less than 5 degrees C between the average surface temperature on the edge and middle of regular slabs of chicken after 30 s exposure. Results show that microwave heating, using 2450 MHz, is unlikely to produce consistently uniform enough surface temperatures on meat to reduce bacterial numbers without surface damage.

  6. Roughness Length of Water Vapor over Land Surfaces and Its Influence on Latent Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Jong Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Latent heat flux at the surface is largely dependent on the roughness length for water vapor (z0q. The determination of z0q is still uncertain because of its multifaceted characteristics of surface properties, atmospheric conditions and insufficient observations. In this study, observed values from the Fluxes Over Snow Surface II field experiment (FLOSS-II from November 2002 to March 2003 were utilized to estimate z0q over various land surfaces: bare soil, snow, and senescent grass. The present results indicate that the estimated z0q over bare soil is much smaller than the roughness length of momentum (z0m; thus, the ratio z0m/z0q is larger than those of previous studies by a factor of 20 - 150 for the available flow regime of the roughness Reynolds number, Re* > 0.1. On the snow surface, the ratio is comparable to a previous estimation for the rough flow (Re* > 1, but smaller by a factor of 10 - 50 as the flow became smooth (Re* < 1. Using the estimated ratio, an optimal regression equation of z0m/z0q is determined as a function of Re* for each surface type. The present parameterization of the ratio is found to greatly reduce biases of latent heat flux estimation compared with that estimated by the conventional method, suggesting the usefulness of current parameterization for numerical modeling.

  7. Experimental investigation of thermal conductivity coefficient and heat exchange between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental research of thermal conductivity coefficients of the siliceous sand bed fluidized by air and an experimental investigation of the particle size influence on the heat transfer coefficient between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surfaces. The measurements were performed for the specific fluidization velocity and sand particle diameters d p=0.3, 0.5, 0.9 mm. The industrial use of fluidized beds has been increasing rapidly in the past 20 years owing to their useful characteristics. One of the outstanding characteristics of a fluidized bed is that it tends to maintain a uniform temperature even with nonuniform heat release. On the basis of experimental research, the influence of the process's operational parameters on the obtained values of the bed's thermal conductivity has been analyzed. The results show direct dependence of thermal conductivity on the intensity of mixing, the degree of fluidization, and the size of particles. In the axial direction, the coefficients that have been treated have values a whole order higher than in the radial direction. Comparison of experimental research results with experimental results of other authors shows good agreement and the same tendency of thermal conductivity change. It is well known in the literature that the value of the heat transfer coefficient is the highest in the horizontal and the smallest in the vertical position of the heat exchange surface. Variation of heat transfer, depending on inclination angle is not examined in detail. The difference between the values of the relative heat transfer coefficient between vertical and horizontal heater position for all particle sizes reduces by approximately 15% with the increase of fluidization rate.

  8. The Limitation of Applying Heat to the External Lid Surface: A Case of Recalcitrant Meibomian Gland Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenrick, Christen J; Alloo, Sabiha S

    2017-01-01

    The effects on the inner surface temperatures of the upper and lower eyelids of four commercial heat therapies were compared for an individual with recalcitrant meibomian gland dysfunction. Three therapies (Bruder mask, Blephasteam, and MiBoFlo) involved the application of heat to the external lid surface, and the fourth (LipiFlow) applied heat to the internal lid surface. Only LipiFlow was effective in elevating the inner surface temperatures to the reported 40°C therapeutic threshold for melting obstructed meibum.

  9. The Limitation of Applying Heat to the External Lid Surface: A Case of Recalcitrant Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen J. Kenrick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects on the inner surface temperatures of the upper and lower eyelids of four commercial heat therapies were compared for an individual with recalcitrant meibomian gland dysfunction. Three therapies (Bruder mask, Blephasteam, and MiBoFlo involved the application of heat to the external lid surface, and the fourth (LipiFlow applied heat to the internal lid surface. Only LipiFlow was effective in elevating the inner surface temperatures to the reported 40°C therapeutic threshold for melting obstructed meibum.

  10. The Limitation of Applying Heat to the External Lid Surface: A Case of Recalcitrant Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Christen J. Kenrick; Sabiha S. Alloo

    2017-01-01

    The effects on the inner surface temperatures of the upper and lower eyelids of four commercial heat therapies were compared for an individual with recalcitrant meibomian gland dysfunction. Three therapies (Bruder mask, Blephasteam, and MiBoFlo) involved the application of heat to the external lid surface, and the fourth (LipiFlow) applied heat to the internal lid surface. Only LipiFlow was effective in elevating the inner surface temperatures to the reported 40°C therapeutic threshold for me...

  11. Surface properties of heat-induced soluble soy protein aggregates of different molecular masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengxian; Xiong, Youling L; Qin, Fang; Jian, Huajun; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Jie

    2015-02-01

    Suspensions (2% and 5%, w/v) of soy protein isolate (SPI) were heated at 80, 90, or 100 °C for different time periods to produce soluble aggregates of different molecular sizes to investigate the relationship between particle size and surface properties (emulsions and foams). Soluble aggregates generated in these model systems were characterized by gel permeation chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat treatment increased surface hydrophobicity, induced SPI aggregation via hydrophobic interaction and disulfide bonds, and formed soluble aggregates of different sizes. Heating of 5% SPI always promoted large-size aggregate (LA; >1000 kDa) formation irrespective of temperature, whereas the aggregate size distribution in 2% SPI was temperature dependent: the LA fraction progressively rose with temperature (80→90→100 °C), corresponding to the attenuation of medium-size aggregates (MA; 670 to 1000 kDa) initially abundant at 80 °C. Heated SPI with abundant LA (>50%) promoted foam stability. LA also exhibited excellent emulsifying activity and stabilized emulsions by promoting the formation of small oil droplets covered with a thick interfacial protein layer. However, despite a similar influence on emulsion stability, MA enhanced foaming capacity but were less capable of stabilizing emulsions than LA. The functionality variation between heated SPI samples is clearly related to the distribution of aggregates that differ in molecular size and surface activity. The findings may encourage further research to develop functional SPI aggregates for various commercial applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Numerical study of the role of microphysical latent heating and surface heat fluxes in a severe precipitation event in the warm sector over southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jin-Fang; Wang, Dong-Hai; Liang, Zhao-Ming; Liu, Chong-Jian; Zhai, Guo-Qing; Wang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Simulations of the severe precipitation event that occurred in the warm sector over southern China on 08 May 2014 are conducted using the Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARWv3.5.1) model to investigate the roles of microphysical latent heating and surface heat fluxes during the severe precipitation processes. At first, observations from surface rain gauges and ground-based weather radars are used to evaluate the model outputs. Results show that the spatial distribution of 24-h accumulated precipitation is well reproduced, and the temporal and spatial distributions of the simulated radar reflectivity agree well with the observations. Then, several sensitive simulations are performed with the identical model configurations, except for different options in microphysical latent heating and surface heat fluxes. From the results, one of the significant findings is that the latent heating from warm rain microphysical processes heats the atmosphere in the initial phase of the precipitation and thus convective systems start by self-triggering and self-organizing, despite the fact that the environmental conditions are not favorable to the occurrence of precipitation event at the initial phase. In the case of the severe precipitation event over the warm sector, both warm and ice microphysical processes are active with the ice microphysics processes activated almost two hours later. According to the sensitive results, there is a very weak precipitation without heavy rainfall belt when microphysical latent heating is turned off. In terms of this precipitation event, the warm microphysics processes play significant roles on precipitation intensity, while the ice microphysics processes have effects on the spatial distribution of precipitation. Both surface sensible and latent heating have effects on the precipitation intensity and spatial distribution. By comparison, the surface sensible heating has a strong influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation

  13. The effect of a heated skate blade on the ice surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hache, A. [Moncton Univ., NB (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2007-05-15

    A new hockey skate using a heated blade, called the Therma Blade, cuts ice friction by half, thereby improving skating performance but has created questions about melting and damage of the ice surface. This paper discussed the effect of the heated skate blade on the ice surface. The paper discussed the thermal power produced by the Therma Blade skate, the ice melting capacity of the therma blade, and the ice temperature profile around the heated blade. It also examined the power dissipation by friction comparing the cold versus the heated blade. Units and definitions as well as conversion factors were also presented in appendix format. Constants and technical specifications were listed in an appendix. It was concluded that the maximum melting capacity of the therma blade is 0.7 grams of ice per skate per minute. This is the upper limit as set by the laws of physics, and this requires the skate to be completely static over ice at 0 degrees Celsius and all the power drawn by the battery to reach the ice friction force. 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  14. Rapid killing of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) on surfaces using heat: application to luggage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The resistance of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) to chemical insecticides has motivated the development of non-chemical control methods such as heat treatment. However, because bed bugs tend to hide in cracks or crevices, their behavior incidentally generates a thermally insulated microenvironment for themselves. Bed bugs located on the outer surface of luggage are less insulated and potentially more vulnerable to brief heat treatment. Soft-sided suitcases with adult male bed bugs on the outside were exposed to an air temperature of 70-75 °C. It took 6 min to kill all of the bed bugs, even those that had concealed themselves under zipper flaps or decorative piping. During heating, only one bed bug (out of 250 in total) moved into the luggage (through a closed zipper). Over long periods of time (24 h) at room temperature, adult male bed bugs on the exterior of luggage only infrequently moved inside; only 3% (5/170) had moved inside during 24 h. Brief exterior heat treatment of luggage is a promising way to reduce the spread of bed bugs being transported on the outer surface of luggage. This treatment will not kill bed bugs inside the luggage, but could be a component of integrated management for this pest. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  16. Surface-selective laser sintering of thermolabile polymer particles using water as heating sensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, E. N.; Krotova, L. I.; Minaev, N. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Mironov, A. V.; Popov, V. K.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    We report the implementation of a novel scheme for surface-selective laser sintering (SSLS) of polymer particles, based on using water as a sensitizer of laser heating and sintering of particles as well as laser radiation at a wavelength of 1.94 μm, corresponding to the strong absorption band of water. A method of sintering powders of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), a hydrophobic bioresorbable polymer, after modifying its surface with an aqueous solution of hyaluronic acid is developed. The sintering thresholds for wetted polymer are by 3 - 4 times lower than those for sintering in air. The presence of water restricts the temperature of the heated polymer, preventing its thermal destruction. Polymer matrices with a developed porous structure are obtained. The proposed SSLS method can be applied to produce bioresorbable polymer matrices for tissue engineering.

  17. Surface-selective laser sintering of thermolabile polymer particles using water as heating sensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, E N; Krotova, L I; Minaev, N V; Minaeva, S A; Mironov, A V; Popov, V K [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies of the Russian Academy of Sciencies, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bagratashvili, V N [Department of Chemistry, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    We report the implementation of a novel scheme for surface-selective laser sintering (SSLS) of polymer particles, based on using water as a sensitizer of laser heating and sintering of particles as well as laser radiation at a wavelength of 1.94 μm, corresponding to the strong absorption band of water. A method of sintering powders of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), a hydrophobic bioresorbable polymer, after modifying its surface with an aqueous solution of hyaluronic acid is developed. The sintering thresholds for wetted polymer are by 3 – 4 times lower than those for sintering in air. The presence of water restricts the temperature of the heated polymer, preventing its thermal destruction. Polymer matrices with a developed porous structure are obtained. The proposed SSLS method can be applied to produce bioresorbable polymer matrices for tissue engineering. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Analysis of the Effects of Vitiates on Surface Heat Flux in Ground Tests of Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Vincent; Gaffney, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    To achieve the high enthalpy conditions associated with hypersonic flight, many ground test facilities burn fuel in the air upstream of the test chamber. Unfortunately, the products of combustion contaminate the test gas and alter gas properties and the heat fluxes associated with aerodynamic heating. The difference in the heating rates between clean air and a vitiated test medium needs to be understood so that the thermal management system for hypersonic vehicles can be properly designed. This is particularly important for advanced hypersonic vehicle concepts powered by air-breathing propulsion systems that couple cooling requirements, fuel flow rates, and combustor performance by flowing fuel through sub-surface cooling passages to cool engine components and preheat the fuel prior to combustion. An analytical investigation was performed comparing clean air to a gas vitiated with methane/oxygen combustion products to determine if variations in gas properties contributed to changes in predicted heat flux. This investigation started with simple relationships, evolved into writing an engineering-level code, and ended with running a series of CFD cases. It was noted that it is not possible to simultaneously match all of the gas properties between clean and vitiated test gases. A study was then conducted selecting various combinations of freestream properties for a vitiated test gas that matched clean air values to determine which combination of parameters affected the computed heat transfer the least. The best combination of properties to match was the free-stream total sensible enthalpy, dynamic pressure, and either the velocity or Mach number. This combination yielded only a 2% difference in heating. Other combinations showed departures of up to 10% in the heat flux estimate.

  19. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  20. Performance Evaluation Criterion at Equal Pumping Power for Enhanced Performance Heat Transfer Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Karwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing equations for the thermal performance evaluation, at equal pumping power for the artificially roughened and smooth surfaced multitube and rectangular duct heat exchangers, have been critically reviewed because the literature survey indicates that a large number of researchers have not interpreted these equations correctly. Three of the most widely used equations have been restated with clearly defined constraints and conditions for their application. Two new equations have been developed for the design constraints not covered earlier.

  1. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENCY OF SURFACE EMISSIVITY ON HEAT TRANSFER USING THE PARAMETERIZED PERTURBATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Jalaal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the temperature dependence of the physical properties such surface emissivity, which controls the radiative problem, is fundamental for determining the thermal balance of many scientific and industrial processes. The current work studies the ability of a strong analytical method called parameterized perturbation method (PPM, which unlike classic perturbation method do not need small parameter, for nonlinear heat transfer equations. The results are compared with the numerical Runge-Kutta method showed good agreement.

  2. Heat Transfer and Mass Diffusion in Nanofluids over a Moving Permeable Convective Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and mass diffusion in nanofluid over a permeable moving surface are investigated. The surface exhibits convective boundary conditions and constant mass diffusion. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are considered. The resulting partial differential equations are reduced into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using suitable transformations. Shooting technique is implemented for the numerical solution. Velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are analyzed for different key parameters entering into the problem. Performed comparative study shows an excellent agreement with the previous analysis.

  3. Experimental investigation of picoliter liquid drops evaporation on a heated solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, D. P.; Zaitsev, D. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a study of the evaporation of sessile picoliter liquid drops on a heated solid surface. It has been shown that during evaporation diameter of the drop is almost constant (the contact line is pinned) and starts to decrease only at the final moment of drop life. It has been shown that the specific evaporation rate of a droplet (droplet weight loss per unit time per unit droplet surface area) is not constant over time: it gradually grows with time up to a maximum, but at the final stage, when the height of the drop becomes on the order of 1 μm, it decreases rapidly.

  4. Effect of Laser Feeding on Heat Treated Aluminium Alloy Surface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labisz K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the investigation results concerning microstructure as well as mechanical properties of the surface layer of cast aluminium-silicon-copper alloy after heat treatment alloyed and/ or remelted with SiC ceramic powder using High Power Diode Laser (HPDL. For investigation of the achieved structure following methods were used: light and scanning electron microscopy with EDS microanalysis as well as mechanical properties using Rockwell hardness tester were measured. By mind of scanning electron microscopy, using secondary electron detection was it possible to determine the distribution of ceramic SiC powder phase occurred in the alloy after laser treatment. After the laser surface treatment carried out on the previously heat treated aluminium alloys, in the structure are observed changes concerning the distribution and morphology of the alloy phases as well as the added ceramic powder, these features influence the hardness of the obtained layers. In the structure, there were discovered three zones: the remelting zone (RZ the heat influence zone (HAZ and transition zone, with different structure and properties. In this paper also the laser treatment conditions: the laser power and ceramic powder feed rate were investigated. The surface laser structure changes in a manner, that there zones are revealed in the form of. This carried out investigations make it possible to develop, interesting technology, which could be very attractive for different branches of industry.

  5. Trends of urban surface temperature and heat island characteristics in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benas, Nikolaos; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios; Cartalis, Constantinos

    2017-11-01

    Urban air temperature studies usually focus on the urban canopy heat island phenomenon, whereby the city center experiences higher near surface air temperatures compared to its surrounding non-urban areas. The Land Surface Temperature (LST) is used instead of urban air temperature to identify the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI). In this study, the nighttime LST and SUHI characteristics and trends in the seventeen largest Mediterranean cities were investigated, by analyzing satellite observations for the period 2001-2012. SUHI averages and trends were based on an innovative approach of comparing urban pixels to randomly selected non-urban pixels, which carries the potential to better standardize satellite-derived SUHI estimations. A positive trend for both LST and SUHI for the majority of the examined cities was documented. Furthermore, a 0.1 °C decade-1 increase in urban LST corresponded to an increase in SUHI by about 0.04 °C decade-1. A longitudinal differentiation was found in the urban LST trends, with higher positive values appearing in the eastern Mediterranean. Examination of urban infrastructure and development factors during the same period revealed correlations with SUHI trends, which can be used to explain differences among cities. However, the majority of the cities examined show considerably increased trends in terms of the enhancement of SUHI. These findings are considered important so as to promote sustainable urbanization, as well as to support the development of heat island adaptation and mitigation plans in the Mediterranean.

  6. In-situ imaging of tungsten surface modification under ITER-like transient heat loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Vasilyev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research on behavior of rolled tungsten plates under intense transient heat loads generated by a powerful (a total power of up to 7 MW long-pulse (0.1–0.3ms electron beam with full irradiation area of 2 cm2 was carried out. Imaging of the sample by the fast CCD cameras in the NIR range and with illumination by the 532nm continuous-wave laser was applied for in-situ surface diagnostics during exposure. In these experiments tungsten plates were exposed to heat loads 0.5–1MJ/m2 with a heat flux factor (Fhf close to and above the melting threshold of tungsten at initial room temperature. Crack formation and crack propagation under the surface layer were observed during multiple exposures. Overheated areas with excessive temperature over surrounding surface of about 500K were found on severely damaged samples more than 5ms after beam ending. The application of laser illumination enables to detect areas of intense tungsten melting near crack edges and crack intersections.

  7. Surface thermal analysis of North Brabant cities and neighbourhoods during heat waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyre Echevarria Icaza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect is often associated with large metropolises. However, in the Netherlands even small cities will be affected by the phenomenon in the future (Hove et al., 2011, due to the dispersed or mosaic urbanisation patterns in particularly the southern part of the country: the province of North Brabant. This study analyses the average night time land surface temperature (LST of 21 North-Brabant urban areas through 22 satellite images retrieved by Modis 11A1 during the 2006 heat wave and uses Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper to map albedo and normalized difference temperature index (NDVI values. Albedo, NDVI and imperviousness are found to play the most relevant role in the increase of night-time LST. The surface cover cluster analysis of these three parameters reveals that the 12 “urban living environment” categories used in the region of North Brabant can actually be reduced to 7 categories, which simplifies the design guidelines to improve the surface thermal behaviour of the different neighbourhoods thus reducing the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect in existing medium size cities and future developments adjacent to those cities.

  8. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface...... months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees...... in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce...

  9. Stochastic clustering of material surface under high-heat plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, Viacheslav P.

    2017-11-01

    The results of a study of a surface formed by high-temperature plasma loads on various materials such as tungsten, carbon and stainless steel are presented. High-temperature plasma irradiation leads to an inhomogeneous stochastic clustering of the surface with self-similar granularity - fractality on the scale from nanoscale to macroscales. Cauliflower-like structure of tungsten and carbon materials are formed under high heat plasma load in fusion devices. The statistical characteristics of hierarchical granularity and scale invariance are estimated. They differ qualitatively from the roughness of the ordinary Brownian surface, which is possibly due to the universal mechanisms of stochastic clustering of material surface under the influence of high-temperature plasma.

  10. The effect of shallow groundwater on soil temperature and soil heat flux near land surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhaier, F.; Su, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Using soil temperature oscillations, the present study investigates the effect of shallow groundwater on land surface. Although some previous studies restricted the effect of shallow groundwater on soil temperature to one meter depth, this study showed that this effect can be up to the very near land surface. Soil temperature readings (taken every ten minutes for six days at two depths -approximately 5 and 10 cm- and in seven locations of different water table depth) were analysed and correlated to water table depth. The results showed strong relations between water table depth and both average and amplitudes of soil temperature oscillations at land surface. This study also showed that shallow groundwater can affect the energy balance at land surface by affecting the magnitude of soil heat flux. These effects were explained using both conceptual and numerical models. The findings of this study pave the way for future studies of detecting shallow groundwater depth using remote sensing. Also they recommend further attention to including the effect of shallow groundwater on energy balance in land surface models. Keywords: Shallow groundwater, Soil temperature, Soil heat flux.

  11. Methods of increasing net work output of organic Rankine cycles for low-grade waste heat recovery with a detailed analysis using a zeotropic working fluid mixture and scroll expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Brandon Jay

    An organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is a thermodynamic cycle that is well-suited for waste heat recovery. It is generally employed for waste heat with temperatures in the range of 80 °C -- 300 °C. When the application is strictly to convert waste heat into work, thermal efficiency is not recommended as a key performance metric. In such an application, maximization of the net power output should be the objective rather than maximization of the thermal efficiency. Two alternative cycle configurations that can increase the net power produced from a heat source with a given temperature and flow rate are proposed and analyzed. These cycle configurations are 1) an ORC with two-phase flash expansion and 2) an ORC with a zeotropic working fluid mixture (ZRC). A design-stage ORC model is presented for consistent comparison of multiple ORC configurations. The finite capacity of the heat source and heat sink fluids is a key consideration in this model. Of all working fluids studied for the baseline ORC, R134a and R245fa yield the highest net power output from a given heat source. Results of the design-stage model indicate that the ORC with two-phase flash expansion offers the most improvement over the baseline ORC. However, the level of improvement that could be achieved in practice is highly uncertain due to the requirement of highly efficient two-phase expansion. The ZRC shows improvement over the baseline as long as the condenser fan power requirement is not negligible. At the highest estimated condenser fan power, the ZRC shows the most improvement, while the ORC with flash expansion is no longer beneficial. The ZRC was selected for detailed study because it does not require two-phase expansion. An experimental test rig was used to evaluate baseline ORC performance with R134a and with R245fa. The ZRC was tested on the same rig with a mixture of 62.5% R134a and 37.5% R245fa. The tested expander is a minimally-modified, of-the-shelf automotive scroll compressor. The high

  12. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Professor of. Computer Science and. Automation at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His research interests are broadly in the areas of stochastic modeling and scheduling methodologies for future factories; and object oriented modeling. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Petri Nets. 1. Overview and Foundations.

  13. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Petri Nets - Overview and Foundations. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department ot Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  14. Analysis of the dual phase lag bio-heat transfer equation with constant and time-dependent heat flux conditions on skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziaei Poor Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on temperature response of skin tissue due to time-dependent surface heat fluxes. Analytical solution is constructed for DPL bio-heat transfer equation with constant, periodic and pulse train heat flux conditions on skin surface. Separation of variables and Duhamel’s theorem for a skin tissue as a finite domain are employed. The transient temperature responses for constant and time-dependent boundary conditions are obtained and discussed. The results show that there is major discrepancy between the predicted temperature of parabolic (Pennes bio-heat transfer, hyperbolic (thermal wave and DPL bio-heat transfer models when high heat flux accidents on the skin surface with a short duration or propagation speed of thermal wave is finite. The results illustrate that the DPL model reduces to the hyperbolic model when τT approaches zero and the classic Fourier model when both thermal relaxations approach zero. However for τq = τT the DPL model anticipates different temperature distribution with that predicted by the Pennes model. Such discrepancy is due to the blood perfusion term in energy equation. It is in contrast to results from the literature for pure conduction material, where the DPL model approaches the Fourier heat conduction model when τq = τT . The burn injury is also investigated.

  15. A comparison of optical and microwave scintillometers with eddy covariance derived surface heat fluxes

    KAUST Repository

    Yee, Mei Sun

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurements of energy fluxes between land and atmosphere are important for understanding and modeling climatic patterns. Several methods are available to measure heat fluxes, and scintillometers are becoming increasingly popular because of their ability to measure sensible (. H) and latent (. LvE) heat fluxes over large spatial scales. The main motivation of this study was to test the use of different methods and technologies to derive surface heat fluxes.Measurements of H and LvE were carried out with an eddy covariance (EC) system, two different makes of optical large aperture scintillometers (LAS) and two microwave scintillometers (MWS) with different frequencies at a pasture site in a semi-arid environment of New South Wales, Australia. We used the EC measurements as a benchmark. Fluxes derived from the EC system and LAS systems agreed (R2>0.94), whereas the MWS systems measured lower H (bias ~60Wm-2) and larger LvE (bias ~65Wm-2) than EC. When the scintillometers were compared against each other, the two LASs showed good agreement of H (R2=0.98), while MWS with different frequencies and polarizations led to different results. Combination of LAS and MWS measurements (i.e., two wavelength method) resulted in performance that fell in between those estimated using either LAS or MWS alone when compared with the EC system. The cause for discrepancies between surface heat fluxes derived from the EC system and those from the MWS systems and the two-wavelength method are possibly related to inaccurate assignment of the structure parameter of temperature and humidity. Additionally, measurements from MWSs can be associated with two values of the Bowen ratio, thereby leading to uncertainties in the estimation of the fluxes. While only one solution has been considered in this study, when LvE was approximately less than 200Wm-2, the alternate solution may be more accurate. Therefore, for measurements of surface heat fluxes in a semi-arid or dry environment, the

  16. Heat

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible to make heat by rubbing your hands together? Why does an ice cube melt when you hold it? In this title, students will conduct experiments to help them understand what heat is. Kids will also investigate concepts such as which materials are good at conducting heat and which are the best insulators. Using everyday items that can easily be found around the house, students will transform into scientists as they carry out step-by-step experiments to answer interesting questions. Along the way, children will pick up important scientific skills. Heat includes seven experiments with detailed, age-appropriate instructions, surprising facts and background information, a "conclusions" section to pull all the concepts in the book together, and a glossary of science words. Colorful, dynamic designs and images truly put the FUN into FUN-damental Experiments.

  17. Evolution of surface sensible heat over the Tibetan Plateau under the recent global warming hiatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lihua; Huang, Gang; Fan, Guangzhou; Qu, Xia; Zhao, Guijie; Hua, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Based on regular surface meteorological observations and NCEP/DOE reanalysis data, this study investigates the evolution of surface sensible heat (SH) over the central and eastern Tibetan Plateau (CE-TP) under the recent global warming hiatus. The results reveal that the SH over the CE-TP presents a recovery since the slowdown of the global warming. The restored surface wind speed together with increased difference in ground-air temperature contribute to the recovery in SH. During the global warming hiatus, the persistent weakening wind speed is alleviated due to the variation of the meridional temperature gradient. Meanwhile, the ground surface temperature and the difference in ground-air temperature show a significant increasing trend in that period caused by the increased total cloud amount, especially at night. At nighttime, the increased total cloud cover reduces the surface effective radiation via a strengthening of atmospheric counter radiation and subsequently brings about a clear upward trend in ground surface temperature and the difference in ground-air temperature. Cloud-radiation feedback plays a significant role in the evolution of the surface temperature and even SH during the global warming hiatus. Consequently, besides the surface wind speed, the difference in ground-air temperature becomes another significant factor for the variation in SH since the slowdown of global warming, particularly at night.

  18. Comparative Assessment of Satellite-Retrieved Surface Net Radiation: An Examination on CERES and SRB Datasets in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xin Pan; Yuanbo Liu; Xingwang Fan

    2015-01-01

    ...) and the Surface Radiation Budget project (SRB) products, respectively, with quality-controlled radiation data from 50 meteorological stations in China for the period from March 2000 to December 2007...

  19. A COUPLED LAND-SURFACE AND DRY DEPOSITION MODEL AND COMPARISON TO FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE HEAT, MOISTURE, AND OZONE FLUXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have developed a coupled land-surface and dry deposition model for realistic treatment of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and chemical dry deposition within a comprehensive air quality modeling system. A new land-surface model (LSM) with explicit treatment of soil moisture...

  20. The Effects of Heat Treatment on the Physical Properties and Surface Roughness of Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna L. Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Çakıcıer

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment is often used to improve the dimensional stability of wood. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on the physical properties and surface roughness of Turkish Hazel (Corylus colurna L. wood were examined. Samples obtained from Kastamonu Forest Enterprises, Turkey, were subjected to heat treatment at varying temperatures and for different durations. The physical properties of heat-treated and control samples were tested, and oven-dry density, air-dry density, and swelling properties were determined. A stylus method was employed to evaluate the surface characteristics of the samples. Roughness measurements, using the stylus method, wereb made in the direction perpendicular to the fiber. Four main roughness parameters, mean arithmetic deviation of profile (Ra, mean peak-to-valley height (Rz, root mean square roughness (Rq, and maximum roughness (Ry obtained from the surface of wood were used to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the surface characteristics of the specimens. Significant difference was determined (p = 0.05 between physical properties and surface roughness parameters (Ra,Rz, Ry, Rq for three temperatures and three durations of heat treatment. The results showed that the values of density, swelling and surface roughness decreased with increasing temperature treatment and treatment times. Turkish Hazel wood could be utilized successfully by applying proper heat treatment techniques without any losses in investigated parameters. This is vital in areas, such as window frames, where working stability and surface smoothness are important factors.

  1. Representing the Australian Heat Low in a GCM Using Different Surface and Cloud Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Allcock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The high insolation during the Southern Hemisphere summer leads to the development of a heat low over north-west Australia, which is a significant feature of the monsoon circulation. It is therefore important that General Circulation Models (GCMs are able to represent this feature well in order to adequately represent the Australian Monsoon. Given that there are many different configurations of GCMs used globally (such as those used as part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, it is difficult to assess the underlying causes of the differences in circulation between such GCMs. In order to address this problem, the work presented here makes use of three different configurations of the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS. The configurations incorporate changes to the surface parameterization, cloud parameterization, and both together (surface and cloud while keeping all other parameterized processes unchanged. The work finds that the surface scheme has a larger impact on the heat low than the cloud scheme, which is caused by differences in the soil thermal inertia. This study also finds that the differences in the circulation caused by changing the cloud and surface schemes together are the linear sum of the individual perturbations (i.e., no nonlinear interaction.

  2. Evolution of steam-water flow structure under subcooled water boiling at smooth and structured heating surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, N. V.; Zeigarnik, Yu A.; Khodakov, K. A.

    2017-11-01

    Experimentally studying of subcooled water boiling in rectangular channel electrically heated from one side was conducted. Flat surfaces, both smooth and coated by microarc oxidation technology, were used as heating surfaces. The tests were conducted at atmospheric pressure in the range of mass flow rate from 650 to 1300 kg/(m2 s) and water subcooling relative to saturation temperature from 23 to 75 °C. Using high-speed filming a change in the two-phase flow structure and its statistic characteristics (nucleation sites density, vapor bubble distribution by size, etc.) were studied. With an increase in the heat flux density (with the mass flow rate and subcooling being the same) and amount and size of the vapor bubbles increased also. At a relatively high heat flux density, non-spherical vapor agglomerates appeared at the heating surface as a result of coalescence of small bubbles. They originated in chaotic manner in arbitrary points of the heating surface and then after random evolution in form and size collapsed. The agglomerate size reached several millimeters and their duration of life was several milliseconds. After formation of large vapor agglomerates, with a further small increase in heat flux density a burnout of the heating surface occurred. In most cases the same effect took place if the large agglomerates were retained for several minutes.

  3. Lee-surface heating and flow phenomena on space shuttle orbiters at large angles of attack and hypersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, J. N.

    1972-01-01

    The lee-surface flow phenomena on a delta-wing orbiter and a straight-wing orbiter have been investigated at angles of attack between 0 deg and 50 deg at a Mach number of 6. Limited studies of the delta-wing orbiter were conducted at a Mach number of 19. Heat-transfer data, pressure distributions, and oil-flow studies were employed to experimentally examine the nature of the surface flow and the severity of the lee-surface heating. The effects of Reynolds number on the flow field and heating were investigated. Problem areas are defined and areas for further study are recommended.

  4. Mass Transfer and MHD Effects on Unsteady Porous Stretching Surface Embedded in a Porous Medium With Variable Heat Flux in The Presence of Heat Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Ramana REDDY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady two dimensional boundary layer flowof a viscous, incompressible, electrically conducting fluid over aporous stretching surface embedded in a porous medium in thepresence of heat source or sink is studied in chapter 7. Theunsteadiness in the flow and temperature fields is caused by thetime dependence of the stretching velocity and the surface heatflux. The governing partial differential equations aretransformed into a system of ordinary differential equationsusing similarity variables, which is then solved numerically byapplying shooting method using Runge-Kutta method. Thesolution is found to be dependent on the governing parametersincluding the Prandtl number, porous parameter, heat source/sink parameter, suction or injection parameter andunsteadiness parameter. Comparison of numerical results ismade with previously published results under the special cases,and found to be in good agreement. Effects of the Prandtlnumber, porous parameter, heat source /sink parameter, suctionor injection parameter and unsteadiness parameter on the flowand heat transfer are examined.

  5. Unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical stretching surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Cai

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient.

  6. Unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical stretching surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenli; Su, Ning; Liu, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of thermal radiation on unsteady convection flow and heat transfer over a vertical permeable stretching surface in porous medium, where the effects of temperature dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity are also considered. By using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent boundary layer equations for momentum and thermal energy are first transformed into coupled, non-linear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Numerical solutions to these equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions are obtained by the numerical shooting technique with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta scheme. Numerical results show that as viscosity variation parameter increases both the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient increase whereas the temperature decreases slightly. With the increase of viscosity variation parameter, the velocity decreases near the sheet surface but increases far away from the surface of the sheet in the boundary layer. The increase in permeability parameter leads to the decrease in both the temperature and the absolute value of the surface friction coefficient, and the increase in both the velocity and the absolute value of the surface temperature gradient.

  7. High-Resolution Profiling of Richardson Number Across the Surface Boundary Layer Using Heated Fiber Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayde, C.; Higgins, C. W.; Perdosa, R.; Mahaffee, W.; Selker, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Most critical atmospheric processes are a balance between buoyancy and shear, typically measured with the Richardson number. The fine scale motions associated with critical or near critical valued of Richardson number are understudied because the location and timing of these events are not known a-priori. To study these motions and quantify their importance for transport of heat momentum and water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer, a distributed measurement approach for temperature and wind speed is required. Here we present the results of 12.5 cm resolution distributed profiling of wind speed and temperature for the first 37 m of the surface boundary layer. Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology was employed to measure temperature every 5 s and 12.5 cm along two Fiber Optics (FO) cables suspended from 37 m elevation to ground by a blimp anchored above a vineyard in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. 3D printed FO holders installed every 3 m along the suspended FO cables insured constant spacing of 7.5 cm between the two cables. The first FO cable was 0.9mm in diameter and reported ambient air temperature. The second FO cable was embedded in a thin stainless steel tube (1.3 mm OD) continuously heated by an electrical current to provide continuous wind speed measurements every 12.5 cm along the heated cable. Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, this approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. The co-located wind speed and ambient temperature measurements are used to calculate Richardson number with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12.5 cm and 5 s respectively for the first 37 m of the surface boundary layer. The equipment employed, including the heating system, which is available to all US scientists, was provided by CTEMPs.org thanks to the generous grant support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number EAR 0930061. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in

  8. Study of the influence of shear in a scraped surface heat exchanger; Etude de l'influence du cisaillement dans un echangeur de chaleur a surface raclee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabit, J.; Loisel, C.; Fayolle, F.; Legrand, J.

    2001-07-01

    This study analyzes the swelling of starch in a scraped surface heat exchanger and the role played by the shear stresses generated by the rotor blades on the additional swelling of starch grains. (J.S.)

  9. Calorimetry Minisensor for the Localised Measurement of Surface Heat Dissipated from the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, Fabiola; Rodríguez de Rivera, Pedro Jesús; Rodríguez de Rivera, Manuel

    2016-11-06

    We have developed a calorimetry sensor that can perform a local measurement of the surface heat dissipated from the human body. The operating principle is based on the law of conductive heat transfer: heat dissipated by the human body passes across a thermopile located between the individual and a thermostat. Body heat power is calculated from the signals measured by the thermopile and the amount of power dissipated across the thermostat in order to maintain a constant temperature. The first prototype we built had a detection area measuring 6 × 6 cm², while the second prototype, which is described herein, had a 2 × 2 cm² detection area. This new design offers three advantages over the initial one: (1) greater resolution and three times greater thermal sensitivity; (2) a twice as fast response; and (3) it can take measurements from smaller areas of the body. The sensor has a 5 mW resolution, but the uncertainty is greater, up to 15 mW, due to the measurement and calculation procedure. The order of magnitude of measurements made in healthy subjects ranged from 60 to 300 mW at a thermostat temperature of 28 °C and an ambient room temperature of 21 °C. The values measured by the sensor depend on the ambient temperature and the thermostat's temperature, while the power dissipated depends on the individual's metabolism and any physical and/or emotional activity.

  10. Heat strain and hydration status of surface mine blast crew workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew P; Parker, Anthony W; Stewart, Ian B

    2014-04-01

    Dehydration and symptoms of heat illness are common among the surface mining workforce. This investigation aimed to determine whether heat strain and hydration status exceeded recommended limits. Fifteen blast crew personnel operating in the tropics were monitored across a 12-hour shift. Heart rate, core body temperature, and urine-specific gravity were continuously recorded. Participants self-reported fluid consumption and completed a heat illness symptom inventory. Core body temperature averaged 37.46 ± 0.13°C, with the group maximum 37.98 ± 0.19°C. Mean urine-specific gravity was 1.024 ± 0.007, with 78.6% of samples 1.020 or more. Seventy-three percent of workers reported at least one symptom of heat illness during the shift. Core body temperature remained within the recommended limits; however, more than 80% of workers were dehydrated before commencing the shift, and tended to remain so for the duration.

  11. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  12. Toronto’s Urban Heat Island—Exploring the Relationship between Land Use and Surface Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Hussain

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect is linked to the built environment and threatens human health during extreme heat events. In this study, we analyzed whether characteristic land uses within an urban area are associated with higher or lower surface temperatures, and whether concentrations of “hot” land uses exacerbate this relationship. Zonal statistics on a thermal remote sensing image for the City of Toronto revealed statistically significant differences between high average temperatures for commercial and resource/industrial land use (29.1 °C, and low average temperatures for parks and recreational land (25.1 °C and water bodies (23.1 °C. Furthermore, higher concentrations of either of these land uses were associated with more extreme surface temperatures. We also present selected neighborhoods to illustrate these results. The paper concludes by recommending that municipal planners and decision-makers formulate policies and regulations that are specific to the problematic land uses, in order to mitigate extreme heat.

  13. Modelling reduction of urban heat load in Vienna by modifying surface properties of roofs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žuvela-Aloise, Maja; Andre, Konrad; Schwaiger, Hannes; Bird, David Neil; Gallaun, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The study examines the potential of urban roofs to reduce the urban heat island (UHI) effect by changing their reflectivity and implementing vegetation (green roofs) using the example of the City of Vienna. The urban modelling simulations are performed based on high-resolution orography and land use data, climatological observations, surface albedo values from satellite imagery and registry of the green roof potential in Vienna. The modelling results show that a moderate increase in reflectivity of roofs (up to 0.45) reduces the mean summer temperatures in the densely built-up environment by approximately 0.25 °C. Applying high reflectivity materials (roof albedo up to 0.7) leads to average cooling in densely built-up area of approximately 0.5 °C. The green roofs yield a heat load reduction in similar order of magnitude as the high reflectivity materials. However, only 45 % of roof area in Vienna is suitable for greening and the green roof potential mostly applies to industrial areas in city outskirts and is therefore not sufficient for substantial reduction of the UHI effect, particularly in the city centre which has the highest heat load. The strongest cooling effect can be achieved by combining the green roofs with high reflectivity materials. In this case, using 50 or 100 % of the green roof potential and applying high reflectivity materials on the remaining surfaces have a similar cooling effect.

  14. Surface design with self-heating smart polymers for on–off switchable traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prapatsorn Techawanitchai, Kazuya Yamamoto, Mitsuhiro Ebara and Takao Aoyagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel self-heating, temperature-responsive chromatography system for the effective separation of biomolecules. Temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-hydroxymethylacrylamide, poly(NIPAAm-co-HMAAm, was covalently grafted onto the surface of magnetite/silica composites as 'on-off' switchable surface traps. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST of the poly(NIPAAm-co-HMAAms was controlled from 35 to 55 °C by varying the HMAAm content. Using the heat generated by magnetic particles in an alternating magnetic field (AMF we were able to induce the hydrophilic to hydrophobic phase separation of the grafted temperature-responsive polymers. To assess the feasibility of the poly(NIPAAm-co-HMAAm-grafted magnetite/silica particles as the stationary phase for chromatography, we packed the particles into the glass column of a liquid chromatography system and analyzed the elusion profiles for steroids. The retention time for hydrophobic steroids markedly increased in the AMF, because the hydrophobic interaction was enhanced via self-heating of the grafted magnetite/silica particles, and this effect could be controlled by changing the AMF irradiation time. Turning off the AMF shortened the total analysis time for steroids. The proposed system is useful for separating bioactive compounds because their elution profiles can be easily controlled by an AMF.

  15. Surface design with self-heating smart polymers for on-off switchable traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techawanitchai, Prapatsorn; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Aoyagi, Takao

    2011-08-01

    We have developed a novel self-heating, temperature-responsive chromatography system for the effective separation of biomolecules. Temperature-responsive poly( N -isopropylacrylamide- co - N -hydroxymethylacrylamide), poly(NIPAAm- co -HMAAm), was covalently grafted onto the surface of magnetite/silica composites as 'on-off' switchable surface traps. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the poly(NIPAAm- co -HMAAm)s was controlled from 35 to 55 °C by varying the HMAAm content. Using the heat generated by magnetic particles in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) we were able to induce the hydrophilic to hydrophobic phase separation of the grafted temperature-responsive polymers. To assess the feasibility of the poly(NIPAAm- co -HMAAm)-grafted magnetite/silica particles as the stationary phase for chromatography, we packed the particles into the glass column of a liquid chromatography system and analyzed the elusion profiles for steroids. The retention time for hydrophobic steroids markedly increased in the AMF, because the hydrophobic interaction was enhanced via self-heating of the grafted magnetite/silica particles, and this effect could be controlled by changing the AMF irradiation time. Turning off the AMF shortened the total analysis time for steroids. The proposed system is useful for separating bioactive compounds because their elution profiles can be easily controlled by an AMF.

  16. Stable water isotope and surface heat flux simulation using ISOLSM: Evaluation against in-situ measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Mick Y.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotopes of water are useful tracers of water sources and hydrological processes. Stable water isotope-enabled land surface modeling is a relatively new approach for characterizing the hydrological cycle, providing spatial and temporal variability for a number of hydrological processes. At the land surface, the integration of stable water isotopes with other meteorological measurements can assist in constraining surface heat flux estimates and discriminate between evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). However, research in this area has traditionally been limited by a lack of continuous in-situ isotopic observations. Here, the National Centre for Atmospheric Research stable isotope-enabled Land Surface Model (ISOLSM) is used to simulate the water and energy fluxes and stable water isotope variations. The model was run for a period of one month with meteorological data collected from a coastal sub-tropical site near Sydney, Australia. The modeled energy fluxes (latent heat and sensible heat) agreed reasonably well with eddy covariance observations, indicating that ISOLSM has the capacity to reproduce observed flux behavior. Comparison of modeled isotopic compositions of evapotranspiration (ET) against in-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measured bulk water vapor isotopic data (10. m above the ground), however, showed differences in magnitude and temporal patterns. The disparity is due to a small contribution from local ET fluxes to atmospheric boundary layer water vapor (~1% based on calculations using ideal gas law) relative to that advected from the ocean for this particular site. Using ISOLSM simulation, the ET was partitioned into E and T with 70% being T. We also identified that soil water from different soil layers affected T and E differently based on the simulated soil isotopic patterns, which reflects the internal working of ISOLSM. These results highlighted the capacity of using the isotope-enabled models to discriminate

  17. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  18. Investigation of heat transfer on surface mount packages for different chip materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdzan, N.; Aziz, M. H. B. A.; Ong, N. R.; Alcain, J. B.; Sauli, Z.

    2017-09-01

    The allocation and design placement of devices consisting of thermal sensitive units and poor thermal design can affect the device performance and damage the device in the worst case scenario. This study investigates the effect of thermal performance on the surface mount package corresponding to difference chip material. COMSOL Multiphysics software was used to assess the thermal effect on the electronic package. All the simulations are conducted under an identical simulation environment. The heat is transferred from the chip through the mount package to the surroundings by conduction. Besides that, thermal conduction mechanism happens among the components and thermal convection occurs on the air-exposed surface. The temperature of surface mount package was analyzed. The simulation result indicates that the chip material of titanium beta 21s as chip material shows the highest temperature of 48.04°C. While, magnesium as chip material shows the lowest temperature about 43.61°C.

  19. Retrieval of surface heat and moisture fluxes from slow-launched radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric A.; Cooper, Harry J.; Crosson, William L.; Delorey, Donald D.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility experiment to determine whether the Bowden ratio (and indirectly moisture fluxes and surface heat) can be reasonably and accurately derived from thermodynamic measurements obtained from balloon-launched radiosondes is presented. This experiment was conducted during July 1988 in Tallahassee, Florida using an airsonde system and a surface radiation and energy budget station. The airsonde system consists of a balloon-launched airsonde, which measures vertical profiles of atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, temperature, and an automatic data acquisition system, which receives and records sensor output from the airsonde package. Intercomparisons were made between Bowen ratios derived from the airsonde profiles and the Bowen ratios measured directly by the energy budget station and the surface radiation.

  20. Determination of regional surface heat fluxes over heterogeneous landscapes by integrating satellite remote sensing with boundary layer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.M.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: satellite remote sensing, surface layer observations, atmospheric boundary layer observations, land surface variables, vegetation variables, land surface heat fluxes, validation, heterogeneous landscape,

  1. Determination of regional surface heat fluxes over heterogeneous landscapes by integrating satellite remote sensing with boundary layer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.M.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: satellite remote sensing, surface layer observations, atmospheric boundary layer observations, land surface variables, vegetation variables, land surface heat fluxes, validation, heterogeneous landscape,

  2. Study on the turbulence model sensitivity for various cross-corrugated surfaces applied to matrix type heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Myung; Ha, Man Yeong; Son, Chang Min; Doo, Jeong Hoon; Min, June Kee [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Diverse cross-corrugated surface geometries were considered to estimate the sensitivity of four variants of k-ε turbulence models (Low Reynolds, standard, RNG and realizable models). The cross-corrugated surfaces considered in this study are a conventional sinusoidal shape and two different asymmetric shapes. The numerical simulations using the steady incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations were carried out to obtain the steady solutions of the flow and thermal fields in the unitary cell of the heat exchanger matrix. In addition, the experimental test for the measurement of local convective heat transfer coefficients on the heat transfer surfaces was performed by means of the Transient liquid crystal (TLC) technique in order to compare the numerical results with the measured data. The features on detailed flow structure and corresponding heat transfer in the unitary cell of the matrix type heat exchanger are compared and analyzed against four different turbulence models considered in this study.

  3. Experimental study of the structure of vapor phase during boiling of R134a on heat exchange surfaces of heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, D. A.; Sukhikh, A. A.; Sidenkov, D. V.; Ustinov, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    The heat supply by means of heat pumps is considered now as a rational method of local heating which can lead to economy of primary fuel. At use of low-potential heat, for example, the heat of a ground (5 … 18 °C) or ground waters (8 … 10°C) only small depressing of temperature of these sources (on 3 … 5°C) is possible that demands application of heat exchangers with intensified heatmass transfer surfaces. In thermal laboratory of TOT department the 200 W experimental installation has been developed for research of process of boiling of freon R134a. The principle of action of the installation consists in realisation of reverse thermodynamic cycle and consecutive natural measurement of characteristics of elements of surfaces of heat exchangers of real installations at boiling points of freon from-10°C to +10°C and condensing temperatures from 15°C to 50 °C. The evaporator casing has optical windows for control of process of boiling of freon on ribbed on technology of distorting cut tubes. Temperature measurement in characteristic points of a cycle is provided by copper-constantan thermocouples which by means of ADT are connected to the computer that allows treat results of measurements in a real time mode. The structure of a two-phase flow investigated by means of the optical procedure based on laser technique.

  4. The effect of heat acclimation on sweat microminerals: artifact of surface contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Matthew R; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Chinevere, Troy; Lacher, Craig P; Lukaski, Henry C; Montain, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    Heat acclimation (HA) reportedly conveys conservation in sweat micromineral concentrations when sampled from arm sweat, but time course is unknown. The observation that comprehensive cleaning of the skin surface negates sweat micromineral reductions during prolonged sweating raises the question of whether the reported HA effect is real or artifact of surface contamination. To measure sweat mineral concentrations serially during HA and determine if surface contamination plays a role in the reported mineral reductions. Calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), magnesium (Mg), and zinc (Zn) were measured in sweat obtained from 17 male volunteers using an arm bag on Day 1, 5, and 10 of a HA protocol. To study the role of contamination, sweat was simultaneously (n = 10 subjects) sampled twice daily from a cleaned site (WASH) and unclean site (NO WASH) on the scapular surface. Sweat Ca, Cu, and Mg from Arm Bag trended progressively downward from Day 1 to Day 10 of HA (p = .10-0.25). Micromineral concentrations from the WASH site did not change between Day 1, 5, or 10 (Ca = 0.30 ± 0.12 mmol/L, Cu 0.41 ± 0.53 μmol/L; Zn 1.11 ± 0.80 μmol/L). Surface contamination can confound sweat mineral estimates, as sweat Ca and Cu from NO WASH site were initially higher than WASH (p Heat acclimation does not confer reductions in sweat Ca, Cu, Mg, or Zn. When the skin surface is not cleaned, mineral residue inflates initial sweat mineral concentrations. Earlier reports of micromineral reductions during HA may have been confounded by interday cleaning variability.

  5. Observed Wind Speed at Weather Station and Heat Transfer Coefficient of External Surface of the Building in Summer and Winter

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 定教; コバヤシ, サダノリ; Sadanori, KOBAYASHI

    1994-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficient of the external surface of the building used for thermal load calculations was proposed by Dr. Watanabe et at. in about 1934. In those days the main purpose of studies focused on heating; recently calculations in respect to cooling have been increasing in importance, calling attention to the heat transfer coefficient in summer in relation to the wind speed. In this paper I studied summer and winter wind speeds based on observation results of a weather station, an...

  6. The pulsations of boundary conditions – factor of the rapid wear on heat exchange surfaces in heterogeneous dispersed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodunkov, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    The results of experimental studies of industrial furnace with a fluidized bed reactor. The data on the values of the coefficient of heat transfer, the quality of fluidization and mixing efficiency. In theory shows that there are significant variables of temperature gradients on the walls of the heat exchange elements are qualitative arguments about the causes of increased wear of heat exchange surfaces in a fluidized bed.

  7. The heat generated on the external root surface during post space preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, E M; Saunders, W P

    1989-07-01

    The heat generated on the external root surface of human premolar teeth during post space preparation was measured in vitro. The rise in temperature was recorded at a point 6 mm from the apex of the tooth using a thermocouple attached to a chart recorder. The temperature rise was greatest when the removal of gutta-percha was combined with post channel preparation. Temperature rises of up to 31 degrees C were recorded. Instruments that only removed gutta-percha did not generate the same amount of heat. The results from this study suggest that the use of engine-driven drills to prepare post channels in teeth may generate temperature rises that may cause periradicular tissue damage, and caution should be exercised during their use.

  8. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  9. Noncovalently assembled nanotubular porous layers for delaying of heating surface failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bong June; Hwang, Taeseon; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan; Kim, Kwang Jin

    2014-10-01

    Thermal management to prevent extreme heat surge in integrated electronic systems and nuclear reactors is a critical issue. To delay the thermal surge on the heater effectively, we report the benefit of a three dimensional nanotubular porous layer via noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds). To observe the contribution of individual noncovalent interactions in a porous network formation, pristine carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) and oxidatively functionalized carbon nanotubes (FCNTs) were compared. Hydrogen-bonded interwoven nanotubular porous layer showed approximately two times critical heat flux (CHF) increase compared to that of a plain surface. It is assumed that the hydrophilic group-tethered nanotubular porous wicks and enhanced fluidity are the main causes for promoting the CHF increase. Reinforced hydrophilicity assists liquid spreading and capillarity-induced liquid pumping, which are estimated by using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Also, shear induced thermal conduction, thermal boundary reduction, and rheology of nanoparticles could attribute to CHF enhancement phenomena.

  10. Surface hardening using cw CO2 laser: laser heat treatment, modelation, and experimental work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, German; Alum, Jorge

    1996-02-01

    In the present work are given the results of the application of laser metal surface hardening techniques using a cw carbon dioxide laser as an energy source on steel 65 G. The laser heat treatment results are presented theoretically and experimentally. Continuous wave carbon dioxide laser of 0.6, 0.3, and 0.4 kW were used. A physical model for the descriptions of the thermophysical laser metal interactions process is given and a numerical algorithm is used to solve this problem by means of the LHT code. The results are compared with the corresponding experimental ones and a very good agreement is observed. The LHT code is able to do predictions of transformation hardening by laser heating. These results will be completed with other ones concerning laser alloying and cladding presented in a second paper.

  11. Similarity Solutions for Flow and Heat Transfer of Non-Newtonian Fluid over a Stretching Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta Sojoudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Similarity solutions are carried out for flow of power law non-Newtonian fluid film on unsteady stretching surface subjected to constant heat flux. Free convection heat transfer induces thermal boundary layer within a semi-infinite layer of Boussinesq fluid. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations (PDE governing the flow and the boundary conditions are converted to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE using two-parameter groups. This technique reduces the number of independent variables by two, and finally the obtained ordinary differential equations are solved numerically for the temperature and velocity using the shooting method. The thermal and velocity boundary layers are studied by the means of Prandtl number and non-Newtonian power index plotted in curves.

  12. The post-2002 global surface warming slowdown caused by the subtropical Southern Ocean heating acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, A.; Watanabe, M.

    2017-04-01

    The warming rate of global mean surface temperature slowed down during 1998-2012. Previous studies pointed out role of increasing ocean heat uptake during this global warming slowdown, but its mechanism remains under discussion. Our numerical simulations, in which wind stress anomaly in the equatorial Pacific is imposed from reanalysis data, suggest that subsurface warming in the equatorial Pacific took place during initial phase of the global warming slowdown (1998-2002), as previously reported. It is newly clarified that the Ekman transport from tropics to subtropics is enhanced during the later phase of the slowdown (after 2002) and enhanced subtropical Ekman downwelling causes accelerated heat storage below depth of 700 m in the subtropical Southern Ocean, leading to the post-2002 global warming slowdown. Observational data of ocean temperature also support this scenario. This study provides clear evidence that deeper parts of the Southern Ocean play a critical role in the post-2002 warming slowdown.

  13. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  14. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    . Further analysis has shown that the sea surface anomalies are well correlated to the anomalies of air temperature and latent heat flux values; whereas they are least correlated to the anomalies of wind stress and net radiation values, except over...

  15. Theoretical development of a new surface heat flux calibration method for thin-film resistive temperature gauges and co-axial thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, J. I.; Keyhani, M.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretically developed and computationally demonstrated surface heat flux calibration method applicable to thin-film resistive temperature gauges and co-axial thermocouples. For this study, the physical situation of interest involves hypersonic shock-tunnel studies. For experiments instrumented with these gauges, constant thermophysical properties are assumed since small temperature variations normally occur in the short-duration run times. Extraction of the net surface heat flux is acquired by resolving a newly formulated first-kind Volterra integral equation that contains calibration data. The proposed calibration method is based on an inverse approach which contrasts system identification methods. Several key advantages to this approach are discussed and demonstrated in the context of these gauges. Advantages of the proposed approach include (a) only one unknown "regularization" parameter is required; (b) estimation of the optimal regularization parameter is systematically and theoretically developed and demonstrated through the energy residuals, (c) computational coding is minimal and computer run times are short, and (d) results indicate robustness, stability and accuracy in the methodology. This calibration formulation and its subsequent regularized numerical method do not explicitly require the thermal effusivity, sqrt{ρ C k} owing to its input-output based derivation.

  16. Surface thermocouples for measurement of pulsed heat flux in the divertor of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, D; LaBombard, B

    2012-03-01

    A novel set of thermocouple sensors has been developed to measure heat fluxes arriving at divertor surfaces in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a magnetic confinement fusion experiment. These sensors operate in direct contact with the divertor plasma, which deposits heat fluxes in excess of ~10 MW/m(2) over an ~1 s pulse. Thermoelectric EMF signals are produced across a non-standard bimetallic junction: a 50 μm thick 74% tungsten-26% rhenium ribbon embedded in a 6.35 mm diameter molybdenum cylinder. The unique coaxial geometry of the sensor combined with its single-point electrical ground contact minimizes interference from the plasma/magnetic environment. Incident heat fluxes are inferred from surface temperature evolution via a 1D thermal heat transport model. For an incident heat flux of 10 MW/m(2), surface temperatures rise ~1000 °C/s, corresponding to a heat flux flowing along the local magnetic field of ~200 MW/m(2). Separate calorimeter sensors are used to independently confirm the derived heat fluxes by comparing total energies deposited during a plasma pulse. Langmuir probes in close proximity to the surface thermocouples are used to test plasma-sheath heat transmission theory and to identify potential sources of discrepancies among physical models.

  17. Effects of post heat-treatment on surface characteristics and adhesive bonding performance of medium density fiberboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir Ayrilimis; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2009-01-01

    A series of commercially manufactured medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels were exposed to a post-manufacture heat-treatment at various temperatures and durations using a hot press and just enough pressure to ensure firm contact between the panel and the press platens. Post-manufacture heat-treatment improved surface roughness of the exterior MDF panels. Panels...

  18. Experimental investigation on narrow gap heat transfer with porous media under downward-facing horizontal heated surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, B.X. [State Key laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an city 710049 (China); Su, G.H., E-mail: ghsu@mail.xjtu.edu.c [State Key laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an city 710049 (China); Wu, Y.W. [State Key laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an city 710049 (China); Sugiyama, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Jo, Nishi 8 Chome, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Qiu, S.Z. [State Key laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an city 710049 (China)

    2009-12-15

    An experimental study of horizontal narrow gap heat transfer of porous media under a round downward-facing heated plate has been carried out, using water as the working fluid. The boiling curves are obtained with different gap size, plate diameter and solid spherules. The results show that the heat transfer increases significantly with porous media in the gap especially under boiling condition, and the occurrence of pool boiling crisis would be brought forward when the gap size is very small. The results also indicate that the heat transfer in horizontal narrow gap can be enhanced by increasing the ratio of gap size to plate diameter and using porous media with high thermal conductivity. Based on the mechanism of heat transfer of porous media, the correlations for natural convection and nucleate boiling are proposed to predict the heat flux.

  19. Diurnal variability of heat fluxes and heat content at a few locations off central east coast of India during April 1989

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, V.S.; Rao, T.V.N.

    Diurnal variability of surface wind speed, net heat exchange, sea surface temperature, vertical thermal structure and heat content at three locations, viz., station A (17 degrees 59'N, 83 degrees 53.9'E), station B (17 degrees 00'N, 82 degrees 32...

  20. Assessment of surface urban heat island across China's three main urban agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghong; Fang, Xiaoyi; Xu, Yongming; Zhang, Shuo; Luan, Qingzu

    2017-06-01

    This article proposes a method for estimating the surface urban heat island intensity (SUHI) of urban areas, which addresses prior difficulties in the determination of rural contexts that may be used as a point of comparison. Based on indexes produced using this method, as well as remotely sensed datasets, the article compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of SUHIs within three major urban agglomerations (the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta) and six typical metropolises. The article also examines the influence of socioeconomic factors on SUHI. The study revealed that this method is able to objectively monitor regional-scale SUHIs. The climate of the area studied is probably a determining factor in the seasonal variation of SUHIs. Research from the last 5 years (2010-2014) demonstrates that the urban heat island effect within the three urban agglomerations and five metropolises is serious. From 1994 to 2014, the average SUHI value for central urban areas rose from 0.4 to 2.3 K, while the total area where the SUHI value was >3.0 K increased from 1938 to 29,690 km2. The morphology of heat islands is significantly influenced by urbanization, meaning that heat islands within the areas studied will only continue to grow. Urban population and electricity consumption are the socioeconomic factors that exerted the greatest influence on the size of heat islands in China's major urban agglomerations. However, it is likely that economic measures designed to mitigate the UHI effect will differ in effectiveness from one urban agglomeration to another.

  1. Africa-wide monitoring of small surface water bodies using multisource satellite data: a monitoring system for FEWS NET: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Senay, Gabriel B.; Rowland, James; Verdin, James P.; Alemu, Henok; Melesse, Assefa M.; Abtew, Wossenu; Setegn, Shimelis G.

    2014-01-01

    Continental Africa has the highest volume of water stored in wetlands, large lakes, reservoirs, and rivers, yet it suffers from problems such as water availability and access. With climate change intensifying the hydrologic cycle and altering the distribution and frequency of rainfall, the problem of water availability and access will increase further. Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has initiated a large-scale project to monitor small to medium surface water points in Africa. Under this project, multisource satellite data and hydrologic modeling techniques are integrated to monitor several hundreds of small to medium surface water points in Africa. This approach has been already tested to operationally monitor 41 water points in East Africa. The validation of modeled scaled depths with field-installed gauge data demonstrated the ability of the model to capture both the spatial patterns and seasonal variations. Modeled scaled estimates captured up to 60 % of the observed gauge variability with a mean root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 22 %. The data on relative water level, precipitation, and evapotranspiration (ETo) for water points in East and West Africa were modeled since 1998 and current information is being made available in near-real time. This chapter presents the approach, results from the East African study, and the first phase of expansion activities in the West Africa region. The water point monitoring network will be further expanded to cover much of sub-Saharan Africa. The goal of this study is to provide timely information on the water availability that would support already established FEWS NET activities in Africa. This chapter also presents the potential improvements in modeling approach to be implemented during future expansion in Africa.

  2. Short-term variability of surface heat budget of the east central Arabian Sea during November, 1992

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, L.V.G.

    The analysis of surface meteorological data collected from the east central Arabian Sea during 10-28 November, 1992 revealed considerable variability in the meteorological parameters and heat budget components on both daily and diurnal time scales...

  3. Effects of aluminum oxide addition on the flexural strength, surface hardness, and roughness of heat-polymerized acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahroo Vojdani

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Reinforcement of the conventional heat-cured acrylic resin with 2.5 wt% Al2O3 powder significantly increased its flexural strength and hardness with no adverse effects on the surface roughness.

  4. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu-shih Lin; Boris P Koch; Tomas Feseker; Kai Ziervogel; Tobias Goldhammer; Frauke Schmidt; Matthias Witt; Matthias Y Kellermann; Matthias Zabel; Andreas Teske; Kai-uwe Hinrichs

    2017-01-01

    .... Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM...

  5. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  6. Surface temperatures in New York City: Geospatial data enables the accurate prediction of radiative heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Masoud; Emig, Thorsten; Aghamohamadnia, Milad

    2018-02-02

    Despite decades of research seeking to derive the urban energy budget, the dynamics of thermal exchange in the densely constructed environment is not yet well understood. Using New York City as a study site, we present a novel hybrid experimental-computational approach for a better understanding of the radiative heat transfer in complex urban environments. The aim of this work is to contribute to the calculation of the urban energy budget, particularly the stored energy. We will focus our attention on surface thermal radiation. Improved understanding of urban thermodynamics incorporating the interaction of various bodies, particularly in high rise cities, will have implications on energy conservation at the building scale, and for human health and comfort at the urban scale. The platform presented is based on longwave hyperspectral imaging of nearly 100 blocks of Manhattan, in addition to a geospatial radiosity model that describes the collective radiative heat exchange between multiple buildings. Despite assumptions in surface emissivity and thermal conductivity of buildings walls, the close comparison of temperatures derived from measurements and computations is promising. Results imply that the presented geospatial thermodynamic model of urban structures can enable accurate and high resolution analysis of instantaneous urban surface temperatures.

  7. Heat budget parameters for the southwestern Arabian Sea during monsoon - 88 experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Sastry, J.S.

    The temporal evolution of heat budget parameters for the southwestern Arabian Sea shows that the net surface heat balance is negative (approx 70 Wm sup(-2)) in May 1988 (phase 1) mainly due to excessive latent heat loss over the radiation income...

  8. Numerical investigation of melting and solidification processes in modified surface layers of metal at induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, V. G.; Popov, V. N.

    2017-10-01

    One of the perspective ways to improve the operational properties of parts of machines during induction treatment of their surfaces is the modification of the melt by specially prepared nanoscale particles of refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, carbonitrides, etc.). This approach allows us to increase the number of crystallization centers and to refine the structural components of the solidified metal. The resulting high dispersity and homogeneity of crystalline grains favorably affect the quality of the treated surfaces. 3D numerical simulation of thermophysical processes in the modification of the surface layer of metal in a moving substrate was carried out. It is assumed that the surface of the substrate is covered with a layer of specially prepared nanoscale particles of a refractory compound, which, upon penetration into the melt, are uniformly distributed in it. The possibility of applying a high-frequency electromagnetic field of high power for heating and melting of a metal (iron) for the purpose of its subsequent modification is investigated. The distribution of electromagnetic energy in the metal is described by empirical formulas. Melting of the metal is considered in the Stefan approximation, and upon solidification it is assumed that all nanoparticles serve as centers for volume-sequential crystallization. Calculations were carried out with the following parameters: specific power p0 = 35 and 40 kW/cm2 at frequency f = 440 and 1200 kHz, the substrate velocity V = 0.5-2.5 cm/s, the nanoparticles' size is 50 nm and concentration Np = 2.0 . 109 cm-3. Based on the results obtained in a quasi-stationary formulation, the distribution of the temperature field, the dimensions of the melting and crystallization zones, the change in the solid fraction in the two-phase zone, the area of the treated substrate surface, depending on the speed of its movement and induction heating characteristics were estimated.

  9. Analytical accuracy of the one dimensional heat transfer in geometry with logarithmic various surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, A.; Fakour, M.; Ganji, D.; Rahimipetroudi, I.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, heat transfer and temperature distribution equations for logarithmic surface are investigated analytically and numerically. Employing the similarity variables, the governing differential equations have been reduced to ordinary ones and solved via Homotopy perturbation method (HPM), Variational iteration method (VIM), Adomian decomposition method (ADM). The influence of the some physical parameters such as rate of effectiveness of temperature on non-dimensional temperature profiles is considered. Also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method (NUM) is used for the validity of these analytical methods and excellent agreement are observed between the solutions obtained from HPM, VIM, ADM and numerical results.

  10. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  11. Effect of heat treatment of wood on the morphology, surface roughness and penetration of simulated and human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekola, J; Lassila, L V J; Nganga, S; Ylä-Soininmäki, A; Fleming, G J P; Grenman, R; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2014-01-01

    Wood has been used as a model material for the development of novel fiber-reinforced composite bone substitute biomaterials. In previous studies heat treatment of wood was perceived to significantly increase the osteoconductivity of implanted wood material. The objective of this study was to examine some of the changing attributes of wood materials that may contribute to improved biological responses gained with heat treatment. Untreated and 140°C and 200°C heat-treated downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) were used as the wood materials. Surface roughness and the effect of pre-measurement grinding were measured with contact and non-contact profilometry. Liquid interaction was assessed with a dipping test using two manufactured liquids (simulated blood) as well as human blood. SEM was used to visualize possible heat treatment-induced changes in the hierarchical structure of wood. The surface roughness was observed to significantly decrease with heat treatment. Grinding methods had more influence on the surface contour and roughness than heat treatment. The penetration of the human blood in the 200°C heat-treated exceeded that in the untreated and 140°C heat-treated materials. SEM showed no significant change due to heat treatment in the dry-state morphology of the wood. The results of the liquid penetration test support previous findings in literature concerning the effects of heat treatment on the biological response to implanted wood. Heat-treatment has only a marginal effect on the surface contour of wood. The highly specialized liquid conveyance system of wood may serve as a biomimetic model for the further development of tailored fiber-composite materials.

  12. Modeling surface aerodynamic temperature in a semiarid advective environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    In mapping evapotranspiration (ET), latent heat flux (LE) can be spatially estimated as an energy balance (EB) residual for land surfaces using remote sensing inputs. The EB equation requires the estimation of net radiation (Rn), soil heat flux (G), and sensible heat flux (H). Rn and G can be estima...

  13. Profiles of ocean surface heating (POSH): A new model of upper ocean diurnal warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentemann, Chelle L.; Minnett, Peter J.; Ward, Brian

    2009-07-01

    Shipboard radiometric measurements of diurnal warming at the ocean surface and profiles through the diurnal thermocline were utilized to assess the temporal and vertical variability and to develop a new physics-based model of near-surface warming. The measurements and modeled diurnal warming were compared, with the goal of comprehensively evaluating differences between the data and model results. On the basis of these results, the diurnal model was refined while attempting to maintain agreement with the measurements. Simplified bulk models commonly do not provide information on the vertical structure within the warm layer, but this new model predicts the vertical temperature profile within the diurnal thermocline using an empirically derived function dependent on wind speed. The vertical profile of temperature provides both a straightforward methodology for modeling differences due to diurnal warming between measurements made at different depths (e.g., in situ measurements at various depths and measurements of the surface temperatures by satellite radiometers) and information on upper ocean thermal structure. Additionally, the model estimates of diurnal warming at the ocean surface are important for air-sea heat and gas flux calculations, blending satellite sea surface temperature fields, and air-sea interaction studies.

  14. Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.C.

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO{sub 2} laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm{sup 2} area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites.

  15. Laser surface modification of medical grade alloys for reduced heating in a magnetic resonance imaging environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benafan, O.; Chen, S.-Y.; Kar, A.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale surface modification of medical grade metallic alloys was conducted using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-based dopant diffusion technique. The objective of this approach was to minimize the induction heating by reducing the absorbed radio frequency field. Such an approach is advantageous in that the dopant is diffused into the alloy and is not susceptible to detachment or spallation as would an externally applied coating, and is expected to not deteriorate the mechanical and electrical properties of the base alloy or device. Experiments were conducted using a controlled environment laser system with the ability to control laser properties (i.e., laser power, spot size, and irradiation time) and dopant characteristics (i.e., temperature, concentration, and pressure). The reflective and transmissive properties of both the doped and untreated samples were measured in a radio frequency (63.86 MHz) magnetic field using a system comprising a high power signal generator, a localized magnetic field source and sensor, and a signal analyzer. The results indicate an increase in the reflectivity of the laser-treated samples compared to untreated samples. The effect of reflectivity on the heating of the alloys is investigated through a mathematical model incorporating Maxwell's equations and heat conduction.

  16. Waste Tyres as Heat Sink to Reduce the Driveway Surface Temperatures in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniza Abdul Aziz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of roads and driveways are on the rise as automobiles are now a necessity to all. This excessive development with its requirements increased the urban heat temperature and the generation of waste tyres. Waste tyre management has therefore been taken seriously by developed countries and since the European directive to ban used tyre products and whole tire disposal from landfill in 2003 and 2006 respectively, many researchers have looked for alternative ways to use the waste tyre. In Malaysia, The Smart and Cool Home Developer attempted to develop an eco-house by utilising waste tyre as the foundation for the driveway and claimed that the buried tyres act as a heat sink for the concrete and reduce the surface temperature of the driveway. Hence investigations were conducted on two sample houses to investigate this phenomenon. Findings from this pilot study show that waste tyres do act as a heat sink to the concrete driveways which affect the ambient temperature and relative humidity of the immediate surroundings.

  17. Northern North Atlantic Sea Surface Height and Ocean Heat Content Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Rhines, Peter; Worthen, Denise L.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of nearly 20 years of altimetric sea surface height (SSH) is investigated to understand its association with decadal to multidecadal variability of the North Atlantic heat content. Altimetric SSH is dominated by an increase of about 14 cm in the Labrador and Irminger seas from 1993 to 2011, while the opposite has occurred over the Gulf Stream region over the same time period. During the altimeter period the observed 0-700 m ocean heat content (OHC) in the subpolar gyre mirrors the increased SSH by its dominantly positive trend. Over a longer period, 1955-2011, fluctuations in the subpolar OHC reflect Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) and can be attributed to advection driven by the wind stress ''gyre mode'' bringing more subtropical waters into the subpolar gyre. The extended subpolar warming evident in SSH and OHC during the altimeter period represents transition of the AMV from cold to warm phase. In addition to the dominant trend, the first empirical orthogonal function SSH time series shows an abrupt change 2009-2010 reaching a new minimum in 2010. The change coincides with the change in the meridional overturning circulation at 26.5N as observed by the RAPID (Rapid Climate Change) project, and with extreme behavior of the wind stress gyre mode and of atmospheric blocking. While the general relationship between northern warming and Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) volume transport remains undetermined, the meridional heat and salt transport carried by AMOC's arteries are rich with decade-to-century timescale variability.

  18. Drought and Heat Waves: The Role of SST and Land Surface Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Drought occurs on a wide range of time scales, and within a variety of different types of regional climates. At the shortest time scales it is often associated with heat waves that last only several weeks to a few months but nevertheless can have profound detrimental impacts on society (e.g., heat-related impacts on human health, desiccation of croplands, increased fire hazard), while at the longest time scales it can extend over decades and can lead to long term structural changes in many aspects of society (e.g., agriculture, water resources, wetlands, tourism, population shifts). There is now considerable evidence that sea surface temperatures (SSTs) play a leading role in the development of drought world-wide, especially at seasonal and longer time scales, though land-atmosphere feedbacks can also play an important role. At shorter (subseasonal) time scales, SSTs are less important, but land feedbacks can play a critical role in maintaining and amplifying the atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves and short-term droughts. This talk reviews our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that drive precipitation and temperature variations on subseasonal to centennial time scales. This includes an assessment of predictability, prediction skill, and user needs at all time scales.

  19. Effects of thermal radiation and heat transfer over an unsteady stretching surface embedded in a porous medium in the presence of heat source or sink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed M. A Elbashbeshy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermal radiation and heat transfer over an unsteady stretching surface embedded in a porous medium in the presence of heat source or sink are studied. The governing time dependent boundary layer equations are transformed to ordinary differential equations containing radiation parameter, permeability parameter, heat source or sink parameter, Prandtl number, and unsteadiness parameter. These equations are solved numerically by applying Nachtsheim-Swinger shooting iteration technique together with Rung-Kutta fourth order integration scheme. The velocity profiles, temperature profiles, the skin friction coefficient, and the rate of heat transfer are computed and discussed in details for various values of the different parameters. Comparison of the obtained numerical results is made with previously published results.

  20. Heat transfer in a channel with inclined target surface cooled by single array of centered impinging jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mubarak Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the heat transfer characteristics in a channel with heated target plate inclined at an angle cooled by single array of equally spaced centered impinging jets for three different jet Reynolds numbers (Re=9300, 14400 and 18800. Air ejected from an array of orifices impinges on the heated target surface The target plate forms the leading edge of a gas turbine blade cooled by jet impingement technique. The work includes the effect of jet Reynolds numbers and feed channel aspect ratios (H/d = 5, 7, 9 where H=2.5, 3.5, 4.5 cm and d=0.5 cm on the heat transfer characteristics for a given orifice jet plate configuration with equally spaced centered holes with outflow exiting in both directions (with inclined heated target surface. In general, It has been observed that, H/d=9 gives the maximum heat transfer over the entire length of the target surface as compared to all feed channel aspect ratios. H/d=9 gives 3% more heat transfer from the target surface as compared to H/d=5 (for Re=14400. Also, it has been observed that the magnitude of the averaged local Nusselt number increases with an increase in the jet Reynolds number for all the feed channel aspect ratios studied.

  1. Surface renewal analysis to obtain sensible heat flux in rice, maize and soybean canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, A.; Paw U, K.; Snyder, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal environment in the plant canopy affects plants' growth processes such as flowering and ripening. High temperatures often cause grain sterility and poor filling, and reduce crop production in tropical and temperate regions. With global warming predicted, these effects have become a major concern worldwide. In this study, surface renewal analysis, which is a novel method for estimating scalar fluxes, was applied to rice, maize and soybean canopies to understand the dynamics of sensible heat in crop canopies. Surface renewal analysis has advantages of (1) lower cost of equipment, (2) a shorter fetch requirement and (3) less disturbance in the field. The temperature of the atmosphere (T) at multiple heights was measured at 10 Hz with fine-wire thermocouples to calculate sensible heat flux (H) from the ramp pattern of T. Variations in H determined from the T measurements at canopy top was from -80 to 120 Wm-2 for rice, and it showed reasonable diurnal variation. However, H values determined from the T measurements within the canopies were smaller because of differences in temperature ramp frequency with height. These results suggest that not all turbulent structures penetrate deeply into canopies. The results for rice, maize and soybean canopies will be presented at the meeting.

  2. Estimates of heat flux to material surfaces in Proto-MPEX with IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showers, M.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Donovan, D.; Goulding, R. H.; Gray, T. K.; Rapp, J.; Youchison, D. L.; Nygren, R. E.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a linear plasma device with the primary purpose of developing the plasma source concept for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX), which will address the plasma material interactions (PMI) science for future fusion reactors. New diagnostics for Proto-MPEX include an infrared (IR) camera, in-vessel thermocouples and ex-vessel fluoroptic probes. The IR camera and other diagnostics provide surface temperature measurements of Proto-MPEX's dump and target plates, located on either end of the machine, which are being exposed to plasma. The change in surface temperature is measured over the duration of the plasma shot to determine the heat flux hitting the plates. The IR camera additionally provides 2-D thermal load distribution images of these plates, highlighting Proto-MPEX plasma behaviors, such as hot spots. The plasma diameter on the dump plate is on the order of 15 cm. The combination of measured heat flux and the thermal load distribution gives information on the efficiency of Proto-MPEX as a plasma generating device. Machine operating parameters that will improve Proto-MPEX's performance may be identified, increasing its PMI research capabilities.

  3. Heat transfer and surface flow visualization around a 180 deg turn in a rectangular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astarita, G.; Cardone, G.; Carlomagno, G.M. [Univ. of Naples (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The efficiency of gas turbine engines strongly depends on the gas entry temperature, the higher the latter, the more efficient is the turbine thermal cycle. Present advanced gas turbines operate at gas entry temperatures much higher than metal creeping temperatures and therefore require intensive cooling of their blades especially in the early stages. The aim of the present study is to obtain detailed measurements of the convective heat transfer coefficient nearby a 180deg sharp turn in a rectangular channel, and to prove that the use of infrared thermography may be appropriate to experimentally study this type of problem. A rectangular two-pass channel, which is 40 mm high and 200 mm wide, is tested for two different geometries of the tip of the partition wall: a square tip and semicircular one. To perform surface flow visualization and heat transfer measurements, the heated-thin-foil technique is used and results in terms of temperature maps and Nusselt number Nu distributions are obtained. Nu is computed by means of the local bulk temperature which is evaluated by making a one-dimensional energy balance along the channel. Reynolds number, based on average inlet velocity and hydraulic diameter of the channel is varied between 1.6 {times} 10{sup 4} and 6.4 {times} 10{sup 4}. By moving in the streamwise direction, at the beginning of the heated zone a rapid increase of the wall temperature is found due to the development of the thermal boundary layer. Two well distinguishable separation zones are found, one at the first outer corner of the channel and the other attached to the partition wall and just downstream of its tip. The influence of the geometry of the latter seems to be limited mainly to the position of the onset of the second separation zone. A third weak recirculation zone seems to appear in the vicinity of the second outer corner at the highest tested Reynolds number.

  4. Effects of Two-stage Heat Treatment on Delayed Coke and Study of Their Surface Texture Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ui-Su; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Seon Ho; Lee, Byung-Rok; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Doo-Hwan

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, surface texture features and chemical properties of two types of cokes, made from coal tar by either 1-stage heat treatment or 2-stage heat treatment, were researched. The relationship between surface texture characteristics and the chemical properties was identified through molecular weight distribution, insolubility of coal tar, weight loss with temperature increase, coking yield, and polarized light microscope analysis. Rapidly cleared anisotropy texture in cokes was observed in accordance with the coking temperature rise. Quinoline insolubility and toluene insolubility of coal tar increased with a corresponding increases in coking temperature. In particular, the cokes produced by the 2-stage heat treatment (2S-C) showed surface structure of needle cokes at a temperature approximately 50°C lower than the 1-stage heat treatment (1S-C). Additionally, the coking yield of 2S-C increased by approximately 14% in comparison with 1S-C.

  5. Radiative heat transfer with hydromagnetic flow and viscous dissipation over a stretching surface in the presence of variable heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Hitesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layer steady flow and heat transfer of a viscous incompressible fluid due to a stretching plate with viscous dissipation effect in the presence of a transverse magnetic field is studied. The equations of motion and heat transfer are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and the exact solutions are obtained using properties of confluent hypergeometric function. It is assumed that the prescribed heat flux at the stretching porous wall varies as the square of the distance from origin. The effects of the various parameters entering into the problem on the velocity field and temperature distribution are discussed.

  6. Transient thermoelectric supercooling: Isosceles current pulses from a response surface perspective and the performance effects of pulse cooling a heat generating mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Alfred J., III

    With increased public interest in protecting the environment, scientists and engineers aim to improve energy conversion efficiency. Thermoelectrics offer many advantages as thermal management technology. When compared to vapor compression refrigeration, above approximately 200 to 600 watts, cost in dollars per watt as well as COP are not advantageous for thermoelectrics. The goal of this work was to determine if optimized pulse supercooling operation could improve cooling capacity or efficiency of a thermoelectric device. The basis of this research is a thermal-electrical analogy based modeling study using SPICE. Two models were developed. The first model, a standalone thermocouple with no attached mass to be cooled. The second, a system that includes a module attached to a heat generating mass. With the thermocouple study, a new approach of generating response surfaces with characteristic parameters was applied. The current pulse height and pulse on-time was identified for maximizing Net Transient Advantage, a newly defined metric. The corresponding pulse height and pulse on-time was utilized for the system model. Along with the traditional steady state starting current of Imax, Iopt was employed. The pulse shape was an isosceles triangle. For the system model, metrics new to pulse cooling were Qc, power consumption and COP. The effects of optimized current pulses were studied by changing system variables. Further studies explored time spacing between pulses and temperature distribution in the thermoelement. It was found net Q c over an entire pulse event can be improved over Imax steady operation but not over steady I opt operation. Qc can be improved over Iopt operation but only during the early part of the pulse event. COP is reduced in transient pulse operation due to the different time constants of Qc and Pin. In some cases lower performance interface materials allow more Qc and better COP during transient operation than higher performance interface materials

  7. Evaluation of the surface urban heat island effect in the city of Madrid by thermal remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobrino, J.; Oltra-Carrio, R; Jimenez-Munoz, J.C.; Franch, B.; Hidalgo, V.; Mattar, C.; Julien, Y.; Cuenca, J.; Romaguera Albentosa, M.R.; Gomez, J.A.; de Miguel, E.; Bianchi, R.; Paganini, M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface urban heat island (SUHI) effect is defined as the increased surface temperatures in urban areas in contrast to cooler surrounding rural areas. In this article, the evaluation of the SUHI effect in the city of Madrid (Spain) from thermal infrared (TIR) remote-sensing data is presented.

  8. Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy immunocytochemistry and antigen retrieval of surface layer proteins from Tannerella forsythensis using microwave or autoclave heating with citraconic anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, K; Mitamura, Y; Iwami, J; Hasegawa, Y; Higuchi, N; Murakami, Y; Maeda, H; Yoshimura, F; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2012-11-01

    Tannerella forsythensis (Bacteroides forsythus), an anaerobic Gram-negative species of bacteria that plays a role in the progression of periodontal disease, has a unique bacterial protein profile. It is characterized by two unique protein bands with molecular weights of more than 200 kDa. It also is known to have a typical surface layer (S-layer) consisting of regularly arrayed subunits outside the outer membrane. We examined the relationship between high molecular weight proteins and the S-layer using electron microscopic immunolabeling with chemical fixation and an antigen retrieval procedure consisting of heating in a microwave oven or autoclave with citraconic anhydride. Immunogold particles were localized clearly at the outermost cell surface. We also used energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) to visualize 3, 3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) reaction products after microwave antigen retrieval with 1% citraconic anhydride. The three-window method for electron spectroscopic images (ESI) of nitrogen by the EFTEM reflected the presence of moieties demonstrated by the DAB reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibodies instead of immunogold particles. The mapping patterns of net nitrogen were restricted to the outermost cell surface.

  9. MHD Heat and Mass Transfer of Chemical Reaction Fluid Flow over a Moving Vertical Plate in Presence of Heat Source with Convective Surface Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Rout

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the influence of chemical reaction and the combined effects of internal heat generation and a convective boundary condition on the laminar boundary layer MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a moving vertical flat plate. The lower surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid while the stream of cold fluid flows over the upper surface with heat source and chemical reaction. The basic equations governing the flow, heat transfer, and concentration are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations by using appropriate transformation for variables and solved numerically by Runge-Kutta fourth-order integration scheme in association with shooting method. The effects of physical parameters on the velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are illustrated graphically. A table recording the values of skin friction, heat transfer, and mass transfer at the plate is also presented. The discussion focuses on the physical interpretation of the results as well as their comparison with previous studies which shows good agreement as a special case of the problem.

  10. Design and Thermodynamic Analysis of a Steam Ejector Refrigeration/Heat Pump System for Naval Surface Ship Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Ezgi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Naval surface ships should use thermally driven heating and cooling technologies to continue the Navy’s leadership role in protecting the marine environment. Steam ejector refrigeration (SER or steam ejector heat pump (SEHP systems are thermally driven heating and cooling technologies and seem to be a promising technology to reduce emissions for heating and cooling on board naval surface ships. In this study, design and thermodynamic analysis of a seawater cooled SER and SEHP as an HVAC system for a naval surface ship application are presented and compared with those of a current typical naval ship system case, an H2O-LiBr absorption heat pump and a vapour-compression heat pump. The off-design study estimated the coefficient of performances (COPs were 0.29–0.11 for the cooling mode and 1.29–1.11 for the heating mode, depending on the pressure of the exhaust gas boiler at off-design conditions. In the system operating at the exhaust gas boiler pressure of 0.2 MPa, the optimum area ratio obtained was 23.30.

  11. Nonmodal and nonlinear dynamics of a volatile liquid film flowing over a locally heated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Naveen; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2009-10-01

    The stability of a thin, volatile liquid film falling under the influence of gravity over a locally heated, vertical plate is analyzed in the noninertial regime using a model based on long-wave theory. The model is formulated to account for evaporation that is either governed by thermodynamic considerations at the interface in the one-sided limit or limited by the rate of mass transfer of the vapor from the interface. The temperature gradient near the upstream edge of the heater induces a gradient in surface tension that opposes the gravity-driven flow, and a pronounced thermocapillary ridge develops in the streamwise direction. Recent theoretical analyses predict that the ridge becomes unstable above a critical value of the Marangoni parameter, leading to the experimentally observed rivulet structure that is periodic in the direction transverse to the bulk flow. An oscillatory, thermocapillary instability in the streamwise direction above the heater is also predicted for films with sufficiently large heat loss at the free surface due to either evaporation or strong convection in the adjoining gas. This present work extends the recent linear stability analysis of such flows by Tiwari and Davis [Phys. Fluids 21, 022105 (2009)] to a nonmodal analysis of the governing non-self-adjoint operator and computations of the nonlinear dynamics. The nonmodal analysis identifies the most destabilizing perturbations to the film and their maximum amplification. Computations of the nonlinear dynamics reveal that small perturbations can be sufficient to destabilize a linearly stable film for a narrow band of wave numbers predicted by the nonmodal, linearized analysis. This destabilization is linked to the presence of stable, discrete modes that appear as the Marangoni parameter approaches the critical value at which the film becomes linearly unstable. Furthermore, the thermocapillary instability leads to a new, time-periodic base state. This transition corresponds to a Hopf

  12. Seasonal Variations of the Surface Urban Heat Island in a Semi-Arid City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirous Haashemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of the surface urban heat island (SUHI varies with latitude, climate, topography and meteorological conditions. This study investigated the seasonal variability of SUHI in the Tehran metropolitan area, Iran, with respect to selected surface biophysical variables. Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST was retrieved as nighttime LST data, while daytime LST was retrieved from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS using the split-window algorithm. Both data covered the time period from September 2013 to September 2015. To assess SUHI intensity, we employed three SUHI indicators, i.e., the LST difference of urban-rural, that of urban-agriculture and that of urban-water. Physical and biophysical surface variables, including land use and land cover (LULC, elevation, impervious surface (IS, fractional vegetation cover (FVC and albedo, were selected to estimate the relationship between LST seasonal variability and the surface properties. Results show that an inversion of the SUHI phenomenon (i.e., surface urban cool island existed at daytime with the maximal value of urban-rural LST difference of −4 K in March; whereas the maximal value of SUHI at nighttime yielded 3.9 K in May. When using the indicators of urban-agriculture and urban-water LST differences, the maximal value of SUHI was found to be 8.2 K and 15.5 K, respectively. Both results were observed at daytime, suggesting the role of bare soils in the inversion of the SUHI phenomenon with the urban-rural indicator. Maximal correlation was observed in the relationship between night LST and elevation in spring (coefficient: −0.76, night LST and IS in spring (0.60, night LST and albedo in winter (−0.53 and day LST with fractional vegetation cover in summer (−0.41. The relationship between all surface properties with LST possessed large seasonal variations, and thus, using these relationships for SUHI modeling may not be

  13. Influence of heat treatment and veneering on the storage modulus and surface of zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavikis, Georgius; Behr, Michael; van der Zel, Jef M; Feilzer, Albert J; Rosentritt, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Glass-ceramic veneered zirconia is used for the application as fixed partial dentures. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether the heat treatment during veneering, the application of glass-ceramic for veneering or long term storage has an influence on the storage modulus of zirconia. Zirconia bars (Cercon, DeguDent, G; 0.5x2x20 mm) were fabricated and treated according to veneering conditions. Besides heating regimes between 680°C and 1000°C (liner bake and annealing), sandblasting (Al(2)O(3)) or steam cleaning were used. The bars were investigated after 90 days storage in water and acid. For investigating the influence of veneering, the bars were veneered in press- or layer technique. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in a three-point-bending design was performed to determine the storage modulus between 25°C and 200°C at a frequency of 1.66 Hz. All specimens were loaded on top and bottom (treatment on pressure or tensile stress side). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for evaluating the superficial changes of the zirconia surface due to treatment. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann Whitney U-test (α=0.05). Sintered zirconia provided a storage modulus E' of 215 (203/219) GPa and tan δ of 0.04 at 110°C. A 10%-decrease of E' was found up to 180°C. The superficial appearance changed due to heating regime. Sandblasting reduced E' to 213 GPa, heating influenced E' between 205 GPa (liner bake 1) and 222 GPa (dentin bake 1). Steam cleaning, annealing and storage changed E' between 4 GPa and 22 GPa, depending on the side of loading. After veneering, strong E'-reduction was found down to 84 GPa and 125 GPa. Veneering of zirconia with glass-ceramic in contrast to heat treating during veneering procedure had a strong influence on the modulus. The application of the glass-ceramic caused a stronger decrease of the storage modulus.

  14. Effects of heat source/sink on magnetohydrodynamic flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian power-law fluid on a stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naikoti Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Newtonian boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics over a stretching surface with thermal radiation and slip condition at the surface is analyzed. The flow is subject to a uniform transverse magnetic field. The suitable local similarity transformations are used to transform the non-linear partial differential equations into system of ordinary differential equations. The non-linear ordinary differential equations are linearized by using Quasi-linearization technique. The implicit finite difference scheme has been adopted to solve the obtained coupled ordinary differential equations. The important finding in this communication is the combined effects of Magnetic field parameter M, power law index n, slip parameter l, radiation parameter R, surface temperature parameter g , heat source/sink parameter S, local Eckert number Ec, temperature difference parameter r, generalized local Prandtl number Pr on velocity and temperature profiles and also the skin-friction coefficient -f''(0and heat transfer coefficient -θ'(0 results are discussed. The results pertaining to the present study indicate that as the increase of magnetic field parameter, slip parameter decreases the velocity profiles, where as the temperature profiles increases for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The power law index n and heat source/sink parameter decreases the dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles. The effect of radiation parameter, Eckert number leads to increase the dimensionless temperature. It is found that increasing the slip parameter has the effect of decreasing the skin-friction coefficient-f''(0and heat transfer coefficient-θ'(0.With the increase of power law index n is to reduce the skin-friction coefficient and increase the heat transfer coefficient.

  15. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating: The soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-Model Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Massman

    2015-01-01

    Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMVmodel, a 1-D (one-dimensional) non-equilibrium (liquid- vapor phase change)...

  16. Periodic Unsteady Flow Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer: Studies on a Curved Surface, Combined Part I and II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic and heat transfer investigations were done on a constant curvature curved plate in a subsonic wind tunnel facility for various wake passing frequencies and zero pressure gradient conditions. Steady and unsteady boundary layer transition measurements were taken on the concave surface of the curved plate at different wake passing frequencies where a rotating squirrel-cage generated the unsteady wake flow. The data were analyzed using timeaveraged and ensemble-averaged techniques to provide insight into the growth of the boundary layer and transition. Ensemble-averaged turbulence intensity contours in the temporal spatial domain showed that transition was induced for increasing wake passing frequency and structure. The local heat transfer coefficient distribution for the concave and convex surface was determined at those wake passing frequencies using a liquid crystal heat transfer measurement technique. Detailed aerodynamic and heat transfer investigations showed that higher wake passing frequency caused transition to occur earlier on the concave surface. Local Stanton numbers were also calculated on the concave surface and compared with Stanton numbers predicted using a differential boundary layer and heat transfer calculation method. On the convex side, no effect of wake passing frequency on heat transfer was observed due to a separation bubble that induced transition.

  17. Mars MetNet Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Vazquez, Luis; Haukka, Harri

    2015-04-01

    New kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is under development in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested. 1. MetNet Lander The MetNet landing vehicles are using an inflatable entry and descent system instead of rigid heat shields and parachutes as earlier semi-hard landing devices have used. This way the ratio of the payload mass to the overall mass is optimized. The landing impact will burrow the payload container into the Martian soil providing a more favorable thermal environment for the electronics and a suitable orientation of the telescopic boom with external sensors and the radio link antenna. It is planned to deploy several tens of MNLs on the Martian surface operating at least partly at the same time to allow meteorological network science. 2. Scientific Payload The payload of the two MNL precursor models includes the following instruments: Atmospheric instruments: 1. MetBaro Pressure device 2. MetHumi Humidity device 3. MetTemp Temperature sensors Optical devices: 1. PanCam Panoramic 2. MetSIS Solar irradiance sensor with OWLS optical wireless system for data transfer 3. DS Dust sensor The descent processes dynamic properties are monitored by a special 3-axis accelerometer combined with a 3-axis gyrometer. The data will be sent via auxiliary beacon antenna throughout the

  18. An analytic model of pool boiling critical heat flux on an immerged downward facing curved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hui; Pan, Liang-ming, E-mail: cneng@cqu.edu.cn; Wu, Yao; Chen, De-qi

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Thin liquid film and supplement of liquid contribute to the CHF. • CHF increases from the bottom to the upper of the lowerhead. • Evaporation of thin liquid film is dominant nearby bottom region. • The subcooling has significant effects on the CHF. - Abstract: In this paper, an analytical model of the critical heat flux (CHF) on the downward facing curved surface for pool boiling has been proposed, which hypothesizes that the CHF on the downward facing curved is composed of two parts, i.e. the evaporation of the thin liquid film underneath the elongated bubble adhering to the lower head outer surface and the depletion of supplement of liquid due to the relative motion of vapor bubbles along with the downward facing curved. The former adopts the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability analysis of vapor–liquid interface of the vapor jets which penetrating in the thin liquid film. When the heat flux closing to the CHF point, the vapor–liquid interface becomes highly distorted, which block liquid to feed the thin liquid film and the thin liquid film will dry out gradually. While the latter considers that the vapor bubbles move along with the downward facing curved surface, and the liquid in two-phase boundary layer enter the liquid film that will be exhausted when the CHF occurs. Based on the aforementioned mechanism and the energy balance between the thin liquid film evaporation and water feeding, and taking the subcooling of the bulk water into account, the mathematic model about the downward facing curved surface CHF has been proposed. The CHF of the downward facing curved surface for pool boiling increases along with the downward facing orientation except in the vicinity of bottom center region, because in this region the vapor bubble almost stagnates and the evaporation of the thin liquid film is dominant. In addition, the subcooling has significant effect on the CHF. Comparing the result of this model with the published experimental results show

  19. Thermo capillary and buoyancy convection in a fluid locally heated on its free surface; Convection thermocapillaire et thermogravitaire dans un fluide chauffe localement sur sa surface libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, E.

    1997-09-26

    coupled buoyancy and thermo-capillary convection lead to a convective motion of the interface liquid/gas which drastically changes the heat and mass transfer across the liquid layer. Two experiments were considered, depending on the fluid: oil or mercury. The liquid is set in a cooled cylindrical vessel, and heated by a heat flux across the center of the free surface. The basic flow, in the case of oil, is a torus. When the heat parameter increases, a stationary flow appears as petals or rays when the aspect ratio. The lateral confinement selects the azimuthal wavelength. In the case of petals-like flow, a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation is underlined. The turbulence is found to be `weak`, even for the largest values of the Marangoni number (Ma = 1.3 10{sup 5}). In the case of mercury, the thermo-capillary effect is reduced to zero to impurities at the surface which have special trajectories we describe and compare to a simpler experiment. Only the buoyancy forces induce a unstationary, weakly turbulent flow as soon as the heating power exceeds 4W (Ra = 4.5 10{sup 3}, calculated with h = 1 mm). The past part concerns the analysis of the effect on the flow of the boundary conditions, the geometry, the Prandtl number and the buoyancy force with the help of the literature. Results concerning heat transfer, in particular the exponent of the law Nusselt number vs. heating power, were compared with available data. (author) 115 refs.

  20. Lee-side flow phenomena on space shuttle configurations at hypersonic speeds. Part 2: Studies of lee-surface heating at hypersonic Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, J. N.; Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Lee surface heating data, obtained at relatively low unit Reynolds numbers at Mach 6 and 19, are discussed with emphasis on the peak heating behavior. Surface pressures measured along the lee meridian of the delta-wing orbiter are presented and analyzed in conjunction with the heating. The effects of nose bluntness and lee surface geometry on the heating are discussed and general guidelines are presented for modifying the lee surface geometry of the shuttle to reduce vortex-induced heating. The application of the wind tunnel results to realistic shuttle flight conditions is discussed.

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Radiant Heat Transfer in Mirror Systems Considering Deep Reflecting Surface Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When designing large-sized mirror concentrating systems (MCS for high-temperature solar power plants, one must have at disposal reasonably reliable and economical methods and tools, making it possible to analyze its characteristics, to predict them depending on the operation conditions and accordingly to choose the most suitable system for the solution of particular task.Experimental determination of MCS characteristics requires complicated and expensive experimentation, having significant limitations on interpretation of the results, as well as limitations imposed due to the size of the structure. Therefore it is of particular interest to develop a mathematical model capable of estimating power characteristics of MCS considering the influence of operating conditions, design features, roughness and other surface defects.For efficient solution of the tasks the model must ensure simulation of solar radiant flux as well as simulation of geometrical and optical characteristics of reflection surface and their interaction. In this connection a statistical mathematical model of radiation heat exchange based on use of Monte Carlo methods and Finite Element Method was developed and realized in the software complex, making it possible to determine main characteristics of the MCS.In this paper the main attention is given to definition of MCS radiation characteristics with account for deep reflecting surface defects (cavities, craters. Deep cavities are not typical for MCS, but their occurrence is possible during operation as a result of erosion or any physical damage. For example, for space technology it is primarily micrometeorite erosion.

  2. Trends and Variations of Ocean Surface Latent Heat Flux: Results from GSSTF2c Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Si; Chiu, Long S.; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Trends and variations of Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) version 2c (GSSTF2c) latent heat flux (LHF) are examined. This version of LHF takes account of the correction in Earth incidence angle. The trend of global mean LHF for GSSTF2c is much reduced relative to GSSTF version 2b Set 1 and Set 2 for the same period 1988-2008. Temporal increase of GSSTF2c LHF in the two decades is 11.0%, in which 3.1%, 5.8%, and 2.1% are attributed to the increase in wind, the increase in sea surface saturated air humidity, and the decrease in near-surface air humidity, respectively. The first empirical orthogonal function of LHF is a conventional El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) mode. However, the trends in LHF are independent of conventional ENSO phenomena. After removing ENSO signal, the pattern of LHF trends is primarily determined by the pattern of air-sea humidity difference trends.

  3. Eddy heat flux across the Antarctic Circumpolar Current estimated from sea surface height standard deviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppert, Annie; Donohue, Kathleen A.; Watts, D. Randolph; Tracey, Karen L.

    2017-08-01

    Eddy heat flux (EHF) is a predominant mechanism for heat transport across the zonally unbounded mean flow of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Observations of dynamically relevant, divergent, 4 year mean EHF in Drake Passage from the cDrake project, as well as previous studies of atmospheric and oceanic storm tracks, motivates the use of sea surface height (SSH) standard deviation, H*, as a proxy for depth-integrated, downgradient, time-mean EHF (>[EHF>¯>]) in the ACC. Statistics from the Southern Ocean State Estimate corroborate this choice and validate throughout the ACC the spatial agreement between H* and >[EHF>¯>] seen locally in Drake Passage. Eight regions of elevated >[EHF>¯>] are identified from nearly 23.5 years of satellite altimetry data. Elevated cross-front exchange usually does not span the full latitudinal width of the ACC in each region, implying a hand-off of heat between ACC fronts and frontal zones as they encounter the different >[EHF>¯>] hot spots along their circumpolar path. Integrated along circumpolar streamlines, defined by mean SSH contours, there is a convergence of ∮>[EHF>¯>] in the ACC: 1.06 PW enters from the north and 0.02 PW exits to the south. Temporal trends in low-frequency [EHF] are calculated in a running-mean sense using H* from overlapping 4 year subsets of SSH. Significant increases in downgradient [EHF] magnitude have occurred since 1993 at Kerguelen Plateau, Southeast Indian Ridge, and the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence, whereas the other five >[EHF>¯>] hot spots have insignificant trends of varying sign.

  4. Dual solutions in hydromagnetic stagnation point flow and heat transfer towards a stretching/shrinking sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink and variable surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abd El-Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The steady stagnation-point flow and heat transfer of a viscous, incompressible and heat generating/absorbing fluid over a shrinking sheet in the presence of a non-uniform heat source/sink is considered. The system of partial differential equations was transformed to a system of ordinary differential equations, which was solved numerically. Numerical results were obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the surface temperature as well as the velocity and temperature profiles for some values of the governing parameters. The study reveals that the range of velocity ratio parameter for which the solution exists increases as the magnetic field increase.

  5. Enhancement and tunability of near-field radiative heat transfer mediated by surface plasmon polaritons in thin plasmonic films

    CERN Document Server

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Huang, Yi; Zhou, Jiawei; Chiloyan, Vazrik; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The properties of thermal radiation exchange between hot and cold objects can be strongly modified if they interact in the near field where electromagnetic coupling occurs across gaps narrower than the dominant wavelength of thermal radiation. Using a rigorous fluctuational electrodynamics approach, we predict that ultra-thin films of plasmonic materials can be used to dramatically enhance near-field heat transfer. The total spectrally integrated film-to-film heat transfer is over an order of magnitude larger than between the same materials in bulk form and also exceeds the levels achievable with polar dielectrics such as SiC. We attribute this enhancement to the significant spectral broadening of radiative heat transfer due to coupling between surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on both sides of each thin film. We show that the radiative heat flux spectrum can be further shaped by the choice of the substrate onto which the thin film is deposited. In particular, substrates supporting surface phonon polaritons (...

  6. Surface heat fluxes and ecosystem function in the Cretan Sea (eastern Mediterranean): a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddorn, J. R.; Allen, J. I.

    2003-01-01

    As a component of the Mediterranean Forecast System Pilot Project, a data buoy was deployed in the Cretan Sea. A 1-D ecosystem model of the site has been used to investigate the role of surface heat fluxes in determining modelled ecosystem behaviour. The method of calculation of these fluxes, the quality of the data used, and the temporal resolution of the data all had an impact upon the modelled ecosystem function. The effects of the changes in heat flux formulation were substantial, with both annually averaged properties of the system and the seasonal evolution of the biology being affected. It was also found that the ecosystem model was extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the meteorological forcing data used, with substantial changes in biology found when offsets in the forcing data were imposed. The frequency of forcing data was relatively unimportant in determining the biological function, although lower frequency forcing damped high frequency variability in the biology. During periods of mixing the biology showed an amplified response to changes in physical dynamics, but during periods of stratification the variations in the physics were found to be less important. Zooplankton showed more sensitivity to physical variability than either phytoplankton or bacteria. The consequences for ecosystem modelling are discussed.

  7. Cooling of High Heat Flux Flat Surface with Nanofluid Assisted Convective Loop: Experimental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Amir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation was conducted on the thermal performance and pressure drop of a convective cooling loop working with ZnO aqueous nanofluids. The loop was used to cool a flat heater connected to an AC autotransformer. Influence of different operating parameters, such as fluid flow rate and mass concentration of nanofluid on surface temperature of heater, pressure drop, friction factor and overall heat transfer coefficient was investigated and briefly discussed. Results of this study showed that, despite a penalty for pressure drop, ZnO/water nanofluid was a promising coolant for cooling the micro-electronic devices and chipsets. It was also found that there is an optimum for concentration of nanofluid so that the heat transfer coefficient is maximum, which was wt. % = 0.3 for ZnO/water used in this research. In addition, presence of nanoparticles enhanced the friction factor and pressure drop as well; however, it is not very significant in comparison with those of registered for the base fluid.

  8. Unsteady MHD radiative flow and heat transfer of a dusty nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sandeep

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic radiative flow and heat transfer characteristics of a dusty nanofluid over an exponentially permeable stretching surface in presence of volume fraction of dust and nano particles. We considered two types of nanofluids namely Cu-water and CuO-water embedded with conducting dust particles. The governing equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and solved numerically using Runge–Kutta based shooting technique. The effects of non-dimensional governing parameters namely magneticfield parameter, mass concentration of dust particles, fluid particle interaction parameter, volume fraction of dust particles, volume fraction of nano particles, unsteadiness parameter, exponential parameter, radiation parameter and suction/injection parameter on velocity profiles for fluid phase, dust phase and temperature profiles are discussed and presented through graphs. Also, friction factor and Nusselt numbers are discussed and presented for two dusty nanofluids separately. Comparisons of the present study were made with existing studies under some special assumptions. The present results have an excellent agreement with existing studies. Results indicated that the enhancement in fluid particle interaction increases the heat transfer rate and depreciates the wall friction. Also, radiation parameter has the tendency to increase the temperature profiles of the dusty nanofluid.

  9. Thermomechanical model of hydrogen cracking at heat affected cannon bore surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, J.H.; Vigilante, G.N.; Troiano, E. [US Army Armament RD and E Center, Watervliet, NY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Hydrogen cracking in weldments presents major challenges, and two examples were discussed concerning hydrogen cracking in the heat-affected region of a fired cannon. The authors described the metallographic evidence of damage at different depths in the vicinity of the bore surface. The verification of near-bore temperature distributions and transient and residual stress distributions calculated using classic one-dimensional heat flow analysis was effected by way of depth of steel transformation due to firing. The results indicated that the predictions as to the depths of thermal change and hydrogen cracks agreed well with the observed depths for various crack orientations and firing temperatures. A description of laboratory fracture mechanics tests using bolt-load compact specimens was included, as well as crack growth and blunt notched tests in acid hydrogen environments. The specific instances of welding for cannons as they relate to the utility of thermal and fracture mechanics analyses and the laboratory fracture mechanics tests were discussed. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  10. Point, surface and volumetric heat sources in the thermal modelling of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yabin; Ayas, Can

    2017-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing technique suitable for producing high precision metal parts. However, distortions and residual stresses within products arise during SLM because of the high temperature gradients created by the laser heating. Residual stresses limit the load resistance of the product and may even lead to fracture during the built process. It is therefore of paramount importance to predict the level of part distortion and residual stress as a function of SLM process parameters which requires a reliable thermal modelling of the SLM process. Consequently, a key question arises which is how to describe the laser source appropriately. Reasonable simplification of the laser representation is crucial for the computational efficiency of the thermal model of the SLM process. In this paper, first a semi-analytical thermal modelling approach is described. Subsequently, the laser heating is modelled using point, surface and volumetric sources, in order to compare the influence of different laser source geometries on the thermal history prediction of the thermal model. The present work provides guidelines on appropriate representation of the laser source in the thermal modelling of the SLM process.

  11. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kouichi [DENSO CORPORATION, Kariya, Aichi 448-8661 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi [DENSO CORPORATION, Kariya, Aichi 448-8661 (Japan)

    2013-11-21

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  12. The impact of rational surfaces on radial heat transport in TJ-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Milligen, B. Ph.; Nicolau, J. H.; García, L.; Carreras, B. A.; Hidalgo, C.; the TJ-II Team

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we study the outward propagation of temperature perturbations. For this purpose, we apply an advanced analysis technique, transfer entropy, to ECE measurements performed in ECR heated discharges at the low-shear stellarator TJ-II. We observe that the propagation of these perturbations is not smooth, but is slowed down at specific radial positions, near ‘trapping zones’ characterized by long time lags with respect to the perturbation origin. We also detect instances of rapid or instantaneous (non-local) propagation, in which perturbations appear to ‘jump over’ specific radial regions. The analysis of perturbations introduced in a resistive magneto-hydrodynamic model of the plasma leads to similar results. The radial regions corresponding to slow radial transport are identified with maxima of the flow shear associated with rational surfaces (mini-transport barriers). The non-local interactions are ascribed to MHD mode coupling effects.

  13. SERSO PLUS - New options in road surface heating; SERSO PLUS - Neue Wege in der Belagsbeheizung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugster, W.J. [Polydynamics Engineering Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2002-12-01

    SERSO is an established but costly system for road surface heating. The new version, SERSO PLUS, is more economical. A feasibility study is presented for a stretch of road in Switzerland. [German] Glatteis... Schneefall... Stossverkehr und Autokolonnen... Situationen wie sie im Winter immer wieder vorkommen: Der Verkehr geraet ins Stocken. Fahrzeuge stehen quer, erste Kollisionen. Fuer die Fahrzeuge des Unterhaltsdienstes gibt es kein Durchkommen mehr. Dies ist eine typische Situation fuer SERSO - ein System, das Hochleistungsstrassen auch bei winterlichen Verhaeltnissen moeglichst lange betriebsbereit haelt. SERSO ging 1994 als Pilotanlage in Betrieb und weist seither eine maximale Betriebssicherheit auf. Leider ist SERSO im Bau sehr teuer. SERSO PLUS, eine Weiterentwicklung von SERSO, ist wesentlich kostenguenstiger. Eine Machbarkeitsstudie fuer einen Streckenabschnitt in der Schweizer Bundesstadt zeigt die technischen und finanziellen Aspekte auf. (orig.)

  14. Turbulence and surface heat transfer near the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    A turbulent boundary layer flow analysis of the momentum and thermal flow fields near the forward stagnation point due to a circular cylinder in turbulent cross flow is presented. Turbulence modeling length scale, anisotropic turbulence initial profiles and boundary conditions were identified as functions of the cross flow turbulence intensity and the boundary layer flow far field velocity. These parameters were used in a numerical computational procedure to calculate the mean velocity, mean temperature, and turbulence double correlation profiles within the flow field. The effects of the cross flow turbulence on the stagnation region momentum and thermal flow fields were investigated. This analysis predicted the existing measurements of the stagnation region mean velocity and surface heat transfer rate with cross flow Reynolds number and turbulence intensity less than 250,000 and 0.05, respectively.

  15. Impact of structural design criteria on first wall surface heat flux limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation environment experienced by the in-vessel components of fusion reactors presents structural design challenges not envisioned in the development of existing structural design criteria such as the ASME Code or RCC-MR. From the standpoint of design criteria, the most significant issues stem from the irradiation-induced changes in material properties, specifically the reduction of ductility, strain hardening capability, and fracture toughness with neutron irradiation. Recently, Draft 7 of the ITER structural design criteria (ISDC), which provide new rules for guarding against such problems, was released for trial use by the ITER designers. The new rules, which were derived from a simple model based on the concept of elastic follow up factor, provide primary and secondary stress limits as functions of uniform elongation and ductility. The implication of these rules on the allowable surface heat flux on typical first walls made of type 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloys are discussed.

  16. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  17. Comparison of mitral valve area by pressure half-time and proximal isovelocity surface area method in patients with mitral stenosis: effect of net atrioventricular compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem Omar, Alaa Mabrouk; Tanaka, Hidekazu; AbdelDayem, Tarek Khairy; Sadek, Ayman S; Raslaan, Halah; Al-Sherbiny, Ashraf; Yamawaki, Kohei; Ryo, Keiko; Fukuda, Yuko; Norisada, Kazuko; Tatsumi, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Tetsuari; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that, unlike calculation of the mitral valve area (MVA) with the pressure half-time method (PHT), the proximal isovelocity surface area method (PISA) is not affected by changes in net atrioventricular compliance (C(n)). We studied 51 patients with mitral stenosis (MS) from two centres. MVA was assessed with the PISA (MVA(PISA)), PHT (MVA(PHT)), and planimetry (MVA(PLN), serving as the gold standard) method. C(n) was calculated with a previously validated equation using 2D echocardiography. MVA(PISA) closely correlated with MVA(PLN) (r = 0.96, P PISA), MVA(PLN), and C(n) (r = 0.1, P = 0.388). MVA calculated with both the PISA and PHT methods correlated well with MVA calculated with the planimetry method. However, the PISA rather than PHT is recommended for patients with MS and extreme C(n) values because PISA, unlike PHT, is not affected by changes in C(n).

  18. Enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer via multiple coupling of surface waves with graphene plasmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Coated silicon carbide (SiC thin films can efficiently enhance near-field radiative heat transfer among metamaterials. In this study, the near-field heat transfer among graphene–SiC–metamaterial (GSM multilayer structures was theoretically investigated. Graphene plasmons could be coupled both with electric surface plasmons supported by the metamaterial and with symmetric and anti-symmetric surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs supported by SiC. The heat transfer among GSM structures was considerably improved compared to that among SiC-coated metamaterials when the chemical potential of graphene was not very high. In addition, the near-field heat transfer was enhanced among SiC–graphene–metamaterial multilayer structures, though the heat transfer among these structures was less than that among GSMs owing to the absence of coupling between symmetric SPhPs and graphene plasmons. Hence, heat transfer could be flexibly tuned by modifying the chemical potential of graphene in both configurations. These results provide a basis for active control of the near-field radiative heat transfer in the far-infrared region.

  19. Enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer via multiple coupling of surface waves with graphene plasmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Song, Chen-Cai; Wang, Tong-Biao; Liu, Wen-Xing; Liu, Jiang-Tao; Yu, Tian-Bao; Liao, Qing-Hua; Liu, Nian-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Coated silicon carbide (SiC) thin films can efficiently enhance near-field radiative heat transfer among metamaterials. In this study, the near-field heat transfer among graphene-SiC-metamaterial (GSM) multilayer structures was theoretically investigated. Graphene plasmons could be coupled both with electric surface plasmons supported by the metamaterial and with symmetric and anti-symmetric surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) supported by SiC. The heat transfer among GSM structures was considerably improved compared to that among SiC-coated metamaterials when the chemical potential of graphene was not very high. In addition, the near-field heat transfer was enhanced among SiC-graphene-metamaterial multilayer structures, though the heat transfer among these structures was less than that among GSMs owing to the absence of coupling between symmetric SPhPs and graphene plasmons. Hence, heat transfer could be flexibly tuned by modifying the chemical potential of graphene in both configurations. These results provide a basis for active control of the near-field radiative heat transfer in the far-infrared region.

  20. Surface heat exchange at power plant cooling lakes. Report No. 5. EEI publication No. 69-901

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, D.K.; Graves, W.L. Jr.; Geyer, J.C.

    1969-11-01

    This report describes the methods and results of analyses of surface heat exchange using three years of field data from the Edison Electric Institute Project's three recirculated cooling lake sites in south-central United States. The report's findings and conclusions, which are summarized at the beginning of the first chapter and detailed in Chapter 7, are being used in current analyses of additional data from the Project's eight other field sites. A brief outline of the collaborative aspects of the study precedes a discussion of the objectives of the analyses and a comparative description of the three lake sites in terms of their meteorological and hydrographic characteristics. The procedure for preparing the data for analysis by computer is summarized, and followed by a comprehensive description of the methods used for evaluating rates of surface heat dissipation in terms of the surface heat exchange coefficient, K, and the equilibrium temperature, E.

  1. Numerical study for nanofluid flow due to a nonlinear curved stretching surface with convective heat and mass conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    Full Text Available This article presents the simultaneous effects of convective heat and mass conditions in boundary-layer flow of nanoliquid due to a nonlinear curved stretching surface. A nonlinear curved stretching surface is used to generate the flow. Thermophoretic diffusion and random motion features are also incorporated. Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed at boundary. Suitable variables are utilized to convert the nonlinear partial differential system into nonlinear ordinary differential system. The obtained nonlinear systems are solved numerically through shooting technique. Plots are displayed in order to explore the role of physical flow variables on the solutions. The skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and examined. Our findings indicate that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are reduced for larger values of thermophoresis parameter. Keywords: Nonlinear curved stretching surface, Nanoparticles, Convective heat and mass conditions, Numerical solution

  2. Experimental Study on States of Liquid Film on Heat Transfer Surface Inside a Horizontal Spirally Grooved Tube during Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiiue, Shinya; Momoki, Satoru; Shigechi, Toru; Mori, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    This paper presents a prediction method of flow regimes during evaporation of pure refrigerants in a horizontal spirally grooved steel tube with 12mm in average inner diameter. Circumferential temperature distributions on the external surface of the tube and boiling heat transfer coefficients were obtained through the experiments on the flow boiling heat transfer using two kinds of fluorocarbon refrigerants, HCFC123 and HCFC22. Based on the temperature distributions and the characteristics of heat transfer coefficient against vapor quality, we discussed the conditions of liquid film formed on the heat transfer surface. The experimental data were classified into four kinds of flow regimes according to the viewpoint on the liquid film conditions and heat transfer characteristics: annular flow, annular flow with liquid meniscus, separated flow with liquid meniscus and separated flow with dry surface. In order to predict the transition quality from separated flow to annular flow, we developed the correlation for border angle of well-wetted perimeter for the present grooved tube based on the Mori et al. correlation proposed for smooth tubes. The correlation for the transitional quality between separated flow with dry surface and separated flow with liquid meniscus was developed empirically as well as the correlation for the transient transitional quality between annular flow and annular flow with liquid meniscus.

  3. Assessing the relationship between surface urban heat islands and landscape patterns across climatic zones in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiquan; Huang, Xin; Li, Jiayi

    2017-08-24

    The urban heat island (UHI) effect exerts a great influence on the Earth's environment and human health and has been the subject of considerable attention. Landscape patterns are among the most important factors relevant to surface UHIs (SUHIs); however, the relationship between SUHIs and landscape patterns is poorly understood over large areas. In this study, the surface UHI intensity (SUHII) is defined as the temperature difference between urban and suburban areas, and the landscape patterns are quantified by the urban-suburban differences in several typical landscape metrics (ΔLMs). Temperature and land-cover classification datasets based on satellite observations were applied to analyze the relationship between SUHII and ΔLMs in 332 cities/city agglomerations distributed in different climatic zones of China. The results indicate that SUHII and its correlations with ΔLMs are profoundly influenced by seasonal, diurnal, and climatic factors. The impacts of different land-cover types on SUHIs are different, and the landscape patterns of the built-up and vegetation (including forest, grassland, and cultivated land) classes have the most significant effects on SUHIs. The results of this study will help us to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between the SUHI effect and landscape patterns.

  4. Study of heat-moisture treatment of potato starch granules by chemical surface gelatinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Josiane; da Rosa Zavareze, Elessandra; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2017-08-01

    Native potato starch was subjected to heat-moisture treatment (HMT) at 12%, 15%, 18%, 21%, and 24% of moisture content at 110 °C for 1 h, and the effects on morphology, structure, and thermal and physicochemical properties were investigated. To reveal the internal structure, 30% and 50% of the granular surface were removed by chemical surface gelatinization in concentrated LiCl solution. At moisture contents of 12% and 15%, HTM reduced the gelatinization temperatures and relative crystallinity of the starches, while at moisture contents of 21% and 24 % both increased. The alterations on morphology, X-ray pattern, physicochemical properties, and increase of amylose content were more intense with the increase of moisture content of HMT. The removal of granular layers showed that the changes promoted by HMT occur throughout the whole granule and were pronounced at the core or peripheral region, depending of the moisture content applied during HMT. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Slag and seed deposition on heat exchanger surfaces from gas-droplet mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, K. H.; Chung, P. M.; Carlson, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Mechanisms of particulate deposition from turbulent streams to solid surfaces are first discussed. Two problems of current interest in MHD application are then analyzed. One is the collection of slag droplets on the interior wall of vertical tubes from the turbulent droplet-laden gas stream. Such processes take place during the cycle of the regenerative heat exchanger used to preheat combustion air. The other is the removal of sub-micron-size slag particles or collection of seed by a bank of staggered vertical tubes situated normal to the gas flow direction. Removal of both vapor and droplet phases of slag and seed is possible with such a system. While thermophoresis is found to be a strong function of the temperature difference between the gas stream and the film surface, it was found that lowering of the tube temperature may not greatly enhance the deposition rate because the lower temperature implies a thicker slag film, and the necessary temperature difference is not correspondingly increased.

  6. Effect of Substrate Temperature and Ambient Pressure on Heat Transfer at Interface Between Molten Droplet and Substrate Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, M.; Yang, K.; Tanaka, K.; Usami, T.; Yasui, T.; Yamada, M.

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter-sized molten Cu droplets were deposited on AISI304 substrate surface by free falling experiment. The roles of substrate temperature and ambient pressure on heat transfer at interface between molten droplet and substrate surface were systematically investigated. The splat characteristics were evaluated in detail. Temperature history of molten droplet was measured at splat-substrate interface. Cooling rate of the flattening droplet was calculated as well. Furthermore, the spreading behavior of molten droplet on substrate surface was captured by high speed camera. The heat transfer from splat to substrate was enhanced both by substrate heating and by ambient pressure reduction, which can be attributed to the good contact at splat bottom surface. The splats in free falling experiment showed similar changing tendency as thermal-sprayed particles. Consequently, substrate temperature and ambient pressure have an equivalent effect to contact condition at interface between droplet and substrate surface. Substrate heating and pressure reduction may enhance the wetting during splat flattening, and then affect the flattening and solidification behavior of the molten droplet.

  7. Effect of surface and heat treatments on the biaxial flexural strength and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Renata Garcia; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; da Silva, Filipe Samuel Correia Pereira; Henriques, Bruno Alexandre Pacheco de; Pinelli, Ligia Antunes Pereira

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of grinding and airborne-particle abrasion on the biaxial flexural strength (BFS) and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic, and examine whether sintering the veneering porcelain renders the previous heat treatment recommended by the manufacturer unnecessary. Lava zirconia specimens (N = 108) were obtained with the following dimensions: 14.0 mm diameter × 1.3 mm thickness (n = 36) and 14.0 mm × 1.6 mm (n = 72). The thicker specimens were ground with diamond burs under irrigation and received (heat-treated groups) or not (non-heat-treated groups) a heat treatment (1000°C for 30 min) prior to the four firing cycles applied to simulate the sintering of the veneering porcelain. All specimens were air abraded as follows (n = 12): 1) 30-μm silica-modified Al₂O₃particles (Rocatec Soft); 2) 110-μm silica-modified Al₂O₃particles (Rocatec Plus); and 3) 120-μm Al₂O₃particles, followed by Rocatec Plus. Three specimens of each group were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) to assess the monoclinic phase content (%). The BFS test was performed in a mechanical testing machine (Instron 8874). Data (MPa) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (grinding × airborne-particle abrasion and heat treatment × airborne-particle abrasion) and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). The strength reliability was analyzed using the Weibull distribution. Grinding significantly decreased the BFS of the non-heat-treated groups (p heat treatment did not influence the BFS (p > 0.05). Air abrasion only influenced the BFS of the ground/heat-treated groups (p heat-treated groups, the grinding did not decrease the Weibull modulus (m), but it did decrease the characteristic strength (σ0). For Rocatec Soft and 120-μm Al₂O₃particles + Rocatec Plus, the heat-treated groups presented lower m and higher σ0 than the ground/non-heat-treated groups. The independent variables did not seem to influence phase transformation. Air-abraded surfaces presented higher monoclinic

  8. Seasonal and annual heat budgets offshore the Hanko Peninsula, Gulf of Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkouriadi, I.; Lepparanta, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics], Email: ioanna.merkouriadi@helsinki.fi; Shirasawa, K. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Pan-Okhotsk Research Center, Inst. of Low Temperature Science

    2013-06-01

    A joint Finnish-Japanese sea-ice experiment 'Hanko-9012' carried out offshore the Hanko Peninsula included seasonal monitoring and intensive field campaigns. Ice, oceanographic and meteorological data were collected to examine the structure and properties of the Baltic Sea brackish ice, heat budget and solar radiation transfer through the ice cover. Here, the data from two years (2000 and 2001) are used for the estimation of the seasonal and annual heat budgets. Results present the surface heat balance, and the heat budget of the ice sheet and the waterbody. The ice cover acted as a good control measure of the net surface heat exchange. Solar radiation had a strong seasonal cycle with a monthly maximum at 160 and a minimum below 10 W m{sup -2}, while net terrestrial radiation was mostly between -40 and -60 W m{sup -2}. Latent heat exchange was much more important than sensible heat exchange, similar the net terrestrial radiation values in summer and autumn. A comparison between the latent heat flux released or absorbed by the ice and the net surface heat fluxes showed similar patterns, with a clearly better fit in 2001. The differences can be partly explained by the oceanic heat flux to the lower ice boundary. (orig.)

  9. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  10. Enhancement and Tunability of Near-Field Radiative Heat Transfer Mediated by Surface Plasmon Polaritons in Thin Plasmonic Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Boriskina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of thermal radiation exchange between hot and cold objects can be strongly modified if they interact in the near field where electromagnetic coupling occurs across gaps narrower than the dominant wavelength of thermal radiation. Using a rigorous fluctuational electrodynamics approach, we predict that ultra-thin films of plasmonic materials can be used to dramatically enhance near-field heat transfer. The total spectrally integrated film-to-film heat transfer is over an order of magnitude larger than between the same materials in bulk form and also exceeds the levels achievable with polar dielectrics such as SiC. We attribute this enhancement to the significant spectral broadening of radiative heat transfer due to coupling between surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs on both sides of each thin film. We show that the radiative heat flux spectrum can be further shaped by the choice of the substrate onto which the thin film is deposited. In particular, substrates supporting surface phonon polaritons (SPhP strongly modify the heat flux spectrum owing to the interactions between SPPs on thin films and SPhPs of the substrate. The use of thin film phase change materials on polar dielectric substrates allows for dynamic switching of the heat flux spectrum between SPP-mediated and SPhP-mediated peaks.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Flow Behaviors in Butt-fusion Welding Process of HDPE Pipes with Curved Fusion Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyun; Ahn, Kyung Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunwoong; Oh, Ju Seok [Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Butt-fusion welding process is used to join the polymeric pipes. Recently, some researchers suggest the curved surface to enhance a welding quality. We investigated how curved welding surface affects heat and flow behaviors of polymer melt during the process in 2D axisymmetric domain with finite element method, and discussed the effect to the welding quality. In this study, we considered HDPE pipes. In heat soak stage, curved phase interface between the melt and solid is shown along the shape of welding surface. In jointing stage, squeezing flow is generated between curved welding surface and phase interface. The low shear rate in fusion domain reduces the alignment of polymer to the perpendicular direction of pipes, and then this phenomenon is expected to help to enhance the welding quality.

  12. Nanosecond laser texturing of uniformly and non-uniformly wettable micro structured metal surfaces for enhanced boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zupančič, Matevž, E-mail: matevz.zupancic@fs.uni-lj.si; Može, Matic; Gregorčič, Peter; Golobič, Iztok

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Surfaces with periodically changed wettability were produced by a ns marking laser. • Heat transfer was investigated on uniformly and non-uniformly wettable surfaces. • Microporous surfaces with non-uniform wettability enhance boiling heat transfer. • The most bubble nucleations were observed in the vicinity of the microcavities. • Results agree with the predictions of the nucleation criteria. - Abstract: Microstructured uniformly and non-uniformly wettable surfaces were created on 25-μm-thin stainless steel foils by laser texturing using a marking nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) and utilizing various laser fluences and scan line separations. High-speed photography and high-speed IR thermography were used to investigate nucleate boiling heat transfer on the microstructured surfaces. The most pronounced results were obtained on a surface with non-uniform microstructure and non-uniform wettability. The obtained results show up to a 110% higher heat transfer coefficients and 20–40 times higher nucleation site densities compared to the untextured surface. We show that the number of active nucleation sites is significantly increased in the vicinity of microcavities that appeared in areas with the smallest (10 μm) scan line separation. Furthermore, this confirms the predictions of nucleation criteria and proves that straightforward, cost-effective nanosecond laser texturing allows the production of cavities with diameters of up to a few micrometers and surfaces with non-uniform wettability. Additionally, this opens up important possibilities for a more deterministic control over the complex boiling process.

  13. Experimental Research on Water Boiling Heat Transfer on Horizontal Copper Rod Surface at Sub-Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, water (R718 as a kind of natural refrigerant—which is environmentally-friendly, safe and cheap—has been reconsidered by scholars. The systems of using water as the refrigerant, such as water vapor compression refrigeration and heat pump systems run at sub-atmospheric pressure. So, the research on water boiling heat transfer at sub-atmospheric pressure has been an important issue. There are many research papers on the ev